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Sample records for behavioral resistance

  1. Observations and simulations of resistance switching behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukwon

    This dissertation describes an exploration to understand the electric field driven resistance switching behavior, which are known to be found in many oxide materials. The behavior is characterized as having two different stable states in their current-voltage characteristics. They have gained much attention as candidates for data storage. Although this interesting phenomenon has been studied for decades, the physical mechanism of the behavior is not revealed, yet. To establish our own model, experiments with Cr doped SrZrO3 are carried out and hypothetical models were developed based on the results. Then, computational calculations were done to test the proposed switching mechanism. Experiments are done using metal(top metal)/Cr-SrZrO3/SrRuO 3(bottom metal) heterojunction stacks, which are grown using Pulsed Laser Deposition system. In the structure, thickness and Cr-doping content of SrZrO3 layer were varied while Pt and Ag are used as primary top metal contacts. And top metal layer is also varied with Pt, Ag, Cu, Cr, Mg, and SrRuO3 to see the influence of top metal contact. The heterostructures were found to exhibit non-rectifying IVCs (so-called Space-Charge-Limited Current) which are observed in many other metal-oxide-metal systems. In the experiments of varying Cr-content and thickness of SrZrO 3 layer, a steep increase of resistance with respect to thickness was observed. For high Cr-doping levels, R ∝ t3 was observed, while for low Cr-doping levels an even stronger relationship was observed. The main result of top metal contact experiment was the one that metal contact's chemical identity decides the slope of IVC (resistances), where resistances were found to be correlated with top metal's heat of oxide formation. Especially for Ag top metal contact, which has the lowest absolute value of heat of oxide formation, reversal switching polarity was observed. Such results lead us to believe that the switching behavior is originated by oxygen vacancy motion with

  2. The effect of resist material composition on development behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minegishi, Shinya; Itani, Toshiro

    2015-03-01

    The relation between resist composition and its development behavior was evaluated. The effect of a hydrophobic unit on a resist and on its development behavior was systematically investigated. The resist was exposed to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or electron beam (EB) exposure, and the development behavior of the film was observed by high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). The introduction of a hydrophobic group in the resist resulted in diminished swelling behavior and uniform dissolution. The resist resin cluster shape was also altered by the introduction of the hydrophobic group. These behaviors imply that the resin-resin and resin-tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution interactions differ. EUV lithography suffers from the photon issue that causes stochastic uniformity; however, in this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of achieving a better uniformity of resist patterning by altering the resist formulation.

  3. Polarization-induced resistive switching behaviors in complex oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Chao; Dong, Chunhui; Jia, Chenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Xue, Desheng

    2015-09-01

    Complex oxide heterostructures are fabricated by growing La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 films on ferroelectric 0.71Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.29PbTiO3 (011) single-crystal substrates. The nonvolatile or pulsed resistive switching behaviors induced by an electric field are achieved simultaneously. Further analyses indicate that the different resistive switching behaviors are resulted from co-control of piezostrain and polarization current effects. With decreasing in-plane read current from 0.1 mA to 0.001 mA, the polarization current effect gradually begins to play a more important role than the piezostrain effect. Consequently, the nonvolatile resistive switching behavior is converted to pulse resistive switching behavior. The results further enhance the application of complex oxides in multifunctional memory devices.

  4. Utilizing Motivational Interviewing to Address Resistant Behaviors in Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahesh, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Motivational interviewing is presented as an approach to address resistant behaviors in clinical supervision. A case example is used to illustrate the process in which the relational and technical elements of motivational interviewing can be applied to supervisee resistance. Implications for supervisors and researchers are discussed.

  5. HIGH RESISTIVITY BEHAVIOR OF HOT-SIDE ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of experiments to explain the high resistivity behavior of hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) collecting fly ash. The working hypothesis is that the behavior is the result of the buildup of a thin layer of sodium-ion-depleted fly ash which has a ...

  6. Resistance Switching Behavior in Epitaxially Grown NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. R.; Bak, J. H.; Park, Y. D.; Char, K.; Kim, D. C.; Jung, R.; Seo, S.; Li, X. S.; Park, G.-S.; Yoo, I. K.

    2008-03-01

    Reproducible resistance switching behavior has been found in NiO films prepared by a pulsed laser deposition system. The I-V measurements of epitaixally grown NiO on SrRuO3 electrode show a bipolar resistive memory switching behavior, in contrast with a unipolar switching behavior of polycrystalline NiO on Pt electrode. In order to understand the resistive memory switching mechanism in NiO, the I-V characteristics and memory switching property of epitaxial NiO prepared under various synthesis conditions and electrodes has been investigated. The IV measurements at room temperature suggest that the interface between NiO and the electrode plays an important role on the resistive switching phenomena. To analyze the role of the interface, our efforts to control the interfaces and to measure the I-V characteristics at low temperature will be presented.

  7. Fundamental study of contact resistance behavior in RSW aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ta-Chien

    2003-06-01

    This dissertation study has developed a fundamental understanding of the contact resistance behavior using the virtual contact volume concept and the equivalent contact resistivity definition. In this research, an integrated experimental-numerical approach was used to demonstrate the proposed equivalent contact resistivity versus temperature relationship. Such relationship was further used to study the expulsion behavior of the resistance spot welding aluminum alloy. A concept of using the constriction ring was demonstrated to be effective in preventing weld expulsion in resistance spot aluminum welds. The a-spot model simulated a single ball contact to define the equivalent contact resistivity. For a specific loading range, the generic equivalent contact resistivity versus temperature relationship, consisting of a proportional term and a exponential term, was derived. The proportionality term represents the increasing contact resistivity with temperature reflecting the Wiedemann-Franz-Lorentz behavior. The exponential term represents the softening effect of the contact surface as temperature increases. With the generic equivalent contact resistivity versus temperature relationship established, an a-spot welding which incorporated the contact pairs with the resistivity relationship leaving three factors as parametric variables and an experimental a-spot welding model were conducted. Both the numerical and experimental analyses show the same relationship that is defined by the theoretical hypothesis of a-spot model. The parametric study was conducted to quantify the parametric factors based on comparisons on nugget size and electrical potential drops across the electrodes. For an ideal combination of parameters at the Cu/Al interface and the Al/Al faying surface, both the comparisons of weld nugget size and potential drops are satisfactory. The mechanical analysis proposed a concept that expulsion would occur when the crack tip is within the solidus nugget zone at

  8. Complementary resistive switching behavior induced by varying forming current compliance in resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Ting-Chang; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Kai-Huang; Chen, Jung-Hui; Li, Yu-Chiuan; Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Ya-Chi; Syu, Yong-En; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M.

    2015-05-01

    In this study of resistance random access memory in a resistive switching film, the breakdown degree was controlled by varying forming current compliance. A SiOx layer was introduced into the ZnO layer of the structure to induce both typical bipolar resistive switching (RS) and complementary resistive switching (CRS). In addition, the SiOx layer-generated vacuum spaces in typical bipolar RS can be verified by electrical characteristics. Changing forming current compliance strikingly modifies the oxygen storage capacity of the inserted SiOx layer. CRS can be achieved, therefore, by tuning the oxygen ion storage behavior made possible by the SiOx layer.

  9. Effects of Behavioral History on Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Adam H.; Cirino, Sergio; Mayfield, Kristin H.; da Silva, Stephanie P.; Okouchi, Hiroto; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether differential resistance to change would occur under identical variable-interval schedules as a function of a differential behavioral history. In Experiment 1, each of 3 pigeons first pecked at different rates under a multiple variable-ratio differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate schedule. In a subsequent condition,…

  10. Temperature dependence of resistive switching behaviors in resistive random access memory based on graphene oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Mingdong; Cao, Yong; Ling, Haifeng; Du, Zhuzhu; Wang, Laiyuan; Yang, Tao; Fan, Quli; Xie, Linghai; Huang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    We reported resistive switching behaviors in the resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices based on the different annealing temperatures of graphene oxide (GO) film as active layers. It was found that the resistive switching characteristics of an indium tin oxide (ITO)/GO/Ag structure have a strong dependence on the annealing temperature of GO film. When the annealing temperature of the GO film was 20 °C, the devices showed typical write-once-read-many-times (WORM) type memory behaviors, which have good memory performance with a higher ON/OFF current ratio (˜104), the higher the high resistance state (HRS)/low resistance state (LRS) ratio (˜105) and stable retention characteristics (>103 s) under lower programming voltage (-1 V and -0.5 V). With the increasing annealing temperature of GO film, the resistive switching behavior of RRAM devices gradually weakened and eventually disappeared. This phenomenon could be understood by the different energy level distributions of the charge traps in GO film, and the different charge injection ability from the Ag electrode to GO film, which is caused by the different annealing temperatures of the GO film.

  11. Temperature dependence of resistive switching behaviors in resistive random access memory based on graphene oxide film.

    PubMed

    Yi, Mingdong; Cao, Yong; Ling, Haifeng; Du, Zhuzhu; Wang, Laiyuan; Yang, Tao; Fan, Quli; Xie, Linghai; Huang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    We reported resistive switching behaviors in the resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices based on the different annealing temperatures of graphene oxide (GO) film as active layers. It was found that the resistive switching characteristics of an indium tin oxide (ITO)/GO/Ag structure have a strong dependence on the annealing temperature of GO film. When the annealing temperature of the GO film was 20 °C, the devices showed typical write-once-read-many-times (WORM) type memory behaviors, which have good memory performance with a higher ON/OFF current ratio (∼10(4)), the higher the high resistance state (HRS)/low resistance state (LRS) ratio (∼10(5)) and stable retention characteristics (>10(3) s) under lower programming voltage (-1 V and -0.5 V). With the increasing annealing temperature of GO film, the resistive switching behavior of RRAM devices gradually weakened and eventually disappeared. This phenomenon could be understood by the different energy level distributions of the charge traps in GO film, and the different charge injection ability from the Ag electrode to GO film, which is caused by the different annealing temperatures of the GO film. PMID:24739543

  12. Negative differential resistance and resistance switching behaviors in BaTiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Jia, C. H. E-mail: wfzhang@henu.edu.cn Chen, X.; Zhang, W. F. E-mail: wfzhang@henu.edu.cn; Chen, Y. H.

    2014-05-28

    The polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) thin films were grown on F-doped SnO{sub 2} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The devices show a rectification at a small voltage, while bipolar resistive switching (RS) and negative differential resistance (NDR) appear at a large voltage. Furthermore, RS remains and NDR disappears when no positive bias is applied, while both RS and NDR behaviors improve when increasing the positive bias. The electrons trapped/detrapped by interface states at Au/BTO interface are proposed to understand the above behaviors.

  13. Bipolar resistive switching behaviors of ITO nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Gong, Zhina; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Jiangteng; Zhang, Ye; Yun, Feng

    2016-02-01

    We have fabricated indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowire (NW) networks on aluminum electrodes using electron beam evaporation. The Ag/ITO-NW networks/Al capacitor exhibits bipolar resistive switching behavior. The resistive switching characteristics of ITO-NW networks are related to the morphology of NWs. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to obtain the chemical nature from the NWs surface, investigating the oxygen vacancy state. A stable switching voltages and a clear memory window were observed in needle-shaped NWs. The ITO-NW networks can be used as a new two-dimensional metal oxide material for the fabrication of high-density memory devices.

  14. Unconventional resistive switching behavior in ferroelectric tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Mao, H J; Song, C; Xiao, L R; Gao, S; Cui, B; Peng, J J; Li, F; Pan, F

    2015-04-21

    We investigate an unconventional resistive switching (RS) behavior in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3/BaTiO3/metal (LSMO/BTO) ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs), which is dominated by the variation of the barrier potential profile modulated by the migration of oxygen vacancies in the p-LSMO/n-BTO junction. The LSMO/BTO/Co junction exhibits a remarkable self-rectifying effect ascribed to the high-density interface state at the BTO/Co interface, in contrast to the symmetric conductivity when the top metal electrode is inert Pt. The effects of ferroelectric polarization on the RS behavior are also emphasized. Our work builds a bridge between FTJs and resistive random access memory devices. PMID:25789877

  15. Behavior of chemically amplified resist defects in TMAH solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yuko; Miyahara, Osamu; Kiba, Yukio; Kitano, Junichi

    2002-07-01

    As semiconductor design rules become increasingly complex, there is growing demand for a reduction in defects in lithography processes, and the process that contributes most to such defects is believed to be the developing process. The control of defects occurring in chemically amplified resist due to changes in the resist structure has been growing in complexity. Today, when the exposure source is about to undergo a transition from KrF (248 nm) to ArF (193 nm), the controlled objects in defect inspection decrease in size, becoming smaller than the particle size that can be handled by inspection machines. For defect control against the background of the increasing miniaturization anticipated in the future, it will be necessary to gain an understanding of the behavior of ultra micro defects contained in developers. This report concerns the consideration of defect behavior in developing fluid resulting from the quantification of defects occurring due to resist dissolution in the developing fluid, and from defect behavioral analysis performed on the developing fluid.

  16. Flux flow pinning and resistive behavior in superconducting networks

    SciTech Connect

    Teitel, S.

    1990-10-01

    We have studied the behavior of superconducting networks in terms of XY and Coulomb gas models. The dynamics of frustrated Josephson junction arrays has been simulated, with a view toward understanding the effects of vortex correlations on flux flow resistance. Randomness has been introduced, and its effects on the superconducting transition, and vortex mobility, have been studied. A three dimensional network has been simulated to study the effects of vortex line entanglement in high temperature superconductors. Preliminary calculations are in progress. The two dimensional classical Coulomb gas where charges map onto vortices in the superconducting network, has been simulated. The melting transitions of ordered charge (vortex) lattices have been studied, and we find clear evidence that these transitions do not have the critical behavior expected from standard symmetry analysis.

  17. Burn-resistant behavior and mechanism of Ti14 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-nan; Huo, Ya-zhou; Song, Xu-ding; Bi, Zhao-zhao; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Yong-qing

    2016-02-01

    The direct-current simulation burning method was used to investigate the burn-resistant behavior of Ti14 titanium alloy. The results show that Ti14 alloy exhibits a better burn resistance than TC4 alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Cu is observed to preferentially migrate to the surface of Ti14 alloy during the burning reaction, and the burned product contains Cu, Cu2O, and TiO2. An oxide layer mainly comprising loose TiO2 is observed beneath the burned product. Meanwhile, Ti2Cu precipitates at grain boundaries near the interface of the oxide layer, preventing the contact between O2 and Ti and forming a rapid diffusion layer near the matrix interface. Consequently, a multiple-layer structure with a Cu-enriched layer (burned product)/Cu-lean layer (oxide layer)/Cu-enriched layer (rapid diffusion layer) configuration is formed in the burn heat-affected zone of Ti14 alloy; this multiple-layer structure is beneficial for preventing O2 diffusion. Furthermore, although Al can migrate to form Al2O3 on the surface of TC4 alloy, the burn-resistant ability of TC4 is unimproved because the Al2O3 is discontinuous and not present in sufficient quantity.

  18. Behavior of chemically amplified resist defects in TMAH solution: III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yuko; Shimoaoki, Takeshi; Naito, Ryoichiro; Kitano, Junichi

    2004-05-01

    As the minimum feature size of electronic devices shrinks to less than 0.25 μm, it is critically important that we reduce the defects that occur in lithography processes. Moreover, as the defects to be controlled become ever smaller, this makes them increasingly difficult to detect by conventional fault detection equipment. In order to detect these minute defects in the context of shrinking device geometries, it is essential that we develop a clear understanding of the behavior of micro defects in developer. In principle, there are three ways in which these defects might be dealt with: (1) defects can be prevented from occurring in the first place, (2) defects can be prevented from adhering to the device, or (3) defects can be eliminated after they occur. Our recent work has mainly been concerned with the first and most effective approach of preventing defects from occurring in the first place, and this motivated the present study to investigate the mechanisms by which defects occur. We believe that defects occur in chemically amplified (CA) resists that are insufficiently unprotected at boundary regions between unexposed and exposed areas or in unexposed areas, so that the de-protection reaction in the resist suns to different degrees of completion due to varying exposure doses. In this study we investigate the number of defects in various developers, and determine the size distribution of the defects. Based on analysis of the behavior of defects from their size distribution in develop we conclude that: (1) the size of defects increases when the exposure dose is reduced by appropriate Eops, (2) defects originate in the boundary area between unexposed and exposed areas, and (3) a portion of CA resist polymer that is insufficiently deprotected is dispersed in the developer, coalesces and is deposited in a form that is not very soluble, and is manifested as relatively large particle defects.

  19. Brief behavioral treatment for patients with treatment-resistant insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihui; Wei, Qinling; Wu, Xiaoli; Zhong, Zhiyong; Li, Guanying

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTI) in treating patients with treatment-resistant insomnia. Methods Seventy-nine adults with treatment-resistant insomnia were randomly assigned to receive either individualized BBTI (delivered in two in-person sessions and two telephone “booster” sessions, n=40) or sleep hygiene education (n=39). The primary outcome was subjective (sleep diary) measures of self-report symptoms and questionnaire measures of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), insomnia severity index (ISI), Epworth sleeping scale (ESS), and dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep scale (DBAS). Results The repeated-measures analysis of variance showed significant time effects between pretreatment and posttreatment in the scale ratings of PSQI, ESS, DBAS, ISI, sleep latency (SL), time in bed (TIB), sleep efficiency (SE), and wake after sleep onset (WASO) in both groups and group × time interaction (FPSQI =3.893, FESS =4.500, FDBAS =5.530, FISI =15.070, FSL =8.909, FTIB =7.895, FSE =2.926, and FWASO =2.595). The results indicated significant differences between BBTI and sleep hygiene in change scores of PSQI, ESS, DBAS, ISI, SL, TIB, SE, and WASO. Effect sizes were moderate to large. Conclusion BBTI is a simple and efficacious intervention for chronic insomnia in adults. PMID:27536119

  20. Eastern mosquitofish resists invasion by nonindigenous poeciliids through agonistic behaviors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Kevin A.; Hill, Jeffrey E.; Nico, Leo G.

    2012-01-01

    Florida is a hotspot for nonindigenous fishes with over 30 species established, although few of these are small-bodied species. One hypothesis for this pattern is that biotic resistance of native species is reducing the success of small-bodied, introduced fishes. The eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki is common in many freshwater habitats in Florida and although small-bodied (<50 mm), it is a predator and aggressive competitor. We conducted four mesocosm experiments to examine the potential for biotic resistance by eastern mosquitofish to two small-bodied nonindigenous fishes, variable platyfish (Xiphophorus variatus) and swordtail (X. hellerii). Experiments tested: (1) effect of eastern mosquitofish density on adult survival, (2) effect of eastern mosquitofish on a stage-structured population, (3) role of habitat structural complexity on nonindigenous adult survival, and (4) behavioral effects of eastern mosquitofish presence and habitat complexity. Eastern mosquitofish attacked and killed non-native poeciliids with especially strong effects on juveniles of both species. Higher eastern mosquitofish density resulted in greater effects. Predation on swordtails increased with increasing habitat complexity. Eastern mosquitofish also actively drove swordtails from cover, which could expose non-native fish to other predators under field conditions. Our results suggest that eastern mosquitofish may limit invasion success.

  1. Macro model for stochastic behavior of resistance distribution of magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Gyuhyun; Choi, Juntae; Song, Yunheub

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we fabricated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) samples to observe behavior of resistance variation, and investigated a stochastic behavior model for MTJ resistance from measured real data. We found the relationship between parallel resistance (RP), anti-parallel resistance (RAP), and TMR from the measurements. The variation of barrier thickness affects not only resistance but also TMR. This means that broad RAP distribution is caused by RP distribution. In addition, RAP distribution can be reduced by increasing temperature and bias voltage. We developed a macro model that can evaluate resistance distribution based on the stochastic behavior of MTJ resistance variation from only tox varied. The amount of resistance variation, which is considered with regard to the circuit performance, can be obtained from Δtox designed by designer. In addition, the impact for operating circumstance such as bias and temperature can be considered by using fit equations.

  2. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, I. N.; Lamikanra, A.; Edelman, R.

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance. PMID:10081668

  3. Behavioral Avoidance - Will Physiological Insecticide Resistance Level of Insect Strains Affect Their Oviposition and Movement Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Nansen, Christian; Baissac, Olivier; Nansen, Maria; Powis, Kevin; Baker, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural organisms, such as insect herbivores, provide unique opportunities for studies of adaptive evolutionary processes, including effects of insecticides on movement and oviposition behavior. In this study, Brassica leaves were treated with one of two non-systemic insecticides and exposed to two individual strains (referred to as single or double resistance) of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) (DBM) exhibiting physiological resistance. Behavioral responses by these two strains were compared as part of characterizing the relative effect of levels of physiological resistance on the likelihood of insects showing signs of behavioral avoidance. For each DBM strain, we used choice bioassays to quantify two possible types of behavioral avoidance: 1) females ovipositing predominantly on leaf surfaces without insecticides, and 2) larvae avoiding insecticide-treated leaf surfaces. In three-choice bioassays (leaves with no pesticide, 50% coverage with pesticide, or 100% coverage with pesticide), females from the single resistance DBM strain laid significantly more eggs on water treated leaves compared to leaves with 100% insecticide coverage (both gamma-cyhalothrin and spinetoram). Females from the double resistance DBM strain also laid significantly more eggs on water treated leaves compared to leaves with 100% gamma-cyhalothrin, while moths did not adjust their oviposition behavior in response to spinetoram. Larvae from the single resistance DBM strain showed a significant increase in mobility in response to both insecticides and avoided insecticide-treated portions of leaves when given a choice. On the other hand, DBM larvae from the double resistance strain showed a significant decrease in mobility in response to insecticides, and they did not avoid insecticide-treated portions of leaves when given a choice. Our results suggest that pest populations with physiological resistance may show behavioral avoidance, as resistant females avoided oviposition on

  4. Isolated cell behavior drives the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Dudley, Carmel; Vega, Nicole M; Gore, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is typically quantified by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), which is defined as the minimal concentration of antibiotic that inhibits bacterial growth starting from a standard cell density. However, when antibiotic resistance is mediated by degradation, the collective inactivation of antibiotic by the bacterial population can cause the measured MIC to depend strongly on the initial cell density. In cases where this inoculum effect is strong, the relationship between MIC and bacterial fitness in the antibiotic is not well defined. Here, we demonstrate that the resistance of a single, isolated cell—which we call the single-cell MIC (scMIC)—provides a superior metric for quantifying antibiotic resistance. Unlike the MIC, we find that the scMIC predicts the direction of selection and also specifies the antibiotic concentration at which selection begins to favor new mutants. Understanding the cooperative nature of bacterial growth in antibiotics is therefore essential in predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26227664

  5. Oppositional Behavior in Urban Schooling: Toward a Theory of Resistance for New Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Early resistance theorists analyzed working class students' oppositional behavior at a time of high availability of viable jobs in manufacturing. They argued that oppositional behavior constituted a rejection of middle class culture motivated by an implicit understanding of the myth of meritocracy. But times have changed. This paper seeks to…

  6. Analysis of the resistive switching behaviors of vanadium oxide thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Ming; Zhang, Kai-Liang; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Jin-Shi; Miao, Yin-Ping

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the polarization of resistive switching for a Cu/VOx/Cu memory cell. The switching behaviors of Cu/VOx/Cu cell are tested by using a semiconductor device analyzer (Agilent B1500A), and the relative micro-analysis of I—V characteristics of VOx/Cu is characterized by using a conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM). The I—V test results indicate that both the forming and the reversible resistive switching between low resistance state (LRS) and high resistance state (HRS) can be observed under either positive or negative sweep. The CAFM images for LRS and HRS directly exhibit evidence for the formation and rupture of filaments based on positive or negative voltage. The Cu/VOx/Cu sandwiched structure exhibits reversible resistive switching behavior and shows potential applications in the next generation of nonvolatile memory.

  7. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A

    2013-08-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect. PMID:23470300

  8. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Melanson, Edward L.; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the sub-population that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, i.e. increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors, and to develop strategies to minimize their impact. PMID:23470300

  9. Solanum Tuber-bearing Species Resistance Behavior Against Nacobbus aberrans

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Eliseo J.; Clausen, Andrea. M.; Franco, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Naccobus aberrans is a major pest of the potato crop in the Andean regions of Argentina, Bolivia, and Perú. It is endemic in northwest Argentina and is also found in lowlands. The resistance of eleven Andean potato landraces and three accessions of the wild tuber-bearing species Solanum acaule, S. infundibuliforme, and S. megistacrolobum were evaluated against a population of N. aberrans from Coctaca, Jujuy province, while Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum ‘Spunta’, ‘Kennebec’, and ‘Frital INTA’ were evaluated against a population from the southeast of Buenos Aires province. The presence, the number of galls, and the number of individuals were recorded. In addition, a reproduction factor was calculated and races were determined. Results showed that the N. aberrans population from Coctaca corresponded to race 2 and the population from the lowlands belonged to the sugar beet group. Landrace Azul, one genotype of S. megistacrolobum, and two genotypes of S. acaule showed resistance towards the race from Coctaca while no infection was recorded in potato cultivars with the Naccobus race from the lowland area. PMID:22661771

  10. Novel Resistive Switching Behavior in Phase Separated Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hangwen; Ward, T. Zac; Sun, Dali; Snijders, Paul C.; Gai, Zheng; Shen, Jian

    2011-03-01

    Electronic phase separation plays a key role in many novel phenomena in complex materials. Manganites are a prime example of this class of materials and have recently come under increase scrutiny for possible application in resistive random-access memory (RRAM) technology. Here, we will discuss our recent work on spatially confined La5/8-xPrxCa3/8MnO3. We have discovered that it is possible to drive single electronic domain formation/annihilation through electric field pulsing. By measuring the I-V curve, we find such resistive switching is different from normal RRAM mechanisms in manganites and is closely related to the nature of electronic phase separation. These findings open these systems to a new understanding of the nature of electronic phase separation and begin the development of manganites for future applications in RRAM devices. Research sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Controlling the Resistive Switching Behavior in Starch-Based Flexible Biomemristors.

    PubMed

    Raeis-Hosseini, Niloufar; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-03-23

    Implementation of biocompatible materials in resistive switching memory (ReRAM) devices provides opportunities to use them in biomedical applications. We demonstrate a robust, nonvolatile, flexible, and transparent ReRAM based on potato starch. We also introduce a biomolecular memory device that has a starch-chitosan composite layer. The ReRAM behavior can be controlled by mixing starch with chitosan in the resistive switching layer. Whereas starch-based biomemory devices which show abrupt changes in current level; the memory device with mixed biopolymers undergoes gradual changes. Both devices exhibit uniform and robust programmable memory properties for nonvolatile memory applications. The explicated source of the bipolar resistive switching behavior is assigned to formation and rupture of carbon-rich filaments. The gradual set/reset behavior in the memory device based on a starch-chitosan mixture makes it suitable for use in neuromorphic devices. PMID:26919221

  12. Fracture toughness and crack-resistance curve behavior in metallic glass-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Suh, Jin-Yo; Kozachkov, Henry; Johnson, William L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-05-26

    Nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics methods are used to assess the fracture toughness of bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites; results are compared with similar measurements for other monolithic and composite BMG alloys. Mechanistically, plastic shielding gives rise to characteristic resistance?curve behavior where the fracture resistance increases with crack extension. Specifically, confinement of damage by second?phase dendrites is shown to result in enhancement of the toughness by nearly an order of magnitude relative to unreinforced glass.

  13. Interfacial reactions and resistive switching behaviors of metal/NiO/metal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Phark, S. H.; Chang, Y. J.; Noh, T. W.; Jung, R.; Kim, D.-W.

    2009-01-12

    Ag/NiO/Pt structures did (did not) exhibit reproducible resistive switching when a positive bias was applied to the Pt (Ag) electrode. X-ray photoemission spectra revealed that ultrathin NiO films on Pt (Ag) layers did (did not) undergo reversible chemical state change during heat treatment in a vacuum and oxygen ambient. Such differences in interfacial chemical interaction may affect filament formation and rupture processes near the electrode and hence alter the resistive switching behaviors.

  14. Complementary resistive switching behavior for conductive bridge random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hao-Xuan; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Kai-Huang; Wang, Ming-Hui; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Lo, Ikai; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Sze, Simon M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a structure of Pt/Cu18Si12O70/TiN has been investigated. By co-sputtering the Cu and SiO2 targets in the switching layer, we can measure the operation mechanism of complementary resistive switching (CRS). This differs from conventional conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) that tends to use Cu electrodes rather than Cu18Si12O70. By changing the voltage and compliance current, we can control device operating characteristics. Because Cu distributes differently in the device depending on this setting, the operating end can be located at either the top or bottom electrode. Device current–voltage (I–V) curves are used to demonstrate that the CRS in the CBRAM device is a double-electrode operation.

  15. Review of insecticide resistance and behavioral avoidance of vectors of human diseases in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Physiological resistance and behavioral responses of mosquito vectors to insecticides are critical aspects of the chemical-based disease control equation. The complex interaction between lethal, sub-lethal and excitation/repellent ('excito-repellent’) properties of chemicals is typically overlooked in vector management and control programs. The development of “physiological” resistance, metabolic and/or target site modifications, to insecticides has been well documented in many insect groups and disease vectors around the world. In Thailand, resistance in many mosquito populations has developed to all three classes of insecticidal active ingredients currently used for vector control with a majority being synthetic-derived pyrethroids. Evidence of low-grade insecticide resistance requires immediate countermeasures to mitigate further intensification and spread of the genetic mechanisms responsible for resistance. This can take the form of rotation of a different class of chemical, addition of a synergist, mixtures of chemicals or concurrent mosaic application of different classes of chemicals. From the gathered evidence, the distribution and degree of physiological resistance has been restricted in specific areas of Thailand in spite of long-term use of chemicals to control insect pests and disease vectors throughout the country. Most surprisingly, there have been no reported cases of pyrethroid resistance in anopheline populations in the country from 2000 to 2011. The precise reasons for this are unclear but we assume that behavioral avoidance to insecticides may play a significant role in reducing the selection pressure and thus occurrence and spread of insecticide resistance. The review herein provides information regarding the status of physiological resistance and behavioral avoidance of the primary mosquito vectors of human diseases to insecticides in Thailand from 2000 to 2011. PMID:24294938

  16. Differential Probing Behavior of Blissus insularis (Hemiptera: Blissidae) on Resistant and Susceptible St. Augustinegrasses.

    PubMed

    Rangasamy, Murugesan; McAuslane, Heather J; Backus, Elaine A; Cherry, Ronald H

    2015-04-01

    Southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis Barber, is a severe pest of St. Augustinegrass throughout the southern United States. Host plant resistance is an environmentally friendly method to manage chinch bug infestations and is increasingly important, as the southern chinch bug develops resistance to insecticides. In this study, in an effort to understand resistance mechanisms in two varieties of St. Augustinegrass ('FX-10' and 'NUF-76'), we used the electrical penetration graph method to quantify stylet probing behaviors in two resistant and two susceptible St. Augustinegrass varieties. Overall, chinch bugs spent less time probing on resistant FX-10 and NUF-76 than on susceptible 'Floratam' and 'Palmetto', and individual probes were shorter in average duration but more numerous in resistant varieties than in susceptible varieties. During probing, chinch bugs spent more time in pathway-associated stylet activities (i.e., penetration through epidermal and mesophyll tissue) in the resistant varieties than in the susceptible varieties, likely indicating difficulty in finding and accessing an ingestion site. As a consequence, chinch bugs spent proportionately much less time engaged in xylem ingestion in both resistant varieties than in susceptible varieties but only in FX-10 were phloem-associated activities significantly reduced compared with those in susceptible varieties. We conclude that there is evidence for non-phloem-associated chinch-bug resistance factors in both NUF-76 and FX-10, and phloem-associated factors in FX-10. PMID:26470190

  17. Feeding Behavior of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Biotype 2 on Resistant and Susceptible Soybean.

    PubMed

    Todd, Jane C; Rouf Mian, M A; Backus, Elaine A; Finer, John J; Redinbaugh, Margaret G

    2016-02-01

    Host plant resistance to the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is an effective means of controlling populations of this introduced pest species in the United States. Rag (Resistance to Aphis glycines) genes identified in soybean germplasm have been incorporated into commercial cultivars, but differential responses by soybean aphid biotypes to the Rag genes have made understanding mechanisms underlying resistance associated with Rag genes increasingly important. We compared the behavior of biotype 2 aphids on the resistant soybean line PI243540, which is a source of Rag2, and the susceptible cultivar Wyandot. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the abaxial surface of leaves from resistant plants had a higher density of both long and glandulartrichomes, which might repel aphids, on veins. Time-lapse animation also suggested a repellent effect of resistant plants on aphids. However, electropenatography (EPG) indicated that the time to first probe did not differ between aphids feeding on the resistant and susceptible lines. EPG also indicated that fewer aphids feeding on resistant plants reached the phloem, and the time before reaching the phloem was much longer relative to susceptible soybean. For aphids that reached the phloem, there was no difference in either number of feedings or their duration in phloem. However, aphids feeding on resistant soybean had fewer prolonged phases of active salivation (E1) and many more pathway activities and non-probing intervals. Together, the feeding behavior of aphids suggested that Rag2 resistance has strong antixenosis effects, in addition to previously reported antibiosis, and was associated with epidermal and mesophyll tissues. PMID:26578627

  18. Resistivity and strain behavior during transformation cycling in nickel-titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.

    1983-09-01

    The effects of stress and transformation fatigue cycling on the resistivity and strain behaviors in Ni-Ti wires were studied. The samples consisted of uncycled wires and wires cycled 5.78 million times in shape memory heat engine devices. Measurements of resistivity and strain were made as a function of temperature at various applied uniaxial tensile stresses. The resistivity-temperature and strain-temperature behaviors were observed to depend on the temperature or the portion of the transformation cycle at which the stress change is made. It was found that the low temperature resistivity and strain increased with increasing stress. Also, the transformation fatigue cycled wires showed a higher and broader resistivity peak with two-stage behavior. The increase in strain with increasing stress is explained in terms of the crystallographic multiplicity of martensite plates and the alteration of the martensite plate structure in response to the applied stress. Prior transformation fatigue cycling causes a decrease in the applied stress dependence of the total strain changes. Also, the shape of curve is changed upon annealing and the M/sub S/ temperature is lowered by transformation fatigue cycling. The lower M/sub S/ temperature upon cycling is due to a stabilization of the high-temperature phase due to transformation-induced dislocations acting as an impediment to further martensite nucleation. Another effect of the stress is to increase the resistivity of the low-temperature phase. However, it was noticed that the stress should be increased above M/sub S/ temperature to increase the resistivity of the low temperature phase. The increase in low-temperature resistivity is partially due to the change in form factor during transformation shape change and due to the alteration of the martensite variants in a preferred direction.

  19. Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior Increases Resistance to Extinction: Clinical Demonstration, Animal Modeling, and Clinical Test of One Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, F. Charles; McComas, Jennifer J.; Mauro, Benjamin C.; Progar, Patrick R.; Taylor, Bridget; Ervin, Ruth; Zangrillo, Amanda N.

    2010-01-01

    Basic research with pigeons on behavioral momentum suggests that differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) can increase the resistance of target behavior to change. This finding suggests that clinical applications of DRA may inadvertently increase the persistence of target behavior even as it decreases its frequency. We conducted…

  20. Predicting Aerobic versus Resistance Exercise Using the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Angela D.; Rocheleau, Courtney A.

    2002-01-01

    Tested the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in aerobic versus resistance training, investigating relationships between TPB variables, extroversion, and perceived health among college students who completed initial and follow-up measurements and provided reasons for exercise. TPB variables, extroversion, and perceived health collectively accounted…

  1. Interaction of Temperamental Resistance to Control and Restrictive Parenting in the Development of Externalizing Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bates, John E.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Ridge, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Child temperament and parental control were studied as interacting predictors of behavior outcomes in 2 longitudinal samples. In Sample 1, data were ratings of resistant temperament and observed restrictive control in infancy–toddlerhood and ratings of externalizing behavior at ages 7 to 10 years; in Sample 2, data were retrospective ratings of temperament in infancy–toddlerhood, observed restrictive control at age 5 years, and ratings of externalizing behavior as ages 7 to 11 years. Resistance more strongly related to externalizing in low-restriction groups than in high-restriction groups. This was true in both samples and for both teacher- and mother-rated outcomes. Several Temperament × Environment interaction effects have been reported previously, but this is one of very few replicated effects. PMID:9779744

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis Resistance Influences European Corn Borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Larval Behavior after Exposure to Cry1Ab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The behavior of target pests has been recognized as an important factor to appropriately define resistance management plans for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops. However, most data available do not include the possible impact resistance alleles may have on the behavior of pest larvae or adults. To ...

  3. Reducing care-resistant behaviors during oral hygiene in persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nursing home residents with dementia are often dependent on others for mouth care, yet will react with care-resistant behavior when receiving assistance. The oral health of these elders deteriorates in the absence of daily oral hygiene, predisposing them to harmful systemic problems such as pneumonia, hyperglycemia, cardiac disease, and cerebral vascular accidents. The purpose of this study is to determine whether care-resistant behaviors can be reduced, and oral health improved, through the application of an intervention based on the neurobiological principles of threat perception and fear response. The intervention, called Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction, combines best mouth care practices with a constellation of behavioral techniques that reduce threat perception and thereby prevent or de-escalate care-resistant behaviors. Methods/Design Using a randomized repeated measures design, 80 elders with dementia from 5 different nursing homes will be randomized at the individual level to the experimental group, which will receive the intervention, or to the control group, which will receive standard mouth care from research team members who receive training in the proper methods for providing mouth care but no training in resistance recognition or prevention/mediation. Oral health assessments and care-resistant behavior measurements will be obtained during a 7-day observation period and a 21-day intervention period. Individual growth models using multilevel analysis will be used to estimate the efficacy of the intervention for reducing care-resistant behaviors in persons with dementia, and to estimate the overall efficacy of the intervention using oral health outcomes. Activity-based costing methods will be used to determine the cost of the proposed intervention. Discussion At the conclusion of this study, the research team anticipates having a proven intervention that prevents and reduces care-resistant within the context of mouth care. Long

  4. Using carbon quantum dots to improve the resistive switching behavior of ZnO nanorods device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueliang; Xu, Jianping; Shi, Shaobo; Zhang, Xiaosong; Zhang, Xuguang; Shi, Xin; Li, Shubin; Li, Linlin; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Lan

    2016-01-01

    An electronic bistable device with a composite structure was fabricated using tapered ZnO nanorod arrays (ZnO NRs) coated with carbon quantum-dots (C QDs). With the addition of C QDs, the ON/OFF resistance ratio is 6 ×102, over 100 times higher than that of device with pristine ZnO NRs. The effect of C QDs on the resistive switching behavior was investigated by current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characterization. The conduction mechanisms of the devices were discussed using space charge limited current (SCLC) model.

  5. Resistive Switching Behavior in Organic-Inorganic Hybrid CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Clx Perovskite for Resistive Random Access Memory Devices.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Eun Ji; Lyu, Miaoqiang; Yun, Jung-Ho; Kang, Chi Jung; Choi, Young Jin; Wang, Lianzhou

    2015-10-28

    The CH3 NH3 PbI3- x Clx organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite material demonstrates remarkable resistive switching behavior, which can be applicable in resistive random access memory devices. The simply designed Au/CH3 NH3 PbI3- x Clx /FTO structure is fabricated by a low-temperature, solution-processable method, which exhibits remarkable bipolar resistive switching and nonvolatile properties. PMID:26331363

  6. Flight take-off and walking behavior of insecticide-susceptible and - resistant strains of Sitophilus zeamais exposed to deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Guedes, N M P; Guedes, R N C; Ferreira, G H; Silva, L B

    2009-08-01

    Insects have evolved a variety of physiological and behavioral responses to various toxins in natural and managed ecosystems. However, insect behavior is seldom considered in insecticide studies although insects are capable of changing their behavior in response to their sensory perception of insecticides, which may compromise insecticide efficacy. This is particularly serious for insect pests that are physiologically resistant to insecticides since insecticide avoidance may further compromise their management. Locomotion plays a major role determining insecticide exposure and was, therefore, considered in investigating the behavioral responses of male and female adult insects from an insecticide-susceptible and two insecticide-resistant strains of the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a major pest of stored cereals. Different dose-dependent behavioral responses were expected among strains with behavioral resistance less likely to occur in physiologically resistant insects since they are able to withstand higher doses of insecticide. The behavioral responses to deltamethrin-sprayed surfaces differed among the maize weevil strains. Such responses were concentration-independent for all of the strains. Stimulus-independent behavioral resistance was unrelated to physiological resistance with one resistant strain exhibiting higher rates of flight take-off and the other resistant strain exhibiting lower flight take-off. Female mobility was similar for all strains, unlike male mobility. Males of each strain exhibited a pattern of mobility following the same trend of flight take-off. Behavioral patterns of response to insecticide are, therefore, variable among strains, particularly among insecticide-resistant strains, and worth considering in resistance surveys and management programs. PMID:19302721

  7. Observation of swelling behavior of ArF resist during development by using QCM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Konishi, Hiroko; Isono, Mariko

    2012-03-01

    Many reports have discussed the swelling behavior of photoresists during development, as observed by the QCM method. Previously, we reported on the development of development analysis equipment based on the QCM method. In this paper, we report on a high-precision resist development analyzer also based on the QCM method. This equipment incorporates a high-precision developing solution temperature controller and features a high-precision air conditioning function for the measurement chamber. We also measured swelling behavior during development using a TBAH developer solution, which features larger molecules than TMAH, comparing these results with those obtained with TMAH. The results of this measurement indicate that the extent of resist swelling during development is less with TBAH developer solution than with TMAH developer solution. This result is consistent with results of a study by Itani et al. using high-speed AFM, suggesting the suitability of the measurement equipment used in our experiments.

  8. Threshold resistive and capacitive switching behavior in binary amorphous GeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Doo Seok; Lim, Hyungkwang; Park, Goon-Ho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Lee, Suyoun; Cheong, Byung-ki

    2012-05-01

    A threshold switching (TS) event in a binary amorphous GeSe film placed between Pt top and bottom electrodes was examined. This GeSe film exhibits fast (<40 ns) TS behavior. The observed TS of the resistance was found to be accompanied with the TS of the capacitance. A mechanism for the TS of the GeSe film was suggested by revisiting the previous controversy about the thermal versus non-thermal electronic mechanism. The non-thermal electronic mechanism envisaging the double-injection of electronic carriers can qualitatively account for the measured threshold resistive and capacitive switching, whereas the TS behavior simulated using the thermal mechanism is inconsistent with the experimental observation.

  9. Therapist awareness of client resistance in cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kimberley M; Westra, Henny A; Aviram, Adi; Button, Melissa L; Constantino, Michael J; Antony, Martin M

    2015-01-01

    Clients' resistance relates negatively to their retention and outcomes in psychotherapy; thus, it has been increasingly identified as a key process marker in both research and practice. This study compared therapists' postsession ratings of resistance with those of trained observers in the context of 40 therapist-client dyads receiving 15 sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. Therapist and observer ratings were then examined as correlates of proximal (therapeutic alliance quality and homework compliance) and distal (posttreatment worry severity) outcomes. Although there was reasonable concordance between rater perspectives, observer ratings were highly and consistently related to both proximal and distal outcomes, while therapist ratings were not. These findings underscore the need to enhance therapists' proficiency in identifying important and often covert in-session clinical phenomena such as the cues reflecting resistance and noncollaboration. PMID:25611825

  10. Sub-10 nm low current resistive switching behavior in hafnium oxide stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Celano, U.; Goux, L.; Liu, L.; Fantini, A.; Degraeve, R.; Youssef, A.; Xu, Z.; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J.; Jurczak, M.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, a tip-induced cell relying on the conductive atomic force microscope is proposed. It is verified as a referable replica of an integrated resistive random access memory (RRAM) device. On the basis of this cell, the functionality of sub-10 nm resistive switching is confirmed in hafnium oxide stack. Moreover, the low current switching behavior in the sub-10 nm dimension is found to be more pronounced than that of a 50 × 50 nm2 device. It shows better ON/OFF ratio and low leakage current. The enhanced memory performance is ascribed to a change in the shape of the conductive filament as the device dimensions are reduced to sub-10 nm. Therefore, device downscaling provides a promising approach for the resistance optimization that benefits the RRAM array design.

  11. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M.; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  12. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  13. Insulin resistance in brain alters dopamine turnover and causes behavioral disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, Andre; Cai, Weikang; Cappellucci, Laura; Ghazarian, Armen; Collins, William R.; Vienberg, Sara G.; Pothos, Emmanuel N.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and insulin resistance are associated with altered brain imaging, depression, and increased rates of age-related cognitive impairment. Here we demonstrate that mice with a brain-specific knockout of the insulin receptor (NIRKO mice) exhibit brain mitochondrial dysfunction with reduced mitochondrial oxidative activity, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation in the striatum and nucleus accumbens. NIRKO mice also exhibit increased levels of monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO A and B) leading to increased dopamine turnover in these areas. Studies in cultured neurons and glia cells indicate that these changes in MAO A and B are a direct consequence of loss of insulin signaling. As a result, NIRKO mice develop age-related anxiety and depressive-like behaviors that can be reversed by treatment with MAO inhibitors, as well as the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, which inhibits MAO activity and reduces oxidative stress. Thus, insulin resistance in brain induces mitochondrial and dopaminergic dysfunction leading to anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, demonstrating a potential molecular link between central insulin resistance and behavioral disorders. PMID:25733901

  14. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-01-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2–based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology. PMID:26880381

  15. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-02-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2-based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology.

  16. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C

    2016-01-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiO(x)) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2-based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiO(x)-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology. PMID:26880381

  17. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng; Tang, Jian-Fu; Su, Hsiu-Hsien; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Huang, Chih-Yu; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li0.06Zn0.94O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li+ ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.

  18. Nonvolatile conductive filaments resistive switching behaviors in Ag/GaO x /Nb:SrTiO3/Ag structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. G.; Zhi, Y. S.; Wang, P. C.; Sun, Z. B.; Li, L. H.; An, Y. H.; Guo, D. Y.; Tang, W. H.; Xiao, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    Ag/GaO x /NSTO/Ag structures were fabricated, and the electrical properties measurement results show that the device behaviors a unipolar resistance switching characteristic with bi-stable resistance ratio of three orders. In the positive voltage region, the dominant conducting mechanism of high resistance state obeys Poole-Frenkel emission rules, while in the negative region, that obeys space-charge-limited current mechanism. Both the I- V curves of ON and OFF states and temperature-dependent variation resistances indicate that the unipolar resistance switching behavior can be explained by the formation/rupture of conductive filaments, which composed of oxygen vacancies. The stable switching results demonstrated that the structure can be applied in resistance random access memory devices.

  19. Creep Resistance and Oxidation Behavior of Novel Mo-Si-B-Ti Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azim, M. A.; Schliephake, D.; Hochmuth, C.; Gorr, B.; Christ, H.-J.; Glatzel, U.; Heilmaier, M.

    2015-11-01

    Mo-Si-B-alloys are promising materials for high-temperature applications because of their high melting point, excellent phase stability, large alloying capabilities, and reasonable mechanical as well as oxidative properties. A continuing alloy development is, however, required because of the catastrophic oxidation taking place at intermediate temperatures and the rather high density. The addition of Ti stabilizes a new ternary phase field including the Mo5Si3 (T1) phase instead of the Mo3Si (A15) phase. Alloys comprising the phases Moss, T1 and Mo5SiB2 (T2) show very high creep resistance, improved oxidation behavior and significantly reduced density. The new T1 phase seems to play a crucial role in the improved oxidation resistance of these new materials, since this phase exhibits excellent oxidation behavior at intermediate and high temperatures. The 4-component alloys possess superior creep behavior compared to Mo-Si-B alloys with the same microstructural phase arrangement and size or to the single crystal Ni-base superalloy CMSX-4. The main reason was found to be the formation of Ti-rich silicide precipitates during processing.

  20. Recrystallization behavior of Ti40 burn-resistant titanium alloy during hot working process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yun-jin; Xin, She-wei; Zhang, Ping-xiang; Zhao, Yong-qing; Ma, Fan-jiao; Liu, Xiang-hong; Feng, Yong

    2016-05-01

    The recrystallization behavior of deformed Ti40 alloy during a heat-treatment process was studied using electron backscatter diffraction and optical microscopy. The results show that the microstructural evolution of Ti40 alloy is controlled by the growth behavior of grain-boundary small grains during the heating process. These small grains at the grain boundaries mostly originate during the forging process because of the alloy's inhomogeneous deformation. During forging, the deformation first occurs in the grain-boundary region. New small recrystallized grains are separated from the parent grains when the orientation between deformation zones and parent grains exceeds a certain threshold. During the heating process, the growth of these small recrystallized grains results in a uniform grain size and a decrease in the average grain size. The special recrystallization behavior of Ti40 alloy is mainly a consequence of the alloy's high β-stabilized elemental content and high solution strength of the β-grains, which partially explains the poor hot working ability of Ti-V-Cr-type burn-resistant titanium alloys. Notably, this study on Ti40 burn-resistant titanium alloy yields important information related to the optimization of the microstructures and mechanical properties.

  1. Unipolar resistance switching and abnormal reset behaviors in Pt/CuO/Pt and Cu/CuO/Pt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang; Li, Xiaomin; Gao, Xiangdong; Zheng, Renkui; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Xinjun; Wang, Qun

    2012-07-01

    The effects of Pt and Cu top electrodes on resistance switching properties were investigated for CuO thin films with Pt/CuO/Pt and Cu/CuO/Pt sandwich structures. Typical unipolar resistance switching (URS) behaviors and two different kinds of resistance changes in the reset process were observed in both structures. When voltages were applied to the film, the low-resistance state (LRS) with relatively low resistance value (<30 Ω) was switched to the high-resistance state (HRS), exhibiting normal reset behavior. For LRS with relatively high resistance value (>50 Ω), the resistance first decreased then increased to HRS, showing abnormal reset behavior. The former variation of LRS could be ascribed to the decrease in filament size induced by Joule heating, while the latter one could be ascribed to the growth of disconnected filaments induced by high electric fields. This study indicates that the switching modes and the abnormal reset behaviors in CuO thin films are not due to Pt and Cu top electrodes, but the intrinsic properties of CuO film.

  2. High Fat Diet Produces Brain Insulin Resistance, Synaptodendritic Abnormalities and Altered Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Carlson, Gregory C.; Browne, Carolyn A.; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17 days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8 weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS616), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors. PMID:24686304

  3. Long-term electrical resistivity monitoring of recharge-induced contaminant plume behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hubbard, Susan S.; Watson, David B.; Baker, Gregory S.; Peterson, John E.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Smith, Meagan; Brooks, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Geophysical measurements, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data in particular, are sensitive to properties that are related (directly or indirectly) to hydrological processes. The challenge is in extracting information from geophysical data at a relevant scale that can be used to gain insight about subsurface behavior and to parameterize or validate flow and transport models. Here, we consider the use of ERT data for examining the impact of recharge on subsurface contamination at the S-3 ponds of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Tennessee. A large dataset of time-lapse cross-well and surface ERT data, collected at the site over a period of 12 months, is used to study time variations in resistivity due to changes in total dissolved solids (primarily nitrate). The electrical resistivity distributions recovered from cross-well and surface ERT data agrees well, and both of these datasets can be used to interpret spatiotemporal variations in subsurface nitrate concentrations due to rainfall, although the sensitivity of the electrical resistivity response to dilution varies with nitrate concentration. Using the time-lapse surface ERT data interpreted in terms of nitrate concentrations, we find that the subsurface nitrate concentration at this site varies as a function of spatial position, episodic heavy rainstorms (versus seasonal and annual fluctuations), and antecedent rainfall history. These results suggest that the surface ERT monitoring approach is potentially useful for examining subsurface plume responses to recharge over field-relevant scales.

  4. Resistive Switching Behavior in Amorphous Aluminum Oxide Film Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiao-Tong; Zhu, Hui-Chao; Cai, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Jia-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Jiao

    2014-07-01

    The repeatable bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in amorphous Al2O3 prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on ITO glass, with ITO as the bottom electrode and Ag as the top electrode. The crystal structure, morphology, composition and optical properties of Al2O3 thin films are investigated by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The electronic character of Ag/Al2O3/ITO structure is tested by an Agilent B1500A. The device shows a typical bipolar resistive switching behavior under the dc voltage sweep mode at room temperature. The variation ratio between HRS and LRS is larger than nearly three orders of magnitude, which indicates the good potential of this structure in future resistive random access memory (ReRAM) applications. Based on the conductive filament model, the high electric field is considered the main reason for the resistive switching according to our measurements.

  5. Effects of Al Contents on Carburization Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of TiAl Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Cui Jiao; He, Yue Hui; Ming, Xing Zu

    2015-10-01

    TiAl alloys with Al contents of 30.7, 37, 46.5, and 54.2 at.% were carburized. Corrosion resistance of the untreated and the carburized TiAl alloys was comparatively analyzed. The phase and microstructure of the carburized TiAl alloys were studied by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of the untreated and the carburized TiAl alloys was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Experimental results indicate that different Al contents bring about distinct microstructure of the carburized layers. The lower Al content leads to the formation of the thicker binary carbides and the thinner Ti2AlC phase. Additionally, the lower Al content leads to higher corrosion resistance in the untreated and the carburized states.

  6. Failure Behavior of Three-Steel Sheets Resistance Spot Welds: Effect of Joint Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouranvari, M.; Marashi, S. P. H.

    2012-08-01

    There is a lack of comprehensive understanding concerning failure characteristics of three-steel sheet resistance spot welds. In this article, macro/microstructural characteristics and failure behavior of 1.25/1.25/1.25 mm three-sheet low carbon steel resistance spot welds are investigated. To evaluate the mechanical properties of the joint, the tensile-shear test was performed in three different joint designs. Mechanical performance of the joint was described in terms of peak load, energy absorption, and failure mode. The critical weld nugget size required to insure pullout failure mode was obtained for each joint design. It was found that the joint design significantly affects the mechanical properties and the tendency to fail in the interfacial failure mode. It was also observed that stiffer joint types exhibit higher critical weld size. Fusion zone size along sheet/sheet interface proved to be the most important controlling factor of spot weld peak load and energy absorption.

  7. Negative differential resistance behavior in phosphorus-doped armchair graphene nanoribbon junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuhong; Zhang, Daoli Zhang, Jianbing; Miao, Xiangshui; Ye, Cong

    2014-02-21

    In this present work, we investigate the electronic transport properties of phosphorus-doped armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) junctions by employing nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density-function theory. Two phosphorus (P) atoms are considered to substitute the central carbon atom with the different width of AGNRs. The results indicate that the electronic transport behaviors are strongly dependent on the width of the P-doped graphene nanoribbons. The current-voltage characteristics of the doped AGNR junctions reveal an interesting negative differential resistance (NDR) and exhibit three distinct family (3 n, 3 n + 1, 3 n + 2) behaviors. These results display that P doping is a very good way to achieve NDR of the graphene nanoribbon devices.

  8. Nonlinear current-voltage behavior of the isolated resistive switching filamentary channels in CuC nanolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Doo-In; Yoon, Jaesik; Kim, Young Moon; Kwon, Se Hun; Kim, Kwang Ho; Park, Ju-Bong; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2011-04-11

    Copper-doped amorphous carbon film was prepared by radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering and their resistive switching behaviors were studied under a conductive atomic force microscope (cAFM). The repetitive scanning over the same area using cAFM with various bias voltages revealed that most of the isolated conductive paths were involved in resistive switching with asymmetric nonlinear I-V characteristics. The observed I-V behavior of nanoscale filamentary channels indicates that electron transfer mechanism of resistive switching filamentary channel in Pt/CuC/Pt is a tunneling between Cu filamentary channel and electrode through the solid electrolyte rather than conduction through fully connected Cu filamentary channel.

  9. Environmental influences on mosquito foraging and integrated vector management can delay the evolution of behavioral resistance.

    PubMed

    Stone, Chris; Chitnis, Nakul; Gross, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Along with the scaled-up distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets for malaria control has become concern about insecticide resistance. A related concern regards the evolution of host-seeking periodicity from the nocturnal to the crepuscular periods of the day. Why we observe such shifts in some areas but not others and which methods could prove useful in managing such behavioral resistance remain open questions. We developed a foraging model to explore whether environmental conditions affect the evolution of behavioral resistance. We looked at the role of the abundance of blood hosts and nectar sources and investigated the potential of attractive toxic sugar baits for integrated control. Higher encounter rates with hosts and nectar sources allowed behaviorally resistant populations to persist at higher levels of bed net coverage. Whereas higher encounter rates with nectar increased the threshold where resistance emerged, higher encounter rates of hosts lowered this threshold. Adding sugar baits lowered the coverage level of bed nets required to eliminate the vector population. In certain environments, using lower bed net coverage levels together with toxic sugar baits may delay or prevent the evolution of behavioral resistance. Designing sustainable control strategies will depend on an understanding of vector behavior expressed in local environmental conditions. PMID:26989441

  10. The Model of Motivational Dynamics in Sport: Resistance to Peer Influence, Behavioral Engagement and Disaffection, Dispositional Coping, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Adam R.; Morley, David; Perry, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The Model of Motivational Dynamics (MMD; Skinner and Pitzer, 2012) infers that peers influence behavioral engagement levels, which in turn is linked to coping and resilience. Scholars, however, are yet to test the MMD among an athletic population. The purpose of this paper was to assess an a priori model that included key constructs from the MMD, such as resistance to peer influence, behavioral engagement and disaffection, coping, and resilience among athletes. Three hundred and fifty-one athletes (male n = 173, female n = 178; Mage = 16.15 years) completed a questionnaire that measured each construct. Our results provide support for the model. In particular, there were positive paths between resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, behavioral engagement and task-oriented coping, and task-oriented coping with resilience. There was also a positive path between resilience and resistance to peer influence, but a negative path from resistance to peer influence to behavioral disaffection. Due to the reported benefits of enhancing resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, researchers could devise sport specific interventions to maximize athletes’ scores in these constructs. PMID:26779107

  11. Evaluation of Chemical Bonding Features and Resistance Switching Behaviors of Ultrathin Si Oxide Dielectric Sandwiched Between Pt Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Akio; Goto, Yuta; Nishigaki, Shingo; Murakami, Hideki; Higashi, Seiichiro; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the chemical bonding features and resistance switching properties of ultrathin Si-rich oxides sandwiched between Pt electrodes to evaluate the feasibility of SiOx-based resistance random access memories (ReRAMs). In the early stages of SiOx deposition on Pt by radio-frequency (RF) sputtering in Ar + O2 gas mixture at 300 °C, the formation of a PtOx layer at the interface between SiOx and the Pt bottom electrode was observed. This interfacial PtOx layer decreased in thickness with increasing SiOx thickness. With decreasing as-deposited SiOx thickness down to 3.3 nm, the initial electrical state changed from the high resistance state (HRS) to the low resistance state (LRS), and resistance switching behavior was observed without the forming process. To gain a better understanding of the resistance switching mechanism, especially the role of oxygen deficiency in the SiOx network, we investigated the impact of O2 annealing after SiOx deposition on the switching behavior. The resistance switching behaviors were barely detectable for the samples at O2 annealing temperatures of over 500 °C. The results imply that the oxygen vacancies in the SiOx play an important role in resistance switching.

  12. Bipolar resistive switching behavior of an amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films with a Te layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sijung; Eom, Taeyong; Gwon, Taehong; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of bipolar resistive switching (BRS) of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) thin films sandwiched between inert electrodes (Ti and Pt) was examined. Typical bipolar resistive switching behavior with a high resistance ratio (~103) and reliable switching characteristics was achieved. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of a conductive Te-filament bridging between the top and bottom electrodes through an amorphous GST matrix. The conduction mechanism analysis showed that the low-resistance state was semiconducting and dominated by band transport, whereas Poole-Frenkel conduction governed the carrier transport in the high-resistance state. Thus, the BRS behavior can be attributed to the formation and rupture of the semiconducting conductive Te bridge through the migration of the Te ions in the amorphous GST matrix under a high electric field. The Te ions are provided by the thin (~5 nm) Te-rich layer formed at the bottom electrode interface.

  13. Investigation of resistive switching behavior of Ag/SnOx/ITO device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da; Huang, Shi-Hua

    2015-04-01

    SnOx thin film was deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering and the resistance switching behavior of Ag/SnOx/ITO was investigated. The endurance testing indicates that HRS resistance decreases with an increase in the number of cycles. After annealing, the memory performance is enhanced, and the ratio of the device resistance of HRS and LRS increases greatly. The abnormal transformation sequence from HRS to LRS was observed for the annealed device and can be explained by electron trapping and detrapping based on the analysis of x-ray diffraction and the Raman spectrum. The temperature-dependent I-V measurement indicates that the thermal activation process is responsible for the temperature range of 300 to 200 K however, the carrier transport can be ascribed to the nearest-neighbor hopping conduction mechanism for the temperature range of 200 to 100 K. The general conduction mechanism of Ag/SnOx/ITO device can be elucidated by the trap-controlled space charge limited conduction model, and the conductive schematic in the SET and RESET processes has been given.

  14. Mechanical flexible and electric fatigue resistant behavior of relaxor ferroelectric terpolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fei; Yang, Wei; Yang, Wen

    2009-08-01

    Uniaxial tension and polarization evolution under cyclic electric field are investigated for poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluorethylene-chlorofluoroethylene) terpolymer films prepared by different annealing conditions. The stress-strain behavior of the terpolymer film exhibits that of polymeric elastomers, with its fracture strain reaching 680%. Structure analysis demonstrates that the polymer chains undergo reorientation, and conformational change from nonpolar to polar phase takes place during uniaxial tension. Under cyclic electric field, the terpolymer film exhibits a narrow polarization loop typical of a ferroelectric relaxor. Conformational change from nonpolar to polar phase also occurs upon the electric field, and it reverses to the nonpolar phase when the field is removed. As the cycle number accumulates, the terpolymer film demonstrates excellent resistance to electric fatigue. Compared to the film annealed at 115 °C, the terpolymer film annealed at 100 °C has a larger volume fraction of crystallite/amorphous interfaces and shows better mechanical flexibility as well as electric fatigue resistance. The mechanical flexible and electric fatigue resistant terpolymer films hold promises for many applications, ranging from embedded sensors and actuators to flexible memory devices.

  15. Treatment-resistant depression in adolescents: is the addition of cognitive behavioral therapy of benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Sarah E; Cox, Georgina R; Merry, Sally N

    2011-01-01

    Background Many young people with major depression fail first-line treatments. Treatment-resistant depression has various definitions in the literature but typically assumes nonresponse to medication. In young people, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the recommended first-line intervention, thus the definition of treatment resistance should be expanded. Therefore, our aim was to synthesize the existing evidence of any interventions for treatment-resistant depression, broadly defined, in children and adolescents and to investigate the effectiveness of CBT in this context. Methods We used Cochrane Collaboration methodology, with electronic searches of Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, and the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group trials registers. Only randomized controlled trials were included, and were assessed for risk of bias. Meta- analysis was undertaken where possible and appropriate. Results Of 953 articles retrieved, four trials were eligible for inclusion. For one study, only the trial registration document was available, because the study was never completed. All other studies were well conducted with a low risk of bias, although one study had a high dropout rate. Two studies assessed the effect of adding CBT to medication. While an assertive trial of antidepressants does appear to lead to benefit, when compared with placebo, there was no significant advantage, in either study, or in a meta-analysis of data from these trials, that clearly demonstrated an additional benefit of CBT. The third trial showed little advantage of a tricyclic antidepressant over placebo in the context of an inpatient admission. Conclusion Few randomized controlled trials have investigated interventions for treatment-resistant depression in young people, and results from these show modest benefit from antidepressants with no additional benefit over medication from CBT. Overall, there is a lack of evidence about effective interventions to treat young people who have failed to

  16. Differential reinforcement of alternative behavior increases resistance to extinction: clinical demonstration, animal modeling, and clinical test of one solution.

    PubMed

    Mace, F Charles; McComas, Jennifer J; Mauro, Benjamin C; Progar, Patrick R; Taylor, Bridget; Ervin, Ruth; Zangrillo, Amanda N

    2010-05-01

    Basic research with pigeons on behavioral momentum suggests that differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) can increase the resistance of target behavior to change. This finding suggests that clinical applications of DRA may inadvertently increase the persistence of target behavior even as it decreases its frequency. We conducted three coordinated experiments to test whether DRA has persistence-strengthening effects on clinically significant target behavior and then tested the effectiveness of a possible solution to this problem in both a nonhuman and clinical study. Experiment 1 compared resistance to extinction following baseline rates of reinforcement versus higher DRA rates of reinforcement in a clinical study. Resistance to extinction was substantially greater following DRA. Experiment 2 tested a rat model of a possible solution to this problem. Training an alternative response in a context without reinforcement of the target response circumvented the persistence-strengthening effects of DRA. Experiment 3 translated the rat model into a novel clinical application of DRA. Training an alternative response with DRA in a separate context resulted in lower resistance to extinction than employing DRA in the context correlated with reinforcement of target behavior. The value of coordinated bidirectional translational research is discussed. PMID:21119850

  17. Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior Increases Resistance to Extinction: Clinical Demonstration, Animal Modeling, and Clinical Test of One Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mace, F. Charles; McComas, Jennifer J; Mauro, Benjamin C; Progar, Patrick R; Taylor, Bridget; Ervin, Ruth; Zangrillo, Amanda N

    2010-01-01

    Basic research with pigeons on behavioral momentum suggests that differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) can increase the resistance of target behavior to change. This finding suggests that clinical applications of DRA may inadvertently increase the persistence of target behavior even as it decreases its frequency. We conducted three coordinated experiments to test whether DRA has persistence-strengthening effects on clinically significant target behavior and then tested the effectiveness of a possible solution to this problem in both a nonhuman and clinical study. Experiment 1 compared resistance to extinction following baseline rates of reinforcement versus higher DRA rates of reinforcement in a clinical study. Resistance to extinction was substantially greater following DRA. Experiment 2 tested a rat model of a possible solution to this problem. Training an alternative response in a context without reinforcement of the target response circumvented the persistence-strengthening effects of DRA. Experiment 3 translated the rat model into a novel clinical application of DRA. Training an alternative response with DRA in a separate context resulted in lower resistance to extinction than employing DRA in the context correlated with reinforcement of target behavior. The value of coordinated bidirectional translational research is discussed. PMID:21119850

  18. Analysis of the effect of mechanical strength of the resist film on pattern collapse behavior using atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Osamu; Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Moriuchi, Takahiro; Niiyama, Takayoshi; Kawai, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Recently, pattern collapse is becoming one of the critical issues in semiconductor manufacturing and many works have been done to solve this issue1) 2). Since pattern collapse occurs when outer force onto the resist pattern such as surface tension, impact of rinse solution, etc. surpasses the resistance of the resist pattern such as mechanical strength, adhesion force between resist and substrate, it is considered effective for improvement of pattern collapse to control resist film properties by track process, i.e., optimization of the mechanical properties of the resist film and enhancement of the adhesion force between resist and substrate 3) -5). In this study, we focused on the mechanical strength of the resist film and examined how post applied bake (PAB) condition affects the pattern collapse behavior. From ellipsometry measurement, it was found that increasing PAB time and temperature resulted in thickness reduction and refractive index increase, which suggested that the density of the resist film became high. Then we analyzed the mechanical strength of the resist film with the tip indentation method using atomic force microscope. It was found that the hardness of the resist film was affected by PAB conditions and regardless of PAB condition, hardened layer existed beneath the film surface. Finally, we carried out the measurements of loads to collapse 180nm resist dot patterns using the direct peeling with atomic force microscope tip (DPAT) method. Loads ranged from 600 to 2000nN overall and essentially increased as seen for indentation measurements when PAB temperature or time was increased, except some critical conditions. Through these evaluations using AFM, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluate the mechanical properties of the resist films processed with various PAB conditions. It was found that PAB condition obviously impacts on the hardness of the resist film and it is closely related to pattern collapse load.

  19. Resisting pressure from peers to engage in sexual behavior: What communication strategies do early adolescent Latino Girls use?

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Anne E.; Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.; Hutchison, Janet; Campoe, Kristi

    2015-01-01

    A content analysis of early adolescent (M=12.02 years) Latino girls’ (n=44) responses to open-ended questions imbedded in an electronic survey was conducted to explore strategies girls may use to resist peer pressure with respect to sexual behavior. Analysis yielded 341 codable response units, 74% of which were consistent with the REAL typology (i.e., refuse, explain, avoid, and leave) previously identified in adolescent substance use research. However, strategies reflecting a lack of resistance (11%) and inconsistency with communication competence (e.g., aggression, involving authorities) were also noted (15%). Frequency of particular strategies varied according to offer type, suggesting a variety of strategies may be needed to resist the peer pressure that puts early adolescent girls at risk for engaging in sexual behavior. Findings argue for universality of the REAL typology, building communication competence skills for conflict resolution in dating situations, and including peer resistance strategies in adolescent pregnancy prevention programs. PMID:26146434

  20. Behavioral and Socioeconomic Risk Factors Associated with Probable Resistance to Ceftriaxone and Resistance to Penicillin and Tetracycline in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Trecker, Molly A.; Waldner, Cheryl; Jolly, Ann; Liao, Mingmin; Gu, Weiming; Dillon, Jo-Anne R.

    2014-01-01

    Globally, incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection is once again the highest of the bacterial sexually transmitted infections. The bacterium can produce serious complications in those infected, and emerging resistance to third generation cephalosporins could usher in an era of potentially untreatable gonorrhea. This research aimed to identify risk factors for antibiotic resistant gonorrhea infection among clients at a Shanghai sexually transmitted infection clinic over two time periods, 2004–2005 and 2008–2011. Demographic and risk factor behavior data, and biological samples for antimicrobial resistance analysis, were collected. Statistical models were built to identify risk factors associated with probable resistance to ceftriaxone and resistance to penicillin and tetracycline. High levels of ciprofloxacin resistance (98%) in our sample precluded examining its risk factors; all isolates were susceptible to spectinomycin. Overall (P<0.001), chromosomal (P<0.001), and plasmid-mediated (P = 0.01) penicillin resistance decreased from the first to second period of the study. For tetracycline, chromosomal resistance decreased (P = 0.01) and plasmid-mediated resistance increased (P<0.001) between the first and second periods of study. In multi-level multivariable regression models, male gender (P = 0.03) and older age (P = 0.01) were associated with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations to ceftriaxone. Male gender (P = 0.03) and alcohol use (P = 0.02) were associated with increased odds of overall tetracycline resistance. Male gender was associated with increased odds of chromosomally-mediated tetracycline resistance (P = 0.04), and alcohol use was associated with increased odds of plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance (P = 0.02). Additionally, individuals in middle-salary categories were found to have lower odds of plasmid-mediated resistance to tetracycline compared with those in the lowest salary category (P≤0

  1. Behavioral and socioeconomic risk factors associated with probable resistance to ceftriaxone and resistance to penicillin and tetracycline in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Trecker, Molly A; Waldner, Cheryl; Jolly, Ann; Liao, Mingmin; Gu, Weiming; Dillon, Jo-Anne R

    2014-01-01

    Globally, incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection is once again the highest of the bacterial sexually transmitted infections. The bacterium can produce serious complications in those infected, and emerging resistance to third generation cephalosporins could usher in an era of potentially untreatable gonorrhea. This research aimed to identify risk factors for antibiotic resistant gonorrhea infection among clients at a Shanghai sexually transmitted infection clinic over two time periods, 2004-2005 and 2008-2011. Demographic and risk factor behavior data, and biological samples for antimicrobial resistance analysis, were collected. Statistical models were built to identify risk factors associated with probable resistance to ceftriaxone and resistance to penicillin and tetracycline. High levels of ciprofloxacin resistance (98%) in our sample precluded examining its risk factors; all isolates were susceptible to spectinomycin. Overall (P<0.001), chromosomal (P<0.001), and plasmid-mediated (P = 0.01) penicillin resistance decreased from the first to second period of the study. For tetracycline, chromosomal resistance decreased (P = 0.01) and plasmid-mediated resistance increased (P<0.001) between the first and second periods of study. In multi-level multivariable regression models, male gender (P = 0.03) and older age (P = 0.01) were associated with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations to ceftriaxone. Male gender (P = 0.03) and alcohol use (P = 0.02) were associated with increased odds of overall tetracycline resistance. Male gender was associated with increased odds of chromosomally-mediated tetracycline resistance (P = 0.04), and alcohol use was associated with increased odds of plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance (P = 0.02). Additionally, individuals in middle-salary categories were found to have lower odds of plasmid-mediated resistance to tetracycline compared with those in the lowest salary category (P≤0.02). This

  2. Changing dynamic behavior of periodic structures by using piezoelectric circuitry with negative resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Wang, X.; Tang, J.

    2009-03-01

    Integrating a piezoelectric circuitry, which consists of a piezoelectric transducer connected with electrical circuitry elements, to a mechanical structure can alter the dynamic behavior of the structural system. From a system dynamics standpoint, these circuitry elements are analogous to the mass, damping, and stiffness elements in the mechanical regime. Using op amp circuits we can synthesize circuitry elements with interesting characteristics such as tunable or negative elements. In this research, we demonstrate that the negative resistance element can reduce the overall system damping, thereby changing the dynamic response of mechanical structures. In particular, it will be shown that not only the response amplitude can be amplified; the response pattern in the mistuned periodic structure can be altered significantly upon the change of local structural properties. Such phenomena are analyzed systematically, and the potential advantage for structural damage detection is highlighted.

  3. Oxidation Behavior and Chlorination Treatment to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vikas Behrani

    2004-12-19

    This thesis is written in an alternate format. The thesis is composed of a general introduction, two original manuscripts, and a general conclusion. References cited within each chapter are given at the end of each chapter. The general introduction starts with the driving force behind this research, and gives an overview of previous work on boron doped molybdenum silicides, Nb/Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3} composites, boron modified niobium silicides and molybdenum niobium silicides. Chapter 2 focuses on the oxidation behavior of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 3 contains studies on a novel chlorination technique to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 4 summarizes the important results in this study.

  4. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of phosphorene nanoribbons: Negative differential resistance behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Ajanta; Singh, Akansha; Sen, Prasenjit; Kibey, Aniruddha; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Kanhere, Dilip G.

    2016-08-01

    Structural, electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of two different types of phosphorene nanoribbons are calculated within the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function formalisms. Armchair nanoribbons turn out to be semiconductors at all widths considered. Zigzag nanoribbons are metallic in their layer-terminated structure, but undergo Peierls-like transition at the edges. Armchair nanoribbons have smaller Young's modulus compared to a monolayer, while zigzag nanoribbons have larger Young's modulus. Edge reconstruction further increases the Young's modulus of zigzag nanoribbons. A two-terminal device made of zigzag nanoribbons show negative differential resistance behavior that is robust with respect to edge reconstruction. We have also calculated the I -V characteristics for two nonzero gate voltages. The results show that the zigzag nanoribbons display strong p -type character.

  5. Deformation behavior, corrosion resistance, and cytotoxicity of Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Qiu, C L; Chen, Q; Chan, K C; Zhang, S M

    2008-07-01

    Two Ni-free bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) of Zr(60)Nb(5)Cu(22.5)Pd(5)Al(7.5) and Zr(60)Nb(5)Cu(20)Fe(5)Al(10) were successfully prepared by arc-melting and copper mold casting. The thermal stability and crystallization were studied using differential scanning calorimetry. It demonstrates that the two BMGs exhibit very good glass forming ability with a wide supercooled liquid region. A multi-step process of crystallization with a preferential formation of quasicrystals occurred in both BMGs under continuous heating. The deformation behavior of the two BMGs was investigated using quasi-static compression testing. It reveals that the BMGs exhibit not only superior strength but also an extended plasticity. Corrosion behaviors of the BMGs were investigated in phosphate buffered solution by electrochemical polarization. The result shows that the two BMGs exhibit excellent corrosion resistance characterized by low corrosion current densities and wide passive regions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the passive film formed after anodic polarization was highly enriched in zirconium, niobium, and aluminum oxides. This is attributed to the excellent corrosion resistance. Additionally, the potential cytotoxicity of the two Ni-free BMGs was evaluated through cell culture for 1 week followed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and SEM observation. The results indicate that the two Ni-free BMGs exhibit as good biocompatibility as Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and thus show a promising potential for biomedical applications. PMID:17957719

  6. Leptin receptor deficiency confers resistance to behavioral effects of fluoxetine and desipramine via separable substrates

    PubMed Central

    Guo, M; Lu, X-Y

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous mental disorder. Currently available antidepressants are only effective in about one-third to one-half of all patients. The mechanisms underlying antidepressant response and treatment resistance are poorly understood. Recent clinical evidence implicates the involvement of leptin in treatment response to antidepressants. In this study, we determined the functional role of the leptin receptor (LepRb) in behavioral responses to the selective serotonergic antidepressant fluoxetine and the noradrenergic antidepressant desipramine. While acute and chronic treatment with fluoxetine or desipramine in wild-type mice elicited antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test, mice null for LepRb (db/db) displayed resistance to treatment with either fluoxetine or desipramine. Fluoxetine stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(Thr308) and GSK-3β(Ser9) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of wild-type mice but not in db/db mice. Desipramine failed to induce measurable changes in Akt, GSK-3β or ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the hippocampus and PFC, as well as hypothalamus of either genotype of mice. Deletion of LepRb specifically from hippocampal and cortical neurons resulted in fluoxetine insensitivity in the forced swim test and tail suspension test while leaving the response to desipramine intact. These results suggest that functional LepRb is critically involved in regulating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of both fluoxetine and desipramine. The antidepressant effects of fluoxetine but not desipramine are dependent on the presence of functional LepRb in the hippocampus and cortex. PMID:25463972

  7. Cation Exchange Synthesis and Unusual Resistive Switching Behaviors of Ag2Se Nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zheng; Li, Min-Qiang; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2015-12-16

    Ag2Se nanobelts are prepared through employing ZnSe nanobelts as templates via a facile cation exchange approach. The templates are derived from precursor ZnSe·0.5N2 H4 nanobelts, which are synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. As-synthesized precursor nanobelts are with 200 nm in width and several hundreds of micrometers in length. Annealed in N2 , they are transformed into ZnSe nanobelts with preserving their initial morphology. Following with a complete replacement of Zn(2+) by Ag(+), Ag2Se nanobelts with single crystalline are obtained via a cation-exchange reaction. Combined with the Langmuir-Blodgett assembly technique, regular films of ZnSe nanobelts can be achieved on transparent glass substrates and Si wafers with interdigital Au electrode arrays. Further, the optical and electrical evolutions are investigated from ZnSe nanobelts to Ag2 Se nanobelts. Finally, the resistive switching characteristic are carefully explored for Ag2Se nanobelts regularly arranged on interdigital Au microelectrodes. The results indicate that it is analogous to complementary resistive switching behaviors, which is different from that of traditional two terminal devices about previously reported Ag2Se. In order to clarify this phenomenon, a possible mechanism has been proposed and indirectly demonstrated through in situ SEM (scanning electron microscropy) observation. PMID:26509434

  8. Scaling behavior of the longitudinal and Hall resistivities in indium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuma, S.; Kokubo, N.

    1997-07-01

    We have made simultaneous measurements of the longitudinal ρxx and Hall ρxy resistivities for granular films of indium with different thicknesses (t¯=12, 20, and 60 nm) and the normal-state resistivities (ρxxn=2-5×10-5 Ω m) at temperatures T down to 0.5 K and in fields B up to 7 T. A striking scaling behavior expressed as ρxy(T)=Aρxx(T)β has been observed for all the films studied irrespective of t¯ and ρxxn at fixed fields which are not close to a critical field BC. In the mixed state (B

  9. Carbide Precipitation Behavior and Wear Resistance of a Novel Roller Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Li, Qiang; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Ligang; Yang, Qingxiang

    2013-06-01

    High speed steel, which contains more alloy elements, cannot be used to manufacture the forged work roll. Therefore, a novel roller steel was designed on the basis of W6Mo5Cr4V2 (M2) steel. In this study, the carbide precipitation behavior and wear resistance of the novel roller steel were investigated. The Fe-C isopleths were calculated by Thermo-Calc to determine the carbide types, which were precipitated at different temperatures. The phase transformation temperatures were measured by differential scanning calorimeter and then the characteristic temperatures were designed. The phase structures quenched from the characteristic temperatures were measured by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The typical microstructures were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy with Energy Disperse Spectroscopy. The hardness and wear resistance of the novel roller steel were measured. The results show that the precipitation temperatures of austenite, MC, M6C, M23C6, and ferrite are 1360, 1340, 1230, 926, and 843 °C respectively. When the specimen is quenched from 1300 °C, only MC precipitates from the matrix. At 1220 °C, MC and M2C precipitate. At 1150 °C, all of MC, M2C and M6C precipitate. Relationship between mass fraction of different phases and temperature were also simulated by Thermo-Calc. The hardness of the novel roller steel is a little lower than that of M2 steel, however, the wear resistance of the novel roller steel is a little higher than that of M2 steel with the increase of wear time.

  10. Surface working of 304L stainless steel: Impact on microstructure, electrochemical behavior and SCC resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Acharyya, S.G.; Khandelwal, A.; Kain, V.; Kumar, A.; Samajdar, I.

    2012-10-15

    The effect of surface working operations on the microstructure, electrochemical behavior and stress corrosion cracking resistance of 304L stainless steel (SS) was investigated in this study. The material was subjected to (a) solution annealing (b) machining and (c) grinding operations. Microstructural characterization was done using stereo microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. The electrochemical nature of the surfaces in machined, ground and solution annealed condition were studied using potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in borate buffer solution. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of 304L SS in different conditions was studied by exposing the samples to boiling MgCl{sub 2} environment. Results revealed that the heavy plastic deformation and residual stresses present near the surface due to machining and grinding operations make 304L SS electrochemically more active and susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Ground sample showed highest magnitude of current density in the passive potential range followed by machined and solution annealed 304L SS. Micro-electrochemical studies established that surface working promotes localized corrosion along the surface asperities which could lead to crack initiation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding produce extensive grain fragmentation near the surface of 304L SS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding result in martensitic transformation near the surface of 304L SS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding drastically reduce the SCC resistance of 304L SS in chloride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding make the surface of 304L SS electrochemically much more active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SECM study reveal that preferential dissolution takes place along surface asperities.

  11. Ionic bipolar resistive switching modes determined by the preceding unipolar resistive switching reset behavior in Pt/TiO2/Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kyung Jean; Song, Seul Ji; Seok, Jun Yeong; Yoon, Jung Ho; Kim, Gun Hwan; Lee, Jong Ho; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2013-04-01

    Various types of bipolar resistive switching (BRS) at the filament ruptured region by the unipolar resistive switching (URS) reset in the structure Pt/TiO2/Pt were categorized in terms of operation polarity and switching parameters. The differences in BRS behavior, even under identical current-voltage switching, are closely related to the previously performed URS reset parameter, especially the power consumed during the reset process. Various modes of BRS from the URS reset status in the structure Pt/TiO2/Pt are reported, and interpreted in terms of a distinct oxygen vacancy configuration in the ruptured region of a Magnéli filament.

  12. Photo-electron double regulated resistive switching memory behaviors of Ag/CuWO4/FTO device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Jia, X. J.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the CuWO4 film based resistive switching memory capacitors were fabricated with hydrothermal and spin-coating approaches. The device exhibits excellent photo-electron double controlled resistive switching memory characteristics with OFF/ON resistance ratio of ~103. It is believed that the interface of CuWO4 and FTO is responsible for such a switching behavior and it can be described by the Schottky-like barriers model. This study is useful for exploring the multifunctional materials and their applications in photo-electron double controlled nonvolatile memory devices.

  13. Abnormal bipolar resistive switching behavior in a Pt/GaO{sub 1.3}/Pt structure

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, D. Y.; Wu, Z. P.; Zhang, L. J.; Yang, T.; Hu, Q. R.; Lei, M.; Tang, W. H. E-mail: pgli@zstu.edu.cn; Li, P. G. E-mail: pgli@zstu.edu.cn; Li, L. H.

    2015-07-20

    A stable and repeatable abnormal bipolar resistive switching behavior was observed in a Pt/GaO{sub 1.3}/Pt sandwich structure without an electroforming process. The low resistance state (LRS) and the high resistance state (HRS) of the device can be distinguished clearly and be switched reversibly under a train of the voltage pulses. The LRS exhibits a conduction of electron tunneling, while the HRS shows a conduction of Schottky-type. The observed phenomena are considered to be related to the migration of oxygen vacancies which changes the space charge region width of the metal/semiconductor interface and results in a different electron transport mechanism.

  14. Peeling behavior and spalling resistance of CFRP sheets bonded to bent concrete surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hong; Li, Faping

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, the peeling behavior and the spalling resistance effect of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets externally bonded to bent concrete surfaces are firstly investigated experimentally. Twenty one curved specimens and seven plane specimens are studied in the paper, in which curved specimens with bonded CFRP sheets can simulate the concrete spalling in tunnel, culvert, arch bridge etc., whereas plane specimens with bonded CFRP sheets can simulate the concrete spalling in beam bridge, slab bridge and pedestrian bridge. Three kinds of curved specimens with different radii of curvature are chosen by referring to practical tunnel structures, and plane specimens are used for comparison with curved ones. A peeling load is applied on the FRP sheet by loading a circular steel tube placed into the central notch of beam to debond CFRP sheets from the bent concrete surface, meanwhile full-range load-deflection curves are recorded by a MTS 831.10 Elastomer Test System. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical analysis is also conducted for the specimens. Both theoretical and experimental results show that only two material parameters, the interfacial fracture energy of CFRP-concrete interface and the tensile stiffness of CFRP sheets, are needed for describing the interfacial spalling behavior. It is found that the radius of curvature has remarkable influence on peeling load-deflection curves. The test methods and test results given in the paper are helpful and available for reference to the designer of tunnel strengthening.

  15. Study of self-compliance behaviors and internal filament characteristics in intrinsic SiOx-based resistive switching memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Ying-Chen; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-compliance characteristics and reliability optimization are investigated in intrinsic unipolar silicon oxide (SiOx)-based resistive switching (RS) memory using TiW/SiOx/TiW device structures. The program window (difference between SET voltage and RESET voltage) is dependent on external series resistance, demonstrating that the SET process is due to a voltage-triggered mechanism. The program window has been optimized for program/erase disturbance immunity and reliability for circuit-level applications. The SET and RESET transitions have also been characterized using a dynamic conductivity method, which distinguishes the self-compliance behavior due to an internal series resistance effect (filament) in SiOx-based RS memory. By using a conceptual "filament/resistive gap (GAP)" model of the conductive filament and a proton exchange model with appropriate assumptions, the internal filament resistance and GAP resistance can be estimated for high- and low-resistance states (HRS and LRS), and are found to be independent of external series resistance. Our experimental results not only provide insights into potential reliability issues but also help to clarify the switching mechanisms and device operating characteristics of SiOx-based RS memory.

  16. Directions in Specialized Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Theory and Practice of Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sookman, Debbie; Steketee, Gail

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses specialized approaches developed for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who are resistant to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Following a review of theoretical and outcome research, two approaches developed to resolve persistent OCD are described and illustrated. Cognitive therapy (CT) designed to address…

  17. Resisting Pressure from Peers to Engage in Sexual Behavior: What Communication Strategies Do Early Adolescent Latino Girls Use?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Anne E.; Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.; Hutchison, Janet; Campoe, Kristi

    2015-01-01

    A content analysis of early adolescent X-bar = 12.02 years) Latino girls' (n = 44) responses to open-ended questions embedded in an electronic survey was conducted to explore strategies girls may use to resist peer pressure with respect to sexual behavior. Analysis yielded 341 codable response units, 74% of which were consistent with the REAL…

  18. Flight behavior of methyl-parathion-resistant and -susceptible western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) populations from Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, Jenny A; Meinke, Lance J; Naranjo, Steve E; Siegfried, Blair D; Wright, Robert J; Chandler, Laurence D

    2005-08-01

    Relative flight behavior of methyl-parathion-resistant and -susceptible western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte populations, was studied as part of a larger effort to characterize the potential impact of insecticide resistance on adult life history traits and to understand the evolution and spread of resistance. A computer interfaced actograph was used to compare flight of resistant and susceptible individuals, and flight of resistant individuals with and without prior exposure to methyl-parathion. In each case, mean trivial and sustained flight durations were compared among treatments. In general, there were few differences in trivial or sustained flight characteristics as affected by beetle population, insecticide exposure, sex, or age and there were few significant interactions among variables. Tethered flight activity was highly variable and distributions of flight duration were skewed toward flights of short duration. Tethered flight activity was similar among resistant and susceptible beetles with the exception that susceptible beetles initiated more flights per beetle than resistant beetles. After sublethal exposure to methyl-parathion, total flight time, total trivial flight time, and mean number of flights per resistant beetle declined significantly. Because long-range flight was uncommon, short- to medium-duration flights may play an important role in determining gene flow and population spread of resistant D. v. virgifera. These results suggest that organophosphate-resistant beetles can readily move and colonize new areas, but localized selection pressure (e.g., management practices) and exposure to methyl-parathion may contribute to the small-scale differences in resistance intensity often seen in the field. PMID:16156583

  19. Forming-free unipolar resistive switching behavior with conical conducting filaments in LaVO4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ling; Tang, Xianwu; Luo, Xuan; Zhang, Kejun; Jin, Linhua; Lin, Gaoting; Chen, Li; Zhu, Xuebin; Song, Wenhai; Dai, Jianmin; Sun, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    LaVO4 thin films have been deposited on Pt / Ti /SiO2 /Si substrates by pulsed laser deposition in order to explore the resistive switching (RS) behavior of the Au/LaVO4/Pt devices. It is found that the as-prepared Au/LaVO4/Pt devices stay in the low resistance state (LRS) and no electroforming process (forming-free) is needed to trigger fresh devices for the subsequent RS. Furthermore, the devices show excellent switching parameters such as a reproducible switching effect, a high resistance ratio of  ˜104 between the LRS and high resistance state (HRS), good endurance and retention characteristics, and non-overlapping switching voltages. The dominant conduction mechanisms are Ohmic conduction in the LRS and the lower voltage region of the HRS, and Poole-Frenkel emission in the higher voltage region of the HRS. The combination of temperature dependence of resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and model analysis suggests that the forming-free unipolar RS behavior can be explained by the formation and rupture of conical conducting filaments formed out of oxygen vacancies. These results may be important for practical application in nonvolatile resistive switching memory.

  20. Scaling behavior of the longitudinal and Hall resistivities in indium films

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, S.; Kokubo, N.

    1997-07-01

    We have made simultaneous measurements of the longitudinal {rho}{sub xx} and Hall {rho}{sub xy} resistivities for granular films of indium with different thicknesses ({bar t}=12, 20, and 60 nm) and the normal-state resistivities ({rho}{sub xxn}=2{endash}5{times}10{sup {minus}5}{Omega}m) at temperatures T down to 0.5 K and in fields B up to 7 T. A striking scaling behavior expressed as {rho}{sub xy}(T)=A{rho}{sub xx}(T){sup {beta}} has been observed for all the films studied irrespective of {bar t} and {rho}{sub xxn} at fixed fields which are not close to a critical field B{sub C}. In the mixed state (B{lt}B{sub C} and T{lt}T{sub C}, where T{sub C} is the transition temperature), the coefficient A and exponent {beta} (=2{endash}3) are nearly independent of the field strength B and the film thickness {bar t}. In the vicinity of the field-driven superconductor-insulator transition, we have found the {ital unusual} insulating region B{sub xxC}{lt}B{lt}B{sub xyC}, where B{sub xxC} and B{sub xyC} represent critical fields determined by {rho}{sub xx} and {rho}{sub xy}, respectively, which tends to grow with increasing {rho}{sub xxn} and/or decreasing {bar t}. This region is similar to one found previously by Paalanen, Hebard, and Ruel in amorphous InO{sub x} thin films, and the present result is consistent with their notion that the insulating region corresponds to the Bose-glass insulator. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Deltamethrin-mediated survival, behavior, and oenocyte morphology of insecticide-susceptible and resistant yellow fever mosquitos (Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Marriel, Nadja Biondine; Tomé, Hudson Vaner Ventura; Guedes, Raul Carvalho Narciso; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    Insecticide use is the prevailing control tactic for the mosquito Aedes aegypti, a vector of several human viruses, which leads to ever-increasing problems of insecticide resistance in populations of this insect pest species. The underlying mechanisms of insecticide resistance may be linked to the metabolism of insecticides by various cells, including oenocytes. Oenocytes are ectodermal cells responsible for lipid metabolism and detoxification. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sublethal effects of deltamethrin on survival, behavior, and oenocyte structure in the immature mosquitoes of insecticide-susceptible and resistant strains of A. aegypti. Fourth instar larvae (L4) of both strains were exposed to different concentrations of deltamethrin (i.e., 0.001, 0.003, 0.005, and 0.007 ppm). After exposure, L4 were subjected to behavioral bioassays. Insecticide effects on cell integrity after deltamethrin exposure (at 0.003 or 0.005 ppm) were assessed by processing pupal oenocytes for transmission electron microscopy or TUNEL reaction. The insecticide resistant L4 survived all the tested concentrations, whereas the 0.007-ppm deltamethrin concentration had lethal effects on susceptible L4. Susceptible L4 were lethargic and exhibited less swimming activity than unexposed larvae, whereas the resistant L4 were hyperexcited following exposure to 0.005 ppm deltamethrin. No sublethal effects and no significant cell death were observed in the oenocytes of either susceptible or resistant insects exposed to deltamethrin. The present study illustrated the different responses of susceptible and resistant strains of A. aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentration of deltamethrin, and demonstrated how the behavior of the immature stage of the two strains varied, as well as oenocyte structure following insecticide exposure. PMID:26943998

  2. Men’s Condom Use Resistance: Alcohol Effects on Theory of Planned Behavior Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kelly Cue; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Danube, Cinnamon L.; Morrison, Diane M.; Norris, Jeanette; George, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study is a novel investigation of 1) the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to predict men’s condom use resistance (CUR; i.e., attempts to avoid condom use with a partner who wants to use one) and 2) the effects of alcohol on endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs. Methods Using an alcohol administration protocol, a between- and within-subjects experiment was conducted with a community sample of 312 young male non-problem drinkers who have sex with women. After assessing endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs (e.g., attitudes, norms, self-efficacy, control, and intentions) in a sober state, beverage condition was experimentally manipulated between subjects and endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs was reassessed. Results Analyses included repeated measures MANOVAs with beverage condition (no alcohol vs. alcohol) as the between-subjects factor and time (pre-beverage vs. post-beverage) as the within-subjects factor. Between-subjects, intoxicated participants reported significantly stronger CUR intentions, more favorable CUR attitudes and normative perceptions, and greater CUR self-efficacy than sober participants. There were significant within-subject changes for CUR intentions, attitudes, normative perceptions, and self-efficacy. Neither between- nor within-subjects effects were found for CUR control. An exploratory multi-group path analysis indicated that the relationships among the TPB-CUR constructs were similar for alcohol and no alcohol groups. Conclusions Findings indicated that alcohol intoxication increased men’s CUR intentions and self-efficacy and led to more positive CUR attitudes and norms, yet had no effect on CUR control. Future research should examine whether there are similar effects of intoxication on TPB constructs related to other sexual risk behaviors. PMID:26348499

  3. Behavioral and Reproductive Response of White Pine Weevil (Pissodes strobi) to Resistant and Susceptible Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis)

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jeanne A.; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    White pine weevil (Pissodes strobi, Peck.) is a native forest insect pest in the Pacific Northwest of North America that attacks species of spruce (Picea spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.). Young Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] trees are particularly susceptible to weevil attack. Pockets of naturally occurring Sitka spruce resistance have been identified in high weevil hazard areas in coastal British Columbia. In this study, we characterize behavioral, physiological and reproductive responses of weevils to an extremely resistant Sitka spruce genotype (H898) in comparison to a highly susceptible genotype (Q903). The experiments relied on a large number of three-year-old clonally propagated trees and were therefore restricted to two contrasting Sitka spruce genotypes. When exposed to resistant trees, both male and female weevils were deterred during host selection and mating, females showed delayed or reduced ovary development, and successful reproduction of weevils was prevented on resistant trees. PMID:26467397

  4. Using short vignettes to disentangle perceived capability from motivation: a test using walking and resistance training behaviors.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Williams, David M; Mistry, Chetan D

    2016-07-01

    Self-efficacy is arguably the strongest correlate of physical activity, yet some researchers suggest this is because the construct confounds ability with motivation. We examine a more circumscribed construct, called perceived capability (PC), meant to measure ability but not motivation and propose that the construct will not be related to unskilled physical activities but may be linked to skilled behaviors. The purpose of this paper was to examine whether a PC construct can be stripped of motivation using a vignette approach in both walking and resistance training behaviors. Participants were a random sample of 248 university students, who were then randomly assigned to either answer resistance training or walking behavior questions. Both groups completed a PC measure and reasons for their answer before and after reading a vignette that clarified the phrasing of capability to a literal use of the term. PC was significantly (p < .01) higher post- compared to pre-vignette and the differences were greater (p < .01) for walking than for resistance training. PC had significantly (p < .01) smaller correlations with intention and self-reported behavior post-disambiguation, which resulted in a null relationship with walking but a small correlation with resistance training behavior. When PC was combined with intention to predict behavior, however, there was no significant (p > .05) difference in the amount of variance explained pre- to post-vignette. Thought listing showed that participants did not report capability barriers to walking and over half of the sample construed capability as motivation/other priorities pre-vignette. The findings support use of a vignette approach for researchers who wish to disentangle the assessment of PC from motivation while creating no overall loss in explained variance of physical activity. PMID:26286687

  5. Resistance switching behavior of ZnO resistive random access memory with a reduced graphene oxide capping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Wei-Yi; Huang, Yen-Lun; Juan, Pi-Chun; Wang, Tse-Wen; Hung, Ke-Yu; Hsieh, Cheng-Yu; Kang, Tsung-Kuei; Shi, Jen-Bin

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the characteristics of ZnO resistive random access memory (RRAM) with a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) capping layer and the polarity effect of the SET/RESET bias on the RRAM. The rGO film insertion enhances the stability of the current-voltage (I-V) switching curve and the superior resistance ratio (˜105) of high-resistance state (HRS) to low-resistance state (LRS). Using the appropriate polarity of the SET/RESET bias applied to the rGO-capped ZnO RRAM enables the oxygen ions to move mainly at the interface of the rGO and ZnO films, resulting in the best performance. Presumably, the rGO film acts as an oxygen reservoir and enhances the easy in and out motion of the oxygen ions from the rGO film. The rGO film also prevents the interaction of oxygen ions and the Al electrode, resulting in excellent performance. In a pulse endurance test, the rGO-capped ZnO RRAM reveals superior endurance of up to 108 cycles over that of the ZnO RRAM without rGO insertion (106 cycles).

  6. The Role of Hidden Curricula on the Resistance Behavior of Undergraduate Students in Psychological Counseling and Guidance at a Turkish University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuksel, Sedat

    2006-01-01

    Student resistance can be a very important problem for the instructors in universities. Student resistance includes the conscious and preplanned behaviors towards the information presented to them in the classroom and the institutional practices. Typically, student resistance takes the form of passive or active non-compliance with roles and…

  7. THE BEHAVIOR OF TRANSVERSE WAVES IN NONUNIFORM SOLAR FLUX TUBES. I. COMPARISON OF IDEAL AND RESISTIVE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón; Goossens, Marcel

    2013-11-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. Kink waves are a type of transverse MHD waves in magnetic flux tubes that are damped due to resonant absorption. The theoretical study of kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes is usually based on the simplification that the transverse variation of density is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the tube, i.e., the so-called thin boundary approximation. Here, we develop a general analytic method to compute the dispersion relation and the eigenfunctions of ideal MHD waves in pressureless flux tubes with transversely nonuniform layers of arbitrary thickness. Results for kink waves are produced and compared with fully numerical resistive MHD eigenvalue computations in the limit of small resistivity. We find that the frequency and resonant damping rate are the same in both ideal and resistive cases. The actual results for thick nonuniform layers deviate from the behavior predicted in the thin boundary approximation and strongly depend on the shape of the nonuniform layer. The eigenfunctions in ideal MHD are very different from those in resistive MHD. The ideal eigenfunctions display a global character regardless of the thickness of the nonuniform layer, while the resistive eigenfunctions are localized around the resonance and are indistinguishable from those of ordinary resistive Alfvén modes. Consequently, the spatial distribution of wave energy in the ideal and resistive cases is dramatically different. This poses a fundamental theoretical problem with clear observational consequences.

  8. Resistivity-Based Evaluation of the Fatigue Behavior of Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Holger; Starke, Peter; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-08-01

    Cast irons are used in particular for highly stressed components in the automotive and commercial vehicle industry, e.g., for crankcases and in the wind power industry, e.g., for rotor hubs. The mechanical properties of cast irons are strongly influenced by parameters like phase composition of the matrix, graphite shape, micro-pinholes, and micro-cracks. The measurement of the electrical resistance in the unloaded state and its change during cyclic loading offers the possibility to get detailed information about the actual defect density and the cyclic deformation behavior. In the scope of the present work, stress-controlled load increase tests and constant amplitude tests were carried out at ambient temperature with specimens of the perlitic cast irons EN-GJL-250 (ASTM A48 35B), EN-GJV-400, and EN-GJS-600 (ASTM 80-55-06). Beside electrical measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the microstructure and to correlate the change of microstructural details with cyclic properties.

  9. Polarization and resistive switching behavior of ferroelectric tunnel junctions with transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Lipatov, Alexey; Sharma, Pankaj; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Sinitskii, Alexander; Gruverman, Alexei; Alexei Gruverman Team; Alexander Sinitskii Team; Chang-Beom Eom Team

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are emerging 2-dimensional (2D) materials of the MX2 type, where M is a transition metal atom (Mo, W, Ti, Sn, Zr, etc.) and X is a chalcogen atom (S, Se, or Te.). Comparing to graphene, TMDs have a sizable band gap and can be metal, half-metal, semiconductor or superconductor. Their band structures can be tuned by external bias voltage, mechanical force, or light illumination. Their rich physical properties make TMDs potential candidates for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) are actively studied as a next-generation of non-volatile memory elements. An FTJ comprises a ferroelectric tunnel barrier sandwiched between two electrodes. In this work, we investigate the resistive switching behavior of MoS2/BaTiO3-based FTJs. The ON/OFF ratio can be modulated via electric or mechanical control of the switched polarization fraction opening a possibility of tunable electroresistance effect. Effect of optical illumination on the polarization reversal dynamics has been observed and analyzed based on the polarization-induced modulation of the MoS2 layered electronic properties.

  10. Nonvolatile Bipolar Resistive Switching Behavior in the Perovskite-like (CH3NH3)2FeCl4.

    PubMed

    Lv, Fengzhen; Gao, Cunxu; Zhou, Heng-An; Zhang, Peng; Mi, Kui; Liu, Xiaoxing

    2016-07-27

    The bipolar resistive switching behavior in a device based on an crystalline iron-based organic-inorganic, perovskite-like material of (CH3NH3)2FeCl4 (MAFC), was examined and studied. Both high and low resistance states appeared to have no obvious degradation during a measurement period of 600 s with 400 cycles in a Ag/MAFC/Cu device, which also exhibited good thermal stability over a wide temperature range of 290 to 340 K. The conductivity-state switching behavior was derived from the competition between the ionic current within the MAFC and the Faradaic current that originated from oxidative reactions at the Ag/MAFC/Cu interface. A model explaining the oxidative reaction process was established to describe the symmetric resistive switching behavior in the Ag/MAFC/Cu cell. With an applied bias voltage sweeping, the oxidative layers passivated and dissipated at the Ag/MAFC/Cu interface that resulted in the competition between the induced current and the ionic current, and thus caused a symmetric resistance change. On the basis of this interfacial effect, the MAFC crystals can be used as memristor elements in devices for write-read-erase-rewrite process. PMID:27414403

  11. The behavior of series resistance of a p-n junction: the diode and the solar cell cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Poliana H.; Costa, Diogo F.; Eick, Alexander; Carvalho, André; Monteiro, Davies W. L.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the impact of the internal parasitic series resistance of a p-n junction, as seen from the microelectronics and photovoltaic communities. The elusive thermal behavior of the aforementioned resistance gave this work its origin. Each community uses a different approach to interpret the operational current-voltage behavior of a p-n junction, which might lead to confusion, since scientists and engineers of these two realms seldom interact. An improvement in the understanding of the different approaches will help one to better model the performance of devices based on p-n junctions and therefore it will favor the performance predictions of photovoltaic cells. For diodes, series resistance is usually determined from a specific forward-bias region of the I-V curve on a semi-logarithmic scale. However, in Photovoltaics this region is not commonly reported and therefore other methods to determine Rs are employed. We mathematically modeled an experimentally obtained I-V curve with various pairs of the ideality factor and Rs and found that more than one pair accurately synthesizes the measured curve. We can conclude that the reported series resistance not only depends on physical parameters, e.g. temperature or irradiance, but also on fitting parameters, i.e. the ideality factor. Generally the behavior of a p-n junction depends on its operating conditions and electrical modeling.

  12. Bipolar resistive switching behavior of an amorphous Ge₂Sb₂Te₅ thin films with a Te layer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sijung; Eom, Taeyong; Gwon, Taehong; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2015-04-14

    The mechanism of bipolar resistive switching (BRS) of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) thin films sandwiched between inert electrodes (Ti and Pt) was examined. Typical bipolar resistive switching behavior with a high resistance ratio (∼10(3)) and reliable switching characteristics was achieved. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of a conductive Te-filament bridging between the top and bottom electrodes through an amorphous GST matrix. The conduction mechanism analysis showed that the low-resistance state was semiconducting and dominated by band transport, whereas Poole-Frenkel conduction governed the carrier transport in the high-resistance state. Thus, the BRS behavior can be attributed to the formation and rupture of the semiconducting conductive Te bridge through the migration of the Te ions in the amorphous GST matrix under a high electric field. The Te ions are provided by the thin (∼5 nm) Te-rich layer formed at the bottom electrode interface. PMID:25785363

  13. Comparative Behavioral Responses of Pyrethroid-Susceptible and -Resistant Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations to Citronella and Eucalyptus Oils.

    PubMed

    Sathantriphop, Sunaiyana; Thanispong, Kanutcharee; Sanguanpong, Unchalee; Achee, Nicole L; Bangs, Michael J; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the behavioral responses (contact irritancy and noncontact spatial repellency) between susceptible and resistant populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) (=Stegomyia aegypti) to essential oils, citronella, and eucalyptus, Eucalyptus globulus, extracts, using an excito-repellency test system. N, N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) was used as the standard reference repellent. Mosquitoes included two long-standing insecticide susceptible colonies (U.S. Department of Agriculture and Bora Bora) and two pyrethroid-resistant populations recently obtained from Phetchabun and Kanchanaburi provinces in Thailand. Both DEET and citronella produced a much stronger excitation ("irritancy") and more rapid flight escape response in both pyrethroid-resistant populations compared with the laboratory populations. Noncontact repellency was also greater in the two resistant populations. Eucalyptus oil was found to be the least effective compound tested. Differences in responses between long-established pyrethroid-susceptible colonies and newly established and naturally resistant colonies were clearly demonstrated. These findings also demonstrate the need for further comparisons using natural pyrethroid-susceptible populations for elucidation of factors that might contribute to different patterns of escape behavior. PMID:26309305

  14. Temperature dependences of ferroelectricity and resistive switching behavior of epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zeng-Xing; Song, Xiao; Zhao, Li-Na; Li, Zhong-Wen; Lin, Yuan-Bin; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Lu, Xu-Bing; Wu, Su-Juan; Gao, Xing-Sen; Yan, Zhi-Bo; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the resistive switching and ferroelectric polarization properties of high-quality epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films in various temperature ranges. The room temperature current-voltage (I-V) curve exhibits a well-established polarization-modulated memristor behavior. At low temperatures (< 253 K), the I-V curve shows an open circuit voltage (OCV), which possibly originates from the dielectric relaxation effects, accompanied with a current hump due to the polarization reversal displacement current. While at relative higher temperatures (> 253 K), the I-V behaviors are governed by both space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC) and Ohmic behavior. The polarization reversal is able to trigger the conduction switching from Ohmic to SCLC behavior, leading to the observed ferroelectric resistive switching. At a temperature of > 298 K, there occurs a new resistive switching hysteresis at high bias voltages, which may be related to defect-mediated effects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272078 and 51332007), the State Key Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No 2015CB921202), the Guangdong Provincial Universities and Colleges Pearl River Scholar Funded Scheme, China (2014), the International Science & Technology Cooperation Platform Program of Guangzhou, China (Grant No. 2014J4500016), and the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University of China (Grant No. IRT1243).

  15. Resistance: Experienced and Novice Consultants' Interpretations and Strategies for Addressing It in Behavioral Consultation Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorges, Todd; Elliott, Stephen N.; Kettler, Ryan J.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined whether experienced and novice school psychology consultants differed in identification of consultee resistance, attribution of sources of resistance, and quantity and variety of strategies to handle resistance. The participants were characterized as novice consultants (N = 33) if they had completed fewer than 20 cases or as…

  16. Testing the Effectiveness of Intervention Programs on Children's Compliance-Resisting Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillen, Jeffrey S.; And Others

    A study examined the effectiveness of a resistance-based prevention program to increase subjects' ability to comprehend and apply resistance skills. Subjects were 30 participants in kindergarten through third grade. Fifteen subjects received resistance-based prevention training from the We Help Ourselves (WHO) program. The remaining 15 subjects…

  17. Stress-induced enhancement of fear conditioning and sensitization facilitates extinction-resistant and habituation-resistant fear behaviors in a novel animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Corley, Michael J; Caruso, Michael J; Takahashi, Lorey K

    2012-01-18

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by stress-induced symptoms including exaggerated fear memories, hypervigilance and hyperarousal. However, we are unaware of an animal model that investigates these hallmarks of PTSD especially in relation to fear extinction and habituation. Therefore, to develop a valid animal model of PTSD, we exposed rats to different intensities of footshock stress to determine their effects on either auditory predator odor fear extinction or habituation of fear sensitization. In Experiment 1, rats were exposed to acute footshock stress (no shock control, 0.4 mA, or 0.8 mA) immediately prior to auditory fear conditioning training involving the pairing of auditory clicks with a cloth containing cat odor. When presented to the conditioned auditory clicks in the next 5 days of extinction testing conducted in a runway apparatus with a hide box, rats in the two shock groups engaged in higher levels of freezing and head out vigilance-like behavior from the hide box than the no shock control group. This increase in fear behavior during extinction testing was likely due to auditory activation of the conditioned fear state because Experiment 2 demonstrated that conditioned fear behavior was not broadly increased in the absence of the conditioned auditory stimulus. Experiment 3 was then conducted to determine whether acute exposure to stress induces a habituation resistant sensitized fear state. We found that rats exposed to 0.8 mA footshock stress and subsequently tested for 5 days in the runway hide box apparatus with presentations of nonassociative auditory clicks exhibited high initial levels of freezing, followed by head out behavior and culminating in the occurrence of locomotor hyperactivity. In addition, Experiment 4 indicated that without delivery of nonassociative auditory clicks, 0.8 mA footshock stressed rats did not exhibit robust increases in sensitized freezing and locomotor hyperactivity, albeit head out vigilance

  18. Codes of Commitment to Crime and Resistance: Determining Social and Cultural Factors over the Behaviors of Italian Mafia Women

    PubMed Central

    Cayli, Baris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article categorizes thirty-three women in four main Italian Mafia groups and explores social and cultural behaviors of these women. This study introduces the feminist theory of belief and action. The theoretical inquiry investigates the sometimes conflicting behaviors of women when they are subject to systematic oppression. I argue that there is a cultural polarization among the categorized sub-groups. Conservative radicals give their support to the Mafia while defectors and rebels resist the Mafia. After testing the theory, I assert that emancipation of women depends on the strength of their beliefs to perform actions against the Mafiosi culture. PMID:26806988

  19. Resistive switching behavior of RF magnetron sputtered ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajalakshmi, R.; Angappane, S.

    2015-06-01

    The resistive switching characteristics of RF magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films have been studied. The x-ray diffraction studies confirm the formation of crystalline ZnO on Pt/TiO2/SiOx/Si substrate. We have fabricated Cu/ZnO/Pt device using a shadow masking technique for resistive switching study. Our Cu/ZnO/Pt device exhibits a unipolar resistive switching behaviour. The switching observed in our device could be related to oxygen vacancies or Cu ions that generate the conducting filaments responsible for resistive switching. We found HRS to LRS resistance ratio of as high as ˜200 for our Cu/ZnO/Pt device. The higher resistance ratio and stability of Cu/ZnO/Pt device would make our RF magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films suitable for non volatile memory applications.

  20. Resistive switching behavior of RF magnetron sputtered ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalakshmi, R.; Angappane, S.

    2015-06-24

    The resistive switching characteristics of RF magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films have been studied. The x-ray diffraction studies confirm the formation of crystalline ZnO on Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub x}/Si substrate. We have fabricated Cu/ZnO/Pt device using a shadow masking technique for resistive switching study. Our Cu/ZnO/Pt device exhibits a unipolar resistive switching behaviour. The switching observed in our device could be related to oxygen vacancies or Cu ions that generate the conducting filaments responsible for resistive switching. We found HRS to LRS resistance ratio of as high as ∼200 for our Cu/ZnO/Pt device. The higher resistance ratio and stability of Cu/ZnO/Pt device would make our RF magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films suitable for non volatile memory applications.

  1. Comparing the Predictive Capacity of Observed In-Session Resistance to Self-Reported Motivation in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Henny A.

    2010-01-01

    Self-report measures of motivation for changing anxiety have been weakly and inconsistently related to outcome in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). While clients may not be able to accurately report their motivation, ambivalence about change may nonetheless be expressed in actual therapy sessions as opposition to the direction set by the therapist (i.e., resistance). In the context of CBT for generalized anxiety disorder, the present study compared the ability of observed in-session resistance in CBT session 1 and two self-report measures of motivation for changing anxiety (the Change Questionnaire & the Client Motivational for Therapy Scale) to (1) predict client and therapist rated homework compliance (2) predict post-CBT and one-year post-treatment worry reduction, and (3) differentiate those who received motivational interviewing prior to CBT from those who received no pretreatment. Observed in-session resistance performed very well on each index, compared to the performance of self-reported motivation which was inconsistent and weaker relative to observed resistance. These findings strongly support both clinician sensitivity to moments of client resistance in actual therapy sessions as early as session 1, and the inclusion of observational process measures in CBT research. PMID:21159325

  2. Differential probing behavior of Blissus insularis (Hemiptera: Blissidae) on resistant and susceptible St. Augustinegrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis Barber, is a severe pest of St. Augustinegrass throughout the southern United States. Host plant resistance is an environmentally friendly method to manage chinch bug infestations and is increasingly important as the southern chinch bug develops resistance to c...

  3. Effects of three novel resistant black raspberry selections on Amphorophora agathonica feeding behavior and performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host plant resistance is a practical and cost-effective approach for growers to manage insect pests. Recently, three new sources of resistance in black raspberry (selections ORUS 3778-1, ORUS 3817-1, and ORUS 4109-1) against the large raspberry aphid, Amphorophora agathonica, were identified. We stu...

  4. Facile formation of superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface and corrosion-resistant behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Libang; Yan, Zhongna; Qiang, Xiaohu; Liu, Yanhua; Wang, Yanping

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic surface with excellent corrosion resistance was prepared on aluminum alloy via boiling water treatment and surface modification with stearic acid. Results suggested that the micro- and nanoscale hierarchical structure along with the hydrophobic chemical composition surface confers the aluminum alloy surface with good superhydrophobicity, and the water contact angle and the water sliding angle can reach 156.6° and 3°, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the superhydrophobic aluminum alloy was first characterized by potentiodynamic polarization, and then the long-term corrosion resistance was investigated by immersing the sample in NaCl solution for 90 days. The surface wettability, morphology, and composition before and after immersion were examined, and results showed that the superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface possessed good corrosion resistance under the experimental conditions, which is favorable for its practical application as an engineering material in seawater corrosion conditions. Finally, the mechanism of the superhydrophobicity and excellent corrosion resistance is deduced.

  5. Radiation resistance evaluation of cross-linked polytetrafluoroethylene by the investigation of friction and wear behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhongfeng; Wang, Mouhua; Zhao, Yanning; Wu, Guozhong

    2011-03-01

    Radiation resistance of cross-linked polytetrafluoroethylene (XPTFE) sheets was evaluated by measuring the friction and wear properties as well as observing the morphology after γ-irradiation in air at room temperature. The wear resistance of XPTFE was confirmed to be much higher than that of virgin PTFE. The friction coefficient of XPTFE decreased with increasing dose, whereas the wear resistance remained stable until a critical dose was reached and then decreased sharply with dose. The critical dose of wear resistance was dependent on the crosslinking density or crosslinking dose of XPTFE. The radiation resistance of XPTFE improved significantly due to the formation of three-dimensional crosslinking networks by irradiation in the molten state. In addition, morphologies of the abraded debris of virgin PTFE and XPTFE were also compared and a clear difference was observed.

  6. Development of Silica Glass Coatings on 316L SS and Evaluation of its Corrosion Resistance Behavior in Ringer's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, U.; Rajeswari, S.

    2012-12-01

    Sol-gel derived silica glasses have many promising features, including low-temperature preparation as well as chemical and physical stability. Two silica glasses with Si100 and Si80 composition were prepared to understand the factors contributing to the rate of bioactivity. The effects of pH, solution aging temperature, and molar ratio of H2O/tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were studied, and the obtained powder sample was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction studies, and scanning electron microscopy. The synthesized silica glasses were deposited on 316L SS by the spin coating method at the optimized speed of 2000 revolutions per minute. The corrosion resistance behavior of the coatings was determined by (1) open-circuit potential vs time of exposure, (2) electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and (3) cyclic polarization in Ringer's solution. A higher breakdown potential ( E b) and repassivation potential ( E p) value with lower current density was obtained from cyclic polarization. Similar results were observed from impedance analysis with higher charge transfer resistance ( R ct) and lower double layer capacitance ( C dl) indicating the corrosion resistance behavior of the coatings compared with the uncoated 316L stainless steel. From the results, it was observed that both Si100 and Si80 glass coatings had a positive effect on the corrosion resistance behavior. An adhesive strength of 46 MPa and 45 MPa was obtained for the Si100 and Si80 coatings, respectively. An accelerated leach out study was carried out by impressing the potential at their breakdown potential to determine the effect of glass coating for long-term contact between the implant and a normal biological medium.

  7. Different variation behaviors of resistivity for high-temperature-grown and low-temperature-grown p-GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yang; De-Gang, Zhao; De-Sheng, Jiang; Ping, Chen; Zong-Shun, Liu; Jian-Jun, Zhu; Ling-Cong, Le; Xiao-Jing, Li; Xiao-Guang, He; Li-Qun, Zhang; Hui, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Two series of p-GaN films grown at different temperatures are obtained by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). And the different variation behaviors of resistivity with growth condition for high- temperature(HT)-grown and low-temperature(LT)-grown p-GaN films are investigated. It is found that the resistivity of HT-grown p-GaN film is nearly unchanged when the NH3 flow rate or reactor pressure increases. However, it decreases largely for LT-grown p-GaN film. These different variations may be attributed to the fact that carbon impurities are easy to incorporate into p-GaN film when the growth temperature is low. It results in a relatively high carbon concentration in LT-grown p-GaN film compared with HT-grown one. Therefore, carbon concentration is more sensitive to the growth condition in these samples, ultimately, leading to the different variation behaviors of resistivity for HT- and LT-grown ones. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61474110, 61377020, 61376089, 61223005, and 61176126), the National Natural Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars, China (Grant No. 60925017), the One Hundred Person Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Basic Research Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20130362).

  8. Unipolar resistive switching behavior of amorphous YCrO{sub 3} films for nonvolatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu; Misra, Pankaj; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu

    2014-08-28

    Amorphous YCrO{sub 3} (YCO) films were prepared on Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate by pulsed laser deposition in order to investigate resistive switching (RS) phenomenon. The Pt/YCO/Pt device showed stable unipolar RS with resistance ratio of ∼10{sup 5} between low and high resistance states, excellent endurance and retention characteristics, as well as, non-overlapping switching voltages with narrow dispersions. Based on the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature dependent switching characteristics, observed RS was mainly ascribed to the oxygen vacancies. Moreover, current-voltage characteristics of the device in low and high resistance states were described by Ohmic and trap controlled space–charge limited conduction mechanisms, respectively.

  9. Structural Properties and Resistance-Switching Behavior of Thermally Grown NiO Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Ranju; Park, Bae Ho; Li, Xiang-Shu; Park, Chanwoo; Shin, Seongmo; Kim, Dong-Chirl; Lee, Chang Won; Seo, Sunae

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the structural and electrical properties of polycrystalline NiO thin films on Pt electrodes formed by thermal oxidation. A Ni-Pt alloy phase was found at the interface, which could be explained by the oxidation kinetics and reactions of Ni, NiO, and Pt. An increase in the oxidation temperature decreased the volume of the alloy layer and improved the crystalline quality of the NiO thin films. Pt/NiO/Pt structures were fabricated, and they showed reversible resistance switching from a high-resistance state (HRS) to a low-resistance state (LRS) and vice versa during unipolar current-voltage measurements. The oxidation temperature affected (did not affect) the HRS (LRS) resistance of the Pt/NiO/Pt structures. This indicated that the transport characteristics of HRS and LRS should be different.

  10. Composite Materials with Distinctive Behaviors under High Electric Fields: I - Material Switches to 'High Resistive' State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H.

    1994-01-01

    Electrically conductive silver filled epoxy ECF-563 preform, sandwiched between gold contact pads exhibits intermittent current-voltage characteristics with switching to 'high resistive' state under applied bias voltage.

  11. Complementary resistive switching behaviors evolved from bipolar TiN/HfO2/Pt device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinman; Hu, Wei; Li, Yan; Wu, Shuxiang; Bao, Dinghua

    2016-02-01

    In this letter, the dynamic evolution of TiN/HfO2/Pt device from bipolar resistive switching (BRS) to complementary resistive switching (CRS) was reported. The device exhibits the uniform BRS with long retention, good endurance, and self-compliance characteristics after the asymmetric two-step electroforming. However, BRS of the device eventually transforms to CRS after the transitional processes through controlling the compliance current. Meanwhile, the effective barrier height rises up accordingly as the device evolves from BRS to CRS. These superior resistive switching performances of TiN/HfO2/Pt device here can be elucidated in views of evolution of asymmetric filament. This work confirms the intimate correlation and discrepancy between BRS and CRS, and also indicates the potential application of TiN/HfO2/Pt device for future ultra-dense resistive random access memory.

  12. Prenatal SSRI alters the hormonal and behavioral responses to stress in female mice: Possible role for glucocorticoid resistance.

    PubMed

    Avitsur, Ronit; Grinshpahet, Rachel; Goren, Naama; Weinstein, Ido; Kirshenboim, Or; Chlebowski, Noa

    2016-08-01

    Life time prevalence of major depression disorder (MDD) is higher in women compared to men especially during the period surrounding childbirth. Women suffering from MDD during pregnancy use antidepressant medications, particularly Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI). These drugs readily cross the placental barrier and impact the developing fetal brain. The present study assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to fluoxetine (FLX), an SSRI antidepressant drug, on corticosterone and behavioral responses to stress in female mice. In young females, prenatal FLX significantly elevated corticosterone response to continuous stress. In adults, prenatal FLX augmented corticosterone response to acute stress and suppressed the response to continuous stress. Additionally, prenatal FLX significantly augmented stress-induced increase in locomotion and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in adult, but not young mice. The dexamethasone suppression test revealed that prenatal FLX induced a state of glucocorticoid resistance in adult females, indicating that the negative feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to stress was disrupted. These findings provide the first indication of altered hormonal and behavioral responses to continuous stress and suggest a role for the development of glucocorticoid resistance in these effects. According to these findings, prenatal environment may have implications for stress sensitivity and responsiveness to life challenges. Furthermore, this study may assist in understanding the limitations and precautions that should be taken in the use of SSRIs during pregnancy. PMID:27283378

  13. Learn to Say Yes! When You Want to Say No! to Create Cooperation Instead of Resistance: Positive Behavior Strategies in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersey, Katharine C.; Masterson, Marie L.

    2011-01-01

    It is human nature to be resistant when someone tells a person no. Children are no exception. Nevertheless, when teachers are frustrated with children's behavior, they may resort to saying no. Often the child responds, "Why?" or resists. What teachers really seek are strategies to help children in preschool and the early primary grades learn how…

  14. Bipolar and unipolar resistive switching behaviors of sol-gel-derived SrTiO3 thin films with different compliance currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M. H.; Wang, Z. P.; Li, J. C.; Zeng, Z. Q.; Xu, X. L.; Wang, G. Y.; Zhang, L. B.; Xiao, Y. G.; Yang, S. B.; Jiang, B.; He, J.

    2011-07-01

    The SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on a Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrate were synthesized using a sol-gel method to form a metal-insulator-metal structure. This device shows the bipolar resistance switching (BRS) behavior for a compliance current Icc of less than 0.1 mA but exhibits soft breakdown at a higher level of compliance current. A transition from the BRS behavior to the stable unipolar resistive switching behavior (URS) was also observed. We found that the BRS behavior may be controlled by the structure interface while the URS behavior is likely bulk controlled. Our study indicates that the external compliance current is a key factor in resistance switching phenomenon of STO thin films.

  15. Bottom-electrode effect on switching behavior and interface reaction in nanoionic-based resistive changing memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takahiro; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Imura, Masataka; Oh, Seungjun; Kobashi, Kazuyoshi; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-08-01

    The bottom-electrode effect on a Cu/HfO2 stack structure, which is an oxide-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM) structure, and the resistance switching behavior of the structures were investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by comparing the Pt and TiN bottom electrodes. In the Pt bottom electrode, a forward bias voltage induced the reduction of the unintentionally oxidized Cu top electrode and the Cu ion migration in the HfO2 layer, resulting in the switching from the high resistivity to the low resistivity at approximately ±1 V. In contrast, the TiN bottom electrode induced the formation of oxygen vacancies in the HfO2 layer and the thick Cu2O layer at the Cu/HfO2 interface, namely, it induced oxygen migration rather than Cu migration. The switching voltage of the Cu/HfO2/TiN structure was twice that of the Cu/HfO2/Pt structure. The switching mechanism in a nanoionic-type ReRAM structure can be controlled by changing the bottom electrode.

  16. Adolescent self-regulation as resilience: resistance to antisocial behavior within the deviant peer context.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Theodore W; Dishion, Thomas J; Connell, Arin M

    2008-02-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that self-regulation serves as a resiliency factor in buffering youth from negative influences of peer deviance in middle to late adolescence. The interactive effects between peer deviance and self-regulation were investigated on change in antisocial behavior from age 17 to 19 years in an ethnically diverse sample of adolescents. A multi-agent construct was created using adolescent, parent, and teacher reports of self-regulation and peer deviance. Results indicated that self-regulation shows convergent validity and covaries as expected with developmental patterns of adolescent antisocial behavior. Self-regulation moderated the association of peer deviance with later self-reported adolescent antisocial behavior after controlling for prior levels of antisocial behavior. The implications of these findings for models for the development of antisocial behaviors and for intervention science are discussed. PMID:17899361

  17. Corrosion behavior and interfacial resistivity of bipolar plate materials under simulated molten carbonate fuel cell conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeler, A. C.; Kaun, T. D.; Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Krumpelt, M.

    2000-03-01

    A material is needed for bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) that combines the low oxide resistivity of 316L stainless steel (SS) with the low corrosion rate of the type 310 SS. We tested a group of materials that included Nitronic 50 SS and a newly developed high-temperature nickel-rich alloy, having chromium contents ranging from 16 to 31 wt %. Our results indicate that chromium content is the primary determinant of oxide scale composition and resistivity. In the MCFC cathode compartment, all tested alloys formed a duplex structure with an inner Cr-rich layer and an outer Fe-rich one. The composition of the inner Cr-rich layer was determined by the chromium content of the base alloy and has a controlling effect on scale resistivity. Oxide scale resistivity was measured for three electrolyte compositions: Li/K, Li/Na, and newly developed (Li, Na, Ca, Ba) carbonates. Changes in the physical/mechanical properties (spallation/cracking) in the oxide scale of 316L SS provided an understanding of its resistivity fluctuations over time.

  18. Corrosion behavior and interfacial resistivity of bipolar plate materials under molten carbonate fuel cell cathode conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeler, A.C.; Kaun, T.D.; Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Krumpelt, M.

    2000-03-01

    A material is needed for bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) that combines the low oxide resistivity of 316L stainless steel (SS) with the low corrosion rate of the type 310 SS. The authors tested a group of materials that included Nitronic 50 SS and a newly developed high-temperature nickel-rich alloy, having chromium contents ranging from 16 to 31 wt %. Their results indicate that chromium content is the primary determinant of oxide scale composition and resistivity. In the MCFC cathode compartment, all tested alloys formed a duplex structure with an inner Cr-rich layer and an outer Fe-rich one. The composition of the inner Cr-rich layer was determined by the chromium content of the base alloy and has a controlling effect on scale resistivity. Oxide scale resistivity was measured for three electrolyte compositions: Li/K, Li/Na, and newly developed (Li, Na, Ca, Ba) carbonates. Changes in the physical/mechanical properties (spallation/cracking) in the oxide scale of 316L SS provided an understanding of its resistivity fluctuations over time.

  19. Rectifying and negative differential resistance behaviors of a functionalized Tour wire: The position effects of functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Gordon; Zhang, Zhenhua; Pan, Jinbo

    2011-09-01

    Based on Tour wire, we construct four D-π-A molecular devices with different positional functional groups, in an attempt to explore the position effects of functional groups on their electronic transport properties and to show that some interesting physical phenomena can emerge by only varying the position of functional groups. The first-principles calculations demonstrate that the position of functional groups can affect the rectifying behaviors (rectification direction and ratio) significantly and determines whether or not the negative differential resistance (NDR) can be observed as well as the physical origin of the NDR phenomenon.

  20. Corrosion resistance and antithrombogenic behavior of La and Nd ion implanted stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, F. J.; Jin, F. Y.; Liu, Y. W.; Wan, G. J.; Liu, X. M.; Zhao, X. B.; Fu, R. K. Y.; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, N.; Chu, Paul K.

    2006-09-15

    Lanthanide ions such as lanthanum (La) and neodymium (Nd) were implanted into 316 stainless steel samples using metal vapor vacuum arc to improve the surface corrosion resistance and antithrombogenic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that lanthanum and neodymium exist in the +3 oxidation state in the surface layer. The corrosion properties of the implanted and untreated control samples were investigated utilizing electrochemical tests and our results show that La and Nd implantations enhance the surface corrosion resistance. In vitro activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests were used to evaluate the antithrombogenic properties. The APTT time of the implanted samples was observed to be prolonged compared to that of the unimplanted stainless steel control. La and Nd ion implantations can be used to improve the surface corrosion resistance and biomedical properties of 316 stainless steels.

  1. Hot Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Behavior of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Conventional and Nanostructured Zirconia Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Mohsen; Keyvani, Ahmad; Heydarzadeh Sohi, Mahmoud

    Conventional and nanostructured zirconia coatings were deposited on In-738 Ni super alloy by atmospheric plasma spray technique. The hot corrosion resistance of the coatings was measured at 1050°C using an atmospheric electrical furnace and a fused mixture of vanadium pent oxide and sodium sulfate respectively. According to the experimental results nanostructured coatings showed a better hot corrosion resistance than conventional ones. The improved hot corrosion resistance could be explained by the change of structure to a dense and more packed structure in the nanocoating. The evaluation of mechanical properties by nano indentation method showed the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of the YSZ coating increased substantially after hot corrosion.

  2. Alcohol-Mediated Resistance-Switching Behavior in Metal-Organic Framework-Based Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Hong; Shi, Wenxiong; Zhang, Weina; Yu, Jiancan; Chandran, Bevita K; Cui, Chenlong; Zhu, Bowen; Liu, Zhiyuan; Li, Bin; Xu, Cai; Xu, Zhiling; Li, Shuzhou; Huang, Wei; Huo, Fengwei; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-07-25

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have drawn increasing attentions as promising candidates for functional devices. Herein, we present MOF films in constructing memory devices with alcohol mediated resistance switching property, where the resistance state is controlled by applying alcohol vapors to achieve multilevel information storage. The ordered packing mode and the hydrogen bonding system of the guest molecules adsorbed in MOF crystals are shown to be the reason for the alcohol mediated electrical switching. This chemically mediated memory device can be a candidate in achieving environment-responsive devices and exhibits potential applications in wearable information storage systems. PMID:27311703

  3. Impact of Treatments for Depression on Comorbid Anxiety, Attentional, and Behavioral Symptoms in Adolescents with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Robert C.; Rengasamy, Manivel; Mansoor, Brandon; He, Jiayan; Mayes, Taryn; Emslie, Graham J.; Porta, Giovanna; Clarke, Greg N.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.; Ryan, Neal; Shamseddeen, Wael; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Brent, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relative efficacy of antidepressant medication, alone and in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), on comorbid symptoms of anxiety, attention, and disruptive behavior disorders in participants in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial. Method: Adolescents with selective serotonin…

  4. Behavior of vascular resistance undergoing various pressure insufflation and perfusion on decellularized lungs.

    PubMed

    da Palma, Renata Kelly; Nonaka, Paula Naomi; Campillo, Noelia; Uriarte, Juan J; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Oliveira, Luis V F

    2016-05-01

    Bioengineering of functional lung tissue by using whole lung scaffolds has been proposed as a potential alternative for patients awaiting lung transplant. Previous studies have demonstrated that vascular resistance (Rv) could be altered to optimize the process of obtaining suitable lung scaffolds. Therefore, this work was aimed at determining how lung inflation (tracheal pressure) and perfusion (pulmonary arterial pressure) affect vascular resistance. This study was carried out using the lungs excised from 5 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. The trachea was cannulated and connected to a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device to provide a tracheal pressure ranging from 0 to 15cmH2O. The pulmonary artery was cannulated and connected to a controlled perfusion system with continuous pressure (gravimetric level) ranging from 5 to 30cmH2O. Effective Rv was calculated by ratio of pulmonary artery pressure (PPA) by pulmonary artery flow (V'PA). Rv in the decellularized lungs scaffolds decreased at increasing V'PA, stabilizing at a pulmonary arterial pressure greater than 20cmH2O. On the other hand, CPAP had no influence on vascular resistance in the lung scaffolds after being subjected to pulmonary artery pressure of 5cmH2O. In conclusion, compared to positive airway pressure, arterial lung pressure markedly influences the mechanics of vascular resistance in decellularized lungs. PMID:26949099

  5. Percieved Coercion, Resistance to Persuasion, and the Type A Behavior Pattern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, Charles S.

    1980-01-01

    Gender differences in resistance to stress are not rooted in recognition of coercive elements, but in differences in responding to coercive elements. Type As are particularly sensitive to threats to personal control. The critical difference may be in the frequency rather than the intensity of the stress. (JAC)

  6. Design of nonlinear resistive networks with prescribed input-output behavior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peikari, B.

    1973-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of designing nonlinear multiport resistive networks for prescribed driving point and transfer characteristics. It is shown that, if the topology of the desired network is given, then the i-v characteristics of the nonlinear elements can be obtained iteratively. This is achieved by implementation of a newly developed steepest descent criterion.

  7. Corrosion resistance and behavior of construction materials exposed to dilute sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures under static conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    Laboratory investigation has been undertaken to determine the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of various construction materials in a simulated hydrolysis environment (5 wt % sulfuric acid) at temperatures ranging from 90 to 220C. Tests were performed in an autoclave-type electrochemical cell. The corrosion behavior of the test materials was determined using computer-controlled DC potentiodynamic polarization. Corrosion rates of the test materials were determined using AC impedance techniques. Among the stainless steels tested, only alloy N08026 (Carpenter 20Mo-6) performed satisfactory up to a temperature of 100C. The alloy passivated spontaneously in the environment and corroded at a rate of less than 2 mpy. None of the stainless steels tested could be used at 120{degrees}C or above. A number of nickel-based alloys tested had good corrosion resistance up to 100C, but their corrosion rate exceeded 2 mpy at higher temperatures. Zirconium alloys were satisfactory up to 180C. Only tantalum and a tantalum-niobium alloy were satisfactory up to 220C.

  8. Abnormal Osmotic Avoidance Behavior in C. elegans Is Associated with Increased Hypertonic Stress Resistance and Improved Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine C.; Kim, Heejung; Ditano, Jennifer; Manion, Dacie; King, Benjamin L.; Strange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Protein function is controlled by the cellular proteostasis network. Proteostasis is energetically costly and those costs must be balanced with the energy needs of other physiological functions. Hypertonic stress causes widespread protein damage in C. elegans. Suppression and management of protein damage is essential for optimal survival under hypertonic conditions. ASH chemosensory neurons allow C. elegans to detect and avoid strongly hypertonic environments. We demonstrate that mutations in osm-9 and osm-12 that disrupt ASH mediated hypertonic avoidance behavior or genetic ablation of ASH neurons are associated with enhanced survival during hypertonic stress. Improved survival is not due to altered systemic volume homeostasis or organic osmolyte accumulation. Instead, we find that osm-9(ok1677) mutant and osm-9(RNAi) worms exhibit reductions in hypertonicity induced protein damage in non-neuronal cells suggesting that enhanced proteostasis capacity may account for improved hypertonic stress resistance in worms with defects in osmotic avoidance behavior. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes that play roles in managing protein damage are upregulated in osm-9(ok1677) worms. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work demonstrating that intercellular communication between neuronal and non-neuronal cells plays a critical role in integrating cellular stress resistance with other organismal physiological demands and associated energy costs. PMID:27111894

  9. Effects of different dopants on switching behavior of HfO2-based resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ning; Pang, Hua; Wu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    In this study the effects of doping atoms (Al, Cu, and N) with different electro-negativities and ionic radii on resistive switching of HfO2-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) are systematically investigated. The results show that forming voltages and set voltages of Al/Cu-doped devices are reduced. Among all devices, Cu-doped device shows the narrowest device-to-device distributions of set voltage and low resistance. The effects of different dopants on switching behavior are explained with deferent types of CFs formed in HfO2 depending on dopants: oxygen vacancy (Vo) filaments for Al-doped HfO2 devices, hybrid filaments composed of oxygen vacancies and Cu atoms for Cu-doped HfO2 devices, and nitrogen/oxygen vacancy filaments for N-doped HfO2 devices. The results suggest that a metal dopant with a larger electro-negativity than host metal atom offers the best comprehensive performance.

  10. Host plant resistance in romaine lettuce affects feeding behavior and biology of Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Sethi, Amit; McAuslane, Heather J; Nagata, Russell T; Nuessly, Gregg S

    2006-12-01

    Lettuce quality and yield can be reduced by feeding of several lepidopterous pests, particularly cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hübner), and beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Host plant resistance to these insects is an environmentally sound adjunct to conventional chemical control. In this study we compared the survival, development, and feeding behavior of cabbage looper and beet armyworm on two romaine lettuce cultivars, resistant 'Valmaine' and susceptible 'Tall Guzmaine'. Larval mortality of both species was significantly higher on resistant Valmaine than on susceptible Tall Guzmaine. The average weight per larva after feeding for 1 wk on Tall Guzmaine plants was 6 times (beet armyworm) and 2 times (cabbage looper) greater than that of larvae feeding on Valmaine plants. Significant reduction in larval growth on Valmaine compared with that on Tall Guzmaine resulted in a 5.9- (beet armyworm) and 2.6-d (cabbage looper) increase in larval duration and almost a 1-d increase in pupal duration. Average pupal and adult weights and successful pupation of cabbage looper and beet armyworm were reduced on Valmaine compared with Tall Guzmaine. The sex ratio of progeny did not deviate from 1:1 when larvae were reared on either Valmaine or Tall Guzmaine. The fecundity of cabbage looper and beet armyworm adults that developed from larvae reared on Valmaine was about one-third that of adults from Tall Guzmaine, but adult longevity did not significantly differ on the two lettuce cultivars. The two insect species showed different feeding preferences for leaves of different age groups on Valmaine and Tall Guzmaine. Cabbage loopers cut narrow trenches on the leaf before actual feeding to block the flow of latex to the intended site of feeding. In contrast, beet armyworms did not trench. The different feeding behavior of the two species on Valmaine may explain the superior performance of cabbage looper compared with beet armyworm. PMID:17195688

  11. Ester-free Thiol-X Resins: New Materials with Enhanced Mechanical Behavior and Solvent Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Chatani, Shunsuke; Claudino, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    A series of thiol-Michael and radical thiol-ene network polymers were successfully prepared from ester-free as well as ester-containing monomer formulations. Polymerization reaction rates, dynamic mechanical analysis, and solvent resistance experiments were performed and compared between compositions with varied ester loading. The incorporation of ester-free alkyl thiol, vinyl sulfone and allylic monomers significantly improved the mechanical properties when compared with commercial, mercaptopropionate-based thiol-ene or thiol-Michael networks. For polymers with no hydrolytically degradable esters, glass transition temperatures (Tg's) as high as 100 °C were achieved. Importantly, solvent resistance tests demonstrated enhanced stability of ester-free formulations over PETMP-based polymers, especially in concentrated basic solutions. Kinetic analysis showed that glassy step-growth polymers are readily formed at ambient conditions with conversions reaching 80% and higher. PMID:25893009

  12. Experimental investigations into composite fuselage impact damage resistance and post-impact compression behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, E. F.; Finn, S. R.; Stevens, J. J.; Lin, K. Y.; Fitch, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Impact damage resistance and residual strength of laminated composite transport aircraft fuselage structure was studied experimentally. Techniques to quantify impact damage discretely and non-discretely are described. Experimental techniques to three-dimensionally map matrix damage and determine the sublaminate structure are illustrated. Impact damage was also quantified non-discretely, using characteristics of flexural wave propagation. Strain distributions in compressively loaded impact damaged laminates were experimentally measured.

  13. Effect of surface chemistry on the morphology, resistance, and colloidal behavior of small silver particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Scott D.; McCreery, Richard L.; Cummings, Kevin D.

    1985-07-01

    Raman spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis were used to characterize small silver particles prepared by evaporation of silver from a molybdenum or tungsten boat into a reduced-pressure atmosphere of argon and oxygen. Particles prepared with both molybdenum and oxygen present were 50-400-Å-diam spheres, but much larger aspherical particles resulted if either molybdenum or oxygen was absent. The spherical particles were coated with approximately one monolayer of polymeric molybdenum oxide formed during fabrication from volatile MoO3. The polymolybdate-coated particles form a stable suspension in water and have high electrical resistance, while those prepared in the absence of molybdenum have low resistance and do not suspend in water. No evidence of silver oxide formation was obtained, even for particles prepared by silver evaporation in oxygen in the absence of molybdenum, We conclude that the polymolybdate coating prevents the formation of very large (>1000 Å) particles during fabrication. Furthermore, the coating becomes negatively charged in polar solvents, leading to formation of a stable colloidal suspension. Thus the molybdenum boat is essential for the fabrication of small spherical particles, and has a large effect on the properties of the final material. While silver oxide formation cannot be rigorously ruled out, it is clear that molybdenum, not silver, oxides determine the morphology and resistance of the particles.

  14. Synaptic behaviors of a single metal-oxide-metal resistive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang-Jun; Kim, Guk-Bae; Lee, Kyoobin; Kim, Ki-Hong; Yang, Woo-Young; Cho, Soohaeng; Bae, Hyung-Jin; Seo, Dong-Seok; Kim, Sang-Il; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2011-03-01

    The mammalian brain is far superior to today's electronic circuits in intelligence and efficiency. Its functions are realized by the network of neurons connected via synapses. Much effort has been extended in finding satisfactory electronic neural networks that act like brains, i.e., especially the electronic version of synapse that is capable of the weight control and is independent of the external data storage. We demonstrate experimentally that a single metal-oxide-metal structure successfully stores the biological synaptic weight variations (synaptic plasticity) without any external storage node or circuit. Our device also demonstrates the reliability of plasticity experimentally with the model considering the time dependence of spikes. All these properties are embodied by the change of resistance level corresponding to the history of injected voltage-pulse signals. Moreover, we prove the capability of second-order learning of the multi-resistive device by applying it to the circuit composed of transistors. We anticipate our demonstration will invigorate the study of electronic neural networks using non-volatile multi-resistive device, which is simpler and superior compared to other storage devices.

  15. Adolescent Self-Regulation as Resilience: Resistance to Antisocial Behavior within the Deviant Peer Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Theodore W.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Connell, Arin M.

    2008-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that self-regulation serves as a resiliency factor in buffering youth from negative influences of peer deviance in middle to late adolescence. The interactive effects between peer deviance and self-regulation were investigated on change in antisocial behavior from age 17 to 19 years in an ethnically diverse sample…

  16. Improving the seismic torsional behavior of plan-asymmetric, single-storey, concrete moment resisting buildings with fluid viscous dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofooei, Fayaz Rahimzadeh; Mohammadzadeh, Sahar

    2016-03-01

    The optimal distribution of fluid viscous dampers (FVD) in controlling the seismic response of eccentric, single-storey, moment resisting concrete structures is investigated using the previously defined center of damping constant (CDC). For this purpose, a number of structural models with different one-way stiffness and strength eccentricities are considered. Extensive nonlinear time history analyses are carried out for various arrangements of FVDs. It is shown that the arrangement of FVDs for controlling the torsional behavior due to asymmetry in the concrete structures is very dependent on the intensity of the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and the extent of the structural stiffness and strength eccentricities. The results indicate that, in the linear range of structural behavior the stiffness eccentricity es which is the main parameter in determining the location of optimal CDC, is found to be less or smaller than the optimal damping constant eccentricity e*d, i.e., |e*d| > |es|. But, in the nonlinear range of structural behavior where the strength eccentricity er is the dominant factor in determining the location of optimal CDC, |e*d| > |er|. It is also concluded that for the majority of the plan-asymmetric, concrete structures considered in this study with er ≠ 0, the optimal CDC approaches the center of mass as er decreases.

  17. Risk-taking plants: anisohydric behavior as a stress-resistance trait.

    PubMed

    Sade, Nir; Gebremedhin, Alem; Moshelion, Menachem

    2012-07-01

    Water scarcity is a critical limitation for agricultural systems. Two different water management strategies have evolved in plants: an isohydric strategy and an anisohydric strategy. Isohydric plants maintain a constant midday leaf water potential (Ψleaf) when water is abundant, as well as under drought conditions, by reducing stomatal conductance as necessary to limit transpiration. Anisohydric plants have more variable Ψleaf and keep their stomata open and photosynthetic rates high for longer periods, even in the presence of decreasing leaf water potential. This risk-taking behavior of anisohydric plants might be beneficial when water is abundant, as well as under moderately stressful conditions. However, under conditions of intense drought, this behavior might endanger the plant. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these two water-usage strategies and their effects on the plant's ability to tolerate abiotic and biotic stress. The involvement of plant tonoplast AQPs in this process will also be discussed. PMID:22751307

  18. Growth behavior and corrosion resistance of 5% Al-Zn coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, K.L.; Ho, J.K.; Lee, J.T. . Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Effects of reaction time and temperature on growth behavior and corrosion performance of batch type 5% aluminum-zinc (Al-Zn) coating were investigated. A fast growth in coating thickness and intermetallic layer occurred within temperatures of 480 C. to 520 C. The coatings grew to a maximum thickness after 520 C. Corrosion performance was enhanced greatly by formation of an intermetallic layer. The best performance was produced at 500 C.

  19. Resistive transition, polaron dynamics and scaling behavior in Fe doped SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arijit; Masud, Md. G.; Sannigrahi, Jhuma; Chaudhuri, B. K.

    2013-04-01

    Temperature dependent electrical transport (ac and dc) and dielectric measurements have been performed with SrFexTi(1-x)O3 (0≤x≤1.0) samples prepared by ceramic route. Metal-insulator like transition observed depending on doping concentration. High dc resistivity of the present system is due to localization of polaronic charge carriers and the dc resistivity data, above respective TMI, fit well with Mott's variable range hopping, Arrhenius conduction mechanism, while a power law nature is followed below TMI. The charge transport mechanism is also revealed from the scaled ac conductivity and dielectric modulus spectrum. The MI transition is considered to be associated with polaron dissociation occurring little below polaron ordering (PO) temperature, TPO. The samples also indicate a cross-over from universal dielectric response (UDR) (f<105 Hz) to second universality (SU) (f>105 Hz). This cross over as well as MI like transition temperature shift towards the lower temperature regime with increasing x.

  20. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27240537

  1. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices.

  2. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sangram K; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K

    2016-01-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27240537

  3. Boron(III)-Containing Donor-Acceptor Compound with Goldlike Reflective Behavior for Organic Resistive Memory Devices.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chun-Ting; Wu, Di; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2016-03-01

    A small-molecule-based boron(III)-containing donor-acceptor compound has been designed and synthesized. Interesting goldlike reflective behavior was observed in the neat thin-film sample from simple spin-coating preparation, which can serve as a potential organic thin-film optical reflector. The small thickness in nanometer range and the relatively smooth surface morphology, together with simple preparation and easy solution processability, are attractive features for opening up new avenues for the fabrication of reflective coatings. Moreover, this donor-acceptor compound has been employed in the fabrication of organic resistive memory device, which exhibited good performance with low turn-on voltage, small operating bias, large ON/OFF ratio, and long retention time. PMID:26879606

  4. In-situ observation of self-regulated switching behavior in WO{sub 3-x} based resistive switching devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, D. S.; Wang, W. X.; Chen, Y. S. Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G.

    2014-09-15

    The transmittance of tungsten oxides can be adjusted by oxygen vacancy (V{sub o}) concentration due to its electrochromic property. Here, we report an in-situ observation of resistive switching phenomenon in the oxygen-deficient WO{sub 3-x} planar devices. Besides directly identifying the formation/rupture of dark-colored conductive filaments in oxide layer, the stripe-like WO{sub 3-x} device demonstrated self-regulated switching behavior during the endurance testing, resulting in highly consistent switching parameters after a stabilizing process. For very high V{sub o}s mobility was demonstrated in the WO{sub 3-x} film by the pulse experiment, we suggested that the electric-field-induced homogeneous migration of V{sub o}s was the physical origin for such unique switching characteristics.

  5. Multiple Negative Differential Resistance Device by Using the Ambipolar Behavior of Tunneling Field Effect Transistor with Fast Switching Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Won; Jang, E-San; Shin, Sunhae; Kim, Kyung Rok

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel double-peak negative differential resistance (NDR) characteristic at the conventional single-peak MOS-NDR circuit by employing ambipolar behavior of TFET. The fluctuated voltage transfer curve (VTC) from ambipolar inverter is analyzed with simple model and successfully demonstrated with TFET, as a practical example, on the device simulation. We also verified that the fluctuated VTC generates additional peak and valleys on NDR characteristics by using circuit simulations. Moreover, by adjusting the threshold voltage of conventional MOSFET, ultra-high 1st and 2nd peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) over 10(7) is obtained with fully suppressed valley currents. The proposed double-peak NDR circuit expected to apply on faster switching and low power multi-functional applications. PMID:27483818

  6. Reversible force-resistivity behavior of thin films of the TTF-TCNQ family

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmann, W.; Sonntag, H.U.

    1997-05-01

    The electrical properties of vacuum sublimed thin films of TIF-TCNQ and its derivatives mainly are determined by electron barriers at grain boundaries. The electrical conductivity is thermal activated and exhibits a significant dependence on a force acting perpendicularly to the film plane. The sample resistance R decreases continuously with increasing force F. TCNQ thin films on steel show a similar R-F relation. The effect has been observed already at forces of 1 N, but also up to about 60 kN. An explanation of these phenomena is given by a grain boundary limited hopping mechanism with pressure dependent potential barrier width and height. Morphology investigations by SEM support the model.

  7. Radiation degradation behavior of chlorine-containing vinyl copolymers. Search for improved electron-beam resists

    SciTech Connect

    Helbert, J.N.; Poindexter, E.H.; Pittman, C.U. Jr.; Chen, C.Y.

    1980-06-01

    Vinyl copolymers with high radiation degradation sensitivity have been synthesized by copolymerizing vinylidene chloride (VDC), CH/sub 2/ = CCl/sub 2/, with methyl methacrylate (MMA), methacrylonitrile, methyl ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylate, and dimethyl itaconate using emulsion techniques. In addition, copolymers of methyl ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylate with methyl methacrylate and poly(..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile) were studied. Introduction of vinylidene chloride into methyl methacrylate polymers caused a sharp increase in G/sub s/ even at relatively low VDC incorporation. Upon 29% VDC incorporation, the G/sub s/ value increased from 1.3 (homopolymer of MMA) to 3.4. G/sub s/ was found to be a linear function of copolymer content for several systems, but G/sub x/ was not. At higher VDC levels, the increase in G/sub s/ was countered by increases in G/sub x/. At lower VDC levels, G/sub x/ was suppressed below the values predicted by a linear G/sub x/ dependence on composition for such systems as VDC/MMA, MCA/MMA, and ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile/MMA. The VDC/MMA copolymer (29% VDC) gave a sensitivity of 4.0 x 10/sup -5/ C/cm/sup 2/ to electron beam exposure using the 0% unexposed resist thickness loss criterion and is 2 to 3 times more sensitive than PMMA. Poly(..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile) is a negative resist with a sensitivity of 5 x 10/sup -5/ C/cm/sup 2/ using one-micron line images for testing.

  8. Corrosion resistance and behavioral characteristics of metals exposed to 70 percent by weight sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Farina, G.E.

    1994-10-01

    The development of a concentrated acid hydrolysis process may necessitate the storage, handling, and processing of concentrated solution of sulfuric acid at temperatures in excess of 70{degrees}C. Due to the corrosivity of the sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures, a series of corrosion tests was conducted to determine the corrosion performance and behavior of various construction materials using immersion and electrochemical techniques. Test results showed that among the stainless steels tested, only Carpenter 20Mo-6 performed satisfactorily up to 70{degrees}C. It passivated spontaneously and corroded at a rate less than 40 {mu}m/yr (1.6 mpy). Among numerous nickel-based alloys tested, only Hastelloy B-2 had excellent corrosion resistance up to 100{degrees}C with a corrosion rate less than 50 {mu}/yr (2 mpy), although the alloy did not passivate. Zirconium alloy Zr 702 provided excellent corrosion resistance to 100{degrees}C. The alloy passivated spontaneously, but its passive range decreased, evidently with increase in temperature. Tantalum and KBI-40 provided excellent corrosion protection at all test temperatures. The materials passivated spontaneously with a wide passive range.

  9. Unipolar resistive switching behaviors and mechanisms in an annealed Ni/ZrO2/TaN memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ling; Ho, Tsung-Han; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Ni/ZrO2/TaN resistive switching memory devices without and with a 400 °C annealing process on switching properties are investigated. The devices exhibit unipolar resistive switching behaviors with low set and reset voltages because of a large amount of Ni diffusion with no reaction with ZrO2 after the annealing process, which is confirmed by ToF-SIMS and XPS analyses. A physical model based on a Ni filament is constructed to explain such phenomena. The device that undergoes the 400 °C annealing process exhibits an excellent endurance of more than 1.5  ×  104 cycles. The improvement can be attributed to the enhancement of oxygen ion migration along grain boundaries, which result in less oxygen ion consumption during the reset process. The device also performs good retention up to 105 s at 150 °C. Therefore, it has great potential for high-density nonvolatile memory applications.

  10. A Physiological and Behavioral Mechanism for Leaf Herbivore-Induced Systemic Root Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Matthias; Robert, Christelle A.M.; Marti, Guillaume; Lu, Jing; Doyen, Gwladys R.; Villard, Neil; Barrière, Yves; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Turlings, Ted C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Indirect plant-mediated interactions between herbivores are important drivers of community composition in terrestrial ecosystems. Among the most striking examples are the strong indirect interactions between spatially separated leaf- and root-feeding insects sharing a host plant. Although leaf feeders generally reduce the performance of root herbivores, little is known about the underlying systemic changes in root physiology and the associated behavioral responses of the root feeders. We investigated the consequences of maize (Zea mays) leaf infestation by Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars for the root-feeding larvae of the beetle Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, a major pest of maize. D. virgifera strongly avoided leaf-infested plants by recognizing systemic changes in soluble root components. The avoidance response occurred within 12 h and was induced by real and mimicked herbivory, but not wounding alone. Roots of leaf-infested plants showed altered patterns in soluble free and soluble conjugated phenolic acids. Biochemical inhibition and genetic manipulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis led to a complete disappearance of the avoidance response of D. virgifera. Furthermore, bioactivity-guided fractionation revealed a direct link between the avoidance response of D. virgifera and changes in soluble conjugated phenolic acids in the roots of leaf-attacked plants. Our study provides a physiological mechanism for a behavioral pattern that explains the negative effect of leaf attack on a root-feeding insect. Furthermore, it opens up the possibility to control D. virgifera in the field by genetically mimicking leaf herbivore-induced changes in root phenylpropanoid patterns. PMID:26430225

  11. Cold resistance depends on acclimation and behavioral caste in a temperate ant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modlmeier, Andreas P.; Pamminger, Tobias; Foitzik, Susanne; Scharf, Inon

    2012-10-01

    Adjusting to low temperatures is important for animals living in cold environments. We studied the chill-coma recovery time in temperate ant workers ( Temnothorax nylanderi) from colonies collected in autumn and spring in Germany. We experimentally acclimated these ant colonies to cold temperatures followed by warm temperatures. As expected, cold-acclimated workers recovered faster from freezing temperatures, but subsequent heat acclimation did not change the short recovery times observed after cold acclimation. Hence, either heat acclimation improves cold tolerance, possibly as a general response to stress, or at least it does not negate enhanced cold tolerance following cold acclimation. Colonies collected in spring showed similar cold tolerance levels to cold-acclimated colonies in the laboratory. Next, we compared the chill-coma recovery time of different worker castes and found that exterior workers recovered faster than interior workers. This difference may be related to their more frequent exposure to cold, higher activity level, or distinct physiology. Interior workers were also heavier and showed a higher gaster-to-head ratio and thorax ratio compared to exterior workers. An obvious difference between exterior and interior workers is activity level, but we found no link between activity and cold tolerance. This suggests that physiology rather than behavioral differences could cause the increased cold tolerance of exterior workers. Our study reveals the importance of acclimation for cold tolerance under natural and standardized conditions and demonstrates differences in cold tolerance and body dimensions in monomorphic behavioral castes of an ant.

  12. A Physiological and Behavioral Mechanism for Leaf Herbivore-Induced Systemic Root Resistance.

    PubMed

    Erb, Matthias; Robert, Christelle A M; Marti, Guillaume; Lu, Jing; Doyen, Gwladys R; Villard, Neil; Barrière, Yves; French, B Wade; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Turlings, Ted C J; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Indirect plant-mediated interactions between herbivores are important drivers of community composition in terrestrial ecosystems. Among the most striking examples are the strong indirect interactions between spatially separated leaf- and root-feeding insects sharing a host plant. Although leaf feeders generally reduce the performance of root herbivores, little is known about the underlying systemic changes in root physiology and the associated behavioral responses of the root feeders. We investigated the consequences of maize (Zea mays) leaf infestation by Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars for the root-feeding larvae of the beetle Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, a major pest of maize. D. virgifera strongly avoided leaf-infested plants by recognizing systemic changes in soluble root components. The avoidance response occurred within 12 h and was induced by real and mimicked herbivory, but not wounding alone. Roots of leaf-infested plants showed altered patterns in soluble free and soluble conjugated phenolic acids. Biochemical inhibition and genetic manipulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis led to a complete disappearance of the avoidance response of D. virgifera. Furthermore, bioactivity-guided fractionation revealed a direct link between the avoidance response of D. virgifera and changes in soluble conjugated phenolic acids in the roots of leaf-attacked plants. Our study provides a physiological mechanism for a behavioral pattern that explains the negative effect of leaf attack on a root-feeding insect. Furthermore, it opens up the possibility to control D. virgifera in the field by genetically mimicking leaf herbivore-induced changes in root phenylpropanoid patterns. PMID:26430225

  13. Comparative study of non-polar switching behaviors of NiO- and HfO 2-based oxide resistive-RAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousseaume, V.; Fantini, A.; Nodin, J. F.; Guedj, C.; Persico, A.; Buckley, J.; Tirano, S.; Lorenzi, P.; Vignon, R.; Feldis, H.; Minoret, S.; Grampeix, H.; Roule, A.; Favier, S.; Martinez, E.; Calka, P.; Rochat, N.; Auvert, G.; Barnes, J. P.; Gonon, P.; Vallée, C.; Perniola, L.; De Salvo, B.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a detailed comparative study of the switching characteristics of resistive memory devices, with NiO or HfO 2 active materials and Pt electrodes, based on identical integration schemes. Material screening and qualification are performed using structural and composition analyses. Preliminary electrical investigations outline the non-polar switching behavior of both HfO 2 and NiO devices. Then, by using a specific test setup, we present a systematic comparative study of HfO 2 and NiO devices, clearly showing the tunability of the electrical characteristics with material type and process. HfO 2 devices lead to largest High Resistance State/Low Resistance State ratios and higher forming voltages compared to NiO cells, while reset voltages are similar. Data retention of both materials show highly stable Low Resistance State, while High Resistance State increases over time under 85 °C baking.

  14. Electrical Resistance Imaging for Evaluation of Soil-Water Behavior in Desert Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Perkins, K. S.; Schmidt, K. M.; Miller, D. M.; Stock, J. D.; Singha, K.

    2009-05-01

    As part of an effort to evaluate habitat types in the Mojave National Preserve, we conducted infiltration/redistribution experiments to investigate unsaturated hydraulic properties and soil-water dynamics. Two investigated locations contrasted sharply in degree of pedogenic development: (1) recently deposited sediments in an active wash and (2) a highly developed soil of late Pleistocene age. Water flow through these materials may be strongly influenced by such features as biotic crusts, vesicular horizons, textural variations, calcic horizons, preferential flow paths, and other forms of vertical and lateral spatial variability. In each location we ponded water in a 1-m-diameter infiltration ring for 2.3 h, generating 1.93 m of infiltration in the active wash and 0.52 m in the Pleistocene soil. Combining input flux data with quantitative knowledge of water content and soil water pressure over space and time provides a basis for estimating soil hydraulic properties. TDR probes and tensiometers, placed outside but within a few m of the infiltration pond at depths to 1.5 m, provided subsurface hydraulic data. In addition to probe measurements, we conducted electrical resistance imaging (ERI) measurements during the infiltration period and for six days of redistribution. Electrodes were in two crossed lines at the surface, 24 in each, at 0.5 m spacing. On each line data were collected over an eight- minute period using a hybrid geometry, with 0 to 6 electrodes skipped between those used for the measurement. Relative change in the inverted resistivities relates to relative change in soil water content. Spatially exhaustive and minimally invasive characterization is valuable because of the extreme difficulty of quantifying soil-moisture distribution over a broad heterogeneous area using a set of individual probes. Soil moisture data directly under the ponded area are especially important, and ERI was our only means for such measurements because probe installation would

  15. Cyclic Strain Resistance, Stress Response, Fatigue Life, and Fracture Behavior of High Strength Low Alloy Steel 300 M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.; Tammana, Deepthi; Poorgangi, Behrang; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2014-05-01

    The focus of this technical manuscript is a record of the specific role of microstructure and test specimen orientation on cyclic stress response, cyclic strain resistance, and cyclic stress versus strain response, deformation and fracture behavior of alloy steel 300 M. The cyclic strain amplitude-controlled fatigue properties of this ultra-high strength alloy steel revealed a linear trend for the variation of log elastic strain amplitude with log reversals-to-failure, and log plastic strain amplitude with log reversals-to-failure for both longitudinal and transverse orientations. Test specimens of the longitudinal orientation showed only a marginal improvement over the transverse orientation at equivalent values of plastic strain amplitude. Cyclic stress response revealed a combination of initial hardening for the first few cycles followed by gradual softening for a large portion of fatigue life before culminating in rapid softening prior to catastrophic failure by fracture. Fracture characteristics of test specimens of this alloy steel were different at both the macroscopic and fine microscopic levels over the entire range of cyclic strain amplitudes examined. Both macroscopic and fine microscopic observations revealed fracture to be a combination of both brittle and ductile mechanisms. The underlying mechanisms governing stress response, deformation characteristics, fatigue life, and final fracture behavior are presented and discussed in light of the competing and mutually interactive influences of test specimen orientation, intrinsic microstructural effects, deformation characteristics of the microstructural constituents, cyclic strain amplitude, and response stress.

  16. Lateral photovoltaic effect co-observed with unipolar resistive switching behavior in Cu-doped ZnO film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jing; Li, Zheng; Yin, Guilin; Ge, Meiying; He, Dannong; Wang, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Unipolar resistive switching (RS) behavior was first observed in Cu-doped ZnO film based on ZnO/SiO2/Si structure, which was a novel phenomenon as memory films grown on Si substrate usually showed a bipolar one. The results demonstrate Cu-doped ZnO a new candidate for memory material. By introducing an external electric-field before the sweeping process, we have verified that the RS behavior was a localized effect. The non-linear I-V character, which suggested a junction of the proposed Cu-doped ZnO/SiO2/Si structure, leads to the lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) investigation. In photovoltaic mode, which is the simplest configuration, the position sensitivity of lateral photovoltage observed on Cu-doped ZnO film achieves 24.82 mV/mm and the nonlinearity is within 9.95%, indicating that Cu-doped ZnO could serve as a LPE material directly. The dual effects accommodate functions of detector and memristor in the same structure and make Cu-doped ZnO a competitive material for advanced multi-functional device.

  17. Multimodal behavioral treatment of nonrepetitive, treatment-resistant nightmares: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Barry A

    2004-12-01

    A 23-yr.-old young woman presenting with a 17-yr. history of nightmares was treated with a variety of behavioral and self-regulatory techniques. The nightmares were unusual in that they did not have an obviously common theme as in most published reports, and, therefore, did not readily lend themselves to several frequently used techniques. Although previous treatment episodes had not affected the incidence of the nightmares, a combination of relaxation procedures, a mnemonic to increase lucid dreaming, and dream rehearsal upon waking from a nightmare resulted in a sharp decrease in the frequency of nightmares in four sessions. Further improvement was reported over the next nine months as additional techniques were introduced and other problems treated, and was maintained during a 9-mo. follow-up. PMID:15739837

  18. Highly Loaded Behavior of Kinesins Increases the Robustness of Transport Under High Resisting Loads

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Woochul; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2015-01-01

    Kinesins are nano-sized biological motors which walk by repeating a mechanochemical cycle. A single kinesin molecule is able to transport its cargo about 1 μm in the absence of external loads. However, kinesins perform much longer range transport in cells by working collectively. This long range of transport by a team of kinesins is surprising because the motion of the cargo in cells can be hindered by other particles. To reveal how the kinesins are able to accomplish their tasks of transport in harsh intracellular circumstances, stochastic studies on the kinesin motion are performed by considering the binding and unbinding of kinesins to microtubules and their dependence on the force acting on kinesin molecules. The unbinding probabilities corresponding to each mechanochemical state of kinesin are modeled. The statistical characterization of the instants and locations of binding are captured by computing the probability of unbound kinesin being at given locations. It is predicted that a group of kinesins has a more efficient transport than a single kinesin from the perspective of velocity and run length. Particularly, when large loads are applied, the leading kinesin remains bound to the microtubule for long time which increases the chances of the other kinesins to bind to the microtubule. To predict effects of this behavior of the leading kinesin under large loads on the collective transport, the motion of the cargo is studied when the cargo confronts obstacles. The result suggests that the behavior of kinesins under large loads prevents the early termination of the transport which can be caused by the interference with the static or moving obstacles. PMID:25734978

  19. Interfacial behavior of resistive switching in ITO-PVK-Al WORM memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcher, T. J.; Woon, K. L.; Wong, W. S.; Chanlek, N.; Nakajima, H.; Saisopa, T.; Songsiriritthigul, P.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the mechanism of resistive switching in a memory device is fundamental in order to improve device performance. The mechanism of current switching in a basic organic write-once read-many (WORM) memory device is investigated by determining the energy level alignments of indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(9-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and aluminum (Al) using x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, current-voltage characterization and Auger depth profiling. The current switching mechanism was determined to be controlled by the interface between the ITO and the PVK. The electric field applied across the device causes the ITO from the uneven surface of the anode to form metallic filaments through the PVK, causing a shorting effect within the device leading to increased conduction. This was found to be independent of the PVK thickness, although the switch-on voltage was non-linearly dependent on the thickness. The formation of these filaments also caused the destruction of the interfacial dipole at the PVK-Al interface.

  20. Cranberry Resistance to Dodder Parasitism: Induced Chemical Defenses and Behavior of a Parasitic Plant.

    PubMed

    Tjiurutue, Muvari Connie; Sandler, Hilary A; Kersch-Becker, Monica F; Theis, Nina; Adler, Lynn A

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic plants are common in many ecosystems, where they can structure community interactions and cause major economic damage. For example, parasitic dodder (Cuscuta spp.) can cause up to 80-100 % yield loss in heavily infested cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) patches. Despite their ecological and economic importance, remarkably little is known about how parasitic plants affect, or are affected by, host chemistry. To examine chemically-mediated interactions between dodder and its cranberry host, we conducted a greenhouse experiment asking whether: (1) dodder performance varies with cranberry cultivar; (2) cultivars differ in levels of phytohormones, volatiles, or phenolics, and whether such variation correlates with dodder parasitism; (3) dodder parasitism induced changes in phytohormones, volatiles, or phenolics, and whether the level of inducible response varied among cultivars. We used five cranberry cultivars to assess host attractiveness to dodder and dodder performance. Dodder performance did not differ across cultivars, but there were marginally significant differences in host attractiveness to dodder, with fewer dodder attaching to Early Black than to any other cultivar. Dodder parasitism induced higher levels of salicylic acid (SA) across cultivars. Cultivars differed in overall levels of flavonols and volatile profiles, but not phenolic acids or proanthocyanidins, and dodder attachment induced changes in several flavonols and volatiles. While cultivars differed slightly in resistance to dodder attachment, we did not find evidence of chemical defenses that mediate these interactions. However, induction of several defenses indicates that parasitism alters traits that could influence subsequent interactions with other species, thus shaping community dynamics. PMID:26905738

  1. Behavior of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in eco-agricultural system: A case study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weixiao; Li, Jianan; Wu, Ying; Xu, Like; Su, Chao; Qian, Yanyun; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Chen, Hong

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to determine abundance and persistence of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in eco-agricultural system (EAS), which starts from swine feces to anaerobic digestion products, then application of anaerobic digestion solid residue (ADSR) and anaerobic digestion liquid residue (ADLR) to the soil to grow ryegrass, one of swine feed. Oxytetracycline had the highest concentration in manure reaching up to 138.7 mg/kg. Most of antibiotics could be effectively eliminated by anaerobic digestion and removal rates ranged from 11% to 86%. ARGs abundance fluctuated within EAS. TetQ had the highest relative abundance and the relative abundance of tetG had the least variation within the system, which indicates that tetG is persistent in the agricultural environment and requires more attention. Compared to the relative abundance in manure, tetC and tetM increased in biogas residue while three ribosomal protection proteins genes (tetO, tetQ, tetW) decreased (p<0.05), with other genes showing no significant change after anaerobic fermentation (p>0.05). Most ARGs in downstream components (soils and fishpond) of EAS showed significantly higher relative abundance than the control agricultural system (p<0.05), except for tetG and sulI. PMID:26546700

  2. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  3. Low-Cost Avoidance Behaviors are Resistant to Fear Extinction in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vervliet, Bram; Indekeu, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of fear and avoidance are core symptoms across the anxiety disorders. It has long been known that fear serves to motivate avoidance. Consequently, fear extinction has been the primary focus in pre-clinical anxiety research for decades, under the implicit assumption that removing the motivator of avoidance (fear) would automatically mitigate the avoidance behaviors as well. Although this assumption has intuitive appeal, it has received little scientific scrutiny. The scarce evidence from animal studies is mixed, while the assumption remains untested in humans. The current study applied an avoidance conditioning protocol in humans to investigate the effects of fear extinction on the persistence of low-cost avoidance. Online danger-safety ratings and skin conductance responses documented the dynamics of conditioned fear across avoidance and extinction phases. Anxiety- and avoidance-related questionnaires explored individual differences in rates of avoidance. Participants first learned to click a button during a predictive danger signal, in order to cancel an upcoming aversive electrical shock (avoidance conditioning). Next, fear extinction was induced by presenting the signal in the absence of shocks while button-clicks were prevented (by removing the button in Experiment 1, or by instructing not to click the button in Experiment 2). Most importantly, post-extinction availability of the button caused a significant return of avoidant button-clicks. In addition, trait-anxiety levels correlated positively with rates of avoidance during a predictive safety signal, and with the rate of pre- to post-extinction decrease during this signal. Fear measures gradually decreased during avoidance conditioning, as participants learned that button-clicks effectively canceled the shock. Preventing button-clicks elicited a sharp increase in fear, which subsequently extinguished. Fear remained low during avoidance testing, but danger-safety ratings increased again when

  4. Low-Cost Avoidance Behaviors are Resistant to Fear Extinction in Humans.

    PubMed

    Vervliet, Bram; Indekeu, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of fear and avoidance are core symptoms across the anxiety disorders. It has long been known that fear serves to motivate avoidance. Consequently, fear extinction has been the primary focus in pre-clinical anxiety research for decades, under the implicit assumption that removing the motivator of avoidance (fear) would automatically mitigate the avoidance behaviors as well. Although this assumption has intuitive appeal, it has received little scientific scrutiny. The scarce evidence from animal studies is mixed, while the assumption remains untested in humans. The current study applied an avoidance conditioning protocol in humans to investigate the effects of fear extinction on the persistence of low-cost avoidance. Online danger-safety ratings and skin conductance responses documented the dynamics of conditioned fear across avoidance and extinction phases. Anxiety- and avoidance-related questionnaires explored individual differences in rates of avoidance. Participants first learned to click a button during a predictive danger signal, in order to cancel an upcoming aversive electrical shock (avoidance conditioning). Next, fear extinction was induced by presenting the signal in the absence of shocks while button-clicks were prevented (by removing the button in Experiment 1, or by instructing not to click the button in Experiment 2). Most importantly, post-extinction availability of the button caused a significant return of avoidant button-clicks. In addition, trait-anxiety levels correlated positively with rates of avoidance during a predictive safety signal, and with the rate of pre- to post-extinction decrease during this signal. Fear measures gradually decreased during avoidance conditioning, as participants learned that button-clicks effectively canceled the shock. Preventing button-clicks elicited a sharp increase in fear, which subsequently extinguished. Fear remained low during avoidance testing, but danger-safety ratings increased again when

  5. [Cognitive-behavioral therapy for auditory hallucinations resistant to neuroleptic treatment].

    PubMed

    Favrod, Jérôme; Pomini, Valentino; Grasset, François

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study is to test the feasibility and the efficacy of a cognitive and behavior therapy manual for auditory hallucinations with persons suffering from schizophrenia in a French-speaking environment and under natural clinical conditions. Eight patients met ICD-10 criteria for paranoid schizophrenia, 2 for hebephrenic schizophrenia and 1 for schizoaffective disorder. All were hearing voices daily. Patients followed the intervention for 3 to 6 months according to their individual rhythms. Participants filled up questionnaires at pre-test, post-test and three months follow-up. The instruments were the Belief About Voice Questionnaire--Revised and two seven points scales about frequency of hallucinations and attribution of the source of the voices. Results show a decrease of voices' frequency and improvement in attributing the voices rather to an internal than to an external source. Malevolent or benevolent beliefs about voices are significantly decreased at follow-up as well as efforts at coping with hallucinations. Results should be interpreted with caution because of the small number of subjects. The sample may not be representative of patients with persistent symptoms since there is an over representation of patients with benevolent voices and an under representation of patients with substance misuse. PMID:15209053

  6. A light-modified ferroelectric resistive switching behavior in Ag/BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO device at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W.X.; Sun, B.; Liu, Y.H.; Wei, L.J.; Li, H.W.; Chen, P.

    2014-12-15

    BaMoO{sub 4} powder was prepared by a facile hydrothermal synthesis. And the BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO device was fabricated by a spin-coated method, in which the thickness of BaMoO{sub 4} layer is about 20 µm. The bipolar resistive switching effect has been observed in Ag/BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO device. Moreover, the resistive switching effect of the device is greatly improved by white light irradiation. The resistive switching behavior is explained by the polarization reversal that changes the charge distribution and modulates the Schottky barriers. - Graphical abstract: We fabricate a resistive switching device based on Ag/BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO, the device shows superior white-light controlled bipolar resistive switching memristive characteristics. - Highlights: • The BaMoO{sub 4} nanosquares powder was prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis. • The resistive switching of the Ag/BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO device was observed for the first time. • It is shown that the resistive switching is greatly improved under the white light irradiation. • The mechanism of resistive switching is attributed to the ferroelectric polarization reversal.

  7. Composition-ratio influence on resistive switching behavior of solution-processed InGaZnO-based thin-film.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yeong-Hyeon; Hwang, Inchan; Cho, Won-Ju

    2014-11-01

    The influence of composition ratio on the bipolar resistive switching behavior of resistive switching memory devices based on amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) using the spin-coating process was investigated. To study the stoichiometric effects of the a-IGZO films on device characteristics, four devices with In/Ga/Zn stoichiometries of 1:1:1, 3:1:1, 1:3:1, and 1:1:3 were fabricated and characterized. The 3:1:1 film showed an ohmic behavior and the 1:1:3 film showed a rectifying switching behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the a-IGZO films with stoichiometries of 1:1:1 and 1:3:1, however, showed a bipolar resistive memory switching behavior. We found that the three-fold increase in the gallium content ratio reduces the reset voltage from -0.9 to - 0.4 V and enhances the current ratio of high to low resistive states from 0.7 x 10(1) to 3 x 10(1). Our results show that the increase in the Ga composition ratio in the a-IGZO-based ReRAM cells effectively improves the device performance and reliability by increasing the initial defect density in the a-IGZO films. PMID:25958499

  8. Differences in Stylet Penetration Behaviors of Glassy-winged Sharpshooters on Xylella-Resistant Vitis candicans vs. Susceptible Vitis vinifera cv. ‘Chardonnay’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical penetration graph (EPG) monitoring was used to compare stylet penetration behaviors of glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), a vector of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), on Xf-resistant Vitis candicans grape vs. susceptible V. vinifera cv. ‘Chardonnay.’ Frequency of occurrence of X waves (represent...

  9. Aerobic physical activity and resistance training: an application of the theory of planned behavior among adults with type 2 diabetes in a random, national sample of Canadians

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Courneya, Kerry S; Trinh, Linda; Karunamuni, Nandini; Sigal, Ronald J

    2008-01-01

    Background Aerobic physical activity (PA) and resistance training are paramount in the treatment and management of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but few studies have examined the determinants of both types of exercise in the same sample. Objective The primary purpose was to investigate the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in explaining aerobic PA and resistance training in a population sample of T2D adults. Methods A total of 244 individuals were recruited through a random national sample which was created by generating a random list of household phone numbers. The list was proportionate to the actual number of household telephone numbers for each Canadian province (with the exception of Quebec). These individuals completed self-report TPB constructs of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and intention, and a 3-month follow-up that assessed aerobic PA and resistance training. Results TPB explained 10% and 8% of the variance respectively for aerobic PA and resistance training; and accounted for 39% and 45% of the variance respectively for aerobic PA and resistance training intentions. Conclusion These results may guide the development of appropriate PA interventions for aerobic PA and resistance training based on the TPB. PMID:19055725

  10. Nanocrystalline Si pathway induced unipolar resistive switching behavior from annealed Si-rich SiN{sub x}/SiN{sub y} multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaofan; Ma, Zhongyuan Yang, Huafeng; Yu, Jie; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Wenping; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Chen, Kunji; Huang, Xinfan; Feng, Duan

    2014-09-28

    Adding a resistive switching functionality to a silicon microelectronic chip is a new challenge in materials research. Here, we demonstrate that unipolar and electrode-independent resistive switching effects can be realized in the annealed Si-rich SiN{sub x}/SiN{sub y} multilayers with high on/off ratio of 10{sup 9}. High resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that for the high resistance state broken pathways composed of discrete nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) exist in the Si nitride multilayers. While for the low resistance state the discrete nc-Si regions is connected, forming continuous nc-Si pathways. Based on the analysis of the temperature dependent I-V characteristics and HRTEM photos, we found that the break-and-bridge evolution of nc-Si pathway is the origin of resistive switching memory behavior. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism of the resistive switching behavior in nc-Si films, opening a way for it to be utilized as a material in Si-based memories.

  11. The oxidation behavior of SiC sintered with Al-B-C and improved oxidation resistance via heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sixta, M

    1997-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of high strength and high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C (ABC-SiC), was examined. Kinetic data were acquired and the parabolic rate constant for oxidation was determined and compared with literature data on various SiC materials. The role of secondary phases on the oxide morphology was explored. ABC-SiC was compared to commercially available SiC, Hexoloy, and SiC sintered with 10% yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). Two-step sintering (pre-coarsening) was employed with holds for 48 hours at 600--1,600 C, prior to the typical hot-pressing conditions of 1,900 C for 1 hour, to change the chemistry and reduce the number of bubbles in the silica scale. The effects on the oxide thickness and integrity was examined as a function of the precoarsening heat treatment temperature. Additionally, the hot-pressed ABC-SiC was subjected to heat treatments (anneals) at 1,800 C for 1 hour in nitrogen, Ar, and vacuum environments, and the effects on subsequent oxidation were evaluated. The Ar and vacuum heat treatments dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of ABC-SiC. Finally, reoxidation experiments were performed to try to alter the surface chemistry of the SiC to improve the oxidation resistance. The four-point bend strengths and two-parameter Weibull plots of the most successful heat treatments were compared with the standard ABC-SiC to ensure that significant degradation did not result from altering the processing of the material.

  12. Correlation of proteome-wide changes with social immunity behaviors provides insight into resistance to the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, in the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease is a major factor driving the evolution of many organisms. In honey bees, selection for social behavioral responses is the primary adaptive process facilitating disease resistance. One such process, hygienic behavior, enables bees to resist multiple diseases, including the damaging parasitic mite Varroa destructor. The genetic elements and biochemical factors that drive the expression of these adaptations are currently unknown. Proteomics provides a tool to identify proteins that control behavioral processes, and these proteins can be used as biomarkers to aid identification of disease tolerant colonies. Results We sampled a large cohort of commercial queen lineages, recording overall mite infestation, hygiene, and the specific hygienic response to V. destructor. We performed proteome-wide correlation analyses in larval integument and adult antennae, identifying several proteins highly predictive of behavior and reduced hive infestation. In the larva, response to wounding was identified as a key adaptive process leading to reduced infestation, and chitin biosynthesis and immune responses appear to represent important disease resistant adaptations. The speed of hygienic behavior may be underpinned by changes in the antenna proteome, and chemosensory and neurological processes could also provide specificity for detection of V. destructor in antennae. Conclusions Our results provide, for the first time, some insight into how complex behavioural adaptations manifest in the proteome of honey bees. The most important biochemical correlations provide clues as to the underlying molecular mechanisms of social and innate immunity of honey bees. Such changes are indicative of potential divergence in processes controlling the hive-worker maturation. PMID:23021491

  13. Role of ITO electrode in the resistive switching behavior of TiN/HfO2/ITO memory devices at different annealing temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Cong; Deng, Teng-fei; Wu, Jiaji; Zhan, Chao; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Jun

    2015-05-01

    TiN/HfO2/ITO memory devices were fabricated and annealed at 200, 300, and 400 °C. At room temperature (RT), 200 °C, and 300 °C, the devices show the self-compliance phenomenon and a low SET voltage of 0.2 V, while at 400 °C the SET voltage increases to 1.1 V and the low resistance state (LRS) current increases to 8 mA. We deduced that the impact of annealing temperature on the resistive switching behavior is mainly attributed to the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. Some Sn4+ ions in the ITO electrode drift towards the HfO2 layer owing to the electrical force, then an interfacial layer is formed and acts as an internal resistor. At 400 °C, the remarkable increase of LRS current is attributed to the decreases in both the ITO electrode resistance and the interface resistance.

  14. Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

  15. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  16. Structural Phase Transition Effect on Resistive Switching Behavior of MoS2 -Polyvinylpyrrolidone Nanocomposites Films for Flexible Memory Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Cunxu; Xu, Benhua; Qi, Lin; Jiang, Changjun; Gao, Meizhen; Xue, Desheng

    2016-04-01

    The 2H phase and 1T phase coexisting in the same molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) nanosheets can influence the electronic properties of the materials. The 1T phase of MoS2 is introduced into the 2H-MoS2 nanosheets by two-step hydrothermal synthetic methods. Two types of nonvolatile memory effects, namely write-once read-many times memory and rewritable memory effect, are observed in the flexible memory devices with the configuration of Al/1T@2H-MoS2 -polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/indium tin oxide (ITO)/polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and Al/2H-MoS2 -PVP/ITO/PET, respectively. It is observed that structural phase transition in MoS2 nanosheets plays an important role on the resistive switching behaviors of the MoS2 -based device. It is hoped that our results can offer a general route for the preparation of various promising nanocomposites based on 2D nanosheets of layered transition metal dichalcogenides for fabricating the high performance and flexible nonvolatile memory devices through regulating the phase structure in the 2D nanosheets. PMID:26938882

  17. Influence of Oxidation Behavior of Feedstock on Microstructure and Ablation Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconium Carbide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cui; Ge, Xuelian; Niu, Yaran; Li, Hong; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Sun, Jinliang

    2015-10-01

    Plasma spray is one of the suitable technologies to deposit carbide coatings with high melting point, such as ZrC. However, in the spray processes performed under atmosphere, oxidation of the carbide powder is inevitable. To investigate the influence of the oxidation behavior of feedstock on microstructure and ablation resistance of the deposited coating, ZrC coatings were prepared by atmospheric and vacuum plasma spray (APS and VPS) technologies, respectively. SiC-coated graphite was applied as the substrate. The obtained results showed that the oxidation of ZrC powder in APS process resulted in the formation of ZrO and Zr2O phases. Pores and cracks were more likely to be formed in the as-sprayed APS-ZrC coating. The VPS-ZrC coating without oxides possessed denser microstructure, higher thermal diffusivity, and lower coefficients of thermal expansion as compared with the APS-ZrC coating. A dense ZrO2 layer would be formed on the surface of the VPS-ZrC-coated sample during the ablation process and the substrate can be protected sufficiently after being ablated in high temperature plasma jet. However, the ZrO2 layer, formed by oxidation of the APS-ZrC coating having loose structure, was easy to be washed away by the shearing action of the plasma jet.

  18. Prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli on coriander.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Segovia-Cruz, Jesús A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on coriander was determined. One hundred coriander samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli were determined using the most probable number procedure. Diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to sixteen antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEPs strains by standard test. The behavior of multidrug-resistant DEPs isolated from coriander was determined on coriander leaves and chopped coriander at 25°± 2 °C and 3°± 2 °C. Generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 43 and 7% of samples. Nine DEPs strains were isolated from positive coriander samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, 4%) enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2%) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 1%). All isolated DEPs strains exhibited multi-resistance to antibiotics. On inoculated coriander leaves stored at 25°± 2 °C or 3°± 2 °C, no growth was observed for multidrug-resistant DEPs strains. However, multidrug-resistant DEPs strains grew in chopped coriander: after 24 h at 25° ± 2 °C, DEPs strains had grown to approximately 3 log CFU/g. However, at 3°± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence and behavior of multidrug-resistant STEC, ETEC and EPEC on coriander and chopped coriander. PMID:27375249

  19. Using positive images to manage resistance-to-care and combative behaviors in nursing home residents with dementia: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Ying; Waszynski, Christine; Kessler, Jeanne; Chiang, Yu-Ching; Clarkson, P John

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study attempted to reduce resistance-to-care (RTC) and combative behaviors in nursing home residents with dementia by eliciting their positive affect. Four female residents with dementia were recruited from a nursing facility. Each resident was involved in one intervention trial and one control trial. The response of the residents was assessed by the Agitated Behavior Scale and the Observational Measurement of Engagement Tool. The distress level of the certified nursing assistants (CNAs) delivering the care was reported through the Distress Thermometer. Results showed that the residents displayed fewer behavioral symptoms in the intervention trial than in the control trial. The CNAs reported less distress in the intervention trial than in the control trial. These preliminary findings suggest that it might be feasible to use positive images to reduce residents' behavioral symptoms and decrease the distress of CNAs. PMID:27040950

  20. Composition of thin Ta2O5 films deposited by different methods and the effect of humidity on their resistive switching behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannequin, Cedric; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-06-01

    The resistive switching behavior of Cu/Ta2O5/Pt atomic switches, in which the Ta2O5 film was deposited by electron-beam (EB) evaporation and radio-frequency sputtering (SP), was investigated under different relative humidity (RH) levels. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that both films possess the oxygen-rich composition and higher water absorption capability of EB films. The Cu/Ta2O5-SP/Pt cell showed a stable, nonvolatile switching behavior in the observed RH range, whereas the Cu/Ta2O5-EB/Pt cell exhibited a similar behavior up to 50% RH, but altered from nonvolatile to volatile switching at higher RH levels. The observed volatile switching behavior of the Cu/Ta2O5-EB/Pt cell can be explained by increased ion migration, assisted by absorbed water and/or proton conduction in hydrated environments. The results indicate that the water uptake ability of the matrix film plays a crucial role in determining the resistive switching behavior of oxide-based atomic switches.

  1. Effects of partial interlaminar bonding on impact resistance and loaded-hole behavior of graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illg, W.

    1986-01-01

    A partial-bonding interlaminar toughening concept was evaluated for resistance to impact and for behavior of a loaded hole. Perforated Mylar sheets were interleaved between all 24 plies of a graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic lay-up. Specimens were impacted by aluminum spheres while under tensile or compressive loads. Impact-failure thresholds and residual strengths were obtained. Loaded-hole specimens were tested in three configurations that were critical in bearing, shear, or tension. Partial bonding reduced the tensile and compressive strengths of undamaged specimens by about one-third. For impact, partial bonding did not change the threshold for impact failure under tensile preload. However, under compressive preload, partial bonding caused serious degradation of impact resistance. Partial bonding reduced the maximum load-carrying capacity of all three types of loaded-hole specimens. Overall, partial bonding degraded both impact resistance and bearing strength of holes.

  2. Why Do Children Resist or Obey Their Foster Parents? The Inner Logic of Children's Behavior during Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elly; Doornenbal, Jeannette; Okma, Krista

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses a study of children's perspectives on disciplinary conflicts with their foster parents. Most children accept parental authority, but they also defend their personal autonomy and loyalties to peers. In this study, only birthchildren told real-life stories about fierce resistance to get their own way. Fierce resistance among…

  3. Light-modulated resistive switching memory behavior in ZnO/BaTiO3/ZnO multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lujun; Sun, Bai; Zhao, Wenxi; Li, Hongwei; Jia, Xiangjiang; Wu, Jianhong; Chen, Peng

    2016-05-01

    Nanoscale structure ZnO/BaTiO3/ZnO multilayer was fabricated on silicon (Si) substrate by RF magnetron sputtering system. The light-modulated resistive switching characteristics in ZnO/BaTiO3/ZnO devices were observed. The light-modulated resistive switching shows good repeatability at room temperature.

  4. ERT of seasonal changes in steep permafrost rocks with laboratory-calibrated temperature-resistivity behavior, an incorporated resistance error model, and temperature validation (Zugspitze, German/Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, M.; Verleysdonk, S.; Flores-Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2008-12-01

    Rockwall instability at the Zugspitze North Face is evident due to the 3.5(±0.5)*108 m3 rockslide that occurred in 3700 B.P from the permafrost-affected Zugspitze (2962 m a.s.l.) North Face and was interpreted as a delayed permafrost response to the Holocene Climatic Optimum (Gude and Barsch, 2005; Jerz and Poschinger, 1995). Thawing of rock permafrost is a key promoting and triggering factor for rock instability, rock creep, and rockfalls. Rock instability in permafrost-affected bedrock is governed by shear stress, hydrostatic pressures, and friction along one or several planes of weaknesses in the rock mass. Friction along planes of weaknesses (without fine-grained cleft fillings) is susceptible to subzero temperature changes due to alterations in intact rock mass strength and ice-mechanical properties along planes of weaknesses. We argue that rock permafrost geophysical surveys have the potential to provide spatially resolved information on subzero temperatures that could serve as highly-important input for stability models. Here we present the first monthly ERT (electrical resistance tomography) results in steep permafrost rocks over the whole summer thaw period. Temperature-resistivity behavior of limestone from the study site was measured in the laboratory during repeated cycles of freezing at 0.2-0.4°C increments and exhibited a two-fold linear relationship divided by a freezing point at about -0.5°C. Field measurements were taken from February to October 2007 in a gallery close to the Zugspitze North Face at 2800 m a.s.l. and display thawing and refreezing behavior up to 30 m depth from the north face. We applied high-resolution, time-lapse 2D ERT with 140 electrodes and ca. 2000 resistance measurements per time frame. Local topographic settings and electrode positions were accommodated in an 8600 finite-element mesh with three different resolutions and varying boundary conditions according to the field setup. Resistivity images were computed using a

  5. Profiles of resistance training behavior and sedentary time among older adults: Associations with health-related quality of life and psychosocial health☆

    PubMed Central

    Bampton, Erin A.; Johnson, Steven T.; Vallance, Jeff K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of the associations of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and psychosocial factors (e.g., satisfaction with life, level of self-esteem, anxiety, depression) with resistance training and sedentary behavior profiles. Methods For this cross-sectional study, 358 older adults (≥ 55 years of age) across Alberta, Canada, completed self-reported measures of resistance training behavior, sedentary time, HRQoL, and psychosocial health (e.g., depression, anxiety, self-esteem, satisfaction with life). Participants were placed into one of four profiles with respect to their sedentary and resistance training behaviors. Data were collected in Alberta, Canada between August 2013 and January 2014. Results Pairwise comparisons indicated that those in the low SED/low RT group had a higher mental health composite (MHC) score compared to those in the high SED/low RT group (Mdiff = 3.9, p = 0.008). Compared to those in the high SED/low RT group, those in the low SED/high RT groups had significantly higher MHC scores (Mdiff = 4.8, p < 0.001). Those in the low SED/high RT group reported significantly higher physical health composite scores (PHC) (Mdiff = 3.7, p = 0.019), compared to the high SED/low RT group. Lower depression symptom scores were observed in the low SED/high RT groups compared to the high SED/low RT group, (Mdiff = − 0.60, p < 0.001). Conclusion Resistance training, regardless of sedentary time, was significantly associated with HRQoL and psychosocial health. PMID:26844148

  6. Reversible photoswitching behavior in bulk resistance and in color of polycrystalline AgI at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Khaton, Rahima; Kashiwagi, Shin-ichiro; Iimori, Toshifumi; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-12-08

    A photoinduced reversible change in bulk resistance of polycrystalline AgI is observed at room temperature. The original yellow color of the sample changes to dark brown with UV (308 nm) photoirradiation, associated with the small decrease in the bulk resistance. A reversible switching of color between dark brown and yellow is observed by alternative UV-visible photoirradiation, associated with a switching between high and low resistance states. The observed reversible photoswitching is interpreted in terms of the photoinduced reversible change in the {beta}-{gamma}-polytype stacking structure of the polycrystalline AgI.

  7. Non-linear resistance behavior in the early stages and after electromigration in Al-Si lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorzoni, A.; De Munari, I.; Stulens, H.; D'Haeger, V.

    1996-07-01

    A common result obtained in electromigration experiments carried out on Al-Si lines using different high resolution resistometric methods, is a monotonous non-linear resistance increase at the very beginning of the high current electromigration test, and a decrease after the high stressing current is switched off. These effects have often been attributed to the attainment of a steady state of vacancy concentration during and after electromigration. This paper shows how even small abrupt temperature steps, always present at the beginning and after electromigration tests, are the triggering events for different, often reversible, physical phenomena contributing to non-linear resistance changes. Precipitation-dissolution of alloyed elements appears to be the most significant one. Abrupt temperature changes also induce a change of the hydrostatic stress of passivated lines. The relaxation of the hydrostatic stress could be coupled with a void volume change, and the total resistance is a function of both the hydrostatic stress (through resistivity) and of void volume. However, we demonstrate that in our experiments the effect of hydrostatic stress relaxation on resistance variations is negligible with respect to the action of precipitation-dissolution. These non-linear, thermally induced effects, however, do not exclude possible simultaneous resistance changes due to the accumulation/relaxation of the electromigration damage. Experimental results are collected by means of different, complementary techniques.

  8. Do Behavioral Risk Factors for Prediabetes and Insulin Resistance Differ across the Socioeconomic Gradient? Results from a Community-Based Epidemiologic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Yang, May H.; Hall, Sue A.; Piccolo, Rebecca S.; Maserejian, Nancy N.; McKinlay, John B.

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether behavioral risk factors associated with diabetes (diet, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, and sleep duration) are also related to both prediabetes and insulin resistance (IR), we used data from Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey (2010–2012, n = 3155). Logistic and linear regression models were used to test the association of lifestyle factors with prediabetes status, insulin resistance, and prediabetes or insulin resistance. All regression models were stratified by education and income levels (to examine whether risk factors had differential effects across socioeconomic factors) and adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, and smoking status. We found that large waist circumference was consistently associated with higher levels of insulin resistance (IR) and increased odds of prediabetes. While the association between large waist circumference and IR was consistent across all levels of SES (P < 0.001), the association between large waist circumference and prediabetes was only statistically significant in the highest socioeconomic strata with odds ratios of 1.68 (95% CI 1.07–2.62) and 1.88 (95% CI 1.22–2.92) for postgraduate degree and income strata, respectively. There was no association between diet, physical activity, sleep duration, and the presence of multiple risk factors and prediabetes or IR within SES strata. PMID:26089894

  9. Distinct behavioral phenotypes in novel "fast" kindling-susceptible and "slow" kindling-resistant rat strains selected by stimulation of the hippocampal perforant path.

    PubMed

    Langberg, Tomer; Dashek, Ryan; Mulvey, Bernard; Miller, Kimberly A; Osting, Susan; Stafstrom, Carl E; Sutula, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Kindling is a phenomenon of activity-dependent neural circuit plasticity induced by repeated seizures that results in progressive permanent increases in susceptibility to epilepsy. As the permanent structural and functional modifications induced by kindling include a diverse range of molecular, cellular, and functional alterations in neural circuits, it is of interest to determine if genetic background associated with seizure-induced plasticity might also influence plasticity in neural circuitry underlying other behaviors. Outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were selected and bred for ~15 generations for "fast' or "slow" rates of kindling development in response to stimulation of the perforant path input to the hippocampus. After 7-8 generations of selection and breeding, consistent phenotypes of "fast" and "slow" kindling rates were observed. By the 15th generation "fast" kindling rats referred to as Perforant Path Kindling Susceptible (PPKS) rats demonstrated a kindling rate of 10.7 ± 1.1 afterdischarges (ADs) to the milestone of the first secondary generalized (Class V) seizure, which differed significantly from "slow" kindling Perforant Path Kindling Resistant (PPKR) rats requiring 25.5 ± 2.0 ADs, and outbred SD rats requiring 16.8 ± 2.5 ADs (p<0.001, ANOVA). Seizure-naïve adult PPKS and PPKR rats from offspring of this generation and age-matched adult outbred SD rats were compared in validated behavioral measures including the open field test as a measure of exploratory activity, the Morris water maze as a measure of hippocampal spatial memory, and fear conditioning as a behavioral paradigm of associative fear learning. The PPKS ("fast" kindling) strain with increased susceptibility to seizure-induced plasticity demonstrated statistically significant increases in motor exploratory activity in the open field test and reduced spatial learning the Morris water maze, but demonstrated normal fear conditioned learning comparable to outbred SD rats and the "slow

  10. Metallic and semiconducting resistivity behavior of La{sub 1−x}K{sub x}MnO{sub 3} manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Dinesh Khan, E. Varshney, Dinesh

    2014-04-24

    The electrical conduction in both metallic and semiconducting phase of La{sub 1−x}K{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.15) is investigated. The phonon frequencies are estimated from the ab initio theory with calibrated Hamiltonian for the atomic interaction between a pair such as Mn–O and La/K–O including van der Walls interaction. The classical electron–phonon model of resistivity, i.e., the Bloch–Gruneisen (BG) model consistently retraces the reported metallic resistivity behavior. The paramagnetic semiconducting nature is discussed with thermal activation, small polaron conduction and Mott’s variable range hopping model. The comparison of experimental data appears favorable with the present analysis.

  11. Systematic deviation from T-linear behavior in the in-plane resistivity of YBa2Cu3O7-y: Evidence for dominant spin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Takenaka, K.; Uchida, S.

    1993-06-01

    The in-plane resistivity ρab(T) and Hall coefficient RH(T) have been measured for YBa2Cu3O7-y single crystals with various oxygen concentrations. We find that for oxygen-depleted samples ρab(T) deviates from T-linear behavior and that RH(T) deviates from 1/T below a temperature To well above Tc. The deviation coincides with the development of a gap in the spin excitations seen in recent neutron and NMR studies. This is evidence that the charge transport in the CuO2 plane is determined by spin scattering.

  12. Effects of siRNA-mediated silencing of myeloid cell leukelia-1 on the biological behaviors and drug resistance of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-Pei; Liu, Jin-Lu; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Wang, Zhen; Mao, Yuan-Tian; Chen, Ye-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was to investigate the effects of siRNA mediated silencing of myeloid cell leukelia-1 (Mcl-1) on the biological behaviors and drug resistance of human drug-resistant gastric cancer (GC) cell lines, and to explore the potential mechanisms. Methods: siRNA targeting Mcl-1 mRNA were designed and independently transfected into SGC-7901/VCR and SGC-7901/DDP. Cell proliferation and drug sensitivity were examined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. Cell Invasion and migration abilities were detected by transwell chamber assays. The expressions of drug-resistance-related genes and apoptosis-related proteins were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot assay, respectively. Results: siRNA effectively inhibited the Mcl-1 expression, lowered the proliferation rate (P<0.05), raised the apoptosis rate (P<0.05), and arrested cells in S-phase (P<0.05). After inhibiting Mcl-1, the cell migration and invasion decreased (P<0.05), the resistance to VCR, DDP and 5-Fu was reversed to different extents (P<0.05), TS mRNA expression increased significantly (P<0.05), MDR1 remained unchanged (P>0.05), but DPD and TOP2A decreased significantly (P<0.05). Following Mcl-1 silencing, Bcl-2 was over-expressed in VCR-siRNA group, but the expressions of Fas and survivin reduced markedly (P<0.05); Bcl-2 and Fas expressions decreased significantly in DDP-siRNA group (P<0.05), but survivin expression remained unchanged. Conclusion: Mcl-1 is implicated in the proliferation, invasion, apoptosis and drug resistance of GC cells, and may be a promising target for the therapy of GC. PMID:26807186

  13. Feeding and Dispersal Behavior of the Cotton Leafworm, Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on Bt and Non-Bt Cotton: Implications for Evolution and Resistance Management

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Francisco S.; Pachú, Jéssica K. S.; Lira, Aline C. S.; Malaquias, José B.; Zanuncio, José C.; Fernandes, Francisco S.

    2014-01-01

    The host acceptance of neonate Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae to Bt cotton plants exerts a strong influence on the potential risk that this pest will develop resistance to Bt cotton. This will also determine the efficiency of management strategies to prevent its resistance such as the “refuge-in-the-bag” strategy. In this study, we assessed the acceptance of neonate A. argillacea larvae to Bt and non-Bt cotton plants at different temperatures during the first 24 h after hatching. Two cotton cultivars were used in the study, one a Bt DP 404 BG (Bollgard) cultivar, and the other, an untransformed isoline, DP 4049 cultivar. There was a greater acceptance by live neonate A. argillacea larvae for the non-Bt cotton plants compared with the Bt cotton plants, especially in the time interval between 18 and 24 h. The percentages of neonate A. argillacea larvae found on Bt or non-Bt plants were lower when exposed to temperatures of 31 and 34°C. The low acceptance of A. argillacea larvae for Bt cotton plants at high temperatures stimulated the dispersion of A. argillacea larvae. Our results support the hypothesis that the dispersion and/or feeding behavior of neonate A. argillacea larvae is different between Bt and non-Bt cotton. The presence of the Cry1Ac toxin in Bt cotton plants, and its probable detection by the A. argillacea larvae tasting or eating it, increases the probability of dispersion from the plant where the larvae began. These findings may help to understand how the A. argillacea larvae detect the Cry1Ac toxin in Bt cotton and how the toxin affects the dispersion behavior of the larvae over time. Therefore, our results are extremely important for the management of resistance in populations of A. argillacea on Bt cotton. PMID:25369211

  14. Feeding and dispersal behavior of the cotton leafworm, Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on Bt and non-Bt cotton: implications for evolution and resistance management.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Francisco S; Pachú, Jéssica K S; Lira, Aline C S; Malaquias, José B; Zanuncio, José C; Fernandes, Francisco S

    2014-01-01

    The host acceptance of neonate Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae to Bt cotton plants exerts a strong influence on the potential risk that this pest will develop resistance to Bt cotton. This will also determine the efficiency of management strategies to prevent its resistance such as the "refuge-in-the-bag" strategy. In this study, we assessed the acceptance of neonate A. argillacea larvae to Bt and non-Bt cotton plants at different temperatures during the first 24 h after hatching. Two cotton cultivars were used in the study, one a Bt DP 404 BG (Bollgard) cultivar, and the other, an untransformed isoline, DP 4049 cultivar. There was a greater acceptance by live neonate A. argillacea larvae for the non-Bt cotton plants compared with the Bt cotton plants, especially in the time interval between 18 and 24 h. The percentages of neonate A. argillacea larvae found on Bt or non-Bt plants were lower when exposed to temperatures of 31 and 34 °C. The low acceptance of A. argillacea larvae for Bt cotton plants at high temperatures stimulated the dispersion of A. argillacea larvae. Our results support the hypothesis that the dispersion and/or feeding behavior of neonate A. argillacea larvae is different between Bt and non-Bt cotton. The presence of the Cry1Ac toxin in Bt cotton plants, and its probable detection by the A. argillacea larvae tasting or eating it, increases the probability of dispersion from the plant where the larvae began. These findings may help to understand how the A. argillacea larvae detect the Cry1Ac toxin in Bt cotton and how the toxin affects the dispersion behavior of the larvae over time. Therefore, our results are extremely important for the management of resistance in populations of A. argillacea on Bt cotton. PMID:25369211

  15. Assessment of social interaction and anxiety-like behavior in senescence-accelerated-prone and -resistant mice.

    PubMed

    Meeker, Harry C; Chadman, Kathryn K; Heaney, Agnes T; Carp, Richard I

    2013-06-13

    Two members of the senescence-accelerated mouse group, SAMP8 and SAMP10, are characterized by learning and memory deficits, while the SAMR1 strain is not. In this study, we used two behavioral tests, social approach and object recognition and compared the results observed for the SAMP strains with those seen in the control strain, SAMR1. In social approach experiments, the 2 SAMP strains showed decreased sociability compared to SAMR1 as shown by their reluctance to spend time near a stranger mouse and increased immobility. In object recognition experiments, SAMP strains spent more time in the thigmotaxis zone and less time in the more exposed central zone than SAMR1 mice. From a behavioral standpoint, SAMP mice were less interactive and showed increased anxiety-like behavior compared to SAMR1. PMID:23672852

  16. Top electrode-dependent resistance switching behaviors of lanthanum-doped ZnO film memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dinglin; Xiong, Ying; Tang, Minghua; Zeng, Baiwen

    2014-03-01

    Lanthanum-doped ZnO (Zn0.99La0.01O) polycrystalline thin films were deposited on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by a chemical solution deposition method. Metal/La-doped ZnO/Pt sandwich structures were constructed by depositing different top electrodes (Ag and Pt). Unipolar switching and bipolar switching characteristics were investigated in Pt/La-doped ZnO/Pt and Ag/La-doped ZnO/Pt structures, respectively. Compared with the undoped devices (Pt/ZnO/Pt and Ag/ZnO/Pt), the La-doped devices exhibits superior resistive switching performances, such as narrow distribution of the resistive switching properties ( R ON, R OFF, V Set, and V Reset), higher R OFF/ R ON ratio and sharp switching transition.

  17. A new metal-organic hybrid material with intrinsic resistance-based bistability: monitoring in situ room temperature switching behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongyue; Zhao, Hanhua; Matsushita, Michio M.; Awaga, Kunio; Dunbar, Kim R.

    2014-08-06

    Two new silver containing materials with TCNQ derivatives were prepared by electrocrystallization. Synchrotron radiation diffraction studies were conducted to determine the structures of the new phases which exhibit unprecedented high room temperature conductivity. The I–V characteristics reveal a room-temperature switching behaviour and memory effect based on intrinsic negative differential resistance (NDR). EPR spectroscopic measurements performed under an applied electric field indicate a g-tensor shift that is correlated to the amplitude of current.

  18. Resistant starch film-coated microparticles for an oral colon-specific polypeptide delivery system and its release behaviors.

    PubMed

    Situ, Wenbei; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xueyu; Li, Xiaoxi

    2014-04-23

    For the delivery of bioactive components to the colon, an oral colon-specific controlled release system coated with a resistant starch-based film through aqueous dispersion coating process was developed. Starch was modified by a high-temperature-pressure reaction, enzymatic debranching, and retrogradation, resulting in a dramatic increase in the resistibility against enzymatic digestion (meaning the formation of resistant starch, specifically RS3). This increase could be associated with an increase in the relative crystallinity, a greater amount of starch molecular aggregation structure, and the formation of a compact mass fractal structure, resulting from the treatment. The microparticles coated with this RS3 film showed an excellent controlled release property. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type II diabetic rats, the RS3 film-coated insulin-loaded microparticles exhibited the ability to steadily decrease the plasma glucose level initially and then maintain the plasma glucose level within the normal range for total 14-22 h with different insulin dosages after oral administration; no glycopenia or glycemic fluctuation was observed. Therefore, the potential of this new RS3 film-coated microparticle system has been demonstrated for the accurate delivery of bioactive polypeptides or protein to the colon. PMID:24684664

  19. Deletion of GIRK2 Subunit of GIRK Channels Alters the 5-HT1A Receptor-Mediated Signaling and Results in a Depression-Resistant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Llamosas, Nerea; Bruzos-Cidón, Cristina; Rodríguez, José Julio; Ugedo, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Targeting dorsal raphe 5-HT1A receptors, which are coupled to G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels, has revealed their contribution not only to behavioral and functional aspects of depression but also to the clinical response to its treatment. Although GIRK channels containing GIRK2 subunits play an important role controlling excitability of several brain areas, their impact on the dorsal raphe activity is still unknown. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate the involvement of GIRK2 subunit-containing GIRK channels in depression-related behaviors and physiology of serotonergic neurotransmission. Methods: Behavioral, functional, including in vivo extracellular recordings of dorsal raphe neurons, and neurogenesis studies were carried out in wild-type and GIRK2 mutant mice. Results: Deletion of the GIRK2 subunit promoted a depression-resistant phenotype and determined the behavioral response to the antidepressant citalopram without altering hippocampal neurogenesis. In dorsal raphe neurons of GIRK2 knockout mice, and also using GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q, the basal firing rate was higher than that obtained in wild-type animals, although no differences were observed in other firing parameters. 5-HT1A receptors were desensitized in GIRK2 knockout mice, as demonstrated by a lower sensitivity of dorsal raphe neurons to the inhibitory effect of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, and the antidepressant citalopram. Conclusions: Our results indicate that GIRK channels formed by GIRK2 subunits determine depression-related behaviors as well as basal and 5-HT1A receptor-mediated dorsal raphe neuronal activity, becoming alternative therapeutic targets for psychiatric diseases underlying dysfunctional serotonin transmission. PMID:25956878

  20. The HDAC inhibitor SAHA improves depressive-like behavior of CRTC1-deficient mice: Possible relevance for treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Meylan, Elsa M; Halfon, Olivier; Magistretti, Pierre J; Cardinaux, Jean-René

    2016-08-01

    Major depression is a highly complex disabling psychiatric disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, a substantial percentage of patients are unresponsive to these medications. A better understanding of the neurobiology of depression and the mechanisms underlying antidepressant response is thus critically needed. We previously reported that mice lacking CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) exhibit a depressive-like phenotype and a blunted antidepressant response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. In this study, we similarly show that Crtc1(-/-) mice are resistant to the antidepressant effect of chronic desipramine in a behavioral despair paradigm. Supporting the blunted response to this tricyclic antidepressant, we found that desipramine does not significantly increase the expression of Bdnf and Nr4a1-3 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of Crtc1(-/-) mice. Epigenetic regulation of neuroplasticity gene expression has been associated with depression and antidepressant response, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to have antidepressant-like properties. Here, we show that unlike conventional antidepressants, chronic systemic administration of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA partially rescues the depressive-like behavior of Crtc1(-/-) mice. This behavioral effect is accompanied by an increased expression of Bdnf, but not Nr4a1-3, in the prefrontal cortex of these mice, suggesting that this epigenetic intervention restores the expression of a subset of genes by acting downstream of CRTC1. These findings suggest that CRTC1 alterations may be associated with treatment-resistant depression, and support the interesting possibility that targeting HDACs may be a useful therapeutic strategy in antidepressant development. PMID:26970016

  1. Impact of Treatments for Depression on Comorbid Anxiety, Attentional, and Behavioral Symptoms in Adolescents With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor–Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Robert C.; Rengasamy, Manivel; Mansoor, Brandon; He, Jiayan; Mayes, Taryn; Emslie, Graham J.; Porta, Giovanna; Clarke, Greg N.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.; Ryan, Neal; Shamseddeen, Wael; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Brent, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the relative efficacy of antidepressant medication, alone and in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), on comorbid symptoms of anxiety, attention, and disruptive behavior disorders in participants in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial. Method Adolescents with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)–resistant depression (N = 334) were randomly assigned to a medication switch alone (to another SSRI or to venlafaxine) or to a medication switch plus CBT. Anxiety, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) symptoms were assessed by psychiatric interview and self-report at regular intervals between baseline and 24 weeks. The differential effects of medication and of CBT, and the impact of remission on the course of comorbid symptoms and diagnoses, were assessed using generalized linear mixed models. Results Remission was associated with a greater reduction in scalar measures of anxiety, ADHD, and DBDs, and a greater decrease in the rate of diagnosed anxiety disorders. The correlations between the changes in symptoms of depression on the CDRS-R and anxiety, ADHD, and oppositional symptoms were modest, ranging from r = 0.12 to r = 0.28. There were no significant differential treatment effects on diagnoses, or corresponding symptoms. Conclusion The achievement of remission had a beneficial effect on anxiety, ADHD, and DBD symptoms, regardless of the type of treatment received. There were no differential effects of medication or CBT on outcome, except for a nonsignificant trend that those adolescents treated with SSRIs showed a greater decrease in rates of comorbid DBDs relative to those treated with venlafaxine. PMID:23622849

  2. Resistance to protein and oil fouling of sulfobetaine-grafted Poly(vinylidene Fluoride) hollow fiber membrane and the electrolyte-responsive behavior in NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Bi, Qiu-Yan; Liu, Tian-Yin; Wang, Xiao-Lin

    2012-07-01

    An excellent protein-fouling-resistance performance of the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF hollow fiber membrane was obtained and the potential of sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF membrane to resist the oil fouling was confirmed in the filtration solution which contained inorganic electrolyte, sodium chloride (NaCl). The electrolyte-responsive behavior of the sulfobetaine-modified PVDF membrane was demonstrated by the filtration of NaCl aqueous solution. The grafting amount of the modified PVDF hollow fiber membrane showed a stable value as 680 μg/cm2. An almost complete coverage of the membrane surface by the grafted sulfobetaine polymer contributed to the high hydrophilicity and membrane strength. The membrane surface became denser and the permeate flux reduced with the increase of NaCl concentration. The cyclic filtration experiment showed that during the filtration of the protein solution with 0.05 mol/L of NaCl, the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF membrane exhibited an excellent protein-fouling-resistance performance with a high relative flux recovery of 98.2% and a low irreversible fouling extent which was lower 10 times than that of the nascent PVDF hollow fiber membrane. In addition, the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF hollow fiber membrane showed an oil-fouling-resistance property during the filtration experiment of the oil-in-water emulsion with 0.05 mol/L of NaCl, resulting in an relative flux recovery of about twice that of the nascent PVDF membrane. The results extended the application of poly(sulfobetaine)-g-PVDF hollow fiber membrane in the fields of bio-separation, artificial oil and wastewater treatment.

  3. Efficient spin-filter and negative differential resistance behaviors in FeN4 embedded graphene nanoribbon device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Liu, J. B.; Yao, K. L.; Ni, Y.; Wang, S. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new device of spintronics by embedding two FeN4 molecules into armchair graphene nanoribbon and sandwiching them between N-doped graphene nanoribbon electrodes. Our first-principle quantum transport calculations show that the device is a perfect spin filter with high spin-polarizations both in parallel configuration (PC) and antiparallel configuration (APC). Moreover, negative differential resistance phenomena are obtained for the spin-down current in PC, and the spin-up and spin-down currents in APC. These transport properties are explained by the bias-dependent evolution of molecular orbitals and the transmission spectra.

  4. Impact of composition and crystallization behavior of atomic layer deposited strontium titanate films on the resistive switching of Pt/STO/TiN devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, N.; Longo, V.; Rodenbücher, C.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Szot, K.; Waser, R.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.

    2014-08-01

    The resistive switching (RS) properties of strontium titanate (Sr1+xTi1+yO3+(x+2y), STO) based metal-oxide-metal structures prepared from industrial compatible processes have been investigated focusing on the effects of composition, microstructure, and device size. Metastable perovskite STO films were prepared on Pt-coated Si substrates utilizing plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) from cyclopentadienyl-based metal precursors and oxygen plasma at 350 °C, and a subsequent annealing at 600 °C in nitrogen. Films of 15 nm and 12 nm thickness with three different compositions [Sr]/([Sr] + [Ti]) of 0.57 (Sr-rich STO), 0.50 (stoichiometric STO), and 0.46 (Ti-rich STO) were integrated into Pt/STO/TiN crossbar structures with sizes ranging from 100 μm2 to 0.01 μm2. Nano-structural characterizations revealed a clear effect of the composition of the as-deposited STO films on their crystallization behavior and thus on the final microstructures. Local current maps obtained by local-conductivity atomic force microscopy were in good agreement with local changes of the films' microstructures. Correspondingly, also the initial leakage currents of the Pt/STO/TiN devices were affected by the STO compositions and by the films' microstructures. An electroforming process set the Pt/STO/TiN devices into the ON-state, while the forming voltage decreased with increasing initial leakage current. After a RESET process under opposite voltage has been performed, the Pt/STO/TiN devices showed a stable bipolar RS behavior with non-linear current-voltage characteristics for the high (HRS) and the low (LRS) resistance states. The obtained switching polarity and nearly area independent LRS values agree with a filamentary character of the RS behavior according to the valence change mechanism. The devices of 0.01 μm2 size with a 12 nm polycrystalline stoichiometric STO film were switched at a current compliance of 50 μA with voltages of about ±1.0 V between resistance states of about

  5. Impact of composition and crystallization behavior of atomic layer deposited strontium titanate films on the resistive switching of Pt/STO/TiN devices

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, N.; Rodenbücher, C.; Szot, K.; Waser, R.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Longo, V.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2014-08-14

    The resistive switching (RS) properties of strontium titanate (Sr{sub 1+x}Ti{sub 1+y}O{sub 3+(x+2y)}, STO) based metal-oxide-metal structures prepared from industrial compatible processes have been investigated focusing on the effects of composition, microstructure, and device size. Metastable perovskite STO films were prepared on Pt-coated Si substrates utilizing plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) from cyclopentadienyl-based metal precursors and oxygen plasma at 350 °C, and a subsequent annealing at 600 °C in nitrogen. Films of 15 nm and 12 nm thickness with three different compositions [Sr]/([Sr] + [Ti]) of 0.57 (Sr-rich STO), 0.50 (stoichiometric STO), and 0.46 (Ti-rich STO) were integrated into Pt/STO/TiN crossbar structures with sizes ranging from 100 μm{sup 2} to 0.01 μm{sup 2}. Nano-structural characterizations revealed a clear effect of the composition of the as-deposited STO films on their crystallization behavior and thus on the final microstructures. Local current maps obtained by local-conductivity atomic force microscopy were in good agreement with local changes of the films' microstructures. Correspondingly, also the initial leakage currents of the Pt/STO/TiN devices were affected by the STO compositions and by the films' microstructures. An electroforming process set the Pt/STO/TiN devices into the ON-state, while the forming voltage decreased with increasing initial leakage current. After a RESET process under opposite voltage has been performed, the Pt/STO/TiN devices showed a stable bipolar RS behavior with non-linear current-voltage characteristics for the high (HRS) and the low (LRS) resistance states. The obtained switching polarity and nearly area independent LRS values agree with a filamentary character of the RS behavior according to the valence change mechanism. The devices of 0.01 μm{sup 2} size with a 12 nm polycrystalline stoichiometric STO film were switched at a current compliance of 50 μA with

  6. Feeding behavior of neonate Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on Cry1Ab Bt corn: implications for resistance management.

    PubMed

    Razze, J M; Mason, C E; Pizzolato, T D

    2011-06-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is an economically important insect pest of corn, Zea mays L., in the United States and Canada. The development of genetically modified corn expressing genes derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that encodes insecticidal crystalline (Cry) proteins has proven to be effective in controlling this insect. To assess the feeding behavior of neonate O. nubilalis on Bt corn, we examined differences in feeding behavior, based on presence of plant material in the gut, between Cry1Ab Bt corn and non-Bt near isoline corn for four intervals over a 48-h period. Feeding experiments revealed that there was significantly less feeding on Bt corn compared with non-Bt near isoline corn. The behavior of neonates on the plant corresponded with the differences in feeding on the two corn lines. The findings also showed that > 50% of the larvae initially left the plant before there was evidence in the gut of feeding regardless of whether the source was Bt or non-Bt corn. A higher quantity of plant material was found in the gut of larvae recovered from leaves of non-Bt compared with Bt corn. At the end of 48 h among the larvae that had left the plant, a greater proportion from Bt corn had plant material in the gut than did those from non-Bt corn. PMID:21735897

  7. Cooking behavior and starch digestibility of NUTRIOSE® (resistant starch) enriched noodles from sweet potato flour and starch.

    PubMed

    Menon, Renjusha; Padmaja, G; Sajeev, M S

    2015-09-01

    The effect of a resistant starch source, NUTRIOSE® FB06 at 10%, 15% and 20% in sweet potato flour (SPF) and 5% and 10% in sweet potato starch (SPS) in reducing the starch digestibility and glycaemic index of noodles was investigated. While NUTRIOSE (10%) significantly reduced the cooking loss in SPF noodles, this was enhanced in SPS noodles and guar gum (GG) supplementation reduced CL of both noodles. In vitro starch digestibility (IVSD) was significantly reduced in test noodles compared to 73.6g glucose/100g starch in control SPF and 65.9 g in SPS noodles. Resistant starch (RS) was 54.96% for NUTRIOSE (15%)+GG (1%) fortified SPF noodles and 53.3% for NUTRIOSE (5%)+GG (0.5%) fortified SPS noodles, as against 33.8% and 40.68%, respectively in SPF and SPS controls. Lowest glycaemic index (54.58) and the highest sensory scores (4.23) were obtained for noodles with 15% NUTRIOSE+1% GG. PMID:25842330

  8. Creep Behavior at 1273 K (1000 °C) in Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels Developed for Exhaust Component Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    ABSTRACT A series of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels with variations of N/C ratios were investigated, and the morphological change of Nb(C,N) from faceted blocks, mixed flake-blocks to "Chinese-script" was observed as N/C ratios decreased. The creep behavior of these alloys was studied at 1273 K (1000 °C), and the longest creep life and lowest creep rate occurred in model alloys with script Nb(C,N). Residual δ-ferrites and (Cr,Fe)23C6 were adverse to creep properties. This work indicates that the control of N/C ratio is required for the as-cast microstructural strengthening.

  9. Creep Behavior at 1273 K (1000 °C) in Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels Developed for Exhaust Component Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    A series of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels with variations of N/C ratios were investigated, and the morphological change of Nb(C,N) from faceted blocks, mixed flake-blocks to "Chinese-script" was observed as N/C ratios decreased. The creep behavior of these alloys was studied at 1273 K (1000 °C), and the longest creep life and lowest creep rate occurred in model alloys with script Nb(C,N). Residual δ-ferrites and (Cr,Fe)23C6 were adverse to creep properties. This work indicates that the control of N/C ratio is required for the as-cast microstructural strengthening.

  10. Switching to Another SSRI or to Venlafaxine With or Without Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With SSRI-Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Brent, David; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Keller, Marty; Vitiello, Benedetto; Ritz, Louise; Iyengar, Satish; Abebe, Kaleab; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Hughes, Carroll; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Spirito, Anthony; Leonard, Henrietta; Melhem, Nadine; Porta, Giovanna; Onorato, Matthew; Zelazny, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    Context Only about 60% of adolescents with depression will show an adequate clinical response to an initial treatment trial with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). There are no data to guide clinicians on subsequent treatment strategy. Objective To evaluate the relative efficacy of 4 treatment strategies in adolescents who continued to have depression despite adequate initial treatment with an SSRI. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled trial of a clinical sample of 334 patients aged 12 to 18 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder that had not responded to a 2-month initial treatment with an SSRI, conducted at 6 US academic and community clinics from 2000–2006. Interventions Twelve weeks of: (1) switch to a second, different SSRI (paroxetine, citalopram, or fluoxetine, 20–40 mg); (2) switch to a different SSRI plus cognitive behavioral therapy; (3) switch to venlafaxine (150–225 mg); or (4) switch to venlafaxine plus cognitive behavioral therapy. Main Outcome Measures Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement score of 2 or less (much or very much improved) and a decrease of at least 50% in the Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R); and change in CDRS-R over time. Results Cognitive behavioral therapy plus a switch to either medication regimen showed a higher response rate (54.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 47%–62%) than a medication switch alone (40.5%; 95% CI, 33%–48%; P=.009), but there was no difference in response rate between venlafaxine and a second SSRI (48.2%; 95% CI, 41%–56% vs 47.0%; 95% CI, 40%–55%; P=.83). There were no differential treatment effects on change in the CDRS-R, self-rated depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, or on the rate of harm-related or any other adverse events. There was a greater increase in diastolic blood pressure and pulse and more frequent occurrence of skin problems during venlafaxine than SSRI treatment. Conclusions For adolescents with

  11. Silicon carbide as an oxidation-resistant high-temperature material. 1: Oxidation and heat corrosion behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, J.

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation and corrosion behavior of SiC (in the form of a SiC powder) and hot-pressed and reaction-bound material were studied. The excellent stability of SiC in an oxidizing atmosphere is due to the development of protective SiO2 coatings. Any changes in these protective layers (e.g., due to impurities, reaction with corrosive media, high porosity of SiC, etc.) lead in most cases to increased rates of oxidation and thus restrict the field of SiC application.

  12. Assessment of End-of-Life Behavior of the Surface Modification to Improve Cavitation-Erosion Resistance in the Mercury Target at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2007-06-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer on annealed or cold-worked substrates of 316LN stainless steel has been examined in mercury using a vibratory horn technique and extended exposure periods intended to expose 'end-of-life' performance characteristics. The Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer tends to remain protective--as evidenced by modest steady-state weight loss and surface roughness increases, only isolated pitting, and limited wetting by mercury--until the protective layer has been thinned by general erosion to about 15-20 {micro}m. Prior to that amount of erosion, the cavitation-erosion resistance of both types of specimens appears defined by the properties of the protective layer. However, after thinning to such a degree, initial breakdown of the protective layer is characterized by increases in both the surface roughness and the number/depth of individual pits across the surface at a rate that is strongly dependent on the substrate condition, with annealed substrates significantly more prone to damage. However, even as the protective properties of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer decrease, both weight change and profile development as a function of sonication time suggest a gradual reversion to cavitation-erosion behavior similar to that of untreated substrates.

  13. Current controlled negative differential resistance behavior in Co2FeO2BO3 and Fe3O2BO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, E. C.; Freitas, D. C.; Fier, I.; Fernandes, J. C.; Continentino, M. A.; de Oliveira, A. J. A.; Walmsley, L.

    2016-03-01

    I-V curves showing negative differential resistance (NDR) are reported for single crystals of Co2FeO2BO3 at 315 K and 290 K and for Fe3O2BO3 at 300 K, 260 K and 220 K. Resistivity measurements are presented for both systems, parallel and perpendicular to the c axis, in the range 315-120 K. The high hysteretic behavior of the I-V curves in Co2FeO2BO3 around room temperature is discussed and the heat dissipated is estimated, suggesting an increase in the sample temperature of almost 22 K for the I-V curve at 315 K and a dominant contribution of Joule self-heating for the observed NDR. In contrast, insignificant hysteresis is observed on the I-V curves of Fe3O2BO3 around room temperature. The depinning of charge order domains is suggested as the main contribution to the NDR phenomenon for Fe3O2BO3. The high reproducibility of the NDR in the Fe3O2BO3 single crystal allows its use as a low frequency oscillator, as it is demonstrated.

  14. Autistic behavior, behavior analysis, and the gene.

    PubMed

    Malott, Richard W

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the meaning of autism, the etiology of autistic behavior and values, the nature-nurture debate, contingencies vs. genes, and resistance to a behavioral analysis of autism. PMID:22477285

  15. Evaluation of damage accumulation behavior and strength anisotropy of NITE SiC/SiC composites by acoustic emission, digital image correlation and electrical resistivity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Ozawa, Kazumi; Asakura, Yuuki; Kohyama, Akira; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the cracking process of the composites is essential to establish the design basis for practical applications. This study aims to investigate the damage accumulation process and its anisotropy for nano-infiltration transient eutectic sintered (NITE) SiC/SiC composites by various characterization techniques such as the acoustic emission (AE), digital image correlation (DIC) and electrical resistivity (ER) measurements. Cracking behavior below the proportional limit stress (PLS) was specifically addressed. Similar to the other generic SiC/SiC composites, the 1st AE event was identified below the PLS for NITE SiC/SiC composites with a dependency of fabric orientation. The DIC results support that the primary failure mode depending on fiber orientation affected more than the other minor modes did. Detailed AE waveform analysis by wavelet shows a potential to classify the failure behavior depending on architecture. Cracking below the PLS is a potential concern in component deign but the preliminary ER measurements imply that the impact of cracking below the PLS on composite function was limited.

  16. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  17. Unusual behavior in the reactivity of 5-substituted-1H-tetrazoles in a resistively heated microreactor

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Bernhard; Glasnov, Toma N; Razzaq, Tahseen; Goessler, Walter; Roberge, Dominique M

    2011-01-01

    Summary The decomposition of 5-benzhydryl-1H-tetrazole in an N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone/acetic acid/water mixture was investigated under a variety of high-temperature reaction conditions. Employing a sealed Pyrex glass vial and batch microwave conditions at 240 °C, the tetrazole is comparatively stable and complete decomposition to diphenylmethane requires more than 8 h. Similar kinetic data were obtained in conductively heated flow devices with either stainless steel or Hastelloy coils in the same temperature region. In contrast, in a flow instrument that utilizes direct electric resistance heating of the reactor coil, tetrazole decomposition was dramatically accelerated with rate constants increased by two orders of magnitude. When 5-benzhydryl-1H-tetrazole was exposed to 220 °C in this type of flow reactor, decomposition to diphenylmethane was complete within 10 min. The mechanism and kinetic parameters of tetrazole decomposition under a variety of reaction conditions were investigated. A number of possible explanations for these highly unusual rate accelerations are presented. In addition, general aspects of reactor degradation, corrosion and contamination effects of importance to continuous flow chemistry are discussed. PMID:21647324

  18. Seeking behavior, place conditioning, and resistance to conditioned suppression of feeding in rats intermittently exposed to palatable food.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Santos, Jeffrey W; Smith, Karen L; Ferragud, Antonio; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    Binge eating disorder is characterized by excessive consumption of highly palatable food within short periods of time accompanied by loss of control over eating. Extensive evidence provides support for the consideration of binge eating disorder as an addiction-like disorder. In this study, we wanted to determine whether rats undergoing an operant binge-like eating procedure could develop maladaptive forms of conditioned feeding behaviors. For this purpose, we trained male rats to self-administer either a sugary, highly palatable diet ("Palatable" rats) or a chow diet ("Chow" rats) for 1 hour a day. After escalation and stabilization of palatable food intake, we tested Chow and Palatable rats in (a) a conditioned place preference test, (b) a second-order schedule of reinforcement, (c) a cue-induced suppression of feeding test. In the conditioned place preference task, Palatable rats spent significantly more time in the compartment that was previously paired with the palatable food, compared to Chow controls. Furthermore, in the second-order schedule of reinforcement task, Palatable rats exhibited active lever responding 4- to 6-fold higher than Chow control rats. Finally, in the cue-induced suppression of feeding test, although Chow control subjects reduced responding by 32% in the presence of the conditioned punishment, Palatable rats persevered in responding despite the aversive cue. These results further characterize this animal model of binge-like eating and provide additional evidence for the addictive properties of highly palatable food. PMID:25798634

  19. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Public Mental Health: Comparison to Treatment as Usual for Treatment -Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Molly A.; Basco, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    State mental health systems have been leaders in the implementation of evidence-based approaches to care for individuals with severe mental illness. Numerous case studies of the wide-scale implementation of research-supported models such as Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment and Assertive Community Treatment are documented. However, relatively few dissemination efforts have focused on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for individuals with major depression despite evidence indicating its efficacy with this population. A multi-site effectiveness trial of CBT was conducted within the Texas public mental health system. Eighty-three adults with major depression received CBT from community clinicians trained through a workshop and regular consultation with a master clinician. Outcomes were compared to a matched sample of individuals receiving pharmacotherapy. Outcome measures used included the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and Beck Depression Inventory. Individuals receiving CBT showed greater improvements in depression symptoms than those in the comparison group. Greater pre-treatment symptom severity predicted better treatment response, while the presence of comorbid personality disorders was associated with poorer outcomes. PMID:24692026

  20. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca (Fe1-xCox) 2As2 studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-11-01

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca (Fe1-xCox) 2As2 (x =0.023 , 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350 °C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x =0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x =0.023 (TN=106 K) and x =0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1 /T1 ), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as in the case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ρc(T ) , but not with the in-plane resistivity ρa(T ) . The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1 /T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. Based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca (Fe1-xCox) 2As2 .

  1. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350°C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (TN=106 K) and x=0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as inmore » the case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ρc(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ρa(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2.« less

  2. Effects of two-step homogenization on precipitation behavior of Al{sub 3}Zr dispersoids and recrystallization resistance in 7150 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhanying; Zhao, Gang; Chen, X.-Grant

    2015-04-15

    The effect of two-step homogenization treatments on the precipitation behavior of Al{sub 3}Zr dispersoids was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in 7150 alloys. Two-step treatments with the first step in the temperature range of 300–400 °C followed by the second step at 470 °C were applied during homogenization. Compared with the conventional one-step homogenization, both a finer particle size and a higher number density of Al{sub 3}Zr dispersoids were obtained with two-step homogenization treatments. The most effective dispersoid distribution was attained using the first step held at 300 °C. In addition, the two-step homogenization minimized the precipitate free zones and greatly increased the number density of dispersoids near dendrite grain boundaries. The effect of two-step homogenization on recrystallization resistance of 7150 alloys with different Zr contents was quantitatively analyzed using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. It was found that the improved dispersoid distribution through the two-step treatment can effectively inhibit the recrystallization process during the post-deformation annealing for 7150 alloys containing 0.04–0.09 wt.% Zr, resulting in a remarkable reduction of the volume fraction and grain size of recrystallization grains. - Highlights: • Effect of two-step homogenization on Al{sub 3}Zr dispersoids was investigated by TEM. • Finer and higher number of dispersoids obtained with two-step homogenization • Minimized the precipitate free zones and improved the dispersoid distribution • Recrystallization resistance with varying Zr content was quantified by EBSD. • Effectively inhibit the recrystallization through two-step treatments in 7150 alloy.

  3. Behavioral economics and behavioral momentum

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Some relations between elasticity of demand and the conditions of reinforcement are reanalyzed in terms of resistance to change, in ways suggested by the metaphor of behavioral momentum; some relations between resistance to change and the conditions of reinforcement are reanalyzed in terms of elasticity of demand, in ways suggested by behavioral economics. In addition, some data on labor supply in relation to variable-ratio schedules and alternative reinforcement are reanalyzed in terms of resistance to change and compared with steady-state resistance data for performance on multiple and concurrent interval schedules. The results of these studies can be summarized by two functions based on the behavioral momentum approach, relating relative behavioral mass to relative reinforcement per response or per unit time. The former is a relation between relative unit price and relative behavioral mass, suggesting the possibility of convergent measurement of a theoretical construct common to both approaches. However, the momentum and economic approaches differ fundamentally on whether it is preferable to construe discriminated operant behavior as selected and strengthened by its consequences or as part of a behavior–consequence bundle that maximizes utility. PMID:16812775

  4. Resistant to the Recession: Low-Income Adults’ Maintenance of Cooking and Away-From-Home Eating Behaviors During Times of Economic Turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsey P.; Ng, Shu Wen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effects of state-level unemployment rates during the recession of 2008 on patterns of home food preparation and away-from-home (AFH) eating among low-income and minority populations. Methods. We analyzed pooled cross-sectional data on 118 635 adults aged 18 years or older who took part in the American Time Use Study. Multinomial logistic regression models stratified by gender were used to evaluate the associations between state-level unemployment, poverty, race/ethnicity, and time spent cooking, and log binomial regression was used to assess respondents’ AFH consumption patterns. Results. High state-level unemployment was associated with only trivial increases in respondents’ cooking patterns and virtually no change in their AFH eating patterns. Low-income and racial/ethnic minority groups were not disproportionately affected by the recession. Conclusions. Even during a major economic downturn, US adults are resistant to food-related behavior change. More work is needed to understand whether this reluctance to change is attributable to time limits, lack of knowledge or skill related to food preparation, or lack of access to fresh produce and raw ingredients. PMID:24625145

  5. Thermopower and electrical resistivity behavior near the martensitic transition in Gd 5(Si xGe 1-x) 4 magnetocaloric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. P.; Sousa, J. B.; Correia, F. C.; Araújo, J. P.; Braga, M. E.; Pereira, A. M.; Morellon, L.; Algarabel, P. A.; Magen, C.; Ibarra, M. R.

    2005-04-01

    Recently, the Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 system exhibits fascinating physical properties, namely giant magnetocaloric, magnetoresistance and magnetostriction effects near a first-order (martensitic like; T =TS) magneto-structural transition. We report the thermopower behavior S (T) between 10 and 300 K for compounds with x = 0 , 0.10 and 0.45, belonging to three distinct regions of the magnetic/structural phase diagram. Large thermopower changes are observed near TS for x = 0 .10 (TS = 78 K ; AFM-Orthorhombic II/FM-Ortho.I) and for x = 0.45 (TS = 242 K ; PM-Monoc/FM-Ortho.I) with a Gaussian distribution in d S / d T , characteristic of a first-order phase transition. Near the purely magnetic transitions (PM/AFM) for x = 0 (TN = 122 K) and x = 0.10 (TN = 127 K) we observe d S / d T peaks governed by spin fluctuation effects. A comparative analysis between d S / d T and the resistivity derivative d ρ / d T near TS is made. At low temperatures S (T) behaves similarly in the ferromagnetic x = 0.10 and 0.45 compounds (S ≈ AT + BT2) , the anomalous B term being related to the mean internal field (spin wave excitations). For x = 0 (AFM phase at low T) one has S = AT (no B term; zero mean internal field).

  6. Temperature dependent behavior of thermal conductivity of sub-5 nm Ir film: Defect-electron scattering quantified by residual thermal resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Zhe; Xu, Zaoli; Xu, Shen; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-01-14

    By studying the temperature-dependent behavior (300 K down to 43 K) of electron thermal conductivity (κ) in a 3.2 nm-thin Ir film, we quantify the extremely confined defect-electron scatterings and isolate the intrinsic phonon-electron scattering that is shared by the bulk Ir. At low temperatures below 50 K, κ of the film has almost two orders of magnitude reduction from that of bulk Ir. The film has ∂κ/∂T > 0, while the bulk Ir has ∂κ/∂T < 0. We introduce a unified thermal resistivity (Θ = T/κ) to interpret these completely different κ ∼ T relations. It is found that the film and the bulk Ir share a very similar Θ ∼ T trend, while they have a different residual part (Θ{sub 0}) at 0 K limit: Θ{sub 0} ∼ 0 for the bulk Ir, and Θ{sub 0} = 5.5 m·K{sup 2}/W for the film. The Ir film and the bulk Ir have very close ∂Θ/∂T (75–290 K): 6.33 × 10{sup −3} m K/W for the film and 7.62 × 10{sup −3} m K/W for the bulk Ir. This strongly confirms the similar phonon-electron scattering in them. Therefore, the residual thermal resistivity provides an unprecedented way to quantitatively evaluating defect-electron scattering (Θ{sub 0}) in heat conduction. Moreover, the interfacial thermal conductance across the grain boundaries is found larger than that of Al/Cu interface, and its value is proportional to temperature, largely due to the electron's specific heat. A unified interfacial thermal conductance is also defined and firmly proves this relation. Additionally, the electron reflection coefficient is found to be large (88%) and almost temperature independent.

  7. Tuning the switching behavior of binary oxide-based resistive memory devices by inserting an ultra-thin chemically active metal nanolayer: a case study on the Ta2O5-Ta system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Zeng, Fei; Wang, Minjuan; Wang, Guangyue; Song, Cheng; Pan, Feng

    2015-05-21

    The common nonpolar switching behavior of binary oxide-based resistive random access memory devices (RRAMs) has several drawbacks in future application, such as the requirements for a high forming voltage, a large reset current, and an additional access device to settle the sneak-path issue. Herein, we propose the tuning of the switching behavior of binary oxide-based RRAMs by inserting an ultra-thin chemically active metal nanolayer, and a case study on Ta2O5-Ta systems is provided. The devices are designed to be Pt/Ta2O5(5 - x/2)/Ta(x)/Ta2O5(5 - x/2)/Pt with x = 0, 2, or 4 nm. The reference devices without the Ta nanolayer exhibit an expected nonpolar switching behavior with a high forming voltage of ∼-4.5 V and a large reset current of >10 mA. In contrast, a self-compliance bipolar switching behavior with a low forming voltage of ∼-2 V and a small reset current of <1 mA is observed after inserting a 2 nm Ta nanolayer. When the Ta nanolayer is increased to 4 nm, a complementary resistive switching (CRS) behavior is found, which can effectively settle the sneak-path issue. The appearance of CRS behavior suggests that a thin Ta nanolayer of 4 nm is robust enough to act as an inner electrode. Besides, the behind switching mechanisms are thoroughly discussed with the help of a transmission electron microscope and temperature-dependent electrical measurements. All these results demonstrate the feasibility of tuning switching behavior of binary oxide-based RRAMs by inserting an ultra-thin chemically active metal nanolayer and might help to advance the commercialization of binary oxide-based RRAMs. PMID:25907552

  8. Video-tracking and on-plant tests show Cry1Ab resistance influences behavior and survival of neonate Ostrinia nubilalis following exposure to Bt maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine how resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins influences movement and survival of European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) neonates, the responses of Cry1Ab-resistant, -susceptible, and hybrid (F1) larvae were examined using two different techniques. First, using an automated video...

  9. Targeted mutations in the Na,K-ATPase α 2 isoform confer ouabain resistance and result in abnormal behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Tori L; Lingrel, Jerry B; Moseley, Amy E; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2011-06-01

    Sodium and potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatases (Na,K-ATPase) are ubiquitous, participate in osmotic balance and membrane potential, and are composed of α, β, and γ subunits. The α subunit is required for the catalytic and transport properties of the enzyme and contains binding sites for cations, ATP, and digitalis-like compounds including ouabain. There are four known α isoforms; three that are expressed in the CNS in a regional and cell-specific manner. The α2 isoform is most commonly found in astrocytes, pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in adults, and developmentally in several other neuronal types. Ouabain-like compounds are thought to be produced endogenously in mammals, bind the Na,K-ATPase, and function as a stress-related hormone, however, the impact of the Na,K-ATPase ouabain binding site on neurobehavioral function is largely unknown. To determine if the ouabain binding site of the α2 isoform plays a physiological role in CNS function, we examined knock-in mice in which the normally ouabain-sensitive α2 isoform was made resistant (α2(R/R) ) while still retaining basal Na,K-ATPase enzymatic function. Egocentric learning (Cincinnati water maze) was impaired in adult α2(R/R) mice compared to wild type (WT) mice. They also exhibited decreased locomotor activity in a novel environment and increased responsiveness to a challenge with an indirect sympathomimetic agonist (methamphetamine) relative to WT mice. The α2(R/R) mice also demonstrated a blunted acoustic startle reflex and a failure to habituate to repeated acoustic stimuli. The α2(R/R) mice showed no evidence of altered anxiety (elevated zero maze) nor were they impaired in spatial learning or memory in the Morris water maze and neither group could learn in a large Morris maze. These results suggest that the ouabain binding site is involved in specific types of learning and the modulation of dopamine-mediated locomotor behavior. PMID:20936682

  10. Targeted Mutations in the Na,K-ATPase Alpha 2 Isoform Confer Ouabain Resistance and Result in Abnormal Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L.; Lingrel, Jerry B; Moseley, Amy E.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Sodium and potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatases (Na,K-ATPase) are ubiquitous, participate in osmotic balance and membrane potential, and are composed of α, β, and γ subunits. The α subunit is required for the catalytic and transport properties of the enzyme and contains binding sites for cations, ATP, and digitalis-like compounds including ouabain. There are four known α isoforms; three that are expressed in the CNS in a regional and cell-specific manner. The α2 isoform is most commonly found in astrocytes, pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in adults, and developmentally in several other neuronal types. Ouabain-like compounds are thought to be produced endogenously in mammals, bind the Na,K-ATPase, and function as a stress-related hormone, however, the impact of the Na,K-ATPase ouabain binding site on neurobehavioral function is largely unknown. To determine if the ouabain binding site of the α2 isoform plays a physiological role in CNS function, we examined knock-in mice in which the normally ouabain-sensitive α2 isoform was made resistant (α2R/R) while still retaining basal Na,K-ATPase enzymatic function. Egocentric learning (Cincinnati water maze) was impaired in adult α2R/R mice compared to wild type (WT) mice. They also exhibited decreased locomotor activity in a novel environment and increased responsiveness to a challenge with an indirect sympathomimetic agonist (methamphetamine) relative to WT mice. The α2R/R mice also demonstrated a blunted acoustic startle reflex and a failure to habituate to repeated acoustic stimuli. The α2R/R mice showed no evidence of altered anxiety (elevated zero maze) nor were they impaired in spatial learning or memory in the Morris water maze and neither group could learn in a large Morris maze. These results suggest that the ouabain binding site is involved in specific types of learning and the modulation of dopamine-mediated locomotor behavior. PMID:20936682

  11. Diet-induced obesity resistance of adult female mice selectively bred for increased wheel-running behavior is reversed by single perinatal exposure to a high-energy diet.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meyer, Neele; Przybyt, Ewa; Scheurink, Anton J W; Harmsen, Martin C; Garland, Theodore; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-04-01

    Female mice from independently bred lines previously selected over 50 generations for increased voluntary wheel-running behavior (S1, S2) resist high energy (HE) diet-induced obesity (DIO) at adulthood, even without actual access to running wheels, as opposed to randomly bred controls (CON). We investigated whether adult S mice without wheels remain DIO-resistant when exposed - via the mother - to the HE diet during their perinatal stage (from 2 weeks prior to conception until weaning on post-natal day 21). While S1 and S2 females subjected to HE diet either perinatally or from weaning onwards (post-weaning) resisted increased adiposity at adulthood (as opposed to CON females), they lost this resistance when challenged with HE diet during these periods combined over one single cycle of breeding. When allowed one-week access to wheels (at week 6-8 and at 10 months), however, tendency for increased wheel-running behavior of S mice was unaltered. Thus, the trait for increased wheel-running behavior remained intact following combined perinatal and post-weaning HE exposure, but apparently this did not block HE-induced weight gain. At weaning, perinatal HE diet increased adiposity in all lines, but this was only associated with hyperleptinemia in S lines irrespective of gender. Because leptin has multiple developmental effects at adolescence, we argue that a trait for increased physical activity may advance maturation in times of plenty. This would be adaptive in nature where episodes of increased nutrient availability should be exploited maximally. Associated disturbances in glucose homeostasis and related co-morbidities at adulthood are probably pleiotropic side effects. PMID:26850290

  12. Enhanced resistive switching and multilevel behavior in bilayered HfAlO/HfAlO{sub x} structures for non-volatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Faita, F. L.; Silva, J. P. B.; Pereira, M.; Gomes, M. J. M.

    2015-12-14

    In this work, hafnium aluminum oxide (HfAlO) thin films were deposited by ion beam sputtering deposition technique on Si substrate. The presence of oxygen vacancies in the HfAlO{sub x} layer deposited in oxygen deficient environment is evidenced from the photoluminescence spectra. Furthermore, HfAlO(oxygen rich)/HfAlO{sub x}(oxygen poor) bilayer structures exhibit multilevel resistive switching (RS), and the switching ratio becomes more prominent with increasing the HfAlO layer thickness. The bilayer structure with HfAlO/HfAlO{sub x} thickness of 30/40 nm displays the enhanced multilevel resistive switching characteristics, where the high resistance state/intermediate resistance state (IRS) and IRS/low resistance state resistance ratios are ≈10{sup 2} and ≈5 × 10{sup 5}, respectively. The switching mechanisms in the bilayer structures were investigated by the temperature dependence of the three resistance states. This study revealed that the multilevel RS is attributed to the coupling of ionic conduction and the metallic conduction, being the first associated to the formation and rupture of conductive filaments related to oxygen vacancies and the second with the formation of a metallic filament. Moreover, the bilayer structures exhibit good endurance and stability in time.

  13. The effect of a Ta oxygen scavenger layer on HfO2-based resistive switching behavior: thermodynamic stability, electronic structure, and low-bias transport.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Rungger, Ivan; Zapol, Peter; Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-03-14

    Reversible resistive switching between high-resistance and low-resistance states in metal-oxide-metal heterostructures makes them very interesting for applications in random access memories. While recent experimental work has shown that inserting a metallic "oxygen scavenger layer" between the positive electrode and oxide improves device performance, the fundamental understanding of how the scavenger layer modifies the heterostructure properties is lacking. We use density functional theory to calculate thermodynamic properties and conductance of TiN/HfO2/TiN heterostructures with and without a Ta scavenger layer. First, we show that Ta insertion lowers the formation energy of low-resistance states. Second, while the Ta scavenger layer reduces the Schottky barrier height in the high-resistance state by modifying the interface charge at the oxide-electrode interface, the heterostructure maintains a high resistance ratio between high- and low-resistance states. Finally, we show that the low-bias conductance of device on-states becomes much less sensitive to the spatial distribution of oxygen removed from the HfO2 in the presence of the Ta layer. By providing a fundamental understanding of the observed improvements with scavenger layers, we open a path to engineer interfaces with oxygen scavenger layers to control and enhance device performance. In turn, this may enable the realization of a non-volatile low-power memory technology with concomitant reduction in energy consumption by consumer electronics and offering significant benefits to society. PMID:26902598

  14. Influence of carbon content on the copper-telluride phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior of carbon alloyed Cu-Te conductive bridge random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devulder, Wouter De Schutter, Bob; Detavernier, Christophe; Opsomer, Karl; Franquet, Alexis; Meersschaut, Johan; Muller, Robert; Van Elshocht, Sven; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Goux, Ludovic; Belmonte, Attilio

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the carbon content on the Cu-Te phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior in carbon alloyed Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4} based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) cells. Carbon alloying of copper-tellurium inhibits the crystallization, while attractive switching behavior is preserved when using the material as Cu-supply layer in CBRAM cells. The phase formation is first investigated in a combinatorial way. With increasing carbon content, an enlargement of the temperature window in which the material stays amorphous was observed. Moreover, if crystalline phases are formed, subsequent phase transformations are inhibited. The electrical switching behavior of memory cells with different carbon contents is then investigated by implementing them in 580 μm diameter dot TiN/Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4}-C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si memory cells. Reliable switching behavior is observed for carbon contents up to 40 at. %, with a resistive window of more than 2 orders of magnitude, whereas for 50 at. % carbon, a higher current in the off state and only a small resistive window are present after repeated cycling. This degradation can be ascribed to the higher thermal and lower drift contribution to the reset operation due to a lower Cu affinity towards the supply layer, leading cycle-after-cycle to an increasing amount of Cu in the switching layer, which contributes to the current. The thermal diffusion of Cu into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under annealing also gives an indication of the Cu affinity of the source layer. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to investigate this migration depth in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} before and after annealing, showing a higher Cu, Te, and C migration for high carbon contents.

  15. Effects of a resistively coated dielectric strip on the TM-polarized resonant backscatter behavior of a slotted conducting rectangular shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin-Kun; Lu, Cheng-Hung

    1993-06-01

    The performance of a resistively coated dielectric strip used to suppress the first TM-type resonant backscatter associated with a 2D slotted conducting rectangular shell is analyzed in this paper using the moment method technique. Results obtained indicate that almost perfect resonance damping performances are attained when a finite-dimensioned resistively coated dielectric strip with dielectric constant epsilon(r) = 4 - j(0.4) and film resistance R(s) = 188.5 ohms is placed: (1) at the slot (which directly faces the normally incident TM-polarized plane wave), (2) on the interior perimeter of the shell adjacent to the slot, or (3) at the center of the back wall of the shell. Poorer damping performances are observed, however, when the resistively coated dielectric strip is placed at other positions and/or with the same or higher film resistance. Finally, it is also shown that in general the knowledge of the waveguide theory can be used advantageously in the placement of the resistively coated dielectric strip for achieving best resonance damping performance.

  16. Structure and optical properties of polycrystalline NiO films and its resistive switching behavior in Au/NiO/Pt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, J. C.; Wang, X. C.; Mi, W. B.; Ding, Y. H.; Yang, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Structure and optical of polycrystalline NiO films fabricated by reactive sputtering and its resistive switching properties in Au/NiO/Pt structures are investigated. The size of surface uniform pyramid-like islands and average surface roughness increase with the increase of NiO film thickness (t). The NiO films grow with the preferred (111) orientation at 400 °C, but both (100) and (110)-oriented grains exist in the films fabricated at room temperature. Raman results reveal that the crystallinity of the films fabricated at 400 °C becomes good by comparing with that at room temperature. The optical band gap monotonically decreases from 4.44 eV at t=22 nm to 3.55 eV at t=800 nm. The resistance of the Au/NiO/Pt/Ti/glass structures could be switched between two stable states including low and high resistance states. The bipolar endurance performance of the resistive switching remains nondegradable after 200 cycles. The resistive switching can be ascribed to the carrier trapping and detrapping induced by the electric field, which can change the thickness of the depletion layer at Au/NiO interface.

  17. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  18. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  19. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  20. Effects of Interface Layers and Domain Walls on the Ferroelectric-Resistive Switching Behavior of Au/BiFeO3/La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Yang, Shengwei; Lin, Yue; Zhang, Dalong; Huang, Weichuan; Zhao, Wenbo; Yin, Yuewei; Dong, Sining; Li, Xiaoguang

    2015-12-01

    The electric field effects on the electric and magnetic properties in multiferroic heterostructures are important for not only understanding the mechanisms of certain novel physical phenomena occurring at heterointerfaces but also offering a route for promising spintronic applications. Using the Au/BiFeO3/La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 (Au/BFO/LSMO) multiferroic heterostructure as a model system, we investigated the ferroelectric-resistive switching (RS) behaviors of the heterostructure. Via the manipulation of the BFO ferroelectric polarizations, the nonvolatile tristate of RS is observed, which is closely related to the Au/BFO and BFO/LSMO interface layers and the highly conducting BFO domain walls (DWs). More interestingly, according to the magnetic field dependence of the RS behavior, the negative magnetoresistance effect of the third resistance state, corresponding to the abnormal current peak in current-pulse voltage hysteresis near the electric coercive field, is also observed at room temperature, which mainly arises from the possible oxygen vacancy accumulation and Fe ion valence variation in the DWs. PMID:26554671

  1. Resistive switching and magnetic behavior of Bi0.8Ba0.2FeO3 / SrRuO3 / SrTiO3 films: role of thickness-dependent strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagadia, Megha; Ravalia, Ashish; Trivedi, Priyanka; Jethva, Sadaf; Katba, Savan; Kuberkar, D. G.

    2016-05-01

    The thickness-dependent resistive switching and magnetic behavior of Bi0.8Ba0.2FeO3/SRO/STO (1 0 0) films have been studied in the context of strain modifications introduced by varying the film thickness. Generation of misfit dislocation results in strain relaxation with an increase in film thickness. All films (50, 100 and 200 nm) show hysteresis in I–V behavior at room temperature with applied voltage V max  =  ±5 V. Fitting of I–V data suggests that trap-controlled SCLC governs the conduction in HRS in the 50 nm film while in the 100 nm and 200 nm films, the charge transport mechanism is ohmic-type throughout the applied field. The ON/OFF switching ratio and current retention performance decrease with an increase in film thickness, suggesting that substrate-induced strain and interface modifications play an important role in governing the resistive switching mechanism in Bi0.8Ba0.2FeO3 films. A film with lower thickness ~50 nm is found to exhibit the highest magnetization which may be attributed to the increase in oxygen vacancies and compressive strain.

  2. No Evolutionary Response to Four Generations of Laboratory Selection on Antipredator Behavior of Aedes albopictus: Potential Implications for Biotic Resistance to Invasion

    PubMed Central

    KESAVARAJU, BANUGOPAN; JULIANO, STEVEN A.

    2009-01-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) is an invasive container-dwelling mosquito and an important disease vector that co-occurs with the native mosquito, Aedes triseriatus (Say), and the predatory midge, Corethrella appendiculata (Grabham). Larval Ae. triseriatus show significantly greater antipredatory responses when compared to larval Ae. albopictus in the presence of predation cues from C. appendiculata. The potential for evolution of antipredatory behavioral responses to C. appendiculata in Ae. albopictus is unknown. We used a controlled laboratory selection experiment to test whether Ae. albopictus could evolve antipredatory behavioral responses to C. appendiculata predation. We subjected replicate Ae. albopictus populations to four generations of predation by C. appendiculata or a predator-free control treatment and compared the behavior and life history of Ae. albopictus in the two treatments in each generation. There were no differences in Ae. albopictus behavioral responses between predation and control lines in any of the four generations. There was also no evidence of differences in life histories between predation and control lines. Ae. albopictus is superior as a competitor compared with Ae. triseriatus, which it has replaced in areas where C. appendiculata are rare. Our results suggest limited potential for Ae. albopictus to evolve stronger antipredatory behavioral responses to C. appendiculata predation and imply that C. appendiculata will continue to act as an impediment to invasion by Ae. albopictus and replacement of Ae. triseriatus and to promote coexistence of these competitors. PMID:19645279

  3. Stop Thinking and Start Doing: Switching from Cognitive Therapy to Behavioral Activation in a Case of Chronic Treatment-Resistant Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottonari, Kathryn A.; Roberts, John E.; Thomas, Sherilyn N.; Read, Jennifer P.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent investigations have demonstrated that Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are both efficacious treatments for depression (Butler, Chapman, Forman, & Beck, 2006; Dimidjian et al., 2006; Dobson, 1989; Gloaguen, Cottraux, Cucherat, & Blackburn, 1998; Hollon, Thase, & Markowitz, 2002; Jacobson et al., 1996). This…

  4. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID invests in basic research to understand the biology of microbes, their behavior, and how drug resistance ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  5. Resistance in Supervision: A Response to Perceived Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddle, Becky J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses supervisee resistance as a defensive response to perceived threat. Coping strategies which interfere with the learning process are seen as resistance. Enumerates various forms of resistant behavior; explores possible sources of threat that may arouse these behaviors, and proposes a step-by-step model for dealing with resistance in…

  6. Mechanism of rectification and two-type bipolar resistance switching behaviors of Pt /Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 /Nb:SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. W.; Jia, C. H.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, W. F.

    2015-12-01

    Epitaxial Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) films have been grown on Nb:SrTiO3 (NSTO) (1 0 0) substrates. The films are a tetragonal perovskite phase with good density and homogeneity. Rectification behavior and two types of bipolar resistance switching (BRS) have been observed in the Pt/PZT/NSTO device. It exhibits rectification below 3 V. According to piezo force microscopy analysis, PZT film has a multidomain structure below 8 V and the device shows abnormal BRS between 3 V and 8 V. When the voltage increases above 8 V, the polarization of the PZT film tends to saturation and it becomes single domain and displays normal BRS behavior. In addition, the device demonstrates good retention and anti-fatigue properties. The transition from abnormal bipolar to normal bipolar behavior caused by ferroelectric polarization can broaden device applications and enable large flexibility in terms of memory architecture.

  7. Study of swelling behavior in ArF resist during development by the QCM method (3): observations of swelling layer elastic modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2013-03-01

    The QCM method allows measurements of impedance, an index of swelling layer viscosity in a photoresist during development. While impedance is sometimes used as a qualitative index of change in the viscosity of the swelling layer, it has to date not been used quantitatively, for data analysis. We explored a method for converting impedance values to elastic modulus (Pa), a coefficient expressing viscosity. Applying this method, we compared changes in the viscosity of the swelling layer in an ArF resist generated during development in a TMAH developing solution and in a TBAH developing solution. This paper reports the results of this comparative study.

  8. Diminishing sign anomaly and scaling behavior of the mixed-state Hall resistivity in Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films containing columnar defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budhani, R. C.; Liou, S. H.; Cai, Z. X.

    1993-01-01

    The issues of sign reversal of the Hall voltage and scaling between longitudinal (rho(xx)) and Hall (rho(xy)) resistivities are studied in Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films in which the vortex dynamics is drastically changed by flux pinning at heavy-ion-irradiation-induced linear defects. While the sign anomaly diminishes with increasing defect concentration, the power law rho(xy) is approximately equal to rho(xx) exp beta, beta = 1.85 +/- 0.1, holds even after irradiation. This result shows that the scaling is a universal feature of the mixed state in this system. The sign anomaly, on the other hand, is not consistent with a model that invokes pinning-induced backflow in the vortex core as the mechanism for this effect.

  9. [CHANGES IN LIFESTYLE FACTORS AFFECT THE LEVELS OF NEUROPEPTIDES, INVOLVED IN THE CONTROL OF EATING BEHAVIOR, INSULIN RESISTANCE AND LEVEL OF CHRONIC SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION IN YOUNG OVERWEIGHT PERSONS].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Yu; Mamontova, T; Baranova, A; Vesnina, L; Kaidashev, I

    2015-11-01

    The continuous rise of overweight and obesity is a major concern for present and future healthcare management. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of lifestyle changes on central regulatory mechanisms of maintaining energy homeostasis, insulin resistance and chronic systemic inflammation in 18-25 year old overweight patients. The anthropometric measurements were done for each patient, including body weight, height, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), waist to hip ratio, and body mass index (BMI). Patients were divided into two groups according to their BMI. 20 males and 21 females with BMI > 25 kg/m2 were included in the first, study, group. The second, control, group consisted of 16 males and 11 females with BMI - 18.5 - 24.9 kg/m 2. Lipid profile, fasting glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR, TNF-α, ceruloplasmin, neuropeptides Agouti-related protein - AgRP and kokain- and amphetamine-mediated transcript - CART were examined at the beginning of the study (Day 1) and after 10 week treatment period (Day 70). During the 10 week treatment period, people in the study group underwent physical exercise programs of 40-60 minute duration three times per week, and brisk walking during the remaining days. The mean calorie expenditure during the exercise was 500 kcal/day. Each patient in the study group was given balanced, healthy diet with 20% calorie restriction from baseline diet. Our study reveled that negative energy balance caused a statistically significant decrease in AgRP, reduction of visceral fat stores, increase of HDL, reduction of TNF-α and dissolution of insulin resistance signs. Significant but not statistically significant reduction of CART level was observed after increased physical activity program and calorie restriction diet, which might play an important role in the mechanism of decreasing weight. However, further investigations are required in order to determine its place in body weight regulation. PMID:26656551

  10. Epidemiologic Behavior and Estimation of an Optimal Cut-Off Point for Homeostasis Model Assessment-2 Insulin Resistance: A Report from a Venezuelan Population

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Martínez, María Sofía; Apruzzese, Vanessa; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gonzalez, Robys; Torres, Yaquelín; Bello, Luis; Añez, Roberto; Chacín, Maricarmen; Toledo, Alexandra; Cabrera, Mayela; Mengual, Edgardo; Ávila, Raquel; López-Miranda, José

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mathematical models such as Homeostasis Model Assessment have gained popularity in the evaluation of insulin resistance (IR). The purpose of this study was to estimate the optimal cut-off point for Homeostasis Model Assessment-2 Insulin Resistance (HOMA2-IR) in an adult population of Maracaibo, Venezuela. Methods. Descriptive, cross-sectional study with randomized, multistaged sampling included 2,026 adult individuals. IR was evaluated through HOMA2-IR calculation in 602 metabolically healthy individuals. For cut-off point estimation, two approaches were applied: HOMA2-IR percentile distribution and construction of ROC curves using sensitivity and specificity for selection. Results. HOMA2-IR arithmetic mean for the general population was 2.21 ± 1.42, with 2.18 ± 1.37 for women and 2.23 ± 1.47 for men (P = 0.466). When calculating HOMA2-IR for the healthy reference population, the resulting p75 was 2.00. Using ROC curves, the selected cut-off point was 1.95, with an area under the curve of 0.801, sensibility of 75.3%, and specificity of 72.8%. Conclusions. We propose an optimal cut-off point of 2.00 for HOMA2-IR, offering high sensitivity and specificity, sufficient for proper assessment of IR in the adult population of our city, Maracaibo. The determination of population-specific cut-off points is needed to evaluate risk for public health problems, such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27379332

  11. Behavioral response of pyrite structured Co0.2Fe0.8S2 nano-wires under high-pressure up to 8 GPa - Mössbauer spectroscopic and electrical resistivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, U.; Sharma, P.; Parthasarathy, G.; Sreedhar, B.

    2016-02-01

    Pyrite-structured Co0.2Fe0.8S2 nano wires with aspect ratio 45:1, synthesized using solution colloid method were studied under high pressure up to 8 GPa using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy (using diamond anvil cell) and electrical resistivity (using tungsten carbide cell) techniques. Room temperature S K-edge XANES studies at INFN-LNF synchrotron beam line signified the changes in the electronic structure owing to Co substitution. Magnetic measurements at 5 K demonstrated disordered ferromagnetic behavior similar to Griffith phase. The value of isomer shift identified Fe in divalent, low spin state corresponding to pyrite structure. Higher value of quadrupole splitting observed at ambient condition was due to large lattice strain and electric field gradient generated by large surface to volume ratio of the nano size of the system. With applied pressure, the value followed the expected trend of increase up to 4.3 GPa, then to decrease till 6.4 GPa. Such change in the trend suggested a phase transition. On decompression to ambient pressure, the system seemed to retain high pressure phase and nano structure. The pressure coefficient of electrical resistivity varying from -0.0454 to -0.166 Ω-cm/GPa across the transition pressure of ~4.5 GPa was sluggish suggesting second order phase transition. The pressure-dependent variations by Mössbauer parameters and electrical resistivity showed identical result. This is the first report of pressure effect on nano sized Co0.2Fe0.8S2. Effect of particle size on transition pressure could not be evaluated due to lack of available reports on bulk system.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets and ...

  13. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  14. Host Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concepts covered in this chapter (for an undergraduate text book) • Disease resistance is a crucial trait for any crop plant. • The degree of disease resistance varies within plant populations. Much of this variation has a genetic basis. • Plant disease resistance can be broadly categorized into s...

  15. RESISTIVITY METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistivity methods were among the first geophysical techniques developed. The basic concept originated with Conrad Schlumberger, who conducted the initial resistivity field tests in Normandy, France during 1912. The resistivity method, employed in its earliest and most conventional form, uses an ex...

  16. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, they can save lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able to resist the effects of an antibiotic. Using antibiotics can lead to resistance. ...

  17. QCM-4, a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist ameliorates plasma HPA axis hyperactivity, leptin resistance and brain oxidative stress in depression and anxiety-like behavior in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj

    2015-01-01

    Several preclinical studies have revealed antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effect of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. In our earlier study, we have reported the antidepressive-like effect of 3-methoxy-N-p-tolylquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (QCM-4) in obese mice subjected to chronic stress. The present study deals with the biochemical mechanisms associated with depression co-morbid with obesity. Mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks, further subjected for treatment with QCM-4 (1 and 2mg/kg p.o.) and standard antidepressant escitalopram (ESC) (10mg/kg p.o.) for 28 days. Behavioral assays for depression such as sucrose preference test (SPT), forced swim test (FST) and for anxiety such as light and dark test (LDT) and hole board test (HBT) were performed in obese mice. Biochemical assessments including plasma leptin and corticosterone concentration followed by brain oxidative stress parameters malonaldehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were performed. Results confirmed that QCM-4 exhibits antidepressive effect by increasing the sucrose consumption in SPT, reducing immobility time in FST and anxiolytic effect by increasing transitions and time in light chamber in LDT, increasing head dip and crossing score in HBT. Furthermore, QCM-4 attenuated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity by reducing the plasma corticosterone, reversing altered plasma leptin, restoring the imbalance of brain MDA and GSH concentration. In conclusion, QCM-4 showed antidepressive and anxiolytic effect by reversing the behavioral alterations that were supported by biochemical estimations in obese mice. PMID:25446100

  18. Comparison of the effects of gamma radiation and low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization on the molecular structure, fatigue resistance, and wear behavior of UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; Pruitt, L

    1998-06-01

    The effects of gamma radiation and low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (HPGP) sterilization on structure and cyclic mechanical properties were examined for orthopedic grade ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and compared to each other as well as to no sterilization (control). Density was monitored with a density gradient column and was found to be directly influenced by the sterilization method employed: Gamma radiation led to an increase, while plasma did not. Oxidation of the polymer was studied by observing changes in the carbonyl peak with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and was found to be strongly affected by both gamma radiation and subsequent aging, while plasma sterilization had little effect. Gamma radiation resulted in embrittlement of the polymer and a decreased resistance to fatigue crack propagation. This mechanical degradation was a direct consequence of postradiation oxidation and molecular evolution of the polymer and was not observed in the plasma-sterilized polymer. Both gamma radiation and plasma sterilization led to improved wear performance of the UHMWPE compared to the nonsterile control material. PMID:9570068

  19. Correlation of Electrical Resistance to CMC Stress-Strain and Fracture Behavior Under High Heat-Flux Thermal and Stress Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory; Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Because SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are under consideration for use as turbine engine hot-section components in extreme environments, it becomes necessary to investigate their performance and damage morphologies under complex loading and environmental conditions. Monitoring of electrical resistance (ER) has been shown as an effective tool for detecting damage accumulation of woven melt-infiltrated SiCSiC CMCs. However, ER change under complicated thermo-mechanical loading is not well understood. In this study a systematic approach is taken to determine the capabilities of ER as a relevant non-destructive evaluation technique for high heat-flux testing, including thermal gradients and localized stress concentrations. Room temperature and high temperature, laser-based tensile tests were conducted in which stress-dependent damage locations were determined using modal acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and compared to full-field strain mapping using digital image correlation (DIC). This information is then compared with the results of in-situ ER monitoring, post-test ER inspection and fractography in order to correlate ER response to convoluted loading conditions and damage evolution.

  20. The effect of Ta ``oxygen scavenger layer'' on HfO2-based resistive switching behavior: termodynamic stability, electronic structure, and low-bias transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Rungger, Ivan; Zapol, Peter; Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro; Heinonen, Olle

    Metal-oxide-metal heterostructures are promising candidates for next-generation random access memories, which exhibit reversible resistive switching between high- and low-conductance states. Recent experimental work showed that inserting a metallic `oxygen scavenger layer' between TiN electrode and HfO2 significantly improves device switching performance. We show, using atomistic modeling within the GGA +U scheme of Density Functional Theory, that a Ta oxygen scavenger layer significantly enhances the thermodynamic stability of depleting oxygen from the oxide. Furthermore, the presence of a Ta layer reduces the dependence of the Schottky barrier heights on the location of the oxygen removed from the oxide matrix. Finally, the Schottky barrier height has a very small effect on the on-state low-bias conductance; this is more sensitive to the location of the depleted oxygen. We gratefully acknowledge the computing resources provided on Blues, a high-performance computing cluster operated by the Laboratory Computing Resource Center at Argonne National Laboratory. Work at Argonne was supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…

  2. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  3. Enhanced salt resistance in apple plants overexpressing a Malus vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene is associated with differences in stomatal behavior and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wei, Zhiwei; Liang, Dong; Zhou, Shasha; Li, Yonghong; Liu, Changhai; Ma, Fengwang

    2013-09-01

    High salinity is a major abiotic factor that limits crop production. The dwarfing apple rootstock M.26 is sensitive to such stress. To obtain an apple that is adaptable to saline soils, we transformed this rootstock with a vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, MdNHX1. Differences in salt tolerance between transgenic and wild-type (WT) rootstocks were examined under field conditions. We also compared differences when 'Naganofuji No. 2' apple was grafted onto these transgenic or WT rootstocks. Plants on the transgenic rootstocks grew well during 60 d of mild stress (100 mM NaCl) while the WT exhibited chlorosis, inhibited growth and even death. Compared with the untreated control, the stomatal density was greater in both non-grafted and grafted WT plants exposed to 200 mM NaCl. In contrast, that density was significantly decreased in leaves from grafted transgenic plants. At 200 mM NaCl, net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and chlorophyll contents were markedly reduced in the WT, whereas the declines in those values were only minor in similarly stressed transgenic plants. Therefore, we conclude that overexpressing plants utilize a better protective mechanism for retaining higher photosynthetic capacity. Furthermore, this contrast in tolerance and adaptability to stress is linked to differences in stomatal behavior and photosynthetic rates. PMID:23774378

  4. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antibiotic-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria ...

  5. Geoelectrical behavior of a Fault Zone: the meaning of the electrical resistivity of metric-scale segments of the Liquiñe-Ofqui and the Arc-oblique Long-lived Fault Systems, Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquer, T.; Arancibia, G.; Yanez, G. A.; Estay, N.; Rowland, J. V.; Figueroa, R.; Iturrieta, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    The geoelectrical behavior of blind fault zones has been studied by different authors at decametric-to-kilometric scales, and inferred to reveal the dimensions of the main structural domains of a fault zone (core vs. damage zone). However, there is still a lack in the application of electrical methods in exposed fault zones, despite the importance of validating the inferences based on electrical measurements with direct geologic observation. In this study we correlate the results of structural mapping and geoelectrical measurements in two metric-scale, very well exposed segments of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Arc-oblique Long-lived Fault System (ALFS), Southern Andes. The LOFS is an active dextral and dextral-normal ca. 1200-km-long Cenozoic intra-arc structure that strikes NNE to NE. Although the LOFS and the ALFS cross-cut each other, the ALFS is an apparently older basement NW-striking fault system where mainly sinistral movement is recorded. Two 22-m-long transects were mapped revealing in both examples a simple core and an assymetric damage zone with more frequency of fractures in the hanging wall than in the footwall. The LOFS outcrop showed a WNW-striking, 65°S-dipping core; the ALFS, a NW-striking, 60°SW-dipping core. A 2D direct-current electrical survey was made at each locality, orthogonal to the respective strike of the core. The field installation of the electrical survey used two electrode configurations for each outcrop: (1) electrodes were put in a vertical wall of rock, which gives a resistivity profile in plan view; and (2) electrodes were put in the ground, which gives a cross-section resistivity profile. The combined structural and electrical results suggest that: (1) it is possible to discriminate the geoelectrical response of the main metric-scale structural domains: the core and the fractured damage zones are relative conductors (20-200 ohm-m), whereas the less fractured damage zones are relative resistive volumes (500

  6. Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Janus, Agnieszka; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a severe medical condition which is estimated to appear in 9-18% of hypertensive patients. Due to higher cardiovascular risk, this disorder requires special diagnosis and treatment. The heterogeneous etiology, risk factors and comorbidities of resistant hypertension stand in need of sophisticated evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and select the best therapeutic options, which should consider lifestyle modifications as well as pharmacological and interventional treatment. After having excluded pseudohypertension, inappropriate blood pressure measurement and control as well as the white coat effect, suspicion of resistant hypertension requires an analysis of drugs which the hypertensive patient is treated with. According to one definition - ineffective treatment with 3 or more antihypertensive drugs including diuretics makes it possible to diagnose resistant hypertension. A multidrug therapy including angiotensin - converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to be effective in resistant hypertension treatment. Nevertheless, optional, innovative therapies, e.g. a renal denervation or baroreflex activation, may create a novel pathway of blood pressure lowering procedures. The right diagnosis of this disease needs to eliminate the secondary causes of resistant hypertension e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, atherosclerosis and renal or hormonal disorders. This paper briefly summarizes the identification of the causes of resistant hypertension and therapeutic strategies, which may contribute to the proper diagnosis and an improvement of the long term management of resistant hypertension. PMID:26935512

  7. Aphid resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Testing and selecting for Russian wheat aphid (RWA) and greenbug resistance in WIT breeding lines continued this year. Several excellent lines with high levels of resistance advanced through the cultivar development process. Single plant selections from six experimental lines were retested to conf...

  8. Implementing a patient education intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention and effect on knowledge and behavior in veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Charlesnika T.; Hill, Jennifer N.; Guihan, Marylou; Chin, Amy; Goldstein, Barry; Richardson, Michael S. A.; Anderson, Vicki; Risa, Kathleen; Kellie, Susan; Cameron, Kenzie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and effect of a nurse-administered patient educational intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevention on knowledge and behavior of Veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). Design Blinded, block-randomized controlled pilot trial. Setting Two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) SCI Centers. Participants Veterans were recruited March–September 2010 through referral by a healthcare provider from inpatient, outpatient, and residential care settings. Intervention Thirty participants were randomized to the nurse-administered intervention and 31 to the usual care group. The intervention included a brochure and tools to assist nurses in conducting the education. Outcome measures Pre- and post-intervention measurement of knowledge and behaviors related to MRSA and prevention strategies and feasibility measures related to implementation. Results Participants were primarily male (95.1%), white (63.9%), with tetraplegia (63.9%) and mean age and duration of injury of 64.3 and 20.5 years, respectively. The intervention groups mean knowledge score significantly increased between pre- and post-test (mean change score = 1.70, 95% confidence interval, CI 0.25–3.15) while the usual care groups score did not significantly change (mean change score = 1.45, 95% CI −0.08–2.98). However, the mean knowledge change between intervention and usual care groups was not significantly different (P = 0.81). Overall behavior scores did not significantly differ between treatment groups; however, the intervention group was more likely to report intentions to clean hands (90.0% vs. 64.5%, P = 0.03) and asking providers about MRSA status (46.7% vs. 16.1%, P = 0.01). Nurse educators reported that the quality of the intervention was high and could be implemented in clinical care. Conclusions A targeted educational strategy is feasible to implement in SCI/D clinical practices and may improve some

  9. Ecology, Behavior and Bionomics: First Genotyping of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Progeny from Crosses between Bt-Resistant and Bt-Susceptible Populations, and 65-Locus Discrimination of Isofami

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) were analyzed in crosses of this species between Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) (Bt) resistant and susceptible populations to determine a possible association between markers and Bt resistance....

  10. Resisting HRD's Resistance to Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierema, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically illustrate how human resource development (HRD) resists and omits issues of diversity in academic programs, textbooks, and research; analyze the research on HRD and diversity over a ten-year period; discuss HRD's resistance to diversity; and offer some recommendations for a more authentic…

  11. Multistate resistive switching in silver nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandouk, Eric J.; Gimzewski, James K.; Stieg, Adam Z.

    2015-08-01

    Resistive switching devices have garnered significant consideration for their potential use in nanoelectronics and non-volatile memory applications. Here we investigate the nonlinear current-voltage behavior and resistive switching properties of composite nanoparticle films comprising a large collective of metal-insulator-metal junctions. Silver nanoparticles prepared via the polyol process and coated with an insulating polymer layer of tetraethylene glycol were deposited onto silicon oxide substrates. Activation required a forming step achieved through application of a bias voltage. Once activated, the nanoparticle films exhibited controllable resistive switching between multiple discrete low resistance states that depended on operational parameters including the applied bias voltage, temperature and sweep frequency. The films’ resistance switching behavior is shown here to be the result of nanofilament formation due to formative electromigration effects. Because of their tunable and distinct resistance states, scalability and ease of fabrication, nanoparticle films have a potential place in memory technology as resistive random access memory cells.

  12. Resistivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Michael R.; Bruce, Victoria J.; Ring, Rosalinda M.; Cole, Edward Jr. I.; Hawkins, Charles F.; Tangyungong, Paiboon

    2006-06-13

    According to an example embodiment of the present invention a semiconductor die having a resistive electrical connection is analyzed. Heat is directed to the die as the die is undergoing a state-changing operation to cause a failure due to suspect circuitry. The die is monitored, and a circuit path that electrically changes in response to the heat is detected and used to detect that a particular portion therein of the circuit is resistive. In this manner, the detection and localization of a semiconductor die defect that includes a resistive portion of a circuit path is enhanced.

  13. RESISTANCE TO DISRUPTION IN A CLASSROOM SETTING

    PubMed Central

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E; Neal, Carrie M; Ahearn, William H; Wheeler, Emily E; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B; Dube, William V

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 7-s VI 30-s schedule for 6 participants with developmental disabilities. Resistance to disruption was measured by presenting a distracting item. Response rates in the disruption components were compared to within-session response rates in prior baseline components. Results were consistent with the predictions of behavioral momentum theory for 5 of 6 participants. PMID:21709794

  14. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... and health professionals can play their part; rewarding innovation and development of new treatment options and other ... and industry can help tackle resistance by: fostering innovation and research and development of new vaccines, diagnostics, ...

  15. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotic are known as methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA. Antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs first became widely ... factors for infection are known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Recently, several cases overseas and in ...

  16. Lantibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Draper, Lorraine A; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2015-06-01

    The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry. PMID:25787977

  17. Lantibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Lorraine A.; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry. PMID:25787977

  18. Enhanced corrosion resistance and cellular behavior of ultrafine-grained biomedical NiTi alloy with a novel SrO-SiO2-TiO2 sol-gel coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, C. Y.; Nie, F. L.; Zheng, Y. F.; Cheng, Y.; Wei, S. C.; Ruan, Liqun; Valiev, R. Z.

    2011-04-01

    NiTi alloy has a unique combination of mechanical properties, shape memory effects and superelastic behavior that makes it attractive for several biomedical applications. In recent years, concerns about its biocompatibility have been aroused due to the toxic or side effect of released nickel ions, which restricts its application as an implant material. Bulk ultrafine-grained Ni50.8Ti49.2 alloy (UFG NiTi) was successfully fabricated by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) technique in the present study. A homogeneous and smooth SrO-SiO2-TiO2 sol-gel coating without cracks was fabricated on its surface by dip-coating method with the aim of increasing its corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility. Electrochemical tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that the pitting corrosion potential of UFG NiTi was increased from 393 mV(SCE) to 1800 mV(SCE) after coated with SrO-SiO2-TiO2 film and the corrosion current density decreased from 3.41 μA/cm2 to 0.629 μA/cm2. Meanwhile, the sol-gel coating significantly decreased the release of nickel ions of UFG NiTi when soaked in SBF. UFG NiTi with SrO-SiO2-TiO2 sol-gel coating exhibited enhanced osteoblast-like cells attachment, spreading and proliferation compared with UFG NiTi without coating and CG NiTi.

  19. Depression and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Sue; Schmidt, Mike; Patton, George; Dwyer, Terry; Blizzard, Leigh; Otahal, Petr; Venn, Alison

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between depressive disorder and insulin resistance in a sample of young adults using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to ascertain depression status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cross-sectional data were collected from 1,732 participants aged between 26 and 36 years. Insulin resistance was derived from blood chemistry measures of fasting insulin and glucose using the homeostasis model assessment method. Those identified with mild, moderate, or severe depression were classified as having depressive disorder. RESULTS The 12-month prevalence of depressive disorder was 5.4% among men and 11.7% among women. In unadjusted models mean insulin resistance was 17.2% (95% CI 0.7–36.0%, P = 0.04) higher in men and 11.4% (1.5–22.0%, P = 0.02) higher in women with depressive disorder. After adjustment for behavioral and dietary factors, the increased level of insulin resistance associated with depressive disorder was 13.2% (−3.1 to 32.3%, P = 0.12) in men and 6.1% (−4.1 to 17.4%, P = 0.25) in women. Waist circumference was identified as a mediator in the relationship between depression and insulin resistance, reducing the β coefficient in the fully adjusted models in men by 38% and in women by 42%. CONCLUSIONS A positive association was found between depressive disorder and insulin resistance in this population-based sample of young adult men and women. The association seemed to be mediated partially by waist circumference. PMID:20185745

  20. Pattern prediction in EUV resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biafore, John J.; Smith, Mark D.; Wallow, Tom; Nalleau, Patrick; Blankenship, David; Deng, Yunfei

    2009-12-01

    Accurate and flexible simulation methods may be used to further a researcher's understanding of how complex resist effects influence the patterning of critical structures. In this work, we attempt to gain insight into the behavior of a state-of-the-art EUV resist through the use of stochastic resist modeling. The statistics of photon and molecule counting are discussed. The acid generation mechanism at EUV is discussed. At lambda = 13.5 nm, the acid generation mechanism may be similar to that found in electron beam resists: acid generators are hypothesized to be activated by secondary electrons yielded by ionization of the resist matrix by high-energy EUV photons, suggesting that acid generators may be activated some distance from the absorption site. A discrete, probabilistic ionization and electron scattering model for PAG conversion at EUV is discussed. The simulated effect of resist absorbance at EUV upon doseto- size and line-width roughness is shown. The model's parameterized fit to experimental data from a resist irradiated EUV are shown. Predictions of statistical resist responses such as CD distribution and line-width roughness are compared with experimental data.

  1. Drug Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drug resistance refers to both intrinsic and acquired abilities of cells or organisms to become insensitive or refractory to chemotherapeutic intervention. The advent of antibiotics is considered one of the most important medicinal developments in human history, which has led to significantly reduce...

  2. Influencing Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howk, Cherie

    1992-01-01

    Teacher interpretations of student behavior frequently provide the data to analyze problem behaviors. There is no absolute way to determine whether behaviors are appropriate or inappropriate. Effective teacher intervention involves reducing the old behavior and introducing new activities to reinforce appropriate behavior. The article suggests…

  3. Feeding Behaviors That Promote Inoculation Of Xylella fastidiosa Are Performed Less By Glassy-winged Sharpshooters on Resistant Vitis Candicans Than On Susceptible V. vinifera cv. ‘Chardonnay’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of grape varieties resistant to Pierce’s Disease, caused by the lethal bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), is considered the most sustainable, long-term solution to the disease. Grape breeders are working to develop varieties resistant to multiplication and spread of the bacterium, by in...

  4. Improving Maladaptive Behaviors Using Sensory Integration Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuman, Theresa

    A study examined the use of sensory integration techniques to reduce the maladaptive behaviors that interfered with the learning of nine high school students with mental impairments attending a special school. Maladaptive behaviors identified included rocking, toe walking, echolalia, resistance to change, compulsive behaviors, aggression,…

  5. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation. PMID:18769797

  6. Pre-resistance-welding resistance check

    DOEpatents

    Destefan, Dennis E.; Stompro, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

  7. Student Resistance to Schooling: Disconnections with Education in Rural Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Katie A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates student reasons for resisting engagement with school in a rural Appalachian area. The concept of student resistance to school is considered within a White, working-class student population. Through classroom observations, students displaying resistant behaviors were selected to participate in interviews. Coding of interview…

  8. Multilevel Resistance Programming in Conductive Bridge Resistive Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalanabis, Debayan

    -configurable resistive weights is also discussed. Lastly, Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) based gradual resistance change behavior in CBRAM device fabricated in back-end-of-line on a CMOS die containing integrate and fire CMOS neuron circuits is demonstrated for the first time which indicates the feasibility of using CBRAM devices as electronic synapses in spiking neural network hardware implementations for non-Boolean neuromorphic computing.

  9. Bathroom Behaviors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bathroom Behaviors Page Content Article Body My son is very ... and your support will ease him into correct behavior. Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Guide to ...

  10. Behavioral Economics

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Derek D.; Niileksela, Christopher R.; Kaplan, Brent A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, behavioral economics has gained much attention in psychology and public policy. Despite increased interest and continued basic experimental studies, the application of behavioral economics to therapeutic settings remains relatively sparse. Using examples from both basic and applied studies, we provide an overview of the principles comprising behavioral economic perspectives and discuss implications for behavior analysts in practice. A call for further translational research is provided. PMID:25729506

  11. Behaviorism Evolves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews basic ideas presented in this special issue on the evolution of behaviorism. Topics addressed include stimulus and response; research with animals; applications to education and training; human motivation; theory through computer programs; experimental analysis of behavior; behaviorism moving into other disciplines; cognitive…

  12. Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Carmit

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants and malleability of noncognitive skills. Using data on boys from the National Education Longitudinal Survey, I focus on youth behavior in the classroom as a measure of noncognitive skills. I find that student behavior during adolescence is persistent. The variation in behavior can be attributed to…

  13. Behavioral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Sol L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains 18 articles discussing the uses of behavioral medicine in such areas as obesity, smoking, hypertension, and headache. Reviews include discussions of behavioral medicine and insomnia, chronic pain, asthma, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary-prone behavior. Newly emerging topics include gastrointestinal disorders, arthritis,…

  14. Critical behavior of resistivity in the pressure-induced first to second order transition in Pr0.6Ca0.4Mn0.96B0.04O3 (B=Co and Cr) polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, R.; Mahendiran, R.; Arumugam, S.

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated the hydrostatic pressure (P) dependence of the resistivity on Pr0.6Ca0.4Mn0.96B0.04O3 (B = Co and Cr) polycrystals. At ambient pressure, the temperature dependence of resistivity [ρ(T)] of both the samples show a first order paramagnetic insulator-ferromagnetic metallic transition at T=TIM. The application of P on both the samples increases the TIM, reduces the resistivity, and suppresses the hysteresis width, indicating a crossover from first to second order transition. The critical pressure, where the first-second order crossover takes place, are 2.02 and 2.40 GPa for Co and Cr doped samples respectively. The critical property of both systems around second order transition is investigated using Fisher-Langer relation and Suezaki-Mori method. The estimated critical exponents are close to the three-dimensional Heisenberg model for the Co doped sample suggesting short range interaction, and the exponents for the Cr doped sample follow the mean field theory suggesting long range ferromagnetic order. Further, the application of P suppresses the high temperature resistivity by reducing high temperature polarons in the case of the Cr doped sample, but it does not happen for the Co doped sample. The application of P helps to examine the stability of polarons in the high temperature regime.

  15. Extinction, Relapse, and Behavioral Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral-momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  16. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  17. Nonuniversal metallic behavior of superconducting wires

    SciTech Connect

    Renn, S.R.; Duan, J.

    1996-04-01

    We calculate the low temperature resistance of a narrow superconducting wire associated with quantum mechanical phase slippage. Particular attention is payed to the effects of Coulomb interactions. Using a renormalization group approach, we obtain the temperature dependent resistance. The results show that, near the superconductor-insulator transition, the wire displays quasimetallic behavior characterized by a small but finite low temperature resistance. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Making Behavioral Activation More Behavioral

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Manos, Rachel C.; Busch, Andrew M.; Rusch, Laura C.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral Activation, an efficacious treatment for depression, presents a behavioral theory of depression--emphasizing the need for clients to contact positive reinforcement--and a set of therapeutic techniques--emphasizing provision of instructions rather than therapeutic provision of reinforcement. An integration of Behavioral Activation with…

  19. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  20. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  1. Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway overcomes the stimulating effect of dabrafenib on the invasive behavior of melanoma cells with acquired resistance to the BRAF inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Simona; Alvino, Ester; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Levati, Lauretta; Giurato, Giorgio; Memoli, Domenico; Caprini, Elisabetta; Antonini Cappellini, Gian Carlo; D'Atri, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) have proven clinical benefits in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma. However, acquired resistance eventually arises. The effects of BRAFi on melanoma cell proliferation and survival have been extensively studied, and several mechanisms involved in acquired resistance to the growth suppressive activity of these drugs have been identified. Much less is known about the impact of BRAFi, and in particular of dabrafenib, on the invasive potential of melanoma cells. In the present study, the BRAF-mutant human melanoma cell line A375 and its dabrafenib-resistant subline A375R were analyzed for invasive capacity, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, and secretion of VEGF-A and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, under basal conditions or in response to dabrafenib. The consequences of inhibiting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway on A375R cell responses to dabrafenib were also evaluated. We found that A375R cells were more invasive and secreted higher levels of VEGF-A and MMP-9 as compared with A375 cells. Dabrafenib reduced invasiveness, VEGFR-2 expression and VEGF-A secretion in A375 cells, whereas it increased invasiveness, VEGF-A and MMP-9 release in A375R cells. In these latter cells, the stimulating effects of dabrafenib on the invasive capacity were markedly impaired by the anti-VEGF‑A antibody bevacizumab, or by AKT1 silencing. A375R cells were not cross-resistant to the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor GSK2126458A. Moreover, this inhibitor given in combination with dabrafenib efficiently counteracted the stimulating effects of the BRAFi on invasiveness and VEGF-A and MMP-9 secretion. Our data demonstrate that melanoma cells with acquired resistance to dabrafenib possess a more invasive phenotype which is further stimulated by exposure to the drug. Substantial evidence indicates that continuing BRAFi therapy beyond progression produces a clinical benefit. Our results suggest that after the development of resistance, a regimen

  2. Coping with Student Resistance to Critical Thinking: What the Psychotherapy Literature Can Tell Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Stuart M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Techniques for college teachers to use in managing student resistance to critical thinking include proactive strategies (creating a cooperative environment, establishing rapport, creating high expectations, and countering resistive behavior) and reactive strategies (avoiding personalization of resistance, inviting students to explore resistance,…

  3. Resistive switching and threshold switching behaviors in La{sub 0.1}Bi{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. Y.; Qiu, Xue; Feng, Yu; Hou, X. G.; Yu, D. S.; Li, D. J.; Liu, W. F.; Gao, J.

    2012-08-01

    The effects of cobalt doping on the electrical conductivity of La{sub 0.1}Bi{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} (LBFCO, x = 0, 0.01, 0.03) ceramics were investigated. It is found that the leakage current increases with cobalt dopant concentration in LBFCO. On the application of bias voltage LBFCO ceramics with cobalt doping exhibits resistive switching effects at room temperature and threshold switching effects at elevated temperatures (50 Degree-Sign C and 80 Degree-Sign C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of LBFCO ceramics show that cobalt dopant is bivalent as an acceptor, which induces an enhancement of oxygen vacancy concentration in LBFCO ceramics. Possible mechanisms for both resistive switching and threshold switching effects are discussed on the basis of the interplay of bound ferroelectric charges and mobile charged defects.

  4. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  5. Behavior modification.

    PubMed

    Pelham, W E; Fabiano, G A

    2000-07-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic and substantially impairing disorder. This means that treatment must also be chronic and substantial. Behavior Modification, and in many cases, the combination of behavior modification and stimulant medication, is a valid, useful treatment for reducing the pervasive impairment experienced by children with ADHD. Based on the research evidence reviewed, behavior modification should be the first line of treatment for children with ADHD. PMID:10944662

  6. Behavioral Momentum Theory: Equations and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral momentum theory provides a quantitative account of how reinforcers experienced within a discriminative stimulus context govern the persistence of behavior that occurs in that context. The theory suggests that all reinforcers obtained in the presence of a discriminative stimulus increase resistance to change, regardless of whether those…

  7. Behavior Matters

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edwin B.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Hayman, Laura L.; Kaplan, Robert M.; Nanney, Marilyn S.; Ockene, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    Behavior has a broad and central role in health. Behavioral interventions can be effectively used to prevent disease, improve management of existing disease, increase quality of life, and reduce healthcare costs. A summary is presented of evidence for these conclusions in cardiovascular disease/diabetes, cancer, and HIV/AIDS as well as with key risk factors: tobacco use, poor diet, physical inactivity, and excessive alcohol consumption. For each, documentation is made of (1) moderation of genetic and other fundamental biological influences by behaviors and social–environmental factors, (2) impacts of behaviors on health, (3) success of behavioral interventions in prevention, (4) disease management, (5) and quality of life, and (6) improvements in the health of populations through behavioral health promotion programs. Evidence indicates the cost effectiveness and value of behavioral interventions, especially relative to other common health services, as well as the value they add in terms of quality of life. Pertinent to clinicians and their patients as well as to health policy and population health, the benefits of behavioral interventions extend beyond impacts on a particular disease or risk factor. Rather, they include broad effects and benefits on prevention, disease management, and well-being across the life span. Among priorities for dissemination research, the application of behavioral approaches is challenged by diverse barriers, including socioeconomic barriers linked to health disparities. However, behavioral approaches including those emphasizing community and social influences appear to be useful in addressing such challenges. In sum, behavioral approaches should have a central place in prevention and health care of the 21st century. PMID:21496745

  8. Behavioral economics

    PubMed Central

    Hursh, Steven R.

    1984-01-01

    Economics, like behavioral psychology, is a science of behavior, albeit highly organized human behavior. The value of economic concepts for behavioral psychology rests on (1) their empirical validity when tested in the laboratory with individual subjects and (2) their uniqueness when compared to established behavioral concepts. Several fundamental concepts are introduced and illustrated by reference to experimental data: open and closed economies, elastic and inelastic demand, and substitution versus complementarity. Changes in absolute response rate are analyzed in relation to elasticity and intensity of demand. The economic concepts of substitution and complementarity are related to traditional behavioral studies of choice and to the matching relation. The economic approach has many implications for the future of behavioral research and theory. In general, economic concepts are grounded on a dynamic view of reinforcement. The closed-economy methodology extends the generality of behavioral principles to situations in which response rate and obtained rate of reinforcement are interdependent. Analysis of results in terms of elasticity and intensity of demand promises to provide a more direct method for characterizing the effects of “motivational” variables. Future studies of choice should arrange heterogeneous reinforcers with varying elasticities, use closed economies, and modulate scarcity or income. The economic analysis can be extended to the study of performances that involve subtle discriminations or skilled movements that vary in accuracy or quality as opposed to rate or quantity, and thus permit examination of time/accuracy trade-offs. PMID:16812401

  9. Making behavioral activation more behavioral.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Jonathan W; Manos, Rachel C; Busch, Andrew M; Rusch, Laura C

    2008-11-01

    Behavioral Activation, an efficacious treatment for depression, presents a behavioral theory of depression--emphasizing the need for clients to contact positive reinforcement--and a set of therapeutic techniques--emphasizing provision of instructions rather than therapeutic provision of reinforcement. An integration of Behavioral Activation with another behavioral treatment, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, addresses this mismatch. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy provides a process for the therapeutic provision of immediate and natural reinforcement. This article presents this integration and offers theoretical and practical therapist guidelines on its application. Although the integration is largely theoretical, empirical data are presented in its support when available. The article ends with a discussion of future research directions. PMID:18420541

  10. Uniform Self-rectifying Resistive Switching Behavior via Preformed Conducting Paths in a Vertical-type Ta2O5/HfO2-x Structure with a Sub-μm(2) Cell Area.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Ho; Yoo, Sijung; Song, Seul Ji; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Kwon, Dae Eun; Kwon, Young Jae; Park, Tae Hyung; Kim, Hye Jin; Shao, Xing Long; Kim, Yumin; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-07-20

    To replace or succeed the present NAND flash memory, resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) should be implemented in the vertical-type crossbar array configuration. The ReRAM cell must have a highly reproducible resistive switching (RS) performance and an electroforming-free, self-rectifying, low-power-consumption, multilevel-switching, and easy fabrication process with a deep sub-μm(2) cell area. In this work, a Pt/Ta2O5/HfO2-x/TiN RS memory cell fabricated in the form of a vertical-type structure was presented as a feasible contender to meet the above requirements. While the fundamental RS characteristics of this material based on the electron trapping/detrapping mechanisms have been reported elsewhere, the influence of the cell scaling size to 0.34 μm(2) on the RS performance by adopting the vertical integration scheme was carefully examined in this work. The smaller cell area provided much better switching uniformity while all the other benefits of this specific material system were preserved. Using the overstressing technique, the nature of RS through the localized conducting path was further examined, which elucidated the fundamental difference between the present material system and the general ionic-motion-related bipolar RS mechanism. PMID:27347693

  11. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Cost Español: Datos breves Facts about Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic resistance has been called one of the world’s most ... antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance in children is of particular concern ...

  12. Drug targeting of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Meli, Rosaria

    2015-11-01

    Leptin regulates glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis as well as feeding behavior, serving as a bridge between peripheral metabolically active tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, this adipocyte-derived hormone, whose circulating levels mirror fat mass, not only exerts its anti-obesity effects mainly modulating the activity of specific hypothalamic neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb), but it also shows pleiotropic functions due to the activation of Ob-Rb in peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate leptin resistance, including obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, impairment of leptin access to CNS and the reduction in Ob-Rb signal transduction effectiveness, among others. During the onset and progression of obesity, the dampening of leptin sensitivity often occurs, preventing the efficacy of leptin replacement therapy from overcoming obesity and/or its comorbidities. This review focuses on obesity-associated leptin resistance and the mechanisms underpinning this condition, to highlight the relevance of leptin sensitivity restoration as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat common obesity and its complications. Interestingly, although promising strategies to counteract leptin resistance have been proposed, these pharmacological approaches have shown limited efficacy or even relevant adverse effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Therefore, the numerous findings from this review clearly indicate a lack of a single and efficacious treatment for leptin resistance, highlighting the necessity to find new therapeutic tools to improve leptin sensitivity, especially in patients with most severe disease profiles. PMID:26071010

  13. Tuning resistance states by thickness control in an electroforming-free nanometallic complementary resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiang; Lu, Yang; Lee, Jongho; Chen, I.-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tuning low resistance state is crucial for resistance random access memory (RRAM) that aims to achieve optimal read margin and design flexibility. By back-to-back stacking two nanometallic bipolar RRAMs with different thickness into a complementary structure, we have found that its low resistance can be reliably tuned over several orders of magnitude. Such high tunability originates from the exponential thickness dependence of the high resistance state of nanometallic RRAM, in which electron wave localization in a random network gives rise to the unique scaling behavior. The complementary nanometallic RRAM provides electroforming-free, multi-resistance-state, sub-100 ns switching capability with advantageous characteristics for memory arrays.

  14. Rodent models of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Caldarone, Barbara J.; Zachariou, Venetia; King, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is a prevalent and debilitating disorder and a substantial proportion of patients fail to reach remission following standard antidepressant pharmacological treatment. Limited efficacy with currently available antidepressant drugs highlights the need to develop more effective medications for treatment resistant patients and emphasizes the importance of developing better preclinical models that focus on treatment resistant populations. This review discusses methods to adapt and refine rodent behavioral models that are predictive of antidepressant efficacy to identify populations that show reduced responsiveness or are resistant to traditional antidepressants. Methods include separating antidepressant responders from non-responders, administering treatments that render animals resistant to traditional pharmacological treatments, and identifying genetic models that show antidepressant resistance. This review also examines pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments regimes that have been effective in refractory patients and how some of these approaches have been used to validate animal models of treatment-resistant depression. The goals in developing rodent models of treatment-resistant depression are to understand the neurobiological mechanisms involved in antidepressant resistance and to develop valid models to test novel therapies that would be effective in patients that do not respond to traditional monoaminergic antidepressants. PMID:25460020

  15. Temporal Context, Preference, and Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    According to behavioral momentum theory, preference and relative resistance to change in concurrent chains schedules are correlated and reflect the relative conditioned value of discriminative stimuli. In the present study, we explore the generality of this relation by manipulating the temporal context within a concurrent-chains procedure through…

  16. Metallic behavior and negative differential resistance properties of (InAs){sub n} (n = 2 − 4) molecule cluster junctions via a combined non–equilibrium Green's function and density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Li, Rong; Xu, Yuanlan; Zhang, Jianbing; Miao, Xiangshui; Zhang, Daoli

    2014-06-21

    In this present work, the geometric structures and electronic transport properties of (InAs){sub n} (n = 2, 3, 4) molecule cluster junctions are comparatively investigated using NEGF combined with DFT. Results indicate that all (InAs){sub n} molecule cluster junctions present metallic behavior at the low applied biases ([−2V, 2V]), while NDR appears at a certain high bias range. Our calculation shows that the current of (InAs){sub 4} molecule cluster–based junction is almost the largest at any bias. The mechanisms of the current–voltage characteristics of all the three molecule cluster junctions are proposed.

  17. Unipolar resistive switching in a transparent ITO/SiOx/ITO sandwich fabricated at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Yi; Shih, Ya-Ru; Huang, Shyh-Jer

    2013-04-01

    A transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)/SiOx/ITO structure was fabricated at room temperature and its resistive switching behaviors were investigated. The average optical transmittance of the structure in the visible region was about 84%. The device demonstrated a unipolar resistive switching behavior. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer results of the SiOx film indicated that many oxygen vacancies were within the SiOx film. From the switching behavior, the temperature coefficient of resistance, and the size effect of resistance, the resistive memory behavior can be explained based on conducting filaments composed of oxygen vacancies. The resistive switching behavior is then explained by the rupture and the formation of filaments near the top electrode.

  18. Anthelmintic resistance: markers for resistance, or susceptibility?

    PubMed Central

    BEECH, R. N.; SKUCE, P.; BARTLEY, D. J.; MARTIN, R. J.; PRICHARD, R. K.; GILLEARD, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Consortium for Anthelmintic Resistance and Susceptibility (CARS) brings together researchers worldwide, with a focus of advancing knowledge of resistance and providing information on detection methods and treatment strategies. Advances in this field suggest mechanisms and features of resistance that are shared among different classes of anthelmintic. Benzimidazole resistance is characterized by specific amino acid substitutions in beta-tubulin. If present, these substitutions increase in frequency upon drug treatment and lead to treatment failure. In the laboratory, sequence substitutions in ion-channels can contribute to macrocyclic lactone resistance, but there is little evidence that they are significant in the field. Changes in gene expression are associated with resistance to several different classes of anthelmintic. Increased P-glycoprotein expression may prevent drug access to its site of action. Decreased expression of ion-channel subunits and the loss of specific receptors may remove the drug target. Tools for the identification and genetic analysis of parasitic nematodes and a new online database will help to coordinate research efforts in this area. Resistance may result from a loss of sensitivity as well as the appearance of resistance. A focus on the presence of anthelmintic susceptibility may be as important as the detection of resistance. PMID:20825689

  19. Resistance Factor-Mediated Spectinomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David H.; Janjigian, J. A.; Prescott, Naomi; Anderson, Porter W.

    1970-01-01

    Of 100 natural isolates of drug-resistant enteric bacteria, 51 were resistant to spectinomycin (Spc) and 46 contained transferable R factors mediating Spc resistance. All SpcR R factors mediated streptomycin and bluensomycin resistance and were fi+ type. Extracts of R-SpcR strains adenylated Spc, dihydrospectinomycin, actinamine, streptomycin, and bluensomycin in vitro in the presence of adenosine triphosphate and Mg++. Results of genetic and biochemical studies support the hypothesis that these reactions are mediated by a single enzyme. PMID:16557684

  20. Behavior change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This brief entry presents the mediating-moderating variable model as a conceptual framework for understanding behavior change in regard to physical activity/exercise and adiposity. The ideas are applied to real world situations....

  1. The Idea of Resistance in Education: A Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Joyce King

    This paper discusses resistance in education as expressed in white working-class girls' reactions to sex role socialization, children's play, minority children's behavior in inner city schools, and the resistance of female faculty in institutions of higher education. The paper takes off from issues addressed in some papers presented at a research…

  2. New resistivity for high-mobility quantum Hall conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceuen, P. L.; Szafer, A.; Richter, C. A.; Alphenaar, B. W.; Jain, J. K.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements showing dramatic nonlocal behavior in the four-terminal resistances of a high-mobility quantum Hall conductor are presented. These measurements illustrate that the standard definition of the resistivity tensor is inappropriate, but they are in excellent agreement with a new model of the conductor that treats the edge and bulk conducting pathways independently. This model uses a single intensive parameter, analogous to a local resistivity for the bulk channel only, to characterize the system.

  3. Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Large amounts of antibiotics used for human therapy, as well as for farm animals and even for fish in aquaculture, resulted in the selection of pathogenic bacteria resistant to multiple drugs. Multidrug resistance in bacteria may be generated by one of two mechanisms. First, these bacteria may accumulate multiple genes, each coding for resistance to a single drug, within a single cell. This accumulation occurs typically on resistance (R) plasmids. Second, multidrug resistance may also occur by the increased expression of genes that code for multidrug efflux pumps, extruding a wide range of drugs. This review discusses our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in both types of resistance. PMID:19231985

  4. Scratch behaviors in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chen

    2000-10-01

    As part of a large effort toward the fundamental understanding of scratch behaviors in polymeric materials, studies were carried out on a broad range of polymers, with an emphasis on automotive thermoplastic olefins (TPOs). Two types of scratch tests were performed in this research, i.e., Ford constant load and instrumented progressive load scratch tests. A scratch model proposed by Hamilton and Goodman was applied to understand the fundamental mechanics of the scratch process. Several characterization techniques were used to investigate the scratch damage mechanisms in polymers. Both testing results and the scratch model analysis indicate that certain rigidity in polymers is essential to give good scratch resistance. Fundamental understanding of the scratching process in terms of basic material characteristics such as Young's modulus, yield stress, tensile strength, friction coefficient, scratch hardness, penetration recovery and fracture toughness are discussed. Scratch damage investigation, on both surface and subsurface, shows that shear yielding is the main cause of the plastics flow scratch pattern, while tensile tear on the surface and shear induced fracture on the subsurface are the main damage mechanisms in the fracture scratch pattern. This study explains why automotive TPOs are susceptible to scratch under the current scratch test practiced in automotive industry. Shear deformation and fracture behavior in model TPOs are also studied using the Iosipescu shear test. Iosipescu shear deformation in terms of shear stress-strain curves of model TPOs is obtained experimentally. Shear fracture process and damage mechanisms in TPOs are also demonstrated and revealed. Further studies on the scratch damage in TPOs based on the roles of additives and fillers in the scratch behavior are addressed. The effects of phase morphology and toughening mechanisms on scratch behavior in TPOs are also discussed. This research has resulted in an increased understanding of the

  5. Resistance switching behavior of atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 film through possible formation of Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woongkyu; Yoo, Sijung; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Yeu, In Won; Chang, Hye Jung; Choi, Jung-Hae; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Waser, Rainer; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-02-01

    Identification of microstructural evolution of nanoscale conducting phase, such as conducting filament (CF), in many resistance switching (RS) devices is a crucial factor to unambiguously understand the electrical behaviours of the RS-based electronic devices. Among the diverse RS material systems, oxide-based redox system comprises the major category of these intriguing electronic devices, where the local, along both lateral and vertical directions of thin films, changes in oxygen chemistry has been suggested to be the main RS mechanism. However, there are systems which involve distinctive crystallographic phases as CF; the Magnéli phase in TiO2 is one of the very well-known examples. The current research reports the possible presence of distinctive local conducting phase in atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 RS thin film. The conducting phase was identified through extensive transmission electron microscopy studies, which indicated that oxygen-deficient Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phase was presumably present mainly along the grain boundaries of SrTiO3 after the unipolar set switching in Pt/TiN/SrTiO3/Pt structure. A detailed electrical characterization revealed that the samples showed typical bipolar and complementary RS after the memory cell was unipolar reset.

  6. Resistance switching behavior of atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 film through possible formation of Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woongkyu; Yoo, Sijung; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Yeu, In Won; Chang, Hye Jung; Choi, Jung-Hae; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Waser, Rainer; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-01-01

    Identification of microstructural evolution of nanoscale conducting phase, such as conducting filament (CF), in many resistance switching (RS) devices is a crucial factor to unambiguously understand the electrical behaviours of the RS-based electronic devices. Among the diverse RS material systems, oxide-based redox system comprises the major category of these intriguing electronic devices, where the local, along both lateral and vertical directions of thin films, changes in oxygen chemistry has been suggested to be the main RS mechanism. However, there are systems which involve distinctive crystallographic phases as CF; the Magnéli phase in TiO2 is one of the very well-known examples. The current research reports the possible presence of distinctive local conducting phase in atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 RS thin film. The conducting phase was identified through extensive transmission electron microscopy studies, which indicated that oxygen-deficient Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phase was presumably present mainly along the grain boundaries of SrTiO3 after the unipolar set switching in Pt/TiN/SrTiO3/Pt structure. A detailed electrical characterization revealed that the samples showed typical bipolar and complementary RS after the memory cell was unipolar reset. PMID:26830978

  7. Resistance switching behavior of atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 film through possible formation of Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woongkyu; Yoo, Sijung; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Yeu, In Won; Chang, Hye Jung; Choi, Jung-Hae; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Waser, Rainer; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-01-01

    Identification of microstructural evolution of nanoscale conducting phase, such as conducting filament (CF), in many resistance switching (RS) devices is a crucial factor to unambiguously understand the electrical behaviours of the RS-based electronic devices. Among the diverse RS material systems, oxide-based redox system comprises the major category of these intriguing electronic devices, where the local, along both lateral and vertical directions of thin films, changes in oxygen chemistry has been suggested to be the main RS mechanism. However, there are systems which involve distinctive crystallographic phases as CF; the Magnéli phase in TiO2 is one of the very well-known examples. The current research reports the possible presence of distinctive local conducting phase in atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 RS thin film. The conducting phase was identified through extensive transmission electron microscopy studies, which indicated that oxygen-deficient Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phase was presumably present mainly along the grain boundaries of SrTiO3 after the unipolar set switching in Pt/TiN/SrTiO3/Pt structure. A detailed electrical characterization revealed that the samples showed typical bipolar and complementary RS after the memory cell was unipolar reset. PMID:26830978

  8. Animal studies of addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Ahmed, Serge H

    2013-04-01

    It is increasingly recognized that studying drug taking in laboratory animals does not equate to studying genuine addiction, characterized by loss of control over drug use. This has inspired recent work aimed at capturing genuine addiction-like behavior in animals. In this work, we summarize empirical evidence for the occurrence of several DSM-IV-like symptoms of addiction in animals after extended drug use. These symptoms include escalation of drug use, neurocognitive deficits, resistance to extinction, increased motivation for drugs, preference for drugs over nondrug rewards, and resistance to punishment. The fact that addiction-like behavior can occur and be studied in animals gives us the exciting opportunity to investigate the neural and genetic background of drug addiction, which we hope will ultimately lead to the development of more effective treatments for this devastating disorder. PMID:23249442

  9. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  10. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  11. Power to Resist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, Janice

    1975-01-01

    Transferrable drug resistance has been observed in bacteria for over ten years. Concern now is that livestock that have been fed with grain supplemented with antibiotics for growth stimulation will infect humans with potentially dangerous resistant bacteria. (MA)

  12. Oxidation-resistant cermet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Chromium metal alloys and chromium oxide ceramic are combined to produce cermets with oxidation-resistant properties. Application of cermets includes use in hot corrosive environments requiring strong resistive materials.

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... major obstacles to understanding the issue of antimicrobial resistance is that the subject material appears abstract and is complex. This video was designed to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to veterinarians, livestock producers, ...

  14. Linguistic Resistance in the Murid Speech Community in Senegal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngom, Fallou

    2002-01-01

    Examines the religious and linguistic behavior of the Murid brotherhood in Touba, Senegal. Argues that the patterns of behavior found in the community are idiosyncratic of the brotherhood and set apart Murids from other religious groups. Argues that unlike other forms of resistance against French assimilation movements, Muridism represents one of…

  15. Sensitivity and Strength: Effects of Instructions on Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Chase, Philip N.

    2006-01-01

    Several research laboratories have found that instructed behavior can be less sensitive to changes in contingencies than shaped behavior. The current experiment examined whether these differences in sensitivity could be related to resistance to change. Two groups of subjects, who were matched on the basis of an initial disruption assessment, were…

  16. Cell shunt resistance and photovoltaic module performance

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T.J.; Basso, T.S.; Rummel, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    Shunt resistance of cells in photovoltaic modules can affect module power output and could indicate flawed manufacturing processes and reliability problems. The authors describe a two-terminal diagnostic method to directly measure the shunt resistance of individual cells in a series-connected module non-intrusively, without deencapsulation. Peak power efficiency vs. light intensity was measured on a 12-cell, series-connected, single crystalline module having relatively high cell shunt resistances. The module was remeasured with 0.5-, 1-, and 2-ohm resistors attached across each cell to simulate shunt resistances of several emerging technologies. Peak power efficiencies decreased dramatically at lower light levels. Using the PSpice circuit simulator, the authors verified that cell shunt and series resistances can indeed be responsible for the observed peak power efficiency vs. intensity behavior. The authors discuss the effect of basic cell diode parameters, i.e., shunt resistance, series resistance, and recombination losses, on PV module performance as a function of light intensity.

  17. Metallic behavior of lanthanum disilicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Robert G.; Bost, M. C.; Mahan, John E.

    1988-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of LaSi2 were prepared by reaction of sputter-deposited lanthanum layers with silicon wafers. Samples of the low-temperature tetragonal and the high-temperature orthorhombic phases were separately obtained. The room-temperature intrinsic resistivities were 24 and 57 microohm cm for the low- and high-temperature structures, respectively. Although lanthanum disilicide had been previously reported to be a semiconductor, classical metallic behavior was found for both phases.

  18. Resisting Mind Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1980-01-01

    Provides conceptual analyses of mind control techniques along with practical advice on how to resist these techniques. The authors stress that effective mind control stems more from everyday social relations than from exotic technological gimmicks. Suggestions are given for resisting persuasion, resisting systems, and challenging the system.…

  19. Grafting for disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary purpose of grafting vegetables worldwide has been to provide resistance to soil-borne diseases. The potential loss of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant combined with pathogen resistance to commonly used pesticides will make resistance to soil-borne pathogens even more important in the fu...

  20. Effect of Inquiry-Based Learning Approach on Student Resistance in a Science and Technology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sever, Demet; Guven, Meral

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the resistance behaviors of 7th grade students exhibited during their Science and Technology course teaching-learning processes, and to remove the identified resistance behaviors through teaching-learning processes that were constructed based on the inquiry-based learning approach. In the quasi-experimentally…

  1. Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Randolph M.

    2010-01-01

    In a perfect world, students would never talk back to school staff and never argue or fight with each other. They would complete all their assigned tasks, and disciplinary actions never would be needed. Unfortunately, people don't live in a perfect world. Student behavior is a daily concern. Teachers continue to refer students to the office as a…

  2. Behavior Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and consequences. Give your child a specified reward (positive reinforcement) every time she shows the desired behavior. Give your child a consequence (unwanted result or punishment) consistently when she has ... in a positive way. Most experts recommend using both medication and ...

  3. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  4. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  5. [Rodenticide resistance and consequences].

    PubMed

    Esther, A; Endepols, S; Freise, J; Klemann, N; Runge, M; Pelz, H-J

    2014-05-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides, such as warfarin was first described in 1958. Polymorphisms in the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) gene and respective substitutions of amino acids in the VKOR enzyme are the major cause for rodenticide resistance. Resistant Norway rats in Germany are characterized by the Tyr139Cys genotype, which is spread throughout the northwest of the country. Resistant house mice with the VKOR variants Tyr139Cys, Leu128Ser and Arg12Trp/Ala26Ser/Ala48Thr/Arg61Leu (spretus type) are distributed over a number of locations in Germany. Resistance can reduce management attempts with consequences for stored product protection, hygiene and animal health. Anticoagulants of the first generation (warfarin, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl) as well as bromadiolone and difenacoum are not an option for the control of resistant Norway rats. The same applies for house mice whereby the tolerance to compounds can be different between local incidences. Due to the higher toxicity and tendency to persist, the most potent anticoagulant rodenticides brodifacoum, flocoumafen and difethialone should be applied but only where resistance is known. In other cases less toxic anticoagulants should be preferred for rodent management in order to mitigate environmental risks. Resistance effects of further VKOR polymorphisms and their combinations, the spread of resistant rats and conditions supporting and reducing resistance should be investigated in order to improve resistance management strategies. PMID:24781908

  6. Genetics of metabolic resistance.

    PubMed

    Richter, Otto; Langemann, Dirk; Beffa, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide resistance has become a major issue for many weeds. Metabolic resistance refers to the biochemical processes within organisms that degrade herbicides to less toxic compounds, resulting in a shift of the dose response curve. This type of resistance involves polygenic inheritance. A model is presented linking the biochemical pathway of amino acid synthesis and the detoxifying pathway of an inhibitor of the key enzyme ALS. From this model, resistance factors for each biotype are derived, which are then applied to a polygenic population genetic model for an annual weed plant. Polygenic inheritance is described by a new approach based on tensor products of heredity matrices. Important results from the model are that low dose regimes favour fast emergence of resistant biotypes and that the emergence of resistant biotypes occurs as abrupt outbreaks. The model is used to evaluate strategies for the management of metabolic resistance. PMID:27424952

  7. EPA RESISTANCE MONITORING RESEARCH (NCR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2006 resistance management research program was organized around three components: development of resistance monitoring program for Bt corn using remote sensing, standardization of resistance assays, and testing of resistance management models. Each area of research has shown...

  8. The Effect of Human Behavior on the Design of an Information Retrieval System Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Zhang; Fine, Sara

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on human behavior in the information-seeking process, and identifies behaviors influencing the design of information retrieval system interfaces. Discusses the principles of saturation, concreteness, least resistance, familiarity, stimulation, certainty, simplicity, and following-form. (PEN)

  9. The resistance to change of observing.

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A; Magee, Adam; Dobberstein, Andria

    2003-01-01

    Observing responses produce contact with discriminative stimuli and have been considered analogous to attending. Many studies have examined the effects of reinforcement rate on the resistance to change of simple operant behavior, but nothing is known about the resistance to change of observing. Two experiments examined the effects of primary reinforcement rate on the resistance to change of observing behavior of pigeons. In Experiment 1, a multiple schedule of observing-response procedures was arranged. In a rich component, observing responses produced stimuli correlated with a high rate of random-interval (RI) reinforcement or extinction. In a lean component, observing responses produced stimuli correlated with a lower rate of RI reinforcement or extinction. In both components, observing responses produced the multiple-schedule stimuli on a fixed-interval 0.75-s schedule. In Experiment 2, a similar procedure was used, but observing in the rich and lean components produced schedule-correlated stimuli on an RI 15-s schedule. Observing in the rich component occurred at a higher rate and was more resistant to disruptions produced by presession feeding and response-independent food deliveries during intercomponent intervals. Despite more frequent observing during unsignaled periods of extinction than unsignaled periods of RI reinforcement, observing during extinction periods was less resistant to change. In addition, replicating the usual result, responding on the food key was generally more resistant to change in the presence of stimuli associated with higher reinforcement rates. These results suggest that quantitative descriptions of resistance to change derived with simple food-maintained responding may be applicable to observing, and perhaps by extension, to attending. PMID:14964708

  10. OPEC behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    This thesis aims to contribute to a further understanding of the real dynamics of OPEC production behavior and its impacts on the world oil market. A literature review in this area shows that the existing studies on OPEC still have some major deficiencies in theoretical interpretation and empirical estimation technique. After a brief background review in chapter 1, chapter 2 tests Griffin's market-sharing cartel model on the post-Griffin time horizon with a simultaneous system of equations, and an innovative hypothesis of OPEC's behavior (Saudi Arabia in particular) is then proposed based on the estimation results. Chapter 3 first provides a conceptual analysis of OPEC behavior under the framework of non-cooperative collusion with imperfect information. An empirical model is then constructed and estimated. The results of the empirical studies in this thesis strongly support the hypothesis that OPEC has operated as a market-sharing cartel since the early 1980s. In addition, the results also provide some support of the theory of non-cooperative collusion under imperfect information. OPEC members collude under normal circumstances and behave competitively at times in response to imperfect market signals of cartel compliance and some internal attributes. Periodic joint competition conduct plays an important role in sustaining the collusion in the long run. Saudi Arabia acts as the leader of the cartel, accommodating intermediate unfavorable market development and punishing others with a tit-for-tat strategy in extreme circumstances.

  11. Genetic resistance to flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Margo A; Perelygin, Andrey A

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to flavivirus-induced disease in mice was first discovered in the 1920s and was subsequently shown to be controlled by the resistant allele of a single dominant autosomal gene. While the majority of current laboratory mouse stains have a homozygous-susceptible phenotype, the resistant allele has been found to segregate in wild mouse populations in many different parts of the world. Resistance is flavivirus specific and extends to both mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses. Resistant animals are infected productively by flaviviruses but produce lower virus titers, especially in their brains, as compared to susceptible mice. Decreased virus production is observed in resistant animals even during a lethal infection and the times of disease onset and death are also delayed as compared to susceptible mice. An intact immune response is required to clear flaviviruses from resistant mice. The resistant phenotype is expressed constitutively and does not require interferon induction. The Flv gene was discovered using a positional cloning approach and identified as Oas1b. Susceptible mice produce a truncated Oas1b protein. A C820T transition in the fourth exon of the gene introduced a premature stop codon and was found in all susceptible mouse strains tested. Possible mechanisms by which the product of the resistant allele could confer the resistant phenotype are discussed. PMID:14689691

  12. Temporal Context, Preference, and Resistance to Change

    PubMed Central

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Thrailkill, Eric A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2011-01-01

    According to behavioral momentum theory, preference and relative resistance to change in concurrent-chains schedules are correlated and reflect the relative conditioned value of discriminative stimuli. In the present study, we explore the generality of this relation by manipulating the temporal context within a concurrent-chains procedure through changes in the duration of the initial links. Consistent with previous findings, preference for a richer terminal link was less extreme with longer initial links across three experiments with pigeons. In Experiment 1, relative resistance to change and preference were related inversely when responding was disrupted with response-independent food presentations during initial links, replicating a previous finding with rats. However, more food was presented with longer initial links, confounding the disrupter and initial-link duration. In Experiment 2, presession feeding was used instead and eliminated the negative relation between relative resistance to change and preference, but relative resistance to change was not sensitive to relative terminal-link reinforcement rates. In Experiment 3, with more extreme relative terminal-link reinforcement rates, increasing initial-link duration similarly decreased preference and relative resistance to change for the richer terminal link. Thus, when conditions of disruption are equal and assessed under the appropriate reinforcement conditions, changes in temporal context impact relative resistance to change and preference similarly. PMID:21909164

  13. Drug Resistance in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Sundar, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    The treatment options of leishmaniasis are limited and far from satisfactory. For more than 60 years, treatment of leishmaniasis has centered around pentavalent antimonials (Sbv). Widespread misuse has led to the emergence of Sbv resistance in the hyperendemic areas of North Bihar. Other antileishmanials could also face the same fate, especially in the anthroponotic cycle. The HIV/ visceral leishmaniasis (VL) coinfected patients are another potential source for the emergence of drug resistance. At present no molecular markers of resistance are available and the only reliable method for monitoring resistance of isolates is the technically demanding in vitro amastigote-macrophage model. As the armametrium of drugs for leishmaniasis is limited, it is important that effective monitoring of drug use and response should be done to prevent the spread of resistance. Regimens of simultaneous or sequential combinations should be seriously considered to limit the emergence of resistance. PMID:20606973

  14. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    de Luca, Carl; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2008-01-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the Metabolic syndrome. In this review, we focus on the interconnection between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause insulin resistance in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver by inhibiting insulin signal transduction. The sources of cytokines in insulin resistant states are the insulin target tissue themselves, primarily fat and liver, but to a larger extent the activated tissue resident macrophages. While the initiating factors of this inflammatory response remain to be fully determined, chronic inflammation in these tissues could cause localized insulin resistance via autocrine/paracrine cytokine signaling and systemic insulin resistance via endocrine cytokine signaling all of which contribute to the abnormal metabolic state. PMID:18053812

  15. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Yesim; Falk, Pamela; Mayhall, C. Glen

    2000-01-01

    After they were first identified in the mid-1980s, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) spread rapidly and became a major problem in many institutions both in Europe and the United States. Since VRE have intrinsic resistance to most of the commonly used antibiotics and the ability to acquire resistance to most of the current available antibiotics, either by mutation or by receipt of foreign genetic material, they have a selective advantage over other microorganisms in the intestinal flora and pose a major therapeutic challenge. The possibility of transfer of vancomycin resistance genes to other gram-positive organisms raises significant concerns about the emergence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We review VRE, including their history, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology, control measures, and treatment. PMID:11023964

  16. Bacterial Cheating Limits the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Xiao Chao, Hui; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tatiana; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removal of the antibiotic. The presence of a cooperative mechanism of resistance suggests that a cheater strain - which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic - may be able to take advantage of resistant cells. We find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We use a simple model in conjunction with difference equations to explain the observed population dynamics as a function of cell density and antibiotic concentration. Our experimental difference equations resemble the logistic map, raising the possibility of oscillations or even chaotic dynamics.

  17. Bed bugs evolved unique adaptive strategy to resist pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Gujar, Hemant; Gordon, Jennifer R.; Haynes, Kenneth F.; Potter, Michael F.; Palli, Subba R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic and post-genomic technologies have facilitated a genome-wide analysis of the insecticide resistance-associated genes in insects. Through bed bug, Cimex lectularius transcriptome analysis, we identified 14 molecular markers associated with pyrethroid resistance. Our studies revealed that most of the resistance-associated genes functioning in diverse mechanisms are expressed in the epidermal layer of the integument, which could prevent or slow down the toxin from reaching the target sites on nerve cells, where an additional layer of resistance (kdr) is possible. This strategy evolved in bed bugs is based on their unique morphological, physiological and behavioral characteristics and has not been reported in any other insect species. RNA interference-aided knockdown of resistance associated genes showed the relative contribution of each mechanism towards overall resistance development. Understanding the complexity of adaptive strategies employed by bed bugs will help in designing the most effective and sustainable bed bug control methods. PMID:23492626

  18. Evolution of resistance to quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vipin C.; Wood, Thomas K.; Kumar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    The major cause of mortality and morbidity in human beings is bacterial infection. Bacteria have developed resistance to most of the antibiotics primarily due to large scale and “indiscriminate” usage. The need is to develop novel mechanisms to treat bacterial infections. The expression of pathogenicity during bacterial infections is mediated by a cell density dependent phenomenon known as quorum sensing (QS). A wide array of QS systems (QSS) is operative in expressing the virulent behavior of bacterial pathogens. Each QSS may be mediated largely by a few major signals along with others produced in minuscule quantities. Efforts to target signal molecules and their receptors have proved effective in alleviating the virulent behavior of such pathogenic bacteria. These QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been reported to be effective in influencing the pathogenicity without affecting bacterial growth. However, evidence is accumulating that bacteria may develop resistance to QSIs. The big question is whether QSIs will meet the same fate as antibiotics? PMID:24194099

  19. Bacterial resistance to uncouplers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K; Naroditskaya, V; Ferrante, A; Fokina, I

    1994-12-01

    Uncoupler resistance presents a potential challenge to the conventional chemiosmotic coupling mechanism. In E. coli, an adaptive response to uncouplers was found in cell growing under conditions requiring oxidative phosphorylation. It is suggested that uncoupler-resistant mutants described in the earlier literature might represent a constitutive state of expression of this "low energy shock" adaptive response. In the environment, bacteria are confronted by nonclassical uncoupling factors such as organic solvents, heat, and extremes of pH. It is suggested that the low energy shock response will aid the cell in coping with the effects of natural uncoupling factors. The genetic analysis of uncoupler resistance has only recently began, and is yielding interesting and largely unexpected results. In Bacillus subtilis, a mutation in fatty acid desaturase causes an increased content of saturated fatty acids in the membrane and increased uncoupler resistance. The protonophoric efficiency of uncouplers remains unchanged in the mutants, inviting nonorthodox interpretations of the mechanism of resistance. In E. coli, two loci conferring resistance to CCCP and TSA were cloned and were found to encode multidrug resistance pumps. Resistance to one of the uncouplers, TTFB, remained unchanged in strains mutated for the MDRs, suggesting a resistance mechanism different from uncoupler extrusion. PMID:7721726

  20. Airflow resistance in soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenghe, R. N.; Nimkar, P. M.; Shirkole, S. S.; Shinde, K. J.

    2012-04-01

    Resistance of material to airflow is an important factor to consider in the design of a dryer or an aeration system. The airflow resistance of soybean was determined with the modified airflow resistance apparatus. It was found that pressure drop increased with increase in airflow rate, bulk density, bed depth and decreased with moisture content. Modified Shedd equation, Hukill and Ives equation and modified Ergun equation were examined for pressure drop prediction. Airflow resistance was accurately described by modified Shedd equation followed by Hukill and Ives equation and modified Ergun equation. The developed statistical model comprised of airflow rate, moisture content and bulk density could fit pressure drop data reasonably well.

  1. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  2. TSH resistance revisited.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects of hormone receptors are the most common form of end-organ hormone resistance. One example of such defects is TSH resistance, which is caused by biallelic inactivating mutations in the TSH receptor gene (TSHR). TSH, a master regulator of thyroid functions, affects virtually all cellular processes involving thyroid hormone production, including thyroidal iodine uptake, thyroglobulin iodination, reuptake of iodinated thyroglobulin and thyroid cell growth. Resistance to TSH results in defective thyroid hormone production from the neonatal period, namely congenital hypothyroidism. Classically, clinical phenotypes of TSH resistance due to inactivating TSHR mutations were thought to vary depending on the residual mutant receptor activity. Nonfunctional mutations in the two alleles produce severe thyroid hypoplasia with overt hypothyroidism (uncompensated TSH resistance), while hypomorphic mutations in at least one allele produce normal-sized thyroid gland with preserved hormone-producing capacity (compensated TSH resistance). More recently, a new subgroup of TSH resistance (nonclassic TSH resistance) that is characterized by paradoxically high thyroidal iodine uptake has been reported. In this article, the pathophysiology and clinical features of TSH resistance due to inactivating TSHR mutations are reviewed, with particular attention to the nonclassic form. PMID:25797365

  3. Acid evaporation property in chemically amplified resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Itani, Toshiro; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Yamana, Mitsuharu; Samoto, Norihiko; Kasama, Kunihiko

    1997-07-01

    The lithographic performance of a chemically amplified resist system very much depends on the photo-generated acid structure. In a previous paper, we reported the molecular structure dependence of two typical photo-generated acids (aromatic sulfonic acid and alkyl sulfonic acid) from the viewpoints of lithographic performance and acid characteristics such as acid generation efficiency, acid diffusion behavior and acid evaporation property. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of the remaining solvent in a resist film on the acid evaporation property. Four types of two-component chemically amplified positive KrF resists were prepared consisting of tert-butoxycarbonyl (t-BOC) protected polyhydroxystyrene and sulfonic acid derivative photo-acid generator (PAG). Here, a different combination of two types of PAGs [2,4-dimethylbenzenesulfonic acid (aromatic sulfonic acid) derivative PAG and cyclohexanesulfonic acid (alkyl sulfonic acid) derivative PAG] and two types of solvents (propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate; PGMEA and ethyl lactate; EL) were evaluated. The aromatic sulfonic acid was able to evaporate easily during post exposure bake (PEB) treatment, but the alkyl sulfonic acid was not. The higher evaporation property of aromatic sulfonic acid might be due to the higher vapor pressure and the longer acid diffusion length. Furthermore, the amount of aromatic sulfonic acid in the PGMEA resist was reduced by more than that in the EL resist. The amount of acid loss also became smaller at a higher prebake temperature. The concentration of the remaining solvent in the resist film decreased with the increasing prebake temperature. We think that the acid evaporation property was affected by the remaining solvent in the resist, film; the large amount of remaining solvent promoted the acid diffusion and eventually accelerated the acid evaporation from the resist film surface in the PGMEA resist. In summary, the acid evaporation property depends on both the acid

  4. Erosion-resistance of plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Z.; Zhang, X.; Song, J.

    1999-12-01

    Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}/NiCr, ZrO{sub 2}/NiCr, WTiC{sub 2}/NiCr, and X40 were plasma sprayed on the substrate 1Cr18NI9Ti in order to solve the erosion wear at high temperature encountered in the oil-refining industry. A series of properties of the coatings, including their microstructure, hardness, and erosion-behavior, have been tested. The test results show that the properties of the coatings have a significant effect on their erosion-resistant performance. Good erosion-resistant materials need to be hard and tough. Both Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}/NiCr and X40 have good erosion resistance at elevated temperature.

  5. Feedback control of resistive instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Furth, H.P.; Park, W.; Chen, L.

    1985-12-01

    Resistive instabilities are responsible for much of the global behavior and the determination of the possible domains of operation of tokamaks. Their successful control could have definite advantages, even making available new regimes of operation. Elimination of sawtoothing might allow operation with higher currents and more peaked current profiles, with q on axis well below unity. In this work different feedback schemes are explored. Simple analytical derivations of the effects of local heating and current drive feedback are presented. Although control of modes with m greater than or equal to 2 is fairly straightforward, the control of the m = 1 mode is more difficult because of its proximity to ideal instability. The most promising scheme utilizes high energy trapped particles. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance: Daptomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction in clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key front-line antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP-resistance (R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP resistance are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have offered novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria. PMID:26495887

  7. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective ...

  8. Resistance gene capture.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, D A; Mazel, D

    1999-10-01

    Integrons are the primary mechanism for antibiotic-resistance gene capture and dissemination among Gram-negative bacteria. The recent finding of super-integron structures in the genomes of several bacterial species has expanded their role in genome evolution and suggests that they are the source of mobile multi-resistant integrons. PMID:10508722

  9. Mold-Resistant Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that one of the surest ways to prevent indoor air quality and mold issues is to use preventive construction materials, discussing typical resistance to dealing with mold problems (usually budget-related) and describing mold-resistant construction, which uses concrete masonry, brick, and stone and is intended to withstand inevitable…

  10. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2016-04-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have not only emerged in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic "attack" is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. "Survival of the fittest" is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material, or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and to devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice, providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  11. Resistance, Reactance, and Consultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jan N.; Falk, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a review of techniques for dealing with consultee resistance. Suggests the social psychological theory of reactance is a useful conceptual framework for considering resistance in consultation. Discusses examples of its application, variables that predict the likely effectiveness of a reactance utilization intervention, and ethical issues.…

  12. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chellat, Mathieu F; Raguž, Luka; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human-pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last-resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled "Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow" triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  13. Paraquat resistance in conyza.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, E P; Nakatani, H Y; Dodge, A D; Penner, D; Arntzen, C J

    1985-04-01

    A biotype of Conyza bonariensis (L.) Cronq. (identical to Conyza linefolia in other publications) originating in Egypt is resistant to the herbicide 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium ion (paraquat). Penetration of the cuticle by [(14)C]paraquat was greater in the resistant biotype than the susceptible (wild) biotype; therefore, resistance was not due to differences in uptake. The resistant and susceptible biotypes were indistinguishable by measuring in vitro photosystem I partial reactions using paraquat, 6,7-dihydrodipyrido [1,2-alpha:2',1'-c] pyrazinediium ion (diquat), or 7,8-dihydro-6H-dipyrido [1,2-alpha:2',1'-c] [1,4] diazepinediium ion (triquat) as electron acceptors. Therefore, alteration at the electron acceptor level of photosystem I is not the basis for resistance. Chlorophyll fluorescence measured in vivo was quenched in the susceptible biotype by leaf treatment with the bipyridinium herbicides. Resistance to quenching of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence was observed in the resistant biotype, indicating that the herbicide was excluded from the chloroplasts. Movement of [(14)C] paraquat was restricted in the resistant biotype when excised leaves were supplied [(14)C]paraquat through the petiole. We propose that the mechanism of resistance to paraquat is exclusion of paraquat from its site of action in the chloroplast by a rapid sequestration mechanism. No differential binding of paraquat to cell walls isolated from susceptible and resistant biotypes could be detected. The exact site and mechanism of paraquat binding to sequester the herbicide remains to be determined. PMID:16664176

  14. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  15. Highly durable and flexible memory based on resistance switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungho; Yarimaga, Oktay; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2010-04-01

    Resistance random access memory (RRAM) consisting of stacked Al/TiOx/Al structure is demonstrated on a flexible and transparent substrate. To improve cell to cell uniformity, TiOx formed by atomic layer deposition is used for resistive switching material. The simple cross-bar structure of the RRAM and good ductility of aluminum electrode results in excellent flexibility and mechanical endurance. Particularly, bipolar and unipolar resistive switching (BRS, URS) behavior appeared simultaneously were investigated. Depending on the current compliance, BRS or URS could be selectively observed. Furthermore, the permanent transition from BRS to URS was observed with a specific current compliance. To understand this transition behavior, the γ-ray irradiation effect into resistive switching is primarily investigated.

  16. Thin film deposition of metal oxides in resistance switching devices: electrode material dependence of resistance switching in manganite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toshihiro; Homma, Kohei; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-02-01

    The electric-pulse-induced resistance switching in layered structures composed of polycrystalline Pr1- x Ca x MnO3 (PCMO) sandwiched between Pt bottom electrode and top electrodes of various metals (metal/PCMO/Pt) was studied by direct current current-voltage ( I- V) measurements and alternating current impedance spectroscopy. The I- V characteristics showed nonlinear, asymmetric, and hysteretic behavior in PCMO-based devices with top electrode of Al, Ni, and Ag, while no hysteretic behavior was observed in Au/PCMO/Pt devices. The PCMO-based devices with hysteretic I- V curves exhibited an electric-pulse-induced resistance switching between high and low resistance states. Impedance spectroscopy was employed to study the origin of the resistance switching. From comparison of the impedance spectra between the high and low resistance states, the resistance switching in the PCMO-based devices was mainly due to the resistance change in the interface between the film and the electrode. The electronic properties of the devices showed stronger correlation with the oxidation Gibbs free energy than with the work function of the electrode metal, which suggests that the interface impedance is due to an interfacial oxide layer of the electrode metal. The interface component observed by impedance spectroscopy in the Al/PCMO/Pt device might be due to Al oxide layer formed by oxidation of Al top electrode. It is considered that the interfacial oxide layer plays a dominant role in the bipolar resistance switching in manganite film-based devices.

  17. Induction of Multidrug Resistance Mechanism in Escherichia coli Biofilms by Interplay between Tetracycline and Ampicillin Resistance Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    May, Thithiwat; Ito, Akinobu; Okabe, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms gain resistance to various antimicrobial agents, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes is thought to contribute to a biofilm-mediated antibiotic resistance. Here we showed the interplay between the tetracycline resistance efflux pump TetA(C) and the ampicillin resistance gene (blaTEM-1) in biofilms of Escherichia coli harboring pBR322 in the presence of the mixture of ampicillin and tetracycline. E. coli in the biofilms could obtain the high-level resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, penicillin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol during biofilm development and maturation as a result of the interplay between the marker genes on the plasmids, the increase of plasmid copy number, and consequently the induction of the efflux systems on the bacterial chromosome, especially the EmrY/K and EvgA/S pumps. In addition, we characterized the overexpression of the TetA(C) pump that contributed to osmotic stress response and was involved in the induction of capsular colanic acid production, promoting formation of mature biofilms. However, this investigated phenomenon was highly dependent on the addition of the subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotic mixture, and the biofilm resistance behavior was limited to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Thus, marker genes on plasmids played an important role in both resistance of biofilm cells to antibiotics and in formation of mature biofilms, as they could trigger specific chromosomal resistance mechanisms to confer a high-level resistance during biofilm formation. PMID:19721076

  18. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350°C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (TN=106 K) and x=0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as in the case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ρc(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ρa(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2.

  19. Resistance switching memory in perovskite oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.B. Liu, J.-M.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance switching behavior has recently attracted great attentions for its application as resistive random access memories (RRAMs) due to a variety of advantages such as simple structure, high-density, high-speed and low-power. As a leading storage media, the transition metal perovskite oxide owns the strong correlation of electrons and the stable crystal structure, which brings out multifunctionality such as ferroelectric, multiferroic, superconductor, and colossal magnetoresistance/electroresistance effect, etc. The existence of rich electronic phases, metal–insulator transition and the nonstoichiometric oxygen in perovskite oxide provides good platforms to insight into the resistive switching mechanisms. In this review, we first introduce the general characteristics of the resistance switching effects, the operation methods and the storage media. Then, the experimental evidences of conductive filaments, the transport and switching mechanisms, and the memory performances and enhancing methods of perovskite oxide based filamentary RRAM cells have been summarized and discussed. Subsequently, the switching mechanisms and the performances of the uniform RRAM cells associating with the carrier trapping/detrapping and the ferroelectric polarization switching have been discussed. Finally, the advices and outlook for further investigating the resistance switching and enhancing the memory performances are given.

  20. Linear waves in a resistive plasma with Hall current

    SciTech Connect

    Almaguer, J.A. )

    1992-10-01

    Dispersion relations for the case of a magnetized plasma are determined taking into account the Hall current and a constant resistivity, {eta}, in Ohm's law. It is found that the Hall effect is relevant only for parallel (to the equilibrium magnetic field) wave numbers in the case of uniform plasmas, giving place to a dispersive behavior. In particular, the cases of {eta}{r arrow}0 and small (nonzero) resistivity are discussed.

  1. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  2. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  3. Linezolid Resistance in Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Stefania; Bongiorno, Dafne; Mongelli, Gino; Campanile, Floriana

    2010-01-01

    Linezolid, the first oxazolidinone to be used clinically, is effective in the treatment of infections caused by various Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus. It has been used successfully for the treatment of patients with endocarditis and bacteraemia, osteomyelitis, joint infections and tuberculosis and it is often used for treatment of complicated infections when other therapies have failed. Linezolid resistance in Gram-positive cocci has been encountered clinically as well as in vitro, but it is still a rare phenomenon. The resistance to this antibiotic has been, until now, entirely associated with distinct nucleotide substitutions in domain V of the 23S rRNA genes. The number of mutated rRNA genes depends on the dose and duration of linezolid exposure and has been shown to influence the level of linezolid resistance. Mutations in associated ribosomal proteins also affect linezolid activity. A new phenicol and clindamycin resistance phenotype has recently been found to be caused by an RNA methyltransferase designated Cfr. This gene confers resistance to lincosamides, oxazolidinones, streptogramin A, phenicols and pleuromutilins, decrease the susceptibility of S. aureus to tylosin, to josamycin and spiramycin and thus differs from erm rRNA methylase genes. Research into new oxazolidinones with improved characteristics is ongoing. Data reported in patent applications demonstrated that some oxazolidinone derivatives, also with improved characteristics with respect to linezolid, are presently under study: at least three of them are in an advanced phase of development.

  4. Some verbal behavior about verbal behavior

    PubMed Central

    Salzinger, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    Beginning with behavior analysts' tendency to characterize verbal behavior as “mere” verbal behavior, the author reviews his own attempt to employ it to influence both his staff and policies of our government. He then describes its role in psychopathology, its effect on speakers in healing themselves and on engendering creativity. The paper ends by calling to our attention the role of verbal behavior in the construction of behavior analysis. PMID:22478393

  5. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  6. THE BEHAVIOR OF MICROORGANISMS RESISTANT TO MERCURY FROM PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is extensive mercury contamination surrounding a chloralkali plant in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan that operated from 1970 to 1990. High-level mercury contamination exists within the confines of the plant, at nearby off-site waste storage and evaporation ponds, in Balkyldak Lake w...

  7. Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An exercise device 10 is particularly well suited for use in low gravity environments, and includes a frame 12 with plurality of resistance elements 30,82 supported in parallel on the frame. A load transfer member 20 is moveable relative to the frame for transferring the applied force to the free end of each captured resistance element. Load selection template 14 is removably secured both to the load transfer member, and a plurality of capture mechanisms engage the free end of corresponding resistance elements. The force applying mechanism 53 may be a handle, harness or other user interface for applying a force to move the load transfer member.

  8. Method of stimulus combination impacts resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Bai, John Y H

    2015-07-01

    Reinforcing an alternative response in the presence of the stimuli governing a target response increases resistance to extinction of target responding, relative to training target responding on its own. Conversely, training alternative and target responses in the presence of different stimuli and combining those stimuli only decreases resistance to extinction of target responding, relative to target responding on its own. The present study assessed how different methods of combining discriminative stimuli influence resistance to extinction of responding in pigeons. As in previous studies, combining stimuli across different keys only decreased resistance to extinction of target responding relative to target responding on its own. In comparison, combining stimuli on the same key initially increased resistance to extinction of target responding, but repeated tests resulted in similar levels of responding as target responding with stimuli combined on separate keys. Moreover, greater overall reinforcement rates produced greater resistance to extinction with both methods of combining stimuli, consistent with behavioral momentum theory. These findings reveal several behavioral processes influence the outcome of combining stimuli--including perceptual processes, discriminative control by contingencies, response competition, and behavioral momentum. PMID:25929758

  9. All about Insulin Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... news is that cutting calories, being active, and losing weight can reverse insulin resistance and lower your ... you’ll lose weight. Studies have shown that losing even 7% of your weight, may help. For ...

  10. Resistance to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel; Wakelee, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Identification of driver mutations in adenocarcinoma of the lung has revolutionized the treatment of this disease. It is now standard of care to look for activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and translocations in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) or ROS1 in all newly diagnosed adenocarcinoma of the lung, and in many patients with squamous cell carcinoma as well. Recognition of multiple other lung cancer driver mutations has also expanded treatment options. Targeted treatments of these mutations lead to rapid and prolonged responses, but resistance inevitably develops. Until recently, traditional chemotherapy was the only alternative at that time, but better understanding of resistance mechanisms has lead to additional therapeutic options. These mechanisms of resistance and treatments are the focus of this chapter. Understanding of mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance is touched upon, along with a brief discussion of immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27535395

  11. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep apnea; and cigarette smoking. [ Top ] Does sleep matter? Yes. Studies show that untreated sleep problems, especially ... a severe form of insulin resistance may have dark patches of skin, usually on the back of ...

  12. Temperature Coefficient of Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, John N.

    1990-01-01

    Described are the apparatus and procedures needed for a demonstration of the measurement of the electrical resistance of metals as a function of temperature using a microcomputer interface. Discussed are materials, apparatus construction, and experimental results. (CW)

  13. Skid Resistance Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Skidding causes many traffic accidents. Streets and highways with skid-resisting surfaces reduce the incidence of such accidents. In fact, resurfacing roads to improve skid resistance is now required by federal law. Skid resistance is measured by road testing with specially equipped skid trailers. A project underway at NASA-Langley may considerably reduce the cost of skid trailers, thus making them more widely available to highway departments. For testing the skid resistance of aircraft runways, Langley engineers developed a relatively inexpensive test vehicle and a "pulsed braking" technique that is now being applied experimentally to road testing. The vehicle is a standard automobile modified to incorporate instrumentation, special test tires and valves, and a trailing fifth wheel for monitoring distance and velocity. The instrumentation includes a low-cost meter, a set of accelerometers that sense motion changes, and a chart recorder.

  14. Pathways to Tamoxifen Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Riggins, Rebecca B.; Schrecengost, Randy S.; Guerrero, Michael S.; Bouton, Amy H.

    2007-01-01

    Therapies that target the synthesis of estrogen or the function of estrogen receptor(s) have been developed to treat breast cancer. While these approaches have proven to be beneficial to a large number of patients, both de novo and acquired resistance to these drugs is a significant problem. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to resistance have provided a means to begin to predict patient responses to these drugs and develop rational approaches for combining therapeutic agents to circumvent or desensitize the resistant phenotype. Here, we review common mechanisms of antiestrogen resistance and discuss the implications for prediction of response and design of effective combinatorial treatments. PMID:17475399

  15. Behavior therapy and callous-unemotional traits: Effects of a pilot study examining modified behavioral contingencies on child behavior

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Natalie V.; Haas, Sarah M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Willoughby, Michael T.; Helseth, Sarah A.; Crum, Kathleen I.; Coles, Erika K.; Pelham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The conduct problems of children with callous-unemotional traits (i.e., lack of empathy, guilt/lack of caring behaviors) (CU) are particularly resistant to current behavioral interventions, and it is possible that differential sensitivities to punishment and reward may underlie this resistance. Children with conduct problems and CU (CPCU) are less responsive to behavioral punishment techniques (e.g., time-out), however reward techniques (e.g., earning points for prizes or activities) are effective for reducing conduct problems. This study examined the efficacy of modified behavioral interventions, which de-emphasized punishment (condition B) and emphasized reward techniques (condition C), compared to a standard behavioral intervention (condition A). Interventions were delivered through a Summer Treatment Program over seven weeks with an A-B-A-C-A-BC-A design to a group of eleven children (7–11 years; 91% male). All children were diagnosed with either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, in addition to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Results revealed the best treatment response occurred during the low punishment condition, with rates of negative behavior (e.g., aggression, teasing, stealing) increasing over the seven weeks. However, there was substantial individual variability in treatment response, and several children demonstrated improvement during the modified intervention conditions. Future research is necessary to disentangle treatment effects from order effects, and implications of group treatment of CPCU children (i.e., deviancy training) are discussed. PMID:25022772

  16. Resistive random access memory utilizing ferritin protein with Pt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenuma, Mutsunori; Kawano, Kentaro; Zheng, Bin; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Yoshii, Shigeo; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2011-05-01

    This study reports controlled single conductive paths found in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) formed by embedding Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in NiO film. Homogeneous Pt NPs produced and placed by ferritin protein produce electric field convergence which leads to controlled conductive path formation. The ReRAM with Pt NPs shows stable switching behavior. A Pt NP density decrease results in an increase of OFF state resistance and decrease of forming voltage, whereas ON resistance was independent of the Pt NP density, which indicates that a single metal NP in a memory cell will achieve low power and stable operation.

  17. Noise on resistive switching: a Fokker–Planck approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G. A.; Grosz, D. F.; Fierens, P. I.

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of internal and external noise on the phenomenon of resistive switching. We consider a non-harmonic external driving signal and provide a theoretical framework to explain the observed behavior in terms of the related Fokker–Planck equations. It is found that internal noise causes an enhancement of the resistive contrast and that noise proves to be advantageous when considering short driving pulses. In the case of external noise, however, noise only has the effect of degrading the resistive contrast. Furthermore, we find a relationship between the noise amplitude and the driving signal pulsewidth that constrains the persistence of the resistive state. In particular, results suggest that strong and short driving pulses favor a longer persistence time, an observation that may find applications in the field of high-integration high-speed resistive memory devices.

  18. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  19. Resistant hypertension - an update.

    PubMed

    Pasha, K; Towhiduzzaman, M; Manwar, A; Jahan, M U

    2015-04-01

    Patients with hypertension are increasing in Bangladesh. Among these patients a growing number of patients are having resistant hypertension faced by both primary care physicians and specialists. There is no data regarding prevalence of resistant hypertension in Bangladesh, but clinical trials abroad suggests that it is not rare, involving perhaps 20% to 30% of study participants. Cardiovascular risk is undoubtedly increased in such patients and the condition is often complicated by multiple other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, sleep apnea, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Resistant hypertension is almost always multifactorial in etiology. Successful treatment requires identification and reversal of lifestyle factors contributing to treatment resistance; diagnosis and appropriate treatment of secondary causes of hypertension; and use of effective multi drug regimens. Studies of resistant hypertension are limited by the high cardiovascular risk of patients within this subgroup, which generally precludes safe withdrawal of medications; presence of multiple disease processes and their associated medical therapies, which confound interpretation of study results. Therefore we should concentrate on expanding our knowledge of the causes of resistant hypertension which will allow for more effective prevention and/or treatment which is essential to improve long-term clinical management of this condition. PMID:26007281

  20. Sand resistance of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Michael; Wood, Caryl; Martinez, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Like water resistance in sunscreens, sand resistance in sunscreens is the ability of the sunscreen to retain its effectiveness while undergoing sand treatment. The influence of the type of sand on the sand resistance of sunscreens has not been described. The sand resistance of a control standard sunscreen, P2, and data on three grades of Quickrete commercial grade sand, #1961, #1962, and #1152, are described. These sands represent a fine sand, a medium sand, and an all-purpose sand. Using the methodology described in the 2007 proposed amendment of the Final Monograph (1) with one exception, we obtained an SPF of 16.5 (1.6) for the control standard, compared to the expected SPF of 16.3 (3.4). After a five-minute treatment of sand #1961, #1962, or #1151, the SPF of the control standard was 18.3 (1.6), 18.4 (2.0), and 17.5 (2.2), respectively. Thus, all three sands exhibited a similar sand-resistance response. Thus, there was no significant difference in the average SPF with and without sand. The medium grade sand, Quickrete commercial grade #1962, was preferred for sand-resistance testing because the fine sand was difficult to remove from the subject's backs and the coarse sand was unpleasant to the subjects. PMID:23193889

  1. Electro-dewatering of activated sludge: Electrical resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Conrardy, Jean-Baptiste; Vaxelaire, Jean; Olivier, Jérémy

    2016-09-01

    The significant risk of ohmic heating and the high electric energy consumption at terminal stages of the dewatering are two problems that hamper the development of the electro-dewatering (EDW) technology. In the future prospect of studying these two issues, it is important to provide and analyse quantitative data relative to the behavior of the electric resistance in EDW. It was the main goal of this study. It showed that the electric resistance of the complete system (cake + filter cloth) depended on the cake dryness. It increased sharply when the solids content exceeded around 45%.The solids loading also influenced the apparent resistance at the beginning of the process. The electric resistance of the filter cloth represented about 20% of the total resistance. It remained relatively constant over the process except at the terminal stage where it generally increased sharply. The use of conductive filter, such as metallic cloth, enabled to decrease the electric resistance and reduce the energy consumption of the process. The electric resistance decreased across the cake from the anode to the cathode. This behavior may be explained by several phenomena such as the ions migration and their interaction with the solid, the decrease of dry solids content from the anode to the cathode and the gas presence at the anode (due to electrolysis reaction). PMID:27192354

  2. Dual operation characteristics of resistance random access memory in indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jyun-Bao; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Chang, Ting-Chang; Huang, Jheng-Jie; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tseng, Hsueh-Chih; Sze, Simon M.

    2014-04-14

    In this study, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors can be operated either as transistors or resistance random access memory devices. Before the forming process, current-voltage curve transfer characteristics are observed, and resistance switching characteristics are measured after a forming process. These resistance switching characteristics exhibit two behaviors, and are dominated by different mechanisms. The mode 1 resistance switching behavior is due to oxygen vacancies, while mode 2 is dominated by the formation of an oxygen-rich layer. Furthermore, an easy approach is proposed to reduce power consumption when using these resistance random access memory devices with the amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor.

  3. Tribological and corrosion behaviors of carburized AISI 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong-on, Atcharawadi; Boonruang, Chatdanai

    2016-01-01

    AISI 4340 steel is widely used in automotive and aircraft industries as gear components. In such applications, surface hardening processes such as carburizing are required in order to improve the life time of the components. There are many studies showing the tribological behavior of the carburized steel, but the corrosion behavior has not yet been clarified. This paper reports on both tribological and corrosion behaviors of the carburized AISI 4340 steel. Factor associated with carburizing, such as the quantities of deposited carbon, dissolved carbon, and formed Cr23C6 and Fe3C, affect the tribological and corrosion behaviors of the steel by improving hardness, friction, lubrication, and wear resistance; but corrosion resistance is reduced. The dissolved carbon affects the formation of the oxide layer of the carburized steel, by obstructing the continuous oxide layer formation and by decreasing the chromium content of the steel, leading to the decrease in the corrosion resistance of the steel.

  4. CORRELATION OF AIRWAY RESISTANCE WITH FORCED RANDOM NOISE RESISTANCE PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The correlation between airway resistance (RAW) measured in a plethysmograph and three respiratory resistance parameters measured by forced random noise was evaluated. Forced random noise resistance parameters were the average resistance between 5 and 9 Hz (R5-9), the average res...

  5. Resistant starches and health.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Emam, Azadeh; Augustin, Livia S A; Jenkins, David J A

    2004-01-01

    It was initially hypothesized that resistant starches, i.e., starch that enters the colon, would have protective effects on chronic colonic diseases, including reduction of colon cancer risk and in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Recent studies have confirmed the ability of resistant starch to increase fecal bulk, increase the molar ratio of butyrate in relation to other short-chain fatty acids, and dilute fecal bile acids. However the ability of resistant starch to reduce luminal concentrations of compounds that are damaging to the colonic mucosa, including fecal ammonia, phenols, and N-nitroso compounds, still requires clear demonstration. As such, the effectiveness of resistant starch in preventing or treating colonic diseases remains to be assessed. Nevertheless, there is a fraction of what has been termed resistant (RS1) starch, which enters the colon and acts as slowly digested or lente carbohydrate in the small intestine. Foods in this class are low glycemic index and have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic disease. They have been associated with systemic physiological effects such as reduced postprandial insulin levels and higher HDL cholesterol levels. Consumption of low glycemic index foods has been shown to be related to reductions in risk of coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has in turn been related to a higher risk of colon cancer. If carbohydrates have a protective role in colon cancer prevention this may lie partly in the systemic effects of low glycemic index foods. The colonic advantages of different carbohydrates, varying in their glycemic index and resistant starch content, therefore, remain to be determined. However, as recent positive research findings continue to mount, there is reason for optimism over the possible health advantages of those resistant starches, which are slowly digested in the small intestine. PMID:15287678

  6. Fourteen years in resistance.

    PubMed

    Livermore, David M

    2012-04-01

    Resistance trends have changed greatly over the 14 years (1997-2011) whilst I was Director of the UK Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring and Reference Laboratory (ARMRL). Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) first rose, then fell with improved infection control, although with the decline of one major clone beginning before these improvements. Resistant pneumococci too have declined following conjugate vaccine deployment. If the situation against Gram-positive pathogens has improved, that against Gram-negatives has worsened, with the spread of (i) quinolone- and cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, (ii) Acinetobacter with OXA carbapenemases, (iii) Enterobacteriaceae with biochemically diverse carbapenemases and (iv) gonococci resistant to fluoroquinolones and, latterly, cefixime. Laboratory, clinical and commercial aspects have also changed. Susceptibility testing is more standardised, with pharmacodynamic breakpoints. Treatments regimens are more driven by guidelines. The industry has fewer big profitable companies and more small companies without sales income. There is good and bad here. The quality of routine susceptibility testing has improved, but its speed has not. Pharmacodynamics adds science, but over-optimism has led to poor dose selection in several trials. Guidelines discourage poor therapy but concentrate selection onto a diminishing range of antibiotics, threatening their utility. Small companies are more nimble, but less resilient. Last, more than anything, the world has changed, with the rise of India and China, which account for 33% of the world's population and increasingly provide sophisticated health care, but also have huge resistance problems. These shifts present huge challenges for the future of chemotherapy and for the edifice of modern medicine that depends upon it. PMID:22386741

  7. Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, J. M.; Foxx, R. M.; Jacobson, J. W.; Green, G.; Mulick, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the origins and characteristics of the positive behavior support (PBS) movement and examines those features in the context of the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA). We raise a number of concerns about PBS as an approach to delivery of behavioral services and its impact on how ABA is viewed by those in human services. We…

  8. Antibiotic resistance in wild birds

    PubMed Central

    Bonnedahl, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been isolated from a multitude of wild bird species. Several studies strongly indicate transmission of resistant bacteria from human rest products to wild birds. There is evidence suggesting that wild birds can spread resistant bacteria through migration and that resistant bacteria can be transmitted from birds to humans and vice versa. Through further studies of the spatial and temporal distribution of resistant bacteria in wild birds, we can better assess their role and thereby help to mitigate the increasing global problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:24697355

  9. Spore Resistance Properties.

    PubMed

    Setlow, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Spores of various Bacillus and Clostridium species are among the most resistant life forms known. Since the spores of some species are causative agents of much food spoilage, food poisoning, and human disease, and the spores of Bacillus anthracis are a major bioweapon, there is much interest in the mechanisms of spore resistance and how these spores can be killed. This article will discuss the factors involved in spore resistance to agents such as wet and dry heat, desiccation, UV and γ-radiation, enzymes that hydrolyze bacterial cell walls, and a variety of toxic chemicals, including genotoxic agents, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, acid, and alkali. These resistance factors include the outer layers of the spore, such as the thick proteinaceous coat that detoxifies reactive chemicals; the relatively impermeable inner spore membrane that restricts access of toxic chemicals to the spore core containing the spore's DNA and most enzymes; the low water content and high level of dipicolinic acid in the spore core that protect core macromolecules from the effects of heat and desiccation; the saturation of spore DNA with a novel group of proteins that protect the DNA against heat, genotoxic chemicals, and radiation; and the repair of radiation damage to DNA when spores germinate and return to life. Despite their extreme resistance, spores can be killed, including by damage to DNA, crucial spore proteins, the spore's inner membrane, and one or more components of the spore germination apparatus. PMID:26104355

  10. MSMA resistance studies.

    PubMed

    Camper, N D; Keese, R J; Coker, P S

    2004-05-01

    Monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA)-resistant and -susceptible common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were treated with MSMA. Plant parameters analyzed were: glutathione synthetase activity, selected amino acid (arginine, glutamic acid, alanine, citrulline, glutamine, and glutathione) content and arsenic content (MSMA, total arsenic, and arsonate). No reduction of arsenic from the parent pentavalent form present in MSMA to the trivalent form was detected. Arginine, glutamic acid, and glutamine content increased in tissue three days after MSMA treatment. Glutathione content decreased during the first three days after treatment; however, five days after treatment the resistant biotype of cocklebur and cotton had elevated glutathione levels (8-20 times greater, respectively). Glutathione Synthetase activity was higher in cotton than in either of the cocklebur biotypes; MSMA did not affect its activity in cotton or either cocklebur biotype. Resistant biotypes have a slightly higher activity than the susceptible biotype. Tolerance of cotton to MSMA may be related to glutathione synthetase activity and possibly to the presence of phytochelatins. Also, increased glutathione levels in the resistant biotype may implicate phytochelatin involvement in the resistance mechanism. PMID:15473645

  11. Histone Modifications, Modifiers and Readers in Melanoma Resistance to Targeted and Immune Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Stuart J; Tiffen, Jessamy C; Hersey, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of melanoma has been revolutionized by new therapies targeting MAPK signaling or the immune system. Unfortunately these therapies are hindered by either primary resistance or the development of acquired resistance. Resistance mechanisms involving somatic mutations in genes associated with resistance have been identified in some cases of melanoma, however, the cause of resistance remains largely unexplained in other cases. The importance of epigenetic factors targeting histones and histone modifiers in driving the behavior of melanoma is only starting to be unraveled and provides significant opportunity to combat the problems of therapy resistance. There is also an increasing ability to target these epigenetic changes with new drugs that inhibit these modifications to either prevent or overcome resistance to both MAPK inhibitors and immunotherapy. This review focuses on changes in histones, histone reader proteins and histone positioning, which can mediate resistance to new therapeutics and that can be targeted for future therapies. PMID:26426052

  12. The Universal Influence of Contact Resistance on the Efficiency of a Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, Rasmus

    2015-08-01

    The influence of electrical and thermal contact resistance on the efficiency of a segmented thermoelectric generator is investigated. We consider 12 different segmented p-legs and 12 different segmented n-legs, using eight different p-type and eight different n-type thermoelectric materials. For all systems, a universal influence of both the electrical and thermal contact resistance is observed on the leg's efficiency, when the systems are analyzed in terms of the contribution of the contact resistance to the total resistance of the leg. The results are compared with the analytical model of Min and Rowe. In order for the efficiency not to decrease by more than 20%, the contact electrical resistance should be less than 30% of the total leg resistance for zero thermal contact resistance, while the thermal contact resistance should be less than 20% for zero electrical contact resistance. The universal behavior also allowed the maximum tolerable contact resistance for a segmented system to be found, i.e., the resistance at which a leg of only the high-temperature thermoelectric material has the same efficiency as the segmented leg with a contact resistance at the interface. If, e.g., segmentation increases the efficiency by 30%, then an electrical contact resistance of 30% or a thermal contact resistance of 20% can be tolerated.

  13. Steps in Behavior Modividation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straughan, James H.; And Others

    James H. Straughan lists five steps for modifying target behavior and four steps for working with teachers using behavior modification. Grant Martin and Harold Kunzelmann then outline an instructional program for pinpointing and recording classroom behaviors. (JD)

  14. Stages and Behaviors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & ... Legal Documents alz.org » Caregiver Center » Stages and Behaviors Text size: A A A Stages / Behaviors As ...

  15. On the theory of behavioral mechanics.

    PubMed

    Dzendolet, E

    1999-12-01

    The Theory of Behavioral Mechanics is the behavioral analogue of Newton's laws of motion, with the rate of responding in operant conditioning corresponding to physical velocity. In an earlier work, the basic relation between rate of responding and sessions under two FI schedules and over a range of commonly used session values had been shown to be a power function. Using that basic relation, functions for behavioral acceleration, mass, and momentum are derived here. Data from other laboratories also support the applicability of a power function to VI schedules. A particular numerical value is introduced here to be the standard reference value for the behavioral force under the VI-60-s schedule. This reference allows numerical values to be calculated for the behavioral mass and momentum of individual animals. A comparison of the numerical values of the momenta of two animals can be used to evaluate their relative resistances to change, e.g., to extinction, which is itself viewed as a continuously changing behavioral force being imposed on the animal. This overall numerical approach allows behavioral force-values to be assigned to various experimental conditions such as the evaluation of the behavioral force of a medication dosage. PMID:10672731

  16. Insecticide Resistance in Fleas.

    PubMed

    Rust, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Fleas are the major ectoparasite of cats, dogs, and rodents worldwide and potential vectors of animal diseases. In the past two decades the majority of new control treatments have been either topically applied or orally administered to the host. Most reports concerning the development of insecticide resistance deal with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis. Historically, insecticide resistance has developed to many of the insecticides used to control fleas in the environment including carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Product failures have been reported with some of the new topical treatments, but actual resistance has not yet been demonstrated. Failures have often been attributed to operational factors such as failure to adequately treat the pet and follow label directions. With the addition of so many new chemistries additional monitoring of flea populations is needed. PMID:26999217

  17. Insecticide Resistance in Fleas

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Fleas are the major ectoparasite of cats, dogs, and rodents worldwide and potential vectors of animal diseases. In the past two decades the majority of new control treatments have been either topically applied or orally administered to the host. Most reports concerning the development of insecticide resistance deal with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis. Historically, insecticide resistance has developed to many of the insecticides used to control fleas in the environment including carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Product failures have been reported with some of the new topical treatments, but actual resistance has not yet been demonstrated. Failures have often been attributed to operational factors such as failure to adequately treat the pet and follow label directions. With the addition of so many new chemistries additional monitoring of flea populations is needed. PMID:26999217

  18. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  19. Fast resistive bolometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Deeney, C.; Fehl, D.L.; Hanson, D.L.; Keltner, N.R.; McGurn, J.S.; McKenney, J.L.

    1998-06-01

    Resistive bolometry is an accurate, robust, spectrally broadband technique for measuring absolute x-ray fluence and flux. Bolometry is an independent technique for x-ray measurements that is based on a different set of physical properties than other diagnostics such as x-ray diodes, photoconducting detectors, and P-I-N diodes. Bolometers use the temperature-driven change in element resistivity to determine the total deposited energy. The calibration of such a device is based on fundamental material properties and its physical dimensions. The authors describe the use of nickel and gold bolometers to measure x rays generated by high power Z pinches on Sandia`s Saturn and Z accelerators. The Sandia bolometer design described herein has a pulse response of {approximately}1 ns. They describe in detail the fabrication, fielding, and data analysis issues leading to highly accurate x-ray measurements. The fundamental accuracy of resistive bolometry will be discussed.

  20. Resistive Oxygen Gas Sensors for Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moos, Ralf; Izu, Noriya; Rettig, Frank; Reiß, Sebastian; Shin, Woosuck; Matsubara, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Resistive oxygen sensors are an inexpensive alternative to the classical potentiometric zirconia oxygen sensor, especially for use in harsh environments and at temperatures of several hundred °C or even higher. This device-oriented paper gives a historical overview on the development of these sensor materials. It focuses especially on approaches to obtain a temperature independent behavior. It is shown that although in the past 40 years there have always been several research groups working concurrently with resistive oxygen sensors, novel ideas continue to emerge today with respect to improvements of the sensor response time, the temperature dependence, the long-term stability or the manufacture of the devices themselves using novel techniques for the sensitive films. Materials that are the focus of this review are metal oxides; especially titania, titanates, and ceria-based formulations. PMID:22163805

  1. Behavioral Health & Performance

    NASA Video Gallery

    Summary of the Behavioral Health and Performance Operations Group’s work including an overview of astronaut selection, behavioral health services provided to astronauts, the psychological aspects o...

  2. Behavior therapy: an overview.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, G W; Gardner, R

    1983-08-01

    The authors examine the broad field of behavior therapy, the theories underlying its development, and the techniques that are used to change behavior. They review recent developments in behavior therapy as they relate to behavioral medicine and to treatment of psychiatric disorders, and briefly describe the use of cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of depression and other problems. They discuss methods of behavioral assessment and the application of behavior therapy in large populations, as well as new uses of behavioral techniques in business and industry, gerontology, and marital therapy. PMID:6137450

  3. Multiwavelength videomicrofluorometry for multiparametric investigations of multidrug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, Emmanuelle; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean; Viallet, Pierre M.

    1996-05-01

    A major problem in the cancer chemotherapy is the development of resistance to a whole range of drugs not only similar to the drugs used for resistance induction but also to some functionally and structurally unrelated. It's one of the multifactorial causes of failure of chemotherapy. Thus it appears essential to evaluate the multi-drug resistance (MDR) in living cells populations to: detect the MDR phenotype, to discriminate between resistant and sensitive cells, to identify mechanisms which are involved in the induction or the reversion of resistance and to study the cytotoxic process. Such a challenge implies the use of multiparametric approach that has been possible using a protocol involving microfluorometry connected to numerical image analysis on single living cells. This protocol relays on the correlation existing between the decreased intracellular accumulation of some fluorescent probes such as Hoechst 33342 (Ho342) and Rhodamine 123 (R123) in resistant cells. The simultaneous estimation of the fluorescence intensities of these probes has required the use of a third probe, the Nile Red, for cell contour delineation. The analysis of parameters related to Ho342 and R123 allows the discrimination of sensitive and resistant cells. So the multiparametric approach using multi-wavelength image analysis, which appears to be a powerful technique, has allowed us to show on human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells lines that the cytotoxic effects could be different depending on the cell resistance or on the cytotoxic drug used: Adriamycine, Vinblastine and the different cell behavior could be used for cell differentiation.

  4. Stalking Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in Common Vegetables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David; Boeke, Caroline; Josowitz, Rebecca; Loya, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    The study developed a simple experimental protocol for studying antibiotic resistant bacteria that will allow students to determine the proportion of such bacteria found on common fruit and vegetable crops. This protocol can open up the world of environmental science and show how human behavior can dramatically alter ecosystems.

  5. Listening to Rap: Cultures of Crime, Cultures of Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Julian; Asbridge, Mark; Wortley, Scot

    2009-01-01

    This research compares representations of rap music with the self-reported criminal behavior and resistant attitudes of the music's core audience. Our database is a large sample of Toronto high school students (n = 3,393) from which we identify a group of listeners, whose combination of musical likes and dislikes distinguish them as rap univores.…

  6. Increasing the frost resistance of facade glazed tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, V.M.; Zotov, S.N.; Romanova, G.P.

    1986-09-01

    The authors investigate the protective properties of a coating of boron oxides and zirconium oxides applied as a glaze to ceramic tiles by conducting a series of tests to determine the frost resistance, the propensity to absorb water, the moisture expansion coefficient, the fracture behavior, and the effect of thermal cycling on the oxides. Results are graphed and tabulated.

  7. Pharmacological Management of Treatment-Resistant Pediatric Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Emslie, Graham; March, John

    2005-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presents with treatment-resistant symptoms of major depression. This is his first episode of depression, initially treated with 200 mg sertraline for 12 weeks with no significant benefit. The severe depression has shown a partial response to weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and fluoxetine, which was titrated up to 60 mg…

  8. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  9. Flame Resistant Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solimide manufactured by Imi-Tech Corporation, is a lightweight fire resistant material produced under a manufacturing process that allows it to be uniformly foamed. Can be produced in a variety of densities and structural configurations and remains resilient under exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 300 to plus 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Is resistant to open flame and generates virtually no smoke or toxic by-products. Used in aircraft for its superior damping characteristics, lighter weight and fire barrier properties, it's also applicable to ships and surface transportation systems such as transit cars, trains, buses and automobiles.

  10. Tackling antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Karen; Courvalin, Patrice; Dantas, Gautam; Davies, Julian; Eisenstein, Barry; Huovinen, Pentti; Jacoby, George A.; Kishony, Roy; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Kutter, Elizabeth; Lerner, Stephen A.; Levy, Stuart; Lewis, Kim; Lomovskaya, Olga; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Piddock, Laura J. V.; Projan, Steven; Thomas, Christopher M.; Tomasz, Alexander; Tulkens, Paul M.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Watson, James D.; Witkowski, Jan; Witte, Wolfgang; Wright, Gerry; Yeh, Pamela; Zgurskaya, Helen I.

    2014-01-01

    The development and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a universal threat to both humans and animals that is generally not preventable, but can nevertheless be controlled and must be tackled in the most effective ways possible. To explore how the problem of antibiotic resistance might best be addressed, a group of thirty scientists from academia and industry gathered at the Banbury Conference Centre in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, May 16-18, 2011. From these discussions emerged a priority list of steps that need to be taken to resolve this global crisis. PMID:22048738

  11. A Piggyback resistive Micromegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attié, D.; Chaus, A.; Colas, P.; Ferrer Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; Giomataris, I.; Gongadze, A.; Iguaz, F. J.; De Oliveira, R.; Papaevangelou, T.; Peyaud, A.

    2013-05-01

    A novel read-out architecture has been developed for the Micromegas detector. The anode element is made of a resistive layer on a ceramic substrate. The detector part is entirely separated from the read-out element. Without significant loss, signals are transmitted by capacitive coupling to the read-out pads. The detector provides high gas gain, good energy resolution and the resistive layer assures spark protection to the electronics. This assembly could be combined with modern pixel array electronic ASICs. This readout organization is free on how the pixels are designed, arranged and connected. We present first results taken with a Medipix2 read-out chip.

  12. Resisting religious coercive control.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Shane

    2014-12-01

    Religious coercive control refers to the use of religious beliefs and doctrine as means to coercively control intimate partners. Scholars have shown that some abusive partners use the Christian doctrine of submission as a means of religious coercive control. I explore how victims who experience the doctrine of submission qua religious coercive control actively resist it. I argue that victims' successful resistance of the doctrine is contingent on their religious capital-that is, the knowledge and mastery that people have of a particular religious culture-and interpretive confidence-that is, people's subjective confidence in their interpretations of religious culture-related to the doctrine. PMID:25398370

  13. Shatter-Resistant, Flame-Resistant Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, William R.; Walker, Ernie D.

    1989-01-01

    Combustion-chamber window combines properties of polycarbonate and sapphire. Inner layer of sapphire, withstands flame in chamber. Outer layer of polycarbonate tough but susceptible to weakening by flame and protected from flame by sapphire layer. Resists flames, shattering, and high pressure. Windows withstand 60 lb/in. to second power (414 kPa) in hydrostatic pressure vessel. Also survives leak test under internal pressure of 2 atm (0.2 MPa) of helium and external pressure of 10 to negative fifth power torr (1.3 mPa). Has transmission density of 0.08 to 0.11 in visible light. In contrast, unbonded layers have transmission density of 0.13 to 0.16.

  14. Role of nutrition in preventing insulin resistance in children.

    PubMed

    Blasetti, Annalisa; Franchini, Simone; Comegna, Laura; Prezioso, Giovanni; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Nutrition during prenatal, early postnatal and pubertal period is crucial for the development of insulin resistance and its consequences. During prenatal period fetal environment and nutrition seems to interfere with metabolism programming later in life. The type of dietary carbohydrates, glycemic index, protein, fat and micronutrient content in maternal nutrition could influence insulin sensitivity in the newborn. The effects of lactation on metabolism and nutritional behavior later in life have been studied. Dietary habits and quality of diet during puberty could prevent the onset of a pathological insulin resistance through an adequate distribution of macro- and micronutrients, a diet rich in fibers and vegetables and poor in saturated fats, proteins and sugars. We want to overview the latest evidences on the risk of insulin resistance later in life due to both nutritional behaviors and components during the aforementioned periods of life, following a chronological outline from fetal development to adolescence. PMID:26630690

  15. Contextual Influences on Resistance to Disruption in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lionello-DeNolf, Karen; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Training context can influence resistance to disruption under differing reinforcement schedules. With nonhumans, when relatively lean and rich reinforcement schedules are experienced in the context of a multiple schedule, greater resistance is found in the rich than the lean component, as described by behavioral momentum theory. By contrast, when…

  16. Overcoming Resistance with Fractals. A New Way to Teach Elementary Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, W. K.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Students construct a Sierpinski gasket from resistors and measure its resistance as a function of size. Provides a brief review of what it means geometrically for the Sierpinski gasket to be fractal, followed by an explanation of how to analyze the electrical resistance on a gasket to find its fractal behavior. (MVL)

  17. Environmental Considerations in the Studies of Corrosion Resistant Alloys for High-Level Radioactive Waste Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Ilevbare, G O; Lian, T; Farmer, J C

    2001-11-26

    The corrosion resistance of Alloy 22 (UNS No.: N06022) was studied in simulated ground water of different pH values and ionic contents at various temperatures. Potentiodynamic polarization techniques were used to study the electrochemical behavior and measure the critical potentials in the various systems. Alloy 22 was found to be resistant to localized corrosion in the simulated ground waters tested.

  18. Testing a Model of Resistance to Peer Pressure among Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamaca, Mayra Y.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the factors associated with resistance to peer pressure toward antisocial behaviors among a sample of Mexican-origin adolescents (n=564) living in a large Southwestern city in the U.S. A model examining the influence of generational status, emotional autonomy from parents, and self-esteem on resistance to peer pressure was…

  19. Resistance fluctuations in insulating silicon films with superconducting nanoprecipitates - superconductor-to-metal or vortex matter phase transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.; Fiedler, J.; Skorupa, W.

    2015-11-01

    Silicon films with Ga-rich nanoprecipitates are superconductors or insulators in dependence on their normal state resistance. Even in the insulating state of the film superconducting nanoprecipitates exist below the critical temperature of 7 K and determine its complex transport behavior. In this range sometimes large, random resistance jumps appear that are accompanied by little temperature changes. The resistance fluctuates between a well-defined low-resistance value and a broader band of higher resistances. Jumps to higher resistance are associated with a temperature decrease and vice versa. We present experimental results on these fluctuations and suppose a first order phase transition in the film as probable origin.

  20. Oxidation-resistant gold-55 clusters.

    PubMed

    Boyen, H-G; Kästle, G; Weigl, F; Koslowski, B; Dietrich, C; Ziemann, P; Spatz, J P; Riethmüller, S; Hartmann, C; Möller, M; Schmid, G; Garnier, M G; Oelhafen, P

    2002-08-30

    Gold nanoparticles ranging in diameter from 1 to 8 nanometers were prepared on top of silicon wafers in order to study the size dependence of their oxidation behavior when exposed to atomic oxygen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a maximum oxidation resistance for "magic-number" clusters containing 55 gold atoms. This inertness is not related to electron confinement leading to a size-induced metal-to-insulator transition, but rather seems to be linked to the closed-shell structure of such magic clusters. The result additionally suggests that gold-55 clusters may act as especially effective oxidation catalysts, such as for oxidizing carbon monoxide. PMID:12202824

  1. [Resistance risk, cross-resistance and biochemical resistance mechanism of Laodelphax striatellus to buprofezin].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xu-lian; Liu, Jin; Li, Xu-ke; Chi, Jia-jia; Liu, Yong-jie

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the resistance development law and biochemical resistance mechanism of Laodelphax striatellus to buprofezin, spraying rice seedlings was used to continuously screen resistant strains of L. striatellus and dipping rice seedlings was applied to determine the toxicity and cross-resistance of L. striatellus to insecticides. After 32-generation screening with buprofezin, L. striatellus developed 168.49 folds resistance and its reality heritability (h2) was 0.11. If the killing rate was 80%-90%, L. striatellus was expected to develop 10-fold resistance to buprofezin only after 5 to 6 generations breeding. Because the actual reality heritability of field populations was usually lower than that of the resistant strains, the production of field populations increasing with 10-fold resistance would need much longer time. The results of cross-resistance showed that resistant strain had high level cross-resistance with thiamethoxam and imidacloprid, low level cross-resistance with acetamiprid, and no cross-resistance with pymetrozine and chlorpyrifos. The activity of detoxification enzymes of different strains and the syergism of synergist were measured. The results showed that cytochrome P450 monooxygenase played a major role in the resistance of L. striatellus to buprofezin, the esterase played a minor role and the GSH-S-transferase had no effect. Therefore, L. striatellus would have high risk to develop resistance to buprofezin when used in the field and might be delayed by using pymetrozine and chlorpyrifos. PMID:27228617

  2. Toward a behavioral ecology of rescue behavior.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Karen L; Nowbahari, Elise

    2013-01-01

    Although the study of helping behavior has revolutionized the field of behavioral ecology, scientific examination of rescue behavior remains extremely rare, except perhaps in ants, having been described as early as 1874. Nonetheless, recent work in our laboratories has revealed several new patterns of rescue behavior that appear to be much more complex than previously studied forms. This precisely-directed rescue behavior bears a remarkable resemblance to what has been labeled empathy in rats, and thus raises numerous philosophical and theoretical questions: How should rescue behavior (or empathy) be defined? What distinguishes rescue from other forms of altruism? In what ways is rescue behavior in ants different from, and similar to, rescue in other non-human animals? What selection pressures dictate its appearance? In this paper, we review our own experimental studies of rescue in both laboratory and field, which, taken together, begin to reveal some of the behavioral ecological conditions that likely have given rise to rescue behavior in ants. Against this background, we also address important theoretical questions involving rescue, including those outlined above. In this way, we hope not only to encourage further experimental analysis of rescue behavior, but also to highlight important similarities and differences in very distant taxa. PMID:23864298

  3. Intestinal colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D; Walker, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    Dense, complex microbial communities, collectively termed the microbiota, occupy a diverse array of niches along the length of the mammalian intestinal tract. During health and in the absence of antibiotic exposure the microbiota can effectively inhibit colonization and overgrowth by invading microbes such as pathogens. This phenomenon is called ‘colonization resistance’ and is associated with a stable and diverse microbiota in tandem with a controlled lack of inflammation, and involves specific interactions between the mucosal immune system and the microbiota. Here we overview the microbial ecology of the healthy mammalian intestinal tract and highlight the microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote colonization resistance. Emerging themes highlight immunological (T helper type 17/regulatory T-cell balance), microbiota (diverse and abundant) and metabolic (short-chain fatty acid) signatures of intestinal health and colonization resistance. Intestinal pathogens use specific virulence factors or exploit antibiotic use to subvert colonization resistance for their own benefit by triggering inflammation to disrupt the harmony of the intestinal ecosystem. A holistic view that incorporates immunological and microbiological facets of the intestinal ecosystem should facilitate the development of immunomodulatory and microbe-modulatory therapies that promote intestinal homeostasis and colonization resistance. PMID:23240815

  4. Genetics of disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic resistance is alluring from both the industrial and academic viewpoints. With respect to poultry companies, losses due to diseases induced by infectious pathogens continue to be a significant issue and can be the key factor in determining economic viability. This is because pathogens lead ...

  5. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PDF) ​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of the ... incorrectly. Please visit your browser settings and turn JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip ...

  6. Teaching, Learning, and Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Kleut, Geraldine; White, Connie

    2010-01-01

    This article is a discussion of the importance of using student resistance to inform and change teacher practice. The authors relate two narratives of practice, one of which takes place in a constructivist second-grade classroom in Ontario, and a second that takes place in a preservice classroom in California. In the first, a student uses the…

  7. Overcoming Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Ted H.; Balka, Don S.; Miles, Ruth Harbin

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to change is a major obstacle in developing and implementing effective instructional programs, yet it is rarely considered, discussed, or addressed. The school leaders who are responsible for improvement frequently feel that their efforts are being blocked or thwarted. For the most part, they are correct, but they may not realize that…

  8. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  9. Wear resistant valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A valve which is resistant to wear caused by particles trapped between the valve seat and the valve member or poppet when the valve closes, including an outlet for directing washing fluid at the valve seat and/or sealing face of the poppet and means for supplying pressured fluid to the outlet at the time when the valve is closing.

  10. Penetration resistant barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, William R.; Mead, Keith E.; Street, Henry K.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a barrier for resisting penetration by such as hand tools and oxy-acetylene cutting torches. The barrier comprises a layer of firebrick, which is preferably epoxy impregnated sandwiched between inner and outer layers of steel. Between the firebrick and steel are layers of resilient rubber-like filler.

  11. POTATO DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential to use systemic acquired resistance for disease control in potato is discussed. The mechanism of how SAR works in plants is described. Potato was found to have high salicylic acid levels in all tissues examined. The defense gene PR-1 was constitutively expressed in potato, in contrast ...

  12. Herbicide Resistant Weed Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metribuzin and rimsulfuron are the only two herbicides registered for postemergence broadleaf weed control in potatoes, and represent the two classes of herbicides, triazines and ALS inhibitors, with the most reported cases of resistant weeds world wide. Other postemergence grass herbicides belongin...

  13. Resistance Management Research Status

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term sustainability of genetically modified corn expressing Bt relies on the validity of assumptions underlying IRM models used by the EPA and the ability of EPA to monitor, detect and react to insect resistance when it develops. The EPA is developing a multi-tiered approac...

  14. Piggyback resistive Micromegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attié, D.; Chaus, A.; Durand, D.; Desforge, D.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; Giomataris, Y.; Gongadze, A.; Iguaz, F. J.; Jeanneau, F.; de Oliveira, R.; Papaevangelou, T.; Peyaud, A.; Teixeira, A.

    2013-11-01

    Piggyback Micromegas is a novel readout architecture where the anode element is made of a resistive layer on a ceramic substrate. The resistive layer is deposited on the thin ceramic substrate by an industrial process which provides a large dynamic range of resistivity (106 to 1010 MΩ/square). The particularity of this new structure is that the active part is entirely dissociated from the read-out element. This gives a large flexibility on the design of the anode structure and the readout scheme. Without significant loss, signals are transmitted by capacitive coupling to the read-out pads. The detector provides high gas gain, good energy resolution and the resistive layer assures spark protection for the electronics. This assembly could be combined with modern pixel array electronic ASICs. First tests with different Piggyback detectors and configurations will be presented. This structure is adequate for cost effective fabrication and low out gazing detector. It was designed to perform in sealed mode and its long term stability has been extensively studied. In addition perspectives on the future developments will be evoked.

  15. Treatment of resistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pickrell, William Owen; Smith, Phil E M

    2014-12-01

    Treatment resistance affects around 20% of people with epilepsy and carries a significant comorbidity. It is important to ensure that the diagnosis of epilepsy is secure and the underlying cause of the epilepsy is investigated thoroughly. Management involves early referral for epilepsy surgery when suitable, optimisation of pharmacological treatment, and consideration of comorbidities such as depression. PMID:25468911

  16. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are common in animals because of the use of fluoroquinolones as therapeutic agents in animal husbandry, particularly in chickens and other poultry. Campylobacter is a commensal in poultry, and therefore, poultry and poultry products are the...

  17. Wrinkle resistant cellulosic textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, J.D.; Patton, R.T.; Nadar, R.S.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes a process for treating a cellulosic textile material so as to impart wrinkle resistance and smooth drying properties. It comprises treating the cellulosic textile material with an aqueous solution comprising trans-1,2,3,4-cyclobutane tetracarboxylic acid, and a curing catalyst, and heating the treated material so as to produce esterification and crosslinking of the material with the acid.

  18. Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is a geophysical method originally developed within the mining industry where it has been used for decades to explore for and characterize subsurface mineral deposits. It is one of the oldest geophysical methods with the first documented usag...

  19. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Examples of Antimicrobial Resistance Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Overview Transmission Diagnosis ...

  20. Hot deformation of heat-resistant superalloys -- An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhury, P.K.; Zhao, D.; Thirukkonda, M.; Guillard, S.

    1995-12-31

    The hot deformation behavior was investigated for four heat-resistant Ni-, Fe-, and Co-base superalloys: Haynes 188, 230, 556, and HR-160. Compression tests were conducted over a wide range of processing conditions. The flow behavior and deformed microstructures were characterized, while recrystallized grain size and percentage of recrystallization were measured for deformed specimens under selected conditions. From the experimental data, constitutive equations and microstructure maps were constructed. During the high temperature deformation, a number of mutually interacting metallurgical processes, such as dynamic recrystallization and precipitation, occurred. Their influence on hot formability and deformed microstructure have been represented by deformation microstructure maps that can serve as a guideline for hot deformation process design and subsequent heat treatment after hot forming. The workability and deformation behaviors of the heat-resistant alloys are also compared in The light of alloy development to ensure the fabricability of newly developed alloys.

  1. Electrode-induced digital-to-analog resistive switching in TaO x -based RRAM devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyi; Wu, Huaqiang; Gao, Bin; Wu, Wei; Wu, Dong; Deng, Ning; Cai, Jian; Qian, He

    2016-07-01

    In RRAM devices, electrodes play a significant role during the switching process. In this paper, different top electrodes are used for TaO y /Ta2O5‑x /AlO σ triple-oxide-layer devices. Top electrode-induced digital resistive switching to analog resistive switching was observed. For Pt top electrode (TE) devices, abrupt digital resistive switching behavior was observed, while Al TE devices showed gradual analog resistive switching behavior. Devices with various AlO σ thicknesses and sizes were fabricated and characterized to evaluate the reliability of the analog resistive switching. The physical mechanisms responsible for this electrode-induced resistive switching behavior were discussed.

  2. Electrode-induced digital-to-analog resistive switching in TaO x -based RRAM devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyi; Wu, Huaqiang; Bin Gao; Wu, Wei; Wu, Dong; Deng, Ning; Cai, Jian; Qian, He

    2016-07-29

    In RRAM devices, electrodes play a significant role during the switching process. In this paper, different top electrodes are used for TaO y /Ta2O5-x /AlO σ triple-oxide-layer devices. Top electrode-induced digital resistive switching to analog resistive switching was observed. For Pt top electrode (TE) devices, abrupt digital resistive switching behavior was observed, while Al TE devices showed gradual analog resistive switching behavior. Devices with various AlO σ thicknesses and sizes were fabricated and characterized to evaluate the reliability of the analog resistive switching. The physical mechanisms responsible for this electrode-induced resistive switching behavior were discussed. PMID:27302281

  3. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics of low temperature grown ZnO thin films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jian; Yang Hui; Zhang Qilong; Dong Shurong; Luo, J. K.

    2013-01-07

    ZnO films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) have been used to investigate resistive memory behavior. The bipolar resistance switching properties were observed in the Al/PEALD-ZnO/Pt devices. The resistance ratio for the high and low resistance states (HRS/LRS) is more than 10{sup 3}, better than ZnO devices deposited by other methods. The dominant conduction mechanisms of HRS and LRS are trap-controlled space charge limited current and Ohmic behavior, respectively. The resistive switching behavior is induced upon the formation/disruption of conducting filaments. This study demonstrated that the PEALD-ZnO films have better properties for the application in 3D resistance random access memory.

  4. The Subtle Transmission of Race Bias via Televised Nonverbal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Weisbuch, Max; Pauker, Kristin; Ambady, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    As compared to more explicit racial slurs and sexist statements, biased facial expressions and body language may resist conscious identification and thus produce a hidden social influence. In four studies we show that race biases can be subtly transmitted via televised nonverbal behavior. Characters on 11 popular television shows exhibited more negative nonverbal behavior toward black than toward status-matched white characters. Critically, exposure to pro-white (vs. pro-black) nonverbal bias increased viewers’ bias even though patterns of nonverbal behavior could not be consciously reported. These findings suggest that hidden patterns of televised nonverbal behavior influence bias among viewers. PMID:20019288

  5. Bi-stable resistive switching in an array of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayen, Sirshendu; Sanyal, Milan K.; Sarma, Abhisakh; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-01-01

    A resistive switching system comprising of metal-insulator-metal sandwich-structured nanowires embedded within polycarbonate membrane has been investigated. The system switches from non-Ohmic high resistive state (HRS) to Ohmic low resistive state on application of a critical bias of 2.5 V. The bipolar switching can be performed by applying current bias as well. Driving two suitable currents, and we observe highly reproducible switching between two stable resistive states. The switching is initiated by establishment of filamentary conduction path commonly formed in oxide materials. However, the main charge transport in the HRS is governed with modified activated behavior, which is obvious from the antisymmetric, reversible I-V characteristic following where a, b and are constants. The exponential term corresponds to charge generation by field-enhanced thermal activation process, whereas the linear term is related to mobility.

  6. Confirmation of resistance to herbicides and evaluation of resistance levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As cases of resistance to herbicides escalate worldwide, there is increasing demand from growers to test for weed resistance and how to manage it. Scientists have developed resistance testing protocols for numerous herbicides and weed species. Growers need immediate answers and scientists are faced ...

  7. Cross resistances in spinosad-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Su, Tianyun; Cheng, Min-Lee

    2014-03-01

    A Culex quinquefasciatus Say colony was selected for 45 generations at LC70-90 levels using Natular XRG, a granular formulation of 2.5% spinosad for induction of spinosad resistance. Resistance to spinosad was noticed in early generations (F1-F9). Resistance levels increased gradually from generations F11-F35, and elevated significantly from generation F37 through F47, when resistance ratios reached 2,845-2,907-fold at LC50 and 11,948-22,928-fold at LC90 The spinosad-resistant Cx. quinquefasciatus colony was found not to be cross-resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), a combination of Bti and Bacillus sphaericus, methoprene, pyriproxyfen, diflubenzuron, novaluron, temephos, or imidacloprid. However, it showed various levels of cross-resistance to B. sphaericus, spinetoram, abamectin, and fipronil. Conversely, a laboratory colony of Cx. quinquefasciatus that is highly resistant to B. sphaericus did not show cross-resistance to spinosad and spinetoram. Field-collected and laboratory-selected Cx. quinquefasciatus that showed low to moderate resistance to methoprene did not show cross-resistance to spinosad and spinetoram. Mechanisms of cross-resistance among several biorational pesticides were discussed according to their modes of actions. PMID:24724293

  8. Panel resonant behavior of wind turbine blades.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2010-03-01

    The principal design drivers in the certification of wind turbine blades are ultimate strength, fatigue resistance, adequate tip-tower clearance, and buckling resistance. Buckling resistance is typically strongly correlated to both ultimate strength and fatigue resistance. A composite shell with spar caps forms the airfoil shape of a blade and reinforcing shear webs are placed inside the blade to stiffen the blade in the flap-wise direction. The spar caps are dimensioned and the shear webs are placed so as to add stiffness to unsupported panel regions and reduce their length. The panels are not the major flap-wise load carrying element of a blade; however, they must be designed carefully to avoid buckling while minimizing blade weight. Typically, buckling resistance is evaluated by consideration of the load-deflection behavior of a blade using finite element analysis (FEA) or full-scale static testing of blades under a simulated extreme loading condition. The focus of this paper is on the use of experimental modal analysis to measure localized resonances of the blade panels. It can be shown that the resonant behavior of these panels can also provide a means to evaluate buckling resistance by means of analytical or experimental modal analysis. Further, panel resonances have use in structural health monitoring by observing changes in modal parameters associated with panel resonances, and use in improving panel laminate model parameters by correlation with test data. In recent modal testing of wind turbine blades, a set of panel modes were measured. This paper will report on the findings of these tests and accompanying numerical and analytical modeling efforts aimed at investigating the potential uses of panel resonances for blade evaluation, health monitoring, and design.

  9. Are Sewage Treatment Plants Promoting Antibiotic Resistance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction 1.1. How bacteria exhibit resistance 1.1.1. Resistance to -lactams 1.1.2. Resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim 1.1.3. Resistance to macrolides 1.1.4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones 1.1.5. Resistance to tetracyclines 1.1.6. Resistance to nitroimidaz...

  10. MDRO - Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRSA in the workplace, see: Methicillin-resistan t Staphylococcus aure us (MRSA) . Provides links with general information, ... of these organisms include: MRSA - Methicillin/oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus VRE - Vancomycin-resistant enterococci ESBLs - Extended-spectrum ...

  11. Galileo's Trajectory with Mild Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of Galileo's classical trajectory that persists in a simple resistance model is noted. The resistive model provides a case study for the classroom analysis of limiting behaviour of an implicitly defined function. (Contains 1 note.)

  12. USDA Data on Antimicrobial Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing remains an important tool as investigators devise ways to arrest the development of antimicrobial resistance, particularly in food borne bacteria. In 1996, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) initiated the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System -...

  13. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  14. Pressure dependence of the resistivity of Ce/sub 3/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.M.; Chen, Y.Y.; Thompson, J.D.; Borges, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ce/sub 3/Al was prepared from very high purity cerium. The resistivity at various pressures show a structural transition near 100/sup 0/K at zero pressure. This antiferromagnetic heavy fermion behavior evolves smoothly towards nonmagnetic large T/sub K/ (slightly overweight fermion) behavior as the pressure is raised. 3 figs. (DLC)

  15. Insulin Resistance of Puberty.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zeitler, Philip S

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is a time of considerable metabolic and hormonal change. Notably, puberty is associated with a marked decrease in insulin sensitivity, on par with that seen during pregnancy. In otherwise healthy youth, there is a nadir in insulin sensitivity in mid-puberty, and then it recovers at puberty completion. However, there is evidence that insulin resistance (IR) does not resolve in youth who are obese going into puberty and may result in increased cardiometabolic risk. Little is known about the underlying pathophysiology of IR in puberty, and how it might contribute to increased disease risk (e.g., type 2 diabetes). In this review, we have outlined what is known about the IR in puberty in terms of pattern, potential underlying mechanisms and other mediating factors. We also outline other potentially related metabolic changes that occur during puberty, and effects of underlying insulin resistant states (e.g., obesity) on pubertal changes in insulin sensitivity. PMID:27179965

  16. [Prevention, why resist it?].

    PubMed

    Laurin, J C

    1989-01-01

    Prevention, why resist it? Based on a 1988 speech the author gave to infection control professionals in Montréal, this article draws a parallel between individuals' resistance to change and their reaction to infection control programs. Gladly, many of the same well-honed techniques that help change along can be applied to infection control efforts, he says. Analyzing the implementation of an infection control program for AIDS in a health center, the author emphasizes do's and don'ts and explores appropriate and inappropriate approaches to leadership, conflict prevention and problem solving. To sell your program, he says, you must also sell yourself; you must be convincing and credible. PMID:2912544

  17. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  18. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  19. String resistance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. Daniel (Inventor); Davies, Francis J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system are disclosed for determining individual string resistance in a network of strings when the current through a parallel connected string is unknown and when the voltage across a series connected string is unknown. The method/system of the invention involves connecting one or more frequency-varying impedance components with known electrical characteristics to each string and applying a frequency-varying input signal to the network of strings. The frequency-varying impedance components may be one or more capacitors, inductors, or both, and are selected so that each string is uniquely identifiable in the output signal resulting from the frequency-varying input signal. Numerical methods, such as non-linear regression, may then be used to resolve the resistance associated with each string.

  20. Forming-free bipolar resistive switching in nonstoichiometric ceria films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Muhammad; Huang, Chun-Yang; Panda, Debashis; Hung, Chung-Jung; Tsai, Tsung-Ling; Jieng, Jheng-Hong; Lin, Chun-An; Chand, Umesh; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmed, Ejaz; Talib, Ijaz; Nadeem, Muhammad Younus; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of forming-free bipolar resistive switching in a Zr/CeO x /Pt device was investigated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis indicated the formation of a ZrO y layer at the Zr/CeO x interface. X-ray diffraction studies of CeO x films revealed that they consist of nano-polycrystals embedded in a disordered lattice. The observed resistive switching was suggested to be linked with the formation and rupture of conductive filaments constituted by oxygen vacancies in the CeO x film and in the nonstoichiometric ZrO y interfacial layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study confirmed the presence of oxygen vacancies in both of the said regions. In the low-resistance ON state, the electrical conduction was found to be of ohmic nature, while the high-resistance OFF state was governed by trap-controlled space charge-limited mechanism. The stable resistive switching behavior and long retention times with an acceptable resistance ratio enable the device for its application in future nonvolatile resistive random access memory (RRAM).