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Sample records for bemisia tabaci genome

  1. The Bemisia tabaci functional genomic project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci, the genome of the whitefly and its expression has not been investigated on a large scale. To address this general shortage of information, we have constructed several cDNA libraries from virulifurous and non-viruliferous whiteflies. A cDNA spotted microarray was constructed in parall...

  2. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Bemisia tabaci cryptic pest species complex Asia I (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Tay, W T; Elfekih, S; Court, L; Gordon, K H; De Barro, P J

    2016-01-01

    The complete length of the Asia I member of the Bemisia tabaci species complex mitochondrial DNA genome (mitogenome) is 15,210 bp (GenBank accession no. KJ778614) with an A-T biased nucleotide composition (A: 32.7%; T: 42.4%; G: 14.0%; C: 10.8%). The mitogenome consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNAs) and a 467 bp putative control region which also includes the A+T rich repeat region. All PCGs have an ATA (n = 8) or ATG (n = 5) start codon. Gene synteny of Asia I is overall similar to B. afer and two other members of the B. tabaci species complex Mediterranean and New World 1, and contains the tRNA-Ser2 located between the Cytb and ND1 genes found in Mediterranean and New World 1, but which is absent in B. afer. The orientation of the tRNA-Arg in Asia I is on the "plus" strand and differed from Mediterranean which is found on the "minus" strand. The Asia I mitogenome size is currently ranked the second smallest after B. afer (14,968 bp) followed by New World 1 (15,322 bp) and Mediterranean (15,632 bp). PMID:24960562

  3. Estimation of the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Genome Size Based on k-mer and Flow Cytometric Analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbo; Hasegawa, Daniel K; Arumuganathan, Kathiravetpillai; Simmons, Alvin M; Wintermantel, William M; Fei, Zhangjun; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Whiteflies of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) cryptic species complex are among the most important agricultural insect pests in the world. These phloem-feeding insects can colonize over 1000 species of plants worldwide and inflict severe economic losses to crops, mainly through the transmission of pathogenic viruses. Surprisingly, there is very little genomic information about whiteflies. As a starting point to genome sequencing, we report a new estimation of the genome size of the B. tabaci B biotype or Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) population. Using an isogenic whitefly colony with over 6500 haploid male individuals for genomic DNA, three paired-end genomic libraries with insert sizes of ~300 bp, 500 bp and 1 Kb were constructed and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 system. A total of ~50 billion base pairs of sequences were obtained from each library. K-mer analysis using these sequences revealed that the genome size of the whitefly was ~682.3 Mb. In addition, the flow cytometric analysis estimated the haploid genome size of the whitefly to be ~690 Mb. Considering the congruency between both estimation methods, we predict the haploid genome size of B. tabaci MEAM1 to be ~680-690 Mb. Our data provide a baseline for ongoing efforts to assemble and annotate the B. tabaci genome. PMID:26463411

  4. Estimation of the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Genome Size Based on k-mer and Flow Cytometric Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenbo; Hasegawa, Daniel K.; Arumuganathan, Kathiravetpillai; Simmons, Alvin M.; Wintermantel, William M.; Fei, Zhangjun; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Whiteflies of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) cryptic species complex are among the most important agricultural insect pests in the world. These phloem-feeding insects can colonize over 1000 species of plants worldwide and inflict severe economic losses to crops, mainly through the transmission of pathogenic viruses. Surprisingly, there is very little genomic information about whiteflies. As a starting point to genome sequencing, we report a new estimation of the genome size of the B. tabaci B biotype or Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) population. Using an isogenic whitefly colony with over 6500 haploid male individuals for genomic DNA, three paired-end genomic libraries with insert sizes of ~300 bp, 500 bp and 1 Kb were constructed and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 system. A total of ~50 billion base pairs of sequences were obtained from each library. K-mer analysis using these sequences revealed that the genome size of the whitefly was ~682.3 Mb. In addition, the flow cytometric analysis estimated the haploid genome size of the whitefly to be ~690 Mb. Considering the congruency between both estimation methods, we predict the haploid genome size of B. tabaci MEAM1 to be ~680–690 Mb. Our data provide a baseline for ongoing efforts to assemble and annotate the B. tabaci genome. PMID:26463411

  5. Flow cytometry and K-mer analysis estimates of the genome sizes of Bemisia tabaci B and Q (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li T.; Wang, Shao L.; Wu, Qing J.; Zhou, Xu G.; Xie, Wen; Zhang, You J.

    2015-01-01

    The genome sizes of the B- and Q-types of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennnadius) were estimated using flow cytometry (Drosophila melanogaster as the DNA reference standard and propidium iodide (PI) as the fluorochrome) and k-mer analysis. For flow cytometry, the mean nuclear DNA content was 0.686 pg for B-type males, 1.392 pg for B-type females, 0.680 pg for Q-type males, and 1.306 pg for Q-type females. Based on the relationship between DNA content and genome size (1 pg DNA = 980 Mbp), the haploid genome size of B. tabaci ranged from 640 to 682 Mbp. For k-mer analysis, genome size of B-type by two methods were consistent highly, but the k-mer depth distribution graph of Q-type was not enough perfect and the genome size was estimated about 60 M larger than its flow cytometry result. These results corroborate previous reports of genome size based on karyotype analysis and chromosome counting. However, these estimates differ from previous flow cytometry estimates, probably because of differences in the DNA reference standard and dyeing time, which were superior in the current study. For Q-type genome size difference by two method, some discussion were also stated, and all these results represent a useful foundation for B. tabaci genomics research. PMID:26042041

  6. Estimation of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci genome size based on k-mer and flow cytometry analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whiteflies, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), are one of the most important agricultural insect pests in the world. These phloem-feeding insects can colonize over 500 crop plants worldwide and inflict severe economic losses, mainly through the transmission of pathogenic viruses. Surprisingl...

  7. Genome sequencing and analysis of the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) MEAM1, one of the most important vectors for plant viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among whiteflies, the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) species complex is particularly important because of its ability to transmit hundreds of plant viruses, resulting in the loss of billions of U.S. dollars on agronomically important crops such as tomato, cucurbits, cassava, and cotton worl...

  8. Sequencing and comparison of the Rickettsia genomes from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci Middle East Asia Minor I.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan-Tong; Xia, Wen-Qiang; Rao, Qiong; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Ghanim, Murad; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2016-08-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, harbors the primary symbiont 'Candidatus Portiera aleyrodidarum' and a variety of secondary symbionts. Among these secondary symbionts, Rickettsia is the only one that can be detected both inside and outside the bacteriomes. Infection with Rickettsia has been reported to influence several aspects of the whitefly biology, such as fitness, sex ratio, virus transmission and resistance to pesticides. However, mechanisms underlying these differences remain unclear, largely due to the lack of genomic information of Rickettsia. In this study, we sequenced the genome of two Rickettsia strains isolated from the Middle East Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) species of the B. tabaci complex in China and Israel. Both Rickettsia genomes were of high coding density and AT-rich, containing more than 1000 coding sequences, much larger than that of the coexisted primary symbiont, Portiera. Moreover, the two Rickettsia strains isolated from China and Israel shared most of the genes with 100% identity and only nine genes showed sequence differences. The phylogenetic analysis using orthologs shared in the genus, inferred the proximity of Rickettsia in MEAM1 and Rickettsia bellii. Functional analysis revealed that Rickettsia was unable to synthesize amino acids required for complementing the whitefly nutrition. Besides, a type IV secretion system and a number of virulence-related genes were detected in the Rickettsia genome. The presence of virulence-related genes might benefit the symbiotic life of the bacteria, and hint on potential effects of Rickettsia on whiteflies. The genome sequences of Rickettsia provided a basis for further understanding the function of Rickettsia in whiteflies. PMID:27273750

  9. Impact of insecticide residue on Bemisia tabaci (B-Biotype)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2005, the Q-biotype of Bemisia tabaci was identified in the United States. This find and increased problems with management of the B-biotype of Bemisia tabaci have resulted in a national effort to develop a comprehensive management plan for whiteflies on ornamental crops. The objective of the fol...

  10. Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) genome project: analysis of sequenced clones from egg, instar, and adult (viruliferous and non-viruliferous) cDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Leshkowitz, Dena; Gazit, Shirley; Reuveni, Eli; Ghanim, Murad; Czosnek, Henryk; McKenzie, Cindy; Shatters, Robert L; Brown, Judith K

    2006-01-01

    Background The past three decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in interest in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, owing to its nature as a taxonomically cryptic species, the damage it causes to a large number of herbaceous plants because of its specialized feeding in the phloem, and to its ability to serve as a vector of plant viruses. Among the most important plant viruses to be transmitted by B. tabaci are those in the genus Begomovirus (family, Geminiviridae). Surprisingly, little is known about the genome of this whitefly. The haploid genome size for male B. tabaci has been estimated to be approximately one billion bp by flow cytometry analysis, about five times the size of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. The genes involved in whitefly development, in host range plasticity, and in begomovirus vector specificity and competency, are unknown. Results To address this general shortage of genomic sequence information, we have constructed three cDNA libraries from non-viruliferous whiteflies (eggs, immature instars, and adults) and two from adult insects that fed on tomato plants infected by two geminiviruses: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Tomato mottle virus (ToMoV). In total, the sequence of 18,976 clones was determined. After quality control, and removal of 5,542 clones of mitochondrial origin 9,110 sequences remained which included 3,843 singletons and 1,017 contigs. Comparisons with public databases indicated that the libraries contained genes involved in cellular and developmental processes. In addition, approximately 1,000 bases aligned with the genome of the B. tabaci endosymbiotic bacterium Candidatus Portiera aleyrodidarum, originating primarily from the egg and instar libraries. Apart from the mitochondrial sequences, the longest and most abundant sequence encodes vitellogenin, which originated from whitefly adult libraries, indicating that much of the gene expression in this insect is directed toward the production of eggs. Conclusion This

  11. The Genome of Cardinium cBtQ1 Provides Insights into Genome Reduction, Symbiont Motility, and Its Settlement in Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Garcia, Diego; Rollat-Farnier, Pierre-Antoine; Beitia, Francisco; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Vavre, Fabrice; Mouton, Laurence; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo; Silva, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Many insects harbor inherited bacterial endosymbionts. Although some of them are not strictly essential and are considered facultative, they can be a key to host survival under specific environmental conditions, such as parasitoid attacks, climate changes, or insecticide pressures. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is at the top of the list of organisms inflicting agricultural damage and outbreaks, and changes in its distribution may be associated to global warming. In this work, we have sequenced and analyzed the genome of Cardinium cBtQ1, a facultative bacterial endosymbiont of B. tabaci and propose that it belongs to a new taxonomic family, which also includes Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus and Cardinium cEper1, endosymbionts of amoeba and wasps, respectively. Reconstruction of their last common ancestors’ gene contents revealed an initial massive gene loss from the free-living ancestor. This was followed in Cardinium by smaller losses, associated with settlement in arthropods. Some of these losses, affecting cofactor and amino acid biosynthetic encoding genes, took place in Cardinium cBtQ1 after its divergence from the Cardinium cEper1 lineage and were related to its settlement in the whitefly and its endosymbionts. Furthermore, the Cardinium cBtQ1 genome displays a large proportion of transposable elements, which have recently inactivated genes and produced chromosomal rearrangements. The genome also contains a chromosomal duplication and a multicopy plasmid, which harbors several genes putatively associated with gliding motility, as well as two other genes encoding proteins with potential insecticidal activity. As gene amplification is very rare in endosymbionts, an important function of these genes cannot be ruled out. PMID:24723729

  12. The Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) as a pest in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) has many common names including sweetpotato whitefly, silverleaf whitefly, tobacco whitefly, tomato whitefly, and cassava whitefly. It is an important global pest of numerous field and greenhouse agricultural crops. It damages plants from its fee...

  13. Ecological determinants of resistance to insecticides in Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insecticide resistance is a critical issue in pest management and has often been implicated as the primary cause of outbreaks of the global whitefly pest Bemisia tabaci Gennadius. Resistance to all modes of action used commonly against B. tabaci has been documented in various locations throughout t...

  14. Natural Enemies of Bemisia tabaci: Predators and Parasitiods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a worldwide problem in numerous agricultural crops. The known parasitoids of B. tabaci include 43 species of Encarsia, 19 Eretmocerus, and a few other genera. Some of these species are more cosmopolitan than others. Work has been conducted ...

  15. The Importance of Maintaining Protected Zone Status against Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Vänninen, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a major pest of economically important crops worldwide. Both the United Kingdom (UK) and Finland hold Protected Zone status against this invasive pest. As a result B. tabaci entering these countries on plants and plant produce is subjected to a policy of eradication. The impact of B. tabaci entering, and becoming established, is that it is an effective vector of many plant viruses that are not currently found in the protected zones. The Mediterranean species is the most commonly intercepted species of B. tabaci entering both the UK and Finland. The implications of maintaining Protected Zone status are discussed. PMID:26463194

  16. The Importance of Maintaining Protected Zone Status against Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.; Vänninen, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a major pest of economically important crops worldwide. Both the United Kingdom (UK) and Finland hold Protected Zone status against this invasive pest. As a result B. tabaci entering these countries on plants and plant produce is subjected to a policy of eradication. The impact of B. tabaci entering, and becoming established, is that it is an effective vector of many plant viruses that are not currently found in the protected zones. The Mediterranean species is the most commonly intercepted species of B. tabaci entering both the UK and Finland. The implications of maintaining Protected Zone status are discussed. PMID:26463194

  17. [Insecticide resistance of Bemisia tabaci field populations].

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Xian; Weng, Qi-Yong; Huang, Jian; Liang, Zhi-Sheng; Lin, Gui-Jun; Wu, Dong-Dong

    2007-07-01

    Resistance to 13 insecticides in field populations of Bemisia tabaci from six regions (Fuzhou, Zhangzhou, Longyan, Sanming, Nanping, Ningde) of Fujian Province, China was monitored by adult leaf-dipping bioassay. Compared with the susceptible SUD-S strain, all the six field populations exhibited high levels of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin (838.38-2460.52 fold), fenpropathrin (244.64-834.29 fold), cypermethrin (116.02-266.35 fold), deltamethrin (81.75-124.18 fold), acephate (425.18-875.56 fold) and chlorpyrifos (54.53-78.43 fold), moderate levels of resistance to dimethoate (14.16-17.66 fold), low to moderate levels of resistance to dichlorvos (6.23-11.25 fold) and low levels of resistance to methomyl (4.07-5.66 fold), respectively. Among these six field-collected populations, only Zhangzhou population had moderate resistance to imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiamethoxam (23.08 fold, 10.32 fold and 24.60 fold, respectively). All field strains tested displayed no resistance to abamectin. PMID:17886654

  18. Life History of Delphastus Catalinae: a predator of Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immature development and reproductive life history of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) feeding on Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) immatures was studied at three constant temperatures: 22, 26 and 30 ºC. Development rates and lower temperature threshold temperatures (T0) were e...

  19. Inheritance of Resistance to Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) in Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a common economic pest in a great number of crops throughout the world. In soybean, they can be vectors of viruses, e.g. soybean crinkle mosaic and soybean dwarf mosaic. Resistance to whitefly has been identified in soybean, however, whitefly resistance genes h...

  20. Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and Indian cassava mosaic virus transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) adults from colonies reared on cassava or sweet potato plants were studied to determine their ability to transmit Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) (Geminiviridae: Begomovirus) from cassava to cassava. Virus acquisition access (feeding) periods (AAP) of 48 h on ICMV-infec...

  1. Population Dynamics, Demography, Dispersal and Spread of Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci is an insect pest of global significance. It attacks multiple crops and causes damage through feeding and transmission of plant viruses. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge of the population dynamics, demography and dispersal of this important pest. Sampling metho...

  2. Baseline susceptibility of Bemisia tabaci B biotype (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) populations from California and Arizona to spiromesifen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility to spiromesifen, a tetronic acid derivative, was determined for three imidacloprid-resistant strains and 12 geographically discrete natural populations of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (= Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring) from California and Arizona by laboratory bioassays. Newl...

  3. Extensive survey of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotypes in Florida investigating the Q invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After the discovery of the Bemisia tabaci Q biotype in the U.S., there was an urgent need to determine its spread. As part of a coordinated whole country survey, an extensive survey of Bemisia tabaci biotypes was conducted in Florida through cooperation with growers and state agencies. This was done...

  4. Distribution of Bemisia tabaci Genetic Groups in India.

    PubMed

    Ellango, R; Singh, Shalini Thakur; Rana, Vipin Singh; Gayatri Priya, N; Raina, Harpreet; Chaubey, Rahul; Naveen, N C; Mahmood, Riaz; Ramamurthy, V V; Asokan, R; Rajagopal, R

    2015-08-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a phloem-feeding, economically important pest of crops worldwide. In addition to direct damage, it also vectors a number of plant viruses belonging to the family Geminiviridae. Its populations differ biologically with respect to insecticide resistance, virus transmission and host range. Therefore, understanding genetic variation among populations is important for management. We sequenced 850 bp of the mitochondrial COI (mtCOI) gene from B. tabaci populations surveyed across India. BLAST analysis of the mtCOI sequences generated in this study with sequences from the mtCOI dataset showed the presence of one invasive group, MEAM1, and eight other groups of B. tabaci in India. mtCOI sequence analyses showed the presence of Asia I, Asia I-India, Asia II-1, Asia II-5, Asia II-7, Asia II-8, and Asia II-11 genetic groups. We also found China-3 in a field in Birbhum district, West Bengal, India, suggesting a role of anthropogenic activities in the distribution of B. tabaci. Interestingly, more than one genetic group was found coexisting in the same field. PMID:26314072

  5. First report of the Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) in Guatemala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) adults were collected from poinsettia plants at a commercial greenhouse, bean and zucchini vegetable fields, weed species, and wild ornamentals species in selected locations in Guatemala. Both adult and immature whiteflies were observed on infested poinsettias. Whiteflies ...

  6. Comparative susceptibility of bemisia tabaci to imidacloprid in field- and laboratory-based bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci biotype B is a resistance-prone pest of protected and open agriculture. Systemic uptake bioassays used in resistance monitoring programs have provided important information on susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides, but have remained decoupled from field performance. Simultaneou...

  7. Bemisia tabaci (Aleyrodidae: Homoptera) nymphal feeding in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used brightfield electron microscopy (BEM), differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate the stylet pathways of Bemisia tabaci during nymphal feeding b...

  8. Monitoring changes in bemisia tabaci susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides in Arizona and California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory bioassays were carried out on field-collected and laboratory strains of Bemisia tabaci to evaluate relative toxicities of four neonicotinoid insecticides: acetamiprid, dinotefuran, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. Susceptibility to all four neonicotinoids in leaf-uptake bioassays varied co...

  9. BAYESIAN PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF MITOCHONDRIAL COI DNA SEQUENCE FROM GLOBAL SAMPLES OF BEMISIA TABACI (HEMIPTERA: ALEYRODIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gen.)(Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is one of the most devastating agricultural pests worldwide and affects the yield of a broad range of agricultural, fiber, vegetable and ornamental crops. Global phylogenetic relationships of the major races of B. tabaci remain unresolved thus a Bayesi...

  10. Impact of Relative Humidity on Adult Weight and Size of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), sweetpotato whitefly, is a serious global sap-sucking insect pest that carries many infectious diseases when feeding on many types of crops. A study was conducted to determine the influence of relative humidity (RH) on body size and mass of B. tabaci. The B-biotype B. t...

  11. Distribution of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotypes in Florida - Investigating the "Q" invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After the 2004 discovery of the Bemisia tabaci Q biotype in the U.S., there was an urgent need to determine its distribution. As part of a coordinated country-wide effort, an extensive survey of B. tabaci biotypes was conducted in Florida, with the cooperation of growers and state agencies, to moni...

  12. Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus: Efficiency of Acquisition, Retention and Transmission by Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a global pest which damages plants directly by feeding on leaves. Moreover, the problem is compounded because B. tabaci also vectors numerous plant viruses, including Begomoviruses (Geminiviridae) such as the Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus (SPL...

  13. Oogenesis in the Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 species complex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-Yang; Wan, Fang-Hao; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-04-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 species complex has invaded several parts of the world in the past 30 years and replaced native whitefly populations in the invaded regions, including certain areas of China. One of the possible reasons for the invasion is that MEAM1 whiteflies are more fecund than native species. However, the factors that affect the reproduction of the B. tabaci cryptic species are not clearly known. The regulation of oogenesis is thought to be one of the essential processes for egg formation and ovary development and could affect its population dynamics. In this study, the ovariole structure and oogenesis of the MEAM1 species complex was examined using light and transmission electron microscopy. Telotrophic ovarioles were observed in the MEAM1 species complex. Each ovariole had two well defined regions: the tropharium and the vitellarium. The tropharium always had more than ten trophocytes. The development of a single oocyte in the vitellarium has four phases: oocyte formation, previtellogenesis, vitellogenesis and choriogenesis. Two arrested oocytes, follicular cells and uncompleted oocytes were separated from the tropharium by microtubule and microfilaments. Early previtellogenesis oocytes absorbed nutrients and endosymbiont bacteria through a nutritive cord. However, the vitellogenesis of oocytes transmitted Vg through both the nutritive cord and the space between follicular cells. Each mature oocyte with deposited yolk proteins had only one bacteriocyte and was surrounded by a single layer of follicular cells. The oogenesis in the B. tabaci MEAM1 species complex concluded with the differentiation of oocytes, the transport of yolk and endosymbionts as well as the development and maturation of oocytes. This result provides important information that further defines the regulation of oogenesis in the B. tabaci complex. PMID:26826802

  14. Glucosinolate Desulfation by the Phloem-Feeding Insect Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Malka, Osnat; Shekhov, Anton; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Vassão, Daniel Giddings; Morin, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Glucosinolates are plant secondary defense metabolites confined nearly exclusively to the order Brassicales. Upon tissue rupture, glucosinolates are hydrolyzed to various bioactive breakdown products by the endogenous plant enzyme myrosinase. As the feeding of chewing insect herbivores is associated with plant tissue damage, these insects have developed several independent strategies for coping with the glucosinolate-myrosinase defense system. On the other hand, our knowledge of how phloem-feeding insects interact with the glucosinolate-myrosinase system is much more limited. In fact, phloem feeders might avoid contact with myrosinase altogether so their susceptibility to intoxication by glucosinolate hydrolysis products is unclear. Previous studies utilizing Arabidopsis thaliana plants accumulating high levels of aliphatic- or indolic-glucosinolates indicated that both glucosinolate groups have moderate negative effects on the reproductive performance of Bemisia tabaci, a generalist phloem-feeding insect. To get a deeper understanding of the interaction between B. tabaci and glucosinolate-defended plants, adults were allowed to feed on artificial diet containing intact glucosinolates or on Brussels sprout and A. thaliana plants, and their honeydew was analyzed for the presence of possible metabolites. We found that B. tabaci is capable of cleaving off the sulfate group of intact glucosinolates, producing desulfoglucosinolates that cannot be activated by myrosinases, a mechanism described to date only in several chewing insect herbivores. The presence of desulfated glucosinolates in the honeydew of a generalist phloem-feeder may indicate the necessity to detoxify glucosinolates, likely due to some level of cellular damage during feeding, which results in glucosinolate activation, or as a mechanism to circumvent the non-enzymatic breakdown of indolic glucosinolates. PMID:26961756

  15. Sequence variation of Bemisia tabaci Chemosensory Protein 2 in cryptic species B and Q: New DNA markers for whitefly recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Xia; Ma, Hong-Mei; Xie, Hong-Yan; Xuan, Ning; Picimbon, Jean-François

    2016-01-15

    Bemisia tabaci Gennadius biotypes B and Q are two of the most important worldwide agricultural insect pests. Genomic sequences of Type-2 B. tabaci chemosensory protein (BtabCSP2) were cloned and sequenced in B and Q biotypes, revealing key biotype-specific variations in the intron sequence. A Q260 sequence was found specifically in Q-BtabCSP2 and Cucumis melo LN692399, suggesting ancestral horizontal transfer of gene between the insect and the plant through bacteria. A cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) method was then developed to differentiate B and Q based on the sequence variation in exon of BtabCSP2 gene. The performances of CSP2-based CAPS for whitefly recognition were assessed using B. tabaci field collections from Shandong Province (P.R. China). Our SacII based CAPS method led to the same result compared to mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase-based CAPS method in the field collections. We therefore propose an explanation for CSP origin and a new rapid simple molecular method based on genomic DNA and chemosensory gene to differentiate accurately the B and Q whiteflies of the Bemisia complex around the world. PMID:26481237

  16. Host plant influences on susceptibility of bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : A resistance monitoring program conducted for the polyphagous whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) in Imperial Valley, CA, USA generated a large set of LC50s for adults collected from broccoli, cantaloupe and cotton crops over a four-year period. A vial bioassay and subsequently a yellow-sticky ca...

  17. Releases of exotic parasitoids of Bemisia tabaci in San Joaquin Valley, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1991, Bemisia tabaci was reported in the southern San Joaquin Valley infesting crops outside of greenhouses for the first time. From 1994 to 1996, 24 species/ strains of imported aphelinids, primarily species of Eretmocerus, were released in urban and agricultural settings for control of this whi...

  18. Effect of dinotefuran on Bemisia tabaci (MED whitefly) and Amblyseius swirskii, 2016

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci is a polyphagous pest known to feed upon over 900 plant taxa, and is an effective vector of more than 100 plant damaging viruses. Among different biotypes of this cryptic species complex, MEAM1 and MED whitefly are the two most destructive members posing threats of several crops of ec...

  19. Population genetics of invasive Bemisia tabaci cryptic species in the United States based on microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex of whiteflies contains two species, MEAM1 and MED, that are highly invasive in supportive climates the world over. In the United States MEAM1 occurs both in the field and in the greenhouse, but MED is only found in the greenhouse. In order to make inference...

  20. Extraordinary resistance to insecticides reveals exotic Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) possessing unusually high levels of resistance to a wide range of insecticides were discovered in 2004 in the course of routine resistance monitoring in Arizona. The multiply-resistant insects, collected from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) plants purchased...

  1. Extraordinary resistance to insecticides reveals exotic Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) in the New World

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) possessing unusually high levels of resistance to a wide range of insecticides were discovered in 2004 in the course of routine resistance monitoring in Arizona. The multiply-resistant insects, collected from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) plants purchased...

  2. Toxicity of selected insecticides to a strain of Bemisia tabaci Biotype Q from Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae), is an important pest in many cropping systems throughout the world. Currently two biotypes of this species are present in Florida, the B-biotype discovered in Florida in 1986 and the recently introduced Q-biotype. B-biot...

  3. Evaluating companion plants and plant products to control sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major insect pest of vegetables and horticultural crops in the southeast US is the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. We are evaluating the effect of companion/ repellent plants and products such as plant oils against this whitefly pest. In laboratory tests, whiteflies were released in potted...

  4. Survey of Reproductive Host Plants of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Egypt, Including New Host Records

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host plants can affect the population dynamics of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), and the plants can be potential sources of numerous whitefly-vectored viruses. This important pest attacks a wide range of agricultural plants, and feed on an extensive number of feral species of...

  5. Looking for Bemisia tabaci biotype Q in Florida: Results of Biotype sampling from 2005-2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In March 2005, Arizona scientists identified the Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci from Poinsettia plants that originated from California. Soon after, Florida began forming a plan for surveying, identifying and dealing with the Q biotype. Efforts for surveying began immediately in March 2005 and have cont...

  6. Insecticidal Activity of Chromobacterium subtsugae on the Sweet Potato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, Biotype B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromobacterium subtsugae crude extracts contain compounds that are toxic to nymphal and adult Bemisia tabaci. When fed on artificial diet containing 10% of the supernatant of an aqueous cell-free extract of C subtsugae, the number of 2nd and 4th instar nymphs and of emerged adults was significantl...

  7. Sampling and Management of Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) Biotype B in Australian Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A management strategy for the B biotype of Bemisia tabaci (silverleaf whitefly) in Australian cotton crops is presented. A fixed-sample size binomial (presence or absence) model based on a tally threshold of 2 adults/leaf was tested using a computer resampling approach and used to develop a sampling...

  8. Molecular and functional characterization of Bemisia tabaci aquaporins reveals the water channel diversity of hemipteran insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is an economically important pest of food, fiber, and ornamental crops. This pest has evolved a number of adaptations to overcome physiological challenges, including 1) the ability to regulate osmotic stress between gut lumen ...

  9. Climate change and Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae): Impacts of temperature and carbon dioxide on life history

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change is relevant to life around the globe. A rise in ambient temperature and CO2 may have various impacts on arthropods such as altered life cycles, modified reproductive patterns, and changes in distribution. The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a global agricultural...

  10. Distribution of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotypes in North America following the Q invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After the 2004 discovery of the Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Q biotype in the U.S., there was a vital need to determine its distribution and its interaction with the resident B biotype because of its innate ability to rapidly develop high level insecticide resistance that does not revert back to susce...

  11. OUT OF AFRICA: DIVERSITY AND HOST PLANT UTILIZATION IN SUB-SAHARAN BEMISIA TABACI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diversity of Bemisia tabaci in Sub-Saharan Africa is greater than in any other geographic location and suggests Sub-Saharan Africa is the likely evolutionary origin of the species. Sampling in Africa is now quite extensive and includes a number of studies that have analyzed host preference withi...

  12. Insecticidal Activity of Some Reducing Sugars Against the Sweet Potato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, Biotype B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 15 sugars on sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) survival were determined using bioassays. Arabinose, mannose, ribose and xylose were strongly inhibitory to both nymphal and adult survival. When 10% mannose was added to the diet, 10.5%, 1.0% and 0% of nymphs developed to the 2nd, ...

  13. Biochemical study of resistance to imidacloprid in B-biotype Bemisia tabaci from Guatemala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic uptake bioassays using excised cotton leaves confirmed resistance to imidacloprid in a Guatemalan population of the tobacco whitefly Bemisia tabaci Gennadius. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of naphthyl esterases identified the insects as B-types. Upon collection from the field, resistan...

  14. Forty-nine New Host Plant Species for Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a worldwide pest of numerous agricultural and ornamental crops. In addition to directly feeding on plants, it also acts as a vector of plant viruses of cultivated and uncultivated host plant species. Moreover, host plants can affect the popula...

  15. COTTON WATER STRESS ON BEMISIA TABACI STRAIN B (HOMOPTERA: ALEYRODIDAE) ON HONEYDEW PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparisons of honeydew production by sweetpotato whitefly (SPW), Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Strain B while feeding on water-stressed or non-water-stressed cotton showed that more honeydew sugars were produced on non water-stressed leaves of cotton plants (four days after irrigation) compared to tho...

  16. EFFECTS OF COTTON PLANT WATER STRESS ON BEMISIA TABACI STRAIN B (HOMOPTERA: ALEYRODIDAE) HONEYDEW PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honeydew production by sweetpotato whitefly (SPW), Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Strain B, feeding on water-stressed and non-water-stressed cotton was compared in field and greenhouse studies. In the field in 1999, leaf water potentials, as a measure of water stress, decreased with increasing numbers ...

  17. Global relationships of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) revealed using Bayesian analysis of mitochondrial COI DNA sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gen.)(Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a species complex that is one of the most devastating agricultural pests worldwide and affects a broad range of food, fiber and ornamental crops. Unfortunately, using parsimony and neighbor joining methods, global phylogenetic relationships of the ma...

  18. Aerial electrostatic-charged spray for deposition and efficacy against sweetpotato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) on cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficacy of aerial electrostatic-charged sprays was evaluated for spray deposit characteristics and season-long control of sweet potato whitefly (SWF), Bemisia tabaci biotype B (a.k.a. B. argentifolii), in an irrigated 24-ha cotton field. Treatments included electrostatic-charged sprays at full and ...

  19. Mortality and Population Dynamics of Bemisia tabaci within a Multi-Crop System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The population dynamics of mobile polyphagous pests is governed by a complex set of interacting factors that involve multiple host-plants, seasonality, movement and demography. Bemisia tabaci is a multivoltine insect with no diapause that maintains population continuity by moving from one host to a...

  20. Identification and characterization of functional aquaporin water channel protein from alimentary tract of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some hemipteran xylem and phloem feeding insects have evolved specialized alimentary structures or filter chambers that rapidly transport water for excretion or osmoregulation. In the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, mass movement of water through opposing alimentary tract tissues within the filter chamber...

  1. Molecular Characterization of Vitellogenin and Vitellogenin Receptor of Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Harpal; Dixit, Sameer; Mendu, Venugopal; Verma, Praveen C

    2016-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg) plays vital role in oocytes and embryo development in insects. Vg is synthesized in the fat body, moves through haemolymph and accumulates in oocytes. Vitellogenin receptors (VgR) present on the surface of oocytes, are responsible for Vg transportation from haemolymph to oocytes. Here, we cloned and characterized these genes from Bemisia tabaci Asia1 (BtA1) species. The cloned BtA1Vg and BtA1VgR genes consisted of 6,330 and 5,430 bp long open reading frames, which encoded 2,109 and 1,809 amino acid (AA) residues long protein. The BtA1Vg protein comprised LPD_N, DUF1943 and VWFD domains, typical R/KXXR/K, DGXR and GL/ICG motifs, and polyserine tracts. BtA1VgR protein contained 12 LDLa, 10 LDLb and 7 EGF domains, and a trans-membrane and cytoplasmic region at C-terminus. Phylogenetic analyses indicated evolutionary association of BtA1Vg and BtA1VgR with the homologous proteins from various insect species. Silencing of BtA1VgR by siRNA did not affect the transcript level of BtA1Vg. However, BtA1Vg protein accumulation in oocytes was directly influenced with the expression level of BtA1VgR. Further, BtA1VgR silencing caused significant mortality and reduced fecundity in adult whiteflies. The results established the role of BtA1VgR in transportation of BtA1Vg in oocytes. Further, these proteins are essential for fecundity, and therefore these can be potential RNAi targets for insect control in crop plants. PMID:27159161

  2. Molecular Characterization of Vitellogenin and Vitellogenin Receptor of Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Harpal; Dixit, Sameer; Mendu, Venugopal; Verma, Praveen C.

    2016-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg) plays vital role in oocytes and embryo development in insects. Vg is synthesized in the fat body, moves through haemolymph and accumulates in oocytes. Vitellogenin receptors (VgR) present on the surface of oocytes, are responsible for Vg transportation from haemolymph to oocytes. Here, we cloned and characterized these genes from Bemisia tabaci Asia1 (BtA1) species. The cloned BtA1Vg and BtA1VgR genes consisted of 6,330 and 5,430 bp long open reading frames, which encoded 2,109 and 1,809 amino acid (AA) residues long protein. The BtA1Vg protein comprised LPD_N, DUF1943 and VWFD domains, typical R/KXXR/K, DGXR and GL/ICG motifs, and polyserine tracts. BtA1VgR protein contained 12 LDLa, 10 LDLb and 7 EGF domains, and a trans-membrane and cytoplasmic region at C-terminus. Phylogenetic analyses indicated evolutionary association of BtA1Vg and BtA1VgR with the homologous proteins from various insect species. Silencing of BtA1VgR by siRNA did not affect the transcript level of BtA1Vg. However, BtA1Vg protein accumulation in oocytes was directly influenced with the expression level of BtA1VgR. Further, BtA1VgR silencing caused significant mortality and reduced fecundity in adult whiteflies. The results established the role of BtA1VgR in transportation of BtA1Vg in oocytes. Further, these proteins are essential for fecundity, and therefore these can be potential RNAi targets for insect control in crop plants. PMID:27159161

  3. New records of entomopathogenic fungi infecting Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum, pests of horticultural crops, in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), and Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) are major crop pests throughout the world. Although extensive research about biological control of whitefly has been conducted towards these insect's parasitoids and predators, several entom...

  4. Compatibility of the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana with neem against sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, on eggplant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study on the compatibility of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) with neem was conducted against sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), on eggplant. Initially, three concentrations of B. bassiana (106, 1...

  5. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus alters the host preferences of its vector Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yong; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Shi, Xiaobin; Chen, Gong; Su, Qi; Yang, Xin; Pan, Huipeng; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci, the whitefly vector of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), seriously reduces tomato production and quality. Here, we report the first evidence that infection by TYLCV alters the host preferences of invasive B. tabaci B (Middle East-Minor Asia 1) and Q (Mediterranean genetic group), in which TYLCV-free B. tabaci Q preferred to settle on TYLCV-infected tomato plants over healthy ones. TYLCV-free B. tabaci B, however, preferred healthy tomato plants to TYLCV-infected plants. In contrast, TYLCV-infected B. tabaci, either B or Q, did not exhibit a preference between TYLCV-infected and TYLCV-free tomato plants. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS)analysis of plant terpene volatiles, significantly more β-myrcene, thymene, β-phellandrene, caryophyllene, (+)-4-carene, and α-humulene were released from the TYLCV-free tomato plants than from the TYLCV-infected ones. The results indicate TYLCV can alter the host preferences of its vector Bemisia tabaci B and Q. PMID:24096821

  6. RNA Interference based Approach to Down Regulate Osmoregulators of Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci): Potential Technology for the Control of Whitefly

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Amir; Malik, Hassan Jamil; Shafiq, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Scheffler, Jodi A.; Scheffler, Brian E.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade RNA interference (RNAi) technology has emerged as a successful tool not only for functional genomics, but in planta expression of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that could offer great potential for insect pest management. The diet of insects feeding exclusively on phloem sieves contains water and sugars as main components, and the uptake of the liquid food greatly depends on the osmotic pressure within the insect body. Based on this physiological mechanism, transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum were generated expressing double stranded RNA (dsRNA) against both aquaporin (AQP) and a sucrase gene, alpha glucosidase (AGLU). These two genes are involved in osmotic pressure maintenance particularly in sap sucking insects, and the aim was to disrupt osmoregulation within the insect ultimately leading to mortality. Real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to assess the suppression of gene expression in Bemisia tabaci (B. tabaci) and mortality was recorded during transgenic tobacco feeding bioassays. Feeding of insects on plants expressing dsRNA significantly reduced the transcript level of the target genes in B. tabaci after six days of feeding and more than 70% mortality was observed in B. tabaci fed on transgenic plants compared to the control plants. Our data shows that down-regulation of genes related to osmoregulation may find practical applications for the control of this important pest in cotton and other crops. PMID:27105353

  7. RNA Interference based Approach to Down Regulate Osmoregulators of Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci): Potential Technology for the Control of Whitefly.

    PubMed

    Raza, Amir; Malik, Hassan Jamil; Shafiq, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Scheffler, Jodi A; Scheffler, Brian E; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade RNA interference (RNAi) technology has emerged as a successful tool not only for functional genomics, but in planta expression of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that could offer great potential for insect pest management. The diet of insects feeding exclusively on phloem sieves contains water and sugars as main components, and the uptake of the liquid food greatly depends on the osmotic pressure within the insect body. Based on this physiological mechanism, transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum were generated expressing double stranded RNA (dsRNA) against both aquaporin (AQP) and a sucrase gene, alpha glucosidase (AGLU). These two genes are involved in osmotic pressure maintenance particularly in sap sucking insects, and the aim was to disrupt osmoregulation within the insect ultimately leading to mortality. Real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to assess the suppression of gene expression in Bemisia tabaci (B. tabaci) and mortality was recorded during transgenic tobacco feeding bioassays. Feeding of insects on plants expressing dsRNA significantly reduced the transcript level of the target genes in B. tabaci after six days of feeding and more than 70% mortality was observed in B. tabaci fed on transgenic plants compared to the control plants. Our data shows that down-regulation of genes related to osmoregulation may find practical applications for the control of this important pest in cotton and other crops. PMID:27105353

  8. The Endosymbiont Hamiltonella Increases the Growth Rate of Its Host Bemisia tabaci during Periods of Nutritional Stress

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qi; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Liu, Baiming; Fang, Yong; Xu, Baoyun; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) harbors several bacterial symbionts. Among the secondary (facultative) symbionts, Hamiltonella has high prevalence and high infection frequencies, suggesting that it may be important for the biology and ecology of its hosts. Previous reports indicated that Hamiltonella increases whitefly fitness and, based on the complete sequencing of its genome, may have the ability to synthesize cofactors and amino acids that are required by its host but that are not sufficiently synthesized by the host or by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera. Here, we assessed the effects of Hamiltonella infection on the growth of B. tabaci reared on low-, standard-, or high-nitrogen diets. When B. tabaci was reared on a standard-nitrogen diet, no cost or benefit was associated with Hamiltonella infection. But, if we reared whiteflies on low-nitrogen diets, Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies often grew better than uninfected whiteflies. Furthermore, nitrogen levels in field-collected whiteflies indicated that the nutritional conditions in the field were comparable to the low-nitrogen diet in our laboratory experiment. These data suggest that Hamiltonella may play a previously unrecognized role as a nutritional mutualist in B. tabaci. PMID:24558462

  9. Prey Preference and Life Table of Amblyseius orientalis on Bemisia tabaci and Tetranychus cinnabarinus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Lv, Jiale; Hu, Yue; Wang, Boming; Chen, Xi; Xu, Xuenong; Wang, Endong

    2015-01-01

    Amblyseius orientalis (Ehara) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a native predatory mite species in China. It used to be considered as a specialist predator of spider mites. However, recent studies show it also preys on other small arthropod pests, such as Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Experiments were conducted to investigate (1) prey preference of A. orientalis between Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisd.) (Acari: Tetranychidae) and B. tabaci, and (2) development, consumption and life table parameters of A. orientalis when reared on T. cinnabarinus, B. tabaci or a mix of both prey species. When preying on different stages of T. cinnabarinus, A. orientalis preferred protonymphs, whereas when preying on different stages of B. tabaci, A. orientalis preferred eggs. When these two most preferred stages were provided together (T. cinnabarinus protonymphs and B. tabaci eggs), A. orientalis randomly selected its prey. Amblyseius orientalis was able to complete its life cycle on B. tabaci eggs, T. cinnabarinus protonymphs, or a mix of both prey. However, its developmental duration was 53.9% and 30.0% longer when reared on B. tabaci eggs than on T. cinnabarinus and a mix of both prey, respectively. In addition, it produced only a few eggs and its intrinsic rate of increase was negative when reared on B. tabaci eggs, which indicates that B. tabaci is not sufficient to maintain A. orientalis population. The intrinsic rates of increase were 0.16 and 0.23 when A. orientalis was fed on the prey mix and T. cinnabarinus, respectively. These results suggest that although B. tabaci is a poor food resource for A. orientalis in comparison to T. cinnabarinus, A. orientalis is able to sustain its population on a mix of both prey. This predatory mite may thus be a potential biological control agent of B. tabaci when this pest co-occurs with the alternative minor pest T. cinnabarinus. PMID:26436422

  10. Prey Preference and Life Table of Amblyseius orientalis on Bemisia tabaci and Tetranychus cinnabarinus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue; Wang, Boming; Chen, Xi; Xu, Xuenong; Wang, Endong

    2015-01-01

    Amblyseius orientalis (Ehara) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a native predatory mite species in China. It used to be considered as a specialist predator of spider mites. However, recent studies show it also preys on other small arthropod pests, such as Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Experiments were conducted to investigate (1) prey preference of A. orientalis between Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisd.) (Acari: Tetranychidae) and B. tabaci, and (2) development, consumption and life table parameters of A. orientalis when reared on T. cinnabarinus, B. tabaci or a mix of both prey species. When preying on different stages of T. cinnabarinus, A. orientalis preferred protonymphs, whereas when preying on different stages of B. tabaci, A. orientalis preferred eggs. When these two most preferred stages were provided together (T. cinnabarinus protonymphs and B. tabaci eggs), A. orientalis randomly selected its prey. Amblyseius orientalis was able to complete its life cycle on B. tabaci eggs, T. cinnabarinus protonymphs, or a mix of both prey. However, its developmental duration was 53.9% and 30.0% longer when reared on B. tabaci eggs than on T. cinnabarinus and a mix of both prey, respectively. In addition, it produced only a few eggs and its intrinsic rate of increase was negative when reared on B. tabaci eggs, which indicates that B. tabaci is not sufficient to maintain A. orientalis population. The intrinsic rates of increase were 0.16 and 0.23 when A. orientalis was fed on the prey mix and T. cinnabarinus, respectively. These results suggest that although B. tabaci is a poor food resource for A. orientalis in comparison to T. cinnabarinus, A. orientalis is able to sustain its population on a mix of both prey. This predatory mite may thus be a potential biological control agent of B. tabaci when this pest co-occurs with the alternative minor pest T. cinnabarinus. PMID:26436422

  11. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: No evidence for replication in the insect vector Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar A.; Cruzado, Lucía; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Begomovirus ssDNA plant virus (family Geminiviridae) replication within the Bemisia tabaci vector is controversial. Transovarial transmission, alteration to whitefly biology, or detection of viral transcripts in the vector are proposed as indirect evidence of replication of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Recently, contrasting direct evidence has been reported regarding the capacity of TYLCV to replicate within individuals of B. tabaci based on quantitave PCR approaches. Time-course experiments to quantify complementary and virion sense viral nucleic acid accumulation within B. tabaci using a recently implemented two step qPCR procedure revealed that viral DNA quantities did not increase for time points up to 96 hours after acquisition of the virus. Our findings do not support a recent report claiming TYLCV replication in individuals of B. tabaci. PMID:27476582

  12. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: No evidence for replication in the insect vector Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar A; Cruzado, Lucía; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Begomovirus ssDNA plant virus (family Geminiviridae) replication within the Bemisia tabaci vector is controversial. Transovarial transmission, alteration to whitefly biology, or detection of viral transcripts in the vector are proposed as indirect evidence of replication of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Recently, contrasting direct evidence has been reported regarding the capacity of TYLCV to replicate within individuals of B. tabaci based on quantitave PCR approaches. Time-course experiments to quantify complementary and virion sense viral nucleic acid accumulation within B. tabaci using a recently implemented two step qPCR procedure revealed that viral DNA quantities did not increase for time points up to 96 hours after acquisition of the virus. Our findings do not support a recent report claiming TYLCV replication in individuals of B. tabaci. PMID:27476582

  13. Baseline susceptibility of Bemisia tabaci B biotype (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae) populations from Californis and Arizona to spirotetramat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baseline toxicity levels to foliarly applied spirotetramat were established for 19 field populations of whiteflies, Bemisia tabaci B biotype from Arizona and California in 2008 and 2009. The susceptibility data was determined against the 2nd instar of B. tabaci field collections before the registrat...

  14. The Contribution of Conservation Biological Control to Management of Bemisia tabaci in Cotton: A Life Table Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural enemies in Arizona cotton can be conserved with the use of selective insect growth regulators (IGRs) for control of Bemisia tabaci. To examine the interaction of mortality forces, cohort-based life tables were constructed for B. tabaci populations subject to three different pest control stra...

  15. A knottin-like putative antimicrobial gene family in the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci B: cloning and transcript regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, is a worldwide plant pest and the vector of agriculturally important plant pathogenic begomoviruses. Of two vectored begomoviruses, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is transcriptionally active in B. tabaci and Tomato mottle virus (ToMoV)is not. Comparative analyses...

  16. Chemical class rotations for control of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) on poinsettia and their effect on cryptic species population composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci, a polyphagous insect with over 900 host plants, is an effective vector of more than 100 plant viruses. Being highly fecund, B. tabaci has the potential to develop insecticide resistance rapidly as demonstrated by reports of use failures with MEAM1 and MED cryptic species (commonly kn...

  17. Genetic distinctions among the Mediterranean and Chinese populations of Bemisia tabaci Q biotype and their endosymbiont Wolbachia populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, is a cryptic species complex composed of more than 24 different biotypes around the world. The Q biotype of B. tabaci, which is thought to have originated in the Mediterranean Basin, is now a widespread and serious agricultural pest. In this study, the genet...

  18. Feeding Experience of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Affects Their Performance on Different Host Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shah, M. Mostafizur Rahman; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2013-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B is extremely polyphagous with >600 species of host plants. We hypothesized that previous experience of the whitefly on a given host plant affects their host selection and performance on the plants without previous experience. We investigated the host selection for feeding and oviposition of adults and development and survival of immatures of three host-plant-experienced populations of B. tabaci, namely Bemisia-eggplant, Bemisia-tomato and Bemisia-cucumber, on their experienced host plant and each of the three other plant species (eggplant, tomato, cucumber and pepper) without previous experience. We found that the influence of previous experience of the whiteflies varied among the populations. All populations refused pepper for feeding and oviposition, whereas the Bemisia-cucumber and the Bemisia-eggplant strongly preferred cucumber. Bemisia-tomato did not show strong preference to any of the three host palnts. Development time from egg to adult eclosion varied among the populations, being shortest on eggplant, longest on pepper, and intermediate on tomato and cucumber except for the Bemisia-cucumber developed similarly on tomato and pepper. The survivorship from egg to adult eclosion of all populations was highest on eggplant (80-98%), lowest on pepper (0-20%), and intermediate on tomato and cucumber. In conclusion, the effects of previous experience of whiteflies on host selection for feeding and oviposition, development, and survivorship varied depending on host plants, and host plants play a stronger role than previous experience. Preference of feeding and oviposition by adults may not accurately reflect host suitability of immatures. These results provided important information for understanding whitefly population dynamics and dispersal among different crop systems. PMID:24146985

  19. Pyrosequencing the Bemisia tabaci Transcriptome Reveals a Highly Diverse Bacterial Community and a Robust System for Insecticide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing-jun; Wang, Shao-li; Yang, Xin; Yang, Ni-na; Li, Ru-mei; Jiao, Xiao-guo; Pan, Hui-peng; Liu, Bai-ming; Su, Qi; Xu, Bao-yun; Hu, Song-nian; Zhou, Xu-guo; Zhang, You-jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a phloem-feeding insect poised to become one of the major insect pests in open field and greenhouse production systems throughout the world. The high level of resistance to insecticides is a main factor that hinders continued use of insecticides for suppression of B. tabaci. Despite its prevalence, little is known about B. tabaci at the genome level. To fill this gap, an invasive B. tabaci B biotype was subjected to pyrosequencing-based transcriptome analysis to identify genes and gene networks putatively involved in various physiological and toxicological processes. Methodology and Principal Findings Using Roche 454 pyrosequencing, 857,205 reads containing approximately 340 megabases were obtained from the B. tabaci transcriptome. De novo assembly generated 178,669 unigenes including 30,980 from insects, 17,881 from bacteria, and 129,808 from the nohit. A total of 50,835 (28.45%) unigenes showed similarity to the non-redundant database in GenBank with a cut-off E-value of 10–5. Among them, 40,611 unigenes were assigned to one or more GO terms and 6,917 unigenes were assigned to 288 known pathways. De novo metatranscriptome analysis revealed highly diverse bacterial symbionts in B. tabaci, and demonstrated the host-symbiont cooperation in amino acid production. In-depth transcriptome analysis indentified putative molecular markers, and genes potentially involved in insecticide resistance and nutrient digestion. The utility of this transcriptome was validated by a thiamethoxam resistance study, in which annotated cytochrome P450 genes were significantly overexpressed in the resistant B. tabaci in comparison to its susceptible counterparts. Conclusions This transcriptome/metatranscriptome analysis sheds light on the molecular understanding of symbiosis and insecticide resistance in an agriculturally important phloem-feeding insect pest, and lays the foundation for future functional genomics research of the B. tabaci complex

  20. [Biotypes and phylogenetic analysis of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Li; Cai, Li; Shen, Wei-Jiang; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2014-04-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is considered taxonomically as a species complex and could cause serious damages to crops by directly feeding on phloem and/or indirectly transmission of plant viruses. In this study, biotypes and phylogenetic relationships of 33 geographic populations of B. tabaci collected from nine provinces of China in 2010 and 2011 were studied based on the mitochondrial COI gene. The results showed there were a total of six biotypes of B. tabaci (B, Q, ZHJ-1, ZHJ-3, An and Nauru) recovered in China and the geographical distribution of these six biotypes was uneven. Phylogenetic analysis showed that biotype An B. tabaci from Taiwan clustered together with Hainan biotype An populations, indicating these two geographic populations might originate from a same ancestor. In addition, biotype B B. tabaci in China had a 99% genetical similarity compared to that from France and Uganda. However, relationships of biotype Q on the phylogenetic tree were divided into two different clusters. One was occupied with the population from China and Western Mediterranean Sea countries (France and Morocco) and the other contained biotype Q populations from Eastern Mediterranean Sea countries (Israel and Turkey). Overall, the results suggested that biotype Q B. tabaci in China was genetically similar to that from Western Mediterranean Sea countries and it could be highly possible that Chinese biotype Q B. tabaci originated from Western Mediterranean Sea areas. PMID:25011310

  1. Update on the Status of Bemisia tabaci in the UK and the Use of Entomopathogenic Fungi within Eradication Programmes

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.

    2013-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) continues to be a serious threat to crops worldwide. The UK holds Protected Zone status against this pest and, as a result, B. tabaci entering on plant material is subjected to a policy of eradication. Both B and Q Bemisia biotypes are now regularly intercepted entering the UK. With increasing reports of neonicotinoid resistance in both these biotypes, it is becoming more problematic to control/eradicate. Therefore, alternative means of control are necessary. Entomopathogenic fungi (Lecanicilllium muscarium and Beauveria bassiana) offer much potential as control agents of B. tabaci within eradication programmes in the UK. PMID:26464385

  2. Biotype Characterization, Developmental Profiling, Insecticide Response and Binding Property of Bemisia tabaci Chemosensory Proteins: Role of CSP in Insect Defense

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoxia; Ma, Hongmei; Xie, Hongyan; Xuan, Ning; Guo, Xia; Fan, Zhongxue; Rajashekar, Balaji; Arnaud, Philippe; Offmann, Bernard; Picimbon, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are believed to play a key role in the chemosensory process in insects. Sequencing genomic DNA and RNA encoding CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 in the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci showed strong variation between B and Q biotypes. Analyzing CSP-RNA levels showed not only biotype, but also age and developmental stage-specific expression. Interestingly, applying neonicotinoid thiamethoxam insecticide using twenty-five different dose/time treatments in B and Q young adults showed that Bemisia CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 were also differentially regulated over insecticide exposure. In our study one of the adult-specific gene (CSP1) was shown to be significantly up-regulated by the insecticide in Q, the most highly resistant form of B. tabaci. Correlatively, competitive binding assays using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking demonstrated that CSP1 protein preferentially bound to linoleic acid, while CSP2 and CSP3 proteins rather associated to another completely different type of chemical, i.e. α-pentyl-cinnamaldehyde (jasminaldehyde). This might indicate that some CSPs in whiteflies are crucial to facilitate the transport of fatty acids thus regulating some metabolic pathways of the insect immune response, while some others are tuned to much more volatile chemicals known not only for their pleasant odor scent, but also for their potent toxic insecticide activity. PMID:27167733

  3. Biotype Characterization, Developmental Profiling, Insecticide Response and Binding Property of Bemisia tabaci Chemosensory Proteins: Role of CSP in Insect Defense.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoxia; Ma, Hongmei; Xie, Hongyan; Xuan, Ning; Guo, Xia; Fan, Zhongxue; Rajashekar, Balaji; Arnaud, Philippe; Offmann, Bernard; Picimbon, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are believed to play a key role in the chemosensory process in insects. Sequencing genomic DNA and RNA encoding CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 in the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci showed strong variation between B and Q biotypes. Analyzing CSP-RNA levels showed not only biotype, but also age and developmental stage-specific expression. Interestingly, applying neonicotinoid thiamethoxam insecticide using twenty-five different dose/time treatments in B and Q young adults showed that Bemisia CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 were also differentially regulated over insecticide exposure. In our study one of the adult-specific gene (CSP1) was shown to be significantly up-regulated by the insecticide in Q, the most highly resistant form of B. tabaci. Correlatively, competitive binding assays using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking demonstrated that CSP1 protein preferentially bound to linoleic acid, while CSP2 and CSP3 proteins rather associated to another completely different type of chemical, i.e. α-pentyl-cinnamaldehyde (jasminaldehyde). This might indicate that some CSPs in whiteflies are crucial to facilitate the transport of fatty acids thus regulating some metabolic pathways of the insect immune response, while some others are tuned to much more volatile chemicals known not only for their pleasant odor scent, but also for their potent toxic insecticide activity. PMID:27167733

  4. The Feeding Rate of Predatory Mites on Life Stages of Bemisia tabaci Mediterranean Species.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S

    2014-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) continues to be a serious threat to crops worldwide. The UK holds Protected Zone status against this pest and, as a result, B. tabaci entering on plant material is subjected to a policy of eradication. There has recently been a shift from Middle East-Asia Minor 1 to the more chemical resistant Mediterranean species entering the UK. Predatory mites (Amblyseius swirskii, Transeius montdorensis and Typhlodromalus limonicus) were screened for their impact upon various lifestages of B. tabaci Mediterranean species. Approximately 30% of eggs were fed upon by A. swirskii following a 5 day period. Feeding rates slightly decreased for all mite species when feeding on first instar life-stages (27%, 24%, 16% respectively) and significantly decreased when feeding on second instars (8.5%, 8.5%, 8.7% respectively). Combining the two mite species (A. swirskii and T. montdorensis) increased mortality of Bemisia eggs to 36%. The potential of incorporating the mites into existing control strategies for B. tabaci is discussed. PMID:26462828

  5. The Feeding Rate of Predatory Mites on Life Stages of Bemisia tabaci Mediterranean Species

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.

    2014-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) continues to be a serious threat to crops worldwide. The UK holds Protected Zone status against this pest and, as a result, B. tabaci entering on plant material is subjected to a policy of eradication. There has recently been a shift from Middle East-Asia Minor 1 to the more chemical resistant Mediterranean species entering the UK. Predatory mites (Amblyseius swirskii, Transeius montdorensis and Typhlodromalus limonicus) were screened for their impact upon various lifestages of B. tabaci Mediterranean species. Approximately 30% of eggs were fed upon by A. swirskii following a 5 day period. Feeding rates slightly decreased for all mite species when feeding on first instar life-stages (27%, 24%, 16% respectively) and significantly decreased when feeding on second instars (8.5%, 8.5%, 8.7% respectively). Combining the two mite species (A. swirskii and T. montdorensis) increased mortality of Bemisia eggs to 36%. The potential of incorporating the mites into existing control strategies for B. tabaci is discussed. PMID:26462828

  6. Wolbachia Has Two Different Localization Patterns in Whitefly Bemisia tabaci AsiaII7 Species.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peiqiong; He, Zhan; Li, Shaojian; An, Xuan; Lv, Ning; Ghanim, Murad; Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Ren, Shun-Xiang; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a cosmopolitan insect species complex that harbors the obligate primary symbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum and several facultative secondary symbionts including Wolbachia, which have diverse influences on the host biology. Here, for the first time, we revealed two different localization patterns of Wolbachia present in the immature and adult stages of B. tabaci AsiaII7 cryptic species. In the confined pattern, Wolbachia was restricted to the bacteriocytes, while in the scattered pattern Wolbachia localized in the bacteriocytes, haemolymph and other organs simultaneously. Our results further indicated that, the proportion of B. tabaci AsiaII7 individuals with scattered Wolbachia were significantly lower than that of confined Wolbachia, and the distribution patterns of Wolbachia were not associated with the developmental stage or sex of whitefly host. This study will provide a new insight into the various transmission routes of Wolbachia in different whitefly species. PMID:27611575

  7. Deep Sequencing-Based Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Regulatory Mechanism of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Nymph Parasitized by Encarsia sophia (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ran; Li, Fei; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Su

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a genetically diverse complex with multiple cryptic species, and some are the most destructive invasive pests of many ornamentals and crops worldwide. Encarsia sophia is an autoparasitoid wasp that demonstrated high efficiency as bio-control agent of whiteflies. However, the immune mechanism of B. tabaci parasitization by E. sophia is unknown. In order to investigate immune response of B. tabaci to E. Sophia parasitization, the transcriptome of E. sophia parasitized B. tabaci nymph was sequenced by Illumina sequencing. De novo assembly generated 393,063 unigenes with average length of 616 bp, in which 46,406 unigenes (15.8% of all unigenes) were successfully mapped. Parasitization by E. sophia had significant effects on the transcriptome profile of B. tabaci nymph. A total of 1482 genes were significantly differentially expressed, of which 852 genes were up-regulated and 630 genes were down-regulated. These genes were mainly involved in immune response, development, metabolism and host signaling pathways. At least 52 genes were found to be involved in the host immune response, 33 genes were involved in the development process, and 29 genes were involved in host metabolism. Taken together, the assembled and annotated transcriptome sequences provided a valuable genomic resource for further understanding the molecular mechanism of immune response of B. tabaci parasitization by E. sophia. PMID:27332546

  8. Development of an antibody-based diagnostic method for the identification of Bemisia tabaci biotype B.

    PubMed

    Baek, Ji Hyeong; Lee, Hye Jung; Kim, Young Ho; Lim, Kook Jin; Lee, Si Hyeock; Kim, Bum Joon

    2016-07-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a very destructive pest. B. tabaci is composed of various morphologically undistinguishable biotypes, among which biotypes B and Q, in particular, draw attention because of their wide distribution in Korea and differential potentials for insecticide resistance development. To develop a biotype-specific protein marker that can readily distinguishes biotypes B from other biotypes in the field, we established an ELISA protocol based on carboxylesterase 2 (COE2), which is more abundantly expressed in biotypes B compared with Q. Recombinant COE2 was expressed, purified and used for antibody construction. Polyclonal antibodies specific to B. tabaci COE2 [anti-COE2 pAb and deglycosylated anti-COE2 pAb (DG anti-COE2 pAb)] revealed a 3-9-fold higher reactivity to biotype B COE2 than biotype Q COE2 by Western blot and ELISA analyses. DG anti-COE2 pAb exhibited low non-specific activity, demonstrating its compatibility in diagnosing biotypes. Western blot and ELISA analyses determined that one of the 11 field populations examined was biotype B and the others were biotype Q, suggesting the saturation of biotype Q in Korea. DG anti-COE2 pAb discriminates B. tabaci biotypes B and Q with high specificity and accuracy and could be useful for the development of a B. tabaci biotype diagnosis kit for on-site field applications. PMID:27265822

  9. Potentiation/Antagonism of pyrethroids with organophosphate insecticides in Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mushtaq

    2007-06-01

    The binary mixtures of pyrethroids cypermethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, zeta-cypermethrin, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and deltamethrin plus organophosphates ethion, profenofos, chlorpyrifos, quinalphos, acephate, methamidophos, methyl parathion, and triazophos were evaluated on putatively resistant field populations of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) from Pakistan using a leaf-dip bioassay. Ethion exhibited good potentiation with all the pyrethroids. Quinalphos potentiated cypermethrin, fenpropathrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin but not bifenthrin. Acephate was potentiating with bifenthrin and fenpropathrin but antagonistic with zeta-cypermethrin. A potentiation effect was also found when methamidophos was mixed with bifenthrin and fenpropathrin. However, profenofos was antagonistic with cypermethrin, bifenthrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin. Similarly, bifenthrin + methyl parathion and deltamethrin + triazophos mixtures were antagonistic when tested on several populations of B. tabaci. Chlorpyrifos was antagonistic with cypermethrin but had an additive effect with fenpropathrin. PMID:17598552

  10. Global haplotype analysis of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci cryptic species Asia I in Asia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Chen, Yong-Dui; Jiang, Zhi-Lin; Nardi, Francesco; Yang, Tai-Yuan; Jin, Jie; Zhang, Zhong-Kai

    2015-04-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidiae), is a cryptic species complex comprising a minimum of 24 cryptic species. Some members of this complex are important agricultural pests, causing considerable damage to vegetable as well as ornamental and horticultural crops. Asia I, one of the cryptic species of B. tabaci, is widely distributed in Asia. One hundred and sixty mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences from eight countries have been analyzed to investigate the geographic origin and current genetic structure of this cryptic species. Sixty different haplotypes were identified, with levels of genetic distances ranging from 0.001 to 0.021. A sign of possible genetic differentiation emerges from the differential distribution of dominant haplotypes in Indonesia and India compared to China. A possible ancient separation between Asia I in India and Indonesia and secondary contact in China has been hypothesized. PMID:24460161

  11. Species and endosymbiont diversity of Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) on vegetable crops in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Hélène, Delatte; Rémy, Baudin; Nathalie, Becker; Anne-Laure, Girard; Traoré, Ramatoulaye Sidebe; Jean-Michel, Lett; Bernard, Reynaud

    2015-03-01

    Bemisia tabaci-transmitted geminiviruses are one of the major threats on cassava and vegetable crops in Africa. However, to date, few studies are available on the diversity of B. tabaci and their associated endosymbionts in Africa. More than 28 species have been described in the complex of B. tabaci cryptic species; among them, 2 are invasive pests worldwide: MED and MEAM1. In order to assess the species diversity of B. tabaci in vegetable crops in Senegal, several samplings in different localities, hosts and seasons were collected and analyzed with nuclear (microsatellite) and mitochondrial (COI) markers. The bacterial endosymbiont community was also studied for each sample. Two species were detected: MED Q1 and MEAM1 B. Patterns of MED Q1 (dominance on most of the samples and sites, highest nuclear and mitochondrial diversity and broader secondary endosymbiont community: Hamiltonella, Cardinium, Wolbachia and Rickettsia), point toward a predominant resident begomovirus vector group for MED Q1 on market gardening crops. Furthermore, the lower prevalence of the second species MEAM1 B, its lower nuclear and mitochondrial diversity and a narrower secondary endosymbiont community (Hamiltonella/Rickettsia), indicate that this genetic group is exotic and results from a recent invasion in this area. PMID:24789572

  12. Genetic structure of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci populations in Colombia following a recent invasion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Endersby, Nancy M; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2015-08-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is one of the most important pests causing economic losses in a variety of cropping systems around the world. This species was recently found in a coastal region of Colombia and has now spread inland. To investigate this invasive process, the genetic structure of B. tabaci was examined in 8 sampling locations from 2 infested regions (coastal, inland) using 9 microsatellite markers and the mitochondrial COI gene. The mitochondrial analysis indicated that only the invasive species of the B. tabaci complex Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM 1 known previously as biotype B) was present. The microsatellite data pointed to genetic differences among the regions and no isolation by distance within regions. The coastal region in the Caribbean appears to have been the initial point of invasion, while the inland region in the Southwest showed genetic variation among populations most likely reflecting founder events and ongoing changes associated with climatic and topographical heterogeneity. These findings have implications for tracking and managing B. tabaci. PMID:24753322

  13. Compatibility of the entomopathogenic fungus Lecanicillium muscarium and insecticides for eradication of sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Walters, Keith F A; Deppe, Carola

    2005-08-01

    The compatibility of the entomopathogenic fungus Lecanicillium muscarium and chemical insecticides used to control the second instar stages of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, was investigated. The effect on spore germination of direct exposure for 24 h to the insecticides imidacloprid, buprofezin, teflubenzuron and nicotine was determined. Only exposure to buprofezin was followed by acceptable spore germination. However, all chemicals significantly reduced spore germination when compared to a water control. Infectivity of L. muscarium in the presence of dry residues of buprofezin, teflubenzuron and nicotine (imidacloprid is a systemic pesticide) on foliage were also investigated. No significant detrimental effects on the level of control of B. tabaci was recorded when compared with fungi applied to residue free foliage on either tomato or verbena plants. Fungi in combination with imidacloprid gave higher B. tabaci mortality on verbena foliage compared to either teflubenzuron or nicotine and fungi combinations. Use of these chemical insecticides with L. muscarium in integrated control programmes for B. tabaci is discussed. PMID:16160767

  14. Pathogenicity of the entomopathogenic fungus, Lecanicillium muscarium, against the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci under laboratory and glasshouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Walters, Keith F A

    2005-11-01

    The potential for using the entomopathogenic fungus Lecanicillium muscarium to control the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci has been established in the laboratory by other studies. Laboratory studies however frequently overestimate the level of control achieved by biological control agents in the glasshouse. Before full-scale commercial or field development is considered, glasshouse trials are required to confirm laboratory results. Under both controlled laboratory and glasshouse conditions high mortality of second instar B. tabaci was recorded after application of L. muscarium. The potential of incorporating L. muscarium into integrated pest management strategies for the control of B. tabaci is discussed. PMID:16244900

  15. Populations of predators and parasitoids of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) after the application of eight biorational insecticides in vegetable crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is an important pest of vegetables and many other crops worldwide. Some insecticides may be more compatible with natural enemies for whitefly management than others. Nine biorational insecticides (based on oil, plant deri...

  16. Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) Instar Effects on Rate of Parasitism by Eretmocerus mundus and Encarsia pergandiella (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to compare preference among Bemisia tabaci Gennadius, Biotype B instars for parasitization by Encarsia pergandiella Howard and Eretmocerus mundus Mercet when provided one instar only, two different instars, and four different instars simultaneously. In the single instar-choic...

  17. Introduction and Recovery of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) as a predator of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Alyerodidae) is an important pest of many crops on a global scale. The use of biological control organisms such as coccinelid predators can help manage this pest. Delphastus catalinae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae) is an obligate predator of whiteflies, in...

  18. Infection of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci with Rickettsia spp. alters its interactions with Tomato yellow leaf curl virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous animal and plant viruses are transmitted by arthropod vectors in a persistent, circulative manner. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is transmitted by the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci. Here we report that infection with Rickettsia spp., a facultative endosymbiont of whiteflies...

  19. Population dynamics of the Bemisia tabaci B and Q biotypes as determined by microsatellite marker and mitochondrial COI sequence comparisons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current understanding of Bemisia tabaci phylogenetics suggests that this organism exists as a cryptic species complex. This complex is composed of what are most commonly called biotypes, at least some of which appear to have pre and/or post zygotic barriers to hybridization. Numerous studies hav...

  20. Comparison of three single-nozzle operator-carried spray applicators for whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) management on squash

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whiteflies cause problems in vegetable production on a global scale. The primary worldwide whitefly pest is Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). Insecticides are commonly used to mitigate the whitefly problem in vegetable crops. In limited-resource crop production, operator-carried spray applicators are comm...

  1. Pathogenicity of Isaria sp. (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae)against the sweetpotato whitefly B biotype, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogenicity of an indigenous entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria sp., found during natural epizootics on whiteflies in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas, against the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius biotype B, was tested under laboratory conditions (27 ºC, 70% RH and a photoperiod...

  2. Identification of the MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are two major invasive cryptic species within the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex in Florida, called MEAM1 or biotype B, and MED or biotype Q. We used loop-mediated isothermal amplification of DNA to detect these groups. Primer sets developed in house and those previously published wer...

  3. Some cultural strategies to help manage Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and associated whitefly-viruses in vegetable crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is an important global pest of numerous crops as a result of its feeding and whitefly-transmitted plant viruses. To help develop a strategy to manage this pest and associated viruses in three vegetable crops in the Egyptian agricultural system, ...

  4. Taxonomic Status of the Bemisia tabaci Complex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Reassessment of the Number of Its Constituent Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhoon; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Gwan-Seok; Lee, Seunghwan; Akimoto, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is one of the most important insect pests in the world. In the present study, the taxonomic status of B. tabaci and the number of species composing the B. tabaci complex were determined based on 1059 COI sequences of B. tabaci and 509 COI sequences of 153 hemipteran species. The genetic divergence within B. tabaci was conspicuously higher (on average, 11.1%) than interspecific genetic divergence within the respective genera of the 153 species (on average, 6.5%). This result indicates that B. tabaci is composed of multiple species that may belong to different genera or subfamilies. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on 212 COI sequences without duplications revealed that the B. tabaci complex is composed of a total of 31 putative species, including a new species, JpL. However, genetic divergence within six species (Asia II 1, Asia II 7, Australia, Mediterranean, New World, and Sub Saharan Africa 1) was higher than 3.5%, which has been used as a threshold of species boundaries within the B. tabaci complex. These results suggest that it is necessary to increase the threshold for species boundaries up to 4% to distinguish the constituent species in the B. tabaci complex. PMID:23675507

  5. Olfactory response of predatory Macrolophus caliginosus Wagner (Heteroptera: Miridae) to the odours host plant infested by Bemisia tabaci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Khalid A.; Roff, M. N. Mohamad; Salam, Mansour; Hanifah Mohd, Y.; Idris, A. B.

    2014-09-01

    Plant infested with herbivores, release volatile that can be used by natural enemies to locate their herbivorous prey. Laboratory studies were carried out to determine the olfactory responses of predator Macrolophus caliginosus Wagner (Heteroptera: Miridae), to chili plant infected with eggs, nymphs of Bemisia tabaci, using Y-tube olfactometer. The results shown that predator, M. caliginosus has ability to discriminate between non-infested and infested plant by B. tabaci. Moreover, the predator preferred plants with nymphs over plants with eggs. This suggested that M. caliginous uses whitefly-induced volatile as reliable indicators to distinguish between infested chili plants by nymphs, eggs and non-infested plants. These results enhance our understanding of the olfactory cues that guide foraging by M. caliginosus to plant with and without Bemisia tabaci.

  6. Effects of selected fertilizers on the life history of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotype B.

    PubMed

    England, K M; Sadof, C S; Cañnas, L A; Kuniyoshi, C H; Lopez, R G

    2011-04-01

    We tested the effects among a purportedly sustainable water-soluble fertilizer, a conventional water-soluble fertilizer, an alternation of these, a controlled-release fertilizer, and a clear water control on the life-history traits of sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae; =Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring) biotype B reared on poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willdenow ex Klotzch). Free amino acids in petioles were measured to estimate plant nutrient assimilation and phloem nutritional quality for B. tabaci biotype B. The sustainable fertilizer produced plants with the highest concentration of amino acids. In contrast, fecundity of whiteflies was lowest in plants treated with the sustainable fertilizer and the water control. The relationship between total amino acids in phloem and survival was significantly quadratic, with the highest survival at intermediate levels. Fecundity, however, was negatively correlated with total amino acid content of the maternal host plant. Variation in total amino acid concentration in petioles of plants treated within fertilizer treatments makes it difficult to predict whether a particular fertilizer will produce plants with enough amino acids to deleteriously affect both survivorship and fecundity and yet yield a plant of good quality. Despite this limitation, we can conclude that the use of this sustainable fertilizer will not cause increases in whitefly populations relative to plants fertilized with water-soluble and slow-release fertilizers that deliver the same level of nitrogen to the plant. PMID:21510203

  7. Endosymbiont metacommunities, mtDNA diversity and the evolution of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) species complex.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, Gwénaelle; Vavre, Fabrice; Gnankine, Olivier; Peterschmitt, Michel; Charif, Delphine; Chiel, Elad; Gottlieb, Yuval; Ghanim, Murad; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Fleury, Frédéric

    2010-10-01

    Bemisia tabaci, an invasive pest that causes crop damage worldwide, is a highly differentiated species complex, divided into biotypes that have mainly been defined based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Although endosymbionts can potentially induce population differentiation, specialization and indirect selection on mtDNA, studies have largely ignored these influential passengers in B. tabaci, despite as many as seven bacterial endosymbionts have been identified. Here, we investigate the composition of the whole bacterial community in worldwide populations of B. tabaci, together with host genetic differentiation, focusing on the invasive B and Q biotypes. Among 653 individuals studied, more than 95% of them harbour at least one secondary endosymbiont, and multiple infections are very common. In addition, sequence analyses reveal a very high diversity of facultative endosymbionts in B. tabaci, with some bacterial genus being represented by more than one strain. In the B and Q biotypes, nine different strains of bacteria have been identified. The mtDNA-based phylogeny of B. tabaci also reveals a very high nucleotide diversity that partitions the two ITS clades (B and Q) into six CO1 genetic groups. Each genetic group is in linkage disequilibrium with a specific combination of endosymbionts. All together, our results demonstrate the rapid dynamics of the bacterial endosymbiont-host associations at a small evolutionary scale, questioning the role of endosymbiotic communities in the evolution of the Bemisia tabaci species complex and strengthening the need to develop a metacommunity theory of inherited endosymbionts. PMID:20723069

  8. A Bemisia tabaci midgut protein interacts with begomoviruses and plays a role in virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vipin Singh; Popli, Sonam; Saurav, Gunjan Kumar; Raina, Harpreet Singh; Chaubey, Rahul; Ramamurthy, V V; Rajagopal, R

    2016-05-01

    Begomoviruses are a major group of plant viruses, transmitted exclusively by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) in a persistent circulative non-propagative manner. The information regarding molecular and cellular basis underlying Begomovirus - whitefly interaction is very scarce. Evidences have suggested that the insect gut possesses some crucial protein receptors that allow specific entry of virus into the insect haemolymph. We have performed yeast two hybrid gut cDNA expression library screening against coat protein of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCV) and Cotton leaf curl Rajasthan virus (CLCuV) as bait. Midgut protein (MGP) was the common protein found interacting with both ToLCV and CLCuV. MGP was localized in whole mount B. tabaci as well as in dissected guts through confocal microscopy. Pull down and dot blot assays confirmed in vitro interaction between ToLCV/CLCuV coat protein and MGP. Immunolocalization analysis also showed colocalization of ToLCV/CLCuV particles and MGP within insect's gut. Finally, anti-MGP antibody fed B. tabaci, exhibited 70% reduction in ToLCV transmission, suggesting a supportive role for MGP in virus transmission. PMID:26488331

  9. Host selection by the autoparasitoid Encarsia pergandiella on primary (Bemisia tabaci) and secondary (Eretmocerus mundus) hosts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Bo; Castañé, Cristina; Gabarra, Rosa; Albajes, Ramon; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2015-12-01

    In autoparasitoids, females are generally primary endoparasitoids of Hemiptera, while males are hyperparasitoids developing in or on conspecific females or other primary parasitoids. Female-host acceptance can be influenced by extrinsic and/or intrinsic factors. In this paper, we are concerned with intrinsic factors such as nutritional status, mating status, etc. We observed the behavior of Encarsia pergandiella Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) females when parasitizing primary (3rd instar larvae of Bemisia tabaci Gennadius [Homoptera: Aleyrodidae]) and secondary hosts (3rd instar larvae and pupae of Eretmocerus mundus Mercet [Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae]) for a period of 1 h. Females had different reproductive (virgin or mated younger) and physiological (fed elder or mated elder) status. Virgin females killed a large number of secondary hosts while investing a long time per host. However, they did not feed upon them. Mated females killed a lower number of secondary hosts and host feeding was observed in both consuming primary and secondary hosts. It was common to observe host examining females of all physiological statues tested repeatedly stinging the same hosts when parasitizing, killing or rejecting them. Fed elder females parasitized more B. tabaci larvae than E. mundus larvae or pupae, while investing less time on the primary host than on the secondary host. They also parasitized more B. tabaci larvae than mated elder females, while investing less time per host. The access of females to honey allowed them to lay more eggs. PMID:24992443

  10. Aphid-induced Defences in Chilli Affect Preferences of the Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Saad, Khalid A; Mohamad Roff, M N; Hallett, Rebecca H; Idris, A B

    2015-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly (WF), Bemisia tabaci, is a major pest that damages a wide range of vegetable crops in Malaysia. WF infestation is influenced by a variety of factors, including previous infestation of the host plant by other insect pests. This study investigated the effects of previous infestation of host chilli plants by the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) on the olfactory behavioural response of B. tabaci, using free-choice bioassay with a Y-tube olfactometer. We analysed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by non-infested and M. persicae-infested chilli plants using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our results showed that female WFs preferred non-infested to pre-infested plants. Collection and analysis of volatile compounds emitted by infested plants confirmed that there were significant increases in the production of monoterpenes (cymene; 1,8-cineole), sesquiterpenes (β-cadinene, α-copaene), and methyl salicylate (MeSA) compared to non-infested plants. Our results suggest that host plant infestation by aphids may induce production of secondary metabolites that deter B. tabaci from settling on its host plants. These results provide important information for understanding WF host selection and dispersal among crops, and also for manipulating WF behaviour to improve IPM in chilli. PMID:26334135

  11. Extraordinary resistance to insecticides reveals exotic Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci in the New World.

    PubMed

    Dennehy, Timothy J; Degain, Benjamin A; Harpold, Virginia S; Zaborac, Marni; Morin, Shai; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Nichols, Robert L; Brown, Judith K; Byrne, Frank J; Li, Xianchun

    2010-12-01

    A strain of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) possessing unusually high levels of resistance to a wide range of insecticides was discovered in 2004 in the course of routine resistance monitoring in Arizona. The multiply resistant insects, collected from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch) plants purchased at a retail store in Tucson, were subjected to biotype analysis in three laboratories. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of naphthyl esterases and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (780 bp) confirmed the first detection of the Q biotype of B. tabaci in the New World. This U.S. Q biotype strain, referred to as Poinsettia'04, was highly resistant to two selective insect growth regulators, pyriproxyfen and buprofezin, and to mixtures of fenpropathrin and acephate. It was also unusually low in susceptibility to the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam, relative to B biotype whiteflies. In 100 collections of whiteflies made in Arizona cotton (Gossypium spp.), vegetable, and melon (Cucumis melo L.) fields from 2001 to 2005, no Q biotypes were detected. Regions of the United States that were severely impacted by the introduction of the B biotype of B. tabaci in the 1980s would be well advised to promote measures that limit movement of the Q biotype from controlled environments into field systems and to formulate alternatives for managing this multiply-resistant biotype, in the event that it becomes more widely distributed. PMID:21309242

  12. Aphid-induced Defences in Chilli Affect Preferences of the Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Khalid A.; Mohamad Roff, M. N.; Hallett, Rebecca H.; Idris, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly (WF), Bemisia tabaci, is a major pest that damages a wide range of vegetable crops in Malaysia. WF infestation is influenced by a variety of factors, including previous infestation of the host plant by other insect pests. This study investigated the effects of previous infestation of host chilli plants by the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) on the olfactory behavioural response of B. tabaci, using free-choice bioassay with a Y-tube olfactometer. We analysed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by non-infested and M. persicae-infested chilli plants using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Our results showed that female WFs preferred non-infested to pre-infested plants. Collection and analysis of volatile compounds emitted by infested plants confirmed that there were significant increases in the production of monoterpenes (cymene; 1,8-cineole), sesquiterpenes (β–cadinene, α-copaene), and methyl salicylate (MeSA) compared to non-infested plants. Our results suggest that host plant infestation by aphids may induce production of secondary metabolites that deter B. tabaci from settling on its host plants. These results provide important information for understanding WF host selection and dispersal among crops, and also for manipulating WF behaviour to improve IPM in chilli. PMID:26334135

  13. Performance of Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) Biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) on Weeds.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, L D M; Lourenção, A L; Colombo, C A

    2014-12-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is regarded as a pest with a large number of hosts, including crops and weeds. The performance of this whitefly on seven weeds was evaluated in order to identify the most suitable host. The following weeds that are very common in intense agricultural areas in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, were selected for this study: spurge (Euphorbia heterophylla), beggarticks (Bidens pilosa), red tasselflower (Emilia sonchifolia), small-flower galinsoga (Galinsoga parviflora), pigweed (Amaranthus viridis), black nightshade (Solanum americanum), and morning glory (Ipomoea sp.). In free-choice tests, adult preference and oviposition were greatest on spurge. In contrast, morning glory was the least attractive and least oviposited plant. In assays carried out for egg-adult development, egg viability was greater than 87% over all weeds, whereas nymph viability ranged from 74 to 97%. The developmental period from egg to adult ranged from 26.7 to 49.1 days among the hosts under study. The lowest nymph density rate was observed for beggarticks and morning glory. Cluster analysis resulted in a single group formed by spurge, indicating its superiority as a host for B. tabaci biotype B. Even though the parameters evaluated indicate that spurge is the most suitable host among the weeds, all the others allow the reproduction of B. tabaci biotype B. For this reason, they should be observed during cropping and the intercrop period in areas infested by this whitefly. PMID:27194066

  14. Transcriptomic dissection of sexual differences in Bemisia tabaci, an invasive agricultural pest worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen; Guo, Litao; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Yang, Nina; Yang, Xin; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    Sex difference involving chromosomes and gene expression has been extensively documented. In this study, the gender difference in the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci was investigated using Illumina-based transcriptomic analysis. Gender-based RNAseq data produced 27 Gb reads, and subsequent de novo assembly generated 93,948 transcripts with a N50 of 1,853 bp. A total of 1,351 differentially expressed genes were identified between male and female B. tabaci, and majority of them were female-biased. Pathway and GO enrichment experiments exhibited a gender-specific expression, including enriched translation in females, and enhanced structural constituent of cuticle in male whiteflies. In addition, a putative transformer2 gene (tra2) was cloned, and the structural feature and expression profile of tra2 were investigated. Sexually dimorphic transcriptome is an uncharted territory for the agricultural insect pests. Molecular understanding of sex determination in B. tabaci, an emerging invasive insect pest worldwide, will provide potential molecular target(s) for genetic pest control alternatives. PMID:24526031

  15. Efficacy of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema feltiae, against sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) under laboratory and glasshouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, A G S; Walters, K F A; Northing, P; Luo, W

    2007-02-01

    The potential of using the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema feltiae to control the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) has been established in previous laboratory studies. However, laboratory studies can overestimate the level of control achieved by biocontrol agents in the glasshouse. Glasshouse trials are therefore required to confirm laboratory results before full-scale commercial development is considered. Under both controlled laboratory and glasshouse conditions high mortality of second instar B. tabaci (>90% and >80%, respectively) was recorded after application of S. feltiae. The efficacy of the biocontrol agent at various application rates was also investigated, where halving the rate of S. feltiae application caused no significant reduction in B. tabaci mortality on tomato foliage. Steinernema feltiae has shown much potential for incorporation into integrated pest management strategies for the control of B. tabaci. PMID:17298677

  16. Infestation by Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and incidence of whitefly-transmitted viruses after the application of four biorational insecticides in some crops in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a global insect pest that transmits many important plant viruses. A field study was conducted on infestation by B. tabaci and incidence of whitefly-transmitted viruses after the application of selected foliar and seed-treated biorational insecti...

  17. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Responses of Sweetpotato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, to Thiamethoxam

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nina; Xie, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Li, Rumei; Pan, Huipeng; Liu, Baiming; Shi, Xiaobin; Fang, Yong; Xu, Baoyun; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    Background The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is one of the most widely distributed agricultural pests. Although it has developed resistance to many registered insecticides including the neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam, the mechanisms that regulate the resistance are poorly understood. To understand the molecular basis of thiamethoxam resistance, “omics” analyses were carried out to examine differences between resistant and susceptible B. tabaci at both transcriptional and translational levels. Results A total of 1,338 mRNAs and 52 proteins were differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible B. tabaci. Among them, 11 transcripts had concurrent transcription and translation profiles. KEGG analysis mapped 318 and 35 differentially expressed genes and proteins, respectively, to 160 and 59 pathways (p<0.05). Thiamethoxam treatment activated metabolic pathways (e.g., drug metabolism), in which 118 transcripts were putatively linked to insecticide resistance, including up-regulated glutathione-S-transferase, UDP glucuronosyltransferase, glucosyl/glucuronosyl transferase, and cytochrome P450. Gene Ontology analysis placed these genes and proteins into protein complex, metabolic process, cellular process, signaling, and response to stimulus categories. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis validated “omics” response, and suggested a highly overexpressed P450, CYP6CX1, as a candidate molecular basis for the mechanistic study of thiamethoxam resistance in whiteflies. Finally, enzymatic activity assays showed elevated detoxification activities in the resistant B. tabaci. Conclusions This study demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput omics tools for identifying molecular candidates related to thiamethoxam resistance in an agricultural important insect pest. In addition, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses provide a solid foundation for future functional investigations into the complex molecular mechanisms

  18. Effect of starvation on vein preference of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) on chilli as host plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siti Sakinah, A.; Mohamad Roff M., N.; Idris, A. B.

    2014-09-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a cosmopolitan pest of horticultural crops. It caused serious damaged to the plants by feeding on plant saps as direct damage and transmit virus as indirect damage. Vein preferences of both female and male whitefly (WF) on chilli plant were recorded using Dinolite, a portable microscope, under laboratory conditions. WF adults of both sexes were starved for 2 and 4 hours before used for observation while no starvation for control individual (treatment). Results showed that both female and male preferred to feed on secondary veins rather than lamina, midrib and vein. From the result of whitefly preferred target site, hopefully this information will help to improve control tactics in WF management.

  19. Investigation on some biological aspects of Chrysoperla lucasina (Chrysopidae: Neuroptera) on Bemisia tabaci in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, A; Sharifi, F; Mirmoayedi, A

    2012-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci is one of the most important key pests of many types of cultivated plants. Lacewings (Chrysopidae: Neuroptera) are predatory insects, widely used in biological control programs. Between them green lacewing is a promising biological control agent of pests in green houses and crop fields. In this study, gravid females of the green lacewing Chrysoperla lucasina (Lacroix) were captured from Sarepolzahab ( altitude 540m, latitude 34 degrees ,14' N 46 degrees, 9' E) in western part of Iran. Collected insects were reared in a growth chamber, under experimental conditions (25 +/- 1 degrees C, 70 +/- 5% RH and a photoperiod of 16:8 L: D). Different diets were offered to larvae which consisted of a whitefly species B. tabaci, an aphid Myzus persica and also lyophilized powder of drone honeybee (Apis melifera). As different foods were used to nurish larvae, so for each diet, mean larval period were calculated, and finally means were compared to each other. Anova in MSTAT-C was used for analysis of variance, and Duncan multiple range test (DMRT) to compare between means. The results showed that larvae had maximum duration of 27 +/- 0.33 days when fed on honeybee lyophilized powder and the minimum value was 17.9 +/- 0.3 days for B. tabaci. 25 +/- 0.27 day recorded for M. persicae. Food preference of the 3rd instar larvae of green lacewing was surveyed, they showed a food preference to M. persicae, to compare with B. tabaci, as the former has a bigger body size, so more easily to be captured by the predator larvae. The 3rd instar larvae of lacewing were more voracious on preys, than the 1st or the 2nd instar larvae. Statistically speaking, there were a significantly difference when mean of different preys consumed by predator larvae were compared. We found, that when the predator larvae have fed on B. tabaci, their development time was shorter, and when arrived to adult stage, the adults showed, an improved fertility. The results indicated that the suitable prey

  20. The Salicylic Acid-Mediated Release of Plant Volatiles Affects the Host Choice of Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaobin; Chen, Gong; Tian, Lixia; Peng, Zhengke; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) causes serious crop losses worldwide by transmitting viruses. We have previously shown that salicylic acid (SA)-related plant defenses directly affect whiteflies. In this study, we applied exogenous SA to tomato plants in order to investigate the interaction between SA-induced plant volatiles and nonviruliferous B. tabaci B and Q or B- and Q-carrying tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The results showed that exogenous SA caused plants to repel nonviruliferous whiteflies, but the effect was reduced when the SA concentration was low and when the whiteflies were viruliferous. Exogenous SA increased the number and quantity of plant volatiles—especially the quantity of methyl salicylate and δ-limonene. In Y-tube olfactometer assays, methyl salicylate and δ-limonene repelled the whiteflies, but the repellency was reduced for viruliferous Q. We suggest that the release of plant volatiles as mediated by SA affects the interaction between whiteflies, plants, and viruses. Further studies are needed to determine why viruliferous Q is less sensitive than nonviruliferous Q to repellent plant volatiles. PMID:27376280

  1. The Salicylic Acid-Mediated Release of Plant Volatiles Affects the Host Choice of Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaobin; Chen, Gong; Tian, Lixia; Peng, Zhengke; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) causes serious crop losses worldwide by transmitting viruses. We have previously shown that salicylic acid (SA)-related plant defenses directly affect whiteflies. In this study, we applied exogenous SA to tomato plants in order to investigate the interaction between SA-induced plant volatiles and nonviruliferous B. tabaci B and Q or B- and Q-carrying tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The results showed that exogenous SA caused plants to repel nonviruliferous whiteflies, but the effect was reduced when the SA concentration was low and when the whiteflies were viruliferous. Exogenous SA increased the number and quantity of plant volatiles-especially the quantity of methyl salicylate and δ-limonene. In Y-tube olfactometer assays, methyl salicylate and δ-limonene repelled the whiteflies, but the repellency was reduced for viruliferous Q. We suggest that the release of plant volatiles as mediated by SA affects the interaction between whiteflies, plants, and viruses. Further studies are needed to determine why viruliferous Q is less sensitive than nonviruliferous Q to repellent plant volatiles. PMID:27376280

  2. Biological Invasions of Geminiviruses: Case Study of TYLCV and Bemisia tabaci in Reunion Island

    PubMed Central

    Péréfarres, Frédéric; Thierry, Magali; Becker, Nathalie; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Reynaud, Bernard; Delatte, Hélène; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    In the last 20 years, molecular ecology approaches have proven to be extremely useful to identify and assess factors associated with viral emerging diseases, particularly in economically and socially important tropical crops such as maize (maize streak disease) and cassava (cassava mosaic disease). Molecular ecology approaches were applied in Reunion Island to analyze the epidemic of tomato yellow leaf curl disease, which has been affecting the island since the end of the 1990s. Before the invasive biotype B (currently known as Middle East-Asia Minor 1 cryptic species) of Bemisia tabaci spread across the world, Reunion Island (South West Indian Ocean) only hosted an indigenous biotype of B. tabaci, Ms (currently known as Indian Ocean cryptic species). Wild hybrids between invasive and indigenous species were subsequently characterized over multiple generations. Endosymbiont analysis of the hybrid population indicated that matings were non-random. Similarly, while no indigenous begomoviruses have ever been reported on Reunion Island, the two main strains of one of the most damaging and emerging plant viruses in the world, the Mild and Israel strains of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-Mld and TYLCV-IL), were introduced in 1997 and 2004 respectively. While these introductions extensively modified the agricultural landscape of Reunion Island, they also provided an invaluable opportunity to study the ecological and genetic mechanisms involved in biological invasion and competition. PMID:23235470

  3. Acyl sugars and whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) resistance in segregating populations of tomato genotypes.

    PubMed

    Dias, D M; Resende, J T V; Marodin, J C; Matos, R; Lustosa, I F; Resende, N C V

    2016-01-01

    The wild tomato, Solanum pennellii, is an important source of resistance genes against tomato pests. This resistance is due to the presence of acyl sugars (AS), which are allelochemicals that have negative effects on arthropod pests. There are no commercially available tomato cultivars that exhibit significant levels of resistance to arthropod pests. Therefore, this study evaluated resistance to whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in F2 and F2RC1 tomato genotypes with high AS levels from a cross between Solanum lycopersicum 'Redenção' and the S. pennellii accession, LA-716. Plants were exposed to B. tabaci biotype B at the pre-flowering stage. In both generations, there were significant, negative correlations between AS content and oviposition preference and nymph development. Whitefly exhibited a lower preference for oviposition and produced fewer nymphs in genotypes with high AS levels and the wild parent S. pennellii than in the low AS-level genotypes and Redenção cultivar, demonstrating that the breeding program was effective in transferring resistance to the F2 and F2RC1 generations. RVTA-2010-pl#31 and RVTA-2010-pl#94 in the F2 population are promising genotypes that produced materials with high AS levels in the F2RC1 generation (RVTA-2010-31-pl#177 and RVTA-2010-94-pl#381). PMID:27173206

  4. Challenges with managing insecticide resistance in agricultural pests, exemplisfied by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, I.

    1998-01-01

    For many key agricultural pests, successful management of insecticide resistance depends not only on modifying the way that insecticides are deployed, but also on reducing the total number of treatments applied. Both approaches benefit from a knowledge of the biological characteristics of pests that promote or may retard the development of resistance. For the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), these factors include a haplodiploid breeding system that encourages the rapid selection and fixation of resistance genes, its breeding cycle on a succession of treated or untreated hosts, and its occurrence on and dispersal from high-value crops in greenhouses and glasshouses. These factors, in conjunction with often intensive insecticide use, have led to severe and widespread resistance that now affects several novel as well as conventional control agents. Resistance-management strategies implemented on cotton in Israel, and subsequently in south-western USA, have nonetheless so far succeeded in arresting the resistance treadmill in B. tabaci through a combination of increased chemical diversity, voluntary or mandatory restrictions on the use of key insecticides, and careful integration of chemical control with other pest-management options. In both countries, the most significant achievement has been a dramatic reduction in the number of insecticide treatments applied against whiteflies on cotton, increasing the prospect of sustained use of existing and future insecticides.

  5. Quantitative resistance against Bemisia tabaci in Solanum pennellii: Genetics and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    van den Oever-van den Elsen, Floor; Lucatti, Alejandro F; van Heusden, Sjaak; Broekgaarden, Colette; Mumm, Roland; Dicke, Marcel; Vosman, Ben

    2016-04-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a serious threat in tomato cultivation worldwide as all varieties grown today are highly susceptible to this devastating herbivorous insect. Many accessions of the tomato wild relative Solanum pennellii show a high resistance towards B. tabaci. A mapping approach was used to elucidate the genetic background of whitefly-resistance related traits and associated biochemical traits in this species. Minor quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for whitefly adult survival (AS) and oviposition rate (OR) were identified and some were confirmed in an F2 BC1 population, where they showed increased percentages of explained variance (more than 30%). Bulked segregant analyses on pools of whitefly-resistant and -susceptible F2 plants enabled the identification of metabolites that correlate either with resistance or susceptibility. Genetic mapping of these metabolites showed that a large number of them co-localize with whitefly-resistance QTLs. Some of these whitefly-resistance QTLs are hotspots for metabolite QTLs. Although a large number of metabolite QTLs correlated to whitefly resistance or susceptibility, most of them are yet unknown compounds and further studies are needed to identify the metabolic pathways and genes involved. The results indicate a direct genetic correlation between biochemical-based resistance characteristics and reduced whitefly incidence in S. pennellii. PMID:26576823

  6. Relative amount of symbionts in Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Q changes with host plant and establishing the method of analyzing free amino acid in B. tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Huipeng; Su, Qi; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Zhou, Long; Liu, Baiming; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Xu, Baoyun; Zhang, YouJun

    2013-01-01

    The impact of symbionts on their insect hosts depends on their infection density. In the current study, we investigated the effects of host plants (cucumber, cabbage, and cotton) on the relative amount of symbionts Portiera and Hamiltonella in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Q. The relative amounts of symbionts in 3 host plant B. tabaci Q populations with the same genetic background were evaluated by quantitative PCR. The whiteflies of cabbage population harbored more Portiera than those of cucumber and cotton populations, and the relative amount of Portiera did not differ statistically between cotton and cucumber populations. The whiteflies of cucumber and cabbage populations harbored more Hamiltonella than that of cotton population, and the relative amount of Hamiltonella did not differ statistically between cabbage and cucumber populations, indicated that the relative amount of symbionts was significantly affected by host plant. In addition, the method of analyzing the composition of free amino acid in B. tabaci was established. Twenty-eight amino acids were detected in the B. tabaci Q population, the non-essential amino acids, such as glutamate, glutamine, alanine, proline and the essential amino acid arginine were the dominant amino acids in B. tabaci Q. PMID:23750302

  7. Monitoring changes in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides in Arizona and California.

    PubMed

    Castle, S J; Prabhaker, N

    2013-06-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B is a highly prolific and polyphagous whitefly that established in much of North America during the 1980s. Neonicotinoid insecticides have been fundamental in regaining control over outbreak populations of B. tabaci, but resistance threatens their sustainability. Susceptibility of B. tabaci in the southwestern United States to four neonicotinoid insecticides varied considerably across populations within each year over a 3 yr period. Using a variability ratio of highest LC50 to lowest LC50 in field-collected whitefly adults from Arizona and California, the ranges of LC50(s) across all tests within compounds were highest to imidacloprid and lowest to thiamethoxam. Patterns of susceptibility were similar among all four neonicotinoid insecticides, but the greater variability in responses to imidacloprid and significantly higher LC50(s) attained indicated higher resistance levels to imidacloprid in all field populations. Further evidence of differential toxicities of neonicotinoids was observed in multiple tests of dinotefuran against imidacloprid-resistant lab strains that yielded significant differences in the LC50(s) of dinotefuran and imidacloprid in simultaneous bioassays. To test the possibility that resistance expression in field-collected insects was sometimes masked by stressful conditions, field strains cultured in a greenhouse without insecticide exposure produced significantly higher LC50(s) to all neonicotinoids compared with LC50(s) attained directly from the field. In harsh climates such as the American southwest, resistance expression in field-collected test insects may be strongly influenced by environmental stresses such as high temperatures, overcrowding, and declining host plant quality. PMID:23865208

  8. Comparison of the Antennal Sensilla Ultrastructure of Two Cryptic Species in Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Man; Wang, Su; Li, Shu; Luo, Chen; Li, Yuan-Xi; Zhang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci is an important agricultural pest with worldwide distribution and host preference. Therefore, understanding the biology of this pest is important to devise specific pest control strategies. The antennae of herbivorous insects play an important role in the identification of hosts using plant volatiles. To understand the features of antennae in B. tabaci MEAM 1(formerly known as biotype ‘B’) and MED (formerly known as biotype ‘Q’), the morphology and distribution of the antennal sensilla were examined using scanning electron micrographs. The results showed that the average antennae length in MEAM 1 was longer than MED. No differences were observed in the number and distribution of antennal sensilla in MEAM 1 and MED antennae; each antenna had nine different types of sensilla. Both cryptic species possessed Microtrichia, Grooved surface trichodea sensilla, Chaetae sensilla, Coeloconic sensillaⅠandⅡ, Basiconic sensilla Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ and Finger-like sensilla. This is the first report of Grooved surface trichodea sensilla and Basiconic sensilla Ⅱ on B. tabaci flies. The numbers of Chaetae sensilla were different in the females and males of MEAM 1 and MED, which females having 5 and males containing 7. The surface structure of Basiconic sensilla Ⅰ was different with MEAM 1 showing a multiple-pitted linen surface and MED showing a multiple-pitted pocking surface. Basiconic sensillaⅡ were double in one socket with the longer one having a multiple-pitted surface and the shorter one with a smooth surface. Basiconic Ⅲ and Finger-like sensillae were longer in MEAM 1 antennae than in MED antennae. Our results are expected to further the studies that link morphological characteristics to insect behavior and help devise strategies to control insect pests. PMID:25822843

  9. [Effects of calcium fertilizer on the development, survival, and feeding of B-biotype Bemisia tabaci on Euphorbia pulcherrima].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Zhang, Juan; Yu, Yong-Ming; Liu, Jian-Xin; Li, Ming-Jiang; Zhu, Kai-Yuan

    2012-09-01

    This paper studied the development, survival, and feeding of B-biotype Bemisia tabaci on Euphorbia pulcherrima under the conditions of 26 +/- 1 degrees C and 60% - 80% relative humidity after applying calcium fertilizer, taking applying fresh water as the control. There existed significant differences in the developmental duration of B. tabaci between treatment applying calcium fertilizer and the control. After applying calcium fertilizer, the egg stage of B. tabaci shortened significantly, and the development from egg to adult took 20.18 days (for the control, it took 18.72 days). However, there were no significant differences in the survival rates of B. tabaci at different development stages between the two treatments. The feeding of B. tabaci on E. pulcherrima induced the plant leaf chlorophyll fluorescence parameters changed, i. e., the photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), photochemical quenching coefficient (q(p)), light use efficiency (alpha), maximum photosynthesis rate (rETRmax), and tolerance to light (I(k)) decreased significantly, while the non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ) had a significant increase. After applying calcium fertilizer, the plant leaf photoinhibition parameter (beta), rETRmax, and I(k) had less difference with th e control. The nail polish blot observation on the lower epidermis structure of plant leaf showed that calcium fertilizer could effectively compensate the decrease in the photosynthesis of E. pulcherrima damaged by B-biotype B. tabaci. PMID:23286011

  10. Trade-offs between survival, longevity, and reproduction, and variation of survival tolerance in Mediterranean Bemisia tabaci after temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Lü, Zhi-Chuang; Wang, Yan-Min; Zhu, Shao-Guang; Yu, Hao; Guo, Jian-Ying; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2014-01-01

    The invasive Mediterranean Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) has emerged as one of the most common agricultural pests in the world. In the present study, we examined the cross-tolerance, fitness costs, and benefits of thermal tolerance and the variation in the responses of life history traits after heat-shock selection. The results showed that survival and longevity of Mediterranean B. tabaci were decreased significantly after direct or cross temperature stress and that the number of eggs per female was not reduced significantly. Furthermore, heat-shock selection dramatically increased the survival of Mediterranean B. tabaci within two generations, and it did not significantly affect the egg number per female within five generations. These results indicated that there was a trade-off between survival, longevity, and reproduction in Mediterranean B. tabaci after temperature stress. The improvement in reproduction was costly in terms of decreased survival and longevity, and there was a fitness consequence to temperature stress. In addition, heat tolerance in Mediterranean B. tabaci increased substantially after selection by heat shock, indicating a considerable variation for survival tolerance in this species. This information could help us better understand the thermal biology of Mediterranean B. tabaci within the context of climate change. PMID:25368068

  11. Insecticidal Activity of Some Reducing Sugars Against the Sweet Potato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, Biotype B

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing S.; Gelman, Dale B.; Salvucci, Michael E.; Chen, Yan P.; Blackburn, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of 16 sugars (arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, gentiobiose, glucose, inositol, lactose, maltose, mannitol (a sugar alcohol), mannose, melibiose, ribose, sorbitol, trehalose, and xylose) on sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) survival were determined using in vitro bioassays. Of these sugars, arabinose, mannose, ribose, and xylose were strongly inhibitory to both nymphal and adult survival. When 10% mannose was added to the nymphal diet, 10.5%, 1.0%, and 0% developed to the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th instars, respectively. When 10% arabinose was added, 10.8% and 0% of the nymphs molted to the 2nd and 3rd instars, respectively. Addition of 10% xylose or ribose completely terminated B. tabaci development, preventing the molt to the 2nd instar. With decreasing sugar concentrations the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced. In tests using adults, arabinose, galactose, inositol, lactose, maltose, mannitol, mannose, melibiose, ribose, sorbitol, trehalose, and xylose significantly reduced mean day survival. Mortality rates were highest when arabinose, mannitol, mannose, ribose, or xylose was added to the diet. Mean day survival was less than 2 days when adults were fed on diet containing 10% of any one of these five sugars. When lower concentrations of sugars were used there was a decrease in mortality. Mode of action studies revealed that toxicity was not due to the inhibition of alpha glucosidase (converts sucrose to glucose and fructose) and/or trehalulose synthase (converts sucrose to trehalulose) activity. The result of agarose gel electrophoresis of RT-PCR products of bacterial endosymbionts amplified from RNA isolated from whiteflies fed with 10% arabinose, mannose, or xylose indicated that the concentration of endosymbionts in mycetomes was not affected by the toxic sugars. Experiments in which B. tabaci were fed on diets that contained radio-labeled sucrose, methionine or inulin and one or none (control) of

  12. Replication of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus in Its Whitefly Vector, Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Pakkianathan, Britto Cathrin; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Lebedev, Galina; Mahadav, Assaf; Zeidan, Muhammad; Czosnek, Henryk

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted exclusively by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent, circulative manner. Replication of TYLCV in its vector remains controversial, and thus far, the virus has been considered to be nonpropagative. Following 8 h of acquisition on TYLCV-infected tomato plants or purified virions and then transfer to non-TYLCV-host cotton plants, the amounts of virus inside whitefly adults significantly increased (>2-fold) during the first few days and then continuously decreased, as measured by the amounts of genes on both virus DNA strands. Reported alterations in insect immune and defense responses upon virus retention led us to hypothesize a role for the immune response in suppressing virus replication. After virus acquisition, stress conditions were imposed on whiteflies, and the levels of three viral gene sequences were measured over time. When whiteflies were exposed to TYLCV and treatment with two different pesticides, the virus levels continuously increased. Upon exposure to heat stress, the virus levels gradually decreased, without any initial accumulation. Switching of whiteflies between pesticide, heat stress, and control treatments caused fluctuating increases and decreases in virus levels. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed these results and showed virus signals inside midgut epithelial cell nuclei. Combining the pesticide and heat treatments with virus acquisition had significant effects on fecundity. Altogether, our results demonstrate for the first time that a single-stranded DNA plant virus can replicate in its hemipteran vector. IMPORTANCE Plant viruses in agricultural crops are of great concern worldwide. Many of them are transmitted from infected to healthy plants by insects. Persistently transmitted viruses often have a complex association with their vectors; however, most are believed not to replicate within these vectors. Such replication is important, as it

  13. Further insight into reproductive incompatibility between putative cryptic species of the Bemisia tabaci whitefly complex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Pan, Li-Long; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), with its global distribution and extensive genetic diversity, is now known to be a complex of over 35 cryptic species. However, a satisfactory resolution of the systematics of this species complex is yet to be achieved. Here, we designed experiments to examine reproductive compatibility among species with different levels of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) divergence. The data show that putative species with mtCOI divergence of >8% between them consistently exhibited complete reproductive isolation. However, two of the putative species, Asia II 9 and Asia II 3, with mtCOI divergence of 4.47% between them, exhibited near complete reproductive compatibility in one direction of their cross, and partial reproductive compatibility in the other direction. Together with some recent reports on this topic from the literature, our data indicates that, while divergence in the mtCOI sequences provides a valid molecular marker for species delimitation in most clades, more genetic markers and more sophisticated molecular phylogeny will be required to achieve adequate delimitation of all species in this whitefly complex. While many attempts have been made to examine the reproductive compatibility among genetic groups of the B. tabaci complex, our study represents the first effort to conduct crossing experiments with putative species that were chosen with considerations of their genetic divergence. In light of the new data, we discuss the best strategy and protocols to conduct further molecular phylogenetic analysis and crossing trials, in order to reveal the overall pattern of reproductive incompatibility among species of this whitefly complex. PMID:27001484

  14. Gene expression profiling in the thiamethoxam resistant and susceptible B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Shao-Ii; Wu, Qing-jun; Yang, Ni-na; Li, Ru-mei; Jiao, Xiao-guo; Pan, Hui-peng; Liu, Bai-ming; Feng, Yun-tao; Xu, Bao-yun; Zhou, Xu-guo; Zhang, You-jun

    2012-01-01

    Thiamethoxam has been used as a major insecticide to control the B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Due to its excessive use, a high level of resistance to thiamethoxam has developed worldwide over the past several years. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in B. tabaci, gene profiles between the thiamethoxam-resistant and thiamethoxam-susceptible strains were investigated using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library approach. A total of 72 and 52 upand down-regulated genes were obtained from the forward and reverse SSH libraries, respectively. These expressed sequence tags (ESTs) belong to several functional categories based on their gene ontology annotation. Some categories such as cell communication, response to abiotic stimulus, lipid particle, and nuclear envelope were identified only in the forward library of thiamethoxam-resistant strains. In contrast, categories such as behavior, cell proliferation, nutrient reservoir activity, sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor activity, and signal transducer activity were identified solely in the reverse library. To study the validity of the SSH method, 16 differentially expressed genes from both forward and reverse SSH libraries were selected randomly for further analyses using quantitative realtime PCR (qRT-PCR). The qRT-PCR results were fairly consistent with the SSH results; however, only 50% of the genes showed significantly different expression profiles between the thiamethoxam-resistant and thiamethoxam-susceptible whiteflies. Among these genes, a putative NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase was substantially over-expressed in the thiamethoxamresistant adults compared to their susceptible counterparts. The distributed profiles show that it was highly expressed during the egg stage, and was most abundant in the abdomen of adult females. PMID:22957505

  15. Behavioral Response of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to 20 Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Emilie, Deletre; Mallent, Maelle; Menut, Chantal; Chandre, Fabrice; Martin, Thibaud

    2015-08-01

    In the Mediterranean region, the use of small-mesh netting to protect horticultural crops is an effective sustainable tool against pests. But in tropical regions, because of high humidity under the net favoring fungal development, netting with a larger mesh size has to be used, protecting crops against lepidopteran pests but not against small pests such as hemipterans, thrips, and phytophagous mites. A combination of netting with a repellent or irritant product is one possible solution, but the desire to reduce the use of synthetic chemicals and mitigate resistance issues calls for a natural alternative. The objective of this study was to evaluate the repellent, irritant, and toxic effects of nets dipped in 20 different plant extracts on Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) adults. The repellent effect of volatile compounds was evaluated using a still-air olfactometer. The irritant effect and toxicity were evaluated with a no-choice test in tubes separated into two parts by an impregnated net. Our results showed the seven most irritant and toxic products against B. tabaci were aframomum, cinnamon, geranium, dill, citronella, litsea, and savory. The most repellent were aframomum and lemongrass, although cinnamon, geranium, and savory were also repellent at higher doses. Effects varied with the plant extract and the concentration, and effects were independent of one another, i.e., an essential oil can be irritant but not repellent, suggesting that the repellent mechanism and that behind the irritant or toxic effects is not the same. The use of repellent compounds in combination with netting as new pest control strategy is discussed. PMID:26470332

  16. Gene Expression Profiling in the Thiamethoxam Resistant and Susceptible B-biotype Sweetpotato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Shao-Ii; Wu, Qing-jun; Yang, Ni-na; Li, Ru-mei; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Pan, Hui-peng; Liu, Bai-ming; Feng, Yun-tao; Xu, Bao-yun; Zhou, Xu-guo; Zhang, You-jun

    2012-01-01

    Thiamethoxam has been used as a major insecticide to control the B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Due to its excessive use, a high level of resistance to thiamethoxam has developed worldwide over the past several years. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in B. tabaci, gene profiles between the thiamethoxam-resistant and thiamethoxam-susceptible strains were investigated using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library approach. A total of 72 and 52 upand down-regulated genes were obtained from the forward and reverse SSH libraries, respectively. These expressed sequence tags (ESTs) belong to several functional categories based on their gene ontology annotation. Some categories such as cell communication, response to abiotic stimulus, lipid particle, and nuclear envelope were identified only in the forward library of thiamethoxam-resistant strains. In contrast, categories such as behavior, cell proliferation, nutrient reservoir activity, sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor activity, and signal transducer activity were identified solely in the reverse library. To study the validity of the SSH method, 16 differentially expressed genes from both forward and reverse SSH libraries were selected randomly for further analyses using quantitative realtime PCR (qRT-PCR). The qRT-PCR results were fairly consistent with the SSH results; however, only 50% of the genes showed significantly different expression profiles between the thiamethoxam-resistant and thiamethoxam-susceptible whiteflies. Among these genes, a putative NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase was substantially over-expressed in the thiamethoxamresistant adults compared to their susceptible counterparts. The distributed profiles show that it was highly expressed during the egg stage, and was most abundant in the abdomen of adult females. PMID:22957505

  17. Computational Insights into the Different Resistance Mechanism of Imidacloprid versus Dinotefuran in Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Chengchun; Feng, Yue; Li, Weihua; Shao, Xusheng; Xu, Zhiping; Cheng, Jiagao; Li, Zhong

    2016-02-17

    Insecticide resistance is a critical problem for pest control and management. For Bemisia tabaci, striking high metabolic resistance (generally conferred by CYP6CM1) was observed for imidacloprid (IMI) and most other neonicotinoid members. However, dinotefuran (DIN) displayed very low resistance factors, which indicated distinct metabolic properties. Here, molecular modeling methods were applied to explore the different resistance features of IMI versus DIN within the Q type of CYP6CM1. It was found that Arg225 played crucial roles in the binding of IMI-CYP6CM1vQ with a cation-π interaction and two stable H-bonds; however, such interactions were all absent in the DIN-CYP6CM1vQ system. The stable binding of IMI with CYP6CM1vQ would facilitate the following metabolic reaction, while the weak binding of DIN might disable its potential metabolism, which should be an important factor for their distinct resistance levels. The findings might facilitate future design of the antiresistance neonicotinoid molecules. PMID:26817991

  18. Bemisia tabaci Q carrying tomato yellow leaf curl virus strongly suppresses host plant defenses

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaobin; Pan, Huipeng; Zhang, Hongyi; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Fang, Yong; Chen, Gong; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    The concurrence of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) with the spread of its vector Bemisia tabaci Q rather than B in China suggests a more mutualistic relationship between TYLCV and Q. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that viruliferous B and Q have different effects on plant defenses. We found the fecundity of nonviruliferous B, nonviruliferous Q, viruliferous Q and viruliferous B was 11.080, 12.060, 10.760, and 11.220 respectively on plants previously attacked by the other biotype, however, on their respective noninfested control leaves fecundity was 12.000, 10.880, 9.760, and 8.020 respectively. Only viruliferous B had higher fecundity on viruliferous Q-infested plants than on control plants. The longevity of viruliferous B showed the same phenomenon. At 1 d infestion, the jasmonic acid content in leaves noninfested and in leaves infested with nonviruliferous B, nonviruliferous Q, viruliferous B and viruliferous Q was 407.000, 281.333, 301.333, 266.667 and 134.000 ng/g FW, respectively. The JA content was lowest in viruliferous Q-infested leaves. The proteinase inhibitor activity and expression of JA-related upstream gene LOX and downstream gene PI II showed the same trend. The substantial suppression of host defenses by Q carrying TYLCV probably enhances the spread of Q and TYLCV in China. PMID:24912756

  19. Transcriptome analysis of host-associated differentiation in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Guo, Litao; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    Host-associated differentiation is one of the driving forces behind the diversification of phytophagous insects. In this study, host induced transcriptomic differences were investigated in the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci, an invasive agricultural pest worldwide. Comparative transcriptomic analyses using coding sequence (CDS), 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTR) showed that sequence divergences between the original host plant, cabbage, and the derived hosts, including cotton, cucumber and tomato, were 0.11–0.14%, 0.19–0.26%, and 0.15–0.21%, respectively. In comparison to the derived hosts, 418 female and 303 male transcripts, respectively, were up-regulated in the original cabbage strain. Among them, 17 transcripts were consistently up-regulated in both female and male whiteflies originated from the cabbage host. Specifically, two ESTs annotated as Cathepsin B or Cathepsin B-like genes were significantly up-regulated in the original cabbage strain, representing a transcriptomic response to the dietary challenges imposed by the host shifting. Results from our transcriptome analysis, in conjunction with previous reports documenting the minor changes in their reproductive capacity, insecticide susceptibility, symbiotic composition and feeding behavior, suggest that the impact of host-associated differentiation in whiteflies is limited. Furthermore, it is unlikely the major factor contributing to their rapid range expansion/invasiveness. PMID:25540625

  20. Biotype expression and insecticide response of Bemisia tabaci chemosensory protein-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo Xia; Xuan, Ning; Chu, Dong; Xie, Hong Yan; Fan, Zhong Xue; Bi, Yu Ping; Picimbon, Jean-François; Qin, Yu Chuan; Zhong, Su Ting; Li, Yao Fa; Gao, Zhan Lin; Pan, Wen Liang; Wang, Guo Ying; Rajashekar, Balaji

    2014-03-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are a group of small soluble proteins found so far exclusively in arthropod species. These proteins act in chemical communication and perception. In this study, a gene encoding the Type 1 CSP (BtabCSP1) from the agricultural pest Bemisia tabaci (whitefly) was analyzed to understand sequence variation and expression specificity in different biotypes. Sequence analysis of BtabCSP1 showed significant differences between the two genetically characterized biotypes, B and Q. The B-biotype had a larger number of BtabCSP1 mutations than the Q-biotype. Similar to most other CSPs, BtabCSP1 was more expressed in the head than in the rest of the body. One-step RT-PCR and qPCR analysis on total messenger RNA showed that biotype-Q had higher BtabCSP1 expression levels than biotype-B. Females from a mixed field-population had high levels of BtabCSP1 expression. The interaction of BtabCSP1 with the insecticide thiamethoxam was investigated by analyzing the BtabCSP1 expression levels following exposure to the neonicotinoid, thiamethoxam, in a time/dose-response study. Insecticide exposure increased BtabCSP1 expression (up to tenfold) at 4 and 24 h following 50 or 100 g/ml treatments. PMID:24478049

  1. Evidence for Horizontal Transmission of Secondary Endosymbionts in the Bemisia tabaci Cryptic Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Muhammad Z.; De Barro, Paul J.; Ren, Shun-Xiang; Greeff, Jaco M.; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2013-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a globally distributed pest composed of at least 34 morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species. At least seven species of endosymbiont have been found infecting some or all members of the complex. The origin(s) of the associations between specific endosymbionts and their whitefly hosts is unknown. Infection is normally vertical, but horizontal transmission does occur and is one way for new infections to be introduced into individuals. The relationships between the different members of the cryptic species complex and the endosymbionts have not been well explored. In this study, the phylogenies of different cryptic species of the host with those of their endosymbionts were compared. Of particular interest was whether there was evidence for both coevolution and horizontal transmission. Congruence was observed for the primary endosymbiont, Portiera aleyrodidarum, and partial incongruence in the case of two secondary endosymbionts, Arsenophonus and Cardinium and incongruence for a third, Wolbachia. The patterns observed for the primary endosymbiont supported cospeciation with the host while the patterns for the secondary endosymbionts, and especially Wolbachia showed evidence of host shifts and extinctions through horizontal transmission rather than cospeciation. Of particular note is the observation of several very recent host shift events in China between exotic invader and indigenous members of the complex. These shifts were from indigenous members of the complex to the invader as well as from the invader to indigenous relatives. PMID:23308142

  2. Bioactivity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants against the Cotton Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, E. Abou-Fakhr; Zeaiter, A.; Saliba, N.; Talhouk, S.

    2014-01-01

    Forty-one methanol extracts of 28 indigenous medicinal plant species were tested for their insecticidal bioactivity against cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), adults and second nymphal instars under controlled conditions. This study is within a bioprospection context, in the form of utilizing local plant species as an alternative in sustainable agriculture development. Eighteen and nine plant extracts caused a significant decrease in number of live adult and nymphal whiteflies, respectively, compared to the control. This is the first report for the potential effect on survival of insects for 22 out of 28 tested medicinal plant species. Whole plant extracts of Ranunculus myosuroudes Boiss. and Kotschy (Ranunculaceae), Achillea damascena L. (Asteraceae), and Anthemis hebronica Boiss. and Kotschy (Asteraceae) and leaf extracts of Verbascum leptostychum DC. (Scrophulariaceae) and Heliotropium rotundifolium Boiss. (Borangiaceae) caused both repellent and toxic effects against the adult and second nymphal instars, respectively. Extracts of leaves and stems of Anthemis scariosa Boiss. (Asteraceae) and Calendula palestina Pers. (Asteraceae) were found to be more bioactive against the adult and nymphal instars, respectively, than extracts of other plant parts, such as flowers. Thus, the bioactive extracts of these medicinal plants have the potential to lower whitefly populations in a comprehensive pest management program in local communities, pending cultivation of these medicinal plant species. PMID:25204756

  3. Sensitivity of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to several new insecticides in China: effects of insecticide type and whitefly species, strain, and stage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Pan, Huipeng; Yang, Xin; Guo, Litao; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    Whitefly biotypes B and Q are the two most damaging members of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) species complex. Control of B. tabaci (and especially of Q) has been impaired by resistance to commonly used insecticides. To find new insecticides for B. tabaci management in China, we investigated the sensitivity of eggs, larvae, and adults of laboratory strains of B and Q (named Lab-B and Lab-Q) and field strains of Q to several insecticides. For eggs, larvae, and adults of B. tabaci and for six insecticides (cyantraniliprole, chlorantraniliprole, pyriproxyfen, buprofezin, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam), LC50 values were higher for Lab-Q than for Lab-B; avermectin LC50 values, however, were low for adults of both Lab-Q and Lab-B. Based on the laboratory results, insecticides were selected to test against eggs, larvae, and adults of four field strains of B. tabaci Q. Although the field strains differed in their sensitivity to the insecticides, the eggs and larvae of all strains were highly sensitive to cyantraniliprole, and the adults of all strains were highly sensitive to avermectin. The eggs, larvae, and adults of B. tabaci Q were generally more resistant than those of B. tabaci B to the tested insecticides. B. tabaci Q eggs and larvae were sensitive to cyantraniliprole and pyriproxyfen, whereas B. tabaci Q adults were sensitive to avermectin. Field trials should be conducted with cyantraniliprole, pyriproxyfen, and avermectin for control of B. tabaci Q and B in China. PMID:25434040

  4. Role of the Insect Supervectors Bemisia tabaci and Frankliniella occidentalis in the Emergence and Global Spread of Plant Viruses.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Robert L; Batuman, Ozgur; Webster, Craig G; Adkins, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Emergence of insect-transmitted plant viruses over the past 10-20 years has been disproportionately driven by two so-called supervectors: the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, and the Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis. High rates of reproduction and dispersal, extreme polyphagy, and development of insecticide resistance, together with human activities, have made these insects global pests. These supervectors transmit a diversity of plant viruses by different mechanisms and mediate virus emergence through local evolution, host shifts, mixed infections, and global spread. Associated virus evolution involves reassortment, recombination, and component capture. Emergence of B. tabaci-transmitted geminiviruses (begomoviruses), ipomoviruses, and torradoviruses has led to global disease outbreaks as well as multiple paradigm shifts. Similarly, F. occidentalis has mediated tospovirus host shifts and global dissemination and the emergence of pollen-transmitted ilarviruses. The plant virus-supervector interaction offers exciting opportunities for basic research and global implementation of generalized disease management strategies to reduce economic and environmental impacts. PMID:26958907

  5. The Dynamics and Environmental Influence on Interactions Between Cassava Brown Streak Disease and the Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, S C; Ndyetabula, I L; Mkamilo, G S; Haji, S; Muhanna, M M; Chuwa, C; Kasele, S; Bouwmeester, H; Ijumba, J N; Legg, J P

    2015-05-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) is currently the most significant virus disease phenomenon affecting African agriculture. In this study, we report results from the most extensive set of field data so far presented for CBSD in Africa. From assessments of 515 farmers' plantings of cassava, incidence in the Coastal Zone of Tanzania (46.5% of plants; 87% of fields affected) was higher than in the Lake Zone (22%; 34%), but incidences for both zones were greater than previous published records. The whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci, was more abundant in the Lake Zone than the Coastal Zone, the reverse of the situation reported previously, and increased B. tabaci abundance is driving CBSD spread in the Lake Zone. The altitudinal "ceiling" previously thought to restrict the occurrence of CBSD to regions <1,000 masl has been broken as a consequence of the greatly increased abundance of B. tabaci in mid-altitude areas. Among environmental variables analyzed, minimum temperature was the strongest determinant of CBSD incidence. B. tabaci in the Coastal and Lake Zones responded differently to environmental variables examined, highlighting the biological differences between B. tabaci genotypes occurring in these regions and the superior adaptation of B. tabaci in the Great Lakes region both to cassava and low temperature conditions. Regression analyses using multi-country data sets could be used to determine the potential environmental limits of CBSD. Approaches such as this offer potential for use in the development of predictive models for CBSD, which could strengthen country- and continent-level CBSD pandemic mitigation strategies. PMID:25585059

  6. Reference Gene Selection for qRT-PCR Analysis in the Sweetpotato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rumei; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Yang, Nina; Yang, Xin; Pan, Huipeng; Zhou, Xiaomao; Bai, Lianyang; Xu, Baoyun; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate evaluation of gene expression requires normalization relative to the expression of reliable reference genes. Expression levels of “classical” reference genes can differ, however, across experimental conditions. Although quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) has been used extensively to decipher gene function in the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci, a world-wide pest in many agricultural systems, the stability of its reference genes has rarely been validated. Results In this study, 15 candidate reference genes from B. tabaci were evaluated using two Excel-based algorithms geNorm and Normfinder under a diverse set of biotic and abiotic conditions. At least two reference genes were selected to normalize gene expressions in B. tabaci under experimental conditions. Specifically, for biotic conditions including host plant, acquisition of a plant virus, developmental stage, tissue (body region of the adult), and whitefly biotype, ribosomal protein L29 was the most stable reference gene. In contrast, the expression of elongation factor 1 alpha, peptidylprolyl isomerase A, NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A and heat shock protein 40 were consistently stable across various abiotic conditions including photoperiod, temperature, and insecticide susceptibility. Conclusion Our finding is the first step toward establishing a standardized quantitative real-time PCR procedure following the MIQE (Minimum Information for publication of Quantitative real time PCR Experiments) guideline in an agriculturally important insect pest, and provides a solid foundation for future RNA interference based functional study in B. tabaci. PMID:23308130

  7. Response of Bemisia tabaci Genn. (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotype B to genotypes of pepper Capsicum annuum (Solanales: Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Ballina-Gomez, H; Ruiz-Sanchez, E; Chan-Cupul, W; Latournerie-Moreno, L; Hernández-Alvarado, L; Islas-Flores, I; Zuñiga-Aguilar, J J

    2013-04-01

    Bemisia tabaci Genn. biotype B is a widely distributed plant pest that represents one of the major constraints for horticultural crop production. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the oviposition preference, survivorship, and development of B. tabaci biotype B on semi-cultivated genotypes of Capsicum annuum from southeast Mexico. In free-choice experiments to evaluate the oviposition preference, lower number of eggs laid by B. tabaci biotype B was observed in the genotypes Maax and Xcat´ik relative to that in the commercial genotype Parado. Egg hatchability was significantly lower in Pico Paloma, Bolita, Blanco, Chawa, Payaso, and Xcat´ik than in the rest of the genotypes, including the commercial genotype Jalapeño. Likewise, survivorship of nymphs was significantly lower in Pico Paloma, Bolita, and Blanco than in the remaining genotypes. Nymph developmental time and the period of development from egg to adult were the shortest in Amaxito. Therefore, sources of resistance to B. tabaci biotype B by antibiosis (accumulation of plant defense compounds) might be found in the semi-cultivated genotypes Pico Paloma, Bolita, and Blanco. PMID:23949756

  8. Rapid accumulation and low degradation: key parameters of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus persistence in its insect vector Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nathalie; Rimbaud, Loup; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Reynaud, Bernard; Thébaud, Gaël; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Of worldwide economic importance, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, Begomovirus) is responsible for one of the most devastating plant diseases in warm and temperate regions. The DNA begomoviruses (Geminiviridae) are transmitted by the whitefly species complex Bemisia tabaci. Although geminiviruses have long been described as circulative non-propagative viruses, observations such as long persistence of TYLCV in B. tabaci raised the question of their possible replication in the vector. We monitored two major TYLCV strains, Mild (Mld) and Israel (IL), in the invasive B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 cryptic species, during and after the viral acquisition, within two timeframes (0-144 hours or 0-20 days). TYLCV DNA was quantified using real-time PCR, and the complementary DNA strand of TYLCV involved in viral replication was specifically quantified using anchored real-time PCR. The DNA of both TYLCV strains accumulated exponentially during acquisition but remained stable after viral acquisition had stopped. Neither replication nor vertical transmission were observed. In conclusion, our quantification of the viral loads and complementary strands of both Mld and IL strains of TYLCV in B. tabaci point to an efficient accumulation and preservation mechanism, rather than to a dynamic equilibrium between replication and degradation. PMID:26625871

  9. Inoculation of tomato plants with rhizobacteria enhances the performance of the phloem-feeding insect Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Shavit, Roee; Ofek-Lalzar, Maya; Burdman, Saul; Morin, Shai

    2013-01-01

    In their natural environment, plants experience multiple biotic interactions and respond to this complexity in an integrated manner. Therefore, plant responses to herbivory are flexible and depend on the context and complexity in which they occur. For example, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can enhance plant growth and induce resistance against microbial pathogens and herbivorous insects by a phenomenon termed induced systemic resistance (ISR). In the present study, we investigated the effect of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) pre-inoculation with the PGPR Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r, on the performance of the generalist phloem-feeding insect Bemisia tabaci. Based on the ability of P. fluorescens WCS417r to prime for ISR against generalists chewing insects and necrotrophic pathogens, we hypothesized that pre-inoculated plants will strongly resist B. tabaci infestation. In contrast, we discovered that the pre-inoculation treatment increased the tomato plant suitability for B. tabaci which was emphasized both by faster developmental rate and higher survivability of nymph stages on pre-inoculated plants. Our molecular and chemical analyses suggested that the phenomenon is likely to be related to: (I) the ability of the bacteria to reduce the activity of the plant induced defense systems; (II) a possible manipulation by P. fluorescens of the plant quality (in terms of suitability for B. tabaci) through an indirect effect on the rhizosphere bacterial community. The contribution of our study to the pattern proposed for other belowground rhizobacteria and mycorrhizal fungi and aboveground generalist phloem-feeders is discussed. PMID:23964283

  10. Rapid accumulation and low degradation: key parameters of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus persistence in its insect vector Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Nathalie; Rimbaud, Loup; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Reynaud, Bernard; Thébaud, Gaël; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Of worldwide economic importance, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, Begomovirus) is responsible for one of the most devastating plant diseases in warm and temperate regions. The DNA begomoviruses (Geminiviridae) are transmitted by the whitefly species complex Bemisia tabaci. Although geminiviruses have long been described as circulative non-propagative viruses, observations such as long persistence of TYLCV in B. tabaci raised the question of their possible replication in the vector. We monitored two major TYLCV strains, Mild (Mld) and Israel (IL), in the invasive B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 cryptic species, during and after the viral acquisition, within two timeframes (0–144 hours or 0–20 days). TYLCV DNA was quantified using real-time PCR, and the complementary DNA strand of TYLCV involved in viral replication was specifically quantified using anchored real-time PCR. The DNA of both TYLCV strains accumulated exponentially during acquisition but remained stable after viral acquisition had stopped. Neither replication nor vertical transmission were observed. In conclusion, our quantification of the viral loads and complementary strands of both Mld and IL strains of TYLCV in B. tabaci point to an efficient accumulation and preservation mechanism, rather than to a dynamic equilibrium between replication and degradation. PMID:26625871

  11. Three Members of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Cryptic Species Complex Occur Sympatrically in Argentine Horticultural Crops.

    PubMed

    Alemandri, V; Vaghi Medina, C G; Dumón, A D; Argüello Caro, E B; Mattio, M F; García Medina, S; López Lambertini, P M; Truol, G

    2015-04-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a cryptic species complex that attacks >600 different species of plants and transmits several plant viruses causing severe economic losses. Until 2010, the B. tabaci complex comprised 24 distinct putative species. Recently, at least 15 new species have been reported. The objective of this study was to identify B. tabaci species present in bean, melon, and tomato crops in Argentina by applying phylogenetic analyses and pairwise comparison of genetic distances of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) sequences. The 39 proposed whitefly species were identified with both analyses, and the presence in Argentina of one indigenous species, New World 2 (NW2), and two introduced species, Middle East-Asia Minor one (MEAM1) and Mediterranean, was confirmed. Common bean crop presented the three whitefly species detected, with NW2, MEAM1, and Mediterranean being present all together under field conditions. Also, Mediterranean was the only species identified in tomato, whereas MEAM1 was found in melon. To the best of our knowledge, Mediterranean is a recent invasive species in open-field agriculture in the American continent and in greenhouse tomato in Argentina. Additionally, we provide the first report of MEAM1 in common bean and melon. These findings raise several questions on the future scenario of B. tabaci and the viruses it transmits in Argentina. PMID:26470151

  12. Molecular cloning of the sex-related gene PSI in Bemisia tabaci and its alternative splicing properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yating; Xie, Wen; Yang, Xin; Guo, Litao; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Yang, Zezhong; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-04-15

    The P-element somatic inhibitor (PSI) is gene known to regulate the transcription of doublesex (dsx) when transformer (tra) is absent in Bombyx mori. In this study, we identified and characterized a PSI homolog in Bemisia tabaci (BtPSI). BtPSI cDNA had a total length of 5700 bp and contained a predicted open reading frame (ORF) of 2208 nucleotides encoding for 735 amino acids. Multiple sequence alignments of the common regions of PSI proteins from B. tabaci and five other insect species revealed a high degree of sequence conservation. BtPSI is expressed in all stages of B. tabaci development, and expression did not significantly differ between female and male adult. A total of 92 BtPSI isoforms (78 in female and 22 in male) were identified, and a marker indicating the female-specific form was found. These results increase the understanding of genes that may determine sex in B. tabaci and provide a foundation for research on the sex determination mechanism in this insect. PMID:26773355

  13. An EPG study of the probing behavior of adult Bemisia tabaci biotype Q (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) following exposure to cyantraniliprole.

    PubMed

    Civolani, Stefano; Cassanelli, Stefano; Chicca, Milvia; Rison, Jean L; Bassi, Andrea; Alvarez, Juan M; Annan, I Billy; Parrella, Giuseppe; Giorgini, Massimo; Fano, Elisa Anna

    2014-06-01

    Cyantraniliprole is a novel insecticide for control of multiple chewing and sucking insect pest species including the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), which is one of the most important polyphagous pests in tropical, subtropical, and Mediterranean regions. This study aims to evaluate the effects of cyantraniliprole on the probing behavior of B. tabaci on tomato. Electrical penetration graph data indicated that on plants treated with cyantraniliprole (foliar application), adult whiteflies of the genetic variant Q2 were not able to reach the phloem and consequently did not perform the activities represented by E1 and E2 waveforms, i.e., phloem salivation (during which inoculation of geminiviruses occurs) and phloem sap ingestion (during which geminiviruses are acquired by the whiteflies), respectively. The complete failure of B. tabaci biotype Q adults to feed from the phloem of tomato plants treated with cyantraniliprole could be explained by rapid cessation of ingestion because of the mode of action of this insecticide. Overall, these findings indicated that cyantraniliprole might represent a useful new tool for producers to protect tomato plants from damage by B. tabaci. PMID:25026647

  14. Implication of the Bacterial Endosymbiont Rickettsia spp. in Interactions of the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci with Tomato yellow leaf curl virus

    PubMed Central

    Kliot, Adi; Cilia, Michelle; Czosnek, Henryk

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous animal and plant viruses are transmitted by arthropod vectors in a persistent, circulative manner. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is transmitted by the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci. We report here that infection with Rickettsia spp., a facultative endosymbiont of whiteflies, altered TYLCV-B. tabaci interactions. A B. tabaci strain infected with Rickettsia acquired more TYLCV from infected plants, retained the virus longer, and exhibited nearly double the transmission efficiency compared to an uninfected B. tabaci strain with the same genetic background. Temporal and spatial antagonistic relationships were discovered between Rickettsia and TYLCV within the whitefly. In different time course experiments, the levels of virus and Rickettsia within the insect were inversely correlated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of Rickettsia-infected midguts provided evidence for niche exclusion between Rickettsia and TYLCV. In particular, high levels of the bacterium in the midgut resulted in higher virus concentrations in the filter chamber, a favored site for virus translocation along the transmission pathway, whereas low levels of Rickettsia in the midgut resulted in an even distribution of the virus. Taken together, these results indicate that Rickettsia, by infecting the midgut, increases TYLCV transmission efficacy, adding further insights into the complex association between persistent plant viruses, their insect vectors, and microorganism tenants that reside within these insects. IMPORTANCE Interest in bacterial endosymbionts in arthropods and many aspects of their host biology in agricultural and human health systems has been increasing. A recent and relevant studied example is the influence of Wolbachia on dengue virus transmission by mosquitoes. In parallel with our recently studied whitefly-Rickettsia-TYLCV system, other studies have shown that dengue virus levels in the mosquito vector are inversely correlated with

  15. Establishment of papaya banker plant system for Parasitoid, Encarsia sophia (Hymenoptera: Aphilidae) against Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in greenhouse tomato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Gennadius) (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae), is a key pest of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and other vegetable crops worldwide. To combat this pest, a non-crop banker plant system was evaluated that employs a parasitoid, Encarsia sophia (Girault & Dodd) ...

  16. Population genetics of Bemisia tabaci biotypes B and Q from the Mediterranean and the U.S. inferred using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci is composed of several biotypes, some of which appear to have pre and/or post zygotic barriers to hybridization. Numerous studies have been performed to determine the geographical distribution of different biotypes, but little is known about the gene flow within and among biotypes. R...

  17. Gene transcript changes associated with Bemisia tabaci Biotype B induced tomato irregular ripening disorder identified using microarray technology and Q-RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato irregular ripening is a disorder manifested in the fruit as a result of silver leaf whitefly (otherwise known as the B biotype of Bemisia tabaci) feeding on leaf phloem of tomato. This physiological disorder has significant economic impact in commercial tomato production; however, little is k...

  18. Pre shipping dip treatments using soap, natural oils, and Isaria fumosorosea: potential biopesticides for mitigating the spread of whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) invasive insects on ornamental plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyodidae) is an invasive insect pest affecting different crops including vegetables, fruits, cereals, and ornamentals. The efficacy of some products such as commercial soap, natural oils and Preferal® (based on the entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea ...

  19. Yellow Sticky Trap Catches of Parasitoids of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Vegetable Crops and Their Relationship to In-field Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the relationship of yellow sticky trap captures of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype ‘B’ parasitoids to the local population of parasitoids as measured by leaf samples of parasitized whiteflies and mass-release of parasitoids. Traps were placed in experimental collard and cowpea field ...

  20. Transcriptome analysis of Bemisia tabaci during tomato yellow leaf curl virus acquisition and ribonucleic acid interference to manage whitefly-transmitted viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 300 viruses are transmitted by the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, with 90% of them belonging to the genus, Begomovirus. Begomoviruses are obligately transmitted by whiteflies to a wide range of agriculture crops, resulting in billions of dollars lost annually, while jeopardizing food security worldw...

  1. Comparative transcriptome analysis in Bemisia tabaci in response to tomato yellow leaf curl virus and development of ribonucleic acid interference to manage whitefly-transmitted viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci transmits over 300 plant viruses, with the majority of them belonging to the Begomovirus genus. Begomoviruses are obligately transmitted to a wide range of agriculture crops, resulting in the loss of billions of dollars annually, while jeopardizing food security worldwid...

  2. Intraguild predation on Eretmocerus nr emiratus, a parasitoid of Bemisia tabaci by three generalist predators with implications for estimating the level and impact of parasitism.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intraguild predation is pervasive in many managed and unmanaged ecosystems. Both generalist predators and aphelinid parasitoids attack Bemisia tabaci on cotton in the southwestern USA. Free-choice and no-choice laboratory assays were conducted to quantify prey consumption patterns and preference by ...

  3. Genetic Networking of the Bemisia tabaci Cryptic Species Complex Reveals Pattern of Biological Invasions

    PubMed Central

    De Barro, Paul; Ahmed, Muhammad Z.

    2011-01-01

    Background A challenge within the context of cryptic species is the delimitation of individual species within the complex. Statistical parsimony network analytics offers the opportunity to explore limits in situations where there are insufficient species-specific morphological characters to separate taxa. The results also enable us to explore the spread in taxa that have invaded globally. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a 657 bp portion of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 from 352 unique haplotypes belonging to the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex, the analysis revealed 28 networks plus 7 unconnected individual haplotypes. Of the networks, 24 corresponded to the putative species identified using the rule set devised by Dinsdale et al. (2010). Only two species proposed in Dinsdale et al. (2010) departed substantially from the structure suggested by the analysis. The analysis of the two invasive members of the complex, Mediterranean (MED) and Middle East – Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1), showed that in both cases only a small number of haplotypes represent the majority that have spread beyond the home range; one MEAM1 and three MED haplotypes account for >80% of the GenBank records. Israel is a possible source of the globally invasive MEAM1 whereas MED has two possible sources. The first is the eastern Mediterranean which has invaded only the USA, primarily Florida and to a lesser extent California. The second are western Mediterranean haplotypes that have spread to the USA, Asia and South America. The structure for MED supports two home range distributions, a Sub-Saharan range and a Mediterranean range. The MEAM1 network supports the Middle East - Asia Minor region. Conclusion/Significance The network analyses show a high level of congruence with the species identified in a previous phylogenetic analysis. The analysis of the two globally invasive members of the complex support the view that global invasion often involve very small portions of the available

  4. Transgenic Cotton-Fed Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Affects the Parasitoid Encarsia desantisi Viggiani (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) Development.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, R; Rossi, G D; Busoli, A C

    2016-02-01

    Cotton cultivars expressing Cry proteins are widely used to control lepidopteran pests. The effects of transgenic plants containing insecticidal Cry proteins on non-target species must be comprehended for a better and rational use of this technology for pest management. We investigated the influence of the Bt cotton cultivars NuOPAL and FM 975 on biological parameters of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), a non-target pest of Bt cotton cultivars and on its parasitoid Encarsia desantisi Viggiani (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). The experiments were conducted in a climatized room, and the non-transgenic near isolines were used for rearing whiteflies as control hosts. The effects of the Bt cotton cultivars on the period of embryonic and larval development and the percentage of adult emergence of B. tabaci were assessed. The period required for embryonic, larval, and pupal development and the percentage of emergence and longevity of E. desantisi females were determined using Bt cotton-fed and non-Bt cotton-fed B. tabaci as hosts. Both Bt cotton cultivars resulted in a decrease of approximately 20% of adult emergence of B. tabaci. Differently, an increase of approximately 10% of adult emergence of E. desantisi was observed for parasitoids that used hosts fed with both Bt cotton cultivars. However, female parasitoid longevity decreased when their hosts were fed on Bt cotton cultivars. Our data suggest that the use of Bt cotton cultivars in association with the biological control agent E. desantisi could be functional for the management of B. tabaci in Bt cotton crops. PMID:26431703

  5. Differential expression patterns among heat-shock protein genes and thermal responses in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Orobio, Rony F; Chavarriaga, Paul; Toro-Perea, Nelson

    2015-08-01

    There is convincing evidence that heat-shock proteins (HSP) are upregulated by stress conditions in insects; however, the relative contribution of each HSP gene to the heat-shock response remains unclear. Here we considered the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1), a phloem feeder and invasive species whose molecular stress response is an important mechanism for overcoming heat stress. We assessed the expression of the hsp23, 40, 70 and 90 genes at the mRNA level when submitted to heat shocks of 40 and 44°C/1h (control at 25°C). For this, we evaluated a set of available and suitable reference genes in order to perform data normalization using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) technique, and then confirmed the production of HSP70 protein based on Western blot. Results were compared with the hardening capacity of B. tabaci, measured by fitness components as a response to heat shocks, using 40°C as the induction temperature. Three of the four genes (hsp23, 70 and 90) were upregulated by heat stress at mRNA, showing differential expression patterns. Hsp70 expression was confirmed at the protein level. Hardening significantly increased fitness following heat stress, suggesting that HSPs may contribute to hardening capacity in B. tabaci. Potential role of each gene in the heat-shock response for whiteflies is discussed. PMID:26267515

  6. Pathogenicity of Isaria fumosorosea to Bemisia tabaci, with some observations on the fungal infection process and host immune response.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Diao, Hongliang; Liang, Li; Hao, Chi; Arthurs, Steven; Ma, Ruiyan

    2015-09-01

    Isaria fumosorosea is an important pathogen of whiteflies, and is used as a mycoinsecticide against this pest in many regions of the world. We quantified the pathogenicity of the Chinese isolate IF-1106 against different life stages of sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, on cucumber plants, and describe the infection process and aspects of the host immunological response in the laboratory. The second instar was the most susceptible life stage to infection, with mortality rates at 10(7)conidia/ml ≈83% after 7d. Scanning electron microscopy was used to monitor morphological aspects of the infection process. The following stages were observed; conidia adhered on the cuticle of B. tabaci and began to germinate within 6h of inoculation, appressoria development after 24h, germ tube penetration within 48h, emergent hyphae within 72h, secondary conidiogenesis within 96h with mass hyphal proliferation occurring on cadavers within 120h. The activities of endogenous enzymes were evaluated from host homogenate at various intervals post infection. Three enzymes associated with antioxidant activity [superoxide dismutase (SOD), perioxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT)], and two with detoxification [glutathione S-transferase (GSTs) and carboxylesterase (CarE)] were apparently upregulated in second instars infected by I. fumosorosea. Enzyme activities reached peak values at 48-60h post infection, then decreased to significantly lower than controls in 84h as mycosis occurred. Our results provide new insights into the pathogenicity and potential physiological response of B. tabaci to this fungal isolate. PMID:26264671

  7. Only a minority of broad-range detoxification genes respond to a variety of phytotoxins in generalist Bemisia tabaci species.

    PubMed

    Halon, Eyal; Eakteiman, Galit; Moshitzky, Pnina; Elbaz, Moshe; Alon, Michal; Pavlidi, Nena; Vontas, John; Morin, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Generalist insect can utilize two different modes for regulating their detoxification genes, the constitutive mode and the induced mode. Here, we used the Bemisia tabaci sibling species MEAM1 and MED, as a model system for studying constitutive and induced detoxification resistance and their associated tradeoffs. B. tabaci adults were allowed to feed through membranes for 24 h on diet containing only sucrose or sucrose with various phytotoxins. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses of 18 detoxification genes, indicated that relatively few transcripts were changed in both the MEAM1 and MED species, in response to the addition of phytotoxins to the diet. Induced transcription of detoxification genes only in the MED species, in response to the presence of indole-3-carbinol in the insect's diet, was correlated with maintenance of reproductive performance in comparison to significant reduction in performance of the MEAM1 species. Three genes, COE2, CYP6-like 5 and BtGST2, responded to more than one compound and were highly transcribed in the insect gut. Furthermore, functional assays showed that the BtGST2 gene encodes a protein capable of interacting with both flavonoids and glucosinolates. In conclusion, several detoxification genes were identified that could potentially be involved in the adaptation of B. tabaci to its host plants. PMID:26655836

  8. Competitive Ability and Fitness Differences between Two Introduced Populations of the Invasive Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Q in China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yi-Wei; Liu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Hua-Li; Jiang, De-Feng; Chu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Background Our long-term field survey revealed that the Cardinium infection rate in Bemisia tabaci Q (also known as biotype Q) population was low in Shandong, China over the past few years. We hypothesize that (1) the Cardinium-infected (C+) B. tabaci Q population cannot efficiently compete with the Cardinium-uninfected (C−) B. tabaci Q population; (2) no reproductive isolation may have occurred between C+ and C−; and (3) the C− population has higher fitness than the C+ population. Methodology and Results To reveal the differences in competitive ability and fitness between the two introduced populations (C+ and C−), competition between C+ and C− was examined over several generations. Subsequently, the reproductive isolation between C+ and C− was studied by crossing C+ with C− individuals, and the fitnesses of C+ and C− populations were compared using a two-sex life table method. Our results demonstrate that the competitive ability of the C+ whiteflies was weaker than that of C−. There is that no reproductive isolation occurred between the two populations and the C− population had higher fitness than the C+ population. Conclusion The competitive ability and fitness differences of two populations may explain why C− whitefly populations have been dominant during the past few years in Shandong, China. However, the potential role Cardinium plays in whitefly should be further explored. PMID:24945699

  9. Only a minority of broad-range detoxification genes respond to a variety of phytotoxins in generalist Bemisia tabaci species

    PubMed Central

    Halon, Eyal; Eakteiman, Galit; Moshitzky, Pnina; Elbaz, Moshe; Alon, Michal; Pavlidi, Nena; Vontas, John; Morin, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Generalist insect can utilize two different modes for regulating their detoxification genes, the constitutive mode and the induced mode. Here, we used the Bemisia tabaci sibling species MEAM1 and MED, as a model system for studying constitutive and induced detoxification resistance and their associated tradeoffs. B. tabaci adults were allowed to feed through membranes for 24 h on diet containing only sucrose or sucrose with various phytotoxins. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses of 18 detoxification genes, indicated that relatively few transcripts were changed in both the MEAM1 and MED species, in response to the addition of phytotoxins to the diet. Induced transcription of detoxification genes only in the MED species, in response to the presence of indole-3-carbinol in the insect’s diet, was correlated with maintenance of reproductive performance in comparison to significant reduction in performance of the MEAM1 species. Three genes, COE2, CYP6-like 5 and BtGST2, responded to more than one compound and were highly transcribed in the insect gut. Furthermore, functional assays showed that the BtGST2 gene encodes a protein capable of interacting with both flavonoids and glucosinolates. In conclusion, several detoxification genes were identified that could potentially be involved in the adaptation of B. tabaci to its host plants. PMID:26655836

  10. Mixed release of two parasitoids and a polyphagous ladybird as a potential strategy to control the tobacco whitefly Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaoling; Hu, Nana; Zhang, Fan; Ramirez-Romero, Ricardo; Desneux, Nicolas; Wang, Su; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mixed species release of parasitoids is used to suppress outbreaks of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae); however, this biocontrol may be inhibited by interspecific interactions. We investigated the effects of mixed releases of natural enemies of B. tabaci on predation rates, parasite performance and adult parasitoid emergence under greenhouse conditions. We tested the polyphagous predatory ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and two whitefly-specific parasitoids, namely Encarsia formosa and Encarsia sophia (both, Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). Harmonia axyridis exhibited the lowest rates of predation when released with each parasitoid than with both parasitoid species together and showed a significant preference for non-parasitized nymphs as prey. Both E. formosa and E. sophia parasitized more B. tabaci when released with the ladybird than when the wasps were released either alone or mixed with the other parasitoid. We also found that the presence of H. axyridis significantly reduced adult parasitoid emergence; the highest rate of adult emergence was obtained with parasitoids released alone. Our results indicate that different combinations of natural enemies can influence observed rates of predation, parasitism, and parasitoid emergence. Therefore, the combination of natural enemies to be used for a particular biological control program should depend on the specific objectives. PMID:27312174

  11. Mixed release of two parasitoids and a polyphagous ladybird as a potential strategy to control the tobacco whitefly Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoling; Hu, Nana; Zhang, Fan; Ramirez-Romero, Ricardo; Desneux, Nicolas; Wang, Su; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mixed species release of parasitoids is used to suppress outbreaks of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae); however, this biocontrol may be inhibited by interspecific interactions. We investigated the effects of mixed releases of natural enemies of B. tabaci on predation rates, parasite performance and adult parasitoid emergence under greenhouse conditions. We tested the polyphagous predatory ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and two whitefly-specific parasitoids, namely Encarsia formosa and Encarsia sophia (both, Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). Harmonia axyridis exhibited the lowest rates of predation when released with each parasitoid than with both parasitoid species together and showed a significant preference for non-parasitized nymphs as prey. Both E. formosa and E. sophia parasitized more B. tabaci when released with the ladybird than when the wasps were released either alone or mixed with the other parasitoid. We also found that the presence of H. axyridis significantly reduced adult parasitoid emergence; the highest rate of adult emergence was obtained with parasitoids released alone. Our results indicate that different combinations of natural enemies can influence observed rates of predation, parasitism, and parasitoid emergence. Therefore, the combination of natural enemies to be used for a particular biological control program should depend on the specific objectives. PMID:27312174

  12. Transcriptome profiling of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci reveals stage-specific gene expression signatures for thiamethoxam resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, N; Xie, W; Jones, CM; Bass, C; Jiao, X; Yang, X; Liu, B; Li, R; Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci has developed high levels of resistance to many insecticides including the neonicotinoids and there is strong evidence that for some compounds resistance is stage-specific. To investigate the molecular basis of B. tabaci resistance to the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam we used a custom whitefly microarray to compare gene expression in the egg, nymph and adult stages of a thiamethoxam-resistant strain (TH-R) with a susceptible strain (TH-S). Gene ontology and bioinformatic analyses revealed that in all life stages many of the differentially expressed transcripts encoded enzymes involved in metabolic processes and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. Several of these are candidate resistance genes and include the cytochrome P450 CYP6CM1, which has been shown to confer resistance to several neonicotinoids previously, a P450 belonging to the Cytochrome P450s 4 family and a glutathione S-transferase (GST) belonging to the sigma class. Finally several ATP-binding cassette transporters of the ABCG subfamily were highly over-expressed in the adult stage of the TH-R strain and may play a role in resistance by active efflux. Here, we evaluated both common and stage-specific gene expression signatures and identified several candidate resistance genes that may underlie B. tabaci resistance to thiamethoxam. PMID:23889345

  13. Bioassay evaluation of the entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassaina Vuellemin against eggs and nymphs of Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Al-Deghairi, Mohammad A

    2008-06-15

    This study was carried out to determine the lethal effect of the entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassaina Vuell. on eggs, young and old nymphs of the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Genn. Mortality percentage was significantly differed based on stage of B. tabaci and conidial concentrations of B. bassina. Average of the infection level to insect was very low particularly in eggs with only 4.49%, even with higher conidial concentrations (6 x 10(6) conidia mL(-1)). Whereas, it was higher with 1st and 2nd instars (42.045%) and 3rd and 4th instars (35.93%). Three parameters was assessed with B. tabaci eggs, namely; egg infection, egg hatchability and crawlers emergence. Egg mortality percentages averaged 1.2, 4.27 and 8.0% with fungal concentration 2 x 10(6), 4 x 10(6) and 6 x 10(6) conidia mL(-1), respectively. Daily infection percentages were varied depend upon the conidial concentration where the highest infection rate of eggs was occurred with 6 x 10(6), followed by 4 x 10(6) conidia mL(-1). Egg hatch was very high, while the mortality among the emerged crawlers was neglectable compared with the check. Efficiency of B. bassaina on whitefly nymphs also was varied based on the insect instar and fungal concentration. Mortality percentages were obviously higher to young nymphs (1st and 2nd instars) than to older ones (3rd and 4th instars). The results indicated that nymphs were highly susceptible to fungal treatment compared with eggs. Additionally, pathogenicity and virulence of B. bassaina against B. tabaci immatures was not indicated by LC50 only, but also, by the time in days (LT50) required to achieve 50% mortality of an insect. PMID:18819641

  14. Lethal and Inhibitory Activities of Plant-Derived Essential Oils Against Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Biotype B in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Fanela, T L M; Baldin, E L L; Pannuti, L E R; Cruz, P L; Crotti, A E M; Takeara, R; Kato, M J

    2016-04-01

    The silverleaf whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is one of the most severe tomato pests in the world. The damage caused by this insect may compromise up to 100% of crop production, and management of this pest has relied on spraying of synthetic insecticides. However, due to the environmental issues associated with this practice, alternative methods such as the use of botanical pesticides are now used as a strategy of integrated pest management (IPM). We evaluated the effects of essential oils of five plant species on B. tabaci biotype B in tomato and demonstrate that the essential oils (0.5%) of Piper callosum (PC-EO), Adenocalymma alliaceum (AA-EO), Pelargonium graveolens (PG-EO), and Plectranthus neochilus (PN-EO) inhibit the settlement and oviposition of B. tabaci biotype B adults in tomato plants. In fumigation tests, A. alliaceum (AA-EO) at 0.4 μL/L of air after 72 h and 0.1 μL/L of air after 6 h was the most effective against nymphs and adults of B. tabaci biotype B, respectively. The major chemical constituents of PC-EO were identified as being safrole (29.3%), α-pinene (19.2%), and β-pinene (14.3%), whereas diallyl trisulfide (66.9%) and diallyl disulfide (23.3%) were the major compounds identified in AA-EO. This is the first report on the reduction of oviposition by the use of P. callosum (PC-EO) and A. alliaceum (AA-EO). In addition, the fumigant effect of A. alliaceum (AA-EO) on nymphs and adults has also been reported here for the first time. PMID:26712319

  15. Densities of Eggs and Nymphs and Percent Parasitism of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) on Common Weeds in West Central Florida

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Hugh A.; Nagle, Curtis A.; Evans, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The density of eggs and nymphs of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B and the percent parasitism of the nymphs were measured from specimens collected on nine species of weeds, commonly found in west central Florida during the spring and summer of 2012 and 2013. The weeds were direct seeded in 2012 and grown as transplants in 2013 for Randomized Complete Block design experiments. The leaf area of each whole-plant sample was measured and the B. tabaci density parameters were converted to numbers per 100 cm2. In June and July, 2013, whole-plant samples became too large to examine entirely, thus a representative portion of a plant totaling about 1000 cm2 was sampled. Egg and nymph densities and percent parasitism varied greatly among weed species, and were higher overall in 2012 than in 2013. The highest densities of eggs and nymphs were measured on Abutilon theophrasti, Cassia obtusifolia and Emilia fosbergii each year. Lower densities of immature B. tabaci were measured on most dates for Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens alba, Ipomoea lacunosa, Sesbania exaltata and Sida acuta. Nymph to egg ratios of 1:4 were observed on A. theophrasti and S. exaltata in 2012, while less than one nymph per ten eggs was observed overall on A. retroflexus, E. fosbergii and I. lacunosa. In 2012, parasitism rates of 32.3% were measured for B. alba, 23.4% for C. obtusifolia and 17.5% for S. acuta. Of the 206 parasitoids reared out over two seasons, 96.6% were Encarsia spp. and the remainder Eretmocerus spp. The role of weeds in managing B. tabaci is discussed. PMID:26462945

  16. Densities of Eggs and Nymphs and Percent Parasitism of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) on Common Weeds in West Central Florida.

    PubMed

    Smith, Hugh A; Nagle, Curtis A; Evans, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    The density of eggs and nymphs of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B and the percent parasitism of the nymphs were measured from specimens collected on nine species of weeds, commonly found in west central Florida during the spring and summer of 2012 and 2013. The weeds were direct seeded in 2012 and grown as transplants in 2013 for Randomized Complete Block design experiments. The leaf area of each whole-plant sample was measured and the B. tabaci density parameters were converted to numbers per 100 cm². In June and July, 2013, whole-plant samples became too large to examine entirely, thus a representative portion of a plant totaling about 1000 cm² was sampled. Egg and nymph densities and percent parasitism varied greatly among weed species, and were higher overall in 2012 than in 2013. The highest densities of eggs and nymphs were measured on Abutilon theophrasti, Cassia obtusifolia and Emilia fosbergii each year. Lower densities of immature B. tabaci were measured on most dates for Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens alba, Ipomoea lacunosa, Sesbania exaltata and Sida acuta. Nymph to egg ratios of 1:4 were observed on A. theophrasti and S. exaltata in 2012, while less than one nymph per ten eggs was observed overall on A. retroflexus, E. fosbergii and I. lacunosa. In 2012, parasitism rates of 32.3% were measured for B. alba, 23.4% for C. obtusifolia and 17.5% for S. acuta. Of the 206 parasitoids reared out over two seasons, 96.6% were Encarsia spp. and the remainder Eretmocerus spp. The role of weeds in managing B. tabaci is discussed. PMID:26462945

  17. Transient receptor potential is essential for high temperature tolerance in invasive Bemisia tabaci Middle East Asia minor 1 cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Lü, Zhi-Chuang; Li, Qian; Liu, Wan-Xue; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor in affecting population dynamics and diffusion distribution of organisms. Alien species can successfully invade and colonize to various temperature environments, and one of important reasons is that alien species have a strong resistance to stress temperature. Recently, researchers have focused on the mechanisms of temperature sensing to determine the sensing and regulation mechanisms of temperature adaptation. The transient receptor potential (TRP) is one of the key components of an organism's temperature perception system. TRP plays important roles in perceiving temperature, such as avoiding high temperature, low temperature and choosing the optimum temperature. To assess high temperature sensation and the heat resistance role of the TRP gene, we used 3' and 5' rapid-amplification of cDNA ends to isolate the full-length cDNA sequence of the TRP gene from Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) MEAM1 (Middle East Asia Minor 1), examined the mRNA expression profile under various temperature conditions, and identified the heat tolerance function. This is the first study to characterize the TRP gene of invasive B. tabaci MEAM1 (MEAM1 BtTRP). The full-length cDNA of MEAM1 BtTRP was 3871 bp, and the open reading frames of BtTRP was 3501 bp, encoding 1166 amino acids. Additionally, the BtTRP mRNA expression level was significantly increased at 35°C. Furthermore, compared with control treatments, the survival rate of B. tabaci MEAM1 adults was significantly decreased under high temperature stress conditions after feeding with dsRNA BtTRP. Collectively, these results showed that MEAM1 BtTRP is a key element in sensing high temperature and plays an essential role in B. tabaci MEAM1 heat tolerance ability. Our data improved our understanding of the mechanism of temperature sensation in B. tabaci MEAM1 at the molecular level and could contribute to the understanding of the thermal biology of B. tabaci MEAM1 within the context of global climate change

  18. Elimination of Arsenophonus and decrease in the bacterial symbionts diversity by antibiotic treatment leads to increase in fitness of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Raina, Harpreet Singh; Rawal, Vagisha; Singh, Shama; Daimei, Guisuibou; Shakarad, Mallikarjun; Rajagopal, Raman

    2015-06-01

    Bemisia tabaci is an invasive agricultural pest with more than 24 genetic groups harboring different bacterial endosymbionts categorized into obligatory and facultative endosymbionts. Arsenophonus is one of the facultative endosymbionts prevalent in B. tabaci of Indian sub-continent. Not much is known about the functional role of this endosymbiont in its host. Some studies have revealed its involvement in virus transmission by B. tabaci, but how it effects the biology of B. tabaci is unknown. In this study, tetracycline was used to eliminate Arsenophonus from B. tabaci to study its effects with regard to development and other fitness parameters. Bacteria specific 16S Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to ascertain Arsenophonus absence with differential effects on other secondary endosymbionts present in B. tabaci. Our results revealed that Arsenophonus negative (A(-)) whiteflies had more fecundity, increased juvenile developmental time, increased nymphal survival and increased adult life span as compared to control (A(+)) whiteflies. Thus, our results demonstrate that A(+) whiteflies have lesser fitness as compared to A(-) whiteflies. These observations give a new insight about the probable role of Arsenophonus in B. tabaci, that need to be explored further. PMID:25801610

  19. Salicylic acid is required for Mi-1-mediated resistance of tomato to whitefly Bemisia tabaci, but not for basal defense to this insect pest.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Álvarez, C I; López-Climent, M F; Gómez-Cadenas, A; Kaloshian, I; Nombela, G

    2015-10-01

    Plant defense to pests or pathogens involves global changes in gene expression mediated by multiple signaling pathways. A role for the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway in Mi-1-mediated resistance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to aphids was previously identified and its implication in the resistance to root-knot nematodes is controversial, but the importance of SA in basal and Mi-1-mediated resistance of tomato to whitefly Bemisia tabaci had not been determined. SA levels were measured before and after B. tabaci infestation in susceptible and resistant Mi-1-containing tomatoes, and in plants with the NahG bacterial transgene. Tomato plants of the same genotypes were also screened with B. tabaci (MEAM1 and MED species, before known as B and Q biotypes, respectively). The SA content in all tomato genotypes transiently increased after infestation with B. tabaci albeit at variable levels. Whitefly fecundity or infestation rates on susceptible Moneymaker were not significantly affected by the expression of NahG gene, but the Mi-1-mediated resistance to B. tabaci was lost in VFN NahG plants. Results indicated that whiteflies induce both SA and jasmonic acid accumulation in tomato. However, SA has no role in basal defense of tomato against B. tabaci. In contrast, SA is an important component of the Mi-1-mediated resistance to B. tabaci in tomato. PMID:26032615

  20. GLOBAL RELATIONSHIPS OF BEMISIA TABACI (HEMIPTERA: ALEYRODIDAE) REVEALED USING BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF MITOCHONDRIAL COI DNA SEQUENCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global phylogenetic relationships of the major races of B. tabaci remain unresolved thus a Bayesian phylogenetic technique was utilized to elucidate affinities. All COI DNA sequence data available in Genbank for B. tabaci world-wide (369 specimens) were obtained and the first well resolved phylogen...

  1. Aqueous extracts of some medicinal plants are as toxic as Imidacloprid to the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Ateyyat, Mazen A; Al-Mazra'awi, Mohammad; Abu-Rjai, Talal; Shatnawi, Mohamad A

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of nine plants, known to have medicinal activity, were tested for their toxicity against the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Genn. (Homoptera: Aleurodidae) compared to the toxicity of the insecticide, Imidacloprid. Extracts of Lepidiuim sativum L. (Brassicales: Brassicaceae) killed 71 % of early stage nymphs, which was not significantly different from mortality caused by Imidacloprid. Treatment of pupae with three plant extracts, L. sativum, Achillea biebersteinii L. (Asterales: Asteraceae), or Retama raetam (Forssk.) Webb and Berthel (Fabales: Fabaceae) prevented adult development, and treatment with R. raetam extract killed adults, at levels that were not significantly different from Imidacloprid. None of the other plants showed significant toxicity. However extracts of four plants, Pimpinella anisum L. (Apiales: Apiaceae), Galium longifolium (Sibth. and SM.) (Gentianales: Rubiaceae), R. raetam and Ballota undulata Bentham (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) had a repellent effect. PMID:19613450

  2. A Primary Screening and Applying of Plant Volatiles as Repellents to Control Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) on Tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wenxiao; Han, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yubo; Qin, Yuchuan

    2016-02-01

    With the goal of finding a new way to reduce population densities of Bemisia tabaci biotype Q in greenhouses, seven repellent volatile chemicals and their combinations were screened. The mixture of DLCO (D-limonene, citral and olive oil (63:7:30)) had a better cost performance(SC50 = 22.59 mg/ml)to repel whiteflies from settling than the other mixtures or single chemicals. In the greenhouse, in both the choice test and the no-choice tests, the number of adult whiteflies that settled on 1% DLCO-treated tomato plants was significantly lower than those settling on the control plants for the different exposure periods (P < 0.01). In the choice test, the egg amount on the treated tomato plants was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that on the control plants, but there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the number of eggs on treated and control plants in the no-choice test. Compared with the controls, 1% DLCO did not cause significantly statistic mortality rates (P > 0.05) out of different living stages of B. tabaci. The tests for evaluating the repellent efficacy, showed that a slow-releasing bottle containing the mixture had a period of efficacy of 29 days, and the application of this mixture plus a yellow board used as a push-pull strategy in the greenhouse was also effective.

  3. Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus by Bemisia tabaci as Affected by Whitefly Sex and Biotype

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Wenxi; Shi, Xiaobin; Liu, Baiming; Pan, Huipeng; Wei, Wanting; Zeng, Yang; Sun, Xinpei; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Cheng, Jiaxu; Peng, Zhengke; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci is a serious pest of vegetables and other crops worldwide. The most damaging and predominant B. tabaci biotypes are B and Q, and both are vectors of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Previous research has shown that Q outperforms B in many respects but comparative research is lacking on the ability of B and Q to transmit viruses. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that B and Q differ in their ability to transmit TYLCV and that this difference helps explain TYLCV outbreaks. We compared the acquisition, retention, and transmission of TYLCV by B and Q females and males. We found that Q females are more efficient than Q males, B females, and B males at TYLCV acquisition and transmission. Although TYLCV acquisition and transmission tended to be greater for B females than B males, the differences were not statistically significant. Based on electrical penetration graphs determination of phloem sap ingestion parameters, females fed better than males, and Q females fed better than Q males, B females, or B males. These results are consistent with the occurrences of TYLCV outbreaks in China, which have been associated with the spread of Q rather than B. PMID:26021483

  4. Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus by Bemisia tabaci as Affected by Whitefly Sex and Biotype.

    PubMed

    Ning, Wenxi; Shi, Xiaobin; Liu, Baiming; Pan, Huipeng; Wei, Wanting; Zeng, Yang; Sun, Xinpei; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Cheng, Jiaxu; Peng, Zhengke; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci is a serious pest of vegetables and other crops worldwide. The most damaging and predominant B. tabaci biotypes are B and Q, and both are vectors of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Previous research has shown that Q outperforms B in many respects but comparative research is lacking on the ability of B and Q to transmit viruses. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that B and Q differ in their ability to transmit TYLCV and that this difference helps explain TYLCV outbreaks. We compared the acquisition, retention, and transmission of TYLCV by B and Q females and males. We found that Q females are more efficient than Q males, B females, and B males at TYLCV acquisition and transmission. Although TYLCV acquisition and transmission tended to be greater for B females than B males, the differences were not statistically significant. Based on electrical penetration graphs determination of phloem sap ingestion parameters, females fed better than males, and Q females fed better than Q males, B females, or B males. These results are consistent with the occurrences of TYLCV outbreaks in China, which have been associated with the spread of Q rather than B. PMID:26021483

  5. A Primary Screening and Applying of Plant Volatiles as Repellents to Control Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) on Tomato.

    PubMed

    Du, Wenxiao; Han, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yubo; Qin, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of finding a new way to reduce population densities of Bemisia tabaci biotype Q in greenhouses, seven repellent volatile chemicals and their combinations were screened. The mixture of DLCO (D-limonene, citral and olive oil (63:7:30)) had a better cost performance(SC50 = 22.59 mg/ml)to repel whiteflies from settling than the other mixtures or single chemicals. In the greenhouse, in both the choice test and the no-choice tests, the number of adult whiteflies that settled on 1% DLCO-treated tomato plants was significantly lower than those settling on the control plants for the different exposure periods (P < 0.01). In the choice test, the egg amount on the treated tomato plants was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that on the control plants, but there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the number of eggs on treated and control plants in the no-choice test. Compared with the controls, 1% DLCO did not cause significantly statistic mortality rates (P > 0.05) out of different living stages of B. tabaci. The tests for evaluating the repellent efficacy, showed that a slow-releasing bottle containing the mixture had a period of efficacy of 29 days, and the application of this mixture plus a yellow board used as a push-pull strategy in the greenhouse was also effective. PMID:26907368

  6. A Primary Screening and Applying of Plant Volatiles as Repellents to Control Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) on Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenxiao; Han, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yubo; Qin, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of finding a new way to reduce population densities of Bemisia tabaci biotype Q in greenhouses, seven repellent volatile chemicals and their combinations were screened. The mixture of DLCO (D-limonene, citral and olive oil (63:7:30)) had a better cost performance(SC50 = 22.59 mg/ml)to repel whiteflies from settling than the other mixtures or single chemicals. In the greenhouse, in both the choice test and the no-choice tests, the number of adult whiteflies that settled on 1% DLCO-treated tomato plants was significantly lower than those settling on the control plants for the different exposure periods (P < 0.01). In the choice test, the egg amount on the treated tomato plants was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that on the control plants, but there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the number of eggs on treated and control plants in the no-choice test. Compared with the controls, 1% DLCO did not cause significantly statistic mortality rates (P > 0.05) out of different living stages of B. tabaci. The tests for evaluating the repellent efficacy, showed that a slow-releasing bottle containing the mixture had a period of efficacy of 29 days, and the application of this mixture plus a yellow board used as a push-pull strategy in the greenhouse was also effective. PMID:26907368

  7. Identification and characterization of two phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase genes from the Mediterranean species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex.

    PubMed

    Jiu, Min; Li, Jun-Min; Gao, Xian-Long; Wang, Lun-Ji; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidases (PHGPXs) are essential enzymes of the cellular antioxidant defense system during insect-plant interactions. However, little attention has been devoted to the functional characterization of PHGXPs in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two PHGPX genes, designated as BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 from the Mediterranean species of the B. tabaci complex. Sequence analysis indicated that the length of BtQ-PHGPX1 is of 942 bp with a 729 bp open-reading frame (ORF) encoding 242 amino acids, and BtQ-PHGPX2 is of 699 bp with a 567 bp ORF encoding 188 amino acids. Sequence alignment analysis showed that BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 shared high similarity with other known PHGPXs. The NVASXCGXT, FPCNQFXXQEPG, and IKWNFXKFLV surrounded the reactive cysteine, glutamine, and tryptophan residues, respectively. Recombinant BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis with whiteflies of different development stages showed that the mRNA levels of BtQ-PHGPX2 were significantly higher in larvae than in other stages. The mRNA levels of BtQ-PHGPX2 were significantly higher than BtQ-PHGPX1 during all the developmental stages. The mRNA levels of BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 in female adults were relatively higher than in male adults. The expression of BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 was induced by the insecticide imidacloprid. These results suggest that BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 may participate in detoxification of oxidative hazards in B. tabaci. PMID:25639712

  8. Tri-Tek (Petroleum Horticultural Oil) and Beauveria bassiana: Use in Eradication Strategies for Bemisia tabaci Mediterranean Species in UK Glasshouses.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Collins, Debbie A

    2015-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a pest of global importance on both outdoor and glasshouse crops. To date, B. tabaci has not become established in the UK. The UK holds Protected Zone status against this pest and, as a result, B. tabaci entering on plant material is subjected to a policy of eradication. Mediterranean species is now the most prevalent Bemisia species entering the UK. Increasing neonicotinoid resistance is becoming increasingly widespread and problematic with this species. As a result, this continues to pose problems for eradication strategies. The current study investigates the efficacy of Tri-Tek (a petroleum horticultural oil awaiting UK registration) and the fungus Beauveria bassiana to act as control agents against Mediterranean species in UK glasshouses. Tri-Tek provided 100% egg mortality compared to 74% for B. bassiana. When tested against second instar larvae, mortalities of 69% and 65% respectively were achieved. Both products can be successfully "tank-mixed". A tank-mix application provided 95.5% mortality of second instar larvae under glasshouse conditions. The potential integration of both products into current Bemisia eradication strategies in UK glasshouses is discussed. PMID:26463071

  9. Tri-Tek (Petroleum Horticultural Oil) and Beauveria bassiana: Use in Eradication Strategies for Bemisia tabaci Mediterranean Species in UK Glasshouses

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.; Collins, Debbie A.

    2015-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a pest of global importance on both outdoor and glasshouse crops. To date, B. tabaci has not become established in the UK. The UK holds Protected Zone status against this pest and, as a result, B. tabaci entering on plant material is subjected to a policy of eradication. Mediterranean species is now the most prevalent Bemisia species entering the UK. Increasing neonicotinoid resistance is becoming increasingly widespread and problematic with this species. As a result, this continues to pose problems for eradication strategies. The current study investigates the efficacy of Tri-Tek (a petroleum horticultural oil awaiting UK registration) and the fungus Beauveria bassiana to act as control agents against Mediterranean species in UK glasshouses. Tri-Tek provided 100% egg mortality compared to 74% for B. bassiana. When tested against second instar larvae, mortalities of 69% and 65% respectively were achieved. Both products can be successfully “tank-mixed”. A tank-mix application provided 95.5% mortality of second instar larvae under glasshouse conditions. The potential integration of both products into current Bemisia eradication strategies in UK glasshouses is discussed. PMID:26463071

  10. Use of honeydew production to determine reduction in feeding by Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) adults when exposed to cyantraniliprole and imidacloprid treatments.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Rachel; Lang, Edward B; Alvarez, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) whitefly populations produce economically important damage to crops by their direct feeding and also by transmitting plant viruses. Although there are several methods to reduce B. tabaci damage, most growers rely on the use of insecticides to decrease populations of this pest. Insecticides that reduce feeding of whitefly adults may also reduce the transmission of viruses that are harmful to crop plants. However, demonstrating the feeding reduction has proved challenging. In this study, water-sensitive paper was used to determine whitefly adult feeding, indirectly through honeydew production, when insects were placed on insecticide-treated and untreated plants. Plant treatments with two formulations of cyantraniliprole (Cyazypyr) showed a reduction in the amount of honeydew produced by B. tabaci adults equivalent to imidacloprid. The reduction in the amount of honeydew produced indicates reduced insect feeding and the possibility for a reduction in virus transmission. Plant treatments with two formulations of cyantraniliprole also resulted in higher mortality than imidacloprid. PMID:24772533

  11. Age-specific interaction between the parasitoid, Encarsia formosa and its host, the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Strain B)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing S.; Gelman, Dale B.; Blackburn, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of hostage, the instar of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) parasitized, on the growth and development of Encarsia formosa (Gahan) was studied. E. formosa was able to parasitize and complete its life cycle no matter which instar of B. tabaci (Strain B), [also identified as B. argentifolii (Bellows and Perring)], was provided for oviposition, but parasitoid development was significantly slower when 1st or 2nd instar B. tabaci rather than 3rd or 4th instars were parasitized. Host age influenced the day on which E. formosa nymphs hatching from eggs was first observed. Mean embryonic development was significantly longer when 1st (5.4 days) rather than 2nd, 3rd or 4th instars (4.1, 3.4 and 3.5 days, respectively) were parasitized. The duration of the 1st instar parasitoid and the pupa, but not the 2nd or 3rd instar parasitoid, were also significantly greater when 1st instars were parasitized than when older host instars were parasitized. Interestingly, no matter which instar was parasitized, the parasitoid did not molt to the 3rd instar until the 4th instar host had reached a depth of about 0.23 mm (Stage 4–5) and had initiated the nymphal-adult molt and adult development. Histological studies revealed that whitefly eye and wing structures had either disintegrated or were adult in nature whenever a 3rd instar parasitoid was present. It appears, then, that the molt of the parasitoid to its last instar is associated with the host whitefly's nymphal-adult molt. However, the initiation of the host's final molt, while a prerequisite for the parasitoid's 2nd–3rd instar molt, did not necessarily trigger this molt. In contrast to its significant effect on various aspects of parasitoid development, host instar did not significantly influence the mean size of the parasitoid larva, pupa, or adult. Larval and pupal length and adult head width were similar for all parasitoids, regardless of which host instar was parasitized as was adult longevity. Adult parasitoid emergence

  12. Use of fluorescence, a novel technique to determine reduction in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) nymph feeding when exposed to Benevia and other insecticides.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Rachel; Lang, Edward B; Annan, I Billy; Portillo, Hector E; Alvarez, Juan M

    2013-04-01

    The sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is an economically important pest in the United States and other countries. Growers in many places rely on the use of insecticides to reduce populations of B. tabaci. However, insecticides may take a few days to cause B. tabaci mortality and some do not reduce feeding before death. Earlier reduction of feeding of whiteflies would decrease the physiological effects on plants, reduce the production of sooty mold and potentially reduce the transmission of viruses. Measuring the reduction in feeding after the exposure of B. tabaci to an insecticide has proven difficult. This series of laboratory experiments demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence in determining B. tabaci feeding cessation. Fluorescein sodium salt is systemically transported in the xylem from the roots to the plant leaves and absorbed by B. tabaci nymphs feeding on these plants. Nymphs start fluorescing shortly after the cotton plant root system is submerged in the fluorescein sodium salt. Using this novel technique, the effect of three insecticides with different modes of action, cyantraniliprole, imidacloprid, and spirotetramat on B. tabaci was evaluated and compared to determine reduction in feeding. Results indicate that B. tabaci nymphs feeding on a plant treated with Benevia have a significant reduction of feeding when compared with nymphs feeding on plants treated with imidacloprid or spirotetramat. Both Benevia and spirotetramat caused significant nymphal mortality by 48 h after exposure. This novel technique will be useful to demonstrate the feeding cessation or reduction in feeding produced by different insecticides in several sucking insect groups. PMID:23786044

  13. Detection of Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus from Bemisia tabaci captured on sticky traps using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) and simple template preparation.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuru; Okuda, Shiori; Iwai, Hisashi

    2015-09-01

    Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus (CCYV) of the genus Crinivirus within the family Closteroviridae is an emerging infectious agent of cucurbits leading to severe disease and significant economic losses. Effective detection and identification methods for this virus are urgently required. In this study, a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed to detect CCYV from its vector Bemisia tabaci. LAMP primer sets to detect CCYV were evaluated for their sensitivity and specificity, and a primer set designed from the HSP70h gene with corresponding loop primers were selected. The RT-LAMP assay was applied to detect CCYV from viruliferous B. tabaci trapped on sticky traps. A simple extraction procedure using RNAsecure™ was developed for template preparation. CCYV was detected in all of the B. tabaci 0, 1, 7 and 14 days after they were trapped. Although the rise of turbidity was delayed in reactions using RNA from B. tabaci trapped for 7 and 14 days compared with those from 0 and 1 day, the DNA amplification was sufficient to detect CCYV in all of the samples. These findings therefore present a simple template preparation method and an effective RT-LAMP assay, which can be easily and rapidly performed to monitor CCYV-viruliferous B. tabaci in the field. PMID:25912723

  14. The suitability of biotypes Q and B of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) at different nymphal instars as hosts for Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Youjun; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli

    2016-01-01

    Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) is a solitary endoparasitoid that is commercially reared and released for augmentative biological control of whiteflies infesting greenhouse crops. In most areas in China, the invasive and destructive whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotype Q has replaced B. tabaci biotype B and has become dominant between the two. A better understanding of the suitability of different nymphal instars of B. tabaci biotypes Q and B as hosts for E. formosa is needed to improve the use of this parasitoid for biological control. Parasitism of the four nymphal instars of B. tabaci biotypes Q and B by the commercial strain of E. formosa mass reared on Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) was assessed in the laboratory. The results indicated that E. formosa parasitized and successfully developed on all instars of both biotypes but performed best on the 3rd instar of B. tabaci biotype B and on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th instars of B. tabaci biotype Q. The host-feeding rate of the adult parasitoid was generally higher on nymphal instars of B. tabaci biotype Q than on the corresponding nymphal instars of biotype B and was significantly higher on the 2nd and 3rd instars. For both whitefly biotypes, the parasitoid's immature developmental period was the longest on the 1st instar, intermediate on the 2nd and 3rd instars, and the shortest on the 4th instar. The parasitoid emergence rate was significantly lower on the 1st instar than on the other three instars and did not significantly differ between B. tabaci biotype B and biotype Q. Offspring longevity was greater on the 3rd and 4th instars than on the 1st instar and did not significantly differ between the two B. tabaci biotypes. The results indicate that commercially-produced E. formosa can parasitize all instars of B. tabaci biotypes B and Q, making this parasitoid a promising tool for the management of the two biotypes of B. tabaci present in

  15. The suitability of biotypes Q and B of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) at different nymphal instars as hosts for Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Youjun; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun

    2016-01-01

    Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) is a solitary endoparasitoid that is commercially reared and released for augmentative biological control of whiteflies infesting greenhouse crops. In most areas in China, the invasive and destructive whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) biotype Q has replaced B. tabaci biotype B and has become dominant between the two. A better understanding of the suitability of different nymphal instars of B. tabaci biotypes Q and B as hosts for E. formosa is needed to improve the use of this parasitoid for biological control. Parasitism of the four nymphal instars of B. tabaci biotypes Q and B by the commercial strain of E. formosa mass reared on Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) was assessed in the laboratory. The results indicated that E. formosa parasitized and successfully developed on all instars of both biotypes but performed best on the 3rd instar of B. tabaci biotype B and on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th instars of B. tabaci biotype Q. The host-feeding rate of the adult parasitoid was generally higher on nymphal instars of B. tabaci biotype Q than on the corresponding nymphal instars of biotype B and was significantly higher on the 2nd and 3rd instars. For both whitefly biotypes, the parasitoid’s immature developmental period was the longest on the 1st instar, intermediate on the 2nd and 3rd instars, and the shortest on the 4th instar. The parasitoid emergence rate was significantly lower on the 1st instar than on the other three instars and did not significantly differ between B. tabaci biotype B and biotype Q. Offspring longevity was greater on the 3rd and 4th instars than on the 1st instar and did not significantly differ between the two B. tabaci biotypes. The results indicate that commercially-produced E. formosa can parasitize all instars of B. tabaci biotypes B and Q, making this parasitoid a promising tool for the management of the two biotypes of B. tabaci present

  16. Tomato Pathogenesis-related Protein Genes are Expressed in Response to Trialeurodes vaporariorum and Bemisia tabaci Biotype B Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Puthoff, David P.; Holzer, Frances M.; Perring, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    The temporal and spatial expression of tomato wound- and defense-response genes to Bemisia tabaci biotype B (the silverleaf whitefly) and Trialeurodes vaporariorum (the greenhouse whitefly) feeding were characterized. Both species of whiteflies evoked similar changes in tomato gene expression. The levels of RNAs for the methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA)- or ethylene-regulated genes that encode the basic β-1,3-glucanase (GluB), basic chitinase (Chi9), and Pathogenesis-related protein-1 (PR-1) were monitored. GluB and Chi9 RNAs were abundant in infested leaves from the time nymphs initiated feeding (day 5). In addition, GluB RNAs accumulated in apical non-infested leaves. PR-1 RNAs also accumulated after whitefly feeding. In contrast, the ethylene- and salicylic acid (SA)-regulated Chi3 and PR-4 genes had RNAs that accumulated at low levels and GluAC RNAs that were undetectable in whitefly-infested tomato leaves. The changes in Phenylalanine ammonia lyase5 (PAL5) were variable; in some, but not all infestations, PAL5 RNAs increased in response to whitefly feeding. PAL5 RNA levels increased in response to MeJA, ethylene, and abscisic acid, and declined in response to SA. Transcripts from the wound-response genes, leucine aminopeptidase (LapA1) and proteinase inhibitor 2 (pin2), were not detected following whitefly feeding. Furthermore, whitefly infestation of transgenic LapA1:GUS tomato plants showed that whitefly feeding did not activate the LapA1 promoter, although crushing of the leaf lamina increased GUS activity up to 40 fold. These studies indicate that tomato plants perceive B. tabaci and T. vaporariorum in a manner similar to baterical pathogens and distinct from tissue-damaging insects. PMID:20927641

  17. Multiple Forms of Vector Manipulation by a Plant-Infecting Virus: Bemisia tabaci and Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baiming; Preisser, Evan L.; Chu, Dong; Pan, Huipeng; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun

    2013-01-01

    For many insect-vectored plant viruses, the relationship between feeding behavior and vector competence may prove integral to an understanding of the epidemiology of the resulting plant disease. While plant-infecting viruses are well known to change host plant physiology in a way that makes them more attractive to vectors, viral manipulation of the vectors themselves has only recently been reported. Previous research suggested that the rapid spread of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) throughout China has been facilitated by its primary vector, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. We conducted two experiments testing the impact of TYLCV infection of the host plant (tomato) and vector (B. tabaci biotypes B and Q) on whitefly feeding behavior. Whiteflies of biotypes B and Q both appeared to find TYLCV-infected plants more attractive, probing them more quickly and having a greater number of feeding bouts; this did not, however, alter the total time spent feeding. Viruliferous whiteflies fed more readily than uninfected whiteflies and spent more time salivating into sieve tube elements. Because vector salivation is essential for viral transmission, this virally mediated alteration of behavior should provide TYLCV a direct fitness benefit. This is the first report of such manipulation by a nonpropagative virus that belongs to an exclusively plant-infecting family of viruses (Geminiviridae). In the context of previous research showing that feeding on TYLCV-infected plants harms biotype B but helps biotype Q, the fact that both biotypes were equally affected by TYLCV also suggests that the virus may alter the biotype B-biotype Q competitive interaction in favor of biotype Q. PMID:23408638

  18. Multiple forms of vector manipulation by a plant-infecting virus: Bemisia tabaci and tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baiming; Preisser, Evan L; Chu, Dong; Pan, Huipeng; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-05-01

    For many insect-vectored plant viruses, the relationship between feeding behavior and vector competence may prove integral to an understanding of the epidemiology of the resulting plant disease. While plant-infecting viruses are well known to change host plant physiology in a way that makes them more attractive to vectors, viral manipulation of the vectors themselves has only recently been reported. Previous research suggested that the rapid spread of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) throughout China has been facilitated by its primary vector, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. We conducted two experiments testing the impact of TYLCV infection of the host plant (tomato) and vector (B. tabaci biotypes B and Q) on whitefly feeding behavior. Whiteflies of biotypes B and Q both appeared to find TYLCV-infected plants more attractive, probing them more quickly and having a greater number of feeding bouts; this did not, however, alter the total time spent feeding. Viruliferous whiteflies fed more readily than uninfected whiteflies and spent more time salivating into sieve tube elements. Because vector salivation is essential for viral transmission, this virally mediated alteration of behavior should provide TYLCV a direct fitness benefit. This is the first report of such manipulation by a nonpropagative virus that belongs to an exclusively plant-infecting family of viruses (Geminiviridae). In the context of previous research showing that feeding on TYLCV-infected plants harms biotype B but helps biotype Q, the fact that both biotypes were equally affected by TYLCV also suggests that the virus may alter the biotype B-biotype Q competitive interaction in favor of biotype Q. PMID:23408638

  19. Potential of entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria fumosorosea to protect potted ornamental plants against Bemisia tabaci during shipping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosoroesa has been evaluated under abiotic conditions similar to those typical for shipping of ornamental plants. When applied to a synchronized population of B. tabaci L4 nymphs on poinsettias, I. fumosorosea induced mortality even in regime of low t...

  20. Effects of Host Sex, Plant Species, and Putative Host Species on the Prevalence of Wolbachia in Natural Populations of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae): A Modified Nested PCR Study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Han-Le; Qi, Lan-Da; Hong, Xiao-Yue; Xie, Hong-Fang; Li, Yuan-Xi

    2015-02-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a globally distributed pest. One of the key endosymbionts in B. tabaci is Wolbachia, an α-proteobacterium implicated in many important biological processes. Previous studies indicated that the infection frequency of Wolbachia in Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED) varied greatly among populations in different areas. However, little is known about the factors that influence the prevalence of Wolbachia in B. tabaci. In this paper, 25 field populations were collected from different locations in China, and 1,161 individuals were screened for the presence of Wolbachia using a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method, which targets the wsp gene, to confirm Wolbachia infection status. The prevalence of Wolbachia ranged from 1.54 to 66.67% within the 25 field populations, and the infection frequency of Wolbachia was affected significantly by the putative species of B. tabaci. The infection frequency (51.55%) of Wolbachia was significantly greater in native species than in the MED (25.65%) and MEAM1 (14.37%). With the exception of host plant, all factors, including putative species, geographic location, and the sex of the host, affected the Wolbachia infection frequency in whiteflies. Six Wolbachia strains were found and clustered into four distinct clades upon phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore, Wolbachia in B. tabaci have close relationships with those from other host species, including Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), Sogatella furcifera (Horvath), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), and Culex pipiens L. The results demonstrated the variation and diversity of Wolbachia in B. tabaci field populations, and that the application of nested PCR extended our knowledge of Wolbachia infection in B. tabaci, especially in invasive whiteflies. PMID:26470122

  1. Rapid genetic turnover in populations of the insect pest Bemisia tabaci Middle East: Asia Minor 1 in an agricultural landscape.

    PubMed

    Dinsdale, A; Schellhorn, N A; De Barro, P; Buckley, Y M; Riginos, C

    2012-10-01

    Organisms differ greatly in dispersal ability, and landscapes differ in amenability to an organism's movement. Thus, landscape structure and heterogeneity can affect genetic composition of populations. While many agricultural pests are known for their ability to disperse rapidly, it is unclear how fast and over what spatial scale insect pests might respond to the temporally dynamic agricultural landscapes they inhabit. We used population genetic analyses of a severe crop pest, a member of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Aleyrodoidea: Aleyrodidea) cryptic species complex known as Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (commonly known as biotype B), to estimate spatial and temporal genetic diversity over four months of the 2006-2007 summer growing season. We examined 559 individuals from eight sites, which were scored for eight microsatellite loci. Temporal genetic structure greatly exceeded spatial structure. There was significant temporal change in local genetic composition from the beginning to the end of the season accompanied by heterozygote deficits and inbreeding. This temporal structure suggests entire cohorts of pests can occupy a large and variable agricultural landscape but are rapidly replaced. These rapid genetic fluctuations reinforce the concept that agricultural landscapes are dynamic mosaics in time and space and may contribute to better decisions for pest and insecticide resistance management. PMID:22420748

  2. Comparison of transmission of Papaya leaf curl China virus among four cryptic species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tao; Guo, Qi; Cui, Xi-Yun; Liu, Yin-Quan; Hu, Jian; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Begomoviruses are transmitted by cryptic species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex, often in a species-specific manner. Papaya leaf curl China virus (PaLCuCNV) has been recorded to infect several crops including papaya, tomato and tobacco in China. To help assess the risks of spread of this virus, we compared the acquisition, retention and transmission of PaLCuCNV among four species of whiteflies, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1), Mediterranean (MED), Asia 1 and Asia II 7. All four species of whiteflies are able to acquire, retain and transmit the virus, but with different levels of efficiency. Transmission tests using tomato as the host plant showed that MEAM1 transmitted PaLCuCNV with substantially higher efficiency than did MED, Asia 1 and Asia II 7. Furthermore, accumulation of PaLCuCNV in the whiteflies was positively associated with its efficiency of transmitting the virus. Altogether, these findings indicate that MEAM1 is the most efficient vector for PaLCuCNV in the four species of whiteflies, and suggest that risks of PaLCuCNV pandemics are high in regions where MEAM1 occurs. PMID:26486606

  3. New Insecticides for Management of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl, a Virus Vectored by the Silverleaf Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H. A.; Giurcanu, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Greenhouse studies using a randomized complete block design were carried out to evaluate the effect of six insecticides on transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum (Miller) (Solanales: Solanaceae), seedlings that were inoculated with whiteflies from a TYLCV colony in cages 3, 7, or 14 d after treatment with insecticide. The purpose was to reveal differences in residual efficacy of four materials that are nearing registration for use on tomato—cyazypyr, flupyradifurone, pyrafluquinazon, and sulfoxaflor—and to compare them with two established insecticides, pymetrozine and a zeta-cypermethrin/bifenthrin combination. Differences in efficacy were expected because these six materials represent five distinct modes of action and both contact and systemic materials. Percentage of tomato seedlings expressing virus symptoms tended to be lowest in seedlings treated with flupyradifurone. The zeta-cypermethrin/bifenthrin insecticide demonstrated comparable efficacy to flupyradifurone in some trials at 3 and 7 d after treatment inoculations, but not the 14 d after treatment inoculation. Pyrafluquinazon was not statistically different from cyazypyr or sulfoxaflor in percentage of plants with virus symptoms in any trial. Percentage virus in the cyazypyr and sulfoxaflor treatments was not statistically different in the 3 and 7 d after treatment inoculations. Among seedlings treated with insecticide, percentage with virus symptoms tended to be highest in the seedlings treated with pymetrozine. PMID:25368089

  4. The Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Knottin-1 Gene Is Implicated in Regulating the Quantity of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Ingested and Transmitted by the Insect.

    PubMed

    Hariton Shalev, Aliza; Sobol, Iris; Ghanim, Murad; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Czosnek, Henryk

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a major pest to agricultural crops. It transmits begomoviruses, such as Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), in a circular, persistent fashion. Transcriptome analyses revealed that B. tabaci knottin genes were responsive to various stresses. Upon ingestion of tomato begomoviruses, two of the four knottin genes were upregulated, knot-1 (with the highest expression) and knot-3. In this study, we examined the involvement of B. tabaci knottin genes in relation to TYLCV circulative transmission. Knottins were silenced by feeding whiteflies with knottin dsRNA via detached tomato leaves. Large amounts of knot-1 transcripts were present in the abdomen of whiteflies, an obligatory transit site of begomoviruses in their circulative transmission pathway; knot-1 silencing significantly depleted the abdomen from knot-1 transcripts. Knot-1 silencing led to an increase in the amounts of TYLCV ingested by the insects and transmitted to tomato test plants by several orders of magnitude. This effect was not observed following knot-3 silencing. Hence, knot-1 plays a role in restricting the quantity of virions an insect may acquire and transmit. We suggest that knot-1 protects B. tabaci against deleterious effects caused by TYLCV by limiting the amount of virus associated with the whitefly vector. PMID:27455309

  5. The Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Knottin-1 Gene Is Implicated in Regulating the Quantity of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Ingested and Transmitted by the Insect

    PubMed Central

    Hariton Shalev, Aliza; Sobol, Iris; Ghanim, Murad; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Czosnek, Henryk

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a major pest to agricultural crops. It transmits begomoviruses, such as Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), in a circular, persistent fashion. Transcriptome analyses revealed that B. tabaci knottin genes were responsive to various stresses. Upon ingestion of tomato begomoviruses, two of the four knottin genes were upregulated, knot-1 (with the highest expression) and knot-3. In this study, we examined the involvement of B. tabaci knottin genes in relation to TYLCV circulative transmission. Knottins were silenced by feeding whiteflies with knottin dsRNA via detached tomato leaves. Large amounts of knot-1 transcripts were present in the abdomen of whiteflies, an obligatory transit site of begomoviruses in their circulative transmission pathway; knot-1 silencing significantly depleted the abdomen from knot-1 transcripts. Knot-1 silencing led to an increase in the amounts of TYLCV ingested by the insects and transmitted to tomato test plants by several orders of magnitude. This effect was not observed following knot-3 silencing. Hence, knot-1 plays a role in restricting the quantity of virions an insect may acquire and transmit. We suggest that knot-1 protects B. tabaci against deleterious effects caused by TYLCV by limiting the amount of virus associated with the whitefly vector. PMID:27455309

  6. Investigation of the genetic diversity of an invasive whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in China using both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Chu, D; Gao, C S; De Barro, P; Wan, F H; Zhang, Y J

    2011-08-01

    It is often considered that reduced genetic variation due to bottlenecks and founder effects limits the capacity for species to establish in new environments and subsequently spread. The recent invasion (during the past five years) of an alien whitefly, one member of Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex, referred to as Mediterranean (herein referred to as Q-type) in Shandong Province, China, provides an ideal opportunity to study the changes in genetic variation between its home range in the Mediterranean region and its invasion range. Using both the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) and nuclear (microsatellite) DNA, we show that Q in Shandong likely originated in the western Mediterranean. We also found that the haplotype diversity was low compared with its presumed geographic origin, whereas microsatellite allele diversity showed no such decline. A key factor in invasions is the establishment of females and so bottleneck and founder events can lead to a very rapid and considerable loss of mitochondrial diversity. The lack of haplotype diversity in Shandong supports the interpretation that, at one or more points between the western Mediterranean and China, the invading Q lost haplotype diversity, most probably through the serial process of establishment and redistribution through trade in ornamental plants. However, the loss in haplotype diversity does not necessarily mean that nuclear allelic diversity should also decline. Provided females can mate freely with whichever males are available, allelic diversity can be maintained or even increased relative to the origin of the invader. Our findings may offer some explanation to the apparent paradox between the concept of reduced genetic variation limiting adaptation to new environments and the observed low diversity in successful invaders. PMID:21320364

  7. Temporal changes of symbiont density and host fitness after rifampicin treatment in a whitefly of the Bemisia tabaci species complex.

    PubMed

    Shan, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Chang-Rong; Yan, Ting-Ting; Tang, Hai-Qin; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Liu, Yin-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Microbial symbionts are essential or important partners to phloem-feeding insects. Antibiotics have been used to selectively eliminate symbionts from their host insects and establish host lines with or without certain symbionts for investigating functions of the symbionts. In this study, using the antibiotic rifampicin we attempted to selectively eliminate certain symbionts from a population of the Middle East-Asia Minor 1 whitefly of the Bemisia tabaci species complex, which harbors the primary symbiont "Candidatus Portiera aleyrodidarum" and two secondary symbionts "Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa" and Rickettsia. Neither the primary nor the secondary symbionts were completely depleted in the adults (F0) that fed for 48 h on a diet treated with rifampicin at concentrations of 1-100 μg/mL. However, both the primary and secondary symbionts were nearly completely depleted in the offspring (F1) of the rifampicin-treated adults. Although the F1 adults produced some eggs (F2), most of the eggs failed to hatch and none of them reached the second instar, and consequently the rifampicin-treated whitefly colony vanished at the F2 generation. Interestingly, quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays showed that in the rifampicin-treated whiteflies, the density of the primary symbiont was reduced at an obviously slower pace than the secondary symbionts. Mating experiments between rifampicin-treated and untreated adults demonstrated that the negative effects of rifampicin on host fitness were expressed when the females were treated by the antibiotic, and whether males were treated or not by the antibiotic had little contribution to the negative effects. These observations indicate that with this whitefly population it is not feasible to selectively eliminate the secondary symbionts using rifampicin without affecting the primary symbiont and establish host lines for experimental studies. However, the extinction of the whitefly colony at the second generation after

  8. Genetic diversity and geographic distribution of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) genotypes associated with cassava in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mugerwa, Habibu; Rey, Marie E C; Alicai, Titus; Ateka, Elijah; Atuncha, Hellen; Ndunguru, Joseph; Sseruwagi, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The genetic variability of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) species, the vectors of cassava mosaic begomoviruses (CMBs) in cassava growing areas of Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, was investigated through comparison of partial sequences of the mitochondria cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) DNA in 2010/11. Two distinct species were obtained including sub-Saharan Africa 1 (SSA1), comprising of two sub-clades (I and II), and a South West Indian Ocean Islands (SWIO) species. Among the SSA1, sub-clade I sequences shared a similarity of 97.8–99.7% with the published Uganda 1 genotypes, and diverged by 0.3–2.2%. A pairwise comparison of SSA1 sub-clade II sequences revealed a similarity of 97.2–99.5% with reference southern Africa genotypes, and diverged by 0.5–2.8%. The SSA1 sub-clade I whiteflies were widely distributed in East Africa (EA). In comparison, the SSA1 sub-clade II whiteflies were detected for the first time in the EA region, and occurred predominantly in the coast regions of Kenya, southern and coast Tanzania. They occurred in low abundance in the Lake Victoria Basin of Tanzania and were widespread in all four regions in Uganda. The SWIO species had a sequence similarity of 97.2–97.7% with the published Reunion sequence and diverged by 2.3–2.8%. The SWIO whiteflies occurred in coast Kenya only. The sub-Saharan Africa 2 whitefly species (Ug2) that was associated with the severe CMD pandemic in Uganda was not detected in our study. PMID:23170210

  9. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications. PMID:24753494

  10. A novel Wolbachia strain from the rice moth Corcyra cephalonica induces reproductive incompatibility in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci: sequence typing combined with phenotypic evidence.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong-Yan; Li, Zheng-Xi

    2015-06-01

    Wolbachia are a group of maternally inherited bacteria frequently found in arthropods and filarial nematodes. They have recently attracted attention for their ecological roles in manipulating host reproduction, their potential use in biological control of pest insects and medical significance. Classification of Wolbachia strains is currently solely based on molecular methods. However, the strains even with identical sequence types may induce different host phenotypes. Here we isolated a Wolbachia strain from the rice moth Corcyra cephalonica (designated as wCcep_B_BJ), which was shown to share multilocus sequence typing and Wolbachia surface protein hypervariable region profiles with a cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI)-inducing strain in supergroup B, but the phenotype wCcep_B_BJ may induce needs to be determined. We thus transinfected it into the whitefly Bemisia tabaci harbouring an A-Wolbachia through nymphal microinjection. Fluorescent in situ hybridization demonstrated that wCcep_B_BJ was successfully transinfected into B. tabaci and transmitted to offspring through host eggs. Reciprocal cross showed that wCcep_B_BJ induced a strong bidirectional CI in the transinfected host without imposing a significant cost on female fecundity. Our results suggest that wCcep_B_BJ may be a promising strain for biocontrol of B. tabaci, an important agricultural pest insect. PMID:25683566

  11. Infection of Bacterial Endosymbionts in Insects: A Comparative Study of Two Techniques viz PCR and FISH for Detection and Localization of Symbionts in Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Harpreet Singh; Singh, Ambika; Popli, Sonam; Pandey, Neeti; Rajagopal, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts have been associated with arthropods and large number of the insect species show interaction with such bacteria. Different approaches have been used to understand such symbiont- host interactions. The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, a highly invasive agricultural pest, harbors as many as seven different bacterial endosymbionts. These bacterial endosymbionts are known to provide various nutritional, physiological, environmental and evolutionary benefits to its insect host. In this study, we have tried to compare two techniques, Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Flourescence in situ Hybridisation (FISH) commonly used for identification and localization of bacterial endosymbionts in B. tabaci as it harbors one of the highest numbers of endosymbionts which have helped it in becoming a successful global invasive agricultural pest. The amplified PCR products were observed as bands on agarose gel by electrophoresis while the FISH samples were mounted on slides and observed under confocal microscope. Analysis of results obtained by these two techniques revealed the advantages of FISH over PCR. On a short note, performing FISH, using LNA probes proved to be more sensitive and informative for identification as well as localization of bacterial endosymbionts in B. tabaci than relying on PCR. This study would help in designing more efficient experiments based on much reliable detection procedure and studying the role of endosymbionts in insects. PMID:26287997

  12. Invasive mechanism and management strategy of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B: progress report of 973 Program on invasive alien species in China.

    PubMed

    Wan, FangHao; Zhang, GuiFen; Liu, ShuSheng; Luo, Chen; Chu, Dong; Zhang, YouJun; Zang, LianSheng; Jiu, Min; Lü, ZhiChuang; Cui, XuHong; Zhang, LiPing; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, QingWen; Liu, WanXue; Liang, Pei; Lei, ZhongRen; Zhang, YongJun

    2009-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B, called a "superbug", is one of the most harmful biotypes of this species complex worldwide. In this report, the invasive mechanism and management of B. tabaci biotype B, based on our 5-year studies, are presented. Six B. tabaci biotypes, B, Q, ZHJ1, ZHJ2, ZHJ3 and FJ1, have been identified in China. Biotype B dominates the other biotypes in many regions of the country. Genetic diversity in biotype B might be induced by host plant, geographical conditions, and/or insecticidal application. The activities of CarE (carboxylesterase) and GSTs (glutathione-S-transferase) in biotype B reared on cucumber and squash were greater than on other host plants, which might have increased its resistance to insecticides. The higher activities of detoxification enzymes in biotype B might be induced by the secondary metabolites in host plants. Higher adaptive ability of biotype B adults to adverse conditions might be linked to the expression of heat shock protein genes. The indigenous B. tabaci biotypes were displaced by the biotype B within 225 d. The asymmetric mating interactions and mutualism between biotype B and begomoviruses via its host plants speed up widespread invasion and displacement of other biotypes. B. tabaci biotype B displaced Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) after 4-7 generations under glasshouse conditions. Greater adaptive ability of the biotype B to adverse conditions and its rapid population increase might be the reasons of its successful displacement of T. vaporariorum. Greater ability of the biotype B to switch to different host plants may enrich its host plants, which might enable it to better compete with T. vaporariorum. Native predatory natural enemies possess greater ability to suppress B. tabaci under field conditions. The kairomones in the 3rd and 4th instars of biotype B may provide an important stimulus in host searching and location by its parasitoids. The present results provide useful information in

  13. Leaf Morphological Characters Can Be a Factor for Intra-Varietal Preference of Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) among Eggplant Varieties.

    PubMed

    Hasanuzzaman, Abu Tayeb Mohammad; Islam, Md Nazrul; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Chen-Yang; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) MEAM1, is considered a serious pest of horticultural and many other crops. While eggplant (Solanum melongena) is one of the most favored host plants, the whiteflies exhibit preferences among different varieties. We hypothesized that certain morphological leaf characteristics of different varieties, like leaf trichome density, trichome length, leaf lamina thickness and leaf color, may affect whitefly landing, feeding and oviposition. In this study, we investigated the variation in leaf morphological characters among selected eggplant varieties and evaluated the effect of these leaf characteristics in rendering eggplant varieties either susceptible or resistant to B. tabaci. We evaluated eight eggplant varieties in choice feeding tests, and we found that the varieties JinSheng Zilongchangqie (JSZ) and H149 were the highly preferred varieties with the highest numbers of whitefly adults and eggs. Significantly lower numbers of whitefly adult eggs were found on the resistant variety Tuo Lu Bamu (TLB). The varieties JinGuangbo Luqie (JGL), JinGuangbo Ziquanqie (JGZ), DaYang Ziguanqie (DYZ), QinXing Ziguanqie (QXZ), and QinXing Niuxinqie (QXN) were moderately favored by B. tabaci. Leaf trichome density, trichome length and leaf lamina thickness were positively correlated with numbers of whitefly adults and eggs. B. tabaci was less attracted to the leaves that reflect long and middle wavelength light (higher R and G values) than to the bright green leaves (medium G value), but the short wavelength light (higher B value) had no significant effect on whitefly preference. The degree of hue had a positive effect, and saturation and brightness had a negative effect on whitefly attraction. PMID:27081849

  14. Leaf Morphological Characters Can Be a Factor for Intra-Varietal Preference of Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) among Eggplant Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Chen-Yang; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) MEAM1, is considered a serious pest of horticultural and many other crops. While eggplant (Solanum melongena) is one of the most favored host plants, the whiteflies exhibit preferences among different varieties. We hypothesized that certain morphological leaf characteristics of different varieties, like leaf trichome density, trichome length, leaf lamina thickness and leaf color, may affect whitefly landing, feeding and oviposition. In this study, we investigated the variation in leaf morphological characters among selected eggplant varieties and evaluated the effect of these leaf characteristics in rendering eggplant varieties either susceptible or resistant to B. tabaci. We evaluated eight eggplant varieties in choice feeding tests, and we found that the varieties JinSheng Zilongchangqie (JSZ) and H149 were the highly preferred varieties with the highest numbers of whitefly adults and eggs. Significantly lower numbers of whitefly adult eggs were found on the resistant variety Tuo Lu Bamu (TLB). The varieties JinGuangbo Luqie (JGL), JinGuangbo Ziquanqie (JGZ), DaYang Ziguanqie (DYZ), QinXing Ziguanqie (QXZ), and QinXing Niuxinqie (QXN) were moderately favored by B. tabaci. Leaf trichome density, trichome length and leaf lamina thickness were positively correlated with numbers of whitefly adults and eggs. B. tabaci was less attracted to the leaves that reflect long and middle wavelength light (higher R and G values) than to the bright green leaves (medium G value), but the short wavelength light (higher B value) had no significant effect on whitefly preference. The degree of hue had a positive effect, and saturation and brightness had a negative effect on whitefly attraction. PMID:27081849

  15. Evaluation of Interspecific Interaction Between Encarsia lutea and Eretomocerus near mundus, the Parasitoids of Cotton Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) with Host Plants Density Levels and Preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad Ullah, Muhammad; Abbasi, Khalida Hamid; Bano, Saadia; Khanum, Saeeda

    `Studies were carried out at CABI Biosciences Pakistan Centre, Rawalpindi to evaluate the effects of host plants and insects with host density levels and preference by both these species, i.e., Encarsia lutea and Eretomocerus separately as well as together in competitive situation. Preference of density levels by both parasitoids species showed that density level 20 (cotton leaf disc with 20 Bemisia tabaci nymphs and pupae) was contributed more (42%) preference than other density levels (5, 10, 40, 60 and 80). Different density levels had highly significant effect on settlement time of both species separately while in competitive situation the settlement time of both species was not significantly different from each other on different treatments.

  16. Extensive settlement of the invasive MEAM1 population of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in the Caribbean and rare detection of indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Y; Granier, M; Caruth, C; Umaharan, P; Marchal, C; Pavis, C; Wicker, E; Martínez, Y; Peterschmitt, M

    2011-10-01

    Bemisia tabaci populations belonging to Middle East-Asia Minor one (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED) groups (formerly biotype B and Q, respectively) have spread throughout the world. Although the introduction of MEAM1 is documented from several Caribbean islands, it is generally not known whether MED has also been introduced; whether indigenous populations have survived; and if in the affirmative, to which group(s) they belonged. Whiteflies were collected from seven islands on various plant species. The prevalence of MEAM1 and non-MEAM1 individuals was assessed using a microsatellite approach validated with sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) gene. Of the 262 samples tested, 247 exhibited the MEAM1 pattern, whereas none showed the MED pattern. The mtCOI gene was partially sequenced from a sample of individuals exhibiting MEAM1 (n = 15) and non-MEAM1 patterns (n = 8) and compared with type sequences. The 15 individuals exhibiting the MEAM1 pattern were confirmed to belong to MEAM1. Of the eight individuals representative of the six non-MEAM1 patterns, two belonged to the indigenous New World (NW) group of B. tabaci (NW), one belonged to a distinct species of Bemisia, and five belonged to MEAM1. One individual belonging to NW exhibited 99.9% nucleotide identity with a NW individual from Puerto Rico. The other was identified as the most divergent individual of the North and Central American genetic cluster. We conclude that a highly homogenous MEAM1 population has extensively settled in the Caribbean and that heterogeneous NW populations were still detectable although severely displaced. PMID:22251711

  17. Potential of two populations of Amblyseius swirskii (Acari: Phytoseiidae) for the control of Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Ana Cristina Cerqueira; Borges, Lucas Rosa; Lourenção, André Luiz; de Moraes, Gilberto José

    2015-12-01

    Predatory mites of the family Phytoseiidae are commercialized in European and North American countries for the control of whiteflies (Insecta: Aleyrodidae). Amblyseius swirskii Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is one of the predators used for that purpose. This predator is not found in Brazil and in many other countries, but its introduction could promote biological control of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B (silverleaf whitefly) in those countries. The aim of this study was to compare two populations of A. swirskii as predators of eggs of B. tabaci of two different ages, as well as the acceptance of those populations for other food types [eggs of Tetranychus urticae Koch; larvae and protonymphs of Aleuroglyphus ovatus (Troupeau) (Astigmatina: Acaridae) and cattail pollen (Typha domingensis Persoon)]. One of the populations of A. swirskii was collected in the Republic of Benin, in tropical Africa, and the other was commercially available in The Netherlands. The comparison was done to evaluate the population with better potential for practical use, and to determine food types that could be used for mass rearing the predator. Experiments were conducted at 28 ± 1 °C, 80 ± 10 % relative humidity and 12 h photophase. Both populations were able to oviposit when fed eggs of B. tabaci, but the Netherlands population showed higher oviposition rate (2.3 and 1.6 times higher on young and older eggs, respectively). Higher predation rates were observed for eggs up to 24 h of age in comparison with older eggs. Aleuroglyphus ovatus proved to be a promising prey for possible mass rearing of this predator in Brazil, where that astigmatic mite is found naturally when pollen was used as food, no significant difference was observed for oviposition rate between populations. The results suggested a higher potential of the Netherlands population of A. swirskii for the control of B. tabaci biotype B in this country for augmentative biological control, with the possible use of

  18. Release and recovery of exotic parasitoids of Bemisia tabaci in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An intensive field program was conducted in the subtropical Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas (LRGV) to evaluate the establishment of the imported parasitoids of B. tabaci. Thirty populations/species of Eretmocerus and Encarsia parasitoids were mass reared for field release in multiple agricultural c...

  19. SEASONAL ECOLOGY OF BEMISIA TABACI IN ARIZONA: LOW TEMPERATURE AND HOST PLANT EFFECTS ON FIELD POPULATIONS AND ASSOCIATED MORTALITY FACTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current ongoing study has examined seasonality and mortality patterns of B. tabaci on different hosts during the year. Plots of six representative host plants (broccoli, cantaloupe, cotton, alfalfa, Lantana and various weeds) were established at the Yuma, Maricopa and Marana Agricultural Centers...

  20. Development of a lateral flow test to detect metabolic resistance in Bemisia tabaci mediated by CYP6CM1, a cytochrome P450 with broad spectrum catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Nauen, Ralf; Wölfel, Katharina; Lueke, Bettina; Myridakis, Antonis; Tsakireli, Dimitra; Roditakis, Emmanouil; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia; Stephanou, Euripides; Vontas, John

    2015-06-01

    Cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) is a major sucking pest in many agricultural and horticultural cropping systems globally. The frequent use of insecticides of different mode of action classes resulted in populations resisting treatments used to keep numbers under economic damage thresholds. Recently it was shown that resistance to neonicotinoids such as imidacloprid is linked to the over-expression of CYP6CM1, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase detoxifying imidacloprid and other neonicotinoid insecticides when recombinantly expressed in insect cells. However over-expression of CYP6CM1 is also known to confer cross-resistance to pymetrozine, an insecticide not belonging to the chemical class of neonicotinoids. In addition we were able to demonstrate by LC-MS/MS analysis the metabolisation of pyriproxyfen by recombinantly expressed CYP6CM1. Based on our results CYP6CM1 is one of the most versatile detoxification enzymes yet identified in a pest of agricultural importance, as it detoxifies a diverse range of chemical classes used to control whiteflies. Therefore we developed a field-diagnostic antibody-based lateral flow assay which detects CYP6CM1 protein at levels providing resistance to neonicotinoids and other insecticides. The ELISA based test kit can be used as a diagnostic tool to support resistance management strategies based on the alternation of different modes of action of insecticides. PMID:26047106

  1. Effectiveness of Cyantraniliprole for Managing Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Interfering with Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus on Tomato.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Rafael; Schuster, David J; Peres, Natalia A; Mangandi, Jozer; Hasing, Tomas; Trexler, Fred; Kalb, Steve; Portillo, Héctor E; Marçon, Paula C; Annan, I B

    2015-06-01

    Cyantraniliprole is the second xylem-systemic active ingredient in the new anthranilic diamide class. Greenhouse (2006), growth chamber (2007), and field studies (2009-2010) were conducted to determine the efficacy of cyantraniliprole for managing Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B and in interfering with transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by this whitefly. Cyantraniliprole applied as soil treatments (200 SC) or foliar sprays (100 OD) provided excellent adult whitefly control, TYLCV suppression, and reduced oviposition and nymph survival, comparable to current standards. The positive results observed in these greenhouse experiments with a high level of insect pressure (10× the field threshold of one adult per plant) and disease pressure (five adults per plant, with a high level of confidence that TYLCV virulent adults were used), indicate a great potential for cyantraniliprole to be used in a whitefly management program. Field evaluations of soil drench treatments confirmed the suppression of TYLCV transmission demonstrated in the greenhouse studies. Field studies in 2009 and 2010 showed that cyantraniliprole (200 SC) provided TYLCV suppression for 2 wk after a drench application, when using a susceptible (2009) or imidacloprid-tolerant (2010) whitefly population. Cyantraniliprole was demonstrated to be a promising tool for management of TYLCV in tomato production, which is very difficult and expensive, and which has limited options. The integration of cyantraniliprole into a resistance management program will help to ensure the continued sustainability of this and current insecticides used for the management of insect vectors, including whiteflies and the TYLCV they spreads. PMID:26470209

  2. Viral infection of tobacco plants improves performance of Bemisia tabaci but more so for an invasive than for an indigenous biotype of the whitefly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Li, Meng; Li, Jun-min; Huang, Chang-jun; Zhou, Xue-ping; Xu, Fang-cheng; Liu, Shu-sheng

    2010-01-01

    The ecological effects of plant-virus-vector interactions on invasion of alien plant viral vectors have been rarely investigated. We examined the transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) by the invasive Q biotype and the indigenous ZHJ2 biotype of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, a plant viral vector, as well as the influence of TYLCCNV-infection of plants on the performance of the two whitefly biotypes. Both whitefly biotypes were able to acquire viruses from infected plants and retained them in their bodies, but were unable to transmit them to either tobacco or tomato plants. However, when the Q biotype fed on tobacco plants infected with TYLCCNV, its fecundity and longevity were increased by 7- and 1-fold, respectively, compared to those of the Q biotype fed on uninfected tobacco plants. When the ZHJ2 biotype fed on virus-infected plants, its fecundity and longevity were increased by only 2- and 0.5-fold, respectively. These data show that the Q biotype acquired higher beneficial effects from TYLCCNV-infection of tobacco plants than the ZHJ2 biotype. Thus, the Q biotype whitefly may have advantages in its invasion and displacement of the indigenous ZHJ2 biotype. PMID:20043350

  3. [Genetic variability of the Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in vegetable crops in São Luís, state of Maranhão, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Maria C; De Lemos, Raimunda N S; Lima, Luzia H C; Gourlart Filho, Luiz R; Pereira, Silma R F

    2009-01-01

    The RAPD technique is widely used to investigate the distinct genetic characteristics of the complex Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), which is currently constituted of approximately 41 biotypes. The objective of this research was to characterize populations of whitefly collected in crops of agricultural producing areas in São Luís, MA, like okra, beans and pepper, using RAPD molecular markers. Females from nine whitefly populations were analyzed and compared with B. tabaci biotype B taken from poinsettia culture of Embrapa Genetic Resources and Biotechnology (Brasília, DF). Twelve out of the 20 primers tested produced specific band patterns suitable to confirm that the evaluated specimens belong to the biotype B of B. tabaci, despite the high percentage of detected polymorphism. The analysis of the 96 RAPD molecular markers generated indicated that the populations on okra, beans and pepper were grouped according to the host cultures, sharing 80, 76 and 45% of genetic similarity, respectively, when compared with the control population of B. tabaci biotype B. A lower selective pressure was observed with the population of whitefly collected on pepper and minor genetic variability in the whitefly populations collected on okra and bean, when compared with the control population. PMID:20098922

  4. Evaluation of Bioinsecticides for Management of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and the Effect on the Whitefly Predator Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Organic Squash.

    PubMed

    Razze, Janine M; Liburd, Oscar E; Nuessly, Gregg S; Samuel-Foo, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Organic zucchini squash is a high-value vegetable crop in Florida and potential exists to expand its production throughout the state. A lack of knowledge on the effectiveness of organic products and their integration with natural enemies is an important constraint to the regulation of pest populations in organic squash production in Florida. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of insecticides labeled for organic production that can be used for management of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B, on organically grown squash; and to determine the effects of the most efficient insecticides on a key natural enemy, Delphastus catalinae (Horn). Experiments were conducted in the greenhouse in exclusion cages. The first experiment compared the effects of four bioinsecticides on whitefly densities. Insecticides include 1) AzaSol (azadirachtin), 2) PyGanic EC 1.4 (pyrethrin), 3) M-Pede (insecticidal soap), and 4) Entrust (spinosad). The second experiment investigated the effects of bioinsecticides on D. catalinae Treatment effectiveness was evaluated 1, 3, and 5 d posttreatment. PyGanic and M-Pede were highly effective in controlling whitefly populations on organic squash, while moderate control was provided by AzaSol and there was no control provided by Entrust. PyGanic and M-Pede treatments reduced D. catalinae populations when adults were released 1 d post pesticide application. However, when adults were released 5 d post application, there was no reduction. The importance of using bioinsecticides in combination with natural enemies to regulate pest populations in organic cropping systems is discussed. PMID:27247302

  5. Virion Stability Is Important for the Circulative Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Sardinia Virus by Bemisia tabaci, but Virion Access to Salivary Glands Does Not Guarantee Transmissibility▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caciagli, Piero; Medina Piles, Vicente; Marian, Daniele; Vecchiati, Manuela; Masenga, Vera; Mason, Giovanna; Falcioni, Tania; Noris, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    The capsid protein (CP) of the monopartite begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), family Geminiviridae, is indispensable for plant infection and vector transmission. A region between amino acids 129 and 152 is critical for virion assembly and insect transmissibility. Two previously described mutants, one with a double Q129P Q134H mutation (PNHD) and another with a further D152E change (PNHE), were found nontransmissible (NT). Another NT mutant with a single N130D change (QDQD) was retrieved from a new mutational analysis. In this study, these three NT mutants and the wild-type (wt) virus were compared in their relationships with the whitefly vector Bemisia tabaci and the nonvector Trialeurodes vaporariorum. Retention kinetics of NT mutants were analyzed by quantitative dot blot hybridization in whiteflies fed on infected plants. The QDQD mutant, whose virions appeared nongeminate following purification, was hardly detectable in either whitefly species at any sampling time. The PNHD mutant was acquired and circulated in both whitefly species for up to 10 days, like the wt virus, while PNHE circulated in B. tabaci only. Using immunogold labeling, both PNHD and PNHE CPs were detected in B. tabaci salivary glands (SGs) like the wt virus, while no labeling was found in any whitefly tissue with the QDQD mutant. Significant inhibition of transmission of the wt virus was observed after prior feeding of the insects on plants infected with the PNHE mutant, but not on plants infected with the other mutants. Virion stability and ability to cross the SG barrier are necessary for TYLCSV transmission, but interactions with molecular components inside the SGs are also critical for transmissibility. PMID:19321611

  6. Fumigant toxicity of summer savory and lemon balm oil constituents and efficacy of spray formulations containing the oils to B- and neonicotinoid-resistant Q-biotypes of Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Chae, Song-Hwa; Kim, Soon-Il; Yeon, Seong Hum; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2014-02-01

    An assessment was made of the fumigant toxicity of 36 constituents from lemon balm oil (LBO) and summer savory oil (SSO) and another additional nine previously identified compounds of the oils, as well as of the control efficacy of four experimental spray formulations containing individual oils (0.5 and 0.1% sprays) and spinosad 10% suspension concentrate (SC) to females from B- and neonicotinoid-resistant Q-biotypes of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Based on 24-h LC50 values, Q-biotype females (0.20 microg/cm3) were 40 times less susceptible to dichlorvos than B-biotype females (0.005 microg/cm3). Thymol (LC50, 0.35 microg/cm3) and carvacrol (0.56 microg/cm3) were the most toxic compounds toward Q-biotype females, followed by (1S)-(-)-borneol, alpha-terpineol, nerol, linalool, and carvone (1.06-1.38 microg/cm3). The toxicity of these compounds was virtually identical toward both biotype females, indicating that the terpenoids and the insecticides (neonicotinoids and dichlorvos) do not share a common mode of action or elicit cross-resistance. The 0.5% spray of LBO, SSO, and spinosad 10% SC resulted in >90% mortality toward both biotype females. Global efforts to reduce the level of toxic synthetic insecticides in the agricultural environment justify further studies on LBO- and SSO-derived materials as potential contact-action fumigants for the control of B. tabaci populations. PMID:24665712

  7. Efficacy of insecticide rotations and their impact on populations of the ‘B’ and ‘Q’ biotypes of Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our trial, we tested rotations of different chemistries in controlling ‘B’ and ‘Q’ whiteflies in a caged environment. Three main objectives were studied during the trial. The first: to determine efficacy of different treatment rotations on a mixed population of Bemisia. Second, to determine the s...

  8. Bemisia: bionomics and management of a global pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci has distinguished itself from the more than 1000 whitefly species in the world by it adaptability, persistence and potential to damage a wide range of agricultural and horticultural crops in all six of the world’s inhabited continents. B. tabaci inflicts plant damage through direct f...

  9. Bemisia tabaci-infested tomato plants show a phase-specific pattern of photosynthetic gene expression indicative of disrupted electron flow leading to photo-oxidation and plant death

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Hernández, María Gloria

    2009-01-01

    A suppression-subtractive-hybridization (SSH) strategy led to the identification of several genes whose expression was differentially modified in response to different larval phases present during the infestation process of tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum) by virus-free whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Bt). The findings regarding photosynthetic gene expression were in accordance to previous studies reporting altered patterns of expression as a result of insect herbivory. However, the examination, in this study, of four stages of larval Bt development permitted the detection of phase-dependent changes in gene expression which appeared to target specific photosynthetic complexes. Thus, an upregulation of photosystem II genes in the latter two phases of Bt development contrasted with a general repression of genes belonging to the three other photosynthetic complexes, in addition to a number of genes coding for proteins associated with the oxygen evolving complex and the Calvin cycle. We propose that the contrasting pattern of expression led to an over-excitation of PSII and consequent oxidative damage, as suggested by the concomitant upregulation of oxidative stress genes, and could have contributed to the wide-spread necrosis observed in Bt-infested tomato plants at late stages of the plant-insect interaction. PMID:19826216

  10. Inundative Field Releases and Evaluation of Three Predators for Bemisia tabasi (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Management in Three Vegetable Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a global pest on numerous crops, including vegetables. Weekly inundative releases of a coccinellid predator (Coccinella undecimpunctata L.), a mirid predator [Macrophillus caliginosus (Wagner)] and a neuropteran predator [Chrysoperla carnea S...

  11. A complete mitochondrial DNA genome derived from a Chinese population of the Bemisia afer species complex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Ling; Zhang, Zhen; Bing, Xiao-Li; Liu, Yin-Quan; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2016-09-01

    We report here the sequence of a complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of a population of Bemisia afer species complex, which was collected from Abutilonaviecnnae gaerner at LinYi, Shan Dong province of China (hereafter B. afer_China_Ag) (GenBank accession number: KR819174). The mitogenome of B. afer_China_Ag is 15 300 bp and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and 2 control regions. The content and arrangement of mitochondrial genes of B. afer_China_Ag exhibit remarkable differences from the mitogenome of a B. afer population collected from African cassava (KF734668). Phylogenetic analyses based on 13 protein-coding genes support the close relationship of the two sequenced B. afer mitogenomes and confirm the species status of our specimen. PMID:26218308

  12. Habitat management for the establishment of Bemisia natural enemies. Chapter 15 in: Biological Control of Bemisia: a Review of the Interagency Research and Implementation Program in the United States, 1992-2001

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During outbreaks of sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B, in the 1990s in the southwestern United States, it was recognized that conservation biological control could play a key role in the establishment of newly introduced whitefly parasitoids. However, many Bemisia host plants in desert...

  13. A draft genome sequence and functional screen reveals the repertoire of type III secreted proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J; Ibanez, Selena Gimenez; MacLean, Daniel; Dangl, Jeffery L; Chang, Jeff H; Rathjen, John P

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial pathogen that causes disease on a broad range of economically important plant species. Pathogenicity of P. syringae strains is dependent on the type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of up to about thirty virulence 'effector' proteins into the host cytoplasm where they subvert the eukaryotic cell physiology and disrupt host defences. P. syringae pathovar tabaci naturally causes disease on wild tobacco, the model member of the Solanaceae, a family that includes many crop species as well as on soybean. Results We used the 'next-generation' Illumina sequencing platform and the Velvet short-read assembly program to generate a 145X deep 6,077,921 nucleotide draft genome sequence for P. syringae pathovar tabaci strain 11528. From our draft assembly, we predicted 5,300 potential genes encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids long, of which 303 (5.72%) had no significant sequence similarity to those encoded by the three previously fully sequenced P. syringae genomes. Of the core set of Hrp Outer Proteins that are conserved in three previously fully sequenced P. syringae strains, most were also conserved in strain 11528, including AvrE1, HopAH2, HopAJ2, HopAK1, HopAN1, HopI, HopJ1, HopX1, HrpK1 and HrpW1. However, the hrpZ1 gene is partially deleted and hopAF1 is completely absent in 11528. The draft genome of strain 11528 also encodes close homologues of HopO1, HopT1, HopAH1, HopR1, HopV1, HopAG1, HopAS1, HopAE1, HopAR1, HopF1, and HopW1 and a degenerate HopM1'. Using a functional screen, we confirmed that hopO1, hopT1, hopAH1, hopM1', hopAE1, hopAR1, and hopAI1' are part of the virulence-associated HrpL regulon, though the hopAI1' and hopM1' sequences were degenerate with premature stop codons. We also discovered two additional HrpL-regulated effector candidates and an HrpL-regulated distant homologue of avrPto1. Conclusion The draft genome sequence facilitates the continued development of P

  14. Biology and management of Bemisia whitefly vectors of cassava virus pandemics in Africa.

    PubMed

    Legg, James P; Shirima, Rudolph; Tajebe, Lensa S; Guastella, Devid; Boniface, Simon; Jeremiah, Simon; Nsami, Elibariki; Chikoti, Patrick; Rapisarda, Carmelo

    2014-10-01

    Cassava mosaic disease and cassava brown streak disease are caused by viruses transmitted by Bemisia tabaci and affect approximately half of all cassava plants in Africa, resulting in annual production losses of more than $US 1 billion. A historical and current bias towards virus rather than vector control means that these diseases continue to spread, and high Bemisia populations threaten future virus spread even if the extant strains and species are controlled. Progress has been made in parts of Africa in replicating some of the successes of integrated Bemisia control programmes in the south-western United States. However, these management efforts, which utilise chemical insecticides that conserve the Bemisia natural enemy fauna, are only suitable for commercial agriculture, which presently excludes most cassava cultivation in Africa. Initiatives to strengthen the control of B. tabaci on cassava in Africa need to be aware of this limitation, and to focus primarily on control methods that are cheap, effective, sustainable and readily disseminated, such as host-plant resistance and biological control. A framework based on the application of force multipliers is proposed as a means of prioritising elements of future Bemisia control strategies for cassava in Africa. PMID:24706604

  15. Remote sensing for detecting and mapping whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) infestations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing technology has long been used for detecting insect infestations on agricultural crops. With recent advances in remote sensing sensors and other spatial information technologies such as Global Position Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing is finding mo...

  16. Transmission of Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus by Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Solanales: Convolvulaceae), is an important world food crop, and Asia is the focal production region. Because it is vegetatively propagated, sweetpotato is especially prone to accumulate infections by several viruses. Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) (ss...

  17. The Evolution of Genomic Instability in the Obligate Endosymbionts of Whiteflies

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Daniel B.; Moran, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Many insects depend on ancient associations with intracellular bacteria to perform essential metabolic functions. These endosymbionts exhibit striking examples of convergence in genome architecture, including a high degree of structural stability that is not typical of their free-living counterparts. However, the recently sequenced genome of the obligate whitefly endosymbiont Portiera revealed features that distinguish it from other ancient insect associates, such as a low gene density and the presence of perfectly duplicated sequences. Here, we report the comparative analysis of Portiera genome sequences both within and between host species. In one whitefly lineage (Bemisia tabaci), we identify large-scale structural polymorphisms in the Portiera genome that exist even within individual insects. This variation is likely mediated by recombination across identical repeats that are maintained by gene conversion. The complete Portiera genome sequence from a distantly related whitefly host (Trialeurodes vaporarium) confirms a history of extensive genome rearrangement in this ancient endosymbiont. Using gene-order-based phylogenetic analysis, we show that the majority of rearrangements have occurred in the B. tabaci lineage, coinciding with an increase in the rate of nucleotide substitutions, a proliferation of short tandem repeats (microsatellites) in intergenic regions, and the loss of many widely conserved genes involved in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. These results indicate that the loss of recombinational machinery is unlikely to be the cause of the extreme structural conservation that is generally observed in obligate endosymbiont genomes and that large, repetitive intergenic regions are an important substrate for genomic rearrangements. PMID:23542079

  18. Diversity and evolution of the Wolbachia endosymbionts of Bemisia (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) whiteflies

    PubMed Central

    Bing, Xiao-Li; Xia, Wen-Qiang; Gui, Jia-Dong; Yan, Gen-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia is the most prevalent symbiont described in arthropods to date. Wolbachia can manipulate host reproduction, provide nutrition to insect hosts and protect insect hosts from pathogenic viruses. So far, 13 supergroups of Wolbachia have been identified. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a complex containing more than 28 morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species. Some cryptic species of this complex are invasive. In this study, we report a comprehensive survey of Wolbachia in B. tabaci and its relative B. afer from 1658 insects representing 54 populations across 13 provinces of China and one state of Australia. Based on the results of PCR or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the overall rates of Wolbachia infection were 79.6% and 0.96% in the indigenous and invasive Bemisia whiteflies, respectively. We detected a new Wolbachia supergroup by sequencing five molecular marker genes including 16S rRNA, groEL, gltA, hcpA, and fbpA genes. Data showed that many protein-coding genes have limitations in detecting and classifying newly identified Wolbachia supergroups and thus raise a challenge to the known Wolbachia MLST standard analysis system. Besides, the other Wolbachia strains detected from whiteflies were clustered into supergroup B. Phylogenetic trees of whitefly mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I and Wolbachia multiple sequencing typing genes were not congruent. In addition, Wolbachia was also detected outside the special bacteriocytes in two cryptic species by fluorescence in situ hybridization, indicating the horizontal transmission of Wolbachia. Our results indicate that members of Wolbachia are far from well explored. PMID:25077022

  19. Improved DNA barcoding method for Bemisia tabaci and related Aleyrodidae: Development of universal and Bemisia tabaci biotype-specific mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I polymerase chain reaction primers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whitefly is the common name of heteropteran insects that comprise the Aleyrodidae family composed of over 160 genera and 1500 different species. The mitochondrial cytochome c oxidase I (mtCOI) sequence has been used extensively in whitefly phylogenetic comparisons and in biotype identification of th...

  20. Relationship of Bemisia tabaci adult mortalities and population control to imidacloprid concentrations in cantaloupes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decision-making in chemical pest management typically depends upon information concerning how well a candidate pesticide performs against a particular pest species in a particular crop environment. The principal source of such information has traditionally been accumulated field efficacy data produ...

  1. Evaluation of mustard plants and other products to control sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major insect pest of vegetables and horticultural crops in the southeast US is the sweetpotato whitefly.Scientists at the USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Center for Veterinary Entomology, Gainesaville, Florida, evaluated the effect of giant red mustard plants and commercial products to control ...

  2. Temperature stress, anti-oxidative enzyme activity and virus acquisition in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most eukaryotic systems, antioxidants provide protection when cells are exposed to stressful environmental conditions. Antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase, function in a stepwise series with SOD initially preventing oxidative damage by conve...

  3. Response of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to vapor pressure deficit: Oviposition, immature survival and body size

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ambient temperature is an abiotic factor that has been studied extensively in insect biology and population dynamics while relatively little investigations have been carried out on the impact of ambient moisture. Whiteflies cause major agricultural problems in environments ranging from arid to humi...

  4. LAMP (Loop-mediated isothermal amplification of DNA) - A technique for biotype discrimination in Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification of DNA (LAMP) can amplify a target DNA sequence at a constant temperature in about 1 hour. LAMP technology has great potential for agricultural applications because of the need for rapid and inexpensive diagnoses. Assays based on LAMP technology are well suited...

  5. Baseline Susceptibilities of B- and Q-biotype Bemisia tabaci to anthranilic diamides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of pyriproxyfen and neonicotinoid resistance in the B biotype whitefly and recent introduction of the Q biotype are threatening the current whitefly management programs in Arizona. Whether the novel anthranilic diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole can be integrated into the ...

  6. Temperature stress effects in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) type B whiteflies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress occurs in response to changes in the redox equilibiurm, which may be caused by increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), a decrease in antioxidant protection or failure of cells to repair oxidative damage. ROS are either free radicals, reactive molecules containing oxygen atoms or...

  7. Effect of yellow flowers on abundance of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) on plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whiteflies are major pests of agricultural crops around the world. Many factors are known to impact the population dynamics of whiteflies. This group of insects is well known to be attracted to the color yellow. Thus, yellow traps are used to monitor or control whiteflies in greenhouse and field ...

  8. Investigating the Q invasion of Bemisia tabaci in Florida: Current status and update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three separate Q haplotypes within Florida were discovered that could be used to associate populations known to be related by grower and plant type thereby tracking distribution routes. We determined that biotype Q entered Florida through at least two separate introductions. In-depth analysis of ins...

  9. Field evaluation of Bemisia parasitoids in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two methods were employed to assess the potential of candidate parasitoid species/strains to parasitize B. tabaci under field conditions in Texas. Sleeve cage evaluations were conducted in kale, cantaloupe melons, and cotton in 1994–1995. In kale, the highest parasitism rates were observed for two s...

  10. In silico prediction of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) encoded microRNAs targets in the genome of Cotton leaf curl Allahabad virus

    PubMed Central

    Shweta; Khan, Jawaid A

    2014-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl Allahabad virus (CLCuAV) belongs to genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae. It has single stranded monopartite DNA genome transmitted by whitefly (Bemisia tabaci). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to class of endogeneous small RNAs which suppress expression of genes following cleavage or translational inhibition of target messenger RNAs. They are demonstrated to be involved in a number of plant processes such as, development, biotic and abiotic stresses. Employing in silico approach, high scoring miRNA-target pairs satisfying rules of minimum free energy and maximum complementarity were selected to investigate if they possess the potential to bind the genome CLCuAV. Our results revealed that miRNA species viz., ghr-miR2950 can target all the viral genes, ghr-miR408 targets overlapping transcripts of AC1 and AC2 genes; while ghr-miR394 and ghr-miR395a and miR395d could bind overlapping transcripts of AC1 and AC4 genes. This is the first report of prediction of cotton miRNAs which have the potential to target CLCuAV genes including AC1 and AC4, involved in viral replication and gene silencing suppression, respectively. PMID:24966530