Science.gov

Sample records for bench-capon giovanni soda

  1. Federated Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, C.

    2014-01-01

    Federated Giovanni is a NASA-funded ACCESS project to extend the scope of the GES DISC Giovanni online analysis tool to 4 other Distributed Active Archive Centers within EOSDIS: OBPG, LP-DAAC, MODAPS and PO.DAAC. As such, it represents a significant instance of sharing technology across the DAACs. We also touch on several sub-areas that are also sharable, such as Giovanni URLs, workflows and OGC-accessible services.

  2. Giovanni-4: The Next Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, C.; Hegde, M.; Smit, C.; Da Silva, D.; Bryant, K.; Zhao, P.; Liu, Z.; Shen, S.; Savtchenko, A.; Teng, W.; Wei, J.; Acker, J.

    2014-01-01

    This talk discusses the new aspects of Giovanni-4. Covered in the talk are new features in Giovanni-4, including shape fileservices, seasonal analysis services, the Omnibus Portal, navigation among variables, and comparison services.

  3. Baking Soda Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the basic principles of baking soda chemistry including the chemical composition of baking soda, its acid-base properties, the reaction of bicarbonate solution with calcium ions, and a description of some general types of chemical reactions. Includes a science activity that involves removing calcium ions from water. (LZ)

  4. Introducing Giovanni Gentile, the "Philosopher of Fascism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This essay aims to introduce Giovanni Gentile to scholars of Gramsci studies broadly and Gramsci-education studies more specifically. The largest part of the essay explores Gentile's academic life, his philosophical agenda, and his political career. Having established a basis for understanding the educational reform Gentile enacted as Mussolini's…

  5. Soda Bottle Boating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William

    1991-01-01

    Describes an activity that allows students to design and build a craft whose propulsion is derived entirely by the carbon dioxide produced in the chemical reaction between baking soda and vinegar. (ZWH)

  6. Exploiting the Capabilities of NASA's Giovanni System for Oceanographic Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.; Petrucio, Emil; Leptoukh, Gregory; Shen, Suhung

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) Giovanni system [GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure] has significant capabilities for oceanographic education and independent research utilizing ocean color radiometry data products. Giovanni allows Web-based data discovery and basic analyses, and can be used both for guided illustration of a variety of marine processes and phenomena, and for independent research investigations. Giovanni's capabilities are particularly suited for advanced secondary school science and undergraduate (college) education. This presentation will describe a variety of ways that Giovanni can be used for oceanographic education. Auxiliary information resources that can be utilized will also be described. Several testimonies of Giovanni usage for instruction will be provided, and a recent case history of Giovanni utilization for instruction and research at the undergraduate level is highlighted.

  7. The Ammonia-Soda Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingle, M.

    1979-01-01

    This article is a condensed version of a commentary written to accompany a set of slides which describes the ammonia-soda process used by the ammonia-soda plant at Northwich of the United Kingdom. (HM)

  8. Remote Sensing Data Visualization, Fusion and Analysis via Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, G.; Zubko, V.; Gopalan, A.; Khayat, M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe Giovanni, the NASA Goddard developed online visualization and analysis tool that allows users explore various phenomena without learning remote sensing data formats and downloading voluminous data. Using MODIS aerosol data as an example, we formulate an approach to the data fusion for Giovanni to further enrich online multi-sensor remote sensing data comparison and analysis.

  9. Giovanni: The Bridge between Data and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Lynnes, Christopher; Kempler, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Giovanni (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) is a web-based remote sensing and model data visualization and analysis system developed by the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). This web-based tool facilitates data discovery, exploration and analysis of large amount of global and regional data sets, covering atmospheric dynamics, atmospheric chemistry, hydrology, oceanographic, and land surface. Data analysis functions include Lat-Lon map, time series, scatter plot, correlation map, difference, cross-section, vertical profile, and animation etc. Visualization options enable comparisons of multiple variables and easier refinement. Recently, new features have been developed, such as interactive scatter plots and maps. The performance is also being improved, in some cases by an order of magnitude for certain analysis functions with optimized software. We are working toward merging current Giovanni portals into a single omnibus portal with all variables in one (virtual) location to help users find a variable easily and enhance the intercomparison capability

  10. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Drake, D

    1996-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque. PMID:11524862

  11. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Drake, D

    1997-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque. PMID:12017929

  12. Exploring Remote Sensing Products Online with Giovanni for Studying Urbanization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina; Kempler, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a Large amount of MODIS land products at multi-spatial resolutions have been integrated into the online system, Giovanni, to support studies on land cover and land use changes focused on Northern Eurasia and Monsoon Asia regions. Giovanni (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) is a Web-based application developed by the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) providing a simple and intuitive way to visualize, analyze, and access Earth science remotely-sensed and modeled data. The customized Giovanni Web portals (Giovanni-NEESPI and Giovanni-MAIRS) are created to integrate land, atmospheric, cryospheric, and social products, that enable researchers to do quick exploration and basic analyses of land surface changes and their relationships to climate at global and regional scales. This presentation documents MODIS land surface products in Giovanni system. As examples, images and statistical analysis results on land surface and local climate changes associated with urbanization over Yangtze River Delta region, China, using data in Giovanni are shown.

  13. Federated Giovanni: multi-sensor data sharing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, M.; Lynnes, C.; Acker, J. G.; Kempler, S. J.; Seiler, E.; Davis, J.; Strub, R. F.; Bryant, K.; Smit, C.; Zhao, P.; Mattmann, C. A.; Laidlaw, R.; Hausman, J.; Lossing, R.; Bailey, S. W.; Kalb, V.; Hendrix, C.

    2015-12-01

    Giovanni (Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Interface) has long been a popular tool among remote sensing data users of the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). It supports about two dozen visualization and analysis services that enable interactive exploration of the data, which is a key early step in data analysis. Giovanni brings usability, a low learning curve, and the ability to provide informative visualizations without downloading large volumes of data to the user's location. Federated Giovanni allows each data center to configure and deploy its own Giovanni and curated data catalog, while allowing various Giovanni instances to share data from each other for data intercomparisons. Providing Giovanni's capabilities to other data providers through federation will allow a dramatically larger number of distributed datasets to be made available for interactive data exploration and inter-comparison. This capability is particularly beneficial to science researchers studying data from multiple sensors and satellites. In this presentation, we will describe the architecture as well as the process of curating and sharing Giovanni data catalogs to enable inter-comparison of data from multiple sensors.

  14. Giovanni Berlinguer: socialist, sanitarian, and humanist!

    PubMed

    Fleury, Sonia

    2015-11-01

    This article highlights important aspects of the biography of Giovanni Berlinguer that led him to become a prominent scientist and political activist. His works were marked by a strong socialist conviction and deep humanism. His contribution to health in Brazil ranged from a vast academic output in the field of public health to an active involvement in the Brazilian Health Movement. His later publications addressing everyday bioethics reveal the common thread that runs through his entire works: the use of science to demonstrate the social determinants of health; the fight against unjust inequality; the defense of life against exploitation; and the struggle to prevent the commoditization of life, the human body, and health care. PMID:26602732

  15. New data and capabilities in the NASA Goddard Giovanni system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, H.; Farley, J.; Leptoukh, G.; Berrick, S. W.

    2007-12-01

    Giovanni, the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure, is the underlying infrastructure for a growing family of Web interfaces that allows users to analyze gridded and swath data interactively online without having to download any data. Giovanni is a simple but powerful tool for researchers to explore and analyze data without having to deal with original data format, volume, and complexity. Since 2002, Giovanni has served many users worldwide with TRMM and MODIS data visualization and analysis. With increasing size and complexity of Earth and Space Science data holdings and growing demands for better, faster, and less costly tools for data exploration, visualization and analysis, Giovanni has been extended to serve CALIPSO, CloudSat, SeaWiFS, TOMS, AIRS, OMI, MLS-Aura, HIRDLS, and HALOE data to the Atmospheric Composition, Aerosol, Air Quality, and other research communities. To further improve Giovanni extendibility, accessibility, and performance, Giovanni version 3 (G3) has been developed and is currently in operation at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). In addition to the existing Giovanni instances, several new G3 instances have been released, including (1) A-Train Data Depot that is capable to allow access to, visualize, analyze and correlate distributed atmospheric measurements from A-Train instruments; (2) NEESPI, a multi-sensor multi-disciplinary instance dedicated to the studies of the environment of the Northern Eurasia; (3) Data Fusion, a prototype Giovanni instance that demonstrates the G3 capability for fusing Earth Science data from multiple sensors. Giovanni capabilities have also been extended to include direct access via WMS protocol, and to provide output in various popular formats, like KML for Google Earth. With much progress in data visualization, data analysis, and easy-to-use toolkits, G3 has simplified and strengthened its capabilities of providing closer links between

  16. SODA: Smart Objects, Dumb Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Zubair, Mohammad; Shen, Stewart N. T.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) model for digital libraries (DLs). The SODA model transfers functionality traditionally associated with archives to the archived objects themselves. We are exploiting this shift of responsibility to facilitate other DL goals, such as interoperability, object intelligence and mobility, and heterogeneity. Objects in a SODA DL negotiate presentation of content and handle their own terms and conditions. In this paper we present implementations of our smart objects, buckets, and our dumb archive (DA). We discuss the status of buckets and DA and how they are used in a variety of DL projects.

  17. Application of NASA Giovanni to Coastal Zone Remote Sensing Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James; Leptoukh, Gregory; Kempler, Steven; Berrick, Stephen; Rui, Hualan; Shen, Suhung

    2007-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) provides rapid access to, and enables effective utilization of, remotely-sensed data that are applicable to investigations of coastal environmental processes. Data sets in Giovanni include precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), particularly useful for coastal storm investigations; ocean color radiometry data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWIFS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), useful for water quality evaluation, phytoplankton blooms, and terrestrial-marine interactions; and atmospheric data from MODIS and the Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS), providing the capability to characterize atmospheric variables. Giovanni provides a simple interface allowing discovery and analysis of environmental data sets with accompanying graphic visualizations. Examples of Giovanni investigations of the coastal zone include hurricane and storm impacts, hydrologically-induced phytoplankton blooms, chlorophyll trend analysis, and dust storm characterization. New and near-future capabilities of Giovanni will be described.

  18. Application of NASA Giovanni to Coastal Zone Remote Sensing Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James; Leptoukh, Gregory; Kempler, Steven; Berrick, Stephen; Rui, Hualan; Shen, Suhung

    2007-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) provides rapid access to, and enables effective utilization of, remotely-sensed data that are applicable to investigations of coastal environmental processes. Data sets in Giovanni include precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), particularly useful for coastal storm investigations; ocean color radiometry data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWIFS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), useful for water quality evaluation, phytoplankton blooms, and terrestrial-marine interactions; and atmospheric data from MODIS and the Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS), providing the capability to characterize atmospheric variables. Giovanni provides a simple interface allowing discovery and analysis of environmental data sets with accompanying graphic visualizations. Examples of Giovanni investigations of the coastal zone include hurricane and storm impacts, hydrologically-induced phytoplankton blooms, chlorophyll trend analysis, and dust storm characterization. New and near-future capabilities of Giovanni will be described.

  19. Exploring NASA and ESA Atmospheric Data Using GIOVANNI, the Online Visualization and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Giovanni, the NASA Goddard online visualization and analysis tool (http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov) allows users explore various atmospheric phenomena without learning remote sensing data formats and downloading voluminous data. Using NASA MODIS (Terra and Aqua) and ESA MERIS (ENVISAT) aerosol data as an example, we demonstrate Giovanni usage for online multi-sensor remote sensing data comparison and analysis.

  20. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  1. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-02-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors1,2 that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the experimentally measured rocket height. Baking soda and vinegar rockets present fewer safety concerns and require a smaller launch area than rapid combustion chemical rockets. Both kits were of nearly identical design, costing ˜20. The rockets required roughly 30 minutes of assembly time consisting of mostly taping the soft plastic fuselage to the Styrofoam nose cone.

  2. Statistical Considerations of Data Processing in Giovanni Online Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suhung, Shen; Leptoukh, G.; Acker, J.; Berrick, S.

    2005-01-01

    The GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) is a web-based interface for the rapid visualization and analysis of gridded data from a number of remote sensing instruments. The GES DISC currently employs several Giovanni instances to analyze various products, such as Ocean-Giovanni for ocean products from SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua; TOMS & OM1 Giovanni for atmospheric chemical trace gases from TOMS and OMI, and MOVAS for aerosols from MODIS, etc. (http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov) Foremost among the Giovanni statistical functions is data averaging. Two aspects of this function are addressed here. The first deals with the accuracy of averaging gridded mapped products vs. averaging from the ungridded Level 2 data. Some mapped products contain mean values only; others contain additional statistics, such as number of pixels (NP) for each grid, standard deviation, etc. Since NP varies spatially and temporally, averaging with or without weighting by NP will be different. In this paper, we address differences of various weighting algorithms for some datasets utilized in Giovanni. The second aspect is related to different averaging methods affecting data quality and interpretation for data with non-normal distribution. The present study demonstrates results of different spatial averaging methods using gridded SeaWiFS Level 3 mapped monthly chlorophyll a data. Spatial averages were calculated using three different methods: arithmetic mean (AVG), geometric mean (GEO), and maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). Biogeochemical data, such as chlorophyll a, are usually considered to have a log-normal distribution. The study determined that differences between methods tend to increase with increasing size of a selected coastal area, with no significant differences in most open oceans. The GEO method consistently produces values lower than AVG and MLE. The AVG method produces values larger than MLE in some cases, but smaller in other cases. Further

  3. Statistical Considerations of Data Processing in Giovanni Online Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S.; Leptoukh, G.; Acker, J.; Berrick, S.

    2005-12-01

    The GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) is a web-based interface for the rapid visualization and analysis of gridded data from a number of remote sensing instruments. The GES DISC currently employs several Giovanni instances to analyze various products, such as Ocean-Giovanni for ocean products from SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua; TOMS & OMI Giovanni for atmospheric chemical trace gases from TOMS and OMI, and MOVAS for aerosols from MODIS, etc. (http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov) Foremost among the Giovanni statistical functions is data averaging. Two aspects of this function are addressed here. The first deals with the accuracy of averaging gridded mapped products vs. averaging from the ungridded Level 2 data. Some mapped products contain mean values only; others contain additional statistics, such as number of pixels (NP) for each grid, standard deviation, etc. Since NP varies spatially and temporally, averaging with or without weighting by NP will be different. In this paper, we address differences of various weighting algorithms for some datasets utilized in Giovanni. The second aspect is related to different averaging methods affecting data quality and interpretation for data with non-normal distribution. The present study demonstrates results of different spatial averaging methods using gridded SeaWiFS Level 3 mapped monthly chlorophyll a data. Spatial averages were calculated using three different methods: arithmetic mean (AVG), geometric mean (GEO), and maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). Biogeochemical data, such as chlorophyll a, are usually considered to have a log-normal distribution. The study determined that differences between methods tend to increase with increasing size of a selected coastal area, with no significant differences in most open oceans. The GEO method consistently produces values lower than AVG and MLE. The AVG method produces values larger than MLE in some cases, but smaller in other cases. Further

  4. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-01-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  5. The shaken-soda syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David

    2001-05-01

    Two identical soda cans released at the same time on an incline will roll down at the same rate. However, if one of the cans is shaken, it will lose the race. Experimental evidence is presented that points to the presence of bubbles as the cause of the greater energy transfer to the fluid in the case of the shaken can.

  6. Soda pop vending machine injuries.

    PubMed

    Cosio, M Q

    1988-11-11

    Fifteen male patients, 15 to 24 years of age, sustained injuries after rocking soda machines. The machines fell onto the victims, resulting in a variety of injuries. Three were killed. The remaining 12 required hospitalization for their injuries. Unless changes are made to safeguard these machines, people will continue to suffer severe and possibly fatal injuries from what are largely preventable accidents. PMID:3184337

  7. Microbial Flocculant for Nature Soda

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Peiyong; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Cuixian

    2004-03-31

    Microbial flocculant for nature soda has been studied. Lactobacillus TRJ21, which was able to produce an excellent biopolymer flocculant for nature soda, was obtained in our lab. The microbial flocculant was mainly produced when the bacteria laid in stationary growth phase. Fructose or glucose, as carbon sources, were more favorable for the bacterial growth and flocculant production. The bacteria was able to use ammonium sulfate or Urea as nitrogen to produce flocculant, but was not able to use peptone effectively. High C/N ratio was more favorable to Lactobacillus TRJ21 growth and flocculant production than low C/N ratio. The biopolymer flocculant was mainly composed of polysaccharide and protein with a molecular weight 1.38x106 by gel permeation chromatography. It was able to be easily purified from the culture medium by acetone. Protein in the flocculant was tested for the flocculating activity ingredient by heating the flocculant.

  8. The Digitizing Project that Made SODA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rible, Jim

    2005-01-01

    What would a person do if they were suddenly given half a million dollars? The Southern Oregon University Library, after receiving a congressional grant of $470,000, decided to use the money to create the Southern Oregon Digital Archives (SODA). The primary goal for SODA was to have a full-text, completely searchable database of hundreds of…

  9. Baking soda: a potentially fatal home remedy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, M H; Wason, S; Gonzalez del Rey, J; Benfield, M

    1995-04-01

    We present a case of a six-week-old infant who developed life-threatening complications after unintentional sodium bicarbonate intoxication. Baking soda was being used by the mother as a home remedy to "help the baby burp." A review of the literature regarding the use (or misuse) of baking soda follows. Our patient, along with the other noted case reports, emphasizes the need for warnings on baking soda products whose labels recommend its use as an antacid. Poisonings must be high in the differential diagnosis of any patient, regardless of age, who presents with altered mental status or status epilepticus. PMID:7596870

  10. Explore GPM IMERG and Other Global Precipitation Products with GES DISC GIOVANNI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Ostrenga, D.; Vollmer, B.; Macritchie, K.; Kempler, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    New features and capabilities in the newly released GIOVANNI allow exploring GPM IMERG (Integrated Multi-satelliE Retrievals for GPM) Early, Late and Final Run global half-hourly and monthly precipitation products as well as other precipitation products distributed by the GES DISC such as TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications), NLDAS (North American Land Data Assimilation Systems), GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation Systems), etc. GIOVANNI is a web-based tool developed by the GES DISC (Goddard Earth Sciences and Data Information Services Center), to visualize and analyze Earth science data without having to download data and software. The new interface in GIOVANNI allows searching and filtering precipitation products from different NASA missions and projects and expands the capabilities to inter-compare different precipitation products in one interface. Knowing differences in precipitation products is important to identify issues in retrieval algorithms, biases, uncertainties, etc. Due to different formats, data structures, units and so on, it is not easy to inter-compare these precipitation products. The recently added new features and capabilities (unit conversion, regridding, etc.) in GIOVANNI make inter-comparison possible. In this presentation, we will describe these new feature and capabilities along with examples. (Related URLs: GIOVANNI URL: http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/giovanni/; GES DISC: http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/)

  11. Gas Experiments with Plastic Soda Bottles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanah, Patrick; Zipp, Arden P.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an inexpensive device consisting of a plastic soda bottle and a modified plastic cap in a range of demonstrations and experimental activities having to do with the behavior of gases. (Author/WRM)

  12. Franz Xaver von Zach and Giovanni Battista Amici

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschiari, Alberto

    The address explores the five-year relationship between Franz Xaver von Zach and the Italian instrument maker Giovanni Battista Amici (Modena 1786 - Florence 1863) from the time of their first meeting at Amici's workshop in Modena on 8 September 1820. Zach was particularly impressed by Amici's prismatic reflecting sector and helped him to obtain the optical glass required for its construction from Fraunhofer in Munich. With his "Correspondance astronomique", Zach was one of Amici's main publishers. In the space of four years he published seven of his scientific letters, discussing and commenting on them with extensive notes. The correspondence between Amici and Zach, kept at the Estense Library in Modena and covering a period of just under three years from July 1822 to May 1825, has been published by A. Meschiari in Nuncius, 1-2002.

  13. Use of Giovanni System in Public Health Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soebiyanto, Radina; Kiang, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    The role of environment and climate in propagating infectious disease has long been recognized since the 5th century. The effect is particularly evident in vector-borne diseases such as malaria where temperature, precipitation and humidity influence the lifecycle of the pathogens and mosquitoes. Likewise, the transmission of respiratory diseases is also often associated with climatic factors. For example, a recent study showed that low humidity and temperature provides efficient condition for seasonal influenza transmission. Understanding of how environment and climate affect infectious diseases would essentially provide guides to prevent and control the spread of disease. Toward this end, our group has developed models for infectious disease risk such as for malaria, dengue and influenza that are driven by climatic and environmental inputs. Results will be presented, especially those that used TRMM data from GIOVANNI.

  14. [The method of "rational medicine" of Giovanni Battista Morgagni].

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Giovanni Battista Morgagni is considered the father of pathological anatomy. His contribution can be contextualized within the sphere of the extraordinary development of anatomy between the seventeenth and eighteenth century, the period in which this discipline became the "queen" of the natural sciences. A new pathology based upon anatomy became possible thanks to the mechanistic perspective that had characterized this science in the seventeenth century, in particular with the work of Marcello Malpighi, whom Morgagni regarded as his master. The approach of Malpighi and of the other "iatromechanists" was the subject of an ample debate in which the advocates of mechanicism and empiricism were opposed to, and intertwined with, the supporters of the "ancient," that is to say, Galenic medicine, with respect to those of the "modern," i.e., "neoteric" one. The anatomic-clinical method of Morgagni can be fully understood only when contextualized within this debate. PMID:26915233

  15. Federated Giovanni: A Distributed Web Service for Analysis and Visualization of Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynnes, C.; Hegde, M.; Acker, J. G.; Mattmann, C. A.; D'Sa, E. J.; Thompson, C. K.; Kalb, V.; Ramirez, P.; Franz, B. A.; Lossing, R.; Fang, F.; Torbert, C.; Hendrix, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Interface (Giovanni) is a popular tool for users of the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) and has been in use for over a decade. It provides a wide variety of algorithms and visualizations to explore large remote sensing datasets without having to download the data and without having to write readers and visualizers for it. Giovanni is now being extended to enable its capabilities at other data centers within the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This "Federated Giovanni" will allow four other data centers to add and maintain their data within Giovanni on behalf of their user community. Those data centers are the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC), MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS), Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG), and Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC). Three tiers are supported: Tier 1 (GES DISC-hosted) gives the remote data center a data management interface to add and maintain data, which are provided through the Giovanni instance at the GES DISC. Tier 2 packages Giovanni up as a virtual machine for distribution to and deployment by the other data centers. Data variables are shared among data centers by sharing documents from the Solr database that underpins Giovanni's data management capabilities. However, each data center maintains their own instance of Giovanni, exposing the variables of most interest to their user community. Tier 3 is a Shared Source model, in which the data centers cooperate to extend the infrastructure by contributing source code.

  16. Federated Giovanni: A Distributed Web Service for Analysis and Visualization of Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Interface (Giovanni) is a popular tool for users of the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) and has been in use for over a decade. It provides a wide variety of algorithms and visualizations to explore large remote sensing datasets without having to download the data and without having to write readers and visualizers for it. Giovanni is now being extended to enable its capabilities at other data centers within the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This Federated Giovanni will allow four other data centers to add and maintain their data within Giovanni on behalf of their user community. Those data centers are the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC), MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS), Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG), and Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC). Three tiers are supported: Tier 1 (GES DISC-hosted) gives the remote data center a data management interface to add and maintain data, which are provided through the Giovanni instance at the GES DISC. Tier 2 packages Giovanni up as a virtual machine for distribution to and deployment by the other data centers. Data variables are shared among data centers by sharing documents from the Solr database that underpins Giovanni's data management capabilities. However, each data center maintains their own instance of Giovanni, exposing the variables of most interest to their user community. Tier 3 is a Shared Source model, in which the data centers cooperate to extend the infrastructure by contributing source code.

  17. Visualization and Analysis of Multi-scale Land Surface Products via Giovanni Portals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Kempler, Steven J.; Gerasimov, Irina V.

    2013-01-01

    Large volumes of MODIS land data products at multiple spatial resolutions have been integrated into the Giovanni online analysis system to support studies on land cover and land use changes,focused on the Northern Eurasia and Monsoon Asia regions through the LCLUC program. Giovanni (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) is a Web-based application developed by the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), providing a simple and intuitive way to visualize, analyze, and access Earth science remotely-sensed and modeled data.Customized Giovanni Web portals (Giovanni-NEESPI andGiovanni-MAIRS) have been created to integrate land, atmospheric,cryospheric, and societal products, enabling researchers to do quick exploration and basic analyses of land surface changes, and their relationships to climate, at global and regional scales. This presentation shows a sample Giovanni portal page, lists selected data products in the system, and illustrates potential analyses with imagesand time-series at global and regional scales, focusing on climatology and anomaly analysis. More information is available at the GES DISCMAIRS data support project portal: http:disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.govmairs.

  18. 1 in 3 Americans Drinks Sugary Soda or Juice Daily

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 in 3 Americans Drinks Sugary Soda or Juice Daily: CDC These beverages linked to greater risk ... drink at least one sugar-laden soda or juice every day, federal health officials report. Sugary drinks ...

  19. 68. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING OF THE CAUSTIC SODA (SODIUM HYDROXIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING OF THE CAUSTIC SODA (SODIUM HYDROXIDE) BUILDING, LOOKING AT CAUSTIC SODA MEASURING TANKS. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  20. Large-sized soda ban as an alternative to soda tax.

    PubMed

    Min, Hery Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This Note examines New York City's Sugary Drinks Portion Cap Rule (Soda Ban), which was originally set to become effective March 12, 2013. The New York County Supreme Court's decision in New York Statewide Coalition of Hispanic Chambers of Commerce v. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene suspended the Soda Ban on March 11, 2013. The First Department of the Appellate Division of New York State Supreme Court affirmed the suspension on July 30, 2013. However, the complex economic policy and constitutional issues arising from the proposed Soda Ban deserve as much attention as the ultimate result of the legal challenge to the ban. Both courts struck down the Soda Ban on the grounds that it violated the separation of powers doctrine. The lower court further held that the Soda Ban was arbitrary and capricious. This Note does not focus solely on the holdings of the two courts, but takes a broader approach in analyzing the issues involved in the Soda Ban. By comparing and contrasting tobacco products with sugary beverages, this Note explains why the public seems to find the Soda Ban less appealing than tobacco regulations. Specifically, this Note addresses how the failed attempts of numerous states and cities to implement soda taxes demonstrate the complexity of policies geared toward curbing obesity; how fundamental values, such as health, fairness, efficiency, and autonomy factor into obesity policies; and the fact that legislatures and courts are struggling to determine the scope of public health law intervention. The Note explores how the Soda Ban, despite its judicial suspension, could represent a stepping-stone in combating the obesity epidemic. PMID:25330566

  1. Mysteries of attraction: Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, astrology and desire.

    PubMed

    Rutkin, H Darrel

    2010-06-01

    Although in his later years Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463-1494) vehemently rejected astrology, he earlier used it in a variety of ways, but primarily to provide further evidence for positions to which he had arrived by other means. One such early use appears in his commentary on his friend Girolamo Benivieni's love poetry, the Canzone d'amore, of 1486-1487. In the passages discussed here, Pico presents an intensive Platonic natural philosophical analysis based on a deep astrologically informed understanding of human nature as he attempts to explain a perennial question, namely, why one person is attracted to a certain person (or people), and another to others. I will place this discussion of the mysteries of attraction and desire in historical perspective by tracing Pico's changing relationship to astrology during the course of his short but passionate life, and in historiographic perspective by revising Frances Yates's still influential views concerning Pico's contribution to Renaissance thought and his relationship with Marsilio Ficino. PMID:20513623

  2. Giovanni Aldini: from animal electricity to human brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Parent, André

    2004-11-01

    Two hundred years ago, Giovanni Aldini published a highly influential book that reported experiments in which the principles of Luigi Galvani (animal electricity) and Alessandro Volta (bimetallic electricity) were used together for the first time. Aldini was born in Bologna in 1762 and graduated in physics at the University of his native town in 1782. As nephew and assistant of Galvani, he actively participated in a series of crucial experiments with frog's muscles that led to the idea that electricity was the long-sought vital force coursing from brain to muscles. Aldini became professor of experimental physics at the University of Bologna in 1798. He traveled extensively throughout Europe, spending much time defending the concept of his discreet uncle against the incessant attacks of Volta, who did not believe in animal electricity. Aldini used Volta's bimetallic pile to apply electric current to dismembered bodies of animals and humans; these spectacular galvanic reanimation experiments made a strong and enduring impression on his contemporaries. Aldini also treated patients with personality disorders and reported complete rehabilitation following transcranial administration of electric current. Aldini's work laid the ground for the development of various forms of electrotherapy that were heavily used later in the 19th century. Even today, deep brain stimulation, a procedure currently employed to relieve patients with motor or behavioral disorders, owes much to Aldini and galvanism. In recognition of his merits, Aldini was made a knight of the Iron Crown and a councillor of state at Milan, where he died in 1834. PMID:15595271

  3. Giovanni Battista Morgagni and his contribution to pediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; Cozzi, Denis A

    2008-04-01

    Pediatric surgery is a less than a century old surgical specialty. However, early knowledge of human malformations and pediatric surgical conditions dates back to centuries before. One of the main contributors to progress in these fields was Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771), who also had a substantial weight in the development of future pediatric surgery. With his masterpiece De Sedibus et Causis Morborum per Anatomen Indagatis (On the Seats and Causes of Diseases Investigated by Anatomy) (1761), he set the basis for modern pathology. In this textbook, Morgagni was the first to describe anatomical elements like the trigonum sternocostale dextrum (the Morgagni's foramen), the appendix testis (the Morgagni's hydatid), and the vertical folds of distal rectum (the Morgagni's columns). He was also the first to describe pediatric pathological conditions like epispadia, meconium peritonitis, Crohn's disease, and coarctation of the aorta. Finally, he substantially contributed to the understanding of the pathophysiology of conditions like the vesico-ureteral reflux, the anterior wall defects (gastroschisis/omphalocele), and the spina bifida. For this, it was said of him: "If all the anatomical findings made by Morgagni should bear his name, probably one third of human body would be called Morgagni's." PMID:18405723

  4. Soda pop vending machine injuries: an update.

    PubMed

    Cosio, M Q; Taylor, G W

    1992-01-01

    Soda pop vending machine tipping continues to be a dangerous behavior that can result in lethal or crippling injuries. This study analyzes 64 cases of injuries secondary to crushing by a soda machine. All were male victims except one. The average age was 19.8 years with a range of 5-39 years. Thirteen victims sustained multiple trauma. Fifteen victims were killed. Increased public awareness coupled with support by the government and private industry has contributed to a sharp reduction in incidence of accidents and improved public safety. PMID:1602339

  5. 21 CFR 172.490 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 172.490 Section 172.490... prussiate of soda. (a) The food additive yellow prussiate of soda (sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate; Na4Fe(CN... dendritic crystals of salt in an amount needed to produce its intended effect but not in excess of 13...

  6. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda (sodium... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section...

  7. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section 573.1020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda...

  8. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section 573.1020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda...

  9. 21 CFR 573.1020 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 573.1020 Section 573.1020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.1020 Yellow prussiate of soda. Yellow prussiate of soda...

  10. Can soda fountains be recommended in hospitals?

    PubMed

    Chaberny, Iris F; Kaiser, Peter; Sonntag, Hans-Günther

    2006-09-01

    Mineral water (soda water) is very popular in Germany. Therefore, soda fountains were developed as alternatives to the traditional deposit bottle system. Nowadays, different systems of these devices are commercially available. For several years, soda fountains produced by different companies have been examined at the University Hospital of Heidelberg. In 1998, it was possible for the first time to observe and evaluate one of these systems over a period of 320 days in a series of microbiological examinations. The evaluation was implemented on the basis of the German drinking water regulation (Anonymous, 1990. Gesetz über Trinkwasser und Wasser für Lebensmittelbetriebe (Trinkwasserverordnung - TrinkwV) vom 12. Dezember 1990. Bundesgesetzblatt 66, 2613ff). Initially, the bacteria counts exceeded the reference values imposed by the German drinking water regulation in almost 50% of the analyses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also detected in almost 38% of the samples. After a re-arrangement of the disinfection procedure and the removal of the charcoal filter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was not detectable any more. However, the bacteria counts still frequently exceeded the reference values of the German drinking water regulation. Following our long-term analysis, we would not recommend soda fountains in high-risk areas of hospitals. If these devices are to be used in hospitals, the disinfection procedures should be executed in weekly or fortnightly intervals and the water quality should be examined periodically. PMID:16740412

  11. Properties Of Soda/Yttria/Silica Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental study of glass-formation compositional region of soda/ yttria/silicate system and of selected physical properties of glasses within compositional region part of continuing effort to identify glasses with high coefficients of thermal expansion and high softening temperatures, for use as coatings on superalloys and as glass-to-metal seals.

  12. SODA ASH TREATMENT OF NEUTRALIZED MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilization of acid mine drainage (AMD) streams as a source of potable and industrial water has become a major goal of several proposed AMD treatment schemes. From among the various schemes available, the lime neutralization/soda ash softening process was selected for use at Alto...

  13. Volume, Variety and Veracity of Big Data Analytics in NASA's Giovanni Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynnes, C.; Hegde, M.; Smit, C.; Pan, J.; Bryant, K.; Chidambaram, C.; Zhao, P.

    2013-12-01

    Earth Observation data have posed challenges to NASA users ever since the launch of several satellites around the turn of the century, generating volumes now measured in petabytes, a volume growth further increased by models assimilating the satellite data. One important approach to bringing Big Data Analytic capabilities to bear on the Volume of data has been the provision of server-side analysis capabilities. For instance, the Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis (Giovanni) tool provides a web interface to large volumes of gridded data from several EOSDIS data centers. Giovanni's main objective is to allow the user to explore its data holdings using various forms of visualization and data summarization or aggregation algorithms, thus allowing the user to examine statistics and pictures for the overall data, while eventually acquiring only the most useful data. Thus much of the preprocessing and data reduction aspects can take place on the server, delivering manageable information quantities to the user. In addition to Volume, Giovanni uses open standards to tackle the Variety aspect of Big Data, incorporating data stored in several formats, from several data centers, and making them available in a uniform data format and structure to both the Giovanni algorithms and the end user. The Veracity aspect of Big Data, perhaps the stickiest of wickets, is enhanced through features that enable reproducibility (provenance and URL-driven workflows), and by a Help Desk staffed by scientists with expertise in the science data.

  14. Explore GPM IMERG and Other Global Precipitation Products with GES DISC GIOVANNI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana M.; Vollmer, Bruce; MacRitchie, Kyle; Kempler, Steven

    2015-01-01

    New features and capabilities in the newly released GIOVANNI allow exploring GPM IMERG (Integrated Multi-satelliE Retrievals for GPM) Early, Late and Final Run global half-hourly and monthly precipitation products as well as other precipitation products distributed by the GES DISC such as TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications), NLDAS (North American Land Data Assimilation Systems), GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation Systems), etc. GIOVANNI is a web-based tool developed by the GES DISC (Goddard Earth Sciences and Data Information Services Center) to visualize and analyze Earth science data without having to download data and software. The new interface in GIOVANNI allows searching and filtering precipitation products from different NASA missions and projects and expands the capabilities to inter-compare different precipitation products in one interface. Knowing differences in precipitation products is important to identify issues in retrieval algorithms, biases, uncertainties, etc. Due to different formats, data structures, units and so on, it is not easy to inter-compare precipitation products. Newly added features and capabilities (unit conversion, regridding, etc.) in GIOVANNI make inter-comparisons possible. In this presentation, we will describe these new features and capabilities along with examples.

  15. 21 CFR 172.490 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 172.490 Section 172.490... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.490 Yellow prussiate of soda. (a) The food additive yellow prussiate of soda (sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate; Na4Fe(CN)6·10H2O contains a minimum of 99 percent by weight...

  16. 21 CFR 172.490 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yellow prussiate of soda. 172.490 Section 172.490... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.490 Yellow prussiate of soda. (a) The food additive yellow prussiate of soda (sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate; Na4Fe(CN)6·10H2O contains a minimum of 99 percent by weight...

  17. 21 CFR 172.490 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 172.490 Section 172.490... CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.490 Yellow prussiate of soda. (a) The food additive yellow prussiate of soda (sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate; Na4Fe(CN)6·10H2O contains a minimum of 99 percent by weight...

  18. Towards Infusing Giovanni with a Semantic and Provenance Aware Visualization System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Rio, N.; Pinheiro da Silva, P.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Lynnes, C.

    2011-12-01

    Giovanni is a Web-based application developed by GES DISC that provides simple and intuitive ways to visualize, analyze, and access vast amounts of Earth science remote sensed data. Currently, the Giovanni visualization module is only aware of the physical links (i.e., hard-coded) between data and services and consequently cannot be easily adapted to new visualization scenarios. VisKo, a semantically enabled visualization framework, can be leveraged by Giovanni as a semantic bridge between data and visualization. VisKo relates data and visualization services at conceptual (i.e., ontological) levels and relies on reasoning systems to leverage the conceptual relationships to automatically infer physical links, facilitating an adaptable environment for new visualization scenarios. This is particularly useful for Giovanni, which has been constantly retrofitted with new visualization software packages to keep up with advancement in visualization capabilities. During our prototype integration of Giovanni with VisKo, a number of future steps were identified that if implemented could cement the integration and promote our prototype to operational status. A number of integration issues arose including the mediation of different languages used by each system to characterize datasets; VisKo relies on semantic data characterization to "match-up" data with visualization processes. It was necessary to identify mappings between Giovanni XML provenance and Proof Markup Language, which is understood by VisKo. Although a translator was implemented based on identified mappings, a more elegant solution is to develop a domain data ontology specific to Giovanni and to "align" this ontology with PML, enabling VisKo to directly ingest the semantic descriptions of Giovanni data. Additionally, the relationship between dataset components (e.g., variables and attributes) and visualization plot components (e.g., geometries, axes, titles) should also be modeled. In Giovanni, meta

  19. [Hygienic assessment of waste of soda production].

    PubMed

    Samutin, N M; Vaisman, Y I; Rudakova, L V; Kalinina, E V; Glushankova, I S; Batrakova, G M

    2013-01-01

    The object of investigations was soda industry waste. Slimes are formed at slimes storage which occupy considerable areas and are considered to be the source of permanent impact on the hydrosphere objects. Slimes storage placement within settlement boundaries and water protection zone of large watercourses leads to the deterioration of sanitary, hygienic and environmental situation and to the rising of risks to health of communities. Waste processing with getting new materials on the base of soda industry waste with wide application is seems to be one of the way for problem solving. It is essential to take into account sanitary and hygienic characteristics of slimes within justifying possible directions of its use. Thus, researches concerning assessment of physical, chemical and toxicological waste characteristics are considered to be actual. The aim of researches is to examine physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics of soda production slimes for justifying directions of its use including delivery of new materials respondent to the all regulatory sanitary and hygienic requirements. Experimental investigations of assessment physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics of slimes were carried out according to standard methods. Within assessment of toxicological slimes characteristics the following test-objects were used: Ceriodaphnia affinis, Paramecium caudatum. As a result of investigations watered slime samples were determined to be referred to the 4th hazard level (low-hazard) waste; samples with preliminary mechanical dehydration are referred to the 5th hazard level (practically nonhazardous) waste for environment. These are correspond to the 3rd and 4th hazard level according to sanitary regulations, respectively. PMID:24003694

  20. Orbital Models Made of Plastic Soda Bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoshin, Vyacheslav V.

    1998-08-01

    The models for demonstration of shape and direction of atomic and molecular orbitals, their overlaps, interactions, and hybridizations may be easily constructed from plastic soda bottles. For such models one may attach the screw caps to the faces of wooden or plastic tetrahedrons, trigonal prisms, or cubes (by screws, glue, wire). When the bottles are screwed into the lids, the models of sp3, sp2, or sp hybridized atoms are obtained. The orbital overlap leading to s bond formation is imitated by insertion of a smaller bottle into a larger one with the bottom cut off. Rubber or plastic rings put on pairs of "p orbitals" mimic pi bond formations.

  1. A Case Study of Convective Transport of Trace Gases and Air Pollutants into the Lower Stratosphere Examined in Giovanni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. P.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Johnson, J. E.; Gerasimov, I. V.; Kempler, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    Giovanni is the Web-based on-line data exploration and visualization tool that provides an easy access to the long-term datasets of atmospheric measurements from the past and current satellite missions (e.g. Aura OMI, MLS and HIRDLS, Aqua AIRS and MODIS, TOMS, UARS HALOE, TRMM) and data from assimilation models that are archived at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC). Giovanni ( http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/ ) has many built-in data analysis capabilities. Users donot need to learn data formats or retrieve large datasets and process it. One can examine and assess various geophysical phenomena interactively. In this presentation we demonstrate Giovanni data exploration capabilities by examining the convective transport of trace gases and air pollutants (water vapor, ozone, CO, NO2, etc) into the lower stratosphere, and seasonal variability of aerosols, cloud and precipitation, over the Tibetan Plateau and South Asian region.

  2. Aerosol Intercomparison Scenarios for the Giovanni Multi-sensor Data Synergy “Advisor”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, S. A.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Prados, A. I.; Shen, S.; Pan, J.; Rui, H.; Lynnes, C.; Fox, P. A.; West, P.; Zednik, S.

    2009-12-01

    The combination of remotely sensed aerosols datasets can result in synergistic products that are more useful than the sum of the individual datasets. Multi-sensor composite datasets can be constructed by data merging (taking very closely related parameters to create a single merged dataset to increase spatial and/or temporal coverage), cross-calibration (creating long-term climate data records from two very similar parameters), validation (using a parameter from one dataset to validate a closely related parameter in another), cross-comparison (comparing two datasets with different parameters), and data fusion (using two or more parameters to estimate a third parameter). However, care must be taken to note the differences in data provenance and quality when combining heterogeneous datasets. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is currently in its first year of funding for our project Multi-sensor Data Synergy Advisor (MDSA or Giovanni Advisor) under the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems and Technology (AIST) program. The Giovanni Advisor will allow researchers to combine and compare aerosol data from multiple sensors using Giovanni, such that scientifically and statistically valid conclusions can be drawn. The Giovanni Advisor will assist the user in determining how to match up two (or more) sets of data that are related, yet significantly different in some way: in the exact phenomenon being measured, the measurement technique, or the location in space-time and/or the quality of the measurements. Failing to account for these differences in merging, validation, cross calibration, comparison or fusion is likely to yield scientifically dubious results. The Giovanni Advisor captures details of each parameter’s attributes, metadata, retrieval heritage, provenance and data quality and flags relevant differences so that the user can make appropriate “apples to apples” comparisons of

  3. Giovanni: A System for Rapid Access, Visualization and Analysis of Earth Science Data Online

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, S.; Rui, H.; Liu, Z.; Zhu, T.; Lu, L.; Berrick, S.; Leptoukh, G.; Teng, W.; Acker, J.; Johnson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Collecting data and understanding data structures traditionally are the first steps that a user must take, before the core investigation can begin. This is a time-consuming and challenging task, especially when science objectives require users to deal with large multi-sensor data that are usually in different formats and internal structures. The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) has created the GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization and ANalysis Infrastructure, Giovanni, to enable Web-based visualization and analysis of satellite remotely sensed meteorological, oceanographic, and hydrologic data sets, without users having to download data. The current operational Giovanni interfaces provide the capability to process a number of important satellite measurements, such as (1) ozone and other trace gases from TOMS, OMI, HALOE, and MLS; (2) air temperature, water vapor, and geopotential height from AIRS; (3) aerosols from MODIS TerrdAqua, and GOCART model; (4) precipitation from TRMM and ground measurements; (5) chlorophyll and other ocean color products from SeaWiFS and MODIS Aqua; and (6) sea surface temperature from MODIS Aqua. Depending on the input data structure, the system provides simple statistical analysis and creates time-averaged area plot, area-averaged time series, animations, Hovmoller latitude vs. time and longitude vs. time plots, as well as vertical profiles. The inter-comparison interfaces allow a user to compare observations from different instruments, to conduct anomaly analysis, and to study basic relationships between physical parameters. Giovanni handles data with different temporal and spatial resolutions and, thus, enables both regional and global long-term climate research and short-term special events investigation, as well as data validations and assessments. Because of its simplicity of usage, Giovanni is powerful and versatile, able to assist a wide range of users, from the discipline scientists

  4. 27 CFR 21.102 - Caustic soda, liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Caustic soda, liquid. 21.102 Section 21.102 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.102 Caustic soda, liquid. (a) The...

  5. INTERIOR OF SHT (ROTARY DRYER FOR SODA) BUILDING OR DRYSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF SHT (ROTARY DRYER FOR SODA) BUILDING OR DRYSIDE DRYERS WHICH REMOVED TRACES OF LIQUID FROM STD FILTRATE. HEAT CONVERTED SODIUM BICARBONATE TO SODIUM CARBONATE OR SODA ASH, THE PRINCIPAL PRODUCT OF THE WORKS. - Solvay Process Company, SHT Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  6. Soda taxes, soft drink consumption, and children's body mass index.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Roland; Powell, Lisa M; Chriqui, Jamie F; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2010-05-01

    Taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages have been proposed to combat obesity. Using data on state sales taxes for soda and individual-level data on children, we examine whether small taxes are likely to change consumption and weight gain or whether larger tax increases would be needed. We find that existing taxes on soda, which are typically not much higher than 4 percent in grocery stores, do not substantially affect overall levels of soda consumption or obesity rates. We do find, however, that subgroups of at-risk children--children who are already overweight, come from low-income families, or are African American--may be more sensitive than others to soda taxes, especially when soda is available at school. A greater impact of these small taxes could come from the dedication of the revenues they generate to other obesity prevention efforts rather than through their direct effect on consumption. PMID:20360173

  7. [Rudolf Krauss, Giovanni Noe and a flash of infectious diseases in Chile, 1930].

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Walter

    2015-06-01

    When there were giants on the earth, two of them, Rudolf Kraus and Giovanni Noe, met at the ancient Bacteriological Institute of Chile, and founded together a journal representing the principles of the institution. A nostalgic glance over the papers published therein for these so named giants lets us know a little about the study of infectious diseases in the thirties, when tuberculosis and malaria were two of the biggest problems for the world's public health... then and now. PMID:26230441

  8. Il sistema multiplo di Spica osservato dal Padre Giovanni Battista Audiffredi nel 1753

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2005-06-01

    The multiplicity of Spica's system has been first observed in 1753 by the dominican father Giovanni Battista Audiffredi through a lunar occultation. Audiffredi noted that the emersion's duration from the bright lunar limb was not instantaneous. Nowadays Spica has five known components, four of them have been discovered by occultation. This observation is presented along with a general introduction of lunar occultations, Watts' profiles, Cassini regions and grazes.

  9. Electrotherapy for melancholia: the pioneering contributions of Benjamin Franklin and Giovanni Aldini.

    PubMed

    Bolwig, Tom G; Fink, Max

    2009-03-01

    The electrical induction of seizures with a therapeutic aim began in 1938, but the history of electric currents to relieve mental illness began 2 centuries earlier with the pioneering work of the Italian Giovanni Aldini and the American Benjamin Franklin.These early experiments are described demonstrating that the electrical force encouraged hopeful applications. This history emphasizes the unique contribution in the induction of grand mal seizures as the therapeutic basis rather than the role of electricity alone. PMID:19209070

  10. Performance, Agility and Cost of Cloud Computing Services for NASA GES DISC Giovanni Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, L.; Chen, A.; Wharton, S.; Winter, E. L.; Lynnes, C.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is investigating the performance, agility and cost of Cloud computing for GES DISC applications. Giovanni (Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure), one of the core applications at the GES DISC for online climate-related Earth science data access, subsetting, analysis, visualization, and downloading, was used to evaluate the feasibility and effort of porting an application to the Amazon Cloud Services platform. The performance and the cost of running Giovanni on the Amazon Cloud were compared to similar parameters for the GES DISC local operational system. A Giovanni Time-Series analysis of aerosol absorption optical depth (388nm) from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument)/Aura was selected for these comparisons. All required data were pre-cached in both the Cloud and local system to avoid data transfer delays. The 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month data were used for analysis on the Cloud and local system respectively, and the processing times for the analysis were used to evaluate system performance. To investigate application agility, Giovanni was installed and tested on multiple Cloud platforms. The cost of using a Cloud computing platform mainly consists of: computing, storage, data requests, and data transfer in/out. The Cloud computing cost is calculated based on the hourly rate, and the storage cost is calculated based on the rate of Gigabytes per month. Cost for incoming data transfer is free, and for data transfer out, the cost is based on the rate in Gigabytes. The costs for a local server system consist of buying hardware/software, system maintenance/updating, and operating cost. The results showed that the Cloud platform had a 38% better performance and cost 36% less than the local system. This investigation shows the potential of cloud computing to increase system performance and lower the overall cost of system management.

  11. Data Visualization and Analysis for Climate Studies using NASA Giovanni Online System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Hualan; Leptoukh, Gregory; Lloyd, Steven

    2008-01-01

    With many global earth observation systems and missions focused on climate systems and the associated large volumes of observational data available for exploring and explaining how climate is changing and why, there is an urgent need for climate services. Giovanni, the NASA GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd ANalysis Infrastructure, is a simple to use yet powerful tool for analysing these data for research on global warming and climate change, as well as for applications to weather. air quality, agriculture, and water resources,

  12. Online Time Series Analysis of Land Products over Asia Monsoon Region via Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Time series analysis is critical to the study of land cover/land use changes and climate. Time series studies at local-to-regional scales require higher spatial resolution, such as 1km or less, data. MODIS land products of 250m to 1km resolution enable such studies. However, such MODIS land data files are distributed in 10ox10o tiles, due to large data volumes. Conducting a time series study requires downloading all tiles that include the study area for the time period of interest, and mosaicking the tiles spatially. This can be an extremely time-consuming process. In support of the Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Study (MAIRS) program, NASA GES DISC (Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center) has processed MODIS land products at 1 km resolution over the Asia monsoon region (0o-60oN, 60o-150oE) with a common data structure and format. The processed data have been integrated into the Giovanni system (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) that enables users to explore, analyze, and download data over an area and time period of interest easily. Currently, the following regional MODIS land products are available in Giovanni: 8-day 1km land surface temperature and active fire, monthly 1km vegetation index, and yearly 0.05o, 500m land cover types. More data will be added in the near future. By combining atmospheric and oceanic data products in the Giovanni system, it is possible to do further analyses of environmental and climate changes associated with the land, ocean, and atmosphere. This presentation demonstrates exploring land products in the Giovanni system with sample case scenarios.

  13. NASA Giovanni: A Tool for Visualizing, Analyzing, and Inter-comparing Soil Moisture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, William; Rui, Hualan; Vollmer, Bruce; deJeu, Richard; Fang, Fan; Lei, Guang-Dih; Parinussa, Robert

    2014-01-01

    There are many existing satellite soil moisture algorithms and their derived data products, but there is no simple way for a user to inter-compare the products or analyze them together with other related data. An environment that facilitates such inter-comparison and analysis would be useful for validation of satellite soil moisture retrievals against in situ data and for determining the relationships between different soil moisture products. As part of the NASA Giovanni (Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) family of portals, which has provided users worldwide with a simple but powerful way to explore NASA data, a beta prototype Giovanni Inter-comparison of Soil Moisture Products portal has been developed. A number of soil moisture data products are currently included in the prototype portal. More will be added, based on user requirements and feedback and as resources become available. Two application examples for the portal are provided. The NASA Giovanni Soil Moisture portal is versatile and extensible, with many possible uses, for research and applications, as well as for the education community.

  14. Giovanni Data Portals and Resources Support Student Problem-Based Learning for Climate Change Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, J. G.; Zalles, D. R.; Krumhansl, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Data-Enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE) project, funded by NASA, is providing dedicated climate data portals in the NASA Giovanni data system for the use of teachers and students. The central content of the DICCE-Giovanni data portals is a reduced set of climate-relevant data parameters drawn from the available Giovanni data sets, with accessible meanings, such as surface temperature, precipitation amount, snow cover, phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration, vegetation indices, and aerosol optical depth. Information resources explain the significance of the data to climate research, how to interpret climate data trends, and address uncertainties in both data visualizations and the interpretation of data plotting output. "How-to" videos and plotting tips facilitate the utilization of the data portals, so that teachers can create problem-based projects based on actual satellite observational data. The use of satellite data in a problem-based framework enhances the relevance and immediacy of the project content to the student, improves their understanding of Earth climate system interrelationships, and also improves pattern recognition, math skills, and interpretation of data representations.;

  15. BICARBONATE OF SODA BLASTING TECHNOLOGY FOR AIRCRAFT WHEEL DEPAINTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addressed product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention and economics in replacing chemical solvent strippers with a bicarbonate of soda blasting technology for removal of point from aircraft wheels. he evaluation was conducted in the Paint Stripping Shop ...

  16. 48. Bottom of shock absorber, bottom of launch tube, soda ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Bottom of shock absorber, bottom of launch tube, soda bottle liter at right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  17. BICARBONATE OF SODA BLASTING TECHNOLOGY FOR AIRCRAFT WHEEL PAINTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addressed product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention and economics in replacing chemical solvent strippers with a bicarbonate of soda blasting technology for removal of paint from aircraft wheels. The evaluation was conducted in the Paint Stripping Sho...

  18. Using NASA's Giovanni Web Portal to Access and Visualize Satellite-Based Earth Science Data in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, S. A.; Acker, J. G.; Prados, A. I.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2008-12-01

    One of the biggest obstacles for the average Earth science student today is locating and obtaining satellite- based remote sensing datasets in a format that is accessible and optimal for their data analysis needs. At the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) alone, on the order of hundreds of Terabytes of data are available for distribution to scientists, students and the general public. The single biggest and time-consuming hurdle for most students when they begin their study of the various datasets is how to slog through this mountain of data to arrive at a properly sub-setted and manageable dataset to answer their science question(s). The GES DISC provides a number of tools for data access and visualization, including the Google-like Mirador search engine and the powerful GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) web interface. Giovanni provides a simple way to visualize, analyze and access vast amounts of satellite-based Earth science data. Giovanni's features and practical examples of its use will be demonstrated, with an emphasis on how satellite remote sensing can help students understand recent events in the atmosphere and biosphere. Giovanni is actually a series of sixteen similar web-based data interfaces, each of which covers a single satellite dataset (such as TRMM, TOMS, OMI, AIRS, MLS, HALOE, etc.) or a group of related datasets (such as MODIS and MISR for aerosols, SeaWIFS and MODIS for ocean color, and the suite of A-Train observations co-located along the CloudSat orbital path). Recently, ground-based datasets have been included in Giovanni, including the Northern Eurasian Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), and EPA fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for air quality. Model data such as the Goddard GOCART model and MERRA meteorological reanalyses (in process) are being increasingly incorporated into Giovanni to facilitate model- data intercomparison. A full suite of data

  19. A learner centered Student Observation Driven Astronomy (SODA)course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottorff, Mark; Doty, S.; Heaton, J.

    2011-01-01

    The non-science major astronomy course, Exploring the Universe, at Southwestern University is now a Student Observation Driven Astronomy (SODA) course. This minimal lecture course emphasizes using student collected observations to infer basic astronomical information about the universe. Observational data is obtained using small telescopes, inexpensive imaging cameras, and reticule eyepieces. The data are collectively analyzed by students in the classroom. In this poster we present the SODA activities that have been successfully carried out in this learner centered course.

  20. Micromachining soda-lime glass by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wei; Yu, Jian; Chai, Lu; Wang, Ching-Yue

    2015-08-01

    The physical process of forming a modified region in soda-lime glass was investigated using 1 kHz intense femtosecond laser pulses from a Ti: sapphire laser at 775 nm. Through the modifications induced by the femtosecond laser radiation using selective chemical etching techniques, we fabricated reproducible and defined microstructures and further studied their morphologies and etching properties. Moreover, a possible physical mechanism for the femtosecond laser modification in soda-lime glass was proposed.

  1. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes

    PubMed Central

    Paul Antony, Chakkiath; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-01-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence. PMID:23178675

  2. Immunotoxicity of washing soda in a freshwater sponge of India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2015-03-01

    The natural habitat of sponge, Eunapius carteri faces an ecotoxicological threat of contamination by washing soda, a common household cleaning agent of India. Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is reported to be toxic to aquatic organisms. Domestic effluent, drain water and various human activities in ponds and lakes have been identified as the major routes of washing soda contamination of water. Phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules are important immunological responses offered by the cells of sponges against environmental toxins and pathogens. Present study involves estimation of phagocytic response and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase in E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Sodium carbonate exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phagocytic response of sponge cells under 4, 8, 16 mg/l of the toxin for 96h and all experimental concentrations of the toxin for 192h. Washing soda exposure yielded an initial increase in the generation of the superoxide anion and nitric oxide followed by a significant decrease in generation of these cytotoxic agents. Sponge cell generated a high degree of phenoloxidase activity under the experimental exposure of 2, 4, 8, 16 mg/l of sodium carbonate for 96 and 192 h. Washing soda induced alteration of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses of E. carteri was indicative to an undesirable shift in their immune status leading to the possible crises of survival and propagation of sponges in their natural habitat. PMID:25497767

  3. NASA Giovanni Portals for NLDAS/GLDAS Online Visualization, Analysis, and Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, H.; Teng, W. L.; Vollmer, B. E.; Mocko, D. M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; Rodell, M.

    2011-12-01

    North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) are generating a series of land surface forcing (e.g., precipitation, surface meteorology, and radiation), state (e.g., soil moisture and temperature, and snow), and flux (e.g., evaporation and sensible heat flux) products, simulated by several land surface models. To date, NLDAS and GLDAS have generated more than 30 and 60 years of data, respectively. These quality-controlled, and spatially and temporally consistent, terrestrial hydrological data could play an important role in characterizing the spatial and temporal variability of water and energy cycles and, thereby, improve our understanding of the land-surface-atmosphere interaction and the impact of land-surface processes on climate extremes. All NLDAS and GLDAS data are accessible from the Hydrology Data and Information Services Center (HDISC) at the NASA GES DISC (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/hydrology). To further facilitate access and use of these data, three new and improved portals of NASA Giovanni have been made available for NLDAS and GLDAS online visualization, analysis, and intercomparison. The new and improved portals include the following: 1. Giovanni portal, http://gdata1.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/daac-bin/G3/gui.cgi?instance_id=NLDAS0125_H, for NLDAS 0.125°x0.125° hourly data from NLDAS Phase 1 (NLDAS-1) forcing product (Aug. 1996 - Dec. 2007) and NLDAS Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) primary forcing, secondary forcing, and Mosaic model products (Jan. 1979 - present). 2. Giovanni portal, http://gdata1.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/daac-bin/G3/gui.cgi?instance_id=GLDAS10_3H, for 1.0°x1.0° 3-hourly data from GLDAS Version 2 (GLDAS-2) NOAH model product (Jan. 1948 - Dec. 2008) and GLDAS Version 1 (GLDAS-1) CLM, Mosaic, NOAH, and VIC model products (Jan. 1979 - present). 3. Giovanni portal, http://gdata1.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/daac-bin/G3/gui.cgi?instance_id=GLDAS10_M, for 1.0°x1.0° monthly data from GLDAS-2 NOAH model product

  4. NASA Giovanni Portals for NLDAS/GLDAS Online Visualization, Analysis, and Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Hualan; Teng, William L.; Vollmer, Bruce; Mocko, David M.; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; Rodell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) are generating a series of land surface forcing (e.g., precipitation, surface meteorology, and radiation), state (e.g., soil moisture and temperature, and snow), and flux (e.g., evaporation and sensible heat flux) products, simulated by several land surface models. To date, NLDAS and GLDAS have generated more than 30 (1979 - present) and 60 (1948 - present) years of data, respectively. To further facilitate data accessibility and utilization, three new portals in the NASA Giovanni system have been made available for NLDAS and GLDAS online visualization, analysis, and intercomparison.

  5. The Renaissance and the universal surgeon: Giovanni Andrea Della Croce, a master of traumatology.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Tarabella, Vittorio; Filardo, Giuseppe; Viganò, Anna; Tomba, Patrizia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2013-12-01

    All the medical knowledge of all time in one book, the universal and perfect manual for the Renaissance surgeon, and the man who wrote it. This paper depicts the life and works of Giovanni Andrea della Croce, a 16th Century physician and surgeon, who, endowed with true spirit of Renaissance humanism, wanted to teach and share all his medical knowledge through his opus magnum, titled "Universal Surgery Complete with All the Relevant Parts for the Optimum Surgeon". An extraordinary book which truly represents a defining moment and a founding stone for traumatology, written by a lesser known historical personality, but nonetheless the Renaissance Master of Traumatology. PMID:24173678

  6. Some remarks on preparations for Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli's journey to Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalakin, V. K.

    The present paper deals with the outline of some circumstances of the visit of Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli to the Nicolai Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Russia. There are some scan-copies of official letters displayed which belong to the collection from the diplomatic correspondence between the Imperial Academy of Sciences of Russia, and the Diplomatic Service of the Kingdom of Sardinia. The correspondence had been triggered by the application of Schiaparelli for his trip to the Pulkovo Observatory with the aim of perfection in Astronomy and Geodesy. The corresponding facsimile as well as its English translation is given

  7. Real Data and Rapid Results: Ocean Color Data Analysis with Giovanni (GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization and ANalysis Infrastructure)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, J. G.; Leptoukh, G.; Kempler, S.; Gregg, W.; Berrick, S.; Zhu, T.; Liu, Z.; Rui, H.; Shen, S.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) has taken a major step addressing the challenge of using archived Earth Observing System (EOS) data for regional or global studies by developing an infrastructure with a World Wide Web interface which allows online, interactive, data analysis: the GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization and ANalysis Infrastructure, or "Giovanni." Giovanni provides a data analysis environment that is largely independent of underlying data file format. The Ocean Color Time-Series Project has created an initial implementation of Giovanni using monthly Standard Mapped Image (SMI) data products from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) mission. Giovanni users select geophysical parameters, and the geographical region and time period of interest. The system rapidly generates a graphical or ASCII numerical data output. Currently available output options are: Area plot (averaged or accumulated over any available data period for any rectangular area); Time plot (time series averaged over any rectangular area); Hovmeller plots (image view of any longitude-time and latitude-time cross sections); ASCII output for all plot types; and area plot animations. Future plans include correlation plots, output formats compatible with Geographical Information Systems (GIs), and higher temporal resolution data. The Ocean Color Time-Series Project will produce sensor-independent ocean color data beginning with the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) mission and extending through SeaWiFS and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data sets, and will enable incorporation of Visible/lnfrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data, which will be added to Giovanni. The first phase of Giovanni will also include tutorials demonstrating the use of Giovanni and collaborative assistance in the development of research projects using the SeaWiFS and Ocean Color Time-Series Project data in the online Laboratory

  8. Microbial and biogeochernical processes Soda Lake, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Cloern, J.E.; Sofer, Z.; Smith, R.L.; Culbertson, C.W.; Zehr, J.; Miller, L.; Cole, B.; Harvey, R.; Iversen, N.; Klug, M.; Des Marais, D J; Rau, G.

    1988-01-01

    Meromictic, alkaline lakes represent modern-day analogues of lacustrine source rock depositional environments. In order to further our understanding of how these lakes function in terms of limnological and biogeochemical processes, we have conducted an interdisciplinary study of Big Soda Lake. Annual mixolimnion productivity (ca. 500 g m-2) is dominated by a winter diatom bloom (60% of annual) caused by upward transport of ammonia to the epilimnion. The remainder of productivity is attributable to chemoautotrophs (30%) and photosynthetic bacteria (10%) present at the oxic -anoxic interface from May to November. Studies of bacterial heterotrophy and particulate fluxes in the water column indicate that about 90% of annual productivity is remineralized in the mixolimnion, primarily by fermentative bacteria. However, high rates of sulphate reduction (9-29 mmol m-2 yr-1) occur in the monimolimnion waters, which could remineralize most (if not all) of the primary productivity. This discrepancy has not as yet been fully explained. Low rates of methanogenesis also occur in the monimolimnion waters and sediments. Most of the methane is consumed by anaerobic methane oxidation occurring in the monimolimnion water column. Other bacterial processes occurring in the lake are also discussed. Preliminary studies have been made on the organic geochemistry of the monimolimnion sediments. Carbon-14-dating indicates a lower depositional rate prior to meromixis and a downcore enrichment in 13C of organic carbon and chlorophyll derivatives. Hydrous pyrolysis experiments indicate that the sediment organic matter is almost entirely derived from the water column with little or no contribution from terrestrial sources. The significance of the organics released by hydrous pyrolysis is discussed.

  9. Soda pulp and fuel gases synthesis from Hesperaloe funifera.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Requejo, Ana; Ferrer, Ana; Navarro, Enrique

    2010-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to evaluate the suitability of Hesperaloe funifera which is an alternative raw material, for pulping with soda-anthraquinone to produce pulp and paper. It was studied the influence of operational variables (temperature (155-185 degrees C), cooking time (20-60 min) and soda concentration (5-15%), with a constant addition of 1% of anthraquinone and a liquid/solid ratio of 8, in soda-anthraquinone cooking of H. funifera on pulps and paper sheets properties obtained. Finally, the cooking liquors were acidified to separate solid fractions that were subjected to pyrolysis and gasification in order to obtain synthesis and fuel gases. H. funifera contains little lignin and abundant alpha-cellulose; this, together with the morphological characteristics of its fibers, makes it a potentially highly useful papermaking raw material. PMID:20430614

  10. Shock response of soda lime glass at 6 GPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Dattatraya

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the results of a variety of shock wave experiments performed on soda lime glass to understand the modifying influence of so called "Failure wave" on its compression, under single shock, release, and tension. These experiments were done to a peak shock induced stress of around 6-7 GPa. Shock induced response was recorded by means of VISAR. The results of these experiments performed on soda lime glass at 6-7 GPa indicate that: (i) The effect of failure wave propagation is to lower the impedances of failed glass under both shocked compressed and released states and the effect is not initiated instantaneously at the impact surface. (ii) Failure wave velocity is determined to be 1.42 km/s. (iii) The spall strength of soda lime glass in the region transversed by failure wave is not negligible i.e., the pull-back velocity is around 50 m/s.

  11. Use of the NASA Giovanni Data System for Geospatial Public Health Research: Example of Weather-Influenza Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.; Soebiyanto, Radina; Kiang, Richard; Kempler, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Giovanni data analysis system has been recognized as a useful tool to access and analyze many different types of remote sensing data. The variety of environmental data types has allowed the use of Giovanni for different application areas, such as agriculture, hydrology, and air quality research. The use of Giovanni for researching connections between public health issues and Earths environment and climate, potentially exacerbated by anthropogenic influence, has been increasingly demonstrated. In this communication, the pertinence of several different data parameters to public health will be described. This communication also provides a case study of the use of remote sensing data from Giovanni in assessing the associations between seasonal influenza and meteorological parameters. In this study, logistic regression was employed with precipitation, temperature and specific humidity as predictors. Specific humidity was found to be associated (p 0.05) with influenza activity in both temperate and tropical climate. In the two temperate locations studied, specific humidity was negatively correlated with influenza; conversely, in the three tropical locations, specific humidity was positively correlated with influenza. Influenza prediction using the regression models showed good agreement with the observed data (correlation coefficient of 0.50.83).

  12. Soda Consumption During Ad Libitum Food Intake Predicts Weight Change

    PubMed Central

    Bundrick, Sarah C.; Thearle, Marie S.; Venti, Colleen A.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B.

    2013-01-01

    Soda consumption may contribute to weight gain over time. Objective data were used to determine whether soda consumption predicts weight gain or changes in glucose regulation over time. Subjects without diabetes (128 men, 75 women; mean age 34.3±8.9 years; mean body mass index [BMI] 32.5±7.4; mean percentage body fat 31.6%±8.6%) self-selected their food from an ad libitum vending machine system for 3 days. Mean daily energy intake was calculated from food weight. Energy consumed from soda was recorded as were food choices that were low in fat (<20%) or high in simple sugars (>30%). Food choices were expressed as percentage of daily energy intake. A subset of 85 subjects had measurement of follow-up weights and oral glucose tolerance (57 men, 28 women; mean follow-up time=2.5±2.1 years, range 6 months to 9.9 years). Energy consumed from soda was negatively related to age (r=–0.27, P=0.0001), and choosing low-fat foods (r=−0.35, P<0.0001), but positively associated with choosing solid foods high in simple sugars (r=0.45, P<0.0001) and overall average daily energy intake (r=0.46, P<0.0001). Energy intake from food alone did not differ between individuals who did and did not consume beverage calories (P=0.11). Total daily energy intake had no relationship with change in weight (P=0.29) or change in glucose regulation (P=0.38) over time. However, energy consumed from soda correlated with change in weight (r=0.21, P=0.04). This relationship was unchanged after adjusting for follow-up time and initial weight. Soda consumption is a marker for excess energy consumption and is associated with weight gain. PMID:24321742

  13. 40 CFR 430.20 - Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. 430.20 Section 430.20 Protection of Environment... PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bleached Papergrade Kraft and Soda Subcategory § 430.20 Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply...

  14. 40 CFR 430.20 - Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. 430.20 Section 430.20 Protection of Environment... PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bleached Papergrade Kraft and Soda Subcategory § 430.20 Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply...

  15. 40 CFR 430.20 - Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. 430.20 Section 430.20 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bleached Papergrade Kraft and Soda Subcategory § 430.20 Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply...

  16. 40 CFR 430.20 - Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. 430.20 Section 430.20 Protection of Environment... PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bleached Papergrade Kraft and Soda Subcategory § 430.20 Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply...

  17. 40 CFR 430.20 - Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. 430.20 Section 430.20 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bleached Papergrade Kraft and Soda Subcategory § 430.20 Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply...

  18. Striking presence of Egyptian blue identified in a painting by Giovanni Battista Benvenuto from 1524.

    PubMed

    Bredal-Jørgensen, Jørn; Sanyova, Jana; Rask, Vibeke; Sargent, Maria Louise; Therkildsen, Rikke Hoberg

    2011-09-01

    Egyptian blue has been identified in a painting from 1524 by the Italian artist Ortolano Ferrarese (Giovanni Battista Benvenuto). Egyptian blue is the oldest known synthetic pigment, invented by the Egyptians in the fourth dynasty (2613-2494 BC) of the Old Kingdom and extensively used throughout Antiquity. From about 1000 A.D., it disappeared from the historical record and was only reinvented in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The discovery of Egyptian blue in Ortolano Ferrarese's painting from 1524 shows that Egyptian blue was in fact available in the period from which it is normally considered not to exist. The identification of Egyptian blue is based on optical microscopy supported by energy-dispersive spectroscopy and visual light photon-induced spectroscopy, and finally confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy. PMID:21678119

  19. Drawings for an exacting author: illustrations from Giovanni Antonio Scopoli's "Deliciae florae et faunae insubricae".

    PubMed

    Siviero, Monica; Violani, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Giovanni Antonio Scopoli (1723-1788) was one of the most versatile naturalists in eighteenth-century Italy. In 1785, Scopoli conceived the ambitious publication, "Deliciae florae et faunae insubricae". Appearing in installments, this included descriptions and illustrations of plants, animals and minerals found in northern Italy. Unfortunately, Scopoli's sudden death halted publication of the "Deliciae" after its third installment. Recently, a corpus of 98 paintings, in the gouache style, were discovered in the Biblioteca Universitaria of Pavia. These gouaches appear to be the basis for plates planned in future installments of the "Deliciae". Marginal notes in Scopoli's handwriting are included. Because Scopoli's plant and animal specimens have been destroyed or dispersed, these drawings are crucial for reconstructing his scientific opus. Combined with other documents, Scopoli's marginal notes also reveal his exacting standards. He criticized the way his artists had poorly rendered the scientific details of the paintings. PMID:19842293

  20. Catalog of Hymenoptera described by Giovanni Gribodo (1846-1924) (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Penati, Fabio; Mariotti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Giovanni Gribodo (1846-1924) was an Italian civil engineer who described 377 new taxa of Hymenoptera, 199 of which are still valid and in use today, and proposed 6 replacement names. The present catalog provides a brief biography of Gribodo, a bibliography of his 42 publications and a complete list of the taxa proposed by Gribodo. The catalog lists, for all published names, details on the type series, type locality and collector, present status based on literature, all data labels, relevant references and remarks. A gazetteer of type-localities, a systematical list of Genus- and Species-group names, a chronological list of new names proposed by Giovanni Gribodo, with name-bearing types, and a list of Algerian species and varieties are also given. Furthermore, an unpublished manuscript by Gribodo on hymenopterological fauna of Tunisia, still kept at the Civic Museum of Natural History "Giacomo Doria" (Genoa, Italy), is described, and data on the 57 "new" taxa therein listed are reported, discussing their relevance in order to ascertain the original type series of 27 taxa validly published later. Finally, the problem posed by the enigmatic "disappearance" of a large number of Algerian types, already faced by several entomologists in the past, is analyzed, in order to prevent future mistaken designations of lectotypes and neotypes. The following six nomenclatural acts are proposed here by R. Wahis: Hemipepsis sycophanta Gribodo, 1884 = Hemipepsis bellicosa (Smith, 1873) new synonym; Anospilus sulcithorax (Gribodo, 1924) new combination; Auplopus validus (Gribodo, 1884) new combination; Dichragenia quartinae (Gribodo, 1884) new combination; Diplonyx caesar (Gribobo, 1894) new combination; Paracyphononyx melanicrus Gribodo, 1884 status revalidated (resurrected from synonymy with Pompilus ruficrus Klug, 1834). The following four nomenclatural acts are proposed by F. Penati: Parachrysis Gribodo, 1879 [subgenus of Chrysis Linnaeus] = Chrysis Linnaeus, 1760 new synonym

  1. Shock-wave properties of soda-lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1996-11-01

    Planar impact experiments and wave profile measurements provided single and double shock equation of state data to 30 GPa. Both compression wave wave profile structure and release wave data were used to infer time-dependent strength and equation of state properties for soda-lime glass.

  2. 21 CFR 172.490 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow prussiate of soda. 172.490 Section 172.490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.490...

  3. 27 CFR 21.102 - Caustic soda, liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., and 50 ml of distilled water. Titrate with 0.25 N hydrochloric acid to the disappearance of the pink color. Not less than 25 ml of the hydrochloric acid shall be required to neutralize the sample of diluted 50 percent caustic soda, and not less than 36.5 ml of the hydrochloric acid shall be required...

  4. 27 CFR 21.102 - Caustic soda, liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and 50 ml of distilled water. Titrate with 0.25 N hydrochloric acid to the disappearance of the pink color. Not less than 25 ml of the hydrochloric acid shall be required to neutralize the sample of diluted 50 percent caustic soda, and not less than 36.5 ml of the hydrochloric acid shall be required...

  5. 27 CFR 21.102 - Caustic soda, liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., and 50 ml of distilled water. Titrate with 0.25 N hydrochloric acid to the disappearance of the pink color. Not less than 25 ml of the hydrochloric acid shall be required to neutralize the sample of diluted 50 percent caustic soda, and not less than 36.5 ml of the hydrochloric acid shall be required...

  6. 27 CFR 21.102 - Caustic soda, liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and 50 ml of distilled water. Titrate with 0.25 N hydrochloric acid to the disappearance of the pink color. Not less than 25 ml of the hydrochloric acid shall be required to neutralize the sample of diluted 50 percent caustic soda, and not less than 36.5 ml of the hydrochloric acid shall be required...

  7. Explosive volcanism lessons learned from Mentos and soda eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, H. M.; Rust, A. C.; Cashman, K. V.

    2006-12-01

    When hard Mentos candies are dropped into a bottle of carbonated beverage, the resultant rapid CO2 exsolution and gas expansion causes an impressive soda `eruption'. We explore the ways in which this simple example can be used to demonstrate explosive volcanic processes. Through hands-on experiments, students can vary the type of candy, the type of beverage, and the shape of the vent (by making a hole in the cap of the soda bottle) to understand the processes that are influencing the height and duration of the eruption column. The activity can be tailored to demonstrate basic principles of gas exsolution and expansion for young students, but can also be extended to more complex principles of heterogeneous bubble nucleation and decreasing surface tension for college students. We present results from Mentos and soda experiments by a group of college freshman in the elementary education program (with no real science background). We compare students' resultant understanding of the similarities and differences between volcanic eruptions and the experiments with the results from a similar activity performed by a group of graduate geology students. The Mentos and soda reaction is dramatic. Video clips of people, young and old, trying this experiment across the world can be found on the world wide web. We suggest that the popularity of this demonstration be used to help teach fundamental concepts in both volcanology and scientific experimentation.

  8. A Computer Model for Soda Bottle Oscillations: "The Bottelator".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents a model to explain the behavior of oscillatory phenomena found in the soda bottle oscillator. Describes recording the oscillations, and the design of the model based on the qualitative explanation of the oscillations. Illustrates a variety of physiochemical concepts including far-from-equilibrium oscillations, feedback, solubility and…

  9. Using Soda Cans to Teach Physical Science Students about Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Humphreys, Teari C.; LaPorte, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    In this experiment, physical science students measured the mass of several soda cans, measured the mass and volume of water displaced when these cans were placed in water, and determined whether these cans sank or floated in water. Then, the students plotted graphs of the mass of displaced water versus the volume of displaced water, the mass of…

  10. 25. WATER TOWER WITH SODA ASH STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. WATER TOWER WITH SODA ASH STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT AND PUMP HOUSE No. 1 ON THE LEFT. THE HOT METAL BRIDGE IS IN THE FAR BACKGROUND. Jet Lowe, Photographer, 1989. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Auxiliary Buildings & Shops, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  11. Successful biological control of tropical soda apple in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum, is a small shrub native to tropical regions of Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina. This weed was first found in Florida in 1988. In May 2003, a leaf feeding beetle, Gratiana boliviana, from South America was released in Florida as a biological control agent of tro...

  12. Using the NASA Giovanni DICCE Portal to Investigate Land-Ocean Linkages with Satellite and Model Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.; Zalles, Daniel; Krumhansl, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Data-enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE), a NASA climate change education project, employs the NASA Giovanni data system to enable teachers to create climate-related classroom projects using selected satellite and assimilated model data. The easy-to-use DICCE Giovanni portal (DICCE-G) provides data parameters relevant to oceanic, terrestrial, and atmospheric processes. Participants will explore land-ocean linkages using the available data in the DICCE-G portal, in particular focusing on temperature, ocean biology, and precipitation variability related to El Ni?o and La Ni?a events. The demonstration includes the enhanced information for educators developed for the DICCE-G portal. The prototype DICCE Learning Environment (DICCE-LE) for classroom project development will also be demonstrated.

  13. Soda consumption during ad libitum food intake predicts weight change.

    PubMed

    Bundrick, Sarah C; Thearle, Marie S; Venti, Colleen A; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B

    2014-03-01

    Soda consumption may contribute to weight gain over time. Objective data were used to determine whether soda consumption predicts weight gain or changes in glucose regulation over time. Subjects without diabetes (128 men, 75 women; mean age 34.3±8.9 years; mean body mass index 32.5±7.4; mean percentage body fat 31.6%±8.6%) self-selected their food from an ad libitum vending machine system for 3 days. Mean daily energy intake was calculated from food weight. Energy consumed from soda was recorded as were food choices that were low in fat (<20% of calories from fat) or high in simple sugars (>30%). Food choices were expressed as percentage of daily energy intake. A subset of 85 subjects had measurement of follow-up weights and oral glucose tolerance (57 men, 28 women; mean follow-up time=2.5±2.1 years, range 6 months to 9.9 years). Energy consumed from soda was negatively related to age (r=-0.27, P=0.0001) and choosing low-fat foods (r=-0.35, P<0.0001), but positively associated with choosing solid foods high in simple sugars (r=0.45, P<0.0001) and overall average daily energy intake (r=0.46, P<0.0001). Energy intake from food alone did not differ between individuals who did and did not consume beverage calories (P=0.11). Total daily energy intake had no relationship with change in weight (P=0.29) or change in glucose regulation (P=0.38) over time. However, energy consumed from soda correlated with change in weight (r=0.21, P=0.04). This relationship was unchanged after adjusting for follow-up time and initial weight. Soda consumption is a marker for excess energy consumption and is associated with weight gain. PMID:24321742

  14. 65 Years of Reprocessed GLDAS Version 2.0 Data and Their Exploration Using the NASA GES DISC Giovanni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, H.; Vollmer, B.; Teng, W. L.; Beaudoing, H. K.; Rodell, M.; Silberstein, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Global Land Data Assimilation System Version 2 (GLDAS-2) has two components: (1) GLDAS-2.0, entirely forced with the Princeton meteorological forcing data and (2) GLDAS-2.1, forced with a combination of model and observation-based data sets. GLDAS-2.0 data from the Noah model have been reprocessed in July 2015 with updated Princeton forcing data and upgraded Land Information System (LIS) software. The temporal coverage of GLDAS 2.0 is extended to 1948 ~ 2012. The reprocessed GLDAS-2.0 data are archived at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), in self-describing and machine-independent NetCDF format, and can be accessed via HTTP for direct download, OPeNDAP for parameter and spatial subsetting, time aggregation, and format conversion, and Giovanni - Interactive Visualization and Analysis System. The OPeNDAP subsetting is also integrated into Simple Subset Wizard (SSW) for better User Interface and better downloading capability. This presentation describes the main characteristics of GLDAS data, the major improvements of the reprocessed data, and the access to the data. To further facilitate their use, reprocessed GLDAS-2.0 data are integrated into Giovanni, where the data can be easily explored with 17 visualization types, such as Lat-Lon Map and Animation, Time Series, Scatter Plot, and Histogram. This presentation also showcases the main climatology characteristics of 65 years of GLDAS, derived with Giovanni's new capabilities in computing climatology for user-defined time range and visualizing in Lat-Lon Map and Time Series. GLDAS-2.1 is analogous to and will soon replace GLDAS Version 1 (GLDAS-1), covering the time period from 2001 (or 2000 for the 0.25 degree data) to the present, with about a one-month latency. The data are also in NetCDF format and can be accessed via HTTP, OPeNDAP, and Giovanni.

  15. Association of soda consumption with subclinical cardiac remodeling in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Charlotte; Sullivan, Lisa; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Aragam, Jayashri; Jacques, Paul; Cheng, Susan; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diet soda consumption increases cardiometabolic risk. The aim of this investigation was to assess the relations between self-reported soda consumption and subclinical cardiac remodeling. Methods We assessed the relations between self-reported soda consumption and left ventricular mass (LVM) and left atrial dimension (LAD) (both standardized within sex) in a sample of middle-aged attendees from the Framingham Heart Offspring cohort examination 5 and 6. Results The overall mean age was 55 years and 59% of the participants were women. Compared to non-consumers (n=1010), soda consumers (n=3192) had greater body weight (mean 86 vs. 82 kg among men, and 70 vs. 67 kg among women). Compared with non-consumers, age- and height-adjusted LAD was increased (standard deviation units) among soda consumers by 0.15 standard error 0.042, p<0.001) for those drinking >0–7 diet soda (n=1023), −0.010 (0.043, p=0.82) for people drinking >0–7 regular soda (n=907), 0.22 (0.057, p<0.0001) for individuals consuming >7 diet soda (n=372), and 0.20 (0.092, p=0.034) for participants drinking >7 regular soda (n=116) per week. LVM was increased among participants consuming diet soda (p<0.05), but not in regular soda consumers (p>0.05). Upon adjustment for weight, however, all aforementioned associations were attenuated. Conclusion The observed associations between soda consumption and LAD or LVM were likely related to the greater body weight of soda drinkers relative to non-drinkers. PMID:25456096

  16. Using NASA DICCE GIOVANNI to Prepare Pre-service STEM Teachers to Teach Climate Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Deep Horizon oil spill incident on April 20, 2010 potentially compromised the Gulf Coast's ecosystem and human health through the marine food chain. One of the mitigation strategies to impede oil migration to the Gulf Coast's shorelines was to burn off crude oil, which resulted in the production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions such as, benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, and benzo[b]fluoranthene compounds. Noticeable high deaths of marine animals and a decline in phytoplankton productivity have been linked to PAH- and dispersant-toxicity. Phytoplankton plays a pivotal role in natural food chains, production of O2, and capture of CO2. Grambling State University's Water Quality Management students used the University of New Hampshire's Student Climate Data website and the NASA DICCE data portal in learning activities to understand impacts of spill mitigation on chlorophyll a concentrations. Students used NASA Giovanni data and spectral satellite images to examine phytoplankton productivity around coastal shorelines, including Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and the Florida pan-handle. Area-averaged time series from Giovanni indicated that June was the peak month for chlorophyll a from 2007 to 2012. Spectral images showed that chlorophyll a concentrations between 2.5-30mg/m3 were widely distributed around the shorelines of Louisiana, Mississippi, and the Florida pan-handle from June 2007 to June 2008. Students then examined chlorophyll a concentrations in April 2010 and May 2010. Data obtained from spectral images by students showed phytoplankton blooms with a 2.5mg/m3 concentration dramatically decreased from that of April 2010. Next students examined phytoplankton productivity from 0.08-30mg/m3 in the month of June for 2010, 2011, and 2012. In June 2010, a pattern of movement in phytoplankton blooms was observed toward southwest Louisiana and Texas shorelines. Comparative data from June 2011 and June 2012 demonstrated a low

  17. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  18. A Computer Model for Soda Bottle Oscillations: "The Bottelator"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.; Bowers, Peter G.; Hofstetter, Christine

    1997-06-01

    Oscillatory release of gas sometimes occurs when a small pinhole is made in a bottle of commercial soda water. We present experimental documentation of these oscillations, and have modeled them using the Stella II modeling package. The oscillations arise because the headspace above the liquid in the bottle is repressurized by escaping bubbles, thereby temporarily shutting off further bubble nucleation. The system makes an extremely simple demonstration of far-from-equilibrium oscillations.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of silver in soda-lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsella, E.; Gonella, F.; Mazzoldi, P.; Quaranta, A.; Battaglin, G.; Polloni, R.

    1998-03-01

    Spectral and time-resolved luminescence of silver in ion-exchanged soda-lime glass are investigated for samples with different Ag concentrations. The evolution of the observed spectroscopic features are correlated with structural changes in the silver environment from a marked ionic position with a weak influence of the surroundings to a configuration characterized by stronger silver-lattice coupling and Ag +-Ag + correlation effects.

  20. Homespun remedy, homespun toxicity: baking soda ingestion for dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Ajbani, Keyur; Chansky, Michael E; Baumann, Brigitte M

    2011-04-01

    A 68-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with a severe metabolic alkalosis after ingesting large quantities of baking soda to treat his dyspepsia. His underlying pulmonary disease and a progressively worsening mental status necessitated intubation for respiratory failure. Laboratory studies revealed a hyponatremic, hypochloremic, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis. The patient was successfully treated after cessation of the oral bicarbonate, initiation of intravenous hydration, and correction of electrolyte abnormalities. PMID:18164162

  1. Ecomorphological variability of Arthrospira fusiformis (Cyanoprokaryota) in African soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Kaggwa, Mary Nakabungo; Burian, Alfred; Oduor, Steve Omondi; Schagerl, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The filamentous spirally coiled cyanoprokaryote Arthrospira fusiformis is found in extremely high densities in tropical soda lakes acting as driving force of the food web. We studied pronounced temporal morphological changes of Arthrospira in Kenyan soda lakes, Nakuru and Bogoria, and identified underlying key factors. Cell (diameter and height) and filament (height of coil, coil diameter, and number) dimensions were measured from weekly samples collected over a period of 16 months. In both lakes, medium-sized cells and large, widely coiled filaments prevailed most. Percentage of large, widely coiled filaments was promoted by elevated levels of soluble reactive phosphorus, wind speed, temperature and conductivity and the opposite for small filaments. Large, narrow-coiled filaments were associated with an increase in mainly Arthrospira-grazing zooplankton and cyanophage infections. Widely coiled spirals were promoted by increased turbulences. Based on fluorescence measurements, we found widely coiled filaments representing high vitality. From this study we were able to demonstrate for the first time morphological patterns of Arthrospira in nature. Arthrospira morphotypes are suitable for indicating the biological status in soda lakes as they are subjective and therefore reflective of what is happening in its habitat. Additionally, this outcome might be also of interest for commercial 'Spirulina' farms in enhancing high-quality production. PMID:24000144

  2. NASA Giovanni: A Tool for Visualizing, Analyzing, and Inter-Comparing Soil Moisture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, William; Rui, Hualan; Vollmer, Bruce; deJeu, Richard; Fang, Fan; Lei, Guang-Dih

    2012-01-01

    There are many existing satellite soil moisture algorithms and their derived data products, but there is no simple way for a user to inter-compare the products or analyze them together with other related data (e.g., precipitation). An environment that facilitates such inter-comparison and analysis would be useful for validation of satellite soil moisture retrievals against in situ data and for determining the relationships between different soil moisture products. The latter relationships are particularly important for applications users, for whom the continuity of soil moisture data, from whatever source, is critical. A recent example was provided by the sudden demise of EOS Aqua AMSR-E and the end of its soil moisture data production, as well as the end of other soil moisture products that had used the AMSR-E brightness temperature data. The purpose of the current effort is to create an environment, as part of the NASA Giovanni family of portals, that facilitates inter-comparisons of soil moisture algorithms and their derived data products.

  3. "Some curious drawings". Mars through Giovanni Schiaparelli's eyes: between science and fiction.

    PubMed

    Canadelli, Elena

    2009-01-01

    From the second half of the 19th century up to the first part of the 20th century the drawings of Mars by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli became the centre of an international controversy concerning the existence of canals and the hypothetical habitability of the red planet. These images also generated a full impact on the popular culture of the time. This essays follows the scientific representations of Mars by Schiaparelli (drawings of discs and maps) from their birth in the hands of the astronomy community up to their growing old in the hands of scientific popularizers such as Camille Flammarion and science fiction writers such as Herbert George Wells. With its seas and canyons Mars turned into the ideal background for scientific and exotic romanticism, offering a suitable setting for novels and tales. The core question crossed paths with the contemporary early 20th century debate raging on about the evolutionary theory. The study of Mars moved from astronomy to extraterrestrial physiology, biology, meteorology and geography: astronomical images then became imaginary portraits of Martians and artificial Martian landscapes. PMID:20506896

  4. Bound soda incorporation during hydrate precipitation -- Effects of caustic, temperature and organics

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, L.; Hunter, J.; McCormick, K.; Warren, H.

    1996-10-01

    Soda is incorporated into aluminum tri-hydroxide (hydrate) during the precipitation stage of the Bayer Process. A review of literature shows the predominant effect is alumina supersaturation. This research extends the literature by quantifying the secondary effects of temperature, caustic and organics on soda incorporation beyond the primary effect through alumina supersaturation. This work advances industry knowledge towards better control of soda incorporation in the refinery in the pursuit of higher and more consistent product quality for smelter grade alumina.

  5. Metadata and Buckets in the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Croom, Delwin R., Jr.; Robbins, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) model for digital libraries (DLs), and discuss the role of metadata in SODA. The premise of the SODA model is to "push down" many of the functionalities generally associated with archives into the data objects themselves. Thus the data objects become "smarter", and the archives "dumber". In the SODA model, archives become primarily set managers, and the objects themselves negotiate and handle presentation, enforce terms and conditions, and perform data content management. Buckets are our implementation of smart objects, and da is our reference implementation for dumb archives. We also present our approach to metadata translation for buckets.

  6. Altered processing of sweet taste in the brain of diet soda drinkers.

    PubMed

    Green, Erin; Murphy, Claire

    2012-11-01

    Artificially sweetened beverage consumption has been linked to obesity, and it has been hypothesized that considerable exposure to nonnutritive sweeteners may be associated with impaired energy regulation. The reward system plays an integral role in modulating energy intake, but little is known about whether habitual use of artificial sweetener (i.e., diet soda consumption) may be related to altered reward processing of sweet taste in the brain. To investigate this, we examined fMRI response after a 12-hour fast to sucrose (a nutritive sweetener) and saccharin (a nonnutritive sweetener) during hedonic evaluation in young adult diet soda drinkers and non-diet soda drinkers. Diet soda drinkers demonstrated greater activation to sweet taste in the dopaminergic midbrain (including ventral tegmental area) and right amygdala. Saccharin elicited a greater response in the right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 47) relative to sucrose in non-diet soda drinkers. There was no difference in fMRI response to the nutritive or nonnutritive sweetener for diet soda drinkers. Within the diet soda drinkers, fMRI activation of the right caudate head in response to saccharin was negatively associated with the amount of diet sodas consumed per week; individuals who consumed a greater number of diet sodas had reduced caudate head activation. These findings suggest that there are alterations in reward processing of sweet taste in individuals who regularly consume diet soda, and this is associated with the degree of consumption. These findings may provide some insight into the link between diet soda consumption and obesity. PMID:22583859

  7. The European accreditation of Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II of Bari.

    PubMed

    Lacalamita, Rosanna; Quaranta, Antonio; Trisorio Liuzzi, Maria Pia; Nigro, Aldo; Simonetti, Umberto; Schirone, Massimiliano; Aloè, Ferruccio; Capochiani, Gianluca; De Francesco, Genoveffa; Gadaleta, Cosimo; Galetta, Domenico; Grammatica, Luciano; Guarini, Attilio; Mattioli, Vittorio; Milella, Piero; Moschetta, Antonio; Nardulli, Patrizia; Nigro, Vincenza; Silvestris, Nico; Paradiso, Angelo

    2015-12-31

    The National Cancer Institute of Bari (Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, IRCCS) has been involved since the conception of the project of the Italian Ministry for Health aimed to validate the applicability of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) accreditation and designation (A&D) model to the Network of Italian Cancer Centers, IRCCS, of Alleanza Contro il Cancro. The self-assessment phase of the Institute started in September 2013 and ended in June 2014. All documents and tools were transferred to the OECI A&D Board in June 2014 and a 2-day peer review visit was conducted in October 2014 by an international qualified audit team. The Institute received its final designation and certification in June 2015. The OECI A&D Board, in its final report, came to the conclusion that Istituto Tumori "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari has a strong research component with some essential elements of comprehensive cancer care still under development; the lack of a system for using outcome data for the strategic management approach to decision-making and missing a regular internal audit system eventually helping further quality improvement were reported as examples of areas with opportunities for improvement. The OECI A&D process represented a great opportunity for the cancer center to benchmark the quality of its performance according to standard parameters in comparison with other international centers and to further develop a participatory group identity. The common goal of accreditation was real and participatory with long-lasting positive effects. We agree with the OECI comments about the next areas of work in which the Institute could produce future further efforts: the use of its powerful IT system as a means for outcome analysis and empowerment projects for its cancer patients. PMID:27096266

  8. Exploring Climatology and Long-Term Variations of Aerosols from NASA Reanalysis MERRA-2 with Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Ostrenga, Dana; Vollmer, Bruce; Li, Zhanqing

    2016-01-01

    Dust plays important roles in energy cycle and climate variations. The dust deposition is the major source of iron in the open ocean, which is an essential micronutrient for phytoplankton growth and therefore may influence the ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2. Mineral dust can also act as fertilizer for forests over long time periods. Over 35 years of simulated global aerosol products from NASA atmospheric reanalysis, second Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2) are available from NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The MERRA-2 covers the period 1980-present, continuing as an ongoing climate analysis. Aerosol assimilation is included throughout the period, using MODIS, MISR, AERONET, and AVHRR (in the pre-EOS period). The aerosols are assimilated by using MERRA-2 aerosol model, which interact directly with the radiation parameterization, and radiatively coupled with atmospheric model dynamics in the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5). Dust deposition data along with other major aerosol compositions (e.g. black carbon, sea salt, and sulfate, etc.) are simulated as dry and wet deposition, respectively. The hourly and monthly data are available at spatial resolution of 0.5ox0.625o (latitude x longitude). Quick data exploration of climatology and interannual variations of MERRA-2 aerosol can be done through the online visualization and analysis tool, Giovanni. This presentation, using dust deposition as an example, demonstrates a number of MERRA-2 data services at GES DISC. Global distributions of dust depositions, and their seasonal and inter-annual variations are investigated from MERRA-2 monthly aerosol products.

  9. Bacterial diversity of lonar soda lake of India.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Kshipra B; Pathak, Anupama P; Karuppayil, Mohan S

    2011-01-01

    Total seventy four bacteria were isolated from Lonar soda lake of Maharashtra state, India. Eleven isolates were identified using morphological, biochemical and molecular analysis. The bacteria isolated belonged to phylum firmicutes and proteobacteria. Majorities (eight) were firmicutes and three were proteobacteria. For the first time we are reporting Alcanivorax spp. which is a genus well known for its oil degradation capacity, indicate the probable existence of oil reservoir in vicinity of Lonar lake. In addition all the eleven bacteria are potential producers of industrially important enzymes, pigments, antibiotics as well. PMID:22282637

  10. Snowpack ground truth Donner Pass site, Soda Springs, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. B.

    1977-01-01

    Ground truth data taken near Soda Springs, California, on January 18, 1977, in support of the NASA Airborne Instrumentation Research Program are presented. Ground truth data taken in support of this mission were as follows: (1) snow depths were taken every 400 feet; (2) snow densities were taken every 1,200 feet; (3) two snowpits were dug, and limited density, vertical layer classifications, and soil observations were taken; and (4) temperatures of the upper 6 inches of the snowpack were taken at one location.

  11. Improvement in hardness of soda-lime-silica glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Riya; De, Moumita; Roy, Sudakshina; Dey, Arjun; Biswas, Sampad K.; Middya, Tapas Ranjan; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop K.

    2012-06-05

    Hardness is a key design parameter for structural application of brittle solids like glass. Here we report for the first time the significant improvement of about 10% in Vicker's hardness of a soda-lime-silica glass with loading rate in the range of 0.1-10 N.s{sup -1}. Corroborative dark field optical and scanning electron microscopy provided clue to this improvement through evidence of variations in spatial density of shear deformation band formation as a function of loading rate.

  12. Baking soda induced severe metabolic alkalosis in a haemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Turkmen, Kultigin; Atalay, Huseyin; Turk, Suleyman

    2009-08-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is a rare occurence in hemodialysis population compared to metabolic acidosis unless some precipitating factors such as nasogastric suction, vomiting and alkali ingestion or infusion are present. When metabolic alkalosis develops, it may cause serious clinical consequences among them are sleep apnea, resistent hypertension, dysrhythmia and seizures. Here, we present a 54-year-old female hemodialysis patient who developed a severe metabolic alkalosis due to baking soda ingestion to relieve dyspepsia. She had sleep apnea, volume overload and uncontrolled hypertension due to metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis was corrected and the patient's clinical condition was relieved with negative-bicarbonate hemodialysis. PMID:25984015

  13. Issues in Data Fusion for Satellite Aerosol Measurements for Applications with GIOVANNI System at NASA GES DISC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalan, Arun; Zubko, Viktor; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2008-01-01

    We look at issues, barriers and approaches for Data Fusion of satellite aerosol data as available from the GES DISC GIOVANNI Web Service. Daily Global Maps of AOT from a single satellite sensor alone contain gaps that arise due to various sources (sun glint regions, clouds, orbital swath gaps at low latitudes, bright underlying surfaces etc.). The goal is to develop a fast, accurate and efficient method to improve the spatial coverage of the Daily AOT data to facilitate comparisons with Global Models. Data Fusion may be supplemented by Optimal Interpolation (OI) as needed.

  14. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV) was first identified in tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum), a noxious weed, in Florida in 2002. This report provides the first full genome sequence of TSAMV. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional spec...

  15. What Contributes to Excessive Diet Soda Intake in Eating Disorders: Appetitive Drive, Weight Concerns, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive diet soda intake is common in eating disorders. The present study examined factors contributing to excessive intake in a sample of individuals with lifetime eating disorders based on proposed DSM-5 criteria (n=240) and non-eating disorder controls (n=157). Individuals with eating disorders, particularly bulimia nervosa, consumed more diet soda than controls. Eating disorder symptoms that reflect increased appetitive drive or increased weight concerns were associated with increased diet soda intake. Increased weight concerns were associated with increased diet soda intake when levels of appetitive drive were high, but not when they were low. Results highlight the importance of monitoring diet soda intake in individuals with eating disorders and may have implications for the maintenance of dysregulated taste reward processing in BN. PMID:23600556

  16. What contributes to excessive diet soda intake in eating disorders: appetitive drive, weight concerns, or both?

    PubMed

    Brown, Tiffany A; Keel, Pamela K

    2013-01-01

    Excessive diet soda intake is common in eating disorders. The present study examined factors contributing to excessive intake in a sample of individuals with lifetime eating disorders based on proposed DSM-5 criteria (n = 240) and non-eating disorder controls (n = 157). Individuals with eating disorders, particularly bulimia nervosa, consumed more diet soda than controls. Eating disorder symptoms that reflect increased appetitive drive or increased weight concerns were associated with increased diet soda intake. Increased weight concerns were associated with increased diet soda intake when levels of appetitive drive were high, but not when they were low. Results highlight the importance of monitoring diet soda intake in individuals with eating disorders and may have implications for the maintenance of dysregulated taste reward processing in bulimia nervosa. PMID:23600556

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Monsanto Chemical Co. (Soda Springs), Soda Springs, ID, April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The Monsanto Chemical Company Superfund Site is located in Caribou County, Idaho, approximately one mile north of the City of Soda Springs. After screening using conservative human health and ecological screening values, the contaminants of potential concern in soils and on-Plant source piles include, radionuclides (radium-226, lead-210, and uranium-238) and chemicals (arsenic, beryllium, selenium and zinc). The groundwater contaminants of potential concern include those substances detected at concentrations above primary MCLs, i.e., cadmium, fluoride, nitrate, and selenium, and manganese, which is present above a secondary MCL.

  18. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  19. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  20. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  1. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  2. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  3. Obesity prevention strategies: could food or soda taxes improve health?

    PubMed

    Encarnação, R; Lloyd-Williams, F; Bromley, H; Capewell, S

    2016-03-01

    Evidence shows that one of the main causes for rising obesity rates is excessive consumption of sugar, which is due in large part to the high sugar content of most soda and juice drinks and junk foods. Worryingly, UK and global populations are consuming increasing amounts of sugary drinks and junk foods (high in salt, sugar and saturated fats). However, there is raised public awareness, and parents in particular want something to be done to curb the alarming rise in childhood obesity. Population-wide policies (i.e. taxation, regulation, legislation, reformulation) consistently achieve greater public health gains than interventions and strategies targeted at individuals. Junk food and soda taxes are supported by increasing evidence from empirical and modelling studies. The strongest evidence base is for a tax on sugar sweetened beverages, but in order to effectively reduce consumption, that taxation needs to be at least 20%. Empirical data from a number of countries which have implemented a duty on sugar or sugary drinks shows rapid, substantial benefits. In the UK, increasing evidence from recent scientific reports consistently support substantial reductions in sugar consumption through comprehensive strategies which include a tax. Furthermore, there is increasing public support for such measures. A sugar sweetened beverages tax will happen in the UK so the question is not 'If?' but 'When?' this tax will be implemented. And, crucially, which nation will get there first? England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales? PMID:27092368

  4. Effects of baking-soda-containing dentifrices on oral malodor.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D M

    1996-01-01

    Oral malodor, also known as bad breath or halitosis, is an extremely common problem. Bad breath can arise from many sources in the body, but most frequently is produced in the mouth by the action of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria on sulfur-containing proteinaceous substrates in the saliva, such as debris and plaque. The primary molecules responsible for oral malodor are volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), such as hydrogen sulfide and methylmercaptan. Increased malodor production is related to greater bacterial numbers, reducing conditions, availability of protein substrates, and a pH above neutral. Bad breath is more common in the elderly, as well as those with unhygienic mouths, gingivitis, and periodontitis, but bad breath can also be found in some individuals who are periodontally healthy. The major source of oral malodor is the tongue. Approaches to controlling malodor have included masking, oral hygiene, antibacterial agents, conversion of VSC to nonodorous forms, oxidizing agents, and traditional approaches, including the use of baking soda. Results of controlled double-blind crossover studies, using both organoleptic (sensory) and gas chromatographic analysis of mouth air VSC, indicate that two dentifrices with high baking-soda concentrations, Arm & Hammer Dental Care and Arm & Hammer PeroxiCare, reduce oral malodor. PMID:11524864

  5. Effects of baking-soda-containing dentifrices on oral malodor.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D M

    1997-01-01

    Oral malodor, also known as bad breath or halitosis, is an extremely common problem. Bad breath can arise from many sources in the body, but most frequently is produced in the mouth by the action of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria on sulfur-containing proteinaceous substrates in the saliva, such as debris and plaque. The primary molecules responsible for oral malodor are volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), such as hydrogen sulfide and methylmercaptan. Increased malodor production is related to greater bacterial numbers, reducing conditions, availability of protein substrates, and a pH above neutral. Bad breath is more common in the elderly, as well as those with unhygienic mouths, gingivitis, and periodontitis, but bad breath can also be found in some individuals who are periodontally healthy. The major source of oral malodor is the tongue. Approaches to controlling malodor have included masking, oral hygiene, antibacterial agents, conversion of VSC to nonodorous forms, oxidizing agents, and traditional approaches, including the use of backing soda. Results of controlled double-blind crossover studies, using both organoleptic (sensory) and gas chromatographic analysis of mouth air VSC, indicate that two dentifrices with high baking-soda concentrations, Arm & Hammer Dental Care and Arm & Hammer PeroxiCare, reduce oral malodor. PMID:12017931

  6. Soda consumption and the risk of stroke in men and women123

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Lawrence; Flint, Alan J; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Willett, Walter C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Consumption of sugar-sweetened soda has been associated with an increased risk of cardiometabolic disease. The relation with cerebrovascular disease has not yet been closely examined. Objective: Our objective was to examine patterns of soda consumption and substitution of alternative beverages for soda in relation to stroke risk. Design: The Nurses’ Health Study, a prospective cohort study of 84,085 women followed for 28 y (1980–2008), and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a prospective cohort study of 43,371 men followed for 22 y (1986–2008), provided data on soda consumption and incident stroke. Results: We documented 1416 strokes in men during 841,770 person-years of follow-up and 2938 strokes in women during 2,188,230 person-years of follow-up. The pooled RR of total stroke for ≥1 serving of sugar-sweetened soda/d, compared with none, was 1.16 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.34). The pooled RR of total stroke for ≥1 serving of low-calorie soda/d, compared with none, was 1.16 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.28). Compared with 1 serving of sugar-sweetened soda/d, 1 serving of decaffeinated coffee/d was associated with a 10% (95% CI: 1%, 19%) lower risk of stroke and 1 serving of caffeinated coffee/d with a 9% (95% CI: 0%, 17%) lower risk. Similar estimated reductions in risk were seen for substitution of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee for low-calorie soda. Conclusions: Greater consumption of sugar-sweetened and low-calorie sodas was associated with a significantly higher risk of stroke. This risk may be reduced by substituting alternative beverages for soda. PMID:22492378

  7. Using NASA's Giovanni System to Simulate Time-Series Stations in the Outflow Region of California's Eel River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.; Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Lee, Zhongping

    2012-01-01

    Oceanographic time-series stations provide vital data for the monitoring of oceanic processes, particularly those associated with trends over time and interannual variability. There are likely numerous locations where the establishment of a time-series station would be desirable, but for reasons of funding or logistics, such establishment may not be feasible. An alternative to an operational time-series station is monitoring of sites via remote sensing. In this study, the NASA Giovanni data system is employed to simulate the establishment of two time-series stations near the outflow region of California s Eel River, which carries a high sediment load. Previous time-series analysis of this location (Acker et al. 2009) indicated that remotely-sensed chl a exhibits a statistically significant increasing trend during summer (low flow) months, but no apparent trend during winter (high flow) months. Examination of several newly-available ocean data parameters in Giovanni, including 8-day resolution data, demonstrates the differences in ocean parameter trends at the two locations compared to regionally-averaged time-series. The hypothesis that the increased summer chl a values are related to increasing SST is evaluated, and the signature of the Eel River plume is defined with ocean optical parameters.

  8. Effect of shear on failure waves in soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, R. J.; Mello, M.; Brar, N. S.

    1998-07-10

    By means of in-material stress gauges, failure waves in shock-compressed soda lime glass have been shown to be distinguished by a marked reduction in shear stress. To explore further the relation between failure waves and shearing resistance, a series of pressure-shear impact experiments have been performed involving the impact of a glass plate by a steel flyer plate and vice versa. The latter configuration is designed to allow direct measurements of the shearing resistance of the failed material. In both configurations, the normal and transverse motion of the free surface of the target is monitored using laser interferometry. The transverse velocity-time profiles show a pronounced loss in shearing resistance of the glass at impact velocities above the threshold for failure waves to occur.

  9. INDEX OF REFRACTION OF SHOCK LOADED SODA-LIME GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C. S.

    2009-12-28

    Soda-lime glass (SLG) is a potential low-cost VISAR window for use at moderate shock pressures (up to 2430 GPa) where the material remains transparent. In order for SLG to be practical as a VISAR window, the correction factor, which describes the frequency correction related to the strain dependence of the refractive index, and hence the index of refraction itself, must be characterized as a function of pressure. Characterization data are reported in this paper and compared to previous results. The present data show good agreement with those of Dandekar [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 6614 (1998)] and separate study results by Gibbons and Ahrens [J. Geophys. Res. 76, 5489 (1971)] up to 7 GPa. However, at stresses over 7 GPa, marked discrepancies are evident between the present data and that of Gibbons and Ahrens. Differences in test methods may explain these discrepancies.

  10. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E; Morrissey, Timothy G; Vuono, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  11. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 2. Pelagic sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    The epilimnion of hypersaline, alkaline, meromictic Big Soda Lake contains an average 58 mmol sulfate liter−1 and 0.4 µmol dissolved iron liter−1. The monimolimnion, which is permanently anoxic, has a sulfide concentration ranging seasonally from 4 to 7 mmol liter−1. Depth profiles of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, assayed with a 35S tracer technique and in situ incubations, demonstrated that sulfate reduction occurs within the water column of this extreme environment. The average rate of reduction in the monimolimnion was 3 µmol sulfate liter−1 d−1in May compared to 0.9 in October. These values are comparable to rates of sulfate reduction reported for anoxic waters of more moderate environments. Sulfate reduction also occurred in the anoxic zone of the mixolimnion, though at significantly lower rates (0.025–0.090 µmol liter−1 d−1 at 25 m). Additions of FeS (1.0 mmol liter−1) doubled the endogenous rate of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, while MnS and kaolinite had no effect. These results suggest that sulfate reduction in Big Soda Lake is iron limited and controlled by seasonal variables other than temperature. Estimates of the organic carbon mineralized by sulfate reduction exceed measured fluxes of particulate organic carbon sinking from the mixolimnion. Thus, additional sources of electron donors (other than those derived from the sinking of pelagic autotrophs) may also fuel monimolimnetic sulfate reduction in the lake.

  12. [Modification of fasting blood glucose in adults with diabetes mellitus type 2 after regular soda and diet soda intake in the State of Querétaro, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Olalde-Mendoza, Liliana; Moreno-González, Yazmín Esmeralda

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the modification of fasting blood glucose in adults with diabetes mellitus type 2 after intake of regular soda and diet soda. We conducted a randomized clinical trial in clinics of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Querétaro, México. We included 80 patients with diabetes (mean weight 74.2 +/- 13.66, BMI 30.5 +/- 4.305, waist 98.2 +/- 12.9 and time evolution of diabetes 3.8 +/- 3.009) who were asked to come with fasting for 8 hours and without taking any medicine before testing. They were divided into two groups of 40 subjects, to whom was measured fasting blood glucose after the ingestion of 200 ml of diet soda (with aspartame and acesulfame potassium) or regular soda (without sweetener) we measure glucose at 10, 15 and 30 minutes. For statistical analysis performed we used Student's t-test for dependent and independent samples, and paired t-test, and chi square test (chi2). Capillary glucose levels at 10 minutes were -34.52 and -25.41%, at 15 minutes -48.8 and -36.2% and at 30 minutes 57.75 and 43.6% of absolute and relative differences, with p = 0.000. In conclusion, according to the observations, diet soda doesn't increased blood glucose levels, with a significant difference in fasting decreased at 30 minutes. PMID:24934070

  13. [Overcrowding in emergency departments: the case of the San Giovanni Battista (Molinette) university hospital in Turin (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Fornero, Giulio; Arione, Roberto; Fiandra, Umberto; Rapellino, Marco; Bono, Alessia; Moiraghi, Corrado; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2011-01-01

    Overcrowding in Emergency Departments (ED) is a common phenomenon worldwide, especially in metropolitan areas. The main reason for overcrowding is not inappropriate emergency department use by patients but rather a shortage of available hospital beds which results in extended ED stays for patients who need emergency admission. The aims of this study, conducted at the San Giovanni Battista (Molinette) University hospital in Turin (Italy), were a) to verify the existence of overcrowding in the hospital ED and b) to test whether, as stated in the literature, overcrowding is due to restricted access to hospital beds for patients needing emergency admission, and to identify contributing factors. Results show the existence of overcrowding and confirm the hypothesized cause. PMID:22508607

  14. Giovanni Battista Morgagni in the murals of Diego Rivera at the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Estañol, Bruno; Delgado, Guillermo R

    2014-07-01

    The Italian physician Giovanni Battista Morgagni was the founder of the clinico-anatomical method. His masterpiece De sedibus, et causis morborum per anatomen indagatis represented a major breakthrough in the history of medicine. In the murals of Diego Rivera at the National Institute of Cardiology, Morgagni appears at the center of the fresco. With his left index finger points to the chest of a dying patient with a bulging pulsating aortic aneurysm below the left clavicle, and with his right hand, that holds a scalpel, shows the aneurysm found at the autopsy table. With this striking image the clinico-anatomical method is succinctly depicted. Professor Ignacio Chávez, the founder of the National Institute of Cardiology, gave the artist the elements to draw Morgagni, but the disposition and the importance of Morgagni in the fresco were due to the talent of Rivera. PMID:23493179

  15. Using NASA's Giovanni Web Portal to Access and Visualize Satellite-based Earth Science Data in the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Steven; Acker, James G.; Prados, Ana I.; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles for the average Earth science student today is locating and obtaining satellite-based remote sensing data sets in a format that is accessible and optimal for their data analysis needs. At the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) alone, on the order of hundreds of Terabytes of data are available for distribution to scientists, students and the general public. The single biggest and time-consuming hurdle for most students when they begin their study of the various datasets is how to slog through this mountain of data to arrive at a properly sub-setted and manageable data set to answer their science question(s). The GES DISC provides a number of tools for data access and visualization, including the Google-like Mirador search engine and the powerful GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) web interface.

  16. Hydrology Research with the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) Datasets at the NASA GES DISC Using Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mocko, David M.; Rui, Hualan; Acker, James G.

    2013-01-01

    The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) is a collaboration project between NASA/GSFC, NOAA, Princeton Univ., and the Univ. of Washington. NLDAS has created a surface meteorology dataset using the best-available observations and reanalyses the backbone of this dataset is a gridded precipitation analysis from rain gauges. This dataset is used to drive four separate land-surface models (LSMs) to produce datasets of soil moisture, snow, runoff, and surface fluxes. NLDAS datasets are available hourly and extend from Jan 1979 to near real-time with a typical 4-day lag. The datasets are available at 1/8th-degree over CONUS and portions of Canada and Mexico from 25-53 North. The datasets have been extensively evaluated against observations, and are also used as part of a drought monitor. NLDAS datasets are available from the NASA GES DISC and can be accessed via ftp, GDS, Mirador, and Giovanni. GES DISC news articles were published showing figures from the heat wave of 2011, Hurricane Irene, Tropical Storm Lee, and the low-snow winter of 2011-2012. For this presentation, Giovanni-generated figures using NLDAS data from the derecho across the U.S. Midwest and Mid-Atlantic will be presented. Also, similar figures will be presented from the landfall of Hurricane Isaac and the before-and-after drought conditions of the path of the tropical moisture into the central states of the U.S. Updates on future products and datasets from the NLDAS project will also be introduced.

  17. More Chemistry in a Soda Bottle: A Conservation of Mass Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Daniel Q.; Shaw, Stephanie A.; Bare, William O.; Goldsby, Kenneth A.

    1995-08-01

    A simple activity designed to illustrate conservation of mass is reported. The activity uses a two-liter soda bottle to contain the products of a gas-evolving reaction. While any number of gas-evolving reactions could be used in this activity, a specific procedure for vinegar and baking soda is given since these materials present nominal hazards and are readily available to K-12 teachers.

  18. Regular-Soda Intake Independent of Weight Status Is Associated with Asthma among US High School Students

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sohyun; Blanck, Heidi M.; Sherry, Bettylou; Jones, Sherry Everett; Pan, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Limited research shows an inconclusive association between soda intake and asthma, potentially attributable to certain preservatives in sodas. This cross-sectional study examined the association between regular (nondiet)-soda intake and current asthma among a nationally representative sample of high school students. Analysis was based on the 2009 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey and included 15,960 students (grades 9 through 12) with data for both regular-soda intake and current asthma status. The outcome measure was current asthma (ie, told by doctor/nurse that they had asthma and still have asthma). The main exposure variable was regular-soda intake (ie, drank a can/bottle/glass of soda during the 7 days before the survey). Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios for regular-soda intake with current asthma after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, weight status, and current cigarette use. Overall, 10.8% of students had current asthma. In addition, 9.7% of students who did not drink regular soda had current asthma, and 14.7% of students who drank regular soda three or more times per day had current asthma. Compared with those who did not drink regular soda, odds of having current asthma were higher among students who drank regular soda two times per day (adjusted odds ratio = 1.28; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.62) and three or more times per day (adjusted odds ratio = 1.64; 95% CI 1.25 to 2.16). The association between high regular-soda intake and current asthma suggests efforts to reduce regular-soda intake among youth might have benefits beyond improving diet quality. However, this association needs additional research, such as a longitudinal examination. PMID:23260727

  19. Holocene climatic and hydrological changes in Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, M. R.; Reidy, L. M.; Starratt, S.; Byrne, R.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to separate the role of hydrology from climate change when assessing the Holocene history of lake sediments. Big Soda Lake is a Holocene maar lake in the Great Basin of Nevada with a 9 m sediment record that covers the Holocene. The mm-scale laminations, diatoms, and δ18O and δ13C from bulk calcite in the core are consistent with a saline, closed-basin lake down to approximately 4.3 m below the sediment water interface. The top 7 cm of the core show the influence of human hydrologic modifications to the area. Below that, stable isotope data shows variable groundwater input that is mostly consistent with climate variation from other records in the western USA. Below 4.3 m depth, the laminations abruptly end and are replaced by unlaminated massive mud, sand, and gravel to the bottom. The isotopic composition of the calcite abruptly changes from covarying, to inversely varying compositions below this break. This break occurred at about 5,600 cal yr BP. In addition, the diatom assemblage below 4.3 m is similar to that found in modern Walker Lake; whereas the diatom assemblage above 4.3 m is similar to modern Mono Lake. The δ18O isotopic composition of the calcite is on average 6 ‰ more negative below 4.3 m than above the change, indicating that the lake contained fresher water before 5,600 cal yr BP ago. The cause for the abrupt change cannot be explained through climate shifts because climate in the Great Basin has been shown to be more arid between 8,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP. It has been hypothesized that the Walker River flowed to the Carson River Basin between about 14,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP, and this added water may have raised the groundwater table sufficiently in the Carson Basin to freshen Big Soda Lake. Once the Walker River diverted back to the Walker Basin, more saline conditions prevailed reflecting changes in climate and human influence at the top of the core.

  20. Sugar-sweetened soda consumption and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in women1234

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Costenbader, Karen H; Gao, Xiang; Al-Daabil, May; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Solomon, Daniel H; Hu, Frank B; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Lu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sugar-sweetened soda consumption is consistently associated with an increased risk of several chronic inflammatory diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Whether it plays a role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a common autoimmune inflammatory disease, remains unclear. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the association between sugar-sweetened soda consumption and risk of RA in US women. Design: We prospectively followed 79,570 women from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS; 1980–2008) and 107,330 women from the NHS II (1991–2009). Information on sugar-sweetened soda consumption (including regular cola, caffeine-free cola, and other sugar-sweetened carbonated soda) was obtained from a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline and approximately every 4 y during follow-up. Incident RA cases were validated by medical record review. Time-varying Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate HRs after adjustment for confounders. Results from both cohorts were pooled by an inverse-variance–weighted, fixed-effects model. Results: During 3,381,268 person-years of follow-up, 857 incident cases of RA were documented in the 2 cohorts. In the multivariable pooled analyses, we found that women who consumed ≥1 serving of sugar-sweetened soda/d had a 63% (HR: 1.63; 95% CI: 1.15, 2.30; P-trend = 0.004) increased risk of developing seropositive RA compared with those who consumed no sugar-sweetened soda or who consumed <1 serving/mo. When we restricted analyses to those with later RA onset (after age 55 y) in the NHS, the association appeared to be stronger (HR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.56, 4.46; P-trend < 0.0001). No significant association was found for sugar-sweetened soda and seronegative RA. Diet soda consumption was not significantly associated with risk of RA in the 2 cohorts. Conclusion: Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened soda, but not diet soda, is associated with increased risk of seropositive

  1. Reductive spectrophotometry of divalent tin sensitization on soda lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejugam, Vinith; Wei, Xingfei; Roper, D. Keith

    2016-07-01

    Rapid and facile evaluation of tin (II) sensitization could lead to improved understanding of metal deposition in electroless (EL) plating. This report used a balanced redox reaction between 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB-HCL) and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) to evaluate effects of sensitization conditions (i.e., sensitization time, analyte concentration, aqueous immersion, and acid content) on the accumulated mass of surface-associated divalent tin ion. The accumulated mass of tin (II) increased as the sensitization time increased up to 30 s in proportion to aqueous tin (II) chloride concentrations between 2.6 and 26 mM at a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) content of 68 mM. The average mass peaked at 7.3 nanomoles (nmol) per cm2 after a 5 s aqueous immersion post-sensitization, and then decreased with increasing aqueous immersion post-sensitization. The total average tin (II) + tin (IV) accumulated on soda lime glass measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was 17% higher at 30 s sensitization, suggesting a fraction of the tin (II) present may have oxidized to tin (IV). These results indicated that in situ spectrophotometric evaluation of tin (II) could support development of EL plating for electronics, catalysis, and solar cells.

  2. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 1. Pelagic bacterial heterotrophy and biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehr, Jon P.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Cloern, James E.; George, Leah H.; Lane, Judith L.

    1987-01-01

    Bacterial activities and abundance were measured seasonally in the water column of meromictic Big Soda Lake which is divided into three chemically distinct zones: aerobic mixolimnion, anaerobic mixolimnion, and anaerobic monimolimnion. Bacterial abundance ranged between 5 and 52 x 106 cells ml−1, with highest biomass at the interfaces between these zones: 2–4 mg C liter−1 in the photosynthetic bacterial layer (oxycline) and 0.8–2.0 mg C liter−1 in the chemocline. Bacterial cell size and morphology also varied with depth: small coccoid cells were dominant in the aerobic mixolimnion, whereas the monimolimnion had a more diverse population that included cocci, rods, and large filaments. Heterotrophic activity was measured by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation and [14C]glutamate uptake. Highest uptake rates were at or just below the photosynthetic bacterial layer and were attributable to small (<1 µm) heterotrophs rather than the larger photosynthetic bacteria. These high rates of heterotrophic uptake were apparently linked with fermentation; rates of other mineralization processes (e.g. sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, denitrification) in the anoxic mixolimnion were insignificant. Heterotrophic activity in the highly reduced monimolimnion was generally much lower than elsewhere in the water column. Therefore, although the monimolimnion contained most of the bacterial abundance and biomass (∼60%), most of the cells there were inactive.

  3. Bicarbonate of soda paint stripping process validation and material characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael N.

    1995-01-01

    The Aircraft Production Division at San Antonio Air Logistics Center has conducted extensive investigation into the replacement of hazardous chemicals in aircraft component cleaning, degreasing, and depainting. One of the most viable solutions is process substitution utilizing abrasive techniques. SA-ALC has incorporated the use of Bicarbonate of Soda Blasting as one such substitution. Previous utilization of methylene chloride based chemical strippers and carbon removal agents has been replaced by a walk-in blast booth in which we remove carbon from engine nozzles and various gas turbine engine parts, depaint cowlings, and perform various other functions on a variety of parts. Prior to implementation of this new process, validation of the process was performed, and materials and waste stream characterization studies were conducted. These characterization studies examined the effects of the blasting process on the integrity of the thin-skinned aluminum substrates, the effects of the process on both air emissions and effluent disposal, and the effects on the personnel exposed to the process.

  4. Internal friction of hydrated soda-lime-silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Reinsch, S; Müller, R; Deubener, J; Behrens, H

    2013-11-01

    The internal friction of hydrated soda-lime-silica glasses with total water content (C(W)) up to 1.9 wt. % was studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) using temperature-frequency sweeps from 723 K to 273 K and from 1 s(-1) to 50 s(-1). Total water content and concentrations of H2O molecules (C(H2O)) and OH groups (C(OH)) in the DMA specimens were determined by infrared spectroscopy. For low water contents (C(W) ≈ C(OH) < 0.25 wt. %) two discrete internal friction peaks below the glass transition (α relaxation) were assigned to the low-temperature motion of alkali ions (γ relaxation) and cooperative movements of dissimilar mobile species under participation of OH at higher temperature (β(OH) relaxation). For large water contents (C(W) > 1 wt. %), where significant amounts of molecular water are evident (C(H2O) > 0.15 wt. %), however, internal friction spectra change unexpectedly: the β(OH) peak heights saturate and a low temperature shoulder appears on the β-relaxation peak. This emerging relaxation mode (β(H2O) relaxation) was assigned to the motions of H2O molecules. β(H2O) relaxation was found to be faster than β(OH) but slower than γ relaxation. Activation energy of the different relaxation modes increased in the order γ < β(H2O) < β(OH) < α. PMID:24206315

  5. Soda-lime glass behavior under laser shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loison, Didier; Guin, Jean Pierre; Sangleboeuf, Jean Christophe; Nivard, Mariette; Lescoute, Emilien; Sollier, Arnaud; Berthe, Laurent; Boustie, Michel

    2015-06-01

    Understanding and modeling the glass behavior is an issue for certain aeronautical, military and civil applications. For example, parts of satellites and shuttles are made of glass. During their lifetime, they are subjected to high velocity impacts, which in the end may damage them. To determine the behavior of these structures during and after impact we used instrumented laser driven shock loading performed on high power intensity Laser facilities: Transverse shadowgraphs of the front wave propagating inside the transparent material were taken at different times. They provide information regarding the position of the shock wave front and of the first damage. PDV or VISAR measurements provide time-resolved free surface velocity to determine mater velocity when shock wave breakout and spall strength for the most powerful laser shots. Under High pressure conditions glass permanently densify, traces of such a plastic deformation are looked for on the path of the shock wave. Those experimental data are necessary to characterize the material behavior under such conditions and to model the mechanical behavior of glass structures. In this presentation we will present experimental results obtained for soda-lime silica glass samples loaded by laser induced shock.

  6. The interactions of Tropical soda apple mosaic tobamovirus and Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), an introduced biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae) (TSA) is a South American invasive plant of rangelands, pastures and natural areas in Florida. A chrysomelid beetle from South America, Gratiana boliviana Spaeth, has been released at >300 locations in Florida for biological control of TSA sinc...

  7. The interactions of Tropical soda apple mosaic tobamovirus and Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), an introduced biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae) (TSA) is a South American invasive plant of rangelands, pastures and natural areas in Florida. A chrysomelid beetle from South America, Gratiana boliviana Spaeth, has been released at >300 locations in Florida for biological control of TSA since...

  8. Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiantao; Fox, Caroline S.; Jacques, Paul F.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Hoffmann, Udo; Smith, Caren E.; Saltzman, Edward; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease affects ~30% of US adults, yet the role of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda on these diseases remains unknown. We examined the cross-sectional association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda and fatty liver disease in participants of the Framingham Offspring and Third Generation cohorts. Methods Fatty liver disease was defined using liver attenuation measurements generated from computed tomography in 2634 participants. Alanine transaminase concentration, a crude marker of fatty liver disease, was measured in 5908 participants. Sugar-sweetened beverage and diet soda intake were estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Participants were categorized as either non-consumers or consumers (3 categories: 1 serving/month to <1 serving/week, 1 serving/week to <1 serving/-day, and ⩾1 serving/day) of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda. Results After adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, Framingham cohort, energy intake, alcohol, dietary fiber, fat (% energy), protein (% energy), diet soda intake, and body mass index, the odds ratios of fatty liver disease were 1, 1.16 (0.88, 1.54), 1.32 (0.93, 1.86), and 1.61 (1.04, 2.49) across sugar-sweetened beverage consumption categories (p trend = 0.04). Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was also positively associated with alanine transaminase levels (p trend = 0.007). We observed no significant association between diet soda intake and measures of fatty liver disease. Conclusion In conclusion, we observed that regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was associated with greater risk of fatty liver disease, particularly in overweight and obese individuals, whereas diet soda intake was not associated with measures of fatty liver disease. PMID:26055949

  9. Effects of Diet Soda on Gut Hormones in Youths With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rebecca J.; Walter, Mary; Rother, Kristina I.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In patients with type 2 diabetes, but not type 1 diabetes, abnormal secretion of incretins in response to oral nutrients has been described. In healthy youths, we recently reported accentuated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion in response to a diet soda sweetened with sucralose and acesulfame-K. In this study, we examined the effect of diet soda on gut hormones in youths with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Subjects aged 12–25 years with type 1 diabetes (n = 9) or type 2 diabetes (n = 10), or healthy control participants (n = 25) drank 240 mL cola-flavored caffeine-free diet soda or carbonated water, followed by a 75-g glucose load, in a randomized, cross-over design. Glucose, C-peptide, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), and peptide Tyr-Tyr (PYY) were measured for 180 min. Glucose and GLP-1 have previously been reported for the healthy control subjects. RESULTS GLP-1 area under the curve (AUC) was 43% higher after ingestion of diet soda versus carbonated water in individuals with type 1 diabetes (P = 0.020), similar to control subjects (34% higher, P = 0.029), but was unaffected by diet soda in patients with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.92). Glucose, C-peptide, GIP, and PYY AUC were not statistically different between the two conditions in any group. CONCLUSIONS Ingestion of diet soda before a glucose load augmented GLP-1 secretion in type 1 diabetic and control subjects but not type 2 diabetic subjects. GIP and PYY secretion were not affected by diet soda. The clinical significance of this increased GLP-1 secretion, and its absence in youths with type 2 diabetes, needs to be determined. PMID:22410815

  10. Spatial and Temporal Coherence of SeaWiFS Chlorophyll Concentration Anomalies in the North Atlantic Bloom (1998-2005) Examined with Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.

    2006-01-01

    The availability of climatological chlorophyll-a concentration data products from the SeaWiFS mission spanning the eight-year mission period allowed the creation of a climatological anomaly analysis function in Giovanni, the GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization and ANalysis Infrastructure. This study utilizes the Giovanni anomaly analysis function to examine mesoscale anomalies in the North Atlantic Ocean during the springtime North Atlantic Bloom. This examination indicates that areas exhibiting positive anomalies and areas exhibiting negative anomalies are coherent over significant spatial scales, with relatively abrupt boundaries between areas with positive and negative anomalies. Year-to-year variability in anomaly "intensity" can be caused by either variability in the temporal occurrence of the bloom peak or by variability in the peak chlorophyll concentration in a particular area. The study will also discuss the feasibility of combining chlorophyll anomaly analysis with other data types.

  11. Lithographic fabrication of soda-lime glass based microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, L.; Norarat, R.; Napari, M.; Kivistö, H.; Chienthavorn, O.; Whitlow, H. J.

    2013-07-01

    Glass is an important material for chemical processing and analysis because of its relatively low cost, mechanical strength, chemical inertness, optical transparency, and electrical insulation and temperature resistance far beyond that of most polymeric materials. We have investigated techniques for direct writing with MeV ions on soda-lime glass as well as capping procedures to form closed buried channels suitable for high-pressure driven flow. Exposure and development of open-channel structures was studied using a combination of programmable proximity aperture lithography and different developers. Unlike our previous work on MeV ion beam lithography of natural silica where an 8% w/v HF in aqueous solution was used as a developer, it was found that 6% w/v HF + 0.5% w/v HCl was an effective developer. Addition of HCl to the developer was necessary, presumably to dissolve oxide residues that were insoluble in HF solution. Different capping and bonding procedures to create closed channels that are strong enough to withstand high hydrostatic pressure have also been tested. It was found that capping to create a closed channel could be achieved after thorough cleaning. This was followed by activation in ∼32% w/v NH4OH or ∼30% w/v H2O2 solution, drying on a hot plate and bonded under uniaxial pressure in a furnace ramped up and down at 1 °C/min to 575 °C. Activation in H2O2 was found to give better bonding. Other methods using HF lead to poor bonding due to oxide precipitation.

  12. Diversity, evolution, and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in soda lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkart, Holly C.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.

    2007-09-01

    Soap Lake is a hypersaline, alkaline lake in Central Washington State (USA). For the past five years the lake has been the site of an NSF Microbial Observatory project devoted to identifying critical geochemical and microbial characteristics of the monimolimnion sediment and water column, and has demonstrated rich multispecies communities occupy all areas of the lake. Soap Lake and similar soda lakes are subject to repeated transient periods of extreme evaporation characterized by significant repetitive alterations in salinity, pH, and total water volume, yet maintain high genetic and metabolic diversity. It has been argued that this repetitive cycle for salinity, alkalinity, and sulfur concentration has been a major driver for prokaryote evolution and diversity. The rapidity of wet-dry cycling places special demands on genome evolution, requirements that are beyond the relatively conservative eukaryotic evolutionary strategy of serial alteration of existing gene sequences in a relatively stable genome. Although HGT is most likely responsible for adding a significant amount of noise to the genetic record, analysis of HGT activity can also provide us with a much-needed probe for exploration of prokaryotic genome evolution and the origin of diversity. Packaging of genetic information within the protective protein capsid of a bacteriophage would seem preferable to exposing naked DNA to the highly alkaline conditions in the lake. In this study, we present preliminary data demonstrating the presence of a diverse group of phage integrases in Soap Lake. Integrase is the viral enzyme responsible for the insertion of phage DNA into the bacterial host's chromosome. The presence of the integrase sequence in bacterial chromosomes is evidence of lysogeny, and the diversity of integrase sequences reported here suggests a wide variety of temperate phage exist in this system, and are especially active in transition zones.

  13. [For a socio-medical iconography of Ramazzini's De Morbis: the manuscript of Giovanni Grevembroch (1731-1807)].

    PubMed

    Bonati, Maurizio Rippa; Zampieri, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Since 2002, a group of historians of medicine in Padua has been working on the creation of a iconographic database related to the professions described by Ramazzini, founder of occupational medicine, in his 1700's De morbis artificum diatriba. A specific example of iconography relevant to De morbis can be found in a 17th century manuscript written and illustrated by Giovanni Grevembroch (1731-1807), Venetian painter probably from a family of Flemish origins. This manuscript describes typical Venetian dress and costumes, accompanied by commentaries made by the artist himself. Here we can find costumes related to some of the very same professions described by Ramazzini and a comparative analysis reveals interesting elements. First of all, in his commentary Grevembroch frequently invokes concepts very similar to those of Ramazzini, related both to the dangers of the environment characteristic of a given profession and to the illnesses typical to each profession. Moreover, analysis of Grevenbroch's images and text often provides supplemental insights into to the context of and risks associated with selected occupations. Finally, the Grevembroch manuscript also supplies supplemental material pertinent to the social and cultural life of the epoch that, even if not strictly linked to questions of occupational medicine. PMID:22214103

  14. [The Barrés test and Mingazzini test -Importance of the original paper by Giovanni Mingazzini].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to find a subtle hemiparesis of the arms and legs, so called "Barré's test" has been routinely used in clinical practice. This eponym has been questioned by several neurologists. To clarify this, I searched and found the original paper by Giovanni Mingazzini, reported in Revue Neurologique in 1913. He showed arm drift test with his original photo, as asking the patient to stretch his arms in front, hands in the same horizontal plane with the manner of swearing and the fingers spread. The eyes are closed. The examiner observes downward drift of the hand after one half to a minute. He described a similar test for the legs in this article. The patient in supine position raises the legs in a 45 degree angle from the bed. If the leg drops downward too early, an organic hemiparesis could be present. Barré described a new leg drift test in 1919 with a patient lying on the abdomen. He also presented the Mingazzini's arm and leg tests with photos as carried by his patient-models in his article of 1937. He did not quote the original article of Mingazzini as a reference. These brought us incorrect information to consider the presence of Barré's arm test. PMID:25986413

  15. Effect of organosolv and soda pulping processes on the metals content of non-woody pulps.

    PubMed

    González, M; Cantón, L; Rodríguez, A; Labidi, J

    2008-09-01

    In this work the effect of different pulping processes (ethyleneglycol, diethyleneglycol, ethanolamine and soda) of tow abounded raw materials (empty fruit bunches - EFB and rice straw) on the ash, silicates and metals (Fe, Zn, Cu, Pb, Mn, Ni and Cd) content of the obtained pulps have been studied. Results showed that pulps obtained by diethyleneglycol pulping process presented lower metals content (756 microg/g and 501 microg/g for EFB and rice straw pulp, respectively) than soda pulps (984 microg/g and 889 microg/g). Ethanolamine pulps presented values of holocellulose (74% and 77% for EFB and rice straw pulp, respectively), alpha-cellulose (74% and 69%), kappa number (18.7 and 18.5) and viscosity (612 and 90 6ml/g) similar to those of soda pulp, and lower lignin contents (11% and 12%). PMID:18226892

  16. Effect of liquid products of semicoking on the absorption properties of arsenic-soda liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonov, V.S.; Anipko, S.N.; Buryak, V.I.; Fomin, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    The process gas obtained in the gasification of semicoke contains organic substances which, entering the arsenic-soda liquor in the process of removal of the sulfur from the gas, impairs its absorption properties. Thus, it is necessary to pretreat the gas to remove organic impurities, one of the methods being absorption. The absorbents may be organic liquids dissolving the gas impurities and having no effect on the absorption properties of the arsenic-soda liquor. The constant nature of the concentration of sulfide sulfur in the absorption liquor permits one to assume that the substances in semicoking middle oil still bottoms improve its redistribution in the hydroxythioarsenic salts with the formation of arsenates which react very slowly with the hydrogen sulfide, and thio-arsenates which do not react at all. A decrease in the sulfur content of the arsenic-soda solution was experienced.

  17. Modeling and Characterization of Dynamic Failure of Soda-lime Glass Under High Speed Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Chen, Weinong W.; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2012-05-27

    In this paper, the impact-induced dynamic failure of a soda-lime glass block is studied using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique is used to conduct dynamic failure test of soda-lime glass first. The damage growth patterns and stress histories are reported for various glass specimen designs. Making use of a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model, the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass are simulated and investigated. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-based damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used to quantify the critical shear stress for the soda-lime glass under examination.

  18. Adaptive strategies in the double-extremophilic prokaryotes inhabiting soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Banciu, Horia Leonard; Muntyan, Maria S

    2015-06-01

    Haloalkaliphiles are double extremophilic organisms thriving both at high salinity and alkaline pH. Although numerous haloalkaliphilic representatives have been identified among Archaea and Bacteria over the past 15 years, the adaptations underlying their prosperity at haloalkaline conditions are scarcely known. A multi-level adaptive strategy was proposed to occur in haloalkaliphilic organisms isolated from saline alkaline and soda environments including adjustments in the cell wall structure, plasma membrane lipid composition, membrane transport systems, bioenergetics, and osmoregulation. Isolation of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing γ-Proteobacteria from soda lakes allowed the elucidation of the structural and physiological differences between haloalkaliphilic (prefer NaCl) and natronophilic (prefer NaHCO3/Na2CO3, i.e. soda) microbes. PMID:26025020

  19. Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA). Version 2.0: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.; Davis, John S.; Zsoldos, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA) computer program, Version 2.0, is discussed. SODA is a spaceflight mission planning system that consists of six program modules integrated around a common database and user interface. SODA runs on a VAX/VMS computer with an Evans and Sutherland PS300 graphics workstation. In the current version, three program modules produce an interactive three dimensional animation of one or more satellites in planetary orbit. Satellite visibility and sensor coverage capabilities are also provided. Circular and rectangular, off nadir, fixed and scanning sensors are supported. One module produces an interactive three dimensional animation of the solar system. Another module calculates cumulative satellite sensor coverage and revisit time for one or more satellites. Currently, Earth, Moon, and Mars systems are supported for all modules except the solar system module.

  20. Cleaner production in the ammonia-soda industry: an ecological and economic study.

    PubMed

    Kasikowski, T; Buczkowski, R; Lemanowska, E

    2004-12-01

    Five methods to reduce the negative influence of soda ash factories on the natural environment are presented: 1. obtaining calcium-magnesium phosphates by treating the suspension from raw brine purification with orthophosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)), 2. production of precipitated chalk from soda processing waste, 3. production of gypsum and semi-brine, 4. desulphurisation of fume gases from the factory power plant, 5. utilization of distiller waste. The tests, accomplished on a laboratory scale, showed the high efficiency of these methods. Economic analysis has proved that only four out of the five presented processes can have a positive financial effect on soda ash factories, as well as being well justified economically. The value of two of the innovations presented is confirmed by their implementation in factories. PMID:15531392

  1. Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA), version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.; Davis, John S.

    1989-01-01

    The Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA) computer program, Version 1.0 is described. SODA is a spaceflight mission planning system which consists of five program modules integrated around a common database and user interface. SODA runs on a VAX/VMS computer with an EVANS & SUTHERLAND PS300 graphics workstation. BOEING RIM-Version 7 relational database management system performs transparent database services. In the current version three program modules produce an interactive three dimensional (3D) animation of one or more satellites in planetary orbit. Satellite visibility and sensor coverage capabilities are also provided. One module produces an interactive 3D animation of the solar system. Another module calculates cumulative satellite sensor coverage and revisit time for one or more satellites. Currently Earth, Moon, and Mars systems are supported for all modules except the solar system module.

  2. Distribution and diversity of microbial communities in meromictic soda Lake Doroninskoe (Transbaikalia, Russia) during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyugina, Evgeniya; Belkova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    Meromictic soda and saline lakes are unique ecosystems characterized by the stability of physical, chemical and biological parameters, and they are distributed all over the world. Lakes located in regions with average annual negative air temperature are of particular interest because of the presence of two periods with intensive and dynamic processes: the so-called biological summer and the long ice season with the biological spring. Soda Lake Doroninskoe is located in Eastern Transbaikalia (51°14'N, 112°14'E) in the permafrost zone in an extreme continental climate, and is covered by ice for seven months per year. The structure and diversity of the microbial communities throughout the water column of the lake was studied by 16S rRNA gene amplicon metasequencing. Different species with specific functions were found to dominate at different depths. Metabolically flexible bacteria with a capacity to switch between anoxygenic photosynthesis and aerobic chemotrophic metabolism dominate in soda Lake Doroninskoe.

  3. Differential performance of tropical soda apple and its biological control agent Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in open and shaded habitats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth has been released since 2003 in the southeastern United States for biological control of tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum Dunal. In Florida, G. boliviana can be found on tropical soda apple growing in open pastures as well as in shady wooded areas...

  4. Successful biological control of tropical soda apple (Solanales: Solanaceae) in Florida: A review of key program components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal) is a small shrub native to South America that is invasive in pastures and conservation areas across Florida. Dense patches of tropical soda apple not only reduce cattle stocking rates and limit their movement, but also serve as reservoirs for pests of solan...

  5. Food environments near home and school related to consumption of soda and fast food.

    PubMed

    Babey, Susan H; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L

    2011-07-01

    In California, more than 2 million adolescents (58%) drink soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages every day, and more than 1.6 million adolescents (46%) eat fast food at least twice a week. Adolescents who live and go to school in areas with more fast food restaurants and convenience stores than healthier food outlets such as grocery stores are more likely to consume soda and fast food than teens who live and go to school in areas with healthier food environments. State and local policy efforts to improve the retail food environment may be effective in improving adolescents' dietary behaviors. PMID:21830348

  6. Planar optical waveguides fabricated by Ag+/K+-Na+ ion exchange in soda lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, Ahmad; Gregorius, Seran Daton; Widhianingsih, Ika; Lestari, Siti; Suryawan, Joko

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the optical properties of the optical planar waveguides in a soda lime glass fabricated by ion exchange. Planar waveguide fabrication was carried out by immersing the soda lime glass in molten 100 % AgNO3 bath for different duration (ranging from 15 minutes to 735 minutes) and at temperature of 280°C. The results show that the surface refractive index values of the ion exchanged glasses are independent of both the ion exchange duration and temperature. The number of modes and the effective diffusion depth, however, increase with increasing the duration of ion exchange process.

  7. Effects of a Baking Soda Gum on extrinsic dental stain: results of a longitudinal 4-week assessment.

    PubMed

    Soparkar, P; Newman, M B

    2001-07-01

    An evaluation of the effects of ARM & HAMMER DENTAL CARE The Baking Soda Gum (AHDC) on extrinsic dental stain was made in 48 subjects presenting with measurable extrinsic stain. The subjects were randomized to use either the baking soda gum or a non-baking soda placebo gum for 20 minutes twice daily after lunch and dinner while brushing once daily. The procedure of limited brushing was chosen to simulate the level of hygiene normally practiced by participants entering a clinical study. After 4 weeks, the reduction in measurable extrinsic stain in the baking soda gum group was statistically significant (P = .0044) relative to baseline. Statistical analysis of the placebo gum group revealed no significant change in extrinsic stain from baseline. The magnitude of the unadjusted longitudinal reduction in extrinsic stain in the baking soda gum group was 29.7% at 4 weeks. PMID:11913306

  8. Nanosecond (ns) laser transfer of silver nanoparticles from silver-exchanged soda-lime glass to transparent soda-lime glass and shock waves formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, Mohamed Chérif; Blondeau, Jean-Philippe; Sagot, Nadine; Ollier, Nadège; Tite, Teddy

    2015-05-01

    In this contribution, we showed for the first time in our knowledge a single-step process for silver clusters and nanoparticles growth and transfer from silver-exchanged soda-lime glass to un-exchanged soda-lime glass (transparent glass in visible and NIR domain) by nanosecond (ns) laser irradiation. The transferred silver nanoparticles in transparent glass are strongly linked to the glass surface. In addition, we point out the formation of shock waves, with selective silver clustering on the top wave. This technique provides an alternative and simple way to obtain metallic nanoparticles in different media which can be traversed by laser wavelength used. Moreover, this experiment is made at room temperature and air environment. It is worth noting that our technique requires a glass previously doped with the corresponding silver ions.

  9. Fractal Loop Heat Pipe Performance Comparisons of a Soda Lime Glass and Compressed Carbon Foam Wick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myre, David; Silk, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    This study compares heat flux performance of a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) wick structure fabricated from compressed carbon foam with that of a wick structure fabricated from sintered soda lime glass. Each wick was used in an LHP containing a fractal based evaporator. The Fractal Loop Heat Pipe (FLHP) was designed and manufactured by Mikros Manufacturing Inc. The compressed carbon foam wick structure was manufactured by ERG Aerospace Inc., and machined to specifications comparable to that of the initial soda lime glass wick structure. Machining of the compressed foam as well as performance testing was conducted at the United States Naval Academy. Performance testing with the sintered soda lime glass wick structures was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Heat input for both wick structures was supplied via cartridge heaters mounted in a copper block. The copper heater block was placed in contact with the FLHP evaporator which had a circular cross-sectional area of 0.88 cm(sup 2). Twice distilled, deionized water was used as the working fluid in both sets of experiments. Thermal performance data was obtained for three different Condenser/Subcooler temperatures under degassed conditions. Both wicks demonstrated comparable heat flux performance with a maximum of 75 W/cm observed for the soda lime glass wick and 70 W /cm(sup 2) for the compressed carbon foam wick.

  10. The Soda Can Optimization Problem: Getting Close to the Real Thing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Premadasa, Kirthi; Martin, Paul; Sprecher, Bryce; Yang, Lai; Dodge, Noah-Helen

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing the dimensions of a soda can is a classic problem that is frequently posed to freshman calculus students. However, if we only minimize the surface area subject to a fixed volume, the result is a can with a square edge-on profile, and this differs significantly from actual cans. By considering a more realistic model for the can that…

  11. SODA FOUNTAIN-LUNCHEONETTE EQUIPMENT AND APPURTENANCES. NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARD NO. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    THIS STANDARD OF SODA FOUNTAIN-LUNCHEONETTE EQUIPMENT IS THE FIRST IN A SERIES OF NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARDS. THESE STANDARDS ARE ISSUED IN RECOGNITION OF THE LONG FELT NEED FOR A COMMON UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROBLEMS OF SANITATION INVOLVING INDUSTRIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE HEALTH OFFICIALS WHOSE OBLIGATION IT IS TO ENFORCE REGULATIONS.…

  12. Soda-anthraquinone pulping of palm oil empty fruit bunches and beating of the resulting pulp.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, L; Serrano, L; Rodríguez, A; Sánchez, R

    2009-02-01

    The influence of soda-anthraquinone pulping variables (temperature, time and soda concentration) and beating (number of PFI beating revolution) of palm oil empty fruit bunches (EFB) on the resulting paper sheets was studied, with a view to identifying the optimum operating conditions. Equations were derived that reproduced the properties of the paper sheets with errors less than 10-12% in 90-95% of cases. An optimum compromise was found as regards operating conditions (15% soda, 170 degrees C, 70 min and 2400 number of PFI beating revolutions) that provided paper properties departing by less than 12% from their optimum values (59.63 Nm/g tensile index, 4.48% stretch, 4.17 kN/g burst index and 7.20 m Nm(2)/g tear index), and a beating grade of 47.5 degrees SR, acceptable to obtain paper sheets. Because these conditions involve a lower soda, temperature, time and beating than those required to maximize the studied paper properties, they can save chemical reagents, energy and immobilized capital for industrial facilities. On the other hand, the stretch properties of these pulp beaten are higher than those of others non-wood pulps, as wheat straw and olive wood. PMID:18815028

  13. TCF bleaching of soda-anthraquinone and diethanolamine pulp from oil palm empty fruit bunches.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, L; Serrano, L; Rodríguez, A; Ferrer, A

    2009-02-01

    The AOpAZRP bleaching sequence (A is an acid treatment, Op an oxygen and peroxide stage, Z an ozone stage, R a reductive treatment and P a peroxide stage) have been applied to oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) soda-anthraquinone and diethanolamine pulp. On similar Kappa numbers for the two types of pulp (14.2 and 17.3), paper from unbleached soda-anthraquinone pulp exhibited increased tensile index (25.8 Nm/g), stretch (2.35%), burst index (1.69 kN/g), tear index (0.50 mN m(2)/g) and brightness (60.6%) relative to paper for unbleached diethanolamine pulp; but the latter type of pulp exhibited higher viscosity (659 mL/g) than the former. Upon bleaching with the AOpAZRP sequence, diethanolamine pulp exhibited higher viscosity (783 mL/g), and the properties of the paper sheets were close to or even better to those from soda-anthraquinone pulp, namely: 22.2 vs 20.4 Nm/g tensile index, 1.30 vs 1.42 kN/g burst index, 0.71 vs 0.70 mN m(2)/g tear index and 71.3% vs 77.5% brightness. Therefore, the properties of paper from diethanolamine pulp evolved more favourably during bleaching than did those of paper from soda-anthraquinone pulp. PMID:18809321

  14. Waste vitrification: prediction of acceptable compositions in a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliam, T.M.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    A model is presented based upon calculated bridging oxygens which allows the prediction of the region of acceptable glass compositions for a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system containing mixed waste. The model can be used to guide glass formulation studies (e.g., treatability studies) or assess the applicability of vitrification to candidate waste streams.

  15. Biological control of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in Florida: Post-release evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was released as a biological control agent against tropical soda apple (TSA) (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae)) in Sumter County, FL in 2006. Evaluation of beetle feeding damage to TSA plants and changes in the beetle po...

  16. Imploding Soda Cans: From Demonstration to Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Jack F.

    2009-01-01

    A guided-inquiry exercise conducted in both the lecture and laboratory components of a college introductory chemistry course for non-science majors is described. The exercise gave students the opportunity to independently determine the relationship between the temperature of water in an aluminum soda can and the intensity of implosion upon placing…

  17. Biology, Reproductive Potential, and Winter Survival of Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and greenhouse studies were conducted from 1996 to 2000 to determine tropical soda apple fruit size required for mature seed, overwintering survival potential of seeds, growth and fruit production, and a combination of late summer clipping followed by herbicides on overwintering potential of m...

  18. TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE BY THE ALUMINA-LIME-SODA PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alumina-lime-soda process is a chemical desalination process for waters in which the principal sources of salinity are sulfate salts and has been field tested at the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's Acid Mine Drainage Research Facility, Hollywood, Pennsylvania, as a method to r...

  19. A microbiological and clinical study of the safety and efficacy of baking-soda dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Zambon, J J; Mather, M L; Gonzales, Y

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study that examined the clinical and microbiological changes associated with regular use of baking-soda dentifrices. Two dentifrice formulations were examined in a 6-month longitudinal study of 101 adult subjects with assessments for plaque, gingival inflammation, and stain at baseline and 3 and 6 months during the active phase of the study, and at 3 months after cessation of product use. One dentifrice contained 52% baking soda and 3% sodium percarbonate (Arm & Hammer PeroxiCare) while the other dentifrice contained 65% baking soda (Arm & Hammer Dental Care). Both dentifrices resulted in statistically significant reductions in dental plaque, gingival inflammation, and stain at all time periods compared to baseline. Dental plaque and buccal soft-tissue samples were obtained for microbiological analysis from a 50-subject subset. Microbiological assays, including bacterial culture, phase-contrast microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy, confirmed the safety of both formulations. Beneficial alterations in dental plaque bacteria were noted, including significant reductions in the levels of Actinomyces species. The data from this study indicate that dentifrices containing high levels of baking soda are clinically effective and microbiologically safe. PMID:12017933

  20. Detection of Baking Soda in Flat Bread by Direct pH Metery and Alkalinity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahed Khaniki, G. H. R.; Vaezi, F.; Yunesian, M.; Nabizadeh, R.; Paseban, G. H. A.

    The objective of this study is evaluation of direct pH metery and alkalinity measurement methods for determination of baking soda in lavash bread (a kind of flat bread) in order to introduce and recommend a good practice of control. For running the experiments, various samples of lavash bread having different concentrations of baking soda were prepared. Ten grams of each sample were mixed with distilled water and then the prepared solutions were filtrated. The filtrates were then analyzed for pH and total alkalinity according to the distractions described in Standard Methods. Results show a significant correlation between the pH values of bread samples and the amount of baking soda. Also, a positive correlation has been observed between the alkalinity of bread samples and used baking soda. By comparing the R2-values specified for these two methods it could be concluded that the direct pH metery method is more reasonable. Furthermore, by this simple method it is possible to accelerate the detection of minute amounts of this chemical in bread.

  1. A microbiological and clinical study of the safety and efficacy of baking-soda dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Zambon, J J; Mather, M L; Gonzales, Y

    1996-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study that examined the clinical and microbiological changes associated with regular use of baking-soda dentifrices. Two dentifrice formulations were examined in a 6-month longitudinal study of 101 adult subjects with assessments for plaque, gingival inflammation, and stain at baseline and 3 and 6 months during the active phase of the study, and at 3 months after cessation of product use. One dentifrice contained 52% baking soda and 3% sodium percarbonate (Arm & Hammer PeroxiCare) while the other dentifrice contained 65% baking soda (Arm & Hammer Dental Care). Both dentifrices resulted in statistically significant reductions in dental plaque, gingival inflammation, and stain at all time periods compared to baseline. Dental plaque and buccal soft-tissue samples were obtained for microbiological analysis from a 50-subject subset. Microbiological assays, including bacterial culture, phase-contrast microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy, confirmed the safety of both formulations. Beneficial alterations in dental plaque bacteria were noted, including significant reductions in the levels of Actinomyces species. The data from this study indicate that dentifrices containing high levels of baking soda are clinically effective and microbiologically safe. PMID:11524866

  2. Tropical soda apple mosaic virus Identified in Solanum capsicoides in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red soda apple (Solanum capsicoides All.), a member of the Solanaceae, is a weed originally from Brazil. It is a perennial in southern Florida and is characterized by abundant prickles on stems, petioles and leaves. Prickles on stems are more dense than on its larger noxious weed relative, tropica...

  3. Use of the sediment quality triad to evaluate metal constituents in Soda Creek, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.; Simpson, J.; Kovats, Z.; Geddes, B.

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from Soda Creek were evaluated using the Sediment Quality Triad as part of investigations being conducted at the Monsanto Company plant in Soda Springs, Idaho. Information collected by an ecological assessment included metal concentrations (arsenic, cadmium, copper, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, and vanadium), benthic fauna community structure, and sediment toxicity. The collected sediments were composed of sandy-silt sized particles, with 2.4% to 9.1% organic carbon. Metal concentrations at sample stations were elevated relative to sediments collected from reference stations. For example, average cadmium concentrations ranged from 13 to 48 mg/kg at sample stations and 0.72 to 3.2 mg/kg at reference stations; selenium concentrations ranged from 4.7 to 91 mg/kg at sample stations and 0.82 to 2.7 mg/kg at reference stations. Soda Creek has a relatively low flow gradient and the benthic fauna at both reference and sample stations was dominated by oligochaete worms and chironomid midge larvae. Taxonomic richness at individual sites ranged from 4.3 to 6.7 and 6 to 10.3 at reference and sample sites, respectively. There was no significant evidence of toxicity at any location sampled. Cluster analysis showed that the benthic community structure of many of the sample stations could not be distinguished from the reference stations. Canonical correlation analysis showed there was a significant relationship between benthic fauna and metal concentration, but there was not a consistent difference between sample and reference stations. For Soda Creek, local phenomena were more significant to benthic community structure than large-scale patterns of metal accumulation. Using the Triad approach, the authors concluded there has been no adverse effect of metal concentrations on the benthic community of Soda Creek.

  4. Giovanni Alessandro Brambilla (1728-1800) and the Imperial Infantry Regiment #22 ("Lacy"). On occasion of the bicentennial of his death.

    PubMed

    Holubar, K; Fatović-Ferencić, S

    2000-09-15

    Giovanni Alessandro Brambilia (1728-1800) was the Chief Surgeon of the Imperial Austrian Army and the first director of the newly founded medico-surgical academy in Vienna (1785). He died in Padua in late July 1800 (29th?), en route from his estate in Lombardy to Vienna, and the chiostro della magnolia in the Santo displays a memorial plaque commemorating his demise. On account of his merits for the education of (military) surgeons and the development of surgery in Austria, this short article shall serve to briefly recall his life and related facts. PMID:11042908

  5. Consumption of artificial sweetener– and sugar-containing soda and risk of lymphoma and leukemia in men and women1234

    PubMed Central

    Schernhammer, Eva S; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Birmann, Brenda M; Sampson, Laura; Willett, Walter C; Feskanich, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite safety reports of the artificial sweetener aspartame, health-related concerns remain. Objective: We prospectively evaluated whether the consumption of aspartame- and sugar-containing soda is associated with risk of hematopoetic cancers. Design: We repeatedly assessed diet in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). Over 22 y, we identified 1324 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), 285 multiple myelomas, and 339 leukemias. We calculated incidence RRs and 95% CIs by using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: When the 2 cohorts were combined, there was no significant association between soda intake and risks of NHL and multiple myeloma. However, in men, ≥1 daily serving of diet soda increased risks of NHL (RR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.72) and multiple myeloma (RR: 2.02; 95% CI: 1.20, 3.40) in comparison with men who did not consume diet soda. We observed no increased risks of NHL and multiple myeloma in women. We also observed an unexpected elevated risk of NHL (RR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.10, 2.51) with a higher consumption of regular, sugar-sweetened soda in men but not in women. In contrast, when sexes were analyzed separately with limited power, neither regular nor diet soda increased risk of leukemia but were associated with increased leukemia risk when data for men and women were combined (RR for consumption of ≥1 serving of diet soda/d when the 2 cohorts were pooled: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.02). Conclusion: Although our findings preserve the possibility of a detrimental effect of a constituent of diet soda, such as aspartame, on select cancers, the inconsistent sex effects and occurrence of an apparent cancer risk in individuals who consume regular soda do not permit the ruling out of chance as an explanation. PMID:23097267

  6. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S.

    1998-09-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition.

  7. Preliminary observation on the effect of baking soda volume on controlling odour from discarded organic waste.

    PubMed

    Qamaruz-Zaman, N; Kun, Y; Rosli, R-N

    2015-01-01

    Food wastes with high moisture and organic matter content are likely to emit odours as a result of the decomposition process. The management of odour from decomposing wastes is needed to sustain the interest of residents and local councils in the source separation of kitchen wastes. This study investigated the potential of baking soda (at 50 g, 75 g and 100g per kg food waste) to control odour from seven days stored food waste. It was found that 50 g of baking soda, spread at the bottom of 8l food wastes bin, can reduce the odour by about 70%. A higher amount (above 100g) is not advised as a pH higher than 9.0 may be induced leading to the volatilization of odorous ammonia. This research finding is expected to benefit the waste management sector, food processing industries as well as the local authorities where malodour from waste storage is a pressing issue. PMID:25445259

  8. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Fillmer, Kornelia; Adkins, Scott; Pongam, Patchara; D'Elia, Tom

    2016-08-01

    We report the first complete genome sequence of tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV), a tobamovirus originally isolated from tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum) collected in Okeechobee, Florida. The complete genome of TSAMV is 6,350 nucleotides long and contains four open reading frames encoding the following proteins: i) 126-kDa methyltransferase/helicase (3354 nt), ii) 183-kDa polymerase (4839 nt), iii) movement protein (771 nt) and iv) coat protein (483 nt). The complete genome sequence of TSAMV shares 80.4 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and 71.2-74.2 % identity with other tobamoviruses naturally infecting members of the Solanaceae plant family. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the 126-kDa and 183-kDa proteins and the complete genome sequence place TSAMV in a subcluster with PMMoV within the Solanaceae-infecting subgroup of tobamoviruses. PMID:27169599

  9. Fall in inspired oxygen and anaesthetic agent concentrations during change of soda lime absorber.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Byrappa; Gopalakrishna, Kadarapura Nanjundaiah; Umamaheswara Rao, Ganne S

    2015-06-01

    Following an episode of reduction in inspired oxygen concentration (FiO(2)) and inhalational agent concentration (Fi agent) during the changing of a soda lime absorber, We conducted an in vitro experiment to understand the impact of disconnection of the absorber on inspired gas dilution at different fresh gas flows. We found that both in Dräger Fabius GS and Primus anaesthesia work stations, disconnection of the absorber caused progressive reduction in FiO(2) and Fi agent as the FGF was decreased. The operating principle of fresh gas decoupling (FGD) valve is a potential source of this complication, which must be kept in mind while changing the soda lime during the course of surgery where an anaesthetic work stations utilizing FGD valves are used. PMID:25260538

  10. Plasmonic resonance of Ag nanoclusters diffused in soda-lime glasses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Promod; Mathpal, Mohan Chandra; Tripathi, Anand Kumar; Prakash, Jai; Agarwal, Arvind; Ahmad, M M; Swart, H C

    2015-04-14

    Silver nanoclusters were prepared in a soda-lime glass matrix through the ion-exchange (Ag(+)↔ Na(+)) method followed by thermal annealing in an air atmosphere. The nanoscale patterning of Ag nanoclusters embedded in a soda lime glass matrix in an air atmosphere at different annealing temperatures has been investigated. During annealing, Ag(+) is reduced to Ag(0) and subsequently forms silver nanoparticles inside the glass matrix. A blue shift of 20 nm has been observed as a function of the post annealing temperature. The photoluminescence intensity is highest for an annealing temperature of 500 °C for 1 h and continuously decreases as annealing temperature increases up to 600 °C. The presence of spherical nanoparticles with a maximum particle size of 7.2 nm has been observed after annealing at 600 °C for 1 hour, which is consistent with Mie theory based results. PMID:25738191

  11. Fluence ablation threshold dependence on tin impurities in commercial soda-lime glass.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Arines, Justo; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we study the reduction in the fluence ablation threshold induced by tin impurities incorporated in float soda-lime glass during the fabrication process. The laser system used in the experiments was a Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse duration of 20 ns. The fluence ablation thresholds found were 112  J/cm2 for the tin side and 920  J/cm2 for the tin-free side, which means a reduction of nearly 1 order of magnitude. The fluence ablation threshold reduction permits the manufacturing of narrower grooves with small level of roughness, obtaining quality elements in low-cost soda-lime substrates. PMID:25321113

  12. Removing Al and regenerating caustic soda from the spent washing liquor of Al etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, M. A.; El-Sheikh, S. M.; Farghly, F. E.

    2005-08-01

    Spent liquor from washing of aluminum section materials after etching with caustic soda (NaOH) has been treated. Aluminum was removed from the liquor and caustic soda was regenerated by adding precipitating agents to hydrolyze sodium aluminate (Na2AlO2), separating the aluminumprecipitate, and concentrating free NaOH in the resulting solution for reuse in the etching process. Four systems were investigated: hydrated lime [Ca(OH)2], hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), H2O2/Ca(OH)2 mixture, and dry lime (CaO). Results revealed that CaO was more efficient in the removal of aluminum from the spent liquor with a higher hydrolyzing rate of Na2AlO2 than Ca(OH)2, H2O2, or their mixture.

  13. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    PubMed

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor. PMID:21526144

  14. Late Byzantine Mineral Soda High Alumina Glasses from Asia Minor: A New Primary Glass Production Group

    PubMed Central

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor. PMID:21526144

  15. Molecular-Level Simulations of Shock Generation and Propagation in Soda-Lime Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Pandurangan, B.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Fountzoulas, C.; Patel, P.

    2012-08-01

    A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method is employed to study the mechanical response of soda-lime glass (a material commonly used in transparent armor applications) when subjected to the loading conditions associated with the generation and propagation of planar shock waves. Specific attention is given to the identification and characterization of various (inelastic-deformation and energy-dissipation) molecular-level phenomena and processes taking place at, or in the vicinity of, the shock front. The results obtained revealed that the shock loading causes a 2-4% (shock strength-dependent) density increase. In addition, an increase in the average coordination number of the silicon atoms is observed along with the creation of smaller Si-O rings. These processes are associated with substantial energy absorption and dissipation and are believed to greatly influence the blast/ballistic impact mitigation potential of soda-lime glass. The present work was also aimed at the determination of the shock Hugoniot (i.e., a set of axial stress vs. density/specific-volume vs. internal energy vs. particle velocity vs. temperature) material states obtained in soda-lime glass after the passage of a shock wave of a given strength (as quantified by the shock speed). The availability of a shock Hugoniot is critical for construction of a high deformation-rate, large-strain, high pressure material model which can be used within a continuum-level computational analysis to capture the response of a soda-lime glass based laminated transparent armor structure (e.g., a military vehicle windshield, door window, etc.) to blast/ballistic impact loading.

  16. The effect of baking soda when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto; Costa, Leonardo Cesar

    2013-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 10% baking soda solution and sodium bicarbonate powder (applied with jets) when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment. The surfaces of 40 bovine incisors were flattened and divided into 5 groups (n = 8): Group B (bleached and restored, negative control), Group W (bleached, stored in distilled water for 7 days, and restored), Group BSJ (bleached, abraded with baking soda jet for 1 min, and restored), Group BSS (bleached, application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min, and restored), and Group R (restored, without bleaching, positive control). The samples were bleached in 1 session with 3 applications of 35% HP-based gel and activated with a LED appliance for 9 min each. Resin composite cylinders (2 mm height and 0.8 mm diameter) were made on the enamel surface after the acid etching and a conventional 1-step single vial adhesive application was performed. After storage in distilled water (37 ± 1°C, 24 hr), the microshear bond test was performed (1 mm/min). ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied to compare the results. The mean results of these tests showed that Groups W, BBS, and R were not statistically different. These groups also indicated a higher bond strength when compared with Groups B and BSJ. The application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min may be an alternative pre-restorative treatment for bleached enamel, but further studies are needed to consider whether or not this treatment may be effectively used in clinical practice. PMID:23928450

  17. Velocity of a freely rising gas bubble in a soda-lime silicate glass melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornyak, E. J.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison is conducted between measured velocities for the buoyant rise of single bubbles of varying size and composition, in a soda-lime silicate glass melt, with the steady state velocities predicted by the Stokes and Hadamard-Rybczynski formulas. In all cases, the data are noted to fit the Hadamard-Rybczynski expression for steady state rise speed considerably better than the Stokes formula.

  18. Effect of OH content on phase separation behavior of soda-silica glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.; Smith, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of phase separation in a gel and ordinary soda-silica glass are followed by use of small angle X-ray scattering. Also, the influence of OH on the phase separation behavior is studied. It is found that OH accelerates the growth of the secondary phase, and that gel and ordinary glasses of similar composition and OH concentration exhibit similar phase separation characteristics.

  19. Mechanism of mechanical strength increase of soda-lime glass by aging

    SciTech Connect

    Han, W.T.; Tomozawa, M. . Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1989-10-01

    This paper reports on two models proposed to explain the mechanical strength increase of abraded or indented soda-lime glasses upon aging, namely, crack tip blunting and the release of residual tensile stress near the crack tip. To clarify the mechanism, the time dependence of the strengthening of an abraded soda-lime glass was investigated. Effects of aging media, such as moist air, distilled water, 1N HCl and 1N NaOH solutions, as well as the abrasion flaw depth, were determined. The strength increase rate in water of abraded soda-lime glass was compared with those of borosilicate and high-silica glasses. The effect of stressing during aging was also investigated. It was found that the rate of strength increase was faster with decreasing abrasion flaw depth and with decreasing chemical durability. For a given flaw depth, an acidic solution produced the fastest strengthening. The strengthening rate was found to accelerate because of the coaxing effect of stressing during aging. From these observations, it was concluded that the strengthening rates relate to the diffusion process and chemical reactions, especially the alkali-hydrogen (or hydronium) ion-exchange reaction, near the crack tip.

  20. Diversity of extremophilic purple phototrophic bacteria in Soap Lake, a Central Washington (USA) Soda Lake.

    PubMed

    Asao, Marie; Pinkart, Holly C; Madigan, Michael T

    2011-08-01

    Culture-based and culture-independent methods were used to explore the diversity of phototrophic purple bacteria in Soap Lake, a small meromictic soda lake in the western USA. Among soda lakes, Soap Lake is unusual because it consists of distinct upper and lower water bodies of vastly different salinities, and its deep waters contain up to 175 mM sulfide. From Soap Lake water new alkaliphilic purple sulfur bacteria of the families Chromatiaceae and Ectothiorhodospiraceae were cultured, and one purple non-sulfur bacterium was isolated. Comparative sequence analysis of pufM, a gene that encodes a key photosynthetic reaction centre protein universally found in purple bacteria, was used to measure the diversity of purple bacteria in Soap Lake. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and subsequent phylogenetic analyses of pufMs amplified from Soap Lake water revealed that a significant diversity of purple bacteria inhabit this soda lake. Although close relatives of several of the pufM phylotypes obtained from cultured species could also be detected in Soap Lake water, several other more divergent pufM phylotypes were also detected. It is possible that Soap Lake purple bacteria are major contributors of organic matter into the ecosystem of this lake, especially in its extensive anoxic and sulfidic deep waters. PMID:21410624

  1. Failure Wave in DEDF and Soda-Lime Glass during Rod Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Orphal, D. L.; Behner, Th.; Hohler, V.; Anderson, C. E. Jr.; Templeton, D. W.

    2006-07-28

    Investigations of glass by planar, and classical and symmetric Taylor impact experiments reveal that failure wave velocity vF depends on impact velocity, geometry, and type of glass. vF typically increases with impact velocity vP to between cS and cL or to {radical}2cS (shear and longitudinal wave velocity). This paper reports initial results of an investigation of failure waves associated with gold rod impact on high-density (DEDF) glass and soda-lime glass. Data are obtained by visualizing simultaneously the failure propagation in the glass with a high-speed camera and the rod penetration velocity u with flash radiography. Results for DEDF glass are reported for vP between 1.2 and 2.0 km/s, those for soda-lime glass with vP {approx_equal}1.3 km/s. It is shown that vF > u, and that in the case of DEDF glass vF/u decreases from ; 1.38 to 1.13 with increasing vp. In addition, several Taylor tests were performed. For both DEDF and soda-lime glass the vF-values, found here as well as vF- data reported in the literature, reveal that--for equal pressures--the failure wave velocities determined from Taylor tests or planar-impact tests are distinctly greater than those observed during steady-state rod penetration.

  2. Application of a computational glass model to the shock response of soda-lime glass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gorfain, Joshua E.; Key, Christopher T.; Alexander, C. Scott

    2016-04-20

    This article details the implementation and application of the glass-specific computational constitutive model by Holmquist and Johnson [1] to simulate the dynamic response of soda-lime glass under high rate and high pressure shock conditions. The predictive capabilities of this model are assessed through comparison of experimental data with numerical results from computations using the CTH shock physics code. The formulation of this glass model is reviewed in the context of its implementation within CTH. Using a variety of experimental data compiled from the open literature, a complete parameterization of the model describing the observed behavior of soda-lime glass is developed.more » Simulation results using the calibrated soda-lime glass model are compared to flyer plate and Taylor rod impact experimental data covering a range of impact and failure conditions spanning an order of magnitude in velocity and pressure. In conclusion, the complex behavior observed in the experimental testing is captured well in the computations, demonstrating the capability of the glass model within CTH.« less

  3. Preliminary observation on the effect of baking soda volume on controlling odour from discarded organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Qamaruz-Zaman, N. Kun, Y.; Rosli, R.-N.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Approximately 50 g baking soda reduced odour concentration by 70%. • Reducing volatile acid concentration reduces odour concentration. • Ammonia has less effect on odour concentration. - Abstract: Food wastes with high moisture and organic matter content are likely to emit odours as a result of the decomposition process. The management of odour from decomposing wastes is needed to sustain the interest of residents and local councils in the source separation of kitchen wastes. This study investigated the potential of baking soda (at 50 g, 75 g and 100 g per kg food waste) to control odour from seven days stored food waste. It was found that 50 g of baking soda, spread at the bottom of 8 l food wastes bin, can reduce the odour by about 70%. A higher amount (above 100 g) is not advised as a pH higher than 9.0 may be induced leading to the volatilization of odorous ammonia. This research finding is expected to benefit the waste management sector, food processing industries as well as the local authorities where malodour from waste storage is a pressing issue.

  4. The utilization of natural soda resource of Ordos in the cultivation of Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yanfei; Yang, Haibo; Meng, Yingying; Liu, Jiao; Shen, Peili; Wu, Peichun; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis oceanica is famous for its strong environmental adaptability and oil-richness, especially high eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content. In this report, the possibility and cultivation parameters for N. oceanica using natural crude soda were testified and compared with seawater culture. To keep a suitable salinity range, different ratio of sea salt addition into soda lake water were used and the growth, lipid content, Fv/Fm and fatty acids profiling were inspected with nitrogen repletion or depletion. The results showed the best performance were achieved while 18g/L (salinity 25‰) sea salt was added into crude soda solution. The μmax and EPA content in fatty acids were 0.72/0.42 and 36%/23% in 500mL/100L bioreactor cultivations respectively, which maintained a relative high productivity to other reports. By comparing the growth and operations with Spirulina production, the feasibility of N. Oceanica in Ordos was proved on both technical and economical point of view. PMID:26528905

  5. Efficacy of baking soda-containing chewing gum in removing natural tooth stain.

    PubMed

    Mankodi, S M; Conforti, N; Berkowitz, H

    2001-07-01

    A 14-week, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 126 healthy volunteers to compare the efficacy of twice-daily use of 3 baking soda-containing chewing gums in removing natural tooth stain when used in conjunction with a program of regular oral hygiene. All 3 chewing gums significantly reduced extrinsic stain (P < .0001) and improved the whitened appearance of teeth (P < .0001) at both the 2-week interim and the final 4-week evaluations. ARM & HAMMER DENTAL CARE The Baking Soda Gum (AHDC) reduced dental stain by 70.8%, compared to reductions of 71.9% and 65.3%, after use of 2 experimental gum formulations. Whitened appearance improved by 1.73 shade tabs using AHDC gum, and up to 2.49 shade tabs with the experimental formulations. These results suggest that the use of baking soda-containing gum after meals, in conjunction with good oral hygiene, can improve both extrinsic dental staining and the whitened appearance of teeth. PMID:11913307

  6. An unconventional method for the recovery of caustic soda from spent Al-rich pickling solutions.

    PubMed

    Aprea, Paolo; de Gennaro, Bruno; Colella, Carmine

    2011-07-01

    This work presents an unconventional procedure for the recovery of spent Al-rich caustic soda solutions from the pickling of dies for the production of aluminium extrusions. Caustic soda was regenerated at roughly 70%, by precipitating aluminate, after addition of a silica source, in the form of zeolite A, a microporous material that is widely used in many technological sectors. It was shown that the process is reliable and can be repeated for several cycles, provided the concentration of the caustic soda solution is suitably restored. The by-product obtained, zeolite A, proved to be a high-grade material with performance as a cation exchanger and physical sorbent that is certainly comparable to that reported in literature (e.g., cation exchange capacity equal to 5.14 meq g(-1) vs. 5.48 meq g(-1) and water vapour adsorption capacity of 26.5% vs. 27.6% at 16 torr and 298 K). The economics of the process, although not examined yet, would appear generally favourable, considering that zeolite A is a valuable by-product which widely covers the costs for the recovery of the spent solutions. There are, therefore, significant prospects for the use of zeolite A, particularly as a builder in detergent formulation. PMID:21458911

  7. Absence of sodA Increases the Levels of Oxidation of Key Metabolic Determinants of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria D.; Smith, Trever C.; Small, Christina M.; Thomas, Derek P.; Seshu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, alters its gene expression in response to environmental signals unique to its tick vector or vertebrate hosts. B. burgdorferi carries one superoxide dismutase gene (sodA) capable of controlling intracellular superoxide levels. Previously, sodA was shown to be essential for infection of B. burgdorferi in the C3H/HeN model of Lyme disease. We employed two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and immunoblot analysis with antibodies specific to carbonylated proteins to identify targets that were differentially oxidized in the soluble fractions of the sodA mutant compared to its isogenic parental control strain following treatment with an endogenous superoxide generator, methyl viologen (MV, paraquat). HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of oxidized proteins revealed that several proteins of the glycolytic pathway (BB0057, BB0020, BB0348) exhibited increased carbonylation in the sodA mutant treated with MV. Levels of ATP and NAD/NADH were reduced in the sodA mutant compared with the parental strain following treatment with MV and could be attributed to increased levels of oxidation of proteins of the glycolytic pathway. In addition, a chaperone, HtpG (BB0560), and outer surface protein A (OspA, BBA15) were also observed to be oxidized in the sodA mutant. Immunoblot analysis revealed reduced levels of Outer surface protein C (OspC), Decorin binding protein A (DbpA), fibronectin binding protein (BBK32), RpoS and BosR in the sodA mutant compared to the control strains. Viable sodA mutant spirochetes could not be recovered from both gp91/phox−⁄− and iNOS deficient mice while borrelial DNA was detected in multiple tissues samples from infected mice at significantly lower levels compared to the parental strain. Taken together, these observations indicate that the increased oxidation of select borrelial determinants and reduced levels of critical pathogenesis-associated lipoproteins contribute to the in vivo deficit of the sodA

  8. Self-reported academic grades and other correlates of sugar-sweetened soda intake among US adolescents.

    PubMed

    Park, Sohyun; Sherry, Bettylou; Foti, Kathryn; Blanck, Heidi M

    2012-01-01

    High consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks has been associated with obesity and other adverse health consequences. This cross-sectional study examined the association of demographic characteristics, weight status, self-reported academic grades, and behavioral factors with sugar-sweetened soda intake among a nationally representative sample of US high school students. Analysis was based on the 2009 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey and included 16,188 students in grades 9 through 12. The main outcome measure was daily sugar-sweetened soda intake (eg, drank a can, bottle, or glass of soda [excluding diet soda] at least one time per day during the 7 days before the survey). Nationally, 29.2% of students reported drinking sugar-sweetened soda at least one time per day. Logistic regression analyses showed factors significantly associated with sugar-sweetened soda intake at least one time per day included male sex (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.47), Hispanic ethnicity (vs whites; OR=0.81), earning mostly B, C, and D/F grades (vs mostly As; OR=1.26, 1.66, and 2.19, respectively), eating vegetables fewer than three times per day (OR=0.72), trying to lose weight (OR=0.72), sleeping <8 hours (OR=1.18), watching television >2 hours/day (OR=1.71), playing video or computer games or using a computer for other than school work >2 hours/day (OR=1.53), being physically active at least 60 minutes/day on <5 days during the 7 days before the survey (OR=1.19), and current cigarette use (OR=2.01). The significant associations with poor self-reported academic grades, inadequate sleep, sedentary behaviors, and cigarette smoking suggest research should examine why soda consumption is associated with these behaviors to inform the design of future nutrition interventions. PMID:22709642

  9. The island of Elba (Tuscany, Italy) at the crossroads of ancient trade routes: an archaeometric investigation of dolia defossa from the archaeological site of San Giovanni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manca, Rosarosa; Pagliantini, Laura; Pecchioni, Elena; Santo, Alba P.; Cambi, Franco; Chiarantini, Laura; Corretti, Alessandro; Costagliola, Pilario; Orlando, Andrea; Benvenuti, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Dolia are large pottery containers used in Roman times for the storage and fermentation of wine. They were produced in specialized pottery workshops (figlinae) and were typically marked with specific epigraphical stamps, which represent a major tool to unravel their provenance and trade. In this work we present the preliminary results of a study of two dolia defossa, recently found at San Giovanni (Portoferraio, island of Elba, Italy) during 2012-2014 archaeological excavations in a Roman farm (late 2nd cent. BC-1st cent. AD), devoted to wine production and probably constituting the antecedent archaeological phase of the adjacent "Villa delle Grotte". Based on archaeological (epigraphic) evidence, five different production areas have been hypothesized: 1) Elba island, where the dolia have been found; 2) the municipal figlinae in the Pisa territory; 3) the middle catchment of the Tiber river (central Latium) where "urban" figlinae occurred; 4) the figlinae of Minturno (southern Latium), a locality known both for wine production and exportation and for the presence of ancient figlinae; 5) the municipal figlinae in the Volterra territory. Archaeometric analysis of tempering agents intentionally added to the clay for the manufacturing of the dolia, particularly magmatic lithic fragments and clinopyroxene crystals, allowed us to suggest that the watershed of the central Tiber Valley - including different volcanic centres belonging to both Tuscany Magmatic Province (Monti Cimini) and Roman Magmatic Province (Monti Vulsini and Vico volcano) - could have been the most likely sites of production of the dolia found at San Giovanni. Alternatively, the site of Minturno (southern Latium) could be proposed.

  10. Morphological alteration, lysosomal membrane fragility and apoptosis of the cells of Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Dutta, Manab Kumar; Acharya, Avanti; Mukhopadhyay, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Sajal

    2015-12-01

    Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is a component of laundry detergent. Domestic effluent, drain water and various anthropogenic activities have been identified as major routes of sodium carbonate contamination of the freshwater ecosystem. The freshwater sponge, Eunapius carteri, bears ecological and evolutionary significance and is considered as a bioresource in aquatic ecosystems. The present study involves estimation of morphological damage, lysosomal membrane integrity, activity of phosphatases and apoptosis in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Exposure to washing soda resulted in severe morphological alterations and damages in cells of E. carteri. Fragility and destabilization of lysosomal membranes of E. carteri under the sublethal exposure was indicative to toxin induced physiological stress in sponge. Prolonged exposure to sodium carbonate resulted a reduction in the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in the cells of E. carteri. Experimental concentration of 8 mg/l of washing soda for 192 h yielded an increase in the physiological level of cellular apoptosis among the semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, which was suggestive to possible shift in apoptosis mediated immunoprotection. The results were indicative of an undesirable shift in the immune status of sponge. Contamination of the freshwater aquifers by washing soda thus poses an alarming ecotoxicological threat to sponges. PMID:26313128

  11. Influence of oxalic acid on the agglomeration process and total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, I.; Blec̆ić, D.; Blagojević, N.; Radmilović, V.; Kovac̆ević, K.

    2003-05-01

    Decomposition of caustic soda solutions is an important part of Bayer process for alumina production. The physico-chemical properties of precipitated Al(OH) 3 are dependent on several processes that take place simultaneously during the decomposition process and they are: nucleation, agglomeration and Al(OH) 3 crystals. An important industrial requirement is increase of Al(OH) 3 crystal grain size, and hence agglomeration and growth of Al(OH) 3 crystals become important processes and they enable increase of particle size. The influence of oxalic acid concentration on the agglomeration process and total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3 at different temperatures and caustic soda concentrations has been investigated. The results have shown that the agglomeration process is increased with increase of temperature and decrease of caustic soda concentration. Total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3 is changed in the same way. Besides, agglomeration process of Al(OH) 3 particles is favored in the presence of oxalic acid.

  12. Low-alumina portland cement from lime-soda sinter residue

    SciTech Connect

    Chesley, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A byproduct for the Ames Lime-Soda Sinter Process for recovering alumina from power plant fly ash was investigated as a cement raw material. This investigation dealt with a determination of the best method to utilize the process residue from both a clinker quality and an economic perspective. The experimental work was divided into 4 major areas; characterization of the sinter residue, laboratory burnability tests, physical testing of produced residue-cements, and a kinetic study of C{sub 3}S formation. Other important topics were considered such as the effect use of the sinter residue has on the energy requirements of a commercial cement kiln and on the economics of a combined lime-soda sinter, cement plant. It was found that a low-alumina, C{sub 3}S-bearing cement could be readily produced from a raw mix containing significant amounts of sinter residue, which was found to consist of {beta}-C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A, CaCO{sub 3}, MgO, and C{sub 4}AF. Based on an energy balance using a typical cement feed containing around 75%{sub w} limestone as a reference, use of the residue in a cement feed allows for a 50% reduction in required energy for the kiln and a 32%{sub w} increased throughput. A laboratory produced residue-cement was found to meet all of the specifications for a Type 5 portland cement. The rate of return found for a combined lime-soda sinter and cement facility processing 43,800 tons per year (TPY) of alumina and 530,400 TPY of portland cement was 4.7%.

  13. Ectothiorhodospira variabilis sp. nov., an alkaliphilic and halophilic purple sulfur bacterium from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Bryantseva, Irina A; Rabold, Sandra; Tourova, Tatjana P; Rubtsova, Dariya; Smirnova, Ekaterina; Thiel, Vera; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2009-04-01

    During studies of moderately halophilic strains of Ectothiorhodospira from steppe soda lakes, we found a novel group of bacteria related to Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila with salt optima at 50-80 g NaCl l(-1). Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from soda lakes in Mongolia, Egypt and Siberia revealed separation of the group of new isolates from other Ectothiorhodospira species, including the closely related Ect. haloalkaliphila. DNA-DNA hybridization studies demonstrated that the new isolates form a homogeneous group at the species level, but at the same time are distinct from related species such as Ect. haloalkaliphila, Ect. vacuolata, Ect. shaposhnikovii and Ect. marina. The new isolates are considered to be strains of a novel species, for which the name Ectothiorhodospira variabilis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain WN22(T) (=VKM B-2479(T) =DSM 21381(T)). Photosynthetic pigments of the novel species are bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spirilloxanthin series with spirilloxanthin and derivatives thereof, together with small amounts of lycopene and rhodopin. Gas vesicles are formed by most of the strains, particularly in media containing yeast extract (0.5 g l(-1)) and acetate (0.5-2.0 g l(-1)). Sequence analysis of nifH (nitrogenase) and cbbL (RuBisCO) confirmed the assignment of the strains to the genus Ectothiorhodospira and in particular the close relationship to Ect. haloalkaliphila. The novel species Ect. variabilis is found in soda lakes separated by great geographical distances and is an alkaliphilic and halophilic bacterium that tolerates salt concentrations up to 150-200 g NaCl l(-1). PMID:19329583

  14. Effects of Aqueous Solutions on the Slow Crack Growth of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow crack growth (SCG) parameters of soda-lime-silicate were measured in distilled and saltwater of various concentrations in order to determine if the presence of salt and the contaminate formation of a weak sodium film affects stress corrosion susceptibility. Past research indicates that solvents affect the rate of crack growth; however, the effects of salt have not been studied. The results indicate a small but statistically significant effect on the SCG parameters A and n at high concentrations; however, for typical engineering purposes, the effect can be ignored.

  15. Arsenic, Prokaryotes, and Closed Basin Soda Lakes of the Western USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    A number of saline, alkaline soda lakes in the Great Basin and Mojave Desert of the United States have unusually high concentrations of inorganic arsenic dissolved in their brine-waters. The arsenic originates from natural rather than anthropogenic sources, namely volcanic hydrothermal inputs. When this influx is coupled with evapo-concentration and the unique chemical behavior of arsenic oxyanions in alkaline waters, it results in extremely elevated As concentrations. For example, the salinity and arsenate levels of 3 comparable soda lakes (pH 9.8) are: Big Soda Lake, NV (27 g/L; 20 uM), Mono Lake, CA (90 g/L; 200 uM), and Searles Lake, CA (340 g/L; 3,900 uM). The arsenic oxidation state changes from As5+ (arsenate) to As3+ (arsenite) with vertical transition from their oxygenated surface water to their anoxic bottom water. Similar phenomena occur in their littoral sediments. These lakes also harbor active populations of prokaryotes that achieve these As redox changes either by using arsenate as an electron acceptor for respiration, or by employing arsenite as a chemoautotrophic electron donor. Diverse microorganisms have been identified in these systems that are involved in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic therein, and in situ studies made with radiotracer (73As) and other means showed that these redox reactions occur at rapid rates. However, other than their use for waterfowl hunting (Big Soda Lake), as a region of scenic beauty (Mono Lake), or as a resource for the chemical industry (Searles Lake), there is little concern about the arsenic in these systems because the waters are not potable and their chemistry is too extreme to allow for the presence of fish. Nonetheless, microbial processes that govern arsenic biogeochemistry can greatly influence the hydrologic mobility and toxicity of this element in freshwater systems, such as drinking water aquifers. Moreover, anthropogenic inputs of arsenic can also occur in closed basin lakes in this region, such as

  16. Effect of fictive temperature on dynamic fatigue behavior of silica and soda-lime glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Agarwal, A.; Tomozawa, Minoru

    1995-05-01

    The dynamic fatigue characteristics of silica glasses with fictive temperatures of 1,000, 1,100, and 1,300 C and soda-lime glasses with fictive temperatures of 470 and 530 C were measured in air. For both glasses, samples with higher fictive temperatures had a greater fatigue resistance. Inert strength of silica glasses with fictive temperatures of 1,000 and 1,300 C was also measured at liquid nitrogen temperature. Glass with higher fictive temperature had a greater inert strength.

  17. An undergraduate experiment demonstrating the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, James T.; Whitehouse, Christopher B.; Oulton, Rupert F.; Gennaro, Sylvain D.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel undergraduate research project that highlights the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans. We confirm the Helmholtz resonance nature of a single can by measuring its amplitude and phase response to a sound wave. Arranging multiple cans in arrays smaller than the wavelength, we then design an antenna that redirects sound into a preferred direction. The antenna can be thought of as a new resonator, composed of artificially engineered meta-atoms, similar to a metamaterial. These experiments are illustrative, tactile, and open ended so as to enable students to explore the physics of matter/wave interaction.

  18. Severe pediatric ocular injury due to explosion of a firecracker inside a soda bottle

    PubMed Central

    Shazly, Tarek A

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a penetrating ocular injury, followed by endophthalmitis, in a four-year-old girl, resulting from explosion of a small K0201 match-cracker inside a soda bottle. The patient presented with two corneal lacerations, ruptured crystalline lens, multiple intraocular foreign bodies, and hyphema of the right eye, for which immediate surgical exploration and repair was performed. The patient developed aggressive endophthalmitis that led to atrophy of the eye within a few weeks. Severe ocular injuries can result from small, relatively “safe” firecrackers. Therefore, this type of firework should not be used, especially by minors. PMID:27147842

  19. Partial genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic soda lake bacterium Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans ARh 2T

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-10-26

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans strain ARh 2T is a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from haloalkaline soda lakes. It is a motile, Gram-negative member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Remarkable properties include the ability to grow on thiocyanate as the sole energy, sulfur and nitrogen source, and the capability of growth at salinities of up to 4.3 M total Na+. This draft genome sequence consists of 61 scaffolds comprising 2,765,337 bp, and contains 2616 protein-coding and 61 RNA-coding genes. In conclusion, this organism was sequenced as part of the Community Science Program of the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  20. Cloning and mapping of the manganese superoxide dismutase gene (sodA) of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Touati, D

    1983-01-01

    An Escherichia coli gene bank composed of large DNA fragments (about 40 kilobases) was constructed by using the small cosmid pHC79. From it, a clone was isolated for its ability to overproduce superoxide dismutase. The enzyme overproduced was manganese superoxide dismutase, as determined by electrophoresis and antibody precipitation. Maxicell analysis and two-dimensional O'Farrell polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the structural gene, sodA, of manganese superoxide dismutase was cloned. Subcloning fragments from the original cosmid located the sodA gene within a 4.8-kilobase EcoRI-BamHI fragment. This fragment was inserted into a lambda phage which was deleted for the att region and consequently could only lysogenize by recombination between the cloned bacterial DNA insertion and the bacterial chromosome. Genetic mapping of the prophage in such lysogens indicated that the chromosomal sodA locus lies near 87 min on the E. coli map. Images PMID:6309739

  1. The Association of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with Fast Food and Soda Consumption and Unhealthy Weight Loss Behaviors Among Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Jacqueline M.; Rahman, Mahbubur

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study examines the association of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms with fast food and soda consumption, unhealthy dieting behaviors, and body mass index (BMI) in a group of young women. Methods This study was conducted on cross-sectional data gathered from 3181 females 16–24 years of age attending five publicly funded clinics in Texas. The associations among PTSD, fast food consumption frequency, soda consumption frequency, unhealthy dieting behaviors, and BMI were examined using binary and ordinal logistic regression. Results PTSD symptoms were associated with an increased frequency of consumption of fast food and soda as well as unhealthy dieting behaviors but not with increased body mass index (BMI). Conclusions PTSD symptoms adversely affect both eating and dieting behaviors of young women. These behaviors may have negative long-term consequences for the health of females with PTSD symptoms. PMID:21751875

  2. Shift in aggregation, ROS generation, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activities in the cells of an Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-09-01

    Washing soda, chemically identified as anhydrous sodium carbonate, is a popular cleaning agent among the rural and urban populations of India which often contaminates the freshwater ponds and lakes, the natural habitat of sponge Eunapius carteri. Present investigation deals with estimation of cellular aggregation, generation of ROS and activities of antioxidant enzymes, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Prolonged treatment of washing soda inhibited the degree of cellular aggregation. Experimental exposure of 8 and 16mg/l of sodium carbonate for 48h elevated the physiological level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the agranulocytes, semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, whereas, treatment of 192h inhibited the ROS generation in three cellular morphotypes. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were recorded to be inhibited under prolonged exposure of washing soda. Washing soda mediated inhibition of ROS generation and depletion in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were indicative to an undesirable shift in cytotoxic status and antioxidative defense in E. carteri. Inhibition in the activity of lysozyme under the treatment of sodium carbonate was suggestive to a severe impairment of the innate immunological efficiency of E. carteri distributed in the washing soda contaminated habitat. Washing soda mediated inhibition in the activity of acetylcholinesterase indicated its neurotoxicity in E. carteri. Washing soda, a reported environmental contaminant, affected adversely the immunophysiological status of E. carteri with reference to cellular aggregation, oxidative stress, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activity. PMID:27178357

  3. The association between state bans on soda only and adolescent substitution with other sugar-sweetened beverages: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Across the United States, many states have actively banned the sale of soda in high schools, and evidence suggests that students’ in-school access to soda has declined as a result. However, schools may be substituting soda with other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), and national trends indicate that adolescents are consuming more sports drinks and energy drinks. This study examined whether students consumed more non-soda SSBs in states that banned the sale of soda in school. Methods Student data on consumption of various SSBs and in-school access to vending machines that sold SSBs were obtained from the National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Study (NYPANS), conducted in 2010. Student data were linked to state laws regarding the sale of soda in school in 2010. Students were cross-classified based on their access to vending machines and whether their state banned soda in school, creating 4 comparison groups. Zero-inflated negative binomial models were used to compare these 4 groups with respect to students’ self-reported consumption of diet soda, sports drinks, energy drinks, coffee/tea, or other SSBs. Students who had access to vending machines in a state that did not ban soda were the reference group. Models were adjusted for race/ethnicity, sex, grade, home food access, state median income, and U.S. Census region. Results Students consumed more servings of sports drinks, energy drinks, coffee/tea, and other SSBs if they resided in a state that banned soda in school but attended a school with vending machines that sold other SSBs. Similar results were observed where schools did not have vending machines but the state allowed soda to be sold in school. Intake was generally not elevated where both states and schools limited SSB availability – i.e., states banned soda and schools did not have SSB vending machines. Conclusion State laws that ban soda but allow other SSBs may lead students to substitute other non-soda SSBs. Additional

  4. Surprising Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Diversity, Community Structure and Biogeography of Ethiopian Soda Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Lanzén, Anders; Simachew, Addis; Gessesse, Amare; Chmolowska, Dominika; Jonassen, Inge; Øvreås, Lise

    2013-01-01

    Soda lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. This makes them valuable model systems for studying the connection between community structure and abiotic parameters such as pH and salinity. For the first time, we apply high-throughput sequencing to accurately estimate phylogenetic richness and composition in five soda lakes, located in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. The lakes were selected for their contrasting pH, salinities and stratification and several depths or spatial positions were covered in each lake. DNA was extracted and analyzed from all lakes at various depths and RNA extracted from two of the lakes, analyzed using both amplicon- and shotgun sequencing. We reveal a surprisingly high biodiversity in all of the studied lakes, similar to that of freshwater lakes. Interestingly, diversity appeared uncorrelated or positively correlated to pH and salinity, with the most “extreme” lakes showing the highest richness. Together, pH, dissolved oxygen, sodium- and potassium concentration explained approximately 30% of the compositional variation between samples. A diversity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic taxa could be identified, including several putatively involved in carbon-, sulfur- or nitrogen cycling. Key processes like methane oxidation, ammonia oxidation and ‘nitrifier denitrification’ were also confirmed by mRNA transcript analyses. PMID:24023625

  5. Mechanical performance of a biocompatible biocide soda-lime glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    López-Esteban, S; Bartolomé, J F; Dí Az, L A; Esteban-Tejeda, L; Prado, C; López-Piriz, R; Torrecillas, R; Moya, J S

    2014-06-01

    A biocompatible soda-lime glass-ceramic in the SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-B2O3 system containing combeite and nepheline as crystalline phases, has been obtained at 750°C by two different routes: (i) pressureless sintering and (ii) Spark Plasma Sintering. The SPS glass-ceramic showed a bending strength, Weibull modulus, and toughness similar values to the cortical human bone. This material had a fatigue limit slightly superior to cortical bone and at least two times higher than commercial dental glass-ceramics and dentine. The in vitro studies indicate that soda-lime glass-ceramic is fully biocompatible. The in vivo studies in beagle jaws showed that implanted SPS rods presented no inflammatory changes in soft tissues surrounding implants in any of the 10 different cases after four months implantation. The radiological analysis indicates no signs of osseointegration lack around implants. Moreover, the biocide activity of SPS glass-ceramic versus Escherichia coli, was found to be >4log indicating that it prevents implant infections. Because of this, the SPS new glass-ceramic is particularly promising for dental applications (inlay, crowns, etc). PMID:24667693

  6. Growth and properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions on soda lime glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dhere, R.G.; Ramanathan, K.; Keyes, B.M.; Moutinho, H.R. )

    1994-06-30

    Polycrystalline thin films of CdTe grown on glass/SnO[sub 2]/CdS substrates are studied using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and time resolved photoluminescence decay techniques. CdS films were deposited by chemical solution. CdTe films were grown by close-spaced sublimation at substrate temperatures between 475--625 [degree]C. CdTe thin films deposited at temperatures higher than 525 [degree]C show preferential orientation in the [l angle]111[r angle] direction. The Grain size of the films increases with substrate temperature and the films are faceted for all the temperatures. The PL decay constant increases with substrate temperature up to 575 [degree]C for as-deposited films on soda-lime substrates. Films on borosilicate substrates show an increase up to the highest temperature used (625 [degree]C). There is systematic increase in the PL decay constant after CdCl[sub 2] heat treatment, and the range of values is 1--1.5 nsec for soda-lime samples and 1--2 nsec for borosilicate samples.

  7. Influence of Copolyester Composition on Adhesion to Soda-Lime Glass via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Ben; Hofmann, John; Pasquinelli, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Copolyesters are a subset of polymers that have the desirable properties of strength and clarity while retaining chemical resistance, and are thus potential candidates for enhancing the impact resistance of soda-lime glass. Adhesion between the polymer and the glass relates to the impact performance of the system, as well as the longevity of the bond between the polymer and the glass under various conditions. Modifying the types of diols and diacids present in the copolyester provides a method for fine-tuning the physical properties of the polymer. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the influence of the chemical composition of the polymers on adhesion of polymer film laminates to two soda-lime glass surfaces, one tin-rich and one oxygen-rich. By calculating properties such as adhesion energies and contact angles, these results provide insights into how the polymer-glass interaction is impacted by the polymer composition, temperature, and other factors such as the presence of free volume or pi stacking. These results can be used to optimize the adhesion of copolyester films to glass surfaces. PMID:27206103

  8. Characterization of Low Firing Temperature Ceramic Glaze Using Phuket MSW and Soda Lime Cullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketboonruang, P.; Jinawat, S.; Kashima, D. P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.; Sujaridworakun, P.; Buggakuptav, W.; Traipol, N.; Jiemsirilers, S.

    2011-10-01

    The normal firing temperature of ceramic products is around 1200 °C. In order to reduce firing temperature, industrial wastes were utilized in ceramic glaze. Phuket municipal solid waste (MSW), soda lime cullet, and borax were used as raw materials for low firing temperature glazes. The glaze compositions were designed using a triaxial diagram. Stoneware ceramic body was glazed then fired at 1000 and 1150 °C for 15 minutes. Morphology and phase composition of glazes were analyzed by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermal expansion compatibility of Stoneware body and glazes were investigated using a dilatometer. Melting behaviour of selected glaze was analyzed by heating stage microscopy. Phuket MSW and Soda lime glass cullet can be used in high percentage as major raw materials for low firing temperature ceramic glaze that show good texture and vitrified at lower firing temperature without using any commercial ceramic frits. The firing temperature can be reduced up to 150 °C in this study.

  9. Making a Low-Cost Soda Can Ethanol Burner for Out-of-Laboratory Flame Test Demonstrations and Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Henson L. Lee; Domingo, Perfecto N., Jr.; Yanza, Elliard Roswell S.; Guidote, Armando M., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates how to make a low-cost ethanol burner utilizing soda cans. It burns with a light blue flame suitable for out-of-laboratory flame test demonstrations where interference from a yellow flame needs to be avoided.

  10. The Association between Family Meals, TV Viewing during Meals, and Fruit, Vegetables, Soda, and Chips Intake among Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andaya, Abegail A.; Arredondo, Elva M.; Alcaraz, John E.; Lindsay, Suzanne P.; Elder, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Examine the relationship of family meals to children's consumption of fruit and vegetables as well as soda and chips. Additionally, to assess the relationship between viewing TV during family meals and children's diet. Design: Cross-sectional study that used a questionnaire completed by parents. Setting: Thirteen schools in San Diego,…

  11. Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum) mediated competition via induced resistance: Interaction between Gratiana boliviana, Spodoptera exigua and Frankliniella occidentalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Survival assays were conducted with beet armyworm (BAW) Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), a tortoise beetle Gratiana bolivana Spaeth and western flower thrips (WFT) Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) on tropical soda apple (TSA) Solanum viarum Dunal, a relative of tomato. Both S. exigua and G. bolivia...

  12. Optimisation of Lime-Soda process parameters for reduction of hardness in aqua-hatchery practices using Taguchi methods.

    PubMed

    Yavalkar, S P; Bhole, A G; Babu, P V Vijay; Prakash, Chandra

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the optimisation of Lime-Soda process parameters for the reduction of hardness in aqua-hatchery practices in the context of M. rosenbergii. The fresh water in the development of fisheries needs to be of suitable quality. Lack of desirable quality in available fresh water is generally the confronting restraint. On the Indian subcontinent, groundwater is the only source of raw water, having varying degree of hardness and thus is unsuitable for the fresh water prawn hatchery practices (M. rosenbergii). In order to make use of hard water in the context of aqua-hatchery, Lime-Soda process has been recommended. The efficacy of the various process parameters like lime, soda ash and detention time, on the reduction of hardness needs to be examined. This paper proposes to determine the parameter settings for the CIFE well water, which is pretty hard by using Taguchi experimental design method. Orthogonal Arrays of Taguchi, Signal-to-Noise Ratio, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) have been applied to determine their dosage and analysed for their effect on hardness reduction. The tests carried out with optimal levels of Lime-Soda process parameters confirmed the efficacy of the Taguchi optimisation method. Emphasis has been placed on optimisation of chemical doses required to reduce the total hardness using Taguchi method and ANOVA, to suit the available raw water quality for aqua-hatchery practices, especially for fresh water prawn M. rosenbergii. PMID:24749379

  13. Anesthetic management of a patient with sustained severe metabolic alkalosis and electrolyte abnormalities caused by ingestion of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jose; Lim, Jeffrey; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  14. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Sustained Severe Metabolic Alkalosis and Electrolyte Abnormalities Caused by Ingestion of Baking Soda

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  15. Stricter School Soda Limits Offered: Facing Lawsuit Threat, Beverage Industry Vows to Curb High-Calorie Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2006-01-01

    The soft-drink industry vowed to voluntarily curb selling sugary sodas and other high-calorie beverages in schools, a move that was taken under threat of litigation by critics who see the industry as a prime culprit in a national obesity crisis. The promise offered no guarantee that schools would go along with the restrictions, though many…

  16. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines.

    PubMed

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tringe, Susannah G; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first "metagenomic snapshots" of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that the top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermaceae-related draft genome were indicative of a "salt-in" strategy of osmotic

  17. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines

    PubMed Central

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D.; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first “metagenomic snapshots” of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that the top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermaceae-related draft genome were indicative of a “salt-in” strategy of

  18. Glass formation, properties and structure of soda-yttria-silica glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1992-01-01

    The glass formation region of the soda yttria silicate system was determined. The glasses within this region were measured to have a density of 2.4 to 3.1 g/cu cm, a refractive index of 1.50 to 1.60, a coefficient of thermal expansion of 7 x 10(exp -6)/C, softening temperatures between 500 and 780 C, and Vickers hardness values of 3.7 to 5.8 GPa. Aqueous chemical durability measurements were made on select glass compositions while infrared transmission spectra were used to study the glass structure and its effect on glass properties. A compositional region was identified which exhibited high thermal expansion, high softening temperatures, and good chemical durability.

  19. Glass formation, properties, and structure of soda-yttria-silicate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1991-01-01

    The glass formation region of the soda yttria silicate system was determined. The glasses within this region were measured to have a density of 2.4 to 3.1 g/cu cm, a refractive index of 1.50 to 1.60, a coefficient of thermal expansion of 7 x 10(exp -6)/C, softening temperatures between 500 and 780 C, and Vickers hardness values of 3.7 to 5.8 GPa. Aqueous chemical durability measurements were made on select glass compositions while infrared transmission spectra were used to study the glass structure and its effect on glass properties. A compositional region was identified which exhibited high thermal expansion, high softening temperatures, and good chemical durability.

  20. Purification of empty fruit bunch (EFB) and kenaf soda lignin with acidified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Sharifah Nurul Ain Syed; Zakaria, Sarani; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin

    2014-09-01

    In this current study, the soda lignins from empty fruit bunch (EFB) and kenaf core were recovered by two step precipitation method. The objective of this research is to study the purity of lignin by washing the lignins with acidified water. The purified lignins were undergone characterization by FT-IR, Uv-Vis and XRD. The FT-IR analysis shows that kenaf core has Guaiacyl(G) and Syringyl(S) unit meanwhile EFB has Hydroxyphenyl(H), Guaiacyl(G) and Syringyl(S) unit of lignin. As for XRD analysis, the non-purified shows that the existence of impurities which is salt (NaCl). The UV analysis shows the higher absorbance which lead to the purity of lignin.

  1. [Algo-bacterial communities of the Kulunda steppe (Altai region, Russia) soda lakes].

    PubMed

    Samylina, O S; Sapozhnikov, F V; Gaĭnanova, O Iu; Riabova, A V; Nikitin, M A; Sorokin, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    The composition and macroscopic structure of the floating oxygenic phototrophic communities from Kulunda steppe soda lakes (Petukhovskoe sodovoe, Tanatara VI, and Gorchiny 3) was described based on the data of the 2011 and 2012 expeditions (Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology). The algo-bacterial community with a green alga Ctenocladus circinnatus as an edificator was the typical one. Filamentous Geitlerinema sp. and Nodosilinea sp. were the dominant cyanobacteria. Apart from C. circinnatus, the algological component of the community contained unicellular green algae Dunaliella viridis and cf. Chlorella minutissima, as well as diatoms (Anomeoneis sphaerophora, Brchysira brebissonii, Brachysira zellensis, Mastogloia pusilla var. subcapitata, Nitzschia amphibia, Nitzschia communis, and Nitzschia sp.1). The latter have not been previously identified in the lakes under study. In all lakes, a considerable increase in salinity was found to result in changes in the composition and macroscopic structure of algo-bacterial communities. PMID:25916153

  2. Research on heavy metals in Ruditapes philippinarum and soda industry wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaobin; Xu, Weihai; Wang, Xinting; Huang, Xinping; Deng, Liping; Kang, Xinglun; Jiang, Zhigang; Ma, Xuli

    2005-03-01

    Heavy metals pollution in Jiaozhou Bay was studied in Ruditapes. philippinarum, a bioindicator of seawater pollution. Heavy metals in soda industry wastes “white mud” were also studied. Comparison of microwave digestion method with general digestion method revealed that microwave digestion is superior to general digestion in precision, recovery, digestion speed and efficiency, etc. Cd concentration in Hongdao R. philippinarum samples exceeded the national standard by 0.046 mg/kg, that of Yinghai sample by 0.02 mg/kg, and that of Hongshiya sample by 0.22 mg/kg. Sample Pb concentration in Hongshiya was found to exceed the national standard by 0.02 mg/kg. However the heavy metals concentration in R. philippinarum near the Qingdao Alkaline Factory was complied with the standard. This was proved by Penaeus chinensis culture experiment. Therefore, the possible contamination source may come from other land areas.

  3. Study of the counting rate capability of MRPC detectors built with soda lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, R.; Margoto Rodríguez, O.; Park, W.; Rodríguez Rodríguez, A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2016-09-01

    We report the results of three MRPC detectors built with soda lime glass and tested in the T10 beam line at CERN. The detectors consist of a stack of 280 μm thick glass sheets with 6 gaps of 220 μm . We built two identical MRPCs, except one had the edges of glass treated with resistive paint. A third detector was built with one HV electrode painted as strips. The detectors' efficiency and time resolution were studied at different particle flux in a pulsed beam environment. The results do not show any improvement with the painted edge technique at higher particle flux. We heated the MRPCs up to 40 °C to evaluate the influence of temperature in the rate capability. Results from this warming has indicated an improvement on the rate capability. The dark count rates show a significant dependence with the temperature.

  4. Cu-Na ion exchange soda-lime glass planar waveguides and their photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ti, Yunqiang; He, Xin; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Pengfei; Farrell, Gerald

    2009-11-01

    Copper ion exchange technique was used to fabricate soda-lime glass planar waveguides. Prism coupling method was applied to measure the effective indices, and the refractive index profiles were reconstructed through Inverse WKB (IWKB) method. Optical absorption and photoluminescence analysis were carried out as well. The emission spectra centered at 520nm are attributed to Cu+ located in distorted octahedral sites. It was found that the ion exchange time and temperature both play an important role in the waveguides luminescence properties. The emission spectra intensities decrease with the ion exchange time increasing. The emission peak wavelength slightly blue shifts as the ion-exchange time increasing as well. The emission band intensity nearly increases consistently with the ion-exchange temperature increasing within proper ion-exchange time. Different excitation wavelengths were tested as well in order to study the site effect on photoluminescence properties.

  5. Optical and spectroscopic properties of soda lime alumino-silicate glasses doped with erbium and silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmo, A. P.; Bell, M. J. V.; Da Costa, Z. M.; Anjos, V.; Barbosa, L. C.; Chillcce, E. F.; Giehl, J. M.; Pontuschka, W. M.

    2011-10-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Ag/Er co-doped soda lime silicate glasses have been studied with the aim of assessing the effective role of silver as a sensitizer for erbium. Changes in spectroscopic properties of Er 3+ as a function of silver addition to the base composition have been measured. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), absorption as well as photoluminescence measurements in the visible and infrared spectral region, particularly 4I 13/2 → 4I 15/2 transition of the Er 3+ ion were performed; excitation wavelengths in the range from 325 to 808 nm were used. Enhancement of the Er 3+ luminescence at 1.54 μm was observed when Ag was added.

  6. Surface Analysis of Stressed and Control Tin Oxide Thin Films on Soda Lime Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Pankow, J. W.

    2003-05-01

    Surface analysis techniques have been used to investigate tin oxide-coated soda lime glass specimens prior and subsequent to their exposure to DC bias, heat, and humidity. All specimens reported here comprise the following layered structure: tin oxide/silicon oxycarbide/glass. Depth profiling using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) clearly shows the interfacial regions in both control samples and samples exposed to the above-mentioned conditions (stressed). Control samples show distinct and relatively compact interfacial regions as well as an intact silicon oxycarbide diffusion barrier. Stressed films, however, show more diffuse interfacial regions and a physically and chemically altered silicon oxycarbide diffusion barrier. This deterioration of the diffusion barrier is proposed to be a pre-requisite event to enable tin oxide delamination.

  7. Manganese modified structural and optical properties of zinc soda lime silica glasses.

    PubMed

    Samsudin, Nur Farhana; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Wahab, Zaidan Abdul; Fen, Yap Wing; Liew, Josephine Ying Chi; Lim, Way Foong; Mohd Zaid, Mohd Hafiz; Omar, Nur Alia Sheh

    2016-03-20

    A series of MnO-doped zinc soda lime silica glass systems was prepared by a conventional melt and quenching technique. In this study, the x-ray diffraction analysis was applied to confirm the amorphous nature of the glasses. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows the glass network consists of MnO4, SiO4, and ZnO4 units as basic structural units. The glass samples under field emission scanning electron microscopy observation demonstrated irregularity in shape and size with glassy phase-like structure. The optical absorption studies revealed that the optical bandgap (Eopt) values decrease with an increase of MnO content. Through the results of various measurements, the doping of MnO in the glass matrix had effects on the performance of the glasses and significantly improved the properties of the glass sample as a potential host for phosphor material. PMID:27140551

  8. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda-lime-silica waste glass.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Babak

    2014-04-01

    Soda-lime-silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity. PMID:24582266

  9. Methanogenesis in Big Soda Lake, Nevada: an Alkaline, Moderately Hypersaline Desert Lake

    PubMed Central

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Marsh, Lorraine; DesMarais, David J.

    1982-01-01

    Incubated sediment slurries from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, produced significant levels of CH4, and production was inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid and by autoclaving. Methane production was stimulated by methanol, trimethylamine, and, to a lesser extent, methionine. Surprisingly, hydrogen, acetate, and formate amendments provided only slight or no stimulation of methanogenesis. Methane production by sediment slurries had a pH optimum of 9.7. A methanol-grown enrichment culture containing a small, epifluorescent coccus as the predominant organism was recovered from sediments. The enrichment grew best when FeS or autoclaved sediment particles were included in the media, had a pH optimum of 9.7, and produced 14CH4 from 14CH3OH. The methane formed by methanolgrown enrichment cultures was depleted in 13C by 72 to 77‰ relative to the methanol. PMID:16345952

  10. The soda-ash roasting of chromite ore processing residue for the reclamation of chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, M. P.; Tathavadkar, V. D.; Calvert, C. C.; Jha, A.

    2001-12-01

    Sodium chromate is produced via the soda-ash roasting of chromite ore with sodium carbonate. After the reaction, nearly 15 pct of the chromium oxide remains unreacted and ends up in the waste stream, for landfills. In recent years, the concern over environmental pollution from hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) from the waste residue has become a major problem for the chromium chemical industry. The main purpose of this investigation is to recover chromium oxide present in the waste residue as sodium chromate. Cr2O3 in the residue is distributed between the two spinel solid solutions, Mg(Al,Cr)2O4 and γ-Fe2O3. The residue from the sodium chromate production process was analyzed both physically and chemically. The compositions of the mineral phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The influence of alkali addition on the overall reaction rate is examined. The kinetics of the chromium extraction reaction resulting from the residue of the soda-ash roasting process under an oxidizing atmosphere is also investigated. It is shown that the experimental results for the roasting reaction can be best described by the Ginstling and Brounshtein (GB) equation for diffusion-controlled kinetics. The apparent activation energy for the roasting reaction was calculated to be between 85 and 90 kJ·mol-1 in the temperature range 1223 to 1473 K. The kinetics of leaching of Cr3+ ions using the aqueous phase from the process residue is also studied by treating the waste into acid solutions with different concentrations.

  11. Bacterial Diversity in the Soda Saline Crater Lake from Isabel Island, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Garrido, José Félix; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo César; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Isabel Lake is a moderate saline soda crater lake located in Isabel Island in the eastern tropical Pacific coast of Mexico. Lake is mainly formed by rainfall and is strongly affected by evaporation and high input of nutrients derived from excretions of a large bird community inhabiting the island. So far, only the island macrobiota has been studied. The knowledge of the prokaryotic biota inhabiting the upper layers of this meromictic lake can give clues for the maintenance of this ecosystem. We assessed the diversity and composition of prokaryotic community in sediments and water of the lake by DGGE profiling, 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing, and cultivation techniques. The bacterial community is largely dominated by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms. Alpha diversity estimations reveal higher value in sediments than in water (P > 0.005). The lake water is dominated by γ-Proteobacteria belonging to four main families where Halomonadaceae presents the highest abundance. Aerobic, phototrophic, and halotolerant prokaryotes such as Cyanobacteria GPIIa, Halomonas, Alcanivorax, Idiomarina, and Cyclobacterium genera are commonly found. However, in sediment samples, Formosa, Muricauda, and Salegentibacter genera corresponding to Flavobacteriaceae family accounted for 15-20 % of the diversity. Heterotrophs like those involved in sulfur cycle, Desulfotignum, Desulfuromonas, Desulfofustis, and Desulfopila, appear to play an important role in sediments. Finally, a collection of aerobic halophilic bacterial isolates was created from these samples; members of the genus Halomonas were predominantly isolated from lake water. This study contributes to state the bacterial diversity present in this particular soda saline crater lake. PMID:26391805

  12. Failure Wave in DEDF and Soda-Lime Glass During Rod Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphal, Dennis; Behner, Thilo; Anderson, Charles; Templeton, Douglas

    2005-07-01

    Investigations of glass by planar, and classical and symmetric Taylor impact experiments reveal that failure wave velocity U/F depends on impact velocity, geometry, and the type of glass. U/F typically increases with impact velocity to between ˜ 1.4 C/S and C/L (shear and longitudinal wave velocities, respectively). This paper reports the results of direct high-speed photographic measurements of the failure wave for gold rod impact from 1.2 and 2.0 km/s on DEDF glass (C/S = 2.0, C/L =3.5 km/s). The average rod penetration velocity, u, was measured using flash X-rays. Gold rods eliminated penetrator strength effects. U/F for gold rod impact on DEDF is ˜ 1.0-1.2 km/s, which is considerably less than C/S. The increase of u with impact velocity is greater than that of U/F. These results are confirmed by soda-lime glass impact on a gold rod at an impact velocity of 1300 m/s. Similar results are found in``edge-on-impact'' tests; U/F values of 1.4 km/s and 2.4-2.6 km/s in soda-lime glass are reported for W-alloy rod impact, considerably less than C/S (3.2 km/s) [1,2]. [1] Bless, et. al.(1990) AIP Proc. Shock Comp. Cond. Matter---1989, pp. 939-942 (1990) [2] E. L. Zilberbrand, et. al. (1999) Int. J. Impact Engng., 23, 995-1001 (1999).

  13. Gene expression changes leading extreme alkaline tolerance in Amur ide (Leuciscus waleckii) inhabiting soda lake

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amur ide (Leuciscus waleckii) is an economically and ecologically important cyprinid species in Northern Asia. The Dali Nor population living in the soda lake Dali Nor can adapt the extremely high alkalinity, providing us a valuable material to understand the adaptation mechanism against extreme environmental stress in teleost. Results In this study, we generated high-throughput RNA-Seq data from three tissues gill, liver and kidney of L. waleckii living in the soda lake Dali Nor and the fresh water lake Ganggeng Nor, then performed parallel comparisons of three tissues. Our results showed that out of assembled 64,603 transcript contigs, 28,391 contigs had been assigned with a known function, corresponding to 20,371 unique protein accessions. We found 477, 2,761 and 3,376 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the gill, kidney, and liver, respectively, of Dali Nor population compared to Ganggeng Nor population with FDR ≤ 0.01and fold-change ≥ 2. Further analysis revealed that well-known functional categories of genes and signaling pathway, which are associated with stress response and extreme environment adaptation, have been significantly enriched, including the functional categories of “response to stimulus”, “transferase activity”, “transporter activity” and “oxidoreductase activity”, and signaling pathways of “mTOR signaling”, “EIF2 signaling”, “superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis”. We also identified significantly DEGs encoding important modulators on stress adaptation and tolerance, including carbonic anhydrases, heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferases, aminopeptidase N, and aminotransferases. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrated that transcriptome changes in L. waleckii played a role in adaptation to complicated environmental stress in the highly alkalized Dali Nor lake. The results set a foundation for further analyses on alkaline-responsive candidate genes, which help

  14. Geologic CO2 Input Into Groundwater and the Atmosphere, Soda Springs, ID, USA

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Lewicki; G. E. Hilley; L. Dobeck; T. L. McLing; B. M. Kennedy; M. Bill; B. D. V. Marino

    2013-02-01

    A set of CO2 flux, geochemical, and hydrologic measurement techniques was used to characterize the source of and quantify gaseous and dissolved CO2 discharges from the area of Soda Springs, southeastern Idaho. An eddy covariance system was deployed for approximately one month near a bubbling spring and measured net CO2 fluxes from - 74 to 1147 g m- 2 d- 1. An inversion of measured eddy covariance CO2 fluxes and corresponding modeled source weight functions mapped the surface CO2 flux distribution within and quantified CO2 emission rate (24.9 t d- 1) from a 0.05 km2 area surrounding the spring. Soil CO2 fluxes (< 1 to 52,178 g m- 2 d- 1) were measured within a 0.05 km2 area of diffuse degassing using the accumulation chamber method. The estimated CO2 emission rate from this area was 49 t d- 1. A carbon mass balance approach was used to estimate dissolved CO2 discharges from contributing sources at nine springs and the Soda Springs geyser. Total dissolved inorganic carbon (as CO2) discharge for all sampled groundwater features was 57.1 t d- 1. Of this quantity, approximately 3% was derived from biogenic carbon dissolved in infiltrating groundwater, 35% was derived from carbonate mineral dissolution within the aquifer(s), and 62% was derived from deep source(s). Isotopic compositions of helium (1.74–2.37 Ra) and deeply derived carbon (d13C approximately 3‰) suggested contribution of volatiles from mantle and carbonate sources. Assuming that the deeply derived CO2 discharge estimated for sampled groundwater features (approximately 35 t d- 1) is representative of springs throughout the study area, the total rate of deeply derived CO2 input into the groundwater system within this area could be ~ 350 t d- 1, similar to CO2 emission rates from a number of quiescent volcanoes.

  15. A fast prototyping process for fabrication of microfluidic systems on soda-lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Che-Hsin; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Lin, Yen-Heng; Chang, Guan-Liang

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes a fast, low-cost but reliable process for the fabrication of microfluidic systems on soda-lime glass substrates. Instead of using an expensive metal or polisilicon/nitride layer as an etch mask, a thin layer of AZ 4620 positive photoresist (PR) is used for buffered oxide etching (BOE) of soda-lime glass. A novel two-step baking process prolongs the survival time of the PR mask in the etchant, which avoids serious peeling problems of the PR. A new process to remove precipitated particles generated during the etching process is also reported in which the glass substrate is dipped into a 1 M hydrochloride solution. A microfluidic channel with a depth of 35.95±0.39 µm is formed after 40 min BOE in an ultrasonic bath. The resulting channel has a smooth profile with a surface roughness of less than 45.95±7.96 Å. Glass chips with microfluidic channels are then bonded at 580 °C for 20 min to seal the channel while a slight pressure is applied. A new bonding process has been developed such that the whole process can be finished within 10 h. To our knowledge, this is the shortest processing time that has ever been reported. In the present study, an innovative microfluidic device, a `micro flow-through sampling chip', has been demonstrated using the fabrication method. Successful sampling and separation of Cy5-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA has been achieved. This simple fabrication process is suitable for fast prototyping and mass production of microfluidic systems.

  16. Diversity of RuBisCO and ATP citrate lyase genes in soda lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Olga L; Tourova, Tatjana P; Muyzer, Gerard; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Sorokin, Dimitry Y

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from six soda lakes of the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) and from hypersaline alkaline lakes of Wadi Natrun (Egypt) were analyzed for the presence of cbb and aclB genes encoding key enzymes Ci assimilation (RuBisCO in Calvin-Benson and ATP citrate lyase in rTCA cycles, respectively). The cbbL gene (RuBisCO form I) was found in all samples and was most diverse, while the cbbM (RuBisCO form II) and aclB were detected only in few samples and with a much lower diversity. The cbbL libraries from hypersaline lakes were dominated by members of the extremely haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing Ectothiorhodospiraceae, i.e. the chemolithotrophic Thioalkalivibrio and the phototrophic Halorhodospira. In the less saline soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe, the cbbL gene comprised up to ten phylotypes with a domination of members of a novel phototrophic Chromatiales lineage. The cbbM clone libraries consisted of two major unidentified lineages probably belonging to chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. One of them, dominating in the haloalkaline lakes from Wadi Natrun, was related to a cbbM phylotype detected previously in a hypersaline lake with a neutral pH, and another, dominating in lakes from the Kulunda Steppe, was only distantly related to the Thiomicrospira cluster. The aclB sequences detected in two samples from the Kulunda Steppe formed a single, deep branch in the Epsilonproteobacteria, distantly related to Arcobacter sulfidicus. PMID:21073490

  17. Methanosalsum natronophilum sp. nov., and Methanocalculus alkaliphilus sp. nov., haloalkaliphilic methanogens from hypersaline soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Merkel, Alexander Y; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Sukhacheva, Marina V; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2015-10-01

    Two groups of haloalkaliphilic methanogenic archaea were dominating in enrichments from hypersaline soda lake sediments at pH 10. At moderate salt concentrations with formate or H2 as electron donor, methanogens belonging to the genus Methanocalculus were enriched, while at high salt concentrations with methylated substrates, a group related to Methanosalsum zhilinae was dominating. For both groups, several pure cultures were obtained including the type strains AMF2T for the Methanocalculus group and AME2T for the Methanosalsum group. The Methanocalculus group is characterized by lithoheterotrophic growth with either formate (preferable substrate) or H2 at moderate salinity up to 1.5-2 M total Na+ and obligate alkaliphilic growth with an optimum at pH 9.5. According to phylogenetic analysis, the group also includes closely related strains isolated previously from the low-salt alkaline Lonar Lake. The novel Methanosalsum group is characterized by high salt tolerance (up to 3.5 M total Na+) and obligate alkaliphilic growth with an optimum at pH 9.5. It has a typical methylotrophic substrate profile, utilizing methanol, methylamines and dimethyl sulfide (at low concentrations) as methanogenic substrates. On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic data, it is proposed that the two groups of soda lake methanogenic isolates are assigned into two novel species, Methanocalculus alkaliphilus sp. nov. (type strain AMF2T = DSM 24457T = UNIQEM U859T) and Methanosalsum natronophilum sp. nov. (type strain AME2T = DSM 24634T = NBRC 110091T). PMID:26228570

  18. Supporting teachers in the use of authentic, near-real time climate data from the NASA GIOVANNI data portal in the pre-college classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhansl, R. A.; Zalles, D. R.; Acker, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Authentic scientific data are increasingly becoming available online, and there is the potential for access to these data to transform how science is taught, giving students opportunities to gain skill in making meaning of complex information, and developing claims based on data and logic. However, simply making authentic data available to students is insufficient to realizing the potential of Web- accessed data for improving scientific understandings among broad student populations, particularly about critical areas such as climate change. There is a need for model programs that tailor expert data interfaces so that they are accessible to pre-college teachers and students. The Data-Enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE) project, funded by NASA, is providing a dedicated climate data portal in the NASA Giovanni data system, customized for educators, as well as ways for teachers to create and share lessons that incorporate these data. The DICCE-G website provides access to a focused set of data parameters useful for detecting and understanding climate trends, explanations of expert terminology and tutorials and other resources to support the creation and interpretation of data visualizations. These data allow students to discover and decipher complex ocean, atmosphere, biosphere interactions by displaying and comparing time-series and data maps of climate-relevant data parameters such as temperature, precipitation amount, snow cover, carbon dioxide fraction, vegetation indices, and aerosol optical depth. Pilot teachers are integrating these lessons into existing climate curricula, such as EDC Earth Science (to be published 2013), which provide a foundational understanding of Earth's energy balance and the key factors that influence regional and global climate. DICCE provides teachers with the opportunity to customize such curricula to their local area, bringing immediate relevance to their climate lessons by allowing students to compare long

  19. Radiation-induced mucositis: a randomized clinical trial of micronized sucralfate versus salt & soda mouthwashes.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Marylin J; Miaskowski, Christine; Greenspan, Deborah; MacPhail, Laurie; Shih, Ai-Shan; Shiba, Gayle; Facione, Noreen; Paul, Steven M

    2003-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the major toxicities caused by radiation therapy (RT) treatments to the head and neck. The clinical efficacy of sucralfate (Carafate R) mouthwash for head and neck cancer patients (HNC) is not consistent across studies. In this study, it was hypothesized that if the particles in the original sucralfate suspension were micronized (i.e., < or = 25 microns) then the coating action of the mouthwash in the oral cavity would be enhanced. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the efficacy of micronized sucralfate (Carafate R) mouthwash and salt & soda mouthwash in terms of the severity of the mucositis, the severity of mucositis-related pain, and the time required to heal RT-induced mucositis in patients with HNC. Severe mucositis and related pain can interfere with the ingestion of food and fluids, so patients' body weights were measured as well. All patients in this randomized clinical trial carried out a systematic oral hygiene protocol called the PRO-SELF: Mouth Aware (PSMA) Program. Patients who developed RT-induced mucositis anytime during their course of RT were randomized to one of the two mouthwashes and followed to the completion of RT and at one month following RT. Two referral sites were used for the study. Repeated measures occurred with the following instruments/variables: MacDibbs Mouth Assessment and weight. Demographic, disease, and cancer treatment information was also obtained. Thirty patients successfully completed the study. The typical participant was male (70%), married/partnered (70%), White (63%), not working or retired (73%), and had an average of 14.5 years of education (SD = 3.7). T-tests and Chi-square analyses with an alpha set at 0.05 were used to compare differences between the two mouthwashes. No significant differences were found in the number of days to onset of mucositis (i.e., 16 +/- 8.4 days). When patients had their worst MacDibbs score, (i.e., the most severe mucositis), there were no significant

  20. Severe metabolic alkalosis due to baking soda ingestion: case reports of two patients with unsuspected antacid overdose.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbons, L J; Snoey, E R

    1999-01-01

    Oral ingestion of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) has been used for decades as a home remedy for acid indigestion. Excessive bicarbonate ingestion places patients at risk for a variety of metabolic derangements including metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and even hypoxia. The clinical presentation is highly variable but can include seizures, dysrhythmias, and cardiopulmonary arrest. We present two cases of severe metabolic alkalosis in patients with unsuspected antacid overdose. The presentation and pathophysiology of antacid-related metabolic alkalosis is reviewed. PMID:9950389

  1. Cerium doped soda-lime-silicate glasses: effects of silver ion-exchange on optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paje, S. E.; García, M. A.; Villegas, M. A.; Llopis, J.

    2001-09-01

    Effects of silver ion-exchange on optical absorption (OA) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of a cerium doped soda-lime-silicate glass at room temperature are investigated. The optical spectra are described in terms of the characteristic transitions 4f↔5d originated in Ce 3+ ions placed mainly in two different sites of the glass network. As Ag + ions are introduced into the cerium doped glass, they are reduced to elementary silver (Ag 0) which are favoured by the reaction Ce 3++Ag +→Ce 4++Ag 0. Then, the number of Ce 3+ ions decrease inversely with depth from the surface contrarily to Ce 4+ ions does, and elementary silver diffuses and aggregates to form nanoparticles. As a consequence of these changes, the OA spectra of exchanged samples increase substantially in the UV range and the luminescence decreases significantly. The high sensitivity of PL together with deconvolution analysis of spectra, however, allows us to detect changes in the excitation and emission spectra from the earlier stages of ion-exchange. This indicates that during the ion-exchange we deal with fast processes (much shorter than 1 min). In fact, transmission electron microscopy observations of samples from the glass exchanged for a short time as 1 min at 325°C show the presence of a scanty number of silver nanoparticles, which confirms this point. Furthermore, with increasing the length of time of ion-exchange, PL spectra exhibit a progressive red shift indicative in part of a covalence increment in the oxygen-cerium coordinated bonding. We observe no luminescence from Ag + ions and other silver molecular species in contrast with other preliminary PL studies on silver ion-exchange in soda-lime-silicate glasses free of cerium. The effect is discussed on the basis of a supplementary increase in the number of Ce 4+ ions mainly due to the reaction Ce 3++Ag +→Ce 4++Ag 0, which prevents efficiently the luminescence of the silver centers.

  2. Formation, structural and optical characterization of neodymium doped-zinc soda lime silica based glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamratul, M. I. M.; Zaidan, A. W.; Khamirul, A. M.; Nurzilla, M.; Halim, S. A.

    New glass system of neodymium - doped zinc soda lime silica glass has been synthesized for the first time by melt-quenching of glass waste soda lime silica (SLS) with zinc oxide (ZnO) as precursor glass and Nd2O3 as dopant. In order to examine the effect of Nd3+ on the structural and optical properties, the prepared sample of structure [(ZnO)0.5(SLS)0.5](Nd2O3)x (x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wt%) was characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and the photoluminescence (PL). XRD pattern justifies the amorphous nature of synthesized glasses. FTIR spectroscopy has been used to observe the structural evolution of ZnO4 and SiO4 groups. The UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra reveals seven peaks centered at excitation of electron from ground state 4I9/2 to 4D3/2 + 4D5/2 (∼360 nm), 2G9/2 + 2D3/2 + 2P3/2(∼470 nm), 2K13/2 + 4G7/2 + 4G9/2 (∼523 nm), 4G5/2 + 2G7/2 (∼583 nm), 4F9/2 (∼678 nm), 4S3/2 + 4F7/2 (∼748 nm) and 4F5/2 + 2H9/2 (∼801 nm). PL spectra under the excitation of 800 nm display four emission bands centered at 531 nm, 598 nm, 637 nm and 671 nm corresponding to 4G7/2 → 4I9/2, (4G7/2 → 4I11/2, 4G5/2 → 4I9/2), (4G5/2 → 4I11/2) and (4G7/2 → 4I13/2, 4G5/2 → 4I11/2) respectively.

  3. Insufficient sleep among elementary and middle school students is linked with elevated soda consumption and other unhealthy dietary behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Franckle, Rebecca L.; Falbe, Jennifer; Gortmaker, Steven; Ganter, Claudia; Taveras, Elsie M.; Land, Thomas; Davison, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examines the extent to which insufficient sleep is associated with diet quality in students taking part in the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Project. Methods Data were collected in Fall 2012 for all 4th and 7th grade children enrolled in public schools in two Massachusetts communities. During annual BMI screening, students completed a survey that assessed diet, physical activity, screen time, and sleep. Of the 2456 enrolled students, 1870 (76%) had complete survey data. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations between sleep duration and dietary outcomes (vegetables, fruit, 100% juice, juice drinks, soda, sugar-sweetened beverages and water), accounting for clustering by school. Models were adjusted for community, grade, race/ethnicity, gender, television in the bedroom, screen time, and physical activity. Results In adjusted models, students who reported sleeping <10 hours/day consumed soda more frequently (β=0.11, 95% CI:0.03, 0.20) and vegetables less frequently (β=−0.09, 95% CI: −0.18, −0.01) compared with students who reported ≥10 hours/day. No significant associations were observed between sleep duration and fruit, 100% juice, juice drinks or water. Conclusions In this population, insufficient sleep duration was associated with more frequent soda and less frequent vegetable consumption. Longitudinal research is needed to further examine these relationships. PMID:25712328

  4. X-ray irradiation of soda-lime glasses studied in situ with surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, A.; Gálvez, F.; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O.; García, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    We present here a study of hard X-ray irradiation of soda-lime glasses performed in situ and in real time. For this purpose, we have used a Au thin film grown on glass and studied the excitation of its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) while irradiating the sample with X-rays, using a recently developed experimental setup at a synchrotron beamline [Serrano et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 083101 (2012)]. The extreme sensitivity of the SPR to the features of the glass substrate allows probing the modifications caused by the X-rays. Irradiation induces color centers in the soda-lime glass, modifying its refractive index. Comparison of the experimental results with simulated data shows that both, the real and the imaginary parts of the refractive index of soda-lime glasses, change upon irradiation in time intervals of a few minutes. After X-ray irradiation, the effects are partially reversible. The defects responsible for these modifications are identified as non-bridging oxygen hole centers, which fade by recombination with electrons after irradiation. The kinetics of the defect formation and fading process are also studied in real time.

  5. X-ray irradiation of soda-lime glasses studied in situ with surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Galvez, F.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Garcia, M. A.

    2013-03-21

    We present here a study of hard X-ray irradiation of soda-lime glasses performed in situ and in real time. For this purpose, we have used a Au thin film grown on glass and studied the excitation of its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) while irradiating the sample with X-rays, using a recently developed experimental setup at a synchrotron beamline [Serrano et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 083101 (2012)]. The extreme sensitivity of the SPR to the features of the glass substrate allows probing the modifications caused by the X-rays. Irradiation induces color centers in the soda-lime glass, modifying its refractive index. Comparison of the experimental results with simulated data shows that both, the real and the imaginary parts of the refractive index of soda-lime glasses, change upon irradiation in time intervals of a few minutes. After X-ray irradiation, the effects are partially reversible. The defects responsible for these modifications are identified as non-bridging oxygen hole centers, which fade by recombination with electrons after irradiation. The kinetics of the defect formation and fading process are also studied in real time.

  6. Effect of dentifrice containing fluoride and/or baking soda on enamel demineralization/remineralization: an in situ study.

    PubMed

    Cury, J A; Hashizume, L N; Del Bel Cury, A A; Tabchoury, C P

    2001-01-01

    The additive effect of baking soda on the anticariogenic effect of fluoride dentifrice is not well established. To evaluate it, a crossover in situ study was done in three phases of 28 days. Volunteers, using acrylic palatal appliances containing four human enamel blocks, two sound (to evaluate demineralization) and two with artificial caries lesions (to evaluate remineralization), took part in this study. During each phase, 10% sucrose solution was dripped (3 times a day) only onto the sound blocks. After 10 min, a slurry of placebo, fluoride (F) or fluoride and baking soda (F+NaHCO(3)) dentifrice was dripped onto all enamel blocks. The results showed a higher F concentration in dental plaque formed during treatment with F+NaHCO(3) than placebo (p<0.05), but the difference related to F dentifrice was not significant. The enamel demineralization was lower, and remineralization was greater, after treatment with F+NaHCO(3) than placebo (p<0.05), but the difference related to F dentifrice was not significant. The data suggest that baking soda neither improves nor impairs the effect of F dentifrice on reduction of demineralization and enhancement of remineralization of enamel. PMID:11275669

  7. Differential performance of tropical soda apple and its biological control agent Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in open and shaded habitats.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Rodrigo; Aguirre, Carlos; Wheeler, Gregory S; Lapointe, Stephen L; Rosskopf, Erin; Overholt, William A

    2011-12-01

    The leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth has been released since 2003 in the southeastern United States for biological control of tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum Dunal. In Florida, G. boliviana can be found on tropical soda apple growing in open pastures as well as in shady wooded areas. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of light intensity on the performance of tropical soda apple and G. boliviana under greenhouse conditions, and to determine the abundance and mortality of G. boliviana in open and shaded habitats. Leaves growing in the shade were less tough, had higher water and nitrogen content, lower soluble sugars, and less dense and smaller glandular trichomes compared with leaves growing in the open. Plants grew slightly taller and wider under shaded conditions but total biomass was significantly reduced compared with plants grown in the open. In the greenhouse, G. boliviana had higher immature survival, greater folivory, larger adult size, and higher fecundity when reared on shaded plants compared with open plants. Sampling of field populations revealed that the overall abundance of G. boliviana was lower but leaf feeding damage was higher in shaded habitats compared with the open habitats. The percentage of eggs surviving to adult was greater in shaded compared with open habitats. The abundance of predators was higher in the open pasture and was positively correlated with the abundance of G. boliviana. These results indicate that not only plant quality but also habitat structure are important to the performance of weed biological control agents. PMID:22217759

  8. Using Data Pooling to Measure the Density of Sodas: An Introductory Discovery Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, Richard S.; Nestor, Lisa P.; Benedetto, David A.

    1999-10-01

    We have developed an experiment in which students measure the density of Coke and Diet Coke. In the first part of the experiment they make measurements using a buret, pipet, and graduated cylinder. The density data are pooled and plotted for each type of glassware. Students discover that Coke and Diet Coke have different densities. Discussion of the data also shows students the relative advantages and disadvantages of each type of apparatus and introduces them to the concept of error analysis. In the second half of the experiment each student uses a buret to accurately measure an assigned volume of either Coke or Diet Coke. Volumes in the range of 2 to 30 mL are assigned. These data are pooled. The slope of the mass-vs-volume plot provides an accurate measurement of the density and also shows that density is an intensive property. The difference in densities is due to the large amount of sugar in Coke compared to the relatively small amount of artificial sweetener in Diet Coke. Information read from soda cans is used to estimate the accuracy of these measurements. This experiment is used as the first experiment for college science students.

  9. Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Study of Hydrous Species in Soda Lime Silica Float Glass.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiawei; Banerjee, Joy; Pantano, Carlo G; Kim, Seong H

    2016-06-21

    It is generally accepted that the mechanical properties of soda lime silica (SLS) glass can be affected by the interaction between sodium ions and hydrous species (silanol groups and water molecules) in its surface region. While the amount of these hydrous species can be estimated from hydrogen profiles and infrared spectroscopy, their chemical environment in the glass network is still not well understood. This work employed vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical environment of hydrous species in the surface region of SLS float glass. SLS float glass shows sharp peaks in the OH stretching vibration region in SFG spectra, while the OH stretch peaks of glasses that do not have leachable sodium ions and the OH peaks of water molecules in condensed phases are normally broad due to fast hydrogen bonding dynamics. The hydrous species responsible for the sharp SFG peaks for the SLS float glass were found to be thermodynamically more stable than physisorbed water molecules, did not exchange with D2O, and were associated with the sodium concentration gradient in the dealkalized subsurface region. These results suggested that the hydrous species reside in static solvation shells defined by the silicate network with relatively slow hydrogen bonding dynamics, compared to physisorbed water layers on top of the glass surface. A putative radial distribution of the hydrous species within the SLS glass network was estimated based on the OH SFG spectral features, which could be compared with theoretical distributions calculated from computational simulations. PMID:27254814

  10. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J.; Meyer, Willem C. H. M.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2013-05-01

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle-glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers' hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H2/N2 atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle-glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required.

  11. Electrocoagulation treatment of black liquor from soda-AQ pulping of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Rastegarfar, N; Behrooz, R; Bahramifar, N

    2015-02-01

    The effect of electrocoagulation treatment was investigated on black liquor from soda-anthraquinone (AQ) pulping of wheat straw. Removal of phenol, chemical oxygen demand (COD), color, total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), and total solids (TS) from black liquor was investigated at different current densities by using aluminum electrodes at various electrolysis times (10, 25, 40, 55, and 70 min) and pH levels (3, 5, 7, 9, and 10.5). It was observed that at 16 V, electrolysis time of 55 min and current density of 61.8 mA/cm(2) were sufficient for the removal of the pollutants. Energy consumption was evaluated as an important cost-relation parameter. Results showed that the electrocoagulation treatment reduced color intensity from the high initial value of 18,750 to 220 PCU. This was strongly influenced by the pH level of the wastewater. In addition, it was found that the removal efficiency increased with increasing of current density. The maximum efficiencies for removal were 98.8, 81, 80, 92, 61, and 68 % for color, phenol, COD, TSS, TDS, and TS, respectively. The lowest energy consumption values were obtained at neutral pH after 55 min. Electrocoagulation was found to be an effective, simple, and low-cost technique to treat black liquor. PMID:25637386

  12. Copepods in Turbid Shallow Soda Lakes Accumulate Unexpected High Levels of Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Tobias; Herzig, Alois; Koinig, Karin A.; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids are protective pigments present in many aquatic organisms that reduce the photooxidative stress induced by short-wavelenght solar radiation, yet increase their susceptibility to predators. Arctodiaptomus spinosus, a calanoid copepod typically found in many fishless shallow soda lakes, shows large between-lake differences in pigmentation. Here, we attribute these differences to the environmental state of these ecosystems, namely, ‘dark water’ lakes with submersed vegetation and turbid ‘white’ lakes lacking macrophytes. Copepod carotenoid concentration in the turbid ‘white’ lakes was significantly (about 20-fold) higher than in the ‘dark water’ ones, although the latter systems were characterized by higher transparency. In addition, males had on a dry weight basis around three times higher carotenoid concentrations than females. Mycosporine-like amino acids (direct UV screening substances) were found in all cases, but in low concentration. The environmental conditions in these ecosystems were largely shaped by the presence/absence of submersed macrophytes Thus, in the turbid lakes, the strong wind-driven mixis allows for copepods to be brought to the surface and being exposed to solar radiation, whereas in ‘dark water’ ones, macrophytes reduce water turbulence and additionally provide shelter. Our results explain the counter-intuitive notion of strong red pigmentation in copepods from a turbid ecosystem and suggest that factors other than high UV transparency favor carotenoid accumulation in zooplankton. PMID:22916208

  13. Prokaryotic Community Diversity Along an Increasing Salt Gradient in a Soda Ash Concentration Pond.

    PubMed

    Simachew, Addis; Lanzén, Anders; Gessesse, Amare; Øvreås, Lise

    2016-02-01

    The effect of salinity on prokaryotic community diversity in Abijata-Shalla Soda Ash Concentration Pond system was investigated by using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing. Surface water and brine samples from five sites spanning a salinity range of 3.4 % (Lake Abijata) to 32 % (SP230F, crystallizer pond) were analyzed. Overall, 33 prokaryotic phyla were detected, and the dominant prokaryotic phyla accounted for more than 95 % of the reads consisting of Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, candidate division TM7, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Euryarchaeota. Diversity indices indicated that operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness decreases drastically with increasing salinity in the pond system. A total of 471 OTUs were found at 3.4 % salinity whereas 49 OTUs were detected in pond SP211 (25 % salinity), and only 19 OTUs in the crystallization pond at 32 % salinity (SP230F). Along the salinity gradient, archaeal community gradually replaced bacterial community. Thus, archaeal community accounted for 0.4 % in Lake Abijata while 99.0 % in pond SP230F. This study demonstrates that salinity appears to be the key environmental parameter in structuring the prokaryotic communities of haloalkaline environments. Further, it confirmed that the prokaryotic diversity in Lake Abijata is high and it harbors taxa with low or no phylogenetic similarities to existing prokaryotic taxa and thus represents novel microorganisms. PMID:26408190

  14. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress. ?? 2008 US Government.

  15. Structure and topology of soda-lime silicate glasses: implications for window glass.

    PubMed

    Laurent, O; Mantisi, B; Micoulaut, M

    2014-11-01

    The structural and topological properties of soda-lime silicate glasses of the form (1-2x)SiO2-xNa2O-xCaO are studied from classical molecular dynamics using a Buckingham type potential. Focus is made on three compositions (x = 6%, 12%, and 18%) which are either silica-rich or modifier-rich. We compare the results to available experimental measurements on structural properties and find that the simulated pair correlation function and total structure factor agree very well with available experimental measurements from neutron diffraction. The detail of the structural analysis shows that the Na and Ca coordination numbers tend to evolve with composition, and with increasing modifier content, changing from 5.0 to 5.6 and from 4.0 to 5.0 for Ca and Na, respectively. The analysis from topological constraints shows that the picture derived on a heuristic basis using classical valence rules remains partially valid. Ultimately, typical elastic phases are identified from the application of rigidity theory, and results indicate that the 6% system is stressed-rigid, whereas the modifier-rich composition (18%) is flexible. These results receive support from a full analysis of the vibrational density of states showing the low-energy bands at E < 20 meV increase as the system becomes flexible, providing another indirect signature of the presence of rigid to flexible transitions in this archetypal glass. Consequences for window glass are discussed under this perspective. PMID:25295377

  16. Alkaline phosphatases in microbialites and bacterioplankton from Alchichica soda lake, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia M; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Alcocer, Javier; Merino-Ibarra, Martín; Macek, Miroslav; Falcón, Luisa I

    2014-11-01

    Dissolved organic phosphorus utilization by different members of natural communities has been closely linked to microbial alkaline phosphatases whose affiliation and diversity is largely unknown. Here we assessed genetic diversity of bacterial alkaline phosphatases phoX and phoD, using highly diverse microbial consortia (microbialites and bacterioplankton) as study models. These microbial consortia are found in an oligo-mesotrophic soda lake with a particular geochemistry, exhibiting a low calcium concentration and a high Mg : Ca ratio relative to seawater. In spite of the relative low calcium concentration in the studied system, our results highlight the diversity of calcium-based metallophosphatases phoX and phoD-like in heterotrophic bacteria of microbialites and bacterioplankton, where phoX was the most abundant alkaline phosphatase found. phoX and phoD-like phylotypes were more numerous in microbialites than in bacterioplankton. A larger potential community for DOP utilization in microbialites was consistent with the TN : TP ratio, suggesting P limitation within these assemblages. A cross-system comparison indicated that diversity of phoX in Lake Alchichica was similar to that of other aquatic systems with a naturally contrasting ionic composition and trophic state, although no phylotypes were shared among systems. PMID:25112496

  17. Utilization of arylaliphatic nitriles by haloalkaliphilic Halomonas nitrilicus sp. nov. isolated from soda soils.

    PubMed

    Chmura, A; Shapovalova, A A; van Pelt, S; van Rantwijk, F; Tourova, T P; Muyzer, G; Sorokin, D Yu

    2008-11-01

    An enrichment culture from saline soda soils, using acetate as carbon and energy source and 2-phenylpropionitrile as nitrogen source (PPN) at pH 10, resulted in the isolation of strain ANL-alpha CH3. The strain was identified as a representative of the genus Halomonas in the Gammaproteobacteria. The bacterium was capable of PPN utilization as a nitrogen source only, while phenylacetonitrile (PAN) served both as carbon, energy and nitrogen source. This capacity was not described previously for any other haloalkaliphilic bacteria. Apart from the nitriles mentioned above, resting cells of ANL-alpha CH3 also hydrolyzed mandelonitrile, benzonitrile, acrylonitrile, and phenylglycinonitrile, presumably using nitrilase pathway. Neither nitrile hydratase nor amidase activity was detected. The isolate showed a capacity to grow with benzoate and salicylate as carbon and energy source and demonstrated the ability to completely mineralize PAN. These clearly indicated a potential to catabolize aromatic compounds. On the basis of unique phenotype and distinct phylogeny, strain ANL-alpha CH3 is proposed as a novel species of the genus Halomonas--Halomonas nitrilicus sp. nov. PMID:18795282

  18. Long-term change of the Pacific North Equatorial Current bifurcation in SODA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaohui; Wu, Lixin

    2012-06-01

    The long-term change of the North Equatorial Current (NEC) bifurcation in the Pacific Ocean is assessed based on the recently developed Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA, version 2.2.4). It is found that the NEC bifurcation latitude (NBL) has shifted southward over the past 60 years, although it displayed a slight northward migration from 1970 to 1992. This southward shift of the bifurcation latitude is associated with changes in the wind stress curl over the tropical Pacific Ocean between 10°N and 20°N, leading to the strengthening of the Kuroshio at its origin. The conclusion is further supported by simulations of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change models. It is demonstrated that the long-term change of the seasonal south-north migration of the bifurcation is modulated by the southward shift of the mean position. Over the past 6 decades, the phase speed of first-mode baroclinic Rossby waves (CR) at the latitude of the bifurcation increases from 13 cm s-1 in 1950 to 18 cm s-1 in 2005, and the corresponding seasonal amplitude increases (decreases) before (after) the mid-1980s. Using a linear vorticity model, it is found that the long-term modulation of the NBL seasonal migration amplitude is associated with the increase of CR in responses to the southward shift of the mean NBL. It is expected that the seasonal amplitude will decrease moderately in the following decades if the ocean continues warming.

  19. Irradiation-induced Ag-colloid formation in ion-exchanged soda-lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccavale, F.; De Marchi, G.; Gonella, F.; Mazzoldi, P.; Meneghini, C.; Quaranta, A.; Arnold, G. W.; Battaglin, G.; Mattei, G.

    1995-03-01

    Ion-exchanged glass samples were obtained by immersing soda-lime slides in molten salt baths of molar concentration in the range 1-20% AgNO 3 in NaNO 3, at temperatures varying from 320 to 350°C, and processing times of the order of a few minutes. Irradiations of exchanged samples were subsequently performed by using H +m, He +, N + ions at different energies in order to obtain comparable projected ranges. The fluence was varied between 5 × 10 15 and 2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2. Most of the samples were treated at current densities lower than 2 μA/cm 2, in order to avoid heating effects. Some samples were irradiated with 4 keV electrons, corresponding to a range of 250 nm. The formation of nanoclusters of radii in the range 1-10 nm has been observed after irradiation, depending on the treatment conditions. The precipitation process is governed by the electronic energy deposition of incident particles. The most desirable results are obtained for helium implants. The process was characterized by the use of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and nuclear techniques (Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Nuclear Reactions (NRA)), in order to determine concentration-depth profiles and by optical absorption and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) measurements for the silver nanoclusters detection and size evaluation.

  20. Gamma irradiated soda lime silicate glasses of different origin: Isothermal light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, E. M.; Okuno, E.; Suszynska, M.

    2002-05-01

    The isothermal light emission, at temperatures from 30 to 70 °C, from gamma irradiated (9 kGy with 60Co source, at room temperature) soda lime silicate glasses, with different amounts of K, Na and/or Ca in the matrix is presented. This emission was not expected in view of the thermoluminescent (TL) peak temperatures, commensurate with low probability of emission at temperatures too much below the peak maxima. It was noticed that single or multi-exponential decay functions can be fitted to experimental data for all the samples. The time constants of luminescence decay obtained range from minutes to several hours, depending on sample composition and temperature. For each sample and temperature, there is a tendency of enlargement of the half life of the light emission for longer heating duration. As the TL mechanism of this material is not yet fully understood, the analysis included, correlated with already known results of other techniques, gives a contribution to its comprehension.

  1. Er3+/Yb3+-codoped soda-lime silicate glasses: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berneschi, Simone; Bettinelli, Marco; Brenci, Massimo; Calzolai, Roberto; Chiasera, Alessandro; Ferrari, Maurizio; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Pelli, Stefano; Sebastiani, Sergio; Speghini, Adolfo; Zheng, Jie; Righini, Giancarlo C.

    2004-06-01

    Silicate glasses are among the best hosts for rare-earth ions, especially for the development of integrated optic amplifiers and lasers, due to their chemical robustness and adaptability to different waveguide fabrication processes. We performed a detailed study of a set of six experimental soda-lime silicate glasses, all having approximately the same base composition but doped with different percentages of Er3+ and Yb3+ ions. Judd-Ofelt analysis was performed on these glasses and the calculated radiative lifetimes were compared with the experimental ones. Planar waveguides were fabricated by using ion-exchange technology, and a new analytical function was used to fit the index profile of the waveguides. Luminescence and Raman spectroscopy was performed on most waveguide samples, and upconversion emission was evaluated. Channel waveguide insertion losses were reduced by using annealing processes, and net gain around 1535 nm was obtained. The gain, so far, is limited, but we are confident to be able to further increase the amplifier performances. Meanwhile, we are also developing a new type of silicate glass doped with alumina in order to increase the gain bandwidth.

  2. Spectral studies of erbium doped soda lime silicate glasses in visible and near infrared regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Y. K.; Surana, S. S. L.; Singh, R. K.; Dubedi, R. P.

    2007-02-01

    Optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of Er 3+ doped soda lime silicate glasses of the composition (in wt.%) 68.94SiO 2-22.55Na 2O-1.91CaO-4.96K 2O-0.85B 2O 3-0.29As 2O 3- xEr 2O 3 where x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5 have been studied in the UV-VIS/NIR regions. From the measured intensities of the various absorption bands of these glasses, the Judd-Ofelt parameters Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6 have been evaluated. Judd-Ofelt theory has been successfully applied to characterize the absorption and luminescence spectra of these glasses. From this theory various radiative properties like spontaneous emission probability, radiative life time, fluorescence branching ratio and stimulated emission cross-section for various emission bands of these glasses in the visible and NIR spectral regions have been determined and reported. An attempt has been made to through some light on the environment of Er 3+ in this glass system. Radiative properties of fluorescence band at ˜1.54 μm suggest the suitability of this glass system for broadband amplifier in the third telecom window.

  3. Time-resolved luminescence studies of Eu3+ in soda-lime silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruivo, Andreia; Muralha, Vânia S. F.; Águas, Hugo; de Matos, António Pires; Laia, César A. T.

    2014-02-01

    Soda-lime glasses doped with Eu3+ were synthesized using a variety of compositions, namely changing the fraction of CaO or Eu2O3. Those glasses were characterized with several techniques, including ellipsometry, UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy, steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy and time-resolved luminescence. The compositions' effects on optical properties such as refraction indexes, Eu3+ oscillator strengths and luminescence lifetimes were accessed from the analysis of the experimental results. Judd-Ofelt theory was used to analyze all these aspects, which allow the detection of a mismatch of optical properties from absorption and emission spectroscopy. This mismatch was confirmed from the time-resolved data, showing the existence of two different spectroscopic Eu3+ species. From those results it is concluded that there is evidence for lanthanide aggregation, giving rise to self-quenching effects that may be described through resonance energy transfer mechanisms. The difference between luminescence lifetimes for isolated and aggregated Eu(III) is interpreted as due to different interactions with oxygen in the matrix, namely degree of covalency of the Eu-O bond and point group symmetry of the lanthanide.

  4. Controlled-source electromagnetic survey at Soda Lakes geothermal area, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, M.; Wilt, M.; Haught, J.R.; Goldstein, N.

    1980-07-01

    The EM-60 system, a large-moment frequency-domain electromagnetic loop prospecting system, was operated in the Soda Lakes geothermal area, Nevada. Thirteen stations were occupied at distances ranging from 0.5-3.0 km from two transmitter sites. These yielded four sounding curves--the normalized amplitudes and phases of the vertical and radial magnetic fields as a function of frequency--at each station. In addition, two polarization ellipse parameters, ellipticity and tilt angle, were calculated at each frequency. The data were interpreted by means of a least-squares inversion procedure which fits a layered resistivity model to the data. A three-layer structure is indicated, with a near-surface 20 ohm-m layer of 100-400 m thickness, a middle 2 ohm-m layer of approximately 1 km thickness, and a basement of greater than 10 ohm-m. The models indicate a northwesterly structural strike; the top and middle layers seem to thicken from northeast to southwest. The results agree quite well with previous results of dipole-dipole and magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. The EM-60 survey provided greater depth penetration (1 to 1.5 km) than dipole-dipole, but MT far surpassed both in its depth of exploration. One advantage of EM in this area is its ease and speed of operation. Another advantage, its relative insensitivity to lateral inhomogeneities, is not as pronounced here as it would be in areas of more complex geology.

  5. Extraction of vanadium from high calcium vanadium slag using direct roasting and soda leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-sheng; Xie, Bing

    2012-07-01

    The extraction of vanadium from high calcium vanadium slag was attempted by direct roasting and soda leaching. The oxidation process of the vanadium slag at different temperatures was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effects of roasting temperature, roasting time, Na2CO3 concentration, leaching temperature, leaching time, and liquid to solid ratio on the extraction of vanadium were studied. The results showed that olivine phases and spinel phases in the vanadium slag were completely decomposed at 500 and 800°C, respectively. Vanadium-rich phases were formed at above 850°C. The leaching rate of vanadium reached above 90% under the optimum conditions: roasting temperature of 850°C, roasting time of 60 min, Na2CO3 concentration of 160 g/L, leaching temperature of 95°C, leaching time of 150 min, and liquid to solid ratio of 10:1 mL/g. The main impurities were Si and P in the leach liquor.

  6. Size Scaling of Tensile Failure Stress in a Soda-Lime-Silicate Float Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Kirkland, Timothy Philip; Ragan, Meredith E; Strong, Kevin T; Lin, Hua-Tay; Patel, P

    2010-01-01

    The (tensile) strength-size scaling of a float soda-lime silicate glass was studied using biaxial flexure and Hertzian ring crack initiation testing. The examined Weibull effective areas spanned ~ 0.4 to 48,000 mm2. Both the air- and tin-sides were tested. The air side was stronger than the tin side as others have observed; however, the differences in their characteristic strengths decreased with decreasing effective area, and their strengths converged for effective areas smaller than ~ 100 mm2. The failure stress at the smallest effective area examined for the tin-side was ~ 500% greater than that at the largest effective area while that difference was ~ 250% for the air- side. A Weibull modulus change at ~ 100 mm2 suggests different strength-limiting flaw types were dominant below and above that effective area. These results reinforce the importance to interpret and use tensile strength of glass in context to how much of its area is being tensile stressed.

  7. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  8. Condensation of Si-rich region inside soda-lime glass by parallel femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sakakura, Masaaki; Yoshimura, Kouhei; Kurita, Torataro; Shimizu, Masahiro; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Naoaki; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Miura, Kiyotaka

    2014-06-30

    Local melting and modulation of elemental distributions can be induced inside a glass by focusing femtosecond (fs) laser pulses at high repetition rate (>100 kHz). Using only a single beam of fs laser pulses, the shape of the molten region is ellipsoidal, so the induced elemental distributions are often circular and elongate in the laser propagation direction. In this study, we show that the elongation of the fs laser-induced elemental distributions inside a soda-lime glass could be suppressed by parallel fsing of 250 kHz and 1 kHz fs laser pulses. The thickness of a Si-rich region became about twice thinner than that of a single 250 kHz laser irradiation. Interestingly, the position of the Si-rich region depended on the relative positions between 1 kHz and 250 kHz photoexcited regions. The observation of glass melt during laser exposure showed that the vortex flow of glass melt occurred and it induced the formation of a Si-rich region. Based on the simulation of the transient temperature and viscosity distributions during laser exposure, we temporally interpreted the origin of the vortex flow of glass melt and the mechanism of the formation of the Si-rich region. PMID:24977898

  9. Interannual variation of the Indonesian throughflow in the Timor Passage as revealed in SODA: 1958 - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, I.; Mardiansyah, W.; Setiabudidaya, D.; Poerwono, P.; Syamsuddin, F.

    2015-09-01

    Temporal variability of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) in the Timor Passage was evaluated with special focus on its interannual variation. The ITF transport was estimated as a latitudinal averaged of an along strait currents in the Timor Passage based on the output of Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) experiment from 1958 - 2008. A Complex Empirical Orthogonal Function (CEOF), then, was applied to the interannual estimated ITF transport to extract the dominant mode of variability. The result has shown that the leading CEOF mode was explaining 67.2% of the total interannual variation. The reconstructed first CEOF time series shows strong positive anomalies (towards the Pacific Ocean) during 1962 - 1969, 1972 - 1978, 1997 - 1999, 2002 - 2005 and 2007. The transport was reversed (towards the Indian Ocean) during other periods. The upper layer transport above ˜200m depth is significantly correlated with the zonal wind stress in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean, with the transport lagging the winds by about 10 months. The middle layer transport between about 200 - 600m depth is significantly influenced by the zonal wind from the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean in which the zonal winds lag the ITF by about 5 months. In addition, the deeper layer transport below about 600m depth shows significant zero lag correlation with the zonal wind stress in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean, though the impact of the equatorial Indian Ocean zonal wind stress is not negligible.

  10. Spectroscopic properties of Er3+- and Yb3+-doped soda-lime silicate and aluminosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehlen, Markus P.; Cockroft, Nigel J.; Gosnell, T. R.; Bruce, Allan J.

    1997-10-01

    A spectroscopic investigation of an extensive series of Er3+-doped and Er3+,Yb3+-codoped soda-lime-silicate (SL) and aluminosilicate (AS) glasses is presented. Compared to SL glasses, 4f transitions in AS glasses show higher oscillator strengths, larger inhomogeneous broadening, and smaller crystal-field splittings of the respective excited-state multiplets. The Er3+ excited-state relaxation dynamics is adequately described by a combination of the Judd-Ofelt model and the energy-gap law. With the exception of 4I13/2, multiphonon relaxation is dominant for all excited states, making it possible to efficiently pump the 1.55 μm 4I13/2-->4I15/2 emission by excitation of 4I11/2 at around 980 nm. The absolute 4I13/2 luminescence quantum yield, for low 980-nm excitation density (~5 W/cm2), η, is ~0.9 at 0.4 mol % Er2O3 and drops to about 0.65 upon increasing Er2O3 to 1.2 mol %, indicating the onset of energy-transfer processes. Samples with high OH- impurity concentration suffer from significantly higher quenching of 4I13/2 luminescence at higher Er3+ concentrations. Energy migration to the minority of Er3+ ions coordinated to OH-, followed by efficient multiphonon relaxation accounts for this effect. At low excitation densities, the strong near-infrared absorption of Yb3+ in combination with efficient Yb-->Er energy transfer increases the 4I13/2 population density in Yb3+,Er3+-codoped samples by up to 2 orders of magnitude compared to equivalent samples without Yb3+. The dependence of η on Yb3+ codotation of 0.4 mol % Er2O3-doped samples predicts that a minimum of ~0.8 mol % Yb2O3 is required to achieve efficient sensitization of Er3+ by Yb3+. The relative intensities of upconversion luminescence from 4S3/2 and 2H11/2 are used to analyze internal sample heating in detail. Due to the high absorption cross section of Yb3+, increasing the Yb3+ concentration in Yb3+,Er3+-codoped samples of given length increases the absorbed power and subsequently the total density of

  11. An Improved Mechanical Material Model for Ballistic Soda-Lime Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Bell, W. C.; Coutris, N.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Fountzoulas, C.; Patel, P.; Templeton, D. W.; Bishnoi, K. D.

    2009-11-01

    In our recent work (Grujicic et al., Int. J. Impact Eng., 2008), various open-literature experimental findings pertaining to the ballistic behavior of soda-lime glass were used to construct a simple, physically based, high strain rate, high-pressure, large-strain mechanical model for this material. The model was structured in such a way that it is suitable for direct incorporation into standard commercial transient non-linear dynamics finite element-based software packages like ANSYS/Autodyn (Century Dynamics Inc., 2007) or ABAQUS/Explicit (Dessault Systems, 2007). To validate the material model, a set of finite element analyses of the edge-on-impact tests was conducted and the results compared with their experimental counterparts obtained in the recent work of Strassburger et al. ( Proceedings of the 23rd International Symposium on Ballistics, Spain, April 2007; Proceedings of the 22nd International Symposium on Ballistics, November 2005, Vancouver, Canada). In general, a good agreement was found between the computational and the experimental results relative to: (a) the front shapes and the propagation velocities of the longitudinal and transverse waves generated in the target during impact and (b) the front shapes and propagation velocities of a coherent-damage zone (a zone surrounding the projectile/target contact surface which contains numerous micron and submicron-size cracks). However, substantial computational analysis/experiment disagreements were found relative to the formation of crack centers, i.e. relative to the presence and distribution of isolated millimeter-size cracks nucleated ahead of the advancing coherent-damage zone front. In the present work, it was shown that these disagreements can be substantially reduced if the glass model (Grujicic et al., Int. J. Impact Eng., 2008) is advanced to include a simple macrocracking algorithm based on the linear elastic fracture mechanics.

  12. Thermal modeling of step-out targets at the Soda Lake geothermal field, Churchill County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwall, Ryan Kenneth

    Temperature data at the Soda Lake geothermal field in the southeastern Carson Sink, Nevada, highlight an intense thermal anomaly. The geothermal field produces roughly 11 MWe from two power producing facilities which are rated to 23 MWe. The low output is attributed to the inability to locate and produce sufficient volumes of fluid at adequate temperature. Additionally, the current producing area has experienced declining production temperatures over its 40 year history. Two step-out targets adjacent to the main field have been identified that have the potential to increase production and extend the life of the field. Though shallow temperatures in the two subsidiary areas are significantly less than those found within the main anomaly, measurements in deeper wells (>1,000 m) show that temperatures viable for utilization are present. High-pass filtering of the available complete Bouguer gravity data indicates that geothermal flow is present within the shallow sediments of the two subsidiary areas. Significant faulting is observed in the seismic data in both of the subsidiary areas. These structures are highlighted in the seismic similarity attribute calculated as part of this study. One possible conceptual model for the geothermal system(s) at the step-out targets indicated upflow along these faults from depth. In order to test this hypothesis, three-dimensional computer models were constructed in order to observe the temperatures that would result from geothermal flow along the observed fault planes. Results indicate that the observed faults are viable hosts for the geothermal system(s) in the step-out areas. Subsequently, these faults are proposed as targets for future exploration focus and step-out drilling.

  13. Photoluminescence of atomic gold and silver particles in soda-lime silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Eichelbaum, Maik; Rademann, Klaus; Hoell, Armin; Tatchev, Dragomir M; Weigel, Wilfried; Stößer, Reinhard; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2008-04-01

    We report the chemistry and photophysics of atomic gold and silver particles in inorganic glasses. By synchrotron irradiation of gold-doped soda-lime silicate glasses we could create and identify unambiguously the gold dimer as a stable and bright luminescing particle embedded in the glassy matrix. The gold dimer spectra coincide perfectly with rare gas matrix spectra of Au(2). The glass matrix is, however, stable for years, and is hence perfectly suited for various applications. If the irradiated gold-doped sample is annealed at 550 degrees C a bright green luminescence can be recognized. Intense 337 nm excitation induces a decrease of the green luminescence and the reappearance of the 753 nm Au(2) emission, indicating a strong interrelationship between both luminescence centers. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations indicate that the green luminescence can be assigned to noble metal dimers bound to silanolate centers. These complexes are recognized as the first stages in the further cluster growth process, which has been investigated with small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In silver-doped glasses, Ag(0) atoms can be identified with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy after synchrotron activation. Annealing at 300 degrees C decreases the concentration of Ag(1), but induces an intense white light emission with 337 nm excitation. The white luminescence can be decomposed into bands that are attributed to small silver clusters such as Ag(2), Ag(3) and Ag(4), and an additional band matching the green emission of gold-doped glasses. PMID:19636156

  14. Photoluminescence of atomic gold and silver particles in soda-lime silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelbaum, Maik; Rademann, Klaus; Hoell, Armin; Tatchev, Dragomir M.; Weigel, Wilfried; Stößer, Reinhard; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2008-04-01

    We report the chemistry and photophysics of atomic gold and silver particles in inorganic glasses. By synchrotron irradiation of gold-doped soda-lime silicate glasses we could create and identify unambiguously the gold dimer as a stable and bright luminescing particle embedded in the glassy matrix. The gold dimer spectra coincide perfectly with rare gas matrix spectra of Au2. The glass matrix is, however, stable for years, and is hence perfectly suited for various applications. If the irradiated gold-doped sample is annealed at 550 °C a bright green luminescence can be recognized. Intense 337 nm excitation induces a decrease of the green luminescence and the reappearance of the 753 nm Au2 emission, indicating a strong interrelationship between both luminescence centers. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations indicate that the green luminescence can be assigned to noble metal dimers bound to silanolate centers. These complexes are recognized as the first stages in the further cluster growth process, which has been investigated with small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In silver-doped glasses, Ag0 atoms can be identified with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy after synchrotron activation. Annealing at 300 °C decreases the concentration of Ag1, but induces an intense white light emission with 337 nm excitation. The white luminescence can be decomposed into bands that are attributed to small silver clusters such as Ag2, Ag3 and Ag4, and an additional band matching the green emission of gold-doped glasses.

  15. Penetration experiments in aluminum 1100 targets using soda-lime glass projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William E.; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Winkler, Jerry L.

    1995-01-01

    The cratering and penetration behavior of annealed aluminum 1100 targets, with thickness varied from several centimeters to ultra-thin foils less than 1 micrometer thick, were experimentally investigated using 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s. The objective was to establish quantitative, dimensional relationships between initial impact conditions (impact velocity, projectile diameter, and target thickness) and the diameter of the resulting crater or penetration hole. Such dimensional relationships and calibration experiments are needed to extract the diameters and fluxes of hypervelocity particles from space-exposed surfaces and to predict the performance of certain collisional shields. The cratering behavior of aluminum 1100 is fairly well predicted. However, crater depth is modestly deeper for our silicate impactors than the canonical value based on aluminum projectiles and aluminum 6061-T6 targets. The ballistic-limit thickness was also different. These differences attest to the great sensitivity of detailed crater geometry and penetration behavior on the physical properties of both the target and impactor. Each penetration experiment was equipped with a witness plate to monitor the nature of the debris plume emanating from the rear of the target. This plume consists of both projectile fragments and target debris. Both penetration hole and witness-plate spray patterns systematically evolve in response to projectile diameter/target thickness. The relative dimensions of the projectile and target totally dominate the experimental products documented in this report; impact velocity is an important contributor as well to the evolution of penetration holes, but is of subordinate significance for the witness-plate spray patterns.

  16. Aerobic carboxydotrophy under extremely haloalkaline conditions in Alkalispirillum/Alkalilimnicola strains isolated from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Aerobic enrichments from soda lake sediments with CO as the only substrate resulted in the isolation of five bacterial strains capable of autotrophic growth with CO at extremely high pH and salinity. The strains belonged to the Alkalispirillum/Alkalilimnicola cluster in the Gammaproteobacteria, where the ability to oxidize CO, but not growth with CO, has been demonstrated previously. The growth with CO was possible only at an oxygen concentration below 5 % and CO concentration below 20 % in the gas phase. The isolates were also capable of growth with formate but not with H(2). The carboxydotrophic growth occurred within a narrow pH range from 8 to 10.5 (optimum at 9.5) and a broad salt concentration from 0.3 to 3.5 M total Na(+) (optimum at 1.0 M). Cells grown on CO had high respiration activity with CO and formate, while the cells grown on formate actively oxidized formate alone. In CO-grown cells, CO-dehydrogenase (CODH) activity was detectable both in soluble and membrane fractions, while the NAD-independent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) resided solely in membranes. The results of total protein profiling and the failure to detect CODH with conventional primers for the coxL gene indicated that the CO-oxidizing enzyme in haloalkaliphilic isolates might differ from the classical aerobic CODH complex. A single cbbL gene encoding the RuBisCO large subunit was detected in all strains, suggesting the presence of the Calvin cycle of inorganic carbon fixation. Overall, these results demonstrated the possibility of aerobic carboxydotrophy under extremely haloalkaline conditions. PMID:19959573

  17. Bacillus lonarensis sp. nov., an alkalitolerant bacterium isolated from a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sultanpuram Vishnuvardhan; Thirumala, Mothe; Farooq, Mohammed; Sasikala, Chintalapati; Ramana, Chintalapati Venkata

    2015-01-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, motile and endospore-forming novel bacterial strain 25nlg(T) was isolated from Lonar soda lake, in India. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, it was identified as a member of Firmicutes, being most closely related to Bacillus patagoniensis PAT 05(T) (96.6 %) and other members in the genus Bacillus (<96.0 %). Strain 25nlg(T) was catalase and oxidase-positive. The strain grows optimally at a pH of 9.5 with 4-6 % (w/v) NaCl and temperature of 35-37 °C. The cell wall of the strain 25nlg(T) contains meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic amino acid. Polar lipids include diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unknown phospholipid (PL2), an aminophospholipid (APL2) and three unknown lipids (L2-4). The predominant isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. iso-C15:0 (41.7 %) was the predominant fatty acid, and significant proportions of anteiso-C15:0 (20.8 %), C12:0 (5.5 %), anteiso-C17:0 (4.9 %), iso-C17:0 (4.5 %) were also detected in the strain 25nlg(T). The DNA G+C content of the strain 25nlg(T) was 40.5 mol%. The results of molecular, physiological and biochemical tests allowed a clear phenotypic differentiation of strain 25nlg(T) from all other members of the genus Bacillus. Strain 25nlg(T) represents a novel member of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus lonarensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 25nlg(T) (=KCTC 33413(T) = LMG 27974(T) = CGMCC = 1.12817(T)). PMID:25294189

  18. Amphibacillus jilinensis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, alkaliphilic bacillus from a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yue; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wen-Wu; Xu, Xue-Wei; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-Fen

    2010-11-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, alkaliphilic, spore-forming, Gram-positive-staining rod, designated Y1(T), was isolated under strictly anaerobic conditions from sediment of a soda lake in Jilin province, China. The strain was not dependent on Na(+) but was highly halotolerant and grew optimally in medium JY with 0.5 M Na(+) (0.06 M NaHCO(3) and 0.44 M NaCl). The optimum pH for growth was 9.0, with a range of pH 7.5-10.5. No growth occurred at pH 7.0 or 11.0. The strain was mesophilic, with a temperature range of 15-45 °C and optimum growth at 32 °C. Strain Y1(T) was able to use certain mono- and oligosaccharides. Soluble starch and casein were hydrolysed. The methyl red test, Voges-Proskauer test and tests for catalase and oxidase activities were negative. The predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(15 : 0). Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 93.4-96.8 % sequence similarity to members of the genus Amphibacillus. The DNA G+C content was 37.7 mol% (T(m) method). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain Y1(T) with respect to Amphibacillus tropicus DSM 13870(T) and Amphibacillus sediminis DSM 21624(T) was 48 and 37 %, respectively. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and the DNA-DNA relatedness data as well as its physiological and biochemical properties, strain Y1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Amphibacillus, for which the name Amphibacillus jilinensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Y1(T) (=CGMCC 1.5123(T) =JCM 16149(T)). PMID:19965990

  19. Repeated detection of microbes in beverages dispensed from soda fountain machines and the effect of flushing on microbial density.

    PubMed

    Godard, Renee D; Sharma, Puja; Wagner, Carlie Jo; Wilson, C Morgan; Fleming-Haddock, Amie; Beach, Rebecca L

    2013-05-15

    Few studies have examined patterns of microbial contamination in soda fountain beverages. In this study, patterns of microbial contamination in beverages dispensed from soda fountain machines (SFMs) sampled in June 2009 and then again 13 months later were compared. Over 70% of beverages contained microbes in both years, suggesting that contamination of beverages dispensed from SFMs can continue for long periods of time. In addition, the impact of disinfecting the dispensing nozzles and plastic tubing of SFMs, as well as the impact of machine use on microbial contamination was assessed. Managers from 26 establishments (fast-food and convenience stores) were interviewed about their SFM disinfecting practices and no correlation was found between the self-reported disinfecting practices and levels of microbial contamination in beverages dispensed from SFMs. Furthermore, in a direct study of two SFMs with an established disinfecting regimen, CFU/mL in beverages increased significantly immediately after disinfecting of plastic tubing yet returned to pre-disinfecting concentrations within 11 days. These results suggest that disinfecting may disturb microbial communities, resulting in increased planktonic microbes, but not the ultimate removal of communities themselves. Additionally, samples of a sugar and a diet soda were collected from 15 different SFMs before and after dispensing of ~0.95 L (the approximate size of a large beverage cup). Samples collected before dispensing this volume had significantly higher microbial counts than those collected after, suggesting that planktonic microbes in the beverage lines had been reduced by flushing. As there are currently no regulations regarding the disinfecting of SFM tubing or periodic inspections of beverages dispensed from SFMs, it would be valuable for consumers to encourage increased surveillance of SFMs, and to dispense some beverage before filling their cups. PMID:23562835

  20. Accelerated formation of sodium depletion layer on soda lime glass surface by corona discharge treatment in hydrogen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Keiga; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Toshio; Harada, Kenji; Nishii, Junji

    2014-05-01

    Formation of a sodium depletion layer on a soda lime glass surface was accelerated efficiently using a corona discharge treatment in H2 atmosphere. One origin of such acceleration was the preferential generation of H+ with a larger mobility at an anode needle end with a lower applied voltage than that in air. The second origin was the applied voltage across the glass plate during the corona discharge treatment, which was estimated theoretically as 2.7 times higher than that in air. These two effects doubled the depletion layer thickness compared with that in air.

  1. A comparison of ZnO films deposited on indium tin oxide and soda lime glass under identical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Angshuman; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2013-06-15

    ZnO films have been grown via a vapour phase transport (VPT) on soda lime glass (SLG) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. ZnO film on ITO had traces of Zn and C which gives them a dark appearance while that appears yellowish-white on SLG. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirm the traces of C in the form of C-O. The photoluminescence studies reveal a prominent green luminescence band for ZnO film on ITO.

  2. A comparison of ZnO films deposited on indium tin oxide and soda lime glass under identical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Angshuman; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2013-06-01

    ZnO films have been grown via a vapour phase transport (VPT) on soda lime glass (SLG) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. ZnO film on ITO had traces of Zn and C which gives them a dark appearance while that appears yellowish-white on SLG. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirm the traces of C in the form of C-O. The photoluminescence studies reveal a prominent green luminescence band for ZnO film on ITO.

  3. Detection and size determination of Ag nanoclusters in ion-exchanged soda-lime glasses by waveguided Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Gonella, F.; Montagna, M.; Tosello, C.

    1996-02-01

    Waveguided Raman measurements have been performed in order to detect the presence of Ag nanoclusters in soda-lime glass waveguides obtained by ion exchange. By subtracting a strong broadband luminescence and the Raman contribution of the glass matrix, a low frequency Raman peak is resolved. The peak is ascribed to surface acoustic vibrations of silver clusters. The involved modes are the quadrupolar spheroidal ones. The size distribution of the Ag clusters is deduced from the energy and the linewidth of the peak. Silver particles have small dimensions with an upper size limit of about 1.5 nm. This result is in good agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy measurements.

  4. Evaluation of the halophyte Salsola soda as an alternative crop for saline soils high in selenium and boron.

    PubMed

    Centofanti, Tiziana; Bañuelos, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Urbanization, industrial development, and intensive agriculture have caused soil contamination and land degradation in many areas of the world. Salinization is one important factor contributing to land degradation and it affects agricultural production and environmental quality. When salinization is combined with soil pollution by trace elements, as it occurs in many arid and semi-arid regions around the world, strategies to phyto-manage pollutants and sustain crop production need to be implemented. In this study, we present the case of saline soils in the West side of Central California which contain naturally-occurring selenium (Se), boron (B), and other salts, such as NaCl, CaCl2, Na2SO4, and Na2SeO4. To sustain crop production on Se- and B-laden arid saline soils, we investigated the potential of the halophyte "agretti" (Salsola soda L.) as an alternative crop. The aim of our greenhouse study was to examine adaptability, B tolerance, and Se accumulation by S. soda grown on soils collected from a typical saline-laden field site located on the West side of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Our results showed that S. soda tolerates the saline (EC ∼ 10 dS m(-1)) and B-laden soils (10 mg B L(-1)) of the SJV even with the additional irrigation of saline and B rich water (EC ∼ 3 dS m(-1) and 4 mg B L(-1)). Under these growing conditions, the plant can accumulate high concentrations of Na (80 g Na kg(-1) DW), B (100 mg B kg(-1) DW), and Se (3-4 mg Se kg(-1) DW) without showing toxicity symptoms. Hence, S. soda showed promising potential as a plant species that can be grown in B-laden saline soils and accumulate and potentially manage excessive soluble Se and B in soil. PMID:25897503

  5. Carbon implanted waveguides in soda lime glass doped with Yb3+ and Er3+ for visible light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, G. V.; Valiente, R.; Gómez-Salces, S.; Flores-Romero, E.; Rickards, J.; Trejo-Luna, R.

    2016-05-01

    Channel waveguides were fabricated by carbon implantation in soda lime glass samples doped with Er3+ and Yb3+, exhibiting good confinement and both monomode and multimode behaviour at 633 nm. Excitation at near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) spectral ranges were used in order to obtain anti-Stokes (upconversion) and Stokes (downshift) emission in the visible range, respectively. The characteristic green and red bands of Er3+ transitions were observed, showing the potential of Yb3+ and Er3+ co-doping for the generation of visible guided emission under NIR excitation.

  6. Time-resolved measurement of photon emission during fast crack propagation in three-point bending fracture of silica glass and soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Tadashi Sato, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Kouichi

    2014-03-10

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of photon emission (PE) and fast crack propagation upon bending fracture were conducted in silica glass and soda lime glass. Observation of fracture surfaces revealed that macroscopic crack propagation behavior was similar between the silica glass and soda lime glass when fracture loads for these specimens were comparable and cracks propagated without branching. However, a large difference in the PE characteristics was found between the two glasses. In silica glass, PE (645–655 nm) was observed during the entire crack propagation process, whereas intense PE (430–490 nm and 500–600 nm) was observed during the initial stages of propagation. In contrast, only weak PE was detected in soda lime glass. These results show that there is a large difference in the atomic processes involved in fast crack propagation between these glasses, and that PE can be used to study brittle fracture on the atomic scale.

  7. Production of concentrated caustic soda and hydrochloride acid solutions from sodium chloride by electrodialysis with the aid of bipolar ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Greben', V.P.; Pivovarov, N.Ya.; Latskov, V.L.

    1988-10-20

    This paper gives a comparative analysis of the action of electrodialyzers containing three and five compartments in the structural unit, and equipped with bipolar, cation-exchange, and anion-exchange membranes, used for production of hydrochloric acid and caustic soda from sodium chloride solutions. It was shown that an electrodialyzer with five compartments gives hydrochloric acid and caustic soda for 2.5-3 M concentration with 0.2-0.3 current efficiency, whereas an electrodialyzer with three compartments in the structural unit gives hydrochloric acid and caustic soda concentrations of about 1.2 M at the same current efficiency. The performance of the electrodialyzers was analyzed and equations were derived for calculating the current efficiencies for acid and alkali under conditions of acidification of the salt solution; this was based on determination of the transport numbers of ions passing through the membranes.

  8. Relationship of the superoxide dismutase genes, sodA and sodB, to the iron uptake (/ital fur/) regulon in /ital Escherichia coli/ K-12

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhoffer, E.C.; Naranjo, C.M.; Fee, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Expression of sodA, as indicated by MnSod activity is normal in /ital fur/ mutants. This suggests that sodA is not a member of the /ital fur/ regulon and that the putative Fe-binding, regulatory protein of sodA, suggested by Moody and Hassan is not the Fur protein. by contrast, expression of sodB, as indicated by FeSod activity, is completely blocked in /ital fur/ mutants and the effect is restored by transformation with a plasmid having a normal /ital fur/ locus. The observations suggest that Fur, either directly or indirectly, controls SodB biosynthesis. Additional observations are described which indicate that SodB and Fur act together in a complicated fashion to control the biosynthesis of enterobactin. 26 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Growth of silver nanoparticles of variable and controlled diameter in silica-based and soda-lime glasses by simultaneous continuous ultraviolet irradiation and heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Goutaland, F.; Marin, E.; Michalon, J. Y.; Boukenter, A.

    2009-05-04

    We report on the space-selective precipitation of silver nanoparticles in silica-based and silver-exchanged soda-lime glasses by simultaneous continuous wave ultraviolet exposure and heat treatment. In silica-based glasses, we explain that simultaneous treatments lead to much higher silver nanoparticles concentration than similar treatments performed into two separated steps by minimizing the detrimental influence of oxidation on the nanoparticles' growth. In the case of silver-exchanged soda-lime glasses, nanoparticles are observed with both small and larger diameters of about 1 and 7 nm, whose concentrations depend both on the laser power density and on the heating temperature.

  10. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these

  11. Beyond baking soda: Demonstrating the link between volcanic eruptions and viscosity to all ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithka, I. N.; Walters, R. L.; Harpp, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Public interest in volcanic eruptions and societal relevance of volcanic hazards provide an excellent basis for successful earth science outreach. During a museum-based earth science outreach event free and open to the public, we used two new interactive experiments to illustrate the relationship between gas content, magma viscosity, and eruption style. Learning objectives for visitors are to understand: how gas drives volcanic eruptions, the differences between effusive and explosive eruption styles, viscosity's control on gas pressure within a magma reservoir, and the role of gas pressure on eruption style. Visitors apply the scientific method by asking research questions and testing hypotheses by conducting the experiments. The demonstrations are framed with real life examples of volcanic eruptions (e.g., Mt. St. Helens eruption in 1980), providing context for the scientific concepts. The first activity demonstrates the concept of fluid viscosity and how gas interacts with fluids of different viscosities. Visitors blow bubbles into water and corn syrup. The corn syrup is so viscous that bubbles are trapped, showing how a more viscous material builds up higher gas pressure. Visitors are asked which kind of magma (high or low viscosity) will produce an explosive eruption. To demonstrate an explosive eruption, visitors add an Alka-Seltzer tablet to water in a snap-top film canister. The reaction rapidly produces carbon dioxide gas, increasing pressure in the canister until the lid pops off and the canister launches a few meters into the air (tinyurl.com/nzsgfoe). Increasing gas pressure in the canister is analogous to gas pressure building within a magma reservoir beneath a volcano. The lid represents high-viscosity magma that prevents degassing, causing gas pressure to reach explosive levels. This interactive activity is combined with a display of an effusive eruption: add vinegar to baking soda in a model volcano to produce a quick-flowing eruption. These

  12. Hydrogeochemistry of Big Soda Lake, Nevada: An alkaline meromictic desert lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Robinson, S.W.; Law, L.M.; Carothers, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    Big Soda Lake, located near Fallon, Nevada, occupies an explosion crater rimmed by basaltic debris; volcanic activity apparently ceased within the last 10,000 years. This lake has been selected for a detailed multidisciplinary study that will ultimately cover the organic and inorganic hydrogeochemistry of water and sediments because the time at which chemical stratification was initiated is known (~1920) and chemical analyses are available for a period of more than 100 years. Detailed chemical analyses of the waters show that the lake is at present alkaline (pH = 9.7), chemically stratified (meromictic) and is extremely anoxic (total reduced sulfur-410 mg/L as H2S) below a depth of about 35 m. The average concentrations (in mg/L) of Na, K, Mg, Ca, NH3, H2S, alkalinity (as HCO3), Cl, SO4, and dissolved organics (as C) in waters of the upper layer (depth 0 to 32 m) are 8,100, 320, 150, 5.0, < 0.1, < 0.5, 4,100, 7,100, 5,800, and 20 respectively; in the deeper layer (depth 37 to 64 m) they are 27,000, 1,200, 5.6, 0.8, 45, 410, 24,000, 27,500, 6,800, and 60, respectively. Chemical and stable isotope analyses of the waters, ??13C and ??14C values of dissolved total carbonate from this lake and surface and ground waters in the area together with mineral-water equilibrium computations indicate that the waters in the lake are primarily meteoric in origin with the present chemical composition resulting from the following geochemical processes: 1. (1) evaporation and exchange with atmosphere, the dominant processes, 2. (2) mineral-water interactions, including dissolution, precipitation and ion exchange, 3. (3) inflow and outflow of ground water and 4. (4) biological activity of macro- and microorganisms, including sulfate reduction in the water column of the deeper layer at a very high rate of 6.6 ??mol L-1 day-1. ?? 1984.

  13. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Peroni, Gabriella; Miccono, Alessandra; Guerriero, Fabio; Guido, Davide; Perna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os) was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal. PMID:26917962

  14. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Peroni, Gabriella; Miccono, Alessandra; Guerriero, Fabio; Guido, Davide; Perna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os) was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal. PMID:26917962

  15. Data on optimized production and characterization of alkaline proteases from newly isolated alkaliphiles from Lonar soda lake, India.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Mukundraj Govindrao; Pathak, Anupama Prabhakarrao

    2016-09-01

    Alkaline proteases are one of the industrially important enzymes and generally preferred from alkaliphilic sources. Here we have provided the data on optimized production and characterization of alkaline proteases from five newly isolated and identified alkaliphiles from Lonar soda lake, India. The data provided for optimization of physicochemical parameters for maximum alkaline proteases production is based on OVAT (one variable at a time) approach. Alkaline protease production (U/mL) recorded by using different agro industrial residues is included in the given data. Further readers can find more information in our previously published research article where we have already described about the methods used and comparative analysis of the data recorded regarding optimized production, characterization and application of alkaline proteases isolated from Lonar soda lake isolates (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bcab.2016.06.002) [1]. The data provided here by us is useful to other researchers for setting up various suitable statistical models to perform optimization studies other than OVAT approach. PMID:27508233

  16. Metal loading in Soda Butte Creek upstream of Yellowstone National Park, Montana and Wyoming; a retrospective analysis of previous research; and quantification of metal loading, August 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boughton, G.K.

    2001-01-01

    Acid drainage from historic mining activities has affected the water quality and aquatic biota of Soda Butte Creek upstream of Yellowstone National Park. Numerous investigations focusing on metals contamination have been conducted in the Soda Butte Creek basin, but interpretations of how metals contamination is currently impacting Soda Butte Creek differ greatly. A retrospective analysis of previous research on metal loading in Soda Butte Creek was completed to provide summaries of studies pertinent to metal loading in Soda Butte Creek and to identify data gaps warranting further investigation. Identification and quantification of the sources of metal loading to Soda Butte Creek was recognized as a significant data gap. The McLaren Mine tailings impoundment and mill site has long been identified as a source of metals but its contribution relative to the total metal load entering Yellowstone National Park was unknown. A tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling study was designed to determine metal loads upstream of Yellowstone National Park.A tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling study was conducted on an 8,511-meter reach of Soda Butte Creek from upstream of the McLaren Mine tailings impoundment and mill site downstream to the Yellowstone National Park boundary in August 1999. Synoptic-sampling sites were selected to divide the creek into discrete segments. A lithium bromide tracer was injected continuously into Soda Butte Creek for 24.5 hours. Downstream dilution of the tracer and current-meter measurements were used to calculate the stream discharge. Stream discharge values, combined with constituent concentrations obtained by synoptic sampling, were used to quantify constituent loading in each segment of Soda Butte Creek.Loads were calculated for dissolved calcium, silica, and sulfate, as well as for dissolved and total-recoverable iron, aluminum, and manganese. Loads were not calculated for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc because these elements were infrequently

  17. Educator Uses of Data-Enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE), An Online System for Accessing a Vast Portal of NASA Earth System Data Known As the Goddard Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure (GIOVANNI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalles, D. R.; Acker, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Data-enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE) has made it easier and more technologically feasible for secondary and post-secondary instructors and students to study climate change and related Earth system phenomena using data products from the Goddard Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure (GIOVANNI), a powerful portal of Earth observation data that provides access to numerous data products on Earth system phenomena representing the land biosphere, physical land, ocean biosphere, physical ocean, physical atmosphere, atmospheric gases, and energy and radiation system. These data products are derived from remote-sensing instruments on satellites, ground stations, and data assimilation models. Instructors and students can query the GIOVANNI data archive, then save the results as map images, time series plots, vertical profiles of the atmosphere, and data tables. Any part of the world can be selected for analysis. The project has also produced a tool for instructors to author and adapt standards-based lesson plans, student data investigation activities, and presentations around visualizations they make available to their students via DICCE-G. Supports are provided to students and teachers about how to interpret trends in data products of their choice at the regional level and a schema has been developed to help them understand how those data products fit into current scientific thinking about the certainties and uncertainties of climate change. The presentation will (1) describe the features of DICCE, (2) examples of curricula developed to make use of DICCE in classrooms, (3) how these curricula align to Next Generation Science Standards, and (4) how they align to science education research literature about how to make school science more engaging. Recently-analyzed teacher and student outcomes from DICCE use will also be reported.

  18. Reduced Availability of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Diet Soda Has a Limited Impact on Beverage Consumption Patterns in Maine High School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley Blum, Janet E.; Davee, Anne-Marie; Beaudoin, Christina M.; Jenkins, Paul L.; Kaley, Lori A.; Wigand, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine change in high school students' beverage consumption patterns pre- and post-intervention of reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and diet soda in school food venues. Design: A prospective, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized study design. Setting: Public high schools. Participants: A convenience sample from…

  19. Influence of sun and shade conditions on Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) abundance and feeding activity on tropical soda apple (Solanales: Solanaceae) under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal) is a perennial invasive weed species which has become a serious problem in both agricultural and natural areas of the southeastern United States. A field survey was conducted at a ranch in Madison County, Florida, to assess the effect of sun and shade condi...

  20. Soda and Cell Aging: Associations Between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Healthy Adults From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Barbara A.; Needham, Belinda L.; Rehkopf, David H.; Adler, Nancy E.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested whether leukocyte telomere length maintenance, which underlies healthy cellular aging, provides a link between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and the risk of cardiometabolic disease. Methods. We examined cross-sectional associations between the consumption of SSBs, diet soda, and fruit juice and telomere length in a nationally representative sample of healthy adults. The study population included 5309 US adults, aged 20 to 65 years, with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease, from the 1999 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Leukocyte telomere length was assayed from DNA specimens. Diet was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls. Associations were examined using multivariate linear regression for the outcome of log-transformed telomere length. Results. After adjustment for sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, sugar-sweetened soda consumption was associated with shorter telomeres (b = –0.010; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.020, −0.001; P = .04). Consumption of 100% fruit juice was marginally associated with longer telomeres (b = 0.016; 95% CI = −0.000, 0.033; P = .05). No significant associations were observed between consumption of diet sodas or noncarbonated SSBs and telomere length. Conclusions. Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened sodas might influence metabolic disease development through accelerated cell aging. PMID:25322305

  1. Effects of light intensity on Tropical Soda Apple and the consequences for performance of its biological control agent, Gratiana boliviana (Chrysomelidae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current research was directed at determining the impact of light intensity on the architecture, amino acid content and trichome density and characteristics of Tropical Soda Apple (TSA), Solanum viarum (Solanaceae). TSA plants were grown in a greenhouse either covered with a shade cloth (75% bloc...

  2. Evaluation of mortality factors using life table analysis of Gratiana boliviana, a biological control agent of tropical soda apple in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple (TSA), Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae), has invaded many pastures and natural areas in Florida. The biological control agent Gratiana boliviana Spaeth (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is providing adequate control of TSA stands in South and Central Florida. However, poor or no es...

  3. Rapid and Accurate Species-Level Identification of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci by Using the sodA Gene as a Target

    PubMed Central

    Poyart, Claire; Quesne, Gilles; Boumaila, Claire; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Simple PCR and sequencing assays that utilize a single pair of degenerate primers were used to characterize a 429-bp-long DNA fragment internal (sodAint) to the sodA gene encoding the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase in 40 coagulase-negative staphylococcal (CNS) type strains. The topology of the phylogenetic tree obtained was in general agreement with that which was inferred from an analysis of their 16S rRNA or hsp60 gene sequences. Sequence analysis revealed that the staphylococcal sodA genes exhibit a higher divergence than does the corresponding 16S ribosomal DNA. These results confirm that the sodA gene constitutes a highly discriminative target sequence for differentiating closely related bacterial species. Clinical isolates that could not be identified at the species level by phenotypical tests were identified by use of this database. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this method for rapid and accurate species identification of CNS isolates, although it does not allow discrimination of subspecies. The sodA sequence polymorphisms observed with staphylococcal species offer good opportunities for the development of assays based on DNA chip technologies. PMID:11724835

  4. Releases, distribution and abundance of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum, Solanaceae), in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A biological control program against tropical soda apple (TSA) (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae)) released 176,643 Gratiana boliviana Spaeth (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Florida from 2003 to 2008. The spatial distribution of releases was clustered with more beetles released in south/central Flor...

  5. Rapid and reliable identification of Staphylococcus equorum by a species-specific PCR assay targeting the sodA gene.

    PubMed

    Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Ercolini, Danilo; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Salzano, Giovanni; Villani, Francesco

    2004-11-01

    Rapid and reliable identification of Staphylococcus (S.) equorum was achieved by species-specific PCR assays. A set of primers targeting the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (sodA) gene of S. equorum was designed. Species-specificity of the primer set was evaluated by using a total of 112 strains (including 27 reference strains of the DSM collection), representing 26 different species of the genus Staphylococcus, 3 species of the genus Kocuria, and different strains of Macrococcus caseolyticus. By using primers SdAEqF and SdAEqR the expected PCR fragment was obtained only when DNA from S. equorum strains was used as template. The rapidity (about 4 h from DNA isolation to results) and reliability of the PCR procedures established suggests that the method may be profitably applied for specific detection and identification of S. equorum strains. PMID:15612627

  6. Selective Deposition of SiO2 on Ion Conductive Area of Soda-lime Glass Surface.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Harada, Kenji; Hara, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Toshio; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Ikutame, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Keiga; Kaiju, Hideo; Nishii, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Selective deposition of SiO2 nanoparticles was demonstrated on a soda-lime glass surface with a periodic sodium deficient pattern formed using the electrical nanoimprint. Positively charged SiO2 particles generated using corona discharge in a cyclic siloxane vapor, were selectively deposited depending on the sodium pattern. For such phenomena to occur, the sodium ion migration to the cathode side was indispensable to the electrical charge compensation on the glass surface. Therefore, the deposition proceeded preferentially outside the alkali-deficient area. Periodic SiO2 structures with 424 nm and 180 nm heights were obtained using one-dimensional (6 μm period) and two-dimensional (500 nm period) imprinted patterns. PMID:27291796

  7. Selective Deposition of SiO2 on Ion Conductive Area of Soda-lime Glass Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Daisuke; Harada, Kenji; Hara, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Toshio; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Ikutame, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Keiga; Kaiju, Hideo; Nishii, Junji

    2016-06-01

    Selective deposition of SiO2 nanoparticles was demonstrated on a soda-lime glass surface with a periodic sodium deficient pattern formed using the electrical nanoimprint. Positively charged SiO2 particles generated using corona discharge in a cyclic siloxane vapor, were selectively deposited depending on the sodium pattern. For such phenomena to occur, the sodium ion migration to the cathode side was indispensable to the electrical charge compensation on the glass surface. Therefore, the deposition proceeded preferentially outside the alkali-deficient area. Periodic SiO2 structures with 424 nm and 180 nm heights were obtained using one-dimensional (6 μm period) and two-dimensional (500 nm period) imprinted patterns.

  8. On the plastic deformation of soda-lime glass-a Cr3+ luminescence study of densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriot, A.; Barthel, E.; Kermouche, G.; Quérel, G.; Vandembroucq, D.

    2011-03-01

    Silicate glasses are known to experience anomalous plastic behavior at micron scales: (1) they exhibit densification when flowing plastically; and (2) hydrostatic pressure affects the yield point. We have previously shown that densification maps are useful to infer a reliable constitutive law for the plastic response of silicate glasses. It is shown here that for soda-lime glass Cr3+ luminescence microspectroscopy may be used for that purpose. We also show that the constitutive law we have previously developed for amorphous silica provides a qualitative description of normal glasses, although it is unable to account for the finer details. More work is needed to quantitatively model normal-glass plasticity at the continuum length-scale.

  9. Structural incorporation of silver in soda-lime glass by the ion-exchange process: a photoluminescence spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsella, E.; Battaglin, G.; Garcia, M. A.; Gonella, F.; Mazzoldi, P.; Polloni, R.; Quaranta, A.

    The structural incorporation of silver in ion-exchanged soda-lime glass is investigated by studying spectral and time-resolved photoluminescence as a function of the temperature. The observed spectroscopic features are related to silver electronic state coupling, following a progressive rearrangement of the Ag+ ion environment at increasing silver incorporation in glass. The bi-exponential luminescence decay at various temperatures in the range 80-294 K is interpreted on the basis of a four-level model. In particular, the energy splitting of the two lower excited states is observed to increase with the silver concentration in glass. The temperature dependence of the slow and fast decay times is related to the thermal quenching of the emission from the lower excited states to the ground state.

  10. Selective Deposition of SiO2 on Ion Conductive Area of Soda-lime Glass Surface

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Daisuke; Harada, Kenji; Hara, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Toshio; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Ikutame, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Keiga; Kaiju, Hideo; Nishii, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Selective deposition of SiO2 nanoparticles was demonstrated on a soda-lime glass surface with a periodic sodium deficient pattern formed using the electrical nanoimprint. Positively charged SiO2 particles generated using corona discharge in a cyclic siloxane vapor, were selectively deposited depending on the sodium pattern. For such phenomena to occur, the sodium ion migration to the cathode side was indispensable to the electrical charge compensation on the glass surface. Therefore, the deposition proceeded preferentially outside the alkali-deficient area. Periodic SiO2 structures with 424 nm and 180 nm heights were obtained using one-dimensional (6 μm period) and two-dimensional (500 nm period) imprinted patterns. PMID:27291796

  11. A laser-based technology for fabricating a soda-lime glass based microfluidic device for circulating tumour cell capture.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Couceiro, Ramiro; Aymerich, Maria; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Abal, Miguel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-01

    We developed a laser-based technique for fabricating microfluidic microchips on soda-lime glass substrates. The proposed methodology combines a laser direct writing, as a manufacturing tool for the fabrication of the microfluidics structures, followed by a post-thermal treatment with a CO2 laser. This treatment will allow reshaping and improving the morphological (roughness) and optical qualities (transparency) of the generated microfluidics structures. The use of lasers commonly implemented for material processing makes this technique highly competitive when compared with other glass microstructuring approaches. The manufactured chips were tested with tumour cells (Hec 1A) after being functionalized with an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody coating. Cells were successfully arrested on the pillars after being flown through the device giving our technology a translational application in the field of cancer research. PMID:26218523

  12. Flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells fabricated using a polyimide-coated soda-lime glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadono, Adiyudha; Hino, Masashi; Ichikawa, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Konagai, Makoto; Yamada, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Flexible solar cells with a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layer were fabricated on a polyimide thin film using a lift-off process. Polyimide-coated soda-lime glass (SLG) was used as a substrate for fabricating CIGS solar cells before the lift-off process conducted to make the cells flexible. A conversion efficiency of 13.4% was achieved by low temperature deposition; this value is comparable to that obtained by direct deposition on a rigid glass substrate even without an external Na source. The final conversion efficiency after the lift-off process was 12.7% with some area correction due to the partial peeling-off between CIGS and Mo. Open-circuit voltage and fill factor did not change before and after the lift-off process, suggesting that the lift-off process did not give any physical damage.

  13. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada - An alkaline, meromictic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the distribution and isotopic composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases at the Big Soda Lake, Nevada, has shown that while neither ethylene nor propylene were found in the lake, ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth. It is concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column, and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in delta C-13/CH4/ and CH4/(C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sedimeents are probably due to bacterial processes, which may include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis, and C2-to-C4 alkane production by microorganisms.

  14. A comparison of intraoral antimicrobial effects of stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice, baking soda/peroxide dentifrice, conventional NaF dentifrice and essential oil mouthrinse.

    PubMed

    Bacca, L A; Leusch, M; Lanzalaco, A C; Macksood, D; Bouwsma, O J; Shaffer, J B; Howard-Nordan, K S; Knippenberg, S H; Kreutzjans, M K; Miller, J M; Poore, C L; Sunberg, R J; Vastola, K A; Becus, M; Bartizek, R D; Block, R P; Briner, W W; White, D J

    1997-01-01

    The intraoral antimicrobial activity of four commercial oral products-conventional NaF dentifrice (Crest), baking soda/peroxide/NaF dentifrice (Mentadent), essential oil mouthrinse (Listerine) and SnF2 dentifrice (Crest Plus Gum Care)-have been compared in three test regimens. Formulations were compared for their ability to suppress the regrowth and apical extension of dental plaque following toothbrushing during thirty hours of non-brushing where products were used as oral rinses (30-hour plaque regrowth model). Formulations were also compared for their ability to suppress the colony-forming units (cfu) of facultative anaerobic bacteria sampled from buccal gingival surfaces following use (Gingival Surface Microbial Index-GSMI model). Lastly, formulations were compared for effects in suppressing the glycolytic metabolic activity and regrowth activity of in vivo-treated dental plaques sampled at various periods following topical use and incubated under controlled ex vivo conditions (Plaque Glycolysis and Regrowth-PGRM model). In thirty-hour plaque regrowth testing, the rank ordered antimicrobial efficacy of formulations followed SnF2 > essential oils > NaF = water = baking soda/peroxide. In GSMI testing, all formulations were shown to suppress the cfu of facultative anaerobic bacteria relative to baseline, although SnF2 treatment was observed to reduce bacterial levels to a significantly greater degree than NaF dentifrice or baking soda/peroxide dentifrice up to two hours following brushing. In PGRM testing, the SnF2 dentifrice provided significant inhibition of bacterial metabolism and regrowth following topical application when compared with the NaF dentifrice as control. The baking soda/peroxide dentifrice provided no reduction in either bacterial metabolism or regrowth in PGRM. Previous studies had demonstrated modest effects for essential oil rinse in reducing PGRM plaque regrowth, with no effects for this treatment on plaque metabolism. Overall, these results

  15. Complete genome sequence of Thialkalivibrio versutus D301 isolated from Soda Lake in northern China, a typical strain with great ability to oxidize sulfide.

    PubMed

    Mu, Tingzhen; Zhou, Jiemin; Yang, Maohua; Xing, Jianmin

    2016-06-10

    Thioalkalivibrio versutus D301 isolated from Soda Lake is a haloalkaliphilic and obligated chemolithoautotrophic Gram-negative bacterium. The strain has a good adaption to hyperhaline and highly alkaline environment and a powerful sulfur-oxidizing ability. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of T. versutus D301, providing insights into the genomic basis of its effects and facilitating its application in microbial desulfurization. PMID:27080450

  16. An analysis of the nonlinear spectral mixing of didymium and soda-lime glass beads using hyperspectral imagery (HSI) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmini, Ronald G.; Rand, Robert S.; Allen, David W.; Deloye, Christopher J.

    2014-06-01

    Nonlinear spectral mixing occurs when materials are intimately mixed. Intimate mixing is a common characteristic of granular materials such as soils. A linear spectral unmixing inversion applied to a nonlinear mixture will yield subpixel abundance estimates that do not equal the true values of the mixture's components. These aspects of spectral mixture analysis theory are well documented. Several methods to invert (and model) nonlinear spectral mixtures have been proposed. Examples include Hapke theory, the extended endmember matrix method, and kernel-based methods. There is, however, a relative paucity of real spectral image data sets that contain well characterized intimate mixtures. To address this, special materials were custom fabricated, mechanically mixed to form intimate mixtures, and measured with a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) microscope. The results of analyses of visible/near-infrared (VNIR; 400 nm to 900 nm) HSI microscopy image cubes (in reflectance) of intimate mixtures of the two materials are presented. The materials are spherical beads of didymium glass and soda-lime glass both ranging in particle size from 63 μm to 125 μm. Mixtures are generated by volume and thoroughly mixed mechanically. Three binary mixtures (and the two endmembers) are constructed and emplaced in the wells of a 96-well sample plate: 0%/100%, 25%/75%, 50%/50%, 80%/20%, and 100%/0% didymium/soda-lime. Analysis methods are linear spectral unmixing (LSU), LSU applied to reflectance converted to single-scattering albedo (SSA) using Hapke theory, and two kernel-based methods. The first kernel method uses a generalized kernel with a gamma parameter that gauges non-linearity, applying the well-known kernel trick to the least squares formulation of the constrained linear model. This method attempts to determine if each pixel in a scene is linear or non-linear, and adapts to compute a mixture model at each pixel accordingly. The second method uses 'K-hype' with a polynomial (quadratic

  17. Alkaline protease production, extraction and characterization from alkaliphilic Bacillus licheniformis KBDL4: a Lonar soda lake isolate.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Anupama P; Deshmukh, Kshipra B

    2012-08-01

    A bacterium producing an alkaline protease was isolated from the Lonar soda lake, Buldhana district (19 degrees 58' N; 76 degrees 31' E), Maharashtra, India. The most appropriate medium for the growth and protease production was composed of (g/L): casein 10; yeast extract 4; KH2PO4 0.5, K2HPO4 0.5 and CaCl2 0.5. The enzyme showed maximum activity with and without 5 mM Ca2+ at 70 and 60 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme retained 40 and 82% of its initial activity after heating for 60 min at 60 degrees C, in absence and presence of 5 mM CaCl2 respectively. The enzyme remained active and stable at pH 8-12, with an optimum at pH 10. The enzyme showed stability towards non-ionic and anionic surfactants, and oxidizing agents. It also showed excellent stability and compatibility with commonly used laundry detergents. Wash performance analysis revealed that enzyme could effectively remove blood stains. It also showed decomposition of gelatinous coating on X- ray film. PMID:23016494

  18. Desulfonatronum paiuteum sp. nov.: A New Alkaliphilic, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium, Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate reducing bacterium strain MLF1(sup T) was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrion cells, motile by singular polar flagellum, with sizes 0.5 - 0.6x 1.2 - 2.0 micron occurred singly, in pairs or short spirilla. Growth was observed over the temperature range of +15 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range is greater than 1 - 7 %, wt/vol (optimum 3 %, wt/vol) and pH range 7.8 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.0 - 9.4). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high carbonate concentration in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase negative. As electron donors strain MLF1(sup T) uses hydrogen, formate, ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The sole end product of growth on formate was H2S. Strain MLF1(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Na2MoO4 inhibits growth of strain MLF1(sup T). The sum of G+C in DNA is 63.1 mol% (by HPLC method). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Desulfonatronum; and the name Desulfonatronum paiuteum sp. nov., is proposed (type strain MLF1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-395(sup T) = DSMZ 14708(sup T).

  19. Dissolution mechanism of soda-lime silicate glass and of PNL 76-68 in the presence of dissolved Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, J.C.; Guo, Y.; Barkatt, A.; Adel-Hadadi, M.A.; Marbury, G.S.; Barkatt, A.

    1994-12-31

    Leaching studies were performed on powdered PNL 76-68 glass in de-ionized water in the presence of Mg solute. The results showed that the presence of Mg in the leachant greatly reduced the rate of glass dissolution. The equation Q = kt{sup {alpha}} was used to express the experimental data. In the absence of Mg, {alpha} was about 1, i.e., the amount of glass dissolved was linear with time. In the presence of Mg, {alpha} was close to 0.5, i.e. the extracted amount was proportional to the square root of time. Therefore, the reduction of the dissolution rate of PNL 76-68 glass in the presence of Mg solute could be explained as a result of a change in the glass dissolution mechanism. Comparative leaching studies on bulk soda-lime silicate glass in a sodium borate buffered system (pH 8.1) showed the same results. The presence of Mg in the leachant reduced the rate of glass dissolution. In the absence of Mg, {alpha} was about 1, while in the presence of Mg, {alpha} was 0.5. This change in {alpha} was not caused by changes in pH, and it represents a real change in the glass dissolution mechanism.

  20. Power law size-distributed heterogeneity explains colloid retention on soda lime glass in the presence of energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Pazmino, Eddy; Trauscht, Jacob; Dame, Brittany; Johnson, William P

    2014-05-20

    This article concerns reading the nanoscale heterogeneity thought responsible for colloid retention on surfaces in the presence of energy barriers (unfavorable attachment conditions). We back out this heterogeneity on glass surfaces by comparing mechanistic simulations incorporating discrete heterogeneity with colloid deposition experiments performed across a comprehensive set of experimental conditions. Original data is presented for attachment to soda lime glass for three colloid sizes (0.25, 1.1, and 1.95 μm microspheres) under a variety of ionic strengths and fluid velocities in an impinging jet system. A comparison of mechanistic particle trajectory simulations incorporating discrete surface heterogeneity represented by nanoscale zones of positive charge (heterodomains) indicates that a power law size distribution of heterodomains ranging in size from 120 to 60 nm in radius was able to explain the observed retention for all conditions examined. In contrast, uniform and random placement of single-sized heterodomains failed to capture experimentally observed colloid retention across the range of conditions examined. PMID:24773424

  1. Effects of soda-lime-silica waste glass on mullite formation kinetics and micro-structures development in vitreous ceramics.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, Nicoletta; D'Alessio, Daniela; Diella, Valeria; Pavese, Alessandro; Francescon, Ferdinando

    2013-07-30

    The effects of soda-lime waste glass, from the recovery of bottle glass cullet, in partial replacement of Na-feldspar for sanitary-ware ceramic production are discussed. Attention is paid to the mullite growth kinetics and to the macroscopic properties of the final output, the latter ones depending on the developed micro-structures and vitrification grade. Measurements have been performed by in situ high temperature X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermal dilatometry, water absorption and mechanical testing. Glass substituting feldspar from 30 to 50 wt% allows one (i) to accelerate the mullite growth reaction kinetics, and (ii) to achieve macroscopic features of the ceramic output that comply with the latest technical requirements. The introduction of waste glass leads to (i) a general saving of fuel and reduction of the CO2-emissions during the firing stage, (ii) a preservation of mineral resources in terms of feldspars, and (iii) an efficient management of the bottle glass refuse by readdressing a part of it in the sanitary-ware manufacturing. PMID:23624427

  2. Amino acid-assimilating phototrophic heliobacteria from soda lake environments: Heliorestis acidaminivorans sp. nov. and 'Candidatus Heliomonas lunata'.

    PubMed

    Asao, Marie; Takaichi, Shinichi; Madigan, Michael T

    2012-07-01

    Two novel taxa of heliobacteria, Heliorestis acidaminivorans sp. nov. strain HR10B(T) and 'Candidatus Heliomonas lunata' strain SLH, were cultured from shoreline sediments/soil of Lake El Hamra (Egypt) and lake water/benthic sediments of Soap Lake (USA), respectively; both are highly alkaline soda lakes. Cells of strain HR10B were straight rods, while cells of strain SLH were curved rods. Both organisms were obligate anaerobes, produced bacteriochlorophyll g, and lacked intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membrane systems. Although the absorption spectrum of strain HR10B was typical of other heliobacteria, that of strain SLH showed unusually strong absorbance of the OH-chlorophyll a component. Major carotenoids of both organisms were OH-diaponeurosporene glucosyl esters, as in other alkaliphilic heliobacteria, and both displayed an alkaliphilic and mesophilic phenotype. Strain HR10B was remarkable among heliobacteria in its capacity to photoassimilate a number of carbon sources, including several amino acids. Nitrogenase activity was observed in strain HR10B, but not in strain SLH. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene tree placed strain HR10B within the genus Heliorestis, but distinct from other described species. By contrast, strain SLH was phylogenetically more closely related to neutrophilic heliobacteria and is the first alkaliphilic heliobacterium known outside of the genus Heliorestis. PMID:22588563

  3. The comparative efficacy of stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice, peroxide/baking soda dentifrice and essential oil mouthrinse for the prevention of gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Beiswanger, B B; McClanahan, S F; Bartizek, R D; Lanzalaco, A C; Bacca, L A; White, D J

    1997-01-01

    This double-blind parallel-design clinical study compared the efficacy of a stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice (Crest Plus Gum Care), baking soda and peroxide (NaF) dentifrice (Mentadent), and essential oil mouthrinse (Listerine) to a conventional NaF dentifrice (Crest) for the control of plaque, gingivitis and gingival bleeding over six months. Following an initial baseline examination and stratification, subjects received a complete oral prophylaxis and were distributed assigned test products. Following three and six months, subjects re-visited the clinic for examinations. Evaluations at baseline and at 3 and 6 months included soft tissue status. Löe-Silness gingivitis/gingival bleeding, Silness-Löe plaque and dental stain. Results subsequent to six months of product use were as follows: At six months, the stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice was observed to produce statistically significant 17.5% reductions in gingivitis and 27.5% reductions in gingival bleeding relative to the NaF dentifrice. The combination of sodium fluoride dentifrice and essential oil mouthrinse produced statistically significant reductions of 7.4% in gingivitis and 10.8% in plaque as compared with the NaF dentifrice. The stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice produced statistically significant reductions in both gingivitis (10.8%) and gingival bleeding (23.0%) relative to the combination of sodium fluoride dentifrice and essential oil mouthrinse. The baking soda and peroxide (NaF) dentifrice did not provide reductions in gingivitis, plaque or gingival bleeding as compared with the conventional NaF dentifrice. The stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice provided statistically significant reductions in gingivitis as compared with the baking soda and peroxide dentifrice following six months of use, and both the essential oil mouthrinse and stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice provided statistically significant reductions in gingivitis as compared with the baking soda and

  4. Seasonal changes in the chemistry and biology of a meromictic lake (Big Soda Lake, Nevada, U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Cole, B.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Big Soda Lake is an alkaline, saline lake with a permanent chemocline at 34.5 m and a mixolimnion that undergoes seasonal changes in temperature structure. During the period of thermal stratification, from summer through fall, the epilimnion has low concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients (N, Si) and CH4, and low biomass of phytoplankton (chlorophyll a ca. 1 mgm -3). Dissolved oxygen disappears near the compensation depth for algal photosynthesis (ca. 20 m). Surface water is transparent so that light is present in the anoxic hypolimnion, and a dense plate of purple sulfur photosynthetic bacteria (Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata) is present just below 20 m (Bchl a ca. 200 mgm-3). Concentrations of N H4+, Si, and CH4 are higher in the hypolimnion than in the epilimnion. As the mixolimnion becomes isothermal in winter, oxygen is mixed down to 28 m. Nutrients (NH4+, Si) and CH4 are released from the hypolimnion and mix to the surface, and a diatom bloom develops in the upper 20 m (chlorophyll a > 40 mgm-3). The deeper mixing of oxygen and enhanced light attenuation by phytoplankton uncouple the anoxic zone and photic zone, and the plate of photosynthetic bacteria disappears (Bchl a ca.10mgm-3). Hence, seasonal changes in temperature distribution and mixing create conditions such that the primary producer community is alternately dominated by phytoplankton and photosynthetic bacteria: the phytoplankton may be nutrient-limited during periods of stratification and the photosynthetic bacteria are light-limited during periods of mixing. ?? 1983 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  5. Dissimilatory arsenate and sulfate reduction in sediments of two hypersaline, arsenic-rich soda lakes: Mono and Searles Lakes, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulp, T.R.; Hoeft, S.E.; Miller, L.G.; Saltikov, C.; Murphy, J.N.; Han, S.; Lanoil, B.; Oremland, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    A radioisotope method was devised to study bacterial respiratory reduction of arsenate in sediments. The following two arsenic-rich soda lakes in California were chosen for comparison on the basis of their different salinities: Mono Lake (???90 g/liter) and Searles Lake (???340 g/liter). Profiles of arsenate reduction and sulfate reduction were constructed for both lakes. Reduction of [73As] arsenate occurred at all depth intervals in the cores from Mono Lake (rate constant [k] = 0.103 to 0.04 h-1) and Searles Lake (k = 0.012 to 0.002 h-1), and the highest activities occurred in the top sections of each core. In contrast, [35S] sulfate reduction was measurable in Mono Lake (k = 7.6 ?? 104 to 3.2 ?? 10-6 h-1) but not in Searles Lake. Sediment DNA was extracted, PCR amplified, and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to obtain phylogenetic markers (i.e., 16S rRNA genes) and a partial functional gene for dissimilatory arsenate reduction (arrA). The amplified arrA gene product showed a similar trend in both lakes; the signal was strongest in surface sediments and decreased to undetectable levels deeper in the sediments. More arrA gene signal was observed in Mono Lake and was detectable at a greater depth, despite the higher arsenate reduction activity observed in Searles Lake. A partial sequence (about 900 bp) was obtained for a clone (SLAS-3) that matched the dominant DGGE band found in deeper parts of the Searles Lake sample (below 3 cm), and this clone was found to be closely related to SLAS-1, a novel extremophilic arsenate respirer previously cultivated from Searles Lake. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Planktonic bacterial community composition of an extremely shallow soda pond during a phytoplankton bloom revealed by cultivation and molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Borsodi, Andrea K; Knáb, Mónika; Czeibert, Katalin; Márialigeti, Károly; Vörös, Lajos; Somogyi, Boglárka

    2013-07-01

    Böddi-szék is one of the shallow soda ponds located in the Kiskunság National Park, Hungary. In June 2008, immediately prior to drying out, an extensive algal bloom dominated by a green alga (Oocystis submarina Lagerheim) was observed in the extremely saline and alkaline water of the pond. The aim of the present study was to reveal the phylogenetic diversity of the bacterial communities inhabiting the water of Böddi-szék during the blooming event. Using two different selective media, altogether 110 aerobic bacterial strains were cultivated. According to the sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, most of the strains belonged to alkaliphilic or alkalitolerant and moderately halophilic species of the genera Bacillus and Gracilibacillus (Firmicutes), Algoriphagus and Aquiflexum (Bacteroidetes), Alkalimonas and Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria). Other strains were closely related to alkaliphilic and phototrophic purple non-sulfur bacteria of the genera Erythrobacter and Rhodobaca (Alphaproteobacteria). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene-based clone library indicated that most of the total of 157 clone sequences affiliated with the anoxic phototrophic bacterial genera of Rhodobaca and Rhodobacter (Alphaproteobacteria), Ectothiorhodospira (Gammaproteobacteria) and Heliorestis (Firmicutes). Phylotypes related to the phylum Bacteroidetes formed the second most abundant group. Clones related to the mainly anaerobic and alkaliphilic bacterial genera of Anoxynatronum (Firmicutes), Spirochaeta (Spirochaetes) and Desulfonatronum (Deltaproteobacteria) were also abundant. Further clone sequences showed less than 95 % similarity values to cultivated species of the phyla Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Fibrobacteres, Gemmatimonadetes and Lentisphaerae. PMID:23609187

  7. The Arsenic Cycle in Searles Lake, California: An Arsenic-Rich, Salt-Saturated Soda Lake: I. Sediment Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, T. R.; Hoeft, S. E.; Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    Searles Lake is a residual playa of what once was the end-member of a series of soda lakes that were connected during the Pleistocene. Brinewaters are saturated (300 g/L), alkaline (pH = 9.8), and rich in arsenic (3.9 mM). Porewater profiles (max. depth = 25 cm.) show the speciation of arsenic changes from arsenate [As(V)] in the slightly oxic (DO = 6.2 uM) surface to predominantly arsenite [As(III)] in the sediments. Porewaters also contained ammonia (0.4 - 1.2 mM), sulfide (0.1 - 0.2 mM), and methane (0.05 - 0.6 uM). Sediment slurries incubated with artificial brinewater (salinity = 346 g/L) demonstrated reduction of As(V) to As(III). The rate of As(V) reduction (40 umol/L/day) increased 50 percent with addition of lactate. Addition of sulfide or hydrogen to slurries stimulated this rate by 2.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. This suggests that chemoautotrophs are important agents of As(V)-respiration in this system. The rate of As(V)-reduction responded inversely with increased salinity, decreasing from 470 umol/L/day at 50 g/L to 40 umol/L/day at 346 g/L. A similar relationship to salinity was found for methane production. Slurries incubated under aerobic conditions showed a rapid biological oxidization of As(III) (rate = 220 umol/L/day). These results show that a microbiological arsenic cycle occurs in this extreme environment. The anaerobes in this ecosystem, however, seem best adapted to lower salinities. Nonetheless, significant dissimilatory As(V) reduction still occurs at the condition of salt-saturation.

  8. Persistent impacts of trace metals from mining on floodplain grass communities along Soda Butte Creek, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Stoughton, J.A.; Marcus, W.A.

    2000-03-01

    In Yellowstone National Park, tailings and associated trace metals from past mining have been deposited along 28 km of Soda Butte Creek by large flood events. This study documents grass species diversity, density, and biomass; trace metal concentrations in soils; and soil pH, salinity, and clay content in four selected floodplain meadows contaminated by these tailings. Trace metal levels frequently exceed acceptable concentrations for agricultural soils at sampling points within the meadows. pH levels within flood-deposited tailings are strongly to moderately acid, while pH levels outside of tailings deposits are neutral. The data analysis: (1) shows that metals and acidity associated with tailings affect plant biomass, density, and diversity; (2) documents that the vegetation/metal and vegetation/pH associations are more of a threshold than a linear relationship; and (3) suggests that other factors may be involved in structuring the community. Vegetation diversity, density, and biomass decrease at threshold levels of trace metal concentrations and soil pH in all four meadows. CuSum plots of diversity in relation to trace metal levels show a decrease in mean diversity at 315 ppm copper, 22 ppm arsenic, 4.2% iron, 65 ppm lead, and 170 ppm zinc. Densities of Phleum pratense and Poa pratensis were significantly lower (P {le} 0.001) on plots with more than 250 ppm copper. Above-ground biomass of Phleum pratense was also significantly lower on plots with copper levels above 250 ppm. Decreased mean grass density was found on plots with pH < 6.4, but the only statistically significant difference was for Juncus balticus, which had increased density on plots with pH < 6.4. In contrast to the clear impacts of trace metals and pH on vegetation, other site characteristics did not alter measured vegetation characteristics.

  9. A simulation approach to material removal in microwave drilling of soda lime glass at 2.45 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautre, Nitin Kumar; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Pradeep, Kumar; Das, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    Material removal during microwave drilling is basically due to thermal ablation of the material in the vicinity of the drilling tool. The microtip of the tool, also termed as concentrator, absorbs microwaves and ionizes the dielectric in its proximity creating a zone of plasma. The plasma takes the shape of a sphere owing to the atmospheric sphere, which acts as the source of thermal energy to be used for processing a material. This mechanism of heating, also called localized microwave heating, was used in the present study to drill holes in 1.2-mm-thick soda lime glass. The mechanism of material removal had been analyzed through simulation of the hot spot region, and the results were attempted to explain through experiment observations. It was realized that the glass being a poor conductor of heat, a low power (90 W in this case) yields better drilling results owing to more localized heat corresponding to a low-volume plasma sphere. The low application time prevents further heat transfer, and a localized concentration of heat becomes possible that primarily causes the material ablation. The plasma sphere appears sustain while the tool moves through the bulk of the glass thickness although its volume gets further shrunk. The process needs careful selection of the parameters. The simulation results show relatively low temperature in the top half (opposite to the tool tip) of the plasma sphere which eventually causes the semimolten viscous glass to collapse into the drill cavity as the tool advances into the bulk and stops the movement of the tool. The continued plasma sphere raises the tip temperature, which makes the tip to melt and gets blunt. The plasma formation ceases owing to larger diameter of the tool, and the tool gets stuck which could be verified through experimental results.

  10. Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

  11. Uranium-series dating of travertine from Soda Dam, New Mexico: Constructing a history of deposition, with implications for landscape evolution, paleohydrology and paleoclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafoya, A. J.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Kolomaznik, M.; Polyak, V. J.; Asmerom, Y.; Cox, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    We apply high precision uranium series geochronology to decipher rates of change in travertine growth at Soda Dam, New Mexico which preserve a paleohydrology record for parts of the last 500 ka. Travertine-depositing springs occur along the intersection of the Soda Dam fault, part of the Jemez fault zone, and the Jemez River. Modern travertine-depositing hot springs are part of the Valles geothermal system, which has been active throughout the Quaternary. Previous U-series dates (Goff et al., 1987) on the Soda Dam travertines were: Soda Dam = 4.8±0.2 ka; Deposit A (west side) = 215±40 ka and >350 ka; Deposit B (east side) = 98±7 ka near top and 58±3 ka in the core; Deposit C (southeast side) = 107±5 ka near base. New dates provide improved geochronologic and geologic context with respect to timing of movement in the western side of the Rio Grande Rift and the Pajarito fault, incision rates of the Jemez River, and timing of travertine accumulation. Large volumes of travertine preserved high in the landscape yield an age of 560.3 ± 324 ka. Inset into this deposit are Jemez River gravels that are 30 m above the modern river with travertine coating on cobbles giving an age of 200.6±2.1 ka and gravels cut by sparite sills of 109 ± 1.5 ka. These ages give river incision rates of 150 m/Ma over the last 200 ka. Deposit B is a mound accumulation on the east side of the river that developed on a banded central fissure ridge, much like the modern Soda Dam. The mound accumulation is 138.4 ± 1.1 ka near the base and 78.2 ± 1.6 ka at the top; the central fissure has a 20 cm thick vein system a portion of which yields a more restricted age range from 133.9±11 ka toward the walls to 95.8±1.0 ka toward the center. The combined data indicate the fissure/mound system was active from 138-78 ka, a 60,000 yr interval that spans the transition from glacial marine isotope stage 6 into interglacial marine isotope stage 5. Accumulation rates on the vein system of deposit B are 2

  12. Reduction on the anaerobic biological activity inhibition caused by heavy metals and sulphates in effluents through chemical precipitation with soda and lime.

    PubMed

    Alves, L de Carvalho; Cammarota, M C; De França, F P

    2006-12-01

    The School of Chemistry Environmental Technology Laboratory generates 43.4 1 of effluent with low pH (0.7) and high contents of COD (1908 mgO2 l(-1)), phenol (132.1 mg l(-1)), sulfate (36700 mg l(-1)) and heavy metals (28.2 mg Hg l(-1); 82.1 mg Cr(total) l(-1); 30.8 mg Cu l(-1); 57.4 mg Fe(total) l(-1); 16.2 mg Al l(-1)) weekly. These data show that this effluent presents high toxicity for biological treatment, with a physical-chemical step being necessary before a biological step. Preliminary studies showed that the most toxic constituents of the effluent were sulfate, phenol and total chromium. In this work, a chemical precipitation step with sodium hydroxide or lime was evaluated for the toxicity reduction on anaerobic microbial consortium. These experiments were carried out with increasing concentrations of alkalis in the effluent in order to obtain pH initial values of 8-12. Similar results were obtained for COD (15-28%), turbidity (95-98%), phenol (13-24%) and total chromium (99.8-99.9%) removals in each condition studied with soda or lime. Sulfate was only removed by precipitation with lime, obtaining reductions from 84 to 88%. The toxicity on the anaerobic sludge was studied employing specific methanogenic activity (SMA) analysis of raw and treated effluent (after chemical precipitation step). The SMA experiments showed that chemical precipitation at pH 8 reduces the toxic effect of the effluent on anaerobic microbial consortium three times (with soda) and thirteen times (with lime). These results indicate that precipitation with lime is more efficient at toxicity removal, however the produced sludge volume is around two times higher than that produced with soda. PMID:17285944

  13. Coffee, tea, soda, and caffeine intake in relation to risk of adult glioma in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Dubrow, Robert; Darefsky, Amy S.; Freedman, Neal D.; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Sinha, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We utilized the large, prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study to further explore the hypothesis, suggested by two recent prospective cohort studies, that increased intake of coffee, tea, soda, and/or caffeine is associated with reduced adult glioma risk. Methods At baseline in 1995–1996, dietary intake, including coffee, tea, and soda, was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CI) for glioma risk in relation to beverage intake. Results During follow-up of 545,771 participants through 2006, 904 participants were diagnosed with glioma. We found no trends of decreasing glioma risk with increasing intake of specific beverages or total caffeine. HR patterns for consumption of the caffeinated versus decaffeinated form of each beverage were inconsistent with a specific caffeine effect. HR patterns of reduced glioma risk for most categories of beverage intake greater than “none” prompted a post hoc analysis that revealed borderline-significant inverse associations for any versus no intake of tea (HR = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.69–1.03), total coffee plus tea (HR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.48–1.03), and soda (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67–1.01). Conclusions The borderline-significant inverse associations could be explained by a threshold effect in which any beverage intake above a low level confers a beneficial effect, most likely due to beverage constituents other than caffeine. They also could be explained by non-drinkers of these beverages sharing unknown extraneous characteristics associated with increased glioma risk, or by chance. PMID:22457000

  14. Laser direct-write technique for fabricating microlens arrays on soda-lime glass with a Nd:YVO4 laser.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Flores-Arias, M Teresa; O'Connor, Gerard M; Gomez-Reino, Carlos

    2010-09-10

    A one-step direct-write technique for fabricating spherical microlenses on soda-lime glass substrates is described. Using a Q switched Nd:YVO(4) laser combined with a galvanometer system, square and triangular microlens arrays were fabricated. The focal length of microlenses is measured using direct and nondirect methods. Values around 118 and 125 µm were obtained for the microlens focal length of square and triangular arrays, respectively. A noncontact profilometer is used for determining the surface roughness of square and triangular arrays. Results are compared with that of glass substrate. PMID:20830187

  15. Nonlinear relationship between the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response and the Al/B ratio in a soda-lime aluminoborosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooqi, Rahmat Ullah; Hrma, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the effect of Al/B ratio on the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response. In an aluminoborosilicate soda-lime glass based on a modified International Simple Glass, ISG-3, the Al/B ratio varied from 0 to 0.55 (in mole fractions). In agreement with various models of the PCT response as a function of glass composition, we observed a monotonic increase of B and Na releases with decreasing Al/B mole ratio, but only when the ratio was higher than 0.05. Below this value (Al/B < 0.05), we observed a sharp decrease that we attribute to B in tetrahedral coordination.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus type strain ARh 1T, an obligately chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a Kenyan soda lake

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-11-19

    Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus strain ARh 1T is a chemolithoautotrophic, non-motile, Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria that was isolated from samples of haloalkaline soda lakes. It derives energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and is notable for its ability to grow on thiocyanate as its sole source of electrons, sulfur and nitrogen. The full genome consists of 3,756,729 bp and comprises 3,500 protein-coding and 57 RNA-coding genes. Moreover, this organism was sequenced as part of the community science program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  17. Factors influencing the density and surface tension of soda lime silica melts containing multi-valent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Douglas Richard

    2003-10-01

    The density and surface tension of (mol %) 15 Na2O 11 CaO 74 SiO2 glass melts containing additions of iron, iron and sulfur (amber glass), and vanadium were measured using the sessile and pendant drop techniques at temperatures between 1200 and 1400°C. The density of the iron-containing melts increased with increasing iron content and decreasing melt temperature. It was determined that melts with high concentrations of Fe3+ are most susceptible to changes in the atmosphere, since Fe3+ can have either tetrahedral or octahedral coordination. Molar volume measurements suggest that the iron is entering the structure as a network modifier at low concentrations and as a network former at high concentrations (>1.0 mol% addition). Multiple correlation analysis was used to develop a model for predicting the surface tension of melts as a function of melt temperature, melt atmosphere and iron oxide addition. For the reducing environment, the model predicted a minimum in melt surface tension near 1360°C with an addition of 1.25 mol% iron oxide. The surface tension of the amber glass melts decreased with increasing temperature. Melt atmosphere had little effect on the surface tension of the sulfur containing melts, suggesting that sulfur decomposition is resulting in a sulfur-rich local environment at the melt surface. The surface tension of the melts was found to increase with increasing SO3 content up to 0.13 to 0.31 wt%, after which it levels off or decreases. The density of the vanadium-containing melts increased with increasing vanadium content and decreasing melt temperature. The surface tension of these melts was found to increase between 10 to 30 mN/m at low additions of vanadia (0.1 to 0.2 mol%), above which the surface tension decreases. This behavior can be explained using the transitional structure theory. The surface tension of vanadium-containing soda lime silica melts was found to be highest in a reducing environment. The surface tension of the vanadia

  18. Spectroscopic properties of Er{sup 3+}- and Yb{sup 3+}-doped soda-lime silicate and aluminosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, M.P.; Cockroft, N.J.; Gosnell, T.R.; Bruce, A.J.

    1997-10-01

    A spectroscopic investigation of an extensive series of Er{sup 3+}-doped and Er{sup 3+},Yb{sup 3+}-codoped soda-lime-silicate (SL) and aluminosilicate (AS) glasses is presented. Compared to SL glasses, 4f transitions in AS glasses show higher oscillator strengths, larger inhomogeneous broadening, and smaller crystal-field splittings of the respective excited-state multiplets. The Er{sup 3+} excited-state relaxation dynamics is adequately described by a combination of the Judd-Ofelt model and the energy-gap law. With the exception of {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, multiphonon relaxation is dominant for all excited states, making it possible to efficiently pump the 1.55 {mu}m {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}{r_arrow}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} emission by excitation of {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} at around 980 nm. The absolute {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} luminescence quantum yield, for low 980-nm excitation density ({approximately}5W/cm{sup 2}), {eta}, is {approximately}0.9 at 0.4 mol{percent} Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and drops to about 0.65 upon increasing Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} to 1.2 mol{percent}, indicating the onset of energy-transfer processes. Samples with high OH{sup {minus}} impurity concentration suffer from significantly higher quenching of {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} luminescence at higher Er{sup 3+} concentrations. Energy migration to the minority of Er{sup 3+} ions coordinated to OH{sup {minus}}, followed by efficient multiphonon relaxation accounts for this effect. At low excitation densities, the strong near-infrared absorption of Yb{sup 3+} in combination with efficient Yb{r_arrow}Er energy transfer increases the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} population density in Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+}-codoped samples by up to 2 orders of magnitude compared to equivalent samples without Yb{sup 3+}. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada: An alkaline, meromictic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Des Marais, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution and isotopic composition (??13C) of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases were studied in Big Soda Lake (depth = 64 m), an alkaline, meromictic lake with permanently anoxic bottom waters. Methane increased with depth in the anoxic mixolimnion (depth = 20-35 m), reached uniform concentrations (55 ??M/l) in the monimolimnion (35-64 m) and again increased with depth in monimolimnion bottom sediments (>400 ??M/kg below 1 m sub-bottom depth). The ??13C[CH4] values in bottom sediment below 1 m sub-bottom depth (<-70 per mil) increased with vertical distance up the core (??13C[CH4] = -55 per mil at sediment surface). Monimolimnion ??13C[CH4] values (-55 to -61 per mil) were greater than most ??13C[CH4] values found in the anoxic mixolimnion (92% of samples had ??13C[CH4] values between -20 and -48 per mil). No significant concentrations of ethylene or propylene were found in the lake. However ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth, with respective maximum concentrations of 260, 80, 23 and 22 nM/l encountered between 50-60 m depth. Concentrations of ethane, propane and butanes decreased with depth in the bottom sediments. Ratios of CH4 [C2H6 + C3H8] were high (250-620) in the anoxic mixolimnion, decreased to ~161 in the monimolimnion and increased with depth in the sediment to values as high as 1736. We concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in ??13C[CH4] and CH4 (C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sediments are probably caused by bacteria] processes. These might include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis and C2 to C4 alkane production by microorganisms. ?? 1983.

  20. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Ashraf, A.; Dwyer, D.; Kisslinger, K.; Zhang, L.; Pang, Y.; Efstathiadis, H.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5 × 1012 e/cm2 or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene’s properties. Here we demonstrate strong (1.33 × 1013 e/cm2), robust, and spontaneous graphene n-doping on a soda-lime-glass substrate via surface-transfer doping from Na without any external chemical, high-temperature, or vacuum processes. Remarkably, the n-doping reaches 2.11 × 1013 e/cm2 when graphene is transferred onto a p-type copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) semiconductor that itself has been deposited onto soda-lime-glass, via surface-transfer doping from Na atoms that diffuse to the CIGS surface. Using this effect, we demonstrate an n-graphene/p-semiconductor Schottky junction with ideality factor of 1.21 and strong photo-response. The ability to achieve strong and persistent graphene n-doping on low-cost, industry-standard materials paves the way toward an entirely new class of graphene-based devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaics, sensors, batteries, and supercapacitors.

  1. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, D M N M; Ashraf, A; Dwyer, D; Kisslinger, K; Zhang, L; Pang, Y; Efstathiadis, H; Eisaman, M D

    2016-01-01

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5 × 10(12) e/cm(2) or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene's properties. Here we demonstrate strong (1.33 × 10(13) e/cm(2)), robust, and spontaneous graphene n-doping on a soda-lime-glass substrate via surface-transfer doping from Na without any external chemical, high-temperature, or vacuum processes. Remarkably, the n-doping reaches 2.11 × 10(13) e/cm(2) when graphene is transferred onto a p-type copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) semiconductor that itself has been deposited onto soda-lime-glass, via surface-transfer doping from Na atoms that diffuse to the CIGS surface. Using this effect, we demonstrate an n-graphene/p-semiconductor Schottky junction with ideality factor of 1.21 and strong photo-response. The ability to achieve strong and persistent graphene n-doping on low-cost, industry-standard materials paves the way toward an entirely new class of graphene-based devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaics, sensors, batteries, and supercapacitors. PMID:26867673

  2. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Ashraf, A.; Dwyer, D.; Kisslinger, K.; Zhang, L.; Pang, Y.; Efstathiadis, H.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5 × 1012 e/cm2 or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene’s properties. Here we demonstrate strong (1.33 × 1013 e/cm2), robust, and spontaneous graphene n-doping on a soda-lime-glass substrate via surface-transfer doping from Na without any external chemical, high-temperature, or vacuum processes. Remarkably, the n-doping reaches 2.11 × 1013 e/cm2 when graphene is transferred onto a p-type copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) semiconductor that itself has been deposited onto soda-lime-glass, via surface-transfer doping from Na atoms that diffuse to the CIGS surface. Using this effect, we demonstrate an n-graphene/p-semiconductor Schottky junction with ideality factor of 1.21 and strong photo-response. The ability to achieve strong and persistent graphene n-doping on low-cost, industry-standard materials paves the way toward an entirely new class of graphene-based devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaics, sensors, batteries, and supercapacitors. PMID:26867673

  3. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Ashraf, A.; Dwyer, D.; Kisslinger, K.; Zhang, L.; Pang, Y.; Efstathiadis, H.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2016-02-12

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5 × 1012 e/cm2 or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene’s properties. Here we demonstrate strong (1.33 × 1013 e/cm2), robust, and spontaneous graphene n-doping on a soda-lime-glass substrate via surface-transfer doping from Na without any external chemical, high-temperature, or vacuum processes. Remarkably, the n-doping reaches 2.11 × 1013more » e/cm2 when graphene is transferred onto a p-type copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) semiconductor that itself has been deposited onto soda-lime-glass, via surface-transfer doping from Na atoms that diffuse to the CIGS surface. Using this effect, we demonstrate an n-graphene/p-semiconductor Schottky junction with ideality factor of 1.21 and strong photo-response. As a result, the ability to achieve strong and persistent graphene n-doping on low-cost, industry-standard materials paves the way toward an entirely new class of graphene-based devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaics, sensors, batteries, and supercapacitors.« less

  4. Bone Loss at Implant with Titanium Abutments Coated by Soda Lime Glass Containing Silver Nanoparticles: A Histological Study in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Arturo; Guitián, Francisco; López-Píriz, Roberto; Bartolomé, José F.; Cabal, Belén; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone loss at implants connected to abutments coated with a soda-lime glass containing silver nanoparticles, subjected to experimental peri-implantitis. Also the aging and erosion of the coating in mouth was studied. Five beagle dogs were used in the experiments. Three implants were placed in each mandible quadrant: in 2 of them, Glass/n-Ag coated abutments were connected to implant platform, 1 was covered with a Ti-mechanized abutment. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced in all implants after the submarginal placement of cotton ligatures, and three months after animals were euthanatized. Thickness and morphology of coating was studied in abutment cross-sections by SEM. Histology and histo-morphometric studies were carried on in undecalfied ground slides. After the induced peri-implantitis: 1.The abutment coating shown losing of thickness and cracking. 2. The histometry showed a significant less bone loss in the implants with glass/n-Ag coated abutments. A more symmetric cone of bone resorption was observed in the coated group. There were no significant differences in the peri-implantitis histological characteristics between both groups of implants. Within the limits of this in-vivo study, it could be affirmed that abutments coated with biocide soda-lime-glass-silver nanoparticles can reduce bone loss in experimental peri-implantitis. This achievement makes this coating a suggestive material to control peri-implantitis development and progression. PMID:24466292

  5. Comparative study of lignin characteristics from wheat straw obtained by soda-AQ and kraft pretreatment and effect on the following enzymatic hydrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haitao; Xie, Yimin; Zheng, Xing; Pu, Yunqiao; Huang, Fang; Meng, Xianzhi; Wu, Weibing; Ragauskas, Arthur; Yao, Lan

    2016-05-01

    To understand the structural changes of lignin after soda-AQ and kraft pretreatment, milled straw lignin, black liquor lignin and residual lignin extracted from wheat straw were characterized by FT-IR, UV, GPC and NMR. The results showed that the main lignin linkages were β-aryl ether substructures (β-O-4'), followed by phenylcoumaran (β-5') and resinol (β-β') substructures, while minor content of spirodienone (β-1'), dibenzodioxocin (5-5') and α,β-diaryl ether linkages were detected as well. After pretreatment, most lignin inter-units and lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) linkages were degraded and dissolved in black liquor, with minor amount left in residual pretreated biomass. In addition, through quantitative (13)C and 2D-HSQC NMR spectral analysis, lignin and LCC were found to be more degraded after kraft pretreatment than soda-AQ pretreatment. Furthermore, the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis results showed that more cellulose in wheat straw was converted to glucose after kraft pretreatment, indicating that LCC linkages were important in the enzymatic hydrolysis process. PMID:26897415

  6. Absorption and luminescence of silver nanocomposite soda-lime glass formed by Ag{sup +}-Na{sup +} ion-exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Manikandan, D.; Mohan, S.; Nair, K.G.M

    2003-09-02

    Metal nanocomposite glasses are formed by a multi step methodology which involves incorporation of the metal ions into the glass by ion-exchange process followed by suitable treatments like low mass ion irradiation or thermal annealing resulting in the aggregation of the metal ions to form nano dimension metal clusters. These embedded metal nanoclusters are well investigated by the optical absorption spectroscopy which gives information regarding the size and shape of the metal clusters embedded in the dielectric matrix. The Ag{sup +} ion-exchanged and annealed soda-lime glasses exhibit photoluminescence around 445 nm at two excitation wavelengths. He{sup +} ion irradiation of the ion-exchanged soda-lime glass resulted in the formation of Ag metal nano crystallites with a thin metal film on the irradiated surface. The Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction study confirmed the formation of Ag nano crystals inside the dielectric matrix. Photoluminescence vanished in the irradiated samples with the neutralization of Ag{sup +} ions into Ag metal nano crystallites.

  7. Fabrication of microlens arrays on soda-lime glass using a laser direct-write technique and a thermal treatment assisted by a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Tamara; Nieto, Daniel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-01

    A low-cost method for fabricating microlens arrays on commercial soda-lime glass is presented. The hybrid technique is composed by a laser direct writing technique and a laser assisted post-thermal treatment. In particular we use a nanosecond Q-Switch Nd:YVO4 laser for fabricating the initial structure of microposts on soda-lime glass substrates and a CO2 laser combined with a furnace for reshaping and improving its morphological and optical qualities. This new fabrication approach lets us obtain a high quality microlenses array with a diameter of 50 μm, sag 1.5 μm, focal length 1 mm and a spot size of 7.8 μm. Furthermore, the proposed technique preserves the advantages of the laser direct-write technique in terms of design flexibility, simplicity, fast prototyping, low cost and so on; while the alternative laser assisted thermal treatment lets us overcome the bounding problems presented in other conventional thermal treatments.

  8. Bone loss at implant with titanium abutments coated by soda lime glass containing silver nanoparticles: a histological study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Arturo; Guitián, Francisco; López-Píriz, Roberto; Bartolomé, José F; Cabal, Belén; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone loss at implants connected to abutments coated with a soda-lime glass containing silver nanoparticles, subjected to experimental peri-implantitis. Also the aging and erosion of the coating in mouth was studied. Five beagle dogs were used in the experiments. Three implants were placed in each mandible quadrant: in 2 of them, Glass/n-Ag coated abutments were connected to implant platform, 1 was covered with a Ti-mechanized abutment. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced in all implants after the submarginal placement of cotton ligatures, and three months after animals were euthanatized. Thickness and morphology of coating was studied in abutment cross-sections by SEM. Histology and histo-morphometric studies were carried on in undecalfied ground slides. After the induced peri-implantitis: 1.The abutment coating shown losing of thickness and cracking. 2. The histometry showed a significant less bone loss in the implants with glass/n-Ag coated abutments. A more symmetric cone of bone resorption was observed in the coated group. There were no significant differences in the peri-implantitis histological characteristics between both groups of implants. Within the limits of this in-vivo study, it could be affirmed that abutments coated with biocide soda-lime-glass-silver nanoparticles can reduce bone loss in experimental peri-implantitis. This achievement makes this coating a suggestive material to control peri-implantitis development and progression. PMID:24466292

  9. Dethiobacter alkaliphilus gen. nov. sp. nov., and Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus gen. nov. sp. nov.: two novel representatives of reductive sulfur cycle from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Yu; Tourova, T P; Mussmann, Marc; Muyzer, G

    2008-05-01

    Anaerobic enrichments with H2 as electron donor and thiosulfate/polysulfide as electron acceptor at pH 10 and 0.6 M total Na+ yielded two non sulfate-reducing representatives of reductive sulfur cycle from soda lake sediments. Strain AHT 1 was isolated with thiosulfate as the electron acceptor from north-eastern Mongolian soda lakes and strain AHT 2-with polysulfide as the electron acceptor from Wadi al Natrun lakes in Egypt. Both isolates represented new phylogenetic lineages: AHT 1-within Clostridiales and AHT 2-within the Deltaproteobacteria. Both bacteria are obligate anaerobes with respiratory metabolism. Both grew chemolithoautotrophically with H2 as the electron donor and can use thiosulfate, elemental sulfur and polysulfide as the electron acceptors. AHT 2 also used nitrate as acceptor, reducing it to ammonia. During thiosulfate reduction, AHT 1 excreted sulfite. dsrAB gene was not found in either strain. Both strains were moderate salt-tolerant (grow up to 2 M total Na+) true alkaliphiles (grow between pH 8.5 and 10.3). On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strains AHT 1 and AHT 2 are proposed as new genera and species Dethiobacter alkaliphilus and Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus, respectively. PMID:18317684

  10. Does secondary plant metabolism provide a mechanism for plant defenses in the tropical soda apple Solanum viarum (Solanales: Solanaceae) against the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua and southern armyworm S. eridania?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Survival assays were conducted with beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua and southern armyworm S. eridania with tropical soda apple Solanum viarum a relative of tomato. In addition, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme assays were conducted to determine if secondary plant defense compounds are being produce...

  11. Riccioli, Giambattista [Giovanni Battista] (1598-1671)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Italian astronomer, born in Ferrara, became a Jesuit and came into conflict with the Copernican system, like OSIANDER refuting it while acknowledging its use as a mathematical hypothesis. Mapped the Moon and introduced some of the names still used, in a chart published in the New Almagest in 1651. As a follower of the Ptolemaic system, he named major lunar craters after HIPPARCHUS, PTOLEMY and BR...

  12. Donati, Giambattista [Giovanni Battista] (1826-73)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in Pisa, Italy. Director of the observatory at Florence, he discovered the brilliant comet (Donati's Comet) of 1858. He was the first to observe a comet's spectrum (Tempel's Comet of 1864). Inspired the foundation of Acretri Observatory....

  13. Nonlinear relationship between the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response and the Al/B ratio in a soda-lime aluminoborosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooqi, Rahmat Ullah; Hrma, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the effect of Al/B ratio on the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response. In an aluminoborosilicate soda-lime glass based on a modified International Simple Glass, ISG-3, the Al/B ratio varied from 0 to 0.55 (in mole fractions). In agreement with various models of the PCT response as a function of glass composition, we observed a monotonic increase of B and Na releases with decreasing Al/B mole ratio, but only when the ratio was higher than 0.05. Below this value (Al/B < 0.05), we observed a sharp decrease that we attribute to B in tetrahedral coordination.

  14. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A.; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y.

    2012-02-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  15. Partial genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic soda lake bacterium Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans ARh 2T

    SciTech Connect

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-10-26

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans strain ARh 2T is a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from haloalkaline soda lakes. It is a motile, Gram-negative member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Remarkable properties include the ability to grow on thiocyanate as the sole energy, sulfur and nitrogen source, and the capability of growth at salinities of up to 4.3 M total Na+. This draft genome sequence consists of 61 scaffolds comprising 2,765,337 bp, and contains 2616 protein-coding and 61 RNA-coding genes. In conclusion, this organism was sequenced as part of the Community Science Program of the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  16. Bacterial tag encoded FLX titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) based assessment of prokaryotic diversity in metagenome of Lonar soda lake, India

    PubMed Central

    Dudhagara, Pravin; Ghelani, Anjana; Patel, Rajesh; Chaudhari, Rajesh; Bhatt, Shreyas

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial diversity and archaeal diversity in metagenome of the Lonar soda lake sediment were assessed by bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP). Metagenome comprised 5093 sequences with 2,531,282 bp and 53 ± 2% G + C content. Metagenome sequence data are available at NCBI under the Bioproject database with accession no. PRJNA218849. Metagenome sequence represented the presence of 83.1% bacterial and 10.5% archaeal origin. A total of 14 different bacteria demonstrating 57 species were recorded with dominating species like Coxiella burnetii (17%), Fibrobacter intestinalis (12%) and Candidatus Cloacamonas acidaminovorans (11%). Occurrence of two archaeal phyla representing 24 species, among them Methanosaeta harundinacea (35%), Methanoculleus chikugoensis (12%) and Methanolinea tarda (11%) were dominating species. Significant presence of 11% sequences as an unclassified indicated the possibilities for unknown novel prokaryotes from the metagenome. PMID:26484168

  17. Femtosecond laser-written high-efficiency blazed phase gratings in the volume of soda lime glass for light management in solar modules.

    PubMed

    Muchow, Markus; Büchner, Torsten; Sprafke, Alexander; Seifert, Gerhard

    2015-12-28

    Highly efficient volume phase gratings have been fabricated in low-iron soda lime glass using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with 1030 nm wavelength and 270 fs pulse duration. Optical simulations based on rigorous coupled-wave analysis theory were performed to determine optimal grating parameters and designs for the application of the gratings for light management in solar modules, suggesting a very effective blazed-like design. Several of such blazed phase gratings have been fabricated and analyzed by measuring their diffraction efficiencies into first and higher orders. Up to 77% of the incoming light in the wavelength region relevant for silicon-based photovoltaics were diffracted by these gratings. Typical induced refractive index changes between 0.002 and 0.006 were derived by comparing the experimental efficiencies with the simulation results. PMID:26832018

  18. Wiping frictional properties of electrospun hydrophobic/hydrophilic polyurethane nanofiber-webs on soda-lime glass and silicon-wafer.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kei; Wei, Kai; Nakashima, Ryu; Kim, Ick Soo; Enomoto, Yuji

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, we conducted the frictional tests of hydrophobic and hydrophilic polyurethane (PUo and PUi) nanofiber webs against engineering materials; soda-lime glass and silicon wafer. PUi/glass combination, with highest hydrophilicity, showed the highest friction coefficient which decrease with the increase of the applied load. Furthermore, the effects of fluorine coating are also investigated. The friction coefficient of fluorine coated hydrophobic PU nanofiber (PUof) shows great decrease against the silicon wafer. Finally, wiping ability and friction property are investigated when the substrate surface is contaminated. Nano-particle dusts are effectively collected into the pores by wiping with PUo and PUi nanofiber webs both on glass and silicon wafer. The friction coefficient gradually increased with the increase of the applied load. PMID:23763132

  19. Exceptionally fast growth rate of <100-yr-old tufa, Big Soda Lake, Nevada: Implications for using tufa as a paleoclimate proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Michael R.; Arehart, Greg B.; Lico, Michael S.

    2004-05-01

    Large tufa mounds (>3 m tall, with a basal circumference of 5 m) have been discovered on the margin of Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA. These tufa mounds are rooted at a maximum of 4 m below the current lake surface and are actively forming from groundwater seepage, which can be seen emanating from the top of the tufa mounds. Big Soda Lake is a volcanic crater lake whose water level is maintained exclusively by groundwater. The age of the tufa mounds is well constrained because prior to the development of the Newlands Irrigation Project in 1907, the water level was ˜18 m lower than the current lake level. The vertical columnar nature of the tufa mounds indicates that they formed under the lake and not subaerially. Thus, the tufa mounds are <100 yr old and have grown at a rate ≥30 mm/yr. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope analyses of tufa carbonate compared to isotopic analyses of groundwater and lake water and hydrochemical data indicate that the fluids responsible for their precipitation are a simple mixture of modern groundwater and lake water and do not reflect a recent climate signature. The exceptionally fast growth of the tufa mounds indicates that large tufa deposits may form almost instantaneously in geologic time. Given this potential for rapid growth and the fact that variations in isotopic compositions of tufa deposits have been interpreted in terms of changes in paleoclimate and changes in the composition of recharge water over thousands of years, care should be taken when trying to determine the significance of variations in isotopic or chemical compositions of tufas that may have been caused by mixing with groundwater.

  20. Exceptionally fast growth rate of <100-yr-old tufa, Big Soda Lake, Nevada: Implications for using tufa as a peleoclimate proxy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Michael R.; Arehart, G.B.; Lico, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Large tufa mounds (>3 m tall, with a basal circumference of 5 m) have been discovered on the margin of Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA. These tufa mounds are rooted at a maximum of 4 m below the current lake surface and are actively forming from groundwater seepage, which can be seen emanating from the top of the tufa mounds. Big Soda Lake is a volcanic crater lake whose water level is maintained exclusively by groundwater. The age of the tufa mounds is well constrained because prior to the development of the Newlands Irrigation Project in 1907, the water level was ???18 m lower than the current lake level. The vertical columnar nature of the tufa mounds indicates that they formed under the lake and not subaerially. Thus, the tufa mounds are <100 yr old and have grown at a rate ???30 mm/yr. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope analyses of tufa carbonate compared to isotopic analyses of groundwater and lake water and hydrochemical data indicate that the fluids responsible for their precipitation are a simple mixture of modern groundwater and lake water and do not reflect a recent climate signature. The exceptionally fast growth of the tufa mounds indicates that large tufa deposits may form almost instantaneously in geologic time. Given this potential for rapid growth and the fact that variations in isotopic compositions of tufa deposits have been interpreted in terms of changes in paleoclimate and changes in the composition of recharge water over thousands of years, care should be taken when trying to determine the significance of variations in isotopic or chemical compositions of tufas that may have been caused by mixing with groundwater. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  1. A novel homocystine-agarose adsorbent for separation and preconcentration of nickel in table salt and baking soda using factorial design optimization of the experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Payman; Rahmani, Zohreh

    2006-02-28

    Homocystine was for the first time, chemically linked to a highly cross-linked agarose support (Novarose) to be employed as a chelating adsorbent for preconcentration and AAS determination of nickel in table salt and baking soda. Nickel is quantitatively adsorbed on a small column packed with 0.25ml of the adsorbent, in a pH range of 5.5-6.5 and simply eluted with 5ml of a 1moll(-1) hydrochloric acid solution. A factorial design was used for optimization of the effects of five different variables on the recovery of nickel. The results indicated that the factors of flow rate and column length, and the interactions between pH and sample volume are significant. In the optimized conditions, the column could tolerate salt concentrations up to 0.5moll(-1) and sample volumes beyond 500ml. Matrix ions of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), with a concentration of 200mgl(-1), and potentially interfering ions of Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Mn(2+), with a concentration of 10mgl(-1), did not have significant effect on the analyte's signal. Preconcentration factors up to 100 and a detection limit of 0.49mugl(-1), corresponding to an enrichment volume of 500ml, were obtained for the determination of the analyte by flame AAS. Application of the method to the determination of natural and spiked nickel in table salt and baking soda solutions resulted in quantitative recoveries. Direct ETAAS determination of nickel in the same samples was not possible because of a high background observed. PMID:18970514

  2. Some New Constraints On The Stratigraphic And Structural Setting Of The Soda Lake Geothermal Field, Churchill County, Nevada - McLACHLAN, Holly S. and FAULDS, James E., Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, H. S.

    2012-12-01

    Our research group is currently conducting a regional survey to identify favorable structural settings of producing and prospective geothermal fields in the Great Basin. The Soda Lake geothermal field - one of the oldest consistently producing fields in this study region - is located in west-central Nevada near the heart of the Carson Sink. Producing and prospective geothermal fields in the surrounding highlands are hosted in 1) fault termination zones (Desert Queen), 2) accommodation zones (Brady's Hot Springs) and 3) fault step-overs (Desert Peak). However, the structural setting is challenging to identify at the Soda Lake field, because it lies in the central part of a large basin with no nearby bedrock exposures. The well field at Soda Lake is centered ~3.5 km NNE of the Holocene Soda Lake maar, from which it takes its name. The geothermal field was identified serendipitously during the drilling of an irrigation survey well in the early 20th century. Modern exploratory drilling at the field began in the mid-1970s and has continued sporadically to the present. There are currently more than 28 500+ m wells at and near the production site. The exceptional drilling density at Soda Lake allows for comparatively reliable correlation of stratigraphy in the subsurface below the feature-poor Carson Sink. Stratigraphy in the Soda Lake geothermal area is relatively "layer cake" at the scale of the well field. Unconsolidated sediments extend more than 1000 m below surface. The upper few hundred meters are composed of fluvial and lacustrine sediments derived from Sierran batholith source rocks. The deeper basin fill derives from more proximal mafic to felsic Miocene volcanic rocks along the basin margins. At ~450-650 m depth, basin sediments are interrupted by a 5.11 Ma trachytic basalt of restricted lateral extent and variable thickness. Most wells intercept ~50-250 m of fine lacustrine sediments below this basalt body before intercepting the basin floor. Basin floor rocks

  3. Natural Analog CCS Site Characterization Soda Springs, Idaho Implications for the Long-term Fate of Carbon Dioxide Stored in Geologic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLing, T. L.; Smith, R. W.; Podgorney, R. K.; Taylor, J.

    2009-12-01

    Implementation of commercial scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) requires an understanding of the long-term fate of CO2 sequestered in the subsurface. Critical to the success of large-scale CCS is an understanding of CO2 transport and geochemical process that occur in storage reservoirs, and potentially in the near surface should a leak occur. One way to gain this necessary understanding is to study natural CO2 reservoirs and their interaction with near surface and deep geologic materials. Many of these types of systems are self-contained, storing CO2 in geologic formations for millions of years. However, some of these systems are naturally leaky and may provide an ideal field laboratory to assess the long-term interaction of upward migrating CO2 and the subsurface environment. In addition, these natural analogs sites may provide important insight at time-scales not be available from other sources (such as CCS demonstration projects), critical to the characterization of proposed geologic sequestration reservoirs. The potential applicability of natural CO2 leaks as long-term natural analogs to geologic sequestration has been previously explored (Heath and Mcpherson 2004). An excellent leaky CCS natural analog is located in southeastern Idaho near the community of Soda Springs. At this site CO2 and CO2 charged waters generated at depth migrate upward interacting with the overlying geologic formations and the near surface local ground and surface waters. We hypothesized that the majority of the vertically migrating CO2 and CO2 charged water is prevented from reaching the surface by geochemical interactions with a thoelitic basalt flow that acts as a reactive cap on the reservoir. However, there are some small natural CO2 surface expressions of this system including several carbonated springs and a large CO2 “geyser” that resulted from a well drilled into the pressurized CO2 reservoir. Preliminary results of geochemical modeling based on initial water sampling

  4. Investigating in vitro bioactivity and magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic fabricated using soda-lime-silica waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M.; Hashemi, B.; Shokrollahi, H.

    2014-04-01

    The main purpose of the current research is the production and characterization of a ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic prepared through the solid-state reaction method using soda-lime-silica waste glass as the main raw material. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural, thermal and magnetic properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). The apatite surface layer formation was examined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The calcium ion concentration in the solutions was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). VSM results revealed that with the addition of 5-20 wt% strontium hexaferrite to bioactive glass-ceramics, the ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramics with hysteresis losses between 7024 and 75,852 erg/g were obtained. The in vitro test showed that the onset formation time of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of the samples was 14 days and after 30 days, this layer was completed.

  5. Optimization the soda-AQ process for cellulose pulp production and energy content of black liquor from L. leucocephala K360.

    PubMed

    Feria, M J; García, J C; Díaz, M J; Garrote, G; López, F

    2012-09-01

    A commercial variety of Leucaena leucocephala K360 was used for pulp production and papermaking employing the soda-anthraquinone process. Also, the chemical and energy contents of the resultant black liquors were determined to simultaneously optimize: pulp and paper production and energy generation. A process temperature of (185°C), an operating time of (120 min) and an active alkali concentration of (21%) provided sheets of paper with good strength (tensile index of 12.12 Nm/g, burst index of 0.38 kPa m(2)/g, tear index of 1.29 mN m(2)/g and a Kappa number of 20.5) and black liquor with a greater calorific value (14.1 MJ/kg) than that obtained with higher active alkali concentrations. However, reducing the active alkali concentration to a level in the low operation range led to less marked degradation of cellulose and allowed paper sheets with good properties to be obtained and energy to be optimally produced from the black liquor. PMID:22789829

  6. Characterization of wheat straw-degrading anaerobic alkali-tolerant mixed cultures from soda lake sediments by molecular and cultivation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Porsch, Katharina; Wirth, Balázs; Tóth, Erika M; Schattenberg, Florian; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline pretreatment has the potential to enhance the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas. However, the elevated pH of the substrate may require alkalitolerant microbial communities for an effective digestion. Three mixed anaerobic lignocellulolytic cultures were enriched from sediments from two soda lakes with wheat straw as substrate under alkaline (pH 9) mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The gas production of the three cultures ceased after 4 to 5 weeks, and the produced gas was composed of carbon dioxide and methane. The main liquid intermediates were acetate and propionate. The physiological behavior of the cultures was stable even after several transfers. The enrichment process was also followed by molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and of the mcrA/mrtA functional gene for methanogens. The main shift in the microbial community composition occurred between the sediment samples and the first enrichment, whereas the structure was stable in the following transfers. The bacterial communities mainly consisted of Sphingobacteriales, Clostridiales and Spirochaeta, but differed at genus level. Methanothermobacter and Methanosarcina genera and the order Methanomicrobiales were predominant methanogenes in the obtained cultures. Additionally, single cellulolytic microorganisms were isolated from enrichment cultures and identified as members of the alkaliphilic or alkalitolerant genera. The results show that anaerobic alkaline habitats harbor diverse microbial communities, which can degrade lignocellulose effectively and are therefore a potential resource for improving anaerobic digestion. PMID:25737100

  7. Characterization of wheat straw-degrading anaerobic alkali-tolerant mixed cultures from soda lake sediments by molecular and cultivation techniques.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Katharina; Wirth, Balázs; Tóth, Erika M; Schattenberg, Florian; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-09-01

    Alkaline pretreatment has the potential to enhance the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas. However, the elevated pH of the substrate may require alkalitolerant microbial communities for an effective digestion. Three mixed anaerobic lignocellulolytic cultures were enriched from sediments from two soda lakes with wheat straw as substrate under alkaline (pH 9) mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The gas production of the three cultures ceased after 4 to 5 weeks, and the produced gas was composed of carbon dioxide and methane. The main liquid intermediates were acetate and propionate. The physiological behavior of the cultures was stable even after several transfers. The enrichment process was also followed by molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and of the mcrA/mrtA functional gene for methanogens. The main shift in the microbial community composition occurred between the sediment samples and the first enrichment, whereas the structure was stable in the following transfers. The bacterial communities mainly consisted of Sphingobacteriales, Clostridiales and Spirochaeta, but differed at genus level. Methanothermobacter and Methanosarcina genera and the order Methanomicrobiales were predominant methanogenes in the obtained cultures. Additionally, single cellulolytic microorganisms were isolated from enrichment cultures and identified as members of the alkaliphilic or alkalitolerant genera. The results show that anaerobic alkaline habitats harbor diverse microbial communities, which can degrade lignocellulose effectively and are therefore a potential resource for improving anaerobic digestion. PMID:25737100

  8. Diversity and ecological tolerance of bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of halophyton plants living nearby Kiskunság soda ponds, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Borsodi, Andrea K; Bárány, Ágnes; Krett, Gergely; Márialigeti, Károly; Szili-Kovács, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    Many halophytes and halophilic microorganisms are capable to adapt to the extremities of saline habitats. This study reveals the taxonomic diversity and ecological tolerance of bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of three different halophytes (Bolboschoenus maritimus, Puccinellia limosa and Aster tripolium) living in the vicinity of Kiskunság soda ponds. Following a sampling in September 2013, altogether 76 bacterial strains were isolated using two different media. The strains were identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing following ARDRA grouping. Salt and pH tolerance of the strains were examined by measuring their growth in broths containing 0-15% NaCl (w/V) and characterized with pH 7-12 values. Among the strains genera of Anaerobacillus, Bacillus and Exiguobacterium (Firmicutes), Agromyces, Isoptericola, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Nocardiopsis, Nesterenkonia and Streptomyces (Actinobacteria), Halomonas and Idiomarina (Proteobacteria) and Anditalea (Bacteroidetes) were identified. The Bolboschoenus and Puccinellia samples characterized with the highest pH and electric conductivity values were dominated by Bacillus, Halomonas and Nesterenkonia, respectively. The salt tolerance of the bacterial strains was strongly dependent on the sampling location and plant species. In contrast, growth of bacterial strains in broths with alkaline pH values was more balanced. The strains from the Puccinellia sample showed the widest salt and pH tolerance. PMID:26132838

  9. Influence of rice straw cooking conditions in the soda-ethanol-water pulping on the mechanical properties of produced paper sheets.

    PubMed

    Navaee-Ardeh, S; Mohammadi-Rovshandeh, J; Pourjoozi, M

    2004-03-01

    A normalized design was used to examine the influence of independent variables (alcohol concentration, cooking time and temperature) in the catalytic soda-ethanol pulping of rice straw on various mechanical properties (breaking length, burst, tear index and folding endurance) of paper sheets obtained from each pulping process. An equation of each dependent variable as a function of cooking variables (independent variables) was obtained by multiple non-linear regression using the least square method by MATLAB software for developing of empirical models. The ranges of alcohol concentration, cooking time and temperature were 40-65% (w/w), 150-180 min and 195-210 degrees C, respectively. Three-dimensional graphs of dependent variables were also plotted versus independent variables. The optimum values of breaking length, burst and tear index and folding endurance were 4683.7 (m), 30.99 (kN/g), 376.93 (mN m2/g) and 27.31, respectively. However, short cooking time (150 min), high ethanol concentration (65%) and high temperature (210 degrees C) could be used to produce papers with suitable burst and tear index. However, for papers with best breaking length and folding endurance low temperature (195 degrees C) was desirable. Differences between optimum values of dependent variables obtained by normalized design and experimental data were less than 20%. PMID:14643987

  10. A novel cold-adapted and highly salt-tolerant esterase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3 from the sediment of a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guozeng; Wang, Qiaohuang; Lin, Xianju; Ng, Tzi Bun; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase gene (estSL3) was cloned from the Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, which was isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The 636-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino acid residues that is closely related with putative GDSL family lipases from Alkalibacterium and Enterococcus. The gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein (rEstSL3) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. rEstSL3 exhibited the highest activity towards pNP-acetate and had no activity towards pNP-esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme was highly cold-adapted, showing an apparent temperature optimum of 30 °C and remaining approximately 70% of the activity at 0 °C. It was active and stable over the pH range from 7 to 10, and highly salt-tolerant up to 5 M NaCl. Moreover, rEstSL3 was strongly resistant to most tested metal ions, chemical reagents, detergents and organic solvents. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that EstSL3 had fewer proline residues, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges than mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, but more acidic amino acids and less hydrophobic amino acids when compared with other salt-tolerant esterases. The cold active, salt-tolerant and chemical-resistant properties make it a promising enzyme for basic research and industrial applications. PMID:26915906

  11. Deep and shallow trap contributions to the ionic current in the thermal-electric field poling in soda-lime glasses.

    PubMed

    Moura, A L; de Araujo, M T; Gouveia, E A; Vermelho, M V; Aitchison, J S

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the contribution of deep and shallow trapped ions on the second-order nonlinearity during typical poling procedures in soda-lime glass. The zero-electric field potential barriers of each contribution were estimated. The shallow traps, measured through the electrical ionic current, was determined as ~0.34 eV; while deep trap activation energy, measured by means of the thermal/electric field activated luminescence, was estimated ~3.8 eV. The traps show different dependence on its thermal energy onset for different applied electric field. The ionic current is linearly dependent on the electric field. The luminescence has a minimum electric field ~3.6 kV/cm and thermal energy ~31 meV (~87 degrees C) to occur. The average ionic jump lengths for both processes are also estimated, and the deep trap length is about ten times shorter than the shallow trap one. Samples poled at the border of the luminescence onset parameters revealed that the higher its contributions the more stable the induced second order nonlinearity. PMID:19532230

  12. Deep and shallow trap contributions to the ionic current in the thermal-electric field poling in soda-lime glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, A. L.; de Araujo, M. T.; Gouveia, E. A.; Vermelho, M. V.; Aitchison, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the contribution of deep and shallow trapped ions on the second-order nonlinearity during typical poling procedures in soda-lime glass. The zero-electric field potential barriers of each contribution were estimated. The shallow traps, measured through the electrical ionic current, was determined as ~0.34 eV; while deep trap activation energy, measured by means of the thermal/electric field activated luminescence, was estimated ~3.8 eV. The traps show different dependence on its thermal energy onset for different applied electric field. The ionic current is linearly dependent on the electric field. The luminescence has a minimum electric field ~3.6 kV/cm and thermal energy ~31 meV (~87°C) to occur. The average ionic jump lengths for both processes are also estimated, and the deep trap length is about ten times shorter than the shallow trap one. Samples poled at the border of the luminescence onset parameters revealed that the higher its contributions the more stable the induced second order nonlinearity.

  13. [Diversity of diazotrophs in the sediments of hypersaline salt and soda lakes analyzed with the use of the nifH gene as a molecular marker].

    PubMed

    Turova, T P; Slobodova, N V; Bumazhkin, B K; Sukhacheva, M V; Sorokin, D Iu

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the nifH genes, encoding the Fe protein of the nitrogenas enzymatic complex, was carried out for pure cultures of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria of diverse origin, as well as for heterotrophic alkaliphilic sulfate reducers isolated from saline and soda lakes. Topology of the nitrogenase tree correlated with that of the 16S rRNAgene tree to a considerable degree; which niade it possible to use the nifH gene as a molecular marker for investigation of diazotrophic bacterialcommunities in silty sediments of saline and sodalakes. Although diazotrophs were revealed in all environmentalsamples, their phylogenetic diversity was relatively low. Sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria and photo- and chemotrophicgammaproteobacteria were predominant in samples integrated over sediment thickness. Analysis of samples fromthe upper sediment layers revealed predominance of phototrophic diazotrophs of various phyla, including purple sulfur and nonsulfur proteobacteria, green nonsulfur bacteria, heliobacteria; and cyanobacteria. Some phylotypes could not be identified, probably indicating the presence of bacterial groups which have not yet been studied by conventional microbiological techniques. PMID:25844470

  14. Preparation of hybrid soda-lime/quartz glass chips with wettability-patterned channels for manipulation of flow profiles in droplet-based analytical systems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zeqing; He, Qiaohong; Huang, Shanshi; Hu, Xianqiao; Chen, Hengwu

    2013-03-12

    Profile switching of two-phase flows is often required in microfluidic systems. Manipulation of flow profiles can be realized by control of local surface energy of micro channel through wettability-patterning of channel surface. This article presents a facile approach for wettability-patterning of the micro channels of glass chips. Commercially available octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) was used to hydrophobilize the channels via the formation of OTS self-assembly monolayer (SAM), and a UV-source that mainly emits deep UV-light of 254 and 185 nm was employed to degrade the in-channel formed OTS-SAM. The architecture of soda-lime glass/quartz glass hybrid chip was designed to facilitate the deep UV-light effective degrading the OTS-SAM. The established approach, together with the side-by-side laminar-flow patterning technique, was applied to prepare various finely patterned channel networks for different tasks of flow profile switching. The micro device capable of conducting the profile switch from W/O droplets to two separated continuous phases was demonstrated to perform on-chip quick liquid-liquid extraction for the determination of partition coefficients of pharmaceuticals. PMID:23452792

  15. Generation of alkali-free and high-proton concentration layer in a soda lime glass using non-contact corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Nishii, Junji; Funatsu, Shiro; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Toshio; Harada, Kenji

    2013-08-14

    Formation mechanisms of alkali-free and high-proton concentration surfaces were investigated for a soda lime glass using a corona discharge treatment under an atmospheric pressure. Protons produced by high DC voltage around an anode needle electrode were incorporated into a sodium ion site in the anode side glass. The sodium ion was swept away to the cathode side as a charge carrier. Then it was discharged. The precipitated sodium was transformed to a Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} powder when the surface contacted with air. The sodium ion in the glass surface layer of the anode side was replaced completely by protons. The concentration of OH groups in the layer was balanced with the amount of excluded sodium ions. The substitution reaction of sodium ions with protons tends to be saturated according to a square root function of time. The alkali depletion layer formation rate was affected by the large difference in mobility between sodium ions and protons in the glass.

  16. A novel cold-adapted and highly salt-tolerant esterase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3 from the sediment of a soda lake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guozeng; Wang, Qiaohuang; Lin, Xianju; Bun Ng, Tzi; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase gene (estSL3) was cloned from the Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, which was isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The 636-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino acid residues that is closely related with putative GDSL family lipases from Alkalibacterium and Enterococcus. The gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein (rEstSL3) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. rEstSL3 exhibited the highest activity towards pNP-acetate and had no activity towards pNP-esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme was highly cold-adapted, showing an apparent temperature optimum of 30 °C and remaining approximately 70% of the activity at 0 °C. It was active and stable over the pH range from 7 to 10, and highly salt-tolerant up to 5 M NaCl. Moreover, rEstSL3 was strongly resistant to most tested metal ions, chemical reagents, detergents and organic solvents. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that EstSL3 had fewer proline residues, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges than mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, but more acidic amino acids and less hydrophobic amino acids when compared with other salt-tolerant esterases. The cold active, salt-tolerant and chemical-resistant properties make it a promising enzyme for basic research and industrial applications. PMID:26915906

  17. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  18. Effects of imposed salinity gradients on dissimilatory arsenate reduction, sulfate reduction, and other microbial processes in sediments from two California soda lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulp, T.R.; Han, S.; Saltikov, C.W.; Lanoil, B.D.; Zargar, K.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Salinity effects on microbial community structure and on potential rates of arsenate reduction, arsenite oxidation, sulfate reduction, denitrification, and methanogenesis were examined in sediment slurries from two California soda lakes. We conducted experiments with Mono Lake and Searles Lake sediments over a wide range of salt concentrations (25 to 346 g liter-1). With the exception of sulfate reduction, rates of all processes demonstrated an inverse relationship to total salinity. However, each of these processes persisted at low but detectable rates at salt saturation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes amplified from As(V) reduction slurries revealed that distinct microbial populations grew at low (25 to 50 g liter-1), intermediate (100 to 200 g liter-1), and high (>300 g liter-1) salinity. At intermediate and high salinities, a close relative of a cultivated As-respiring halophile was present. These results suggest that organisms adapted to more dilute conditions can remain viable at high salinity and rapidly repopulate the lake during periods of rising lake level. In contrast to As reduction, sulfate reduction in Mono Lake slurries was undetectable at salt saturation. Furthermore, sulfate reduction was excluded from Searles Lake sediments at any salinity despite the presence of abundant sulfate. Sulfate reduction occurred in Searles Lake sediment slurries only following inoculation with Mono Lake sediment, indicating the absence of sulfate-reducing flora. Experiments with borate-amended Mono Lake slurries suggest that the notably high (0.46 molal) concentration of borate in the Searles Lake brine was responsible for the exclusion of sulfate reducers from that ecosystem. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Time-resolved study of luminescence in soda-lime silicate glasses co-doped with Gd 3+ and Eu 3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Ota, Rikuo; Fujii, Tomoki; Ishikawa, Yo-ichi

    2005-05-01

    Energy transfer process in soda-lime glasses co-doped with Gd 3+ and Eu 3+, where a ground state of Gd 3+, 8S 7/2, was selectively excited to a 6I J state by a 275-nm pulsed laser irradiation, was studied based on a time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. The luminescence decay rate at 313 nm (Gd 3+: 6P 7/2 → 8S 7/2) was observed to be (1.5 ± 0.2) × 10 2 s -1 ( τ = 6.6 ± 0.6 ms) without Eu 3+ and to increase monotonously with increasing co-doped Eu 3+ concentration, giving an apparent quenching rate constant of (5.0 ± 0.5) × 10 -18 ion -1 cm 3 s -1 (≈(1.9 ± 0.2) × 10 3 mol% -1 s -1) for a 6P 7/2 state of Gd 3+ ion with Eu 3+. The relaxation rate of a 6I J state to a luminescent state 6P 7/2 in Gd 3+ ion was estimated to be (1.8 ± 0.2) × 10 6 s -1 from the rise rate at 313-nm luminescence ( τrise ≈ 0.56 μs), which was observed to be almost independent of the Eu 3+ concentration. The luminescence intensity from Eu 3+ at 591 nm and 613 nm monotonously increased with increasing Eu 3+ concentration up to 0.33-mol% Eu 3+, while it started decreasing at concentration of Eu 3+ higher than 0.33-mol%, which was interpreted in terms of the resonant energy transfer to nearby Eu 3+ resulting in the excitation to the Eu 3+-O - charge transfer states.

  20. Molecular Characterization of a Thermophilic and Salt- and Alkaline-Tolerant Xylanase from Planococcus sp. SL4, a Strain Isolated from the Sediment of a Soda Lake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun; Wang, Guozeng

    2015-05-01

    To enrich the genetic resource of microbial xylanases with high activity and stability under alkaline conditions, a xylanase gene (xynSL4) was cloned from Planococcus sp. SL4, an alkaline xylanase-producing strain isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. Deduced XynSL4 consists of a putative signal peptide of 29 residues and a catalytic domain (30-380 residues) of glycosyl hydrolase family 10, and shares the highest identity of 77% with a hypothetical protein from Planomicrobium glaciei CHR43. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that deduced XynSL4 is closely related with thermophilic and alkaline xylanases from Geobacillus and Bacillus species. The gene xynSL4 was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme showed some superior properties. Purified recombinant XynSL4 (rXynSL4) was highly active and stable over the neutral and alkaline pH range from 6 to 11, with maximum activity at pH 7 and more than 60% activity at pH 11. It had an apparent temperature optimum of 70°C and retained stable at this temperature in the presence of substrate. rXynSL4 was highly halotolerant, retaining more than 55% activity with 0.25-3.0 M NaCl and was stable at the concentration of NaCl up to 4M. The enzyme activity was significantly enhanced by β-mercaptoethanol and Ca(2+) but strongly inhibited by heavy-metal ions and SDS. This thermophilic and alkaline- and salt-tolerant enzyme has great potential for basic research and industrial applications. PMID:25381738

  1. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  2. Seasonal variability of the meridional overturning circulation in the South China Sea and its connection with inter-ocean transport based on SODA2.2.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yaohua; Fang, Guohong; Wei, Zexun; Wang, Yonggang; Teng, Fei; Qu, Tangdong

    2016-05-01

    We have proposed a five-layer-scheme to investigate the volume transport through the South China Sea (SCS) based on the updated Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA2.2.4) product. By demonstrating horizontal transport in each layer, we have revealed different formation mechanisms for the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in winter and summer in the SCS. Our analysis suggests three meridional circulation systems in the SCS: (1) the seasonal monsoon-driven circulation in the surface layer, i.e., southward circulation in winter and northward in summer, (2) the compensatory transport-induced seasonal intermediate MOC in the central SCS, and (3) the persistent deep MOC in the southern SCS all year round. By examining vertical velocity distribution, we have identified that the major overturning process of the intermediate MOC is located along the continental slope east and southeast of Vietnam, while the major overturning process of the deep MOC is located along the continental slope northwest of Borneo. The downwelling in the intermediate MOC in winter and upwelling in the deep MOC all year round bring different water masses to the intermediate and subintermediate layers to be mixed in the SCS. We found no evidence to suggest that the strength and extent of the MOC south of 18°N are related to inter-ocean volume transport. The surface layer transport in the Luzon Strait has been decreasing since the 1960s. However, the causes of the meridionally staggered and interdecadal alternating acceleration/slowdown of the meridional stream function difference are unknown.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus type strain ARh 1T, an obligately chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a Kenyan soda lake

    SciTech Connect

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-11-19

    Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus strain ARh 1T is a chemolithoautotrophic, non-motile, Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria that was isolated from samples of haloalkaline soda lakes. It derives energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and is notable for its ability to grow on thiocyanate as its sole source of electrons, sulfur and nitrogen. The full genome consists of 3,756,729 bp and comprises 3,500 protein-coding and 57 RNA-coding genes. Moreover, this organism was sequenced as part of the community science program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  4. Single-pulse laser ablation threshold of borosilicate, fused silica, sapphire, and soda-lime glass for pulse widths of 500  fs, 10  ps, 20  ns.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Arines, Justo; O'Connor, Gerard M; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-10

    In this work, we report a comparative study of the laser ablation threshold of borosilicate, fused silica, sapphire, and soda-lime glass as a function of the pulse width and for IR laser wavelengths. We determine the ablation threshold for three different pulse durations: τ=500  fs, 10 ps, and 20 ns. Experiments have been performed using a single laser pulse per shot in an ambient (air) environment. The results show a significant difference, of two orders of magnitude, between the group of ablation thresholds obtained for femtosecond, picosecond, and nanosecond pulses. This difference is reduced to 1 order of magnitude in the soda-lime substrate with tin impurities, pointing out the importance of the incubation effect. The morphology of the marks generated over the different glass materials by one single pulse of different pulse durations has been analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (FESEM ULTRA Plus). Our results are important for practical purposes, providing the ablation threshold data of four commonly used substrates at three different pulse durations in the infrared regime (1030-1064 nm) and complete data for increasing the understanding of the differences in the mechanism's leading ablation in the nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond regimes. PMID:26479792

  5. Soda Pop Fizz-ics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Tonya

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a brief summary of an "open-ended" physics experiment that gave my students a glimpse of what real physics research is like. They found it to be both fun and challenging. The subject of the experiment is the well-known Diet Coke and Mentos reaction. A more detailed description of the experimental results has been published elsewhere.

  6. Improved electron injection and transport by use of baking soda as a low-cost, air-stable, n-dopant for solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earmme, Taeshik; Jenekhe, Samson A.

    2013-06-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda, NaHCO3) is found to be an efficient low-cost, air-stable, and environmentally friendly n-dopant for electron-transport layer (ETL) in solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). A 2.0-fold enhancement in power efficiency of blue PhOLEDs is observed by use of NaHCO3-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) ETL. The bulk conductivity of NaHCO3-doped BPhen film is increased by 5 orders of magnitude. Enhanced performance of PhOLEDs is similarly observed by use of NaHCO3-doped 1,3,5-tris(m-pyrid-3-yl-phenyl)benzene ETL. These results demonstrate that sodium bicarbonate is an effective n-dopant in organic electronics.

  7. Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771), the First Pediatric Pathologist.

    PubMed

    Abramowsky, Carlos R; Berkowitz, Frank E

    2015-01-01

    During the age of enlightenment in the 18th century, radical changes were occurring in the Western world in science, medicine, philosophy, religion, and socio-economic concepts. In medicine, major advances had already been underway since the days of Vesalius. PMID:26699086

  8. Genetic classification and distinguishing of Staphylococcus species based on different partial gap, 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, sodA, and tuf gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghebremedhin, B; Layer, F; König, W; König, B

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences has been the technique generally used to study the evolution and taxonomy of staphylococci. However, the results of this method do not correspond to the results of polyphasic taxonomy, and the related species cannot always be distinguished from each other. Thus, new phylogenetic markers for Staphylococcus spp. are needed. We partially sequenced the gap gene (approximately 931 bp), which encodes the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, for 27 Staphylococcus species. The partial sequences had 24.3 to 96% interspecies homology and were useful in the identification of staphylococcal species (F. Layer, B. Ghebremedhin, W. König, and B. König, J. Microbiol. Methods 70:542-549, 2007). The DNA sequence similarities of the partial staphylococcal gap sequences were found to be lower than those of 16S rRNA (approximately 97%), rpoB (approximately 86%), hsp60 (approximately 82%), and sodA (approximately 78%). Phylogenetically derived trees revealed four statistically supported groups: S. hyicus/S. intermedius, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus/S. simulans, and S. aureus/epidermidis. The branching of S. auricularis, S. cohnii subsp. cohnii, and the heterogeneous S. saprophyticus group, comprising S. saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus and S. equorum subsp. equorum, was not reliable. Thus, the phylogenetic analysis based on the gap gene sequences revealed similarities between the dendrograms based on other gene sequences (e.g., the S. hyicus/S. intermedius and S. sciuri groups) as well as differences, e.g., the grouping of S. arlettae and S. kloosii in the gap-based tree. From our results, we propose the partial sequencing of the gap gene as an alternative molecular tool for the taxonomical analysis of Staphylococcus species and for decreasing the possibility of misidentification. PMID:18174295

  9. Genetic Classification and Distinguishing of Staphylococcus Species Based on Different Partial gap, 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, sodA, and tuf Gene Sequences▿

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremedhin, B.; Layer, F.; König, W.; König, B.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences has been the technique generally used to study the evolution and taxonomy of staphylococci. However, the results of this method do not correspond to the results of polyphasic taxonomy, and the related species cannot always be distinguished from each other. Thus, new phylogenetic markers for Staphylococcus spp. are needed. We partially sequenced the gap gene (∼931 bp), which encodes the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, for 27 Staphylococcus species. The partial sequences had 24.3 to 96% interspecies homology and were useful in the identification of staphylococcal species (F. Layer, B. Ghebremedhin, W. König, and B. König, J. Microbiol. Methods 70:542-549, 2007). The DNA sequence similarities of the partial staphylococcal gap sequences were found to be lower than those of 16S rRNA (∼97%), rpoB (∼86%), hsp60 (∼82%), and sodA (∼78%). Phylogenetically derived trees revealed four statistically supported groups: S. hyicus/S. intermedius, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus/S. simulans, and S. aureus/epidermidis. The branching of S. auricularis, S. cohnii subsp. cohnii, and the heterogeneous S. saprophyticus group, comprising S. saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus and S. equorum subsp. equorum, was not reliable. Thus, the phylogenetic analysis based on the gap gene sequences revealed similarities between the dendrograms based on other gene sequences (e.g., the S. hyicus/S. intermedius and S. sciuri groups) as well as differences, e.g., the grouping of S. arlettae and S. kloosii in the gap-based tree. From our results, we propose the partial sequencing of the gap gene as an alternative molecular tool for the taxonomical analysis of Staphylococcus species and for decreasing the possibility of misidentification. PMID:18174295

  10. SodaConstructing Knowledge through Exploratoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svarovsky, Gina Navoa; Shaffer, David Williamson

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we describe a preliminary study that integrates research on engineering design activities for K-12 students with work on microworlds as learning tools. Here, we extend these bodies of research by exploring whether--and how--authentic recreations of engineering practices can help students develop conceptual understanding of…

  11. Inspire Curiosity, Promote Understanding, Explode Soda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eix, Sandra

    2012-10-01

    Pyrotechnical demonstration shows, summer camps,and larger-than-life exhibits. Is this a theme park or an educational institution? We'll explore what informal science education has to offer, and ponder why and how a science centre does what it does best. Be forewarned: this presentation may involve audience participation and rubber chickens.

  12. Calorie count - sodas and energy drinks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throttle 8 oz. 111 Monster Energy Drink (Low Carb) 16 oz. 10 Monster Energy Drink 16 oz. 200 Red Bull Energy Drink 16 oz. 220 Red Bull Energy Drink (Red, Silver, and Blue) 16 oz. 226 Rockstar Energy Drink 16 oz. 280

  13. Simultaneous trace determination of acidic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in purified water, tap water, juice, soda and energy drink by hollow fiber-based liquid-phase microextraction and ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haojie; Du, Zhenxia; Ji, Yu; Mei, Mei

    2013-05-15

    In this study, a two-phase hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) coupling with ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for determination of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs)-salicylic acid, ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac in real water samples. The influencing parameters of HF-LPME sample preparation method, such as organic solvents (acceptor phase), pH of sample solution (donor phase), extraction time, stirring speed, extraction temperature and ionic strength were systematically optimized. Through the developed determination method, high enrichment factors (195-346) were achieved for the four drugs. The instrumental calibration curves of salicylic acid, naproxen, diclofenac, and ibuprofen show good linear relations (R>0.998) in the concentration range of 1-500, 5-2500, 10-5000 and 5-2500 μg L(-1), respectively. The average recoveries of the four drugs in the low, medium and high spiked concentration levels (20-200, 50-500 and 100-1000 μg L(-1)) were between 98-115% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values were less than 12% (n=6). Limits of detection (LOD) of salicylic acid, naproxen, diclofenac, and ibuprofen in water were 0.5, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.25 μg L(-1), respectively. The determination method has been applied for the real samples (purified water, tap water, juice, soda and energy drinks), and the results show that salicylic acid was detected in tap water and soda, the concentrations were 2.85 μg L(-1) and 61.22 μg L(-1) separately, the RSD values were less than 9% (n=6). Salicylic acid and diclofenac were detected in energy drink, the concentrations were 44.62 μg L(-1) and 8.31 μg L(-1), the RSD values were less than 11% (n=6). PMID:23618157

  14. 75 FR 1680 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition: Determinations: “Giovanni Boldini in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ...Notice is hereby given of the following determinations: Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the Act of October 19, 1965 (79 Stat. 985; 22 U.S.C. 2459), Executive Order 12047 of March 27, 1978, the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (112 Stat. 2681, et seq.; 22 U.S.C. 6501 note, et seq.), Delegation of Authority No. 234 of October 1, 1999, Delegation of Authority No. 236......

  15. Developing GIOVANNI-based Online Prototypes to Intercompare TRMM-Related Global Gridded-Precipitation Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana; Teng, William; Kempler, Steven; Milich, Lenard

    2014-01-01

    New online prototypes have been developed to extend and enhance the previous effort by facilitating investigation of product characteristics and intercomparison of precipitation products in different algorithms as well as in different versions at different spatial scales ranging from local to global without downloading data and software. Several popular Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products and the TRMM Composite Climatology are included. In addition, users can download customized data in several popular formats for further analysis. Examples show product quality problems and differences in several monthly precipitation products. It is seen that differences in daily and monthly precipitation products are distributed unevenly in space and it is necessary to have tools such as those presented here for customized and detailed investigations. A simple time series and two area maps allow the discovery of abnormal values of 3A25 in one of the months. An example shows a V-shaped valley issue in the Version 6 3B43 time series and another example shows a sudden drop in 3A25 monthly rain rate, all of which provide important information when the products are used for long-term trend studies. Future plans include adding more products and statistical functionality in the prototypes.

  16. Cassini, Gian Domenico [Giovanni Domenico; Jean Dominique; known as Cassini I] (1625-1712)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Italian-born French astronomer, born in Perinaldo, near Naples. Attracted to astrology in his youth, became Professor at Bologna, during which time he conducted hydrological studies for the Pope to mitigate flooding of the River Po. In 1669 Cassini moved to France and set up the Paris Observatory, remaining director for the rest of his career. He pushed continually for the observatory to acquire ...

  17. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Comprehensive catalogue of drill‐hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross‐sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

  18. Autotrophic processes in meromictic Big Soda Lake, Nevada.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Cole, B.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Daily rates of oxygenic photosynthesis (OP) by phytoplankton, anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP) by purple sulfur bacteria, and chemoautotrophic productivity (CP = dark CO2 assimilation) were measured once each season. Total daily productivity and the relative importance of each autotrophic process varied with seasonal changes in vertical mixing, light availability, and the biomass of phototrophs. Daily productivity was highest (2830 mg C.m-2) and was dominated by OP in winter when the mixolimnion was isothermal, the biomass of phytoplankton was high, and the biomass of purple sulfur bacteria was low. During the summer-fall period of thermal stratification, phytoplankton biomass decreased, a plate of purple sulfur bacteria formed below the oxycline, and daily rates of dark CO2 assimilation (CP = 390-680 mg C.m-2) exceeded phototrophic productivity (OP + AP = 200-370 mg C.m-2). Total annual productivity was approx 500 g C.m-2, of which 60% was produced by phytoplankton (mostly in winter), 30% by chemoautotrophs (nitrifying and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria), and only 10% by photosynthetic bacteria. -Authors

  19. On the Stability of a Can of Soda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benesh, G. A.; Olafsen, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Stability is often an important consideration in both static and dynamic systems. While introductory students soon grasp the balance of forces required for constant velocity motion, it generally takes longer for them to reliably identify the various torques involved in producing rotational equilibrium. Accelerating systems have the additional…

  20. Coffee, Wine Good for Healthy Gut, Sodas May Be Bad

    MedlinePlus

    ... to as the "gut microbiome," said Dr. David Johnson. He is chief of gastroenterology at Eastern Virginia ... but little-understood role in human health, said Johnson, who was not involved with the new studies. " ...

  1. Coffee, Wine Good for Healthy Gut, Sodas May Be Bad

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetics at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. On the other hand, foods containing loads of ... than 1,100 people living in the northern Netherlands. The samples were used to analyze the DNA ...

  2. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of soda-lime glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunnell, L. Roy; Vertrees, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this educational exercise was to demonstrate the difference between the electrical conductivity of metals and ceramics. A list of the equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  3. Etching of nanostructures on soda-lime glass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Elmer; Zhao, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Nanostructures were created on the surface of optical glass using nanosphere lithography. The substrates were etched with vapor-phase hydrofluoric (HF) acid. The etching rate was studied and compared with existing results of wet and dry HF etching. An empirical etching rate formula is found for etching depth up to 300 nm. The subsequent artificial material layer demonstrated enhanced transmittance in optical wavelengths. PMID:24978727

  4. 65 Years of Reprocessed GLDAS Version 2.0 Data and Their Exploration Using the NASA GES DISC Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Hualan; Vollmer, B.; Teng, W.; Beaudoing, H.; Rodell, M.; Silberstein, D.

    2015-01-01

    GLDAS-2.0 data have been reprocessed with updated Princeton meteorological forcing data within the Land Information System (LIS) Version 7, and temporal coverage have been extended to 1948-2012.Global Land Data Assimilation System Version 2 (GLDAS-2) has two components: GLDAS-2.0: entirely forced with the Princeton meteorological forcing data GLDAS-2.1: forced with atmospheric analysis and observation-based data after 2001In order to create more climatologically consistent data sets, NASA GSFC's Hydrological Sciences Laboratory (HSL) has recently reprocessed the GLDAS-2.0, by using updated Princeton meteorological forcing data within the LIS Version 7.GLDAS-2.0 data and data services are provided at NASA GES DISC Hydrology Data and Information Services Center (HDISC), in collaboration with HSL.

  5. Fabrication of ultrafine tungsten-based alloy powders by novel soda reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Won; Turaev, Farkhod; Kim, Ju-Hyeong; Yang, Mingchuan

    2010-03-15

    A novel reduction method has been developed to fabricate ultrafine tungsten heavy alloy powders, with ammonium metatungstate (AMT), iron(II) chloride tetrahydrate (FeCl{sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O), nickel(II) chloride hexahydrate (NiCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O) as source materials and sodium tungstate dihydrate (Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) as a reductant. In the preparation of mixtures the amounts of the source components were chosen so as to obtain alloy of 93W-5Ni-2Fe composition (wt.%). The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, XPS, field-emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and chemical composition was analyzed by EDX.

  6. Recovery of wheat straw soda lignin using flocculation by proteins, synthetic flocculants, and a metal coagulant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-sulfonated lignin, a byproduct of biomass conversion to fuel ethanol, is finding increasing applications and can be converted to chemical substances which replace those obtained from petrochemicals. To date, most studies of flocculant function on non-sulfonated lignin have used mixtures of lign...

  7. Arsenophilic Bacterial Processes in Searles Lake: A Salt-saturated, Arsenic-rich, Alkaline Soda Lake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Kulp, T. R.; Hoeft, S. E.; Miller, L. G.; Swizer Blum, J.; Stolz, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    Searles Lake, located in the Mojave Desert of California, is essentially a chemically-similar, concentrated version of Mono Lake, but having a much higher salinity (e.g., 340 vs. 90 g/L) and a greater dissolved inorganic arsenic content in its brine (e.g., 3.9 vs. 0.2 mM). The source of all this arsenic ultimately comes from hydrothermal spring inputs, thereby underscoring the importance of volcanic and fluvial processes in transporting this toxic element into these closed basin lakes. Nonetheless, the presence of microbial activities with regard to respiration of arsenate oxyanions under anaerobic conditions and the oxidation of arsenite oxyanions under aerobic conditions can be inferred from porewater profiles taken from handcores retrieved beneath Searles Lake's salt crust. Sediment slurry incubations confirmed biological arsenate respiration and arsenite oxidation, with the former processes notably enhanced by provision of the inorganic electron donor sulfide or H2. Hence, arsenic-linked chemo-autotrophy appears to be an important means of carbon fixation in this system. Subsequent efforts using 73As-arsenate as radiotracer detected dissimilatory arsenate reduction activity down the length of the core, but we were unable to detect any evidence for sulfate-reduction using 35S-sulfate. An extremely halophilic anaerobic bacterium of the order Haloanaerobiales [strain SLAS-1] was isolated from the sediments that grew via arsenate respiration using lactate or sulfide as its electron donors. These results show that, unlike sulfate-reduction, arsenic metabolism (i.e., both oxidation of arsenite and dissimilatory reduction of arsenate) is operative and even vigorous under the extreme conditions of salt-saturation and high pH. The occurrence of arsenophilic microbial processes in Searles Lake is relevant to the search for extant or extinct microbial life on Mars. It is evident from surface imagery that Mars had past episodes of volcanism, fluvial transport, and most likely brine concentration reactions (e.g., evapo- and cryo-concentration) occurring in its early Noachian/Hesperian epochs. We speculate that these processes may have created arsenic-rich, dense brines on the Martian surface or even within its underlying regolith. Whether such brines persisted long enough for prokaryotic life to evolve in them, and if so, was such life capable of adapting to and exploiting arsenic redox reactions for the purpose of generating metabolic energy remain tantalizing, but still hypothetical questions.

  8. Nickel recovery from spent Raneynickel catalyst through dilute sulfuric acid leaching and soda ash precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Rao, S Venkateswara; Kumar, B Nagaphani; Kang, Dong Jun; Reddy, B Ramachandra

    2010-04-15

    Pharmaceutical industry makes extensive use of Raneynickel catalyst for various organic drug intermediates/end products. Spent catalysts contain environmentally critical and economically valuable metals. In the present study, a simple hydrometallurgical process using dilute sulfuric acid leaching was described for the recovery of nickel from spent Raneynickel catalyst. Recovery of nickel varied with acid concentration and time, whereas temperature had negligible effect. Increase of S/L ratio to 30% (w/v) showed marginal effect on nickel (90%) recovery, whereas Al recovery decreased drastically to approximately 20%. Under the optimum conditions of leaching viz: 12 vol.% H(2)SO(4), 30 degrees C, 20% solid to liquid (S/L) ratio and 120 min reaction time, it was possible to recover 98.6% Ni along with 39.2% Al. Leach liquor [pH 0.7] containing 85.0 g/L Ni and 3.25 g/L Al was adjusted to pH 5.4 with 30 wt.% alkali for quantitative aluminum removal. Nickel loss was about 2% during this Al removal step. Nickel from the purified leach liquor was recovered as nickel carbonate by adding required amount of Na(2)CO(3). The purity of NiCO(3) product was found to be 100% with a Ni content of 48.6%. Na(2)SO(4) was recovered as a by-product with a purity of 99%. Complete process is presented. PMID:20018448

  9. Using Data Pooling To Measure the Density of Sodas: An Introductory Discovery Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Richard S.; Nestor, Lisa P.; Benedetto, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which students determine the density of Coke and Diet Coke, consider density as an intensive property, and compare the accuracy and precision of different types of glassware. (WRM)

  10. Sulfate Fining Chemistry in Oxidized and Reduced Soda-Lime-Silica Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2005-05-13

    Various reducing agents were used and their additions were varied to (1) increase glass quality through eliminating defects from silica scum, (2) decrease SOx emissions through changing the kind and quantity of reducing agents, and (3) improve production efficiency through increased flexibility of glass redox control during continuous processing. The work included measuring silica sand dissolution and sulfate decomposition in melts from glass batches. Glass batches were heated at a temperature-increase rate deemed similar to that experienced in the melting furnace. The sulfate decomposition kinetics was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis and evolved gas analysis. Sulfur concentrations in glasses quenched at different temperatures were determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The distribution of residual sand (that which was not dissolved during the initial batch reactions) in the glass was obtained as a function of temperature with optical microscopy in thin-sections of melts. The fraction of undissolved sand was measured with X-ray diffraction. The results of the present study helped Visteon Inc. reduce the energy consumption and establish the batch containing 0.118 mass% of graphite as the best candidate for Visteon glass production. The improved glass batch has a lower potential for silica scum formation and for brown fault occurrence in the final glass product. It was established that bubbles trapped in the melt even at 1450 C have a high probability to be refined when reaching the hot zone in the glass furnace. Furthermore, silica sand does not accumulate at the glass surface and dissolves faster in the batch with graphite than in the batch with carbocite.

  11. Pre-feasibility power generation study for the Magadi Soda Company, Magadi, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to: (a) review the extensive published and unpublished literature on the geochemistry, hydrology and geology of Lake Magadi, Kenya, and its associated hot springs; (b) based on this review of field visits, estimate the temperature in the geothermal reservoir beneath the lake; and (c) from this, develop a plan to determine the potential for the development of geothermal electric power at Lake Magadi. 6 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Spatial and temporal patterns in the microbial diversity of a meromictic soda lake in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Dimitriu, Pedro A; Pinkart, Holly C; Peyton, Brent M; Mormile, Melanie R

    2008-08-01

    The microbial community diversity and composition of meromictic Soap Lake were studied using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The water column and sediments were sampled monthly for a year. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed an increase in diversity with depth for both groups. Late-summer samples harbored the highest prokaryotic diversity, and the bacteria exhibited less seasonal variability than the archaea. Most-probable-number assays targeting anaerobic microbial guilds were performed to compare summer and fall samples. In both seasons, the anoxic samples appeared to be dominated by lactate-oxidizing sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. High numbers of lactate- and acetate-oxidizing iron-reducing bacteria, as well as fermentative microorganisms, were also found, whereas the numbers of methanogens were low or methanogens were undetectable. The bacterial community composition of summer and fall samples was also assessed by constructing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. A total of 508 sequences represented an estimated >1,100 unique operational taxonomic units, most of which were from the monimolimnion, and the summer samples were more diverse than the fall samples (Chao1 = 530 and Chao1 = 295, respectively). For both seasons, the mixolimnion sequences were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, and the chemocline and monimolimnion libraries were dominated by members of the low-G+C-content group, followed by the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group; the mixolimnion sediments contained sequences related to uncultured members of the Chloroflexi and the CFB group. Community overlap and phylogenetic analyses, however, not only demonstrated that there was a high degree of spatial turnover but also suggested that there was a degree of temporal variability due to differences in the members and structures of the communities. PMID:18552187

  13. Antioxidant glucosylated caffeoylquinic acid derivatives in the invasive tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eggplant (Solanum melongena) and other species within the “spiny solanums” (Solanum subgenus Leptostemonum) contain diverse and abundant antioxidant caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) derivatives. The fruit of an aggressive invasive species in the spiny solanums, Solanum viarum, contain numerous CQA deri...

  14. Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to a temperature in the range 700.degree.-900.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acid-soluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

  15. Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ to a temperature in the range 700/sup 0/ to 900/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acidsoluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

  16. A Soft OR Approach to Fostering Systems Thinking: SODA Maps plus Joint Analytical Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Higher order thinking skills are important for managers. Systems thinking is an important type of higher order thinking in business education. This article investigates a soft Operations Research approach to teaching and learning systems thinking. It outlines the integrative use of Strategic Options Development and Analysis maps for visualizing…

  17. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov.: A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1, was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.22 x 10-15 micron. Growth was observed over the temperature range of 10 C to 44 C (optimum 37 C), NaCl concentration range of greater than 1 - 12 % (wt/vol) (optimum 3%), and pH range 7.5 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. Main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain AspG1 is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species among the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA_392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  18. Soda-fuel metallurgy: Metal ions for carbon neutral CO2 and H2O reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelameggham, Neale R.

    2009-04-01

    The role of minerals in biomass formation is understood only to a limited extent. When the term “photosynthesis—CO2 and H2O reduction of sugars, using solar energy”—is used, one normally thinks of chlorophyll as a compound containing magnesium. Alkali and alkaline earth metals present in leaf cells in the form of ions are equally essential in this solar energy bioconversion coupled with nitrogen fixation. Application of some of these principles can lead to artificial carbon-neutral processes on an industrial scale close to the concentrated CO2 emission sources.

  19. Volcanic Experimentation: Using Mentos and Soda to Teach Causal Research in a Marketing Research Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Edwin; Stelling, Pete

    2012-01-01

    The reaction that occurs when Mentos are added to bottled soft drinks has become a staple demonstration in earth science courses to explain how volcanoes erupt. This paper presents how this engaging exercise can be used in a marketing research course to provide hands-on experience with problem formation, hypothesis testing, and causal research. A…

  20. Forty years abuse of baking soda, rhabdomyolysis, glomerulonephritis, hypertension leading to renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Terje; Koistinen, Arvo; Anttinen, Jorma; Wagner, Bodo; Miettinen, Marja

    2008-01-01

    We present a patient who had ingested sodium bicarbonate for treatment of alcoholic dyspepsia during forty years at increasing doses. During the last year he had used more than 50 grams daily. He presented with metabolic alkalosis, epileptic convulsions, subdural hematoma, hypertension and rhabdomyolysis with end stage renal failure, for which he had to be given regular intermittent hemodialysis treatment. Untreated hypertension and glomerulonephritis was probably present prior to all these acute incidents. Examination of the kidney biopsy revealed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and arterial wall thickening causing nephrosclerosis together with interstitial calcinosis. The combination of all these pathologic changes might be responsible for the development of progressive chronic renal failure ending up with the need for continuous intermittent hemodialysis treatment. PMID:24179353

  1. The effect of phosphate content on the bioactivity of soda-lime-phosphosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, M D; Watts, S J; Hill, R G; Law, R V

    2009-08-01

    We report on the bioactivity of two series of glasses in the SiO(2)-Na(2)O-CaO-P(2)O(5) system after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) after 21 days. The effect of P(2)O(5) content was examined for compositions containing 0-9.25 mol.% phosphate. Both series of glasses degraded to basic pH, but the solutions tended towards to neutrality with increasing phosphate content; a result of the acidic phosphate buffering the effect of the alkali metal and alkaline earth ions on degradation. Bioactivity was assessed by the appearance of features in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) traces and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra consistent with crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate-apatite (HCAp): such as the appearance of the (002) Bragg reflection in XRD and splitting of the P-O stretching vibration around 550 cm(-1) in the FTIR respectively. All glasses formed HCAp in SBF over the time periods studied and the time for formation of this crystalline phase occurred more rapidly in both series as the phosphate contents were increased. For P(2)O(5) content >3 mol.% both series exhibited highly crystalline apatite by 16 h immersion in SBF. This indicates that in the compositions studied, phosphate content is more important for bioactivity than network connectivity (NC) of the silicate phase and compositions showing rapid apatite formation are presented, superior to 45S5 Bioglass which was tested under identical conditions for comparison. PMID:19330429

  2. Studies and testing of antireflective (AR) coatings for soda-lime glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastirik, E. M.; Sparks, T. G.; Coleman, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Processes for producing antireflection films on glass are concentrated in three areas: acid etching of glass, plasma etching of glass, and acid development of sodium silicate films on glass. The best transmission was achieved through the acid etching technique, while the most durable films were produced from development of sodium silicate films. Control of the acid etching technique is presently inadequate for production implementation. While films having excellent antireflective properties were fabricated by plasma etching techniques, all were water soluble.

  3. Laser-induced periodic alignment of Ag nanoparticles in soda-lime glass.

    PubMed

    Goutaland, François; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Sow, Mohamed Cherif; Ollier, Nadège; Vocanson, Francis

    2013-12-30

    One-, two- or three-dimensional arrays of closely spaced silver nanoparticles may lead to new optical properties, due to short or long range coupling between their resonant surface plasmons, so that the spatially controlled growth of silver nanoparticles provides an efficient way to tune their optical properties. Towards this way, we present here the periodic pattern of a glass surface with silver nanoparticles by continuous ultraviolet laser exposure. The formation of the 160 nm period pattern is well described by an interference-based model which agrees with the experimental conclusions, mainly obtained by various forms of microscopy. Statistical approach based on the autocorrelation function gives quantitative description about the quality of the order in the periodic structure and about the nanoparticles averaged diameter (80 nm). We also present the optical extinction spectrum of the Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure (LIPSS)-containing area of the glass, which unusually shows several bands in the visible range. The period of 160 nm of the periodic structure is short enough to allow coupling between nanoparticles, which makes it a possible candidate for plasmon-based optical applications. PMID:24514774

  4. Hydrogen metabolism by decomposing cyanobacterial aggregates in Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.

    1983-05-01

    Hydrogen production by incubated cyanobacterial epiphytes occurred only in the dark, was stimulated by C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, and was inhibited by O/sub 2/. Addition of NO/sub 3//sup -/ inhibited dark, anaerobic H/sub 2/ production, whereas the addition of NH/sub 4//sup +/ inhibited N/sub 2/ fixation (C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ reduction) but not dark H/sub 2/ production. Aerobically incubated cyanobacterial aggregates consumed H/sub 2/, but light-incubated rates (3.6 mu mol of H/sub 2/ g-1 h-1) were statistically equivalent to dark uptake rates (4.8 mu mol of H/sub 2/ g-1 h-1), which were statistically equivalent to dark, anaerobic production rates (2.5 to 10 mu mol of H/sub 2/ g-1 h-1). Production rates of H/sub 2/ were fourfold higher for aggregates in a more advanced stage of decomposition. Enrichment cultures of H/sub 2/-producing fermentative bacteria were recovered from freshly harvested, H/sub 2/-producing cyanobacterial aggregates. Hydrogen production in these cyanobacterial communities appears to be caused by the resident bacterial flora and not by the cyanobacteria. In situ areal estimates of dark H/sub 2/ production by submerged epiphytes (6.8 mu mol of H/sub 2/ m-2 h-1) were much lower than rates of light-driven N/sub 2/ fixation by the epiphytic cyanobacteria (310 mu mol of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ meters -2 h-1). (26 Refs.)

  5. Sunlight, Skyscrapers, and Soda Pop: The Wherever-You-Look Science Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Andrea T.; Kessler, James H.

    This book contains a series of hands-on science activities for young children. The activities are designed to be done by children with an adult partner. An interactive learning feature is also included. Through these activities, children can discover that science is all around them and that science helps to explain why things happen the way they…

  6. Anomalous phase separation behavior of gel-derived soda-silica glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of retained bound hydroxyl groups on amorphous immiscibility behavior and on the kinetics of phase separation were studied in glasses containing from 10 to 19 percent sodium oxide preparaed by the gel process. Differences in behavior as functions of preliminary thermal treatment of the gel precursor and of melting conditions were studied, employing IR spectroscopy, SAXS and WAXD to monitor the variation in glass microstructure. Both the initial gel treatment and the OH concentration in the prepared glasses were found to affect the immiscibility temperatures, and the magnitude of the maximum temperature increase was also a function of the sodium oxide concentration. It is suggested that the variation in thermodynamic behavior may be caused by the structural arrangement attained by the OH groups during the gel condensation process, which in turn affects the extent of hydrogen bonding to nonbridging oxygen ions.

  7. From Euclid as Textbook to the Giovanni Gentile Reform (1867-1923): Problems, Methods and Debates in Mathematics Teaching in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacardi, Livia

    2006-01-01

    The earliest legislation aimed to give comprehensive organization to the Italian education system was the Casati law, from the name of the then Minister for Education Gabrio Casati who drafted it. Promulgated by King Vittorio Emanuele II on 13 November 1859, the new law was designed to reorganize the school system in Piedmont and Lombardy, and was…

  8. Selective recovery of molybdenum from spent HDS catalyst using oxidative soda ash leach/carbon adsorption method.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Ho; Mohapatra, D; Reddy, B Ramachandra

    2006-11-16

    The petroleum refining industry makes extensive use of hydroprocessing catalysts. These catalysts contain environmentally critical and economically valuable metals such as Mo, V, Ni and Co. In the present study, a simple hydrometallurgical processing of spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst for the recovery of molybdenum using sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide mixture was investigated. Recovery of molybdenum was largely dependent on the concentrations of Na2CO3 and H2O2 in the reaction medium, which in turn controls the pH of leach liquor and the presence of Al and Ni as impurities. Under the optimum leaching conditions (40 g L(-1) Na2CO3, 6 vol.% H2O2, room temperature, 1h) about 85% recovery of Mo was achieved. The leach liquor was processed by the carbon adsorption method, which selectively adsorbs Mo at pH around 0.75. Desorption of Mo was selective at 15 vol.% NH4OH. With a single stage contact, it was found possible to achieve >99%, adsorption and desorption efficiency. Using this method, recovery of molybdenum as MoO3 product of 99.4% purity was achieved. PMID:16860466

  9. Flocculation of wheat straw soda lignin by hemoglobin and chicken blood: Effects of cationic polymer or calcium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flocculation can be used to separate non-sulfonated lignin from base hydrolyzed biomass. In the industrial process, the lignin is isolated by filtration and washed with water. Some of the lignin is lost in the wash water, and flocculation can be used to recover this lignin. Several ways of enhanc...

  10. When Soda Is a Social Justice Issue: Design and Documentation of a Participatory Action Research Project with Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, James

    2015-01-01

    Schools are increasingly seen as having a promising role to play in reducing adverse health and wellness outcomes among young people. This paper uses a collaborative action research approach to examine the effects of one school's efforts to change its students' eating habits by implementing a "junk-food free campus." By engaging school…

  11. Spatial and Temporal Patterns in the Microbial Diversity of a Meromictic Soda Lake in Washington State▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriu, Pedro A.; Pinkart, Holly C.; Peyton, Brent M.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2008-01-01

    The microbial community diversity and composition of meromictic Soap Lake were studied using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The water column and sediments were sampled monthly for a year. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed an increase in diversity with depth for both groups. Late-summer samples harbored the highest prokaryotic diversity, and the bacteria exhibited less seasonal variability than the archaea. Most-probable-number assays targeting anaerobic microbial guilds were performed to compare summer and fall samples. In both seasons, the anoxic samples appeared to be dominated by lactate-oxidizing sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. High numbers of lactate- and acetate-oxidizing iron-reducing bacteria, as well as fermentative microorganisms, were also found, whereas the numbers of methanogens were low or methanogens were undetectable. The bacterial community composition of summer and fall samples was also assessed by constructing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. A total of 508 sequences represented an estimated >1,100 unique operational taxonomic units, most of which were from the monimolimnion, and the summer samples were more diverse than the fall samples (Chao1 = 530 and Chao1 = 295, respectively). For both seasons, the mixolimnion sequences were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, and the chemocline and monimolimnion libraries were dominated by members of the low-G+C-content group, followed by the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group; the mixolimnion sediments contained sequences related to uncultured members of the Chloroflexi and the CFB group. Community overlap and phylogenetic analyses, however, not only demonstrated that there was a high degree of spatial turnover but also suggested that there was a degree of temporal variability due to differences in the members and structures of the communities. PMID:18552187

  12. Composition of the Rex Chert and associated rocks of the Permian Phosphoria Formation: Soda Springs area, SE Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; McIntyre, Brandie; Perkins, Robert B.; Piper, David Z.; Evans, James

    2002-01-01

    This study, one in a series, reports bulk chemical and mineralogical compositions, as well as petrographic and outcrop descriptions of rocks collected from three measured outcrop sections of the Rex Chert member of the Phosphoria Formation in SE Idaho. The three measured sections were chosen from ten outcrops of Rex Chert that were described in the field. The Rex Chert overlies the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation, the source of phosphate ore in the region. Rex Chert removed as overburden comprises part of the material disposed in waste-rock piles during phosphate mining. It has been proposed that the chert be used to cap and isolate waste piles, thereby inhibiting the leaching of potentially toxic elements into the environment. It is also used to surface roads in the mining district. The rock samples studied here constitute a set of individual chert beds that are representative of each stratigraphic section sampled. The informally named cherty shale member that overlies the Rex Chert in measured section 1 was also described and sampled. The upper Meade Peak and the transition zone to the Rex Chert were described and sampled in section 7. The cherts are predominantly spicularite composed of granular and mosaic quartz, and sponge spicules, with various but minor amounts of other fossils and detrital grains. The cherty shale member and transition rocks between the Meade Peak and Rex Chert are siliceous siltstones and argillaceous cherts with ghosts of sponge spicules and somewhat more detrital grains than the chert. The overwhelmingly dominant mineral is quartz, although carbonate beds are rare in each section and are composed predominantly of calcite and dolomite in addition to quartz. Feldspar, mica, clay minerals, calcite, dolomite, and carbonate fluorapatite are minor to trace minerals in the chert. The mean concentrations of oxides and elements in the Rex Chert and the cherty shale member are dominated by SiO2, which averages 94.6%. Organic-carbon contents are generally very low in the chert, but are up to 1.8 wt. % in cherty shale member samples and up to 3.3% in samples from the transition between the Meade Peak and Rex Chert. Likewise, phosphate (P2O5) is generally low in the chert, but can be up to 3.1% in individual beds. Selenium concentrations in Rex Chert and cherty shale member samples vary from Q-mode factors are interpreted to represent the following rock and mineral components: chert-silica component consisting of Si (± Ba); phosphorite-phosphate component composed of P, Ca, As, Y, V, Cr, Sr, and La (± Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Li, Se, Nd, Hg); shale component composed of Al, Na, Zr, K, Ba, Li, and organic C (± Ti, Mg, Se, Ni, Fe, Sr, V, Mn, Zn); carbonate component (dolomite, calcite, silicified carbonates) composed of carbonate C, Mg, Ca, and Si (± Mn); tentatively organic matter-hosted elements (and/or sulfide-sulfate phases) composed of Cu (± organic C, Zn, Mn Si, Ni, Hg, and Li). Selenium shows a dominant association with the shale component, but correlations and Qmode factors also indicate that organic matter (within the shale component) and carbonate fluorapatite may host a portion of the Se. Consideration of larger numbers of factors in Qmode analysis indicates that native Se (a factor containing Se (± Ba)) may also comprise a minor component of the Se compliment.

  13. Assessment of spectroscopic properties of erbium ions in a soda-lime silicate glass after silver sodium exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasera, A.; Ferrari, M.; Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Pelli, S.; Portales, H.; Zheng, J.; Righini, G. C.

    2005-10-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Ag/Er co-doped thin plates of silicate glass were investigated with the aim of assessing the effective role of silver as a sensitizer for erbium. Additive heat treatments in air at different temperatures were performed on both a silver-exchanged and a silver-free plate in order to promote the formation of silver nanoparticles in the former and to refer to the later in the spectroscopic characterization. Absorption as well as photoluminescence and lifetime measurements in the region of the 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition of the Er3+ ion were performed; excitation wavelengths in the range from 360 to 750 nm were used. Enhancement of the Er3+ luminescence at 1.53 μm was observed when the excitation wavelength was in the blue region. This spectral range typically coincides with the excitation energy of the surface plasmon resonance of nanometer-sized spherical silver particles.

  14. Spirochaeta Americana sp. Nov., A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochaete Isolated from Soda Mona Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microns. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 C (optimum 37 C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3 % NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG1(sup T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(sup T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(sup T) revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7 %. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(sup T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC 13AA-392(sup T) = DSM 14872(sup T)).

  15. Spirochaeta Americana Sp. Nov., A new Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The Gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.2 - 0.22 X 8-15 microns. Growth was observed over the following ranges: temperature 10 C to 44 C; optimum +37 C; NaCl concentration 2 - 12 % (w/v); optimum NaCl3 % and pH 8 - 10.5; optimum pH 9.5. The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. The main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain ASpG(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, and rifampin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%, genome size is 2.98 x l0(exp 9) Daltons, Tm of the genomic DNA is 68 +/- 2 C, and DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Spirocheta alkalica Strain Z-7491(sup T), exhibited 48.7% homology. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  16. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  17. Laser marking on soda-lime glass by laser-induced backside wet etching with two-beam interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazumi, Tomoka; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    For crack-free marking of glass materials, a beam-scanning laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) process by a beam spot with a fine periodic structure was examined. The fine periodic structure was produced within a beam spot by means of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer incorporated to the optical setup for the beam-scanning LIBWE. A fine structure with a period of 9 µm was observed within the microstructures with a diameter of ca. 40 µm fabricated by a laser shot under double-beam irradiation, and they could be homogeneously fabricated within an area of 800  ×  800 µm. The area filled with the microstructures, including fine periodic structures, could be observed in high contrast under a diffuse, on-axis illumination that was used in commercial QR code readers.

  18. Evaluation of the halophyte Salsola soda as an alternative crop for saline soils high in selenium and boron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salinization is one important factor contributing to land degradation, which affects agricultural production and environmental quality, especially in the West side of central California. When salinization is combined with a natural contamination of trace elements (i.e., Se and B) in arid and semi-ar...

  19. Alkalitalea saponilacus gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately anaerobic, alkaliphilic, xylanolytic bacterium from a meromictic soda lake.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisuo; Chen, Shulin

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic, motile, slender, flexible rod, designated SC/BZ-SP2(T), was isolated from mixed alkaline water and sediment of Soap Lake, Washington State, USA. Strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) formed salmon to pink colonies and was alkaliphilic. The isolate grew at pH(35 °C) 7.5-10.5 (optimum pH(35 °C) 9.7), at 8-40 °C (optimum 35-37 °C) and with 0.35-1.38 M Na(+) (optimum 0.44-0.69 M Na(+)). The isolate utilized L-arabinose, D-ribose, D-xylose, D-fructose, D-mannose, D-galactose, cellobiose, maltose, sucrose, trehalose, sorbitol, xylan, malate and yeast extract as carbon and energy sources; best growth was observed with L-arabinose, cellobiose, maltose and trehalose. The major fermentation products from beechwood xylan were propionate and acetate. The dominant fatty acids were iso-C(15:0), anteiso-C(15:0), iso-C(17:0) 3-OH, C(17:0) 3-OH and C(15:0) 3-OH. The cell-wall sugars were ribose, xylose, galactose and glucose. Thiosulfate and sulfite could be reduced to sulfide. The genomic DNA G+C content was 39.5 ± 0.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) belonged to the family Marinilabiliaceae of the order Bacteroidales, class Bacteroidia. The most closely related strains were Alkaliflexus imshenetskii Z-7010(T) (91.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Marinilabilia salmonicolor Cy s1(T) (91.0%) and Anaerophaga thermohalophila Fru22(T) (90.4%). On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic features, strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) represents a novel species in a new genus of the family Marinilabiliaceae, for which the name Alkalitalea saponilacus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Alkalitalea saponilacus is SC/BZ-SP2(T) (=ATCC BAA-2172(T) =DSM 24412(T)). PMID:22199219

  20. Histological response of soda-lime glass-ceramic bactericidal rods implanted in the jaws of beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Moya, José S; Martínez, Arturo; López-Píriz, Roberto; Guitián, Francisco; Díaz, Luis A; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Cabal, Belén; Sket, Federico; Fernández-García, Elisa; Tomsia, Antoni P; Torrecillas, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections remain a major clinical challenge. Implant infections very often require complicated revision procedures that are troublesome to patients and costly to the healthcare system. Innovative approaches to tackle infections are urgently needed. We investigated the histological response of novel free P2O5 glass-ceramic rods implanted in the jaws of beagle dogs. Due to the particular percolated morphology of this glass-ceramic, the dissolution of the rods in the animal body environment and the immature bone formation during the fourth months of implantation maintained the integrity of the glass-ceramic rod. No clinical signs of inflammation took place in any of the beagle dogs during the four months of implantation. This new glass-ceramic biomaterial with inherent bactericidal and fungicidal properties can be considered as an appealing candidate for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27515388

  1. Geohydrology, aqueous geochemistry, and thermal regime of the Soda Lakes and Upsal Hogback geothermal systems, Churchill County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olmsted, F.H.; Welch, A.H.; Van Denburgh, A.S.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    A flow-routing model of the upper Schoharie Creek basin, New York, was developed and used to simulate high flows at the inlet of the Blenheim-Gilboa Reservoir. The flows from Schoharie Creek at Prattsville, the primary source of flow data in the basin, and tributary flows from the six minor basins downstream, are combined and routed along the 9.7 mile reach of the Schoharie Creek between Prattsville and the reservoir inlet. Data from five historic floods were used for model calibration and four for verification. The accuracy of the model as measured by the difference between simulated and observed total flow volumes, is within 14 percent. Results indicate that inflows to the Blenheim-Gilboa Reservoir can be predicted approximately 2 hours in advance. One of the historical floods was chosen for additional model testing to assess a hypothetical real-time model application. Total flow-volume errors ranged from 30.2 percent to -9.2 percent. Alternative methods of obtaining hydrologic data for model input are presented for use in the event that standard forms of hydrologic data are unavailable. (USGS)

  2. Histological response of soda-lime glass-ceramic bactericidal rods implanted in the jaws of beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Moya, José S.; Martínez, Arturo; López-Píriz, Roberto; Guitián, Francisco; Díaz, Luis A.; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Cabal, Belén; Sket, Federico; Fernández-García, Elisa; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Torrecillas, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections remain a major clinical challenge. Implant infections very often require complicated revision procedures that are troublesome to patients and costly to the healthcare system. Innovative approaches to tackle infections are urgently needed. We investigated the histological response of novel free P2O5 glass-ceramic rods implanted in the jaws of beagle dogs. Due to the particular percolated morphology of this glass-ceramic, the dissolution of the rods in the animal body environment and the immature bone formation during the fourth months of implantation maintained the integrity of the glass-ceramic rod. No clinical signs of inflammation took place in any of the beagle dogs during the four months of implantation. This new glass-ceramic biomaterial with inherent bactericidal and fungicidal properties can be considered as an appealing candidate for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27515388

  3. Comparative studies between theoretical and experimental of elastic properties and irradiation effects of soda lime glasses doped with neodymium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bootjomchai, C.

    2015-05-01

    A comparative studies on the theoretical and experimental values of elastic moduli of (90 - x) RWG -(10)Na2O -(x)Nd2O3 glass system, where RWG is recycled window glass and x is 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 mol%, was investigated. The radiation effects on structural properties and elastic moduli were evaluated by measuring the ultrasonic velocities. In addition, the FTIR spectra were measured to investigate the effects of irradiation on the structure of the glass. Moreover, the theoretical bond compression model was used to confirm the obtained results from the experiments. The results show that evidently changes in the structure of the glass depend on the concentration of the neodymium oxide and gamma irradiation. Furthermore, the experimental elastic moduli are in good agreement with the theoretical values.

  4. 40 CFR 63.864 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... kiln, sulfite combustion unit, or kraft or soda smelt dissolving tank equipped with a wet scrubber must... opacity; (ii) For a new or existing kraft or soda recovery furnace, kraft or soda smelt dissolving tank... quarterly period; (iii) For a new or existing kraft or soda recovery furnace, kraft or soda smelt...

  5. 40 CFR 63.864 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... kiln, sulfite combustion unit, or kraft or soda smelt dissolving tank equipped with a wet scrubber must... opacity; (ii) For a new or existing kraft or soda recovery furnace, kraft or soda smelt dissolving tank... quarterly period; (iii) For a new or existing kraft or soda recovery furnace, kraft or soda smelt...

  6. 40 CFR 63.864 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... kiln, sulfite combustion unit, or kraft or soda smelt dissolving tank equipped with a wet scrubber must... opacity; (ii) For a new or existing kraft or soda recovery furnace, kraft or soda smelt dissolving tank... quarterly period; (iii) For a new or existing kraft or soda recovery furnace, kraft or soda smelt...

  7. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sal soda poisoning; Soda ash poisoning; Disodium salt poisoning; Carbonic acid poisoning; Washing soda poisoning ... have symptoms. In this rare situation, long-term effects, even death, are possible if you do not ...

  8. The Arsenic Cycle in Searles Lake, California: An Arsenic-Rich, Salt-Saturated Soda Lake. II. Isolation of Arsenic-Metabolizing Microbes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Stolz, J. F.; Langley, S.; Beveridge, T. J.; Kulp, T. R.; Oremland, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    The motivation for isolating arsenic-metabolizing prokaryotes from Searles Lake was to characterize the physiology of microbes that can cope simultaneously with at least 3 environmental extremes: saturating salt concentration, high pH, and high dissolved inorganic arsenic. A secondary motivation was to find extremely halophilc Archaea that could respire As(V), as this has only been reported for the Crenarchaea. Enrichment cultures of arsenate [As(V)]-respirers were established by inoculating Searles Lake mud into an anaerobic, alkaline (pH = 9.8) artificial medium containing 346 g/L dissolved salts, with lactate as the electron donor and As(V) as the electron acceptor. After about 6 months of bi-weekly transfers, the enrichment was purified by serial dilution, with the highest growth-positive dilution tube exhibiting motile cells having uniform morphology (curved rods). This culture, strain SLAS-1, grew by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus carbon dioxide while reducing As(V) to arsenite [As(III)]. The doubling time was 48 hours at 346 g/L salinity, and nearly equivalent growth rates were observed over a salinity range of 200 to 346 g/l, with no growth evident below 200 g/L. The pH range was 8.5 to 10, with an optimum at 9.5. Strain SLAS-1 has an unusual motility that can be characterized as a "fish-like" swimming motion. Thin section electron micrographs revealed the presence of an internal cytoplasmic filament that runs the full length of the microorganism. We suggest that this filament may be involved in cellular motility. However, taxonomic classification of SLAS-1 made by 16S rRNA gene sequences aligned it in the order Haloanaerobacteriales of the Domain Bacteria. In a further effort to isolate haloalkaliphilic Archaea, a similar enrichment strategy was employed as above, but cell-wall antibiotics were added to the medium to discourage the growth of Bacteria. An enrichment culture, designated Serl-Ab, was established that oxidized lactate to acetate plus carbon dioxide. Preliminary evidence suggests that the culture consists of a lactate-oxidizing sulfate-reducer growing in synthrophy with a chemoautotrophic, sulfide-oxidizing As(V)-respirer. Terminal restriction length polymorphism analysis has indicated the presence of both bacterial and archaeal components in the Serl-Ab enrichment, although it is not yet known which is responsible for the observed As(V)-reduction and sulfate-reduction. Efforts are ongoing to resolve Serl-Ab by using classical isolation procedures for a heterotrophic sulfate reducer and an autotrophic As(V)-respirer. In addition, new efforts are being undertaken to isolate hydrogen-oxidizing As(V)-respirers, as well as aerobic As(III)-oxidizers from the extreme environment of Searles Lake.

  9. Inverse gas chromatographic evaluation of the influence of soy protein on the binding of selected butter flavor compounds in a wheat soda cracker system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiaoxuan; Lee, Soo-Yeun; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2006-07-26

    Binding of selected volatile butter flavor compounds to wheat vs soy-containing crackers was studied by inverse gas chromatography (IGC), sensory evaluation, and equilibrium sorption measurements. IGC data showed greater binding of gamma-butyrolactone and butyric acid to both types of crackers than either diacetyl or hexanal, possibly due to the involvement of stronger binding forces such as hydrogen bonding and even ionic forces in the case of butyric acid. The presence of soy proteins did not affect binding of diacetyl and hexanal but increased binding of strongly interacting compounds gamma-butyrolactone and especially butyric acid, probably through enhanced matrix polarity. In agreement with the IGC data, sensory evaluation results showed that the headspace aroma intensities were similar between the two diacetyl-flavored crackers, while they significantly differed between the butyric acid-flavored crackers. In addition, equilibrium sorption measurement data showed that binding of butyric acid was higher in the soy-containing cracker, but sorption of diacetyl to the two crackers did not significantly differ. PMID:16848540

  10. Structural characterization of amphiphilic siderophores produced by a soda lake isolate, Halomonas sp. SL01, reveals cysteine-, phenylalanine- and proline-containing head groups.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Luis O'mar Serrano; Schwarz, Benjamin; Richards, Abigail M

    2015-11-01

    Soap Lake, located in Washington State, is a naturally occurring saline and alkaline lake. Several organisms inhabiting this lake have been identified as producers of siderophores that are unique in structure. Bacterial isolates, enriched from Soap Lake sediment and water samples, were screened for siderophore production using both the chrome azurol S (CAS) agar plate and liquid methods. Bacterial isolate Halomonas sp. SL01 was found to produce relatively high concentrations of siderophores in liquid medium (up to 40 µM). Siderophores from the isolate were separated from the culture supernatant using solid phase extraction and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Siderophore structure was determined using LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC. Two distinct new families of amphiphilic siderophores were produced by isolate SL01. All siderophores ranged in size from 989 to 1096 atomic mass units and consisted of a conserved peptidic head group (per family), which coordinates iron, coupled to fatty acid moieties. The fatty acyl moieties were C10-C14 in length and some with hydroxyl substitutions at the third α position. These siderophores resembled amphiphilic aquachelin siderophores produced by Halomonas aquamarina strain DS40M3, a marine bacterium as well as siderophores from isolate Halomonas sp. SL28 that was found to produce amphiphilic siderophores. Bacteria thriving under saline and alkaline conditions are capable of producing unique siderophores resembling those produced by microbes inhabiting marine environments. PMID:26439615

  11. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-03-15

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [Spanish] Una prueba de campo fue conducida para evaluar la especificidad del escarabajo suramericano defoliador Gratiana boliviana Spaeth para control biologico de Solanum viarum Dunal en los Estados Unidos. La prueba con berenjena se realizo en el campo experimental de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y una parcela control con S. viarum fue establecida a 40 km. Cien escarabajos adultos fueron liberados en cada parcela al inicio del experimento durante la fase vegetativa, y cuarenta escarabajos adicionales fueron liberados en la parcela de berenjena durante la floracion. Todas las plantas en cada parcela fueron inspeccionadas dos veces a la semana y el numero de adultos, larvas, y posturas fueron registrados. Resultados indicaron un casi completo rechazo de la berenjena por G. boliviana. Ningun dano visible de defoliacion en la berenjena fue detectado. Las pruebas concluyeron cuando las plantas de berenjena alcazaron su madurez o fueron severamente danadas por mosca blanca y acaros. Resultados corroboran previas pruebas de especificidad en laboratorio/cuarentena que indican que la berenjena no es un hospedero de G. boliviana y que la posibilidad de llegar a ser una plaga de este cultivo es muy remota. Gratiana boliviana fue aprobado para ser liberado en el campo en mayo del 2003. Ningun dano ha sido observado hasta la fecha a plantas no blanco. (author)

  12. DFT modeling of 45S5 and 77S soda-lime phospho-silicate glass surfaces: clues on different bioactivity mechanism.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Enrico; Pedone, Alfonso; Ugliengo, Piero; Corno, Marta

    2013-05-14

    The reactivity of bioglasses, which is related to the dissolution of cations and orthosilicate groups in the physiological fluid, strongly depends on the key structural features present at the glass surfaces. On the basis of the composition and the synthetic routes employed to make the glass, surfaces with very different characteristics and thus presenting different mechanisms of dissolution can be observed. In this paper, the surface structures of two very different bioglass compositions, namely 45S5 (46.1 SiO2, 24.4 Na2O, 26.9 CaO, and 2.6 P2O5 mol %) and 77S (80.0 SiO2, 16.0 CaO, and 4.0 P2O5 mol %), have been investigated by means of periodic DFT calculations based on a PBE functional and localized Gaussian basis set as encoded in the CRYSTAL code. Our calculations show that the two glass surfaces differ by the relative amount of key structural sites such as NBOs, exposed ions, orthosilicate units, and small rings. We have demonstrated how the number of these sites affects the surface stability and reactivity (bioactivity). PMID:23594027

  13. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of Tropical Soda Apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An open-field experiment was conducted to asses the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buen...

  14. Black Feminist Thought: Implications for a Transformative Women's Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Shawn D.

    1996-01-01

    The history of black women's social reform work remains unrecognized in the academy and the general culture. The contributions of courageous black feminist authors such as bell hooks, Nikki Giovanni, and Audre Lorde are important for all students. Hooks works with educators to denounce sexist and racist stereotypes, Giovanni stresses the concept…

  15. Exercise and Bone Health for Women: The Skeletal Risk of Overtraining

    MedlinePlus

    ... be dieting often drink diet sodas rather than milk. Yet, milk and other dairy products are a good source ... ingredient for healthy bones. Drinking sodas instead of milk can be a problem, especially during the teen ...

  16. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  17. Sweeteners - sugars

    MedlinePlus

    ... soda. However, popular "vitamin-type" waters, sports drinks, coffee drinks, and energy drinks also contain a lot ... of regular soda, "vitamin-type" water, sports drinks, coffee drinks, and energy drinks. Eat less candy and ...

  18. What Makes the Fizz?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimkanin, John

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity to answer the question, "What makes soda pop fizz?". Lists necessary materials and describes the procedure for making soda pop. Discusses the fermentation process and how it occurs. (NB)

  19. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  20. 40 CFR 98.297 - Records that must be retained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... production of soda ash (tons) (2) Monthly consumption of trona or liquid alkaline feedstock (tons) (3) Annual... technical basis for these estimates must be provided. (5) If you produce soda ash using the liquid...