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1

Bench-Scale Filtration Testing in Support of the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP testing program specifies that bench-scale testing is to be performed in support of specific operations, including filtration, caustic leaching, and oxidative leaching.

Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2009-09-28

2

SAES(R) ST909 Bench Scale Methane Cracking Tests  

SciTech Connect

Bench Scale methane cracking tests have been completed using a stack of ten whole SAES(R) St909 pellets - a 6 gram sample size. Methane was found to be the most difficult impurity to process and can impact diffuser operation.

Klein, J.E.

2001-09-25

3

Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report  

SciTech Connect

A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird{reg_sign} sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method.

BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

2000-12-06

4

Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses the utility of conducting bench-scale testing on selected bioretention media and media amendments to validate hydrologic properties before installing media and amendments in larger pilot- or full-scale rain garden installations. The bench-scale study conclude...

5

Bench Scale Test of Absorption Slurry-ice Maker  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Slurry ice system is desirable as cold heat source for air conditioning, because it requires less conveyance power or less pipe size. On the other hand, recently absorption refrigerator is reevaluated because it can utilize various types of waste heat and it does not use fluorocarbon refrigerant. But it had been regarded to be difficult to make ice by absorption refrigerator because the refrigerant is water. However making slurry ice is possible, of cource, if the slurry ice generated by partial freezing of water is continuously taken away from the evaporator. This method was certified experimentally with a bench scale model. For ice making continuously, ice had not to be frozen stiff at water surface or inside wall of the evaporator. Then refrigerant water in the evaporator was raised swirl flow. And inside wall of the evaporator was finished by water repellent coating, and heated from outside wall. This slurry ice was adaptable to hydraulic transportation, because ice was needle crystal with about 5 mm length and ice temperature was 0°C.

Sasao, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

6

Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design - slides  

EPA Science Inventory

The oral presentation will be at the EWRI International LID Conference in San Francisco, on April 11-14, 2010. The slides discuss the utility of conducting bench-scale testing on selected bioretention media and media amendments to validate hydrologic properties before installing...

7

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01

8

The Application of a Genetic Algorithm to Estimate Material Properties for Fire Modeling from Bench-Scale Fire Test Data   

E-print Network

A methodology based on an automated optimization technique that uses a genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to estimate the material properties needed for CFD-based fire growth modeling from bench-scale fire test data. ...

Lautenberger, Chris; Rein, Guillermo; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

9

Electrolytic Reduction of Spent Oxide Fuel – Bench-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests were performed to demonstrate the electrolytic reduction of spent light water reactor fuel at bench-scale in a hot cell at the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex (formerly Argonne National Laboratory - West). The process involves the conversion of oxide fuel to metal by electrolytic means, which would then enable subsequent separation and recovery of actinides via existing electrometallurgical technologies, i.e., electrorefining. Four electrolytic reduction runs were performed at bench scale using ~500 ml of molten LiCl -- 1 wt% Li2O electrolyte at 650 ºC. In each run, ~50 g of crushed spent oxide fuel was loaded into a permeable stainless steel basket and immersed into the electrolyte as the cathode. A spiral wound platinum wire was immersed into the electrolyte as the anode. When a controlled electric current was conducted through the anode and cathode, the oxide fuel was reduced to metal in the basket and oxygen gas was evolved at the anode. Salt samples were extracted before and after each electrolytic reduction run and analyzed for fuel and fission product constituents. The fuel baskets following each run were sectioned and sampled, revealing an extent of uranium oxide reduction in excess of 98%.

S. D. Herrmann; S. X. Li; M. F. Simpson

2005-10-01

10

Performance Study of Protective Clothing against Hot Water Splashes: from Bench Scale Test to Instrumented Manikin Test.  

PubMed

Hot liquid hazards existing in work environments are shown to be a considerable risk for industrial workers. In this study, the predicted protection from fabric was assessed by a modified hot liquid splash tester. In these tests, conditions with and without an air spacer were applied. The protective performance of a garment exposed to hot water spray was investigated by a spray manikin evaluation system. Three-dimensional body scanning technique was used to characterize the air gap size between the protective clothing and the manikin skin. The relationship between bench scale test and manikin test was discussed and the regression model was established to predict the overall percentage of skin burn while wearing protective clothing. The results demonstrated strong correlations between bench scale test and manikin test. Based on these studies, the overall performance of protective clothing against hot water spray can be estimated on the basis of the results of the bench scale hot water splashes test and the information of air gap size entrapped in clothing. The findings provide effective guides for the design and material selection while developing high performance protective clothing. PMID:25349371

Lu, Yehu; Song, Guowen; Wang, Faming

2015-03-01

11

Synthetic lightweight aggregate from cool water slag: Bench-scale confirmation tests  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential for production of synthetic lightweight aggregate (SLA) from a Texaco coal gasification solid residue. The objective of the project was to develop a replacement for conventional lightweight aggregates typically derived from expanded clays and shales or natural lightweight aggregates. The sequence of tests performed to develop SLA from slag began with the crushing of samples of slag, followed by either extrusion or pelletization. The level of clay binder required for sufficient aggregate strength was evaluated. Using a tube furnace, expansion characteristics were studied as a function of temperature and residence time. Next, a large batch of SLA was produced in a muffle furnace and used to form concrete test cylinders. The unit weight of the resultant concrete was 105 lb/ft{sup 3}, with a compressive strength of 3100 psi, which meets the requirements specified in ASTM C 330 for lightweight aggregate of a comparable density. When the same sequence of tests was performed using a slag from which the bulk of the char had been removed, the concrete test cylinders showed an improved relationship between strength and density. Based on the results of bench-scale tests and the similarity to conventional LWA production, the conceptual design of an SLA processing plant was formulated. A comparative estimate of operating costs was prepared by analyzing data from plants using clays and shales to produce lightweight aggregates. 24 refs., 15 figs., 17 tabs.

Choudhry, V.; Hadley, S.R. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA))

1990-05-01

12

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: BENCH-SCALE TESTING OF PHOTOLYSIS, CHEMICAL OXIDATION AND BIODEGRADATION OF PCB CONTAMINATED SOILS AND PHOTOLYSIS OF TCDD CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

This report presents the results of bench-scale testing on degradation of 2,3,7,8-TCDD using W photolysis, and PCB degradation using UV photolysis, chemical oxidation and biological treatment. Bench-scale tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of a two-phase detoxifi...

13

100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

Field, J.G.

1994-06-10

14

Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with microcel. Final report  

SciTech Connect

It was the purpose of this investigation to test a new fine coal cleaning system, in which a coal is cleaned first by column flotation to remove primarily ash-forming minerals and then by an enhanced gravity separation technique to remove the pyrite remaining in the flotation product. Of the various column flotation technologies developed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy, the Microcel{sup TM} flotation column was chosen because it is being used commercially in the US coal industry, particularly by low-sulfur coal producers. Of the various enhanced gravity separation technologies used in minerals industry, Multi-Gravity Separator (MGS) was chosen because it shows promise for pyrite rejection from fine coal streams containing a wide range of particle sizes. The bench-scale tests were conducted using three different circuit configurations, i.e.; Microcel{sup TM} column alone; MGS alone; and Microcel{sup Tm} and MGS in series. In general, high ash-rejections were achieved using Microcel{sup TM} column and an MGS unit in series, both the ash and pyritic sulfur rejections exceeded what can be achieved using either the Microcel{sup TM} column or the MGS unit alone, demonstrating a synergistic effect.

Luttrell, G.H.; Venkatraman, P.; Phillips, D.I.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Center for Coal and Minerals Processing, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1995-03-01

15

Bench-scale reactor tests of low-temperature, catalytic gasification of wet, industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale reactor tests are under way at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for to a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of a continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The catalyst is nickel metal on an inert support. Typical results show that feedstocks such as solutions of 2% para-cresol or 5% and 10% lactose in water or cheese whey can be processed to >99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) at a rate of up to 2 L/hr. The estimated residence time is less than 5 min at 360{degree}C and 3000 psig, not including 1 to 2 min required in the preheating zone of the reactor. The liquid hourly space velocity has been varied from 1.8 to 2.9 L feedstock/L catalyst/hr depending on the feedstock. The product fuel gas contains 40% to 55% methane, 35% to 50% carbon dioxide, and 5% to 10% hydrogen with as much as 2% ethane, but less than 0.1% ethylene or carbon monoxide, and small amounts of higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics amounting to less than 500 mg/L COD. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J.

1990-04-01

16

Results of bench-scale plasma system testing in support of the Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) is a high-temperature process that destroys hazardous organic components and stabilizes the radioactive components and hazardous metals in a leach-resistant vitreous slag waste form. The PHP technology development program is targeted at mixed waste that cannot be easily treated by conventional means. For example, heterogeneous debris, which may contain hazardous organics, toxic metals, and radionuclides, is difficult to characterize and cannot be treated with conventional thermal, chemical, or physical treatment methods. A major advantage of the PHP over other plasma processes is its ability to separate nonradioactive, non-hazardous metals from the non-metallic and radioactive components which are contained in the vitreous slag. The overall PHP program involves the design, fabrication, and operation of test hardware to demonstrate and certify that the PHP concept is viable for DOE waste treatment. The program involves bench-scale testing of PHP equipment in radioactive service, as well as pilot-scale demonstration of the PHP concept using nonradioactive, surrogate test materials. The fate of secondary waste streams is an important consideration for any technology considered for processing mixed waste. The main secondary waste stream generated by the PHP is flyash captured by the fabric- filter baghouse. The PHP concept is that flyash generated by the process can, to a large extent, be treated by processing this secondary waste stream in the PHP. Prior to the work presented in the paper, however, the PHP project has not quantitatively demonstrated the ability to treat PHP generated flyash. A major consideration is the quantity of radionuclides and RCRA-regulated metals in the flyash that can be retained the resultant waste form.

Leatherman, G.L.; Cornelison, C. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frank, S. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-10-01

17

Bench scale testing of low-NO/sub x/ LBG combustors  

SciTech Connect

The high efficiencies obtained in a combined gas-turbine/steam-turbine power cycle burning low Btu gas (LBG) make it a potentially attractive alternative to the high sulfur emitting direct coal-fired steam cycle. This paper examines the pressurized bench scale performance of reactors previously demonstrated to produce low NO/sub x/ emissions in atmospheric laboratory scale experiments 16 refs.

Clark, W.D.; Folsom, B.A.; Seeker, W.R.; Courtney, C.W.

1982-01-01

18

SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford tank farms contain approximately 57 million gallons of wastes, most of which originated during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel to produce plutonium for defense purposes. DOE intends to pre-treat the tank waste to separate the waste into a high level fraction, that will be vitrified and disposed of in a national repository as high-level waste (HLW), and a low-activity waste (LAW) fraction that will be immobilized for on-site disposal at Hanford. The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the focal point for the treatment of Hanford tank waste. However, the WTP lacks the capacity to process all of the LAW within the regulatory required timeframe. Consequently, a supplemental LAW immobilization process will be required to immobilize the remainder of the LAW. One promising supplemental technology is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) to produce a sodium-alumino-silicate (NAS) waste form. The NAS waste form is primarily composed of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}), sodalite (Nas[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}Cl{sub 2}), and nosean (Na{sub 8}[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}SO{sub 4}). Semivolatile anions such as pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) and volatiles such as iodine as iodide (I{sup -}) are expected to be entrapped within the mineral structures, thereby immobilizing them (Janzen 2008). Results from preliminary performance tests using surrogates, suggests that the release of semivolatile radionuclides {sup 99}Tc and volatile {sup 129}I from granular NAS waste form is limited by Nosean solubility. The predicted release of {sup 99}Tc from the NAS waste form at a 100 meters down gradient well from the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) was found to be comparable to immobilized low-activity waste glass waste form in the initial supplemental LAW treatment technology risk assessment (Mann 2003). To confirm this hypothesis, DOE is funding a treatability study where three actual Hanford tank waste samples (containing both {sup 99}Tc and {sup 125}I) will be processed in Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) to form the mineral product, similar to the granular NAS waste form, that will then be subject to a number of waste form qualification tests. In previous tests, SRNL have demonstrated that the BSR product is chemically and physically equivalent to the FBSR product (Janzen 2005). The objective of this paper is to describe the sample selection, sample preparation, and environmental and regulatory considerations for treatability studies of the FBSR process using Hanford tank waste samples at the SNRL. The SNRL will process samples in its BSR. These samples will be decontaminated in the 222-S Laboratory to remove undissolved solids and selected radioisotopes to comply with Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping regulations and to ensure worker safety by limiting radiation exposure to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). These decontamination levels will also meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) definition of low activity waste (LAW). After the SNRL has processed the tank samples to a granular mineral form, SRNL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will conduct waste form testing on both the granular material and monoliths prepared from the granular material. The tests being performed are outlined in Appendix A.

DUNCAN JB

2010-08-19

19

Manganese removal during bench-scale biofiltration.  

PubMed

As biological manganese (Mn) removal becomes a more popular water treatment technology, there is still a large gap in understanding the key mechanisms and range of operational characteristics. This research aimed to expand on previous bench-scale experiments by directly comparing small filtration columns inoculated with indigenous biofilms from a Mn filtration plant and filtration columns inoculated with a liquid suspension of Leptothrix discophora SP-6. Batch tests found that in the absence of manganese oxidizing bacteria Mn was not removed by air alone, whereas a mixed population and Leptothrix strain achieved greater than 90% removal of Mn. The bench-scale biofiltration experiments found that biological filters can be inoculated with a pure culture of L. discophora SP-6 and achieve a similar removal of indigenous biofilm. While Mn oxidizing bacteria (MOB) seem to be necessary for the auto-catalytic nature of these biological filters, Mn removal is achieved with a combination of adsorption to Mn oxides and biological oxidation. Additionally, it was demonstrated that biological Mn removal is possible over a broader "field of activity" (e.g., Mn removal occurred at a pH level as low as 6.5) than has previously been reported. The ability of this treatment technology to work over a broader range of influent conditions allows for more communities to consider biological treatment as an option to remove Mn from their drinking water. PMID:18809196

Burger, Mark S; Mercer, Stephen S; Shupe, Gordon D; Gagnon, Graham A

2008-12-01

20

Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report 3, July--September, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventional coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data.

Anast, K.

1993-10-29

21

Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report 4, October--December, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventional coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data.

Anast, K.

1994-01-25

22

The stability of aerobic granular sludge treating municipal sludge deep dewatering filtrate in a bench scale sequencing batch reactor.  

PubMed

Inoculated with mature aerobic granular sludge in a sequencing batch reactor, gradually increasing the proportion of municipal sludge deep dewatering filtrate in influent, aerobic granular sludge was domesticated after 84 days and maintained its structure during the operation. The domesticated AGS was yellowish-brown, dense and irregular spherical shape, average size was 1.49 mm, water content and specific density were 98.13% and 1.0114, the SVI and settling velocity were 40 ml/g and 46.5m/h. After 38 days, NO3(-)-N accumulated obviously in the reactor as lack of carbon sources. When adding 1-3g solid CH3COONa at 4.5 and 5.5h of each cycle from the 57th day, the removal rate of TN rose to above 90% after 20 days, where effective COD removal and denitrification were realized in a single bioreactor. Finally, the removal rates of COD, TP, TN and NH4(+)-N were higher than 95%, 88%, 96% and 99%. PMID:25058300

Long, Bei; Yang, Chang-zhu; Pu, Wen-hong; Yang, Jia-kuan; Shi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jing; Bai, Jun; Zhou, Xuan-yue; Jiang, Guo-sheng; Li, Chun-yang; Liu, Fu-biao

2014-10-01

23

Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventional coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data. The project is divided into eight tasks which include design, construction, operation and testing, sample analysis, evaluation, and decommissioning. Coal will be received from three different mines and processed through the bench scale{backslash}e plant. Testing has been split into three phases: (1) Component Testing which will examine each of the major components independently, optimize, and compare performance to lab scale tests, (2) Integrated Testing will provide evaluation of the components operating as an integrated system, and (3) Extended Tests will utilize coal from each of the three mines to determine ash and sulfur removal on each candidate feedstock. Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for following tasks: project and test planning, and engineering and design.

Anast, K.

1993-07-23

24

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31

25

Crucible melts and bench-scale ISV (in situ vitrification) tests on simulated wastes in INEL (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) soils  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of eight crucible melt tests and three bench-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test that were performed on simulated metals/soils mixtures containing actual site soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The crucible melt and bench-scale ISV tests are a part of efforts by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assist the INEL in conducting a treatability study on ISV for application to the mixed waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area (SDA). The crucible melt tests were performed to evaluate the effect of various chemical additives and metal oxidation techniques on soil melting temperatures, melt viscosities, metals versus electrode oxidation potentials, and metals incorporation in the glass. The bench-scale ISV tests were performed to supplement the existing ISV data base with information on certain hazardous materials that have not been adequately evaluated in previous ISV tests. These materials included five EP toxicity metals, various volatile organic materials fixed in a cementitious matrix (including carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE)), and asbestos. In addition, the bench-scale test were used to evaluated the effect of the proposed chemical additive on ISV processing performance and product quality. 8 refs., 24 figs., 19 tabs.

Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Reimus, M.A.H.

1990-05-01

26

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: BENCH-SCALE TESTING OF PHOTOLYSIS, CHEMICAL OXIDATION, AND BIODEGRADATION OF PCB CONTAMINATED SOIL AND PHOTOLYSIS OF TCDD CONTAMINATED SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

Bench-scale tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of a two phase detoxification process that would have application to the treatment of soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). he first of the process w...

27

Pilot- and bench-scale testing of faecal indicator bacteria survival in marine beach sand near point sources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Aim: Factors affecting faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogen survival/persistence in sand remain largely unstudied. This work elucidates how biological and physical factors affect die-off in beach sand following sewage spills. Methods and Results: Solar disinfection with mechanical mixing was pilot-tested as a disinfection procedure after a large sewage spill in Los Angeles. Effects of solar exposure, mechanical mixing, predation and/or competition, season, and moisture were tested at bench scale. First-order decay constants for Escherichia coli ranged between -0??23 and -1??02 per day, and for enterococci between -0??5 and -1??0 per day. Desiccation was a dominant factor for E. coli but not enterococci inactivation. Effects of season were investigated through a comparison of experimental results from winter, spring, and fall. Conclusions: Moisture was the dominant factor controlling E. coli inactivation kinetics. Initial microbial community and sand temperature were also important factors. Mechanical mixing, common in beach grooming, did not consistently reduce bacterial levels. Significance and Impact of the Study: Inactivation rates are mainly dependent on moisture and high sand temperature. Chlorination was an effective disinfection treatment in sand microcosms inoculated with raw influent. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

Mika, K.B.; Imamura, G.; Chang, C.; Conway, V.; Fernandez, G.; Griffith, J.F.; Kampalath, R.A.; Lee, C.M.; Lin, C.-C.; Moreno, R.; Thompson, S.; Whitman, R.L.; Jay, J.A.

2009-01-01

28

Pilot- and bench-scale testing of faecal indicator bacteria survival in marine beach sand near point sources  

PubMed Central

Aim Factors affecting faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogen survival/persistence in sand remain largely unstudied. This work elucidates how biological and physical factors affect die-off in beach sand following sewage spills. Methods and Results Solar disinfection with mechanical mixing was pilot-tested as a disinfection procedure after a large sewage spill in Los Angeles. Effects of solar exposure, mechanical mixing, predation and/or competition, season, and moisture were tested at bench scale. First-order decay constants for Escherichia coli ranged between ?0·23 and ?·102 per day, and for enterococci between ?0·5 and ?1·0 per day. Desiccation was a dominant factor for E. coli but not enterococci inactivation. Effects of season were investigated through a comparison of experimental results from winter, spring, and fall. Conclusions Moisture was the dominant factor controlling E. coli inactivation kinetics. Initial microbial community and sand temperature were also important factors. Mechanical mixing, common in beach grooming, did not consistently reduce bacterial levels. Significance and Impact of the Study Inactivation rates are mainly dependent on moisture and high sand temperature. Chlorination was an effective disinfection treatment in sand microcosms inoculated with raw influent. PMID:19302327

Mika, K.B.; Imamura, G.; Chang, C.; Conway, V.; Fernandez, G.; Griffith, J.F.; Kampalath, R.A.; Lee, C.M.; Lin, C.-C.; Moreno, R.; Thompson, S.; Whitman, R.L.; Jay, J.A.

2014-01-01

29

Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with Microcel  

SciTech Connect

Work this quarter focused on the development of the engineering design specifications for the ET Test Circuit. Process flowsheets and detailed equipment specifications were finalized. Based on this information, bid packages were assembled and purchase orders were issued for all of the necessary process equipment. The design and procurement information is summarized in the ET Circuit Design Report submitted to the DOE's COR this quarter. Final drafts of the ET Circuit - System Safety Analysis, Nuclear Density Gauge - System Safety Analysis and Operating Manual/SOP were also completed and submitted to the COR this quarter. Preliminary characterization studies were also initiated this quarter. Tests were conducted to determine the grinding conditions required to achieve the desired particle size distributions for the characterization work. Flotation release analysis tests were conducted on both the Pittsburgh [number sign]8 and Illinois [number sign]6 seam coals as a function of grind size. The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install, and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining the Microcel and Multi-Gravity-Separator (MGS) technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column effectively removes ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS efficiently removes coal-pyrite composites. By combining both unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential to improve coal quality beyond that achieved using the individual technologies.

Not Available

1993-04-30

30

Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with Microcel  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining Microcel and MGS technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column is effective in removing ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS is capable of efficiently removing coal-pyrite composites. Therefore, by combining both of these unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential of improving coal quality beyond that which could be achieved using either one of the technologies individually. In addition to the primary objective, secondary objectives of the proposed test program will include: (1) Circuit Optimization: The performance of each unit operation, individually and combined, will be optimized by conducting parametric studies as a function of key operating variables. The goal of this work will be to maximize the rejections of pyritic sulfur and ash while maintaining a high energy recovery; and (2) Process Variability: The steady-state performance of the optimized processing circuit will be studied (i) by conducting several long-duration test runs over a period of several days and (ii) by testing coal samples from other sources specified by the participating coal companies.

Not Available

1993-01-29

31

Baseline and optional bench-scale testing of a chemical candle filter safeguard device  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and test the feasibility of a hot-gas filter safeguard device (SGD) to prevent the release of dust in the event of candle filter failure under both pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) (oxidizing) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (reducing) operating conditions. The SGD must use existing filter system seals, gaskets, fixtures, and assemblies as much as possible. It must also activate quickly when a candle filter has failed, preferably preventing dust concentrations downstream of the SGD from exceeding 1 ppmw. In addition, the SGD must be able to operate in an inactive mode with minimal pressure drop, and its operation cannot be affected by repeated backpulse cleaning events of up to 3 psia and 1/2 second in duration.

Hurley, J.P.; Swanson, M.L.

2000-11-01

32

Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventonal coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data.

Anast, K.

1993-09-01

33

High-temperature, high-pressure testing of zinc titanate in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor for 100 cycles  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are being advanced worldwide to produce electricity from coal owing to their potential for superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. A key component of these plants is a hot-gas desulfurization system employing efficient regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents. Leading sorbent candidates include zinc ferrite and zinc titanate. These sorbents can remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in the fuel gas down to very low levels (typically <20 ppmv) at 500 to 750{degree}C and can be readily regenerated for multicycle operation with air. To this end, the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) has formulated and tested a series of zinc titanate sorbents in a high-temperature, high- pressure HTHP fluidized-bed bench-scale reactor. Multicycle HTHP bench-scale testing of these sorbents under a variety of conditions culminated in the development of a ZT-4 sorbent that exhibited the best overall performance in terms of chemical reactivity, sulfur capacity, regenerability, structural properties, and attrition resistance. Following this parametric study, a life-cycle test consisting of 100 sulfidation-regeneration cycles was carried out with ZT-4 in the bench unit.

Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

1993-06-01

34

NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis  

SciTech Connect

Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

1994-06-01

35

Foaming phenomenon in bench-scale anaerobic digesters.  

PubMed

The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (The District) in Madison, Wisconsin has been experiencing seasonal foaming in their anaerobic biosolids digesters, which has occurred from mid-November to late June for the past few years. The exact cause(s) of foaming is unknown. Previous research findings are unclear as to whether applications of advanced anaerobic digestion processes reduce the foaming potential of digesters. The object of this study was to investigate how configurations of thermophilic and acid phase-thermophilic anaerobic digestion would affect foaming at the bench-scale level compared to single stage mesophilic digestion for The District. Bench-scale anaerobic digesters were fed with a 4 to 4.5% by dry weight of solids content blend of waste activated sludge (WAS) and primary sludge from The District. Foaming potential was monitored using Alka-Seltzer and aeration foaming tests. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digester had a higher foaming potential than the bench-scale mesophilic digester. These results indicate that higher temperatures increase the foaming potential of the bench-scale anaerobic digesters. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digesters had a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) volatile solids destruction and a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) total solids destruction when compared to the bench-scale mesophilic digester. Overall, for the full-scale foaming experienced by The District, it appears that adding an acid phase or switching to thermophilic digestion would not alleviate The District's foaming issues. PMID:23697241

Siebels, Amanda M; Long, Sharon C

2013-04-01

36

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-06-08

37

Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: continued purchase of small equipment and supplies for the circuit; completed the circuit commissioning task; procured one lot of PennMag Grade-K and one lot Grade-L magnetite; completed work on analytical investigations; completed Classifying Circuit Component Testing on Pittsburgh No. 8 coal; completed the final Heavy-Media cyclone component testing on the Pittsburgh No. 8 seam using Grade-K and Grade-L magnetites; continued QA/QC tests on wet screening, wet splitting, Marcy Balance, and reproducibility checks on component tests and component test samples; and completed the magnetite recovery circuit component testing with and without screens using the Grade-K magnetite and the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal seam. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

NONE

1995-08-10

38

Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The major focus of the project is to install and test a 500 lbs./hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The circuit consists of three subcircuits: Classification Circuit; Dense-Medium Cycloning Circuit; and Magnetite Recovery Circuit. The testing scope involves initial closed-loop testing of each subcircuit to optimize the performance of the equipment in each subcircuit (i.e., Component Testing), followed by open-circuit testing of the entire integrated circuit to optimize the process and quantify the process efficiency (i.e., Integrated Testing). This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

NONE

1996-08-13

39

Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Eighth quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The major focus of the project is to install and test a 500 lbs./hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The circuit consists of three subcircuits: Classification Circuit; Dense-Medium Cycloning Circuit; and Magnetite Recovery Circuit. The testing scope involves initial closed-loop testing of each subcircuit to optimize the performance of the equipment in each subcircuit (i.e., Component Testing), followed by open-circuit testing of the entire integrated circuit to optimize the process and quantify the process efficiency (i.e., Integrated Testing). This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

NONE

1996-08-13

40

Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, October--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The major focus of the project is to install and test a 500 lbs./hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The circuit consists of three subcircuits: Classification Circuit; Dense-Medium Cycloning Circuit; and Magnetite Recovery Circuit. The testing scope involves initial closed-loop testing of each subcircuit to optimize the performance of the equipment in each subcircuit (i.e., Component Testing), followed by open-circuit testing of the entire integrated circuit to optimize the process and quantify the process efficiency (i.e., Integrated Testing). This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

NONE

1996-08-13

41

High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion

R. E. Anderson; D. M. Jassowski; R. A. Newton; M. L. Rudnicki

1981-01-01

42

High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup reactor.

Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

1981-04-01

43

Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Second quarterly technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the Quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Micronized Magnetite Testing Project being performed at PETC`s Process Research Facility (PRF). This second quarterly report covers the period from October, 1994 through December, 1994. The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: (1) Submitted all overdue project documents and kept up with routine reporting requirements; (2) Worked with CLI Corporation, the design subcontractor, and completed the circuit design and finalized all design drawings; (3) Specified and procured all of the process equipment for the circuit, as well as a number of ancillary equipment, instruments, and supplies; (4) Assisted Vangura Iron Inc. in detailing and constructing the structural and platework steel; (5) Subcontracted Rizzo & Sons to perform the circuit mechanical and electrical installation, and prepared for January 23rd installation start date; (6) Organized and prepared for coal and magnetite procurement; (7) Specified and organized an operating personnel plan for the commissioning and testing tasks in the project; (8) Assessed analytical challenges for project, and began to research problem areas. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the abovementioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

NONE

1995-01-19

44

Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Third quarterly technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995  

SciTech Connect

The major focus of the project, which is scheduled to occur through December 1995, will be to install and test a 500{number_sign}/hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The overall objectives of the project are to: Determine the effects of operating time on the characteristics of the recirculating medium in a continuous integrated processing circuit, and subsequently, the sensitivity of cyclone separation performance to the quality of the recirculating medium; and determine the technical and economic feasibility of various unit operations and systems in optimizing the separation and recovery of the micronized magnetite from the coal products. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

NONE

1995-04-29

45

Development of a bench-scale immersed ultrafiltration apparatus for coagulation pretreatment experiments.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to present results of a project that focused on developing a standardized bench-scale apparatus and operating procedures for immersed ultrafiltration (UF) membrane systems to assess integrated process designs (e.g., coagulation-UF) under controlled laboratory conditions. The integrated test apparatus, termed Immersed Ultrafiltration Enhanced Coagulation (IUEC), was designed using a hollow-fiber, outside-in UF module immersed in a single compartment water preparation and filtration tank equipped with aeration mixing capabilities for coagulation and flocculation process evaluations. Bench-scale experiments were conducted with alum on a low turbidity surface water source to evaluate system performance of the integrated IUEC apparatus compared to a standard jar test unit. The experiments were evaluated by measuring the removal of natural organic matter and zeta-potential analysis from water collected from a conventional mechanically-mixed process with a manual transfer to a UF membrane system and comparing these results to the IUEC system. The results of this study demonstrated that using the single-compartment IUEC apparatus can provide water quality data that is congruent with those obtained through conventional methods that rely on use of standard jar tests. PMID:21547820

Walsh, Margaret E; Zhao, Na; Gagnon, Graham A

2011-01-01

46

COMPARING RBF WITH BENCH-SCALE CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT FOR PRECURSOR REDUCTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The reduction of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors upon riverbank filtration (RBF) at three drinking water utilities in the mid-Western United States was compared with that obtained using a bench-scale conventional treatment train on the corresponding river waters. The riv...

47

BENCH-SCALE RECOVERY OF LEAD USING AN ELECTROMEMBRANE/CHELATION PROCESS  

EPA Science Inventory

This report presents the results of a bench-scale treatability test to investigate key process parameters influencing an innovative chelation electrodeposition process for recovery of lead from contaminated sons. thylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta...

48

BENCH-SCALE RECOVERY OF LEAD USING AND ELECTRO- MEMBRANE/CHELATION PROCESS  

EPA Science Inventory

This report presents the results of a bench-scale treatability test to investigate key process parameters influencing an innovative chelation electrodeposition process for recovery of lead from contaminated sons. thylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta...

49

EVALUATION OF A BENCH-SCALE DRY FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEM FOR SCREENING POTENTIAL REAGENTS AND OPERATING CONDITIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses two series of bench-scale dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) laboratory tests, the primary objective of which was to evaluate the ability of a bench-scale dry FGD system to screen potential reagents and operating conditions in support of testing at larger pilo...

50

Bench-scale co-processing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this contract is to extend and optimize UOP's single-stage slurry-catalyzed co-processing scheme. Particular emphasis is given to defining and improving catalyst utilization and costs, evaluating alternative and disposable slurry-catalyst systems, and improving catalyst recycle and recovery techniques. The work during this quarter involved a series of temperature studies with different concentrations of Mo slurry catalyst. The results of bench-scale Runs 26 and 27 are discussed in the following report. 25 figs.

Nafis, D.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Lea, C.; Miller, M.A.

1990-03-27

51

Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

Vince Maio

2011-08-01

52

Bench-scale feasibility testing of pulsed-air technology for in-tank mixing of dry cementitious solids with tank liquids and settled solids  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of testing performed to determine the feasibility of using a pulsed-air mixing technology (equipment developed by Pulsair Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA) to mix cementitious dry solids with supernatant and settled solids within a horizontal tank. The mixing technology is being considered to provide in situ stabilization of the {open_quotes}V{close_quotes} tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The testing was performed in a vessel roughly 1/6 the scale of the INEEL tanks. The tests used a fine soil to simulate settled solids and water to simulate tank supernatants. The cementitious dry materials consisted of Portland cement and Aquaset-2H (a product of Fluid Tech Inc. consisting of clay and Portland cement). Two scoping tests were conducted to allow suitable mixing parameters to be selected. The scoping tests used only visual observations during grout disassembly to assess mixing performance. After the scoping tests indicated the approach may be feasible, an additional two mixing tests were conducted. In addition to visual observations during disassembly of the solidified grout, these tests included addition of chemical tracers and chemical analysis of samples to determine the degree of mixing uniformity achieved. The final two mixing tests demonstrated that the pulsed-air mixing technique is capable of producing slurries containing substantially more cementitious dry solids than indicated by the formulations suggested by INEEL staff. Including additional cement in the formulation may have benefits in terms of increasing mobilization of solids, reducing water separation during curing, and increasing the strength of the solidified product. During addition to the tank, the cementitious solids had a tendency to form clumps which broke down with continued mixing.

Whyatt, G.A.; Hymas, C.R.

1997-09-01

53

Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. The proposed program is composed of three major technical tasks. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion.

Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

1985-01-01

54

Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench- scale coal gasifier  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. The proposed program is composed of three major technical tasks. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion. (VC)

Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

1985-01-01

55

Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratoryâs Bench Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification'

Vince Maio

2011-01-01

56

Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with Microcel. Second Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Work this quarter focused on the development of the engineering design specifications for the ET Test Circuit. Process flowsheets and detailed equipment specifications were finalized. Based on this information, bid packages were assembled and purchase orders were issued for all of the necessary process equipment. The design and procurement information is summarized in the ET Circuit Design Report submitted to the DOE`s COR this quarter. Final drafts of the ET Circuit - System Safety Analysis, Nuclear Density Gauge - System Safety Analysis and Operating Manual/SOP were also completed and submitted to the COR this quarter. Preliminary characterization studies were also initiated this quarter. Tests were conducted to determine the grinding conditions required to achieve the desired particle size distributions for the characterization work. Flotation release analysis tests were conducted on both the Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 and Illinois {number_sign}6 seam coals as a function of grind size. The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install, and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining the Microcel and Multi-Gravity-Separator (MGS) technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column effectively removes ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS efficiently removes coal-pyrite composites. By combining both unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential to improve coal quality beyond that achieved using the individual technologies.

Not Available

1993-04-30

57

Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with Microcel. First quarterly report, September 29, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining Microcel and MGS technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column is effective in removing ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS is capable of efficiently removing coal-pyrite composites. Therefore, by combining both of these unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential of improving coal quality beyond that which could be achieved using either one of the technologies individually. In addition to the primary objective, secondary objectives of the proposed test program will include: (1) Circuit Optimization: The performance of each unit operation, individually and combined, will be optimized by conducting parametric studies as a function of key operating variables. The goal of this work will be to maximize the rejections of pyritic sulfur and ash while maintaining a high energy recovery; and (2) Process Variability: The steady-state performance of the optimized processing circuit will be studied (i) by conducting several long-duration test runs over a period of several days and (ii) by testing coal samples from other sources specified by the participating coal companies.

Not Available

1993-01-29

58

Development of a bench scale biomass torrefier  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cofiring biomass with coal has become very popular with power utilities to reduce fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. It is relatively easy to implement on most common pulverised coal plants. However, raw biomass is difficult to utilise and requires upgrading to a higher quality fuel to substitute coal. Upgrading by torrefaction can improve the properties of biomass close to low rank coals suitable for cofiring. In this study, a bench scale torrefier was developed to produce torrefied biomass samples for further studies of its properties and combustion behaviour. The torrefier was developed from a domestic 1600W electric oven. Biomass pellets was then torrefied at 250 °C for 1 hour using this torrefier. Proximate analysis and gross calorific value (GCV) of the torrefied biomass were carried out. The results showed that GCV of the torrefied biomass had increased when compared to raw. The moisture content and volatile matter had decreased, and ash content and fixed carbon had increased as expected.

Mohd Ja'afar, M. N.; Abd Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

2013-06-01

59

Bench-scale co-processing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this contract is to extend and optimize UOP's single-stage, slurry-catalyzed co-processing scheme. The particular emphasis is one evaluating alternative and disposable slurry-catalyst systems. During the current quarter, Lloydminster vacuum resid was processed without the presence of coal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the manner in which the resid is upgraded at high-severity conditions to help understand the function of the resid during co-processing. This report coves Bench-Scale Runs 30 to 34. In Runs 30 to 34, Lloydminster vacuum resid was processed without the presence of coal using a 0.05 wt % molybdenum-based catalyst at 465{degrees}C.

Piasecki, C.A.; Gatsis, J.G.

1992-02-19

60

Bench-Scale Evaluation Of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Technology To Stabilize Mercury Waste Mixtures  

EPA Science Inventory

This bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization of mercury (Hg) and mercuric chloride-containing surrogate test materials by the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics technology. This study was performed as part of a U.S. EPA program to evaluate treatment and d...

61

BENCH-SCALE EVALUATION OF CALCIUM SORBENTS FOR ACID GAS EMISSION CONTROL  

EPA Science Inventory

Calcium sorbents for acid gas emission control were evaluated for effectiveness in removing SO2/HCl and SO2/NO from simulated incinerator and boiler flue gases. All tests were conducted in a bench-scale reactor (fixed-bed) simulating fabric filter conditions in an acid gas remova...

62

DESIGN AND OPERATION OF A CONSTANT LEVEL, CONSTANT RATE PILOT FILTRATION PLANT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Granular media filtration is one of the most complicated water treatment processes to operate and design. There are currently no bench scale tests which can accurately predict the performance of filters over the course of a filter run and therefore pilot plant trials should be carried out whenever filters are to be designed or modified in any way. However, the

P. A. Thompson; B. M. Brouckaert; R. Rajagopaul; M. N. Ngcekwa; M. Mhlongo

2004-01-01

63

Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A phase 2 study was initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This publication covers the first quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: the refurbishment of the high-pressure, high-temperature reactor autoclave, the completion of four coal liquefaction runs with Pittsburgh #8 coal, two each with and without sodium lignosulfonate surfactant, and the development of an analysis scheme for the product liquid filtrate and filter cake. Initial results at low reactor temperatures show that the addition of the surfactant produces an improvement in conversion yields and an increase in lighter boiling point fractions for the filtrate.

Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

1992-01-01

64

Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A phase 2 study has been initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This report covers the second quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: completion of coal liquefaction autoclave reactor runs with Illinois number 6 coal at processing temperatures of 300, 325, and 350 C, and pressures of 1800 psig; analysis of the filter cake and the filtrate obtained from the treated slurry in each run; and correlation of the coal conversions and the liquid yield quality to the surfactant concentration. An increase in coal conversions and upgrading of the liquid product quality due to surfactant addition was observed for all runs.

Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

1993-01-01

65

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER TREATABILITY STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Bench-Scale Reforming testing. The type, quantity, and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluidized bed steam reformer. A determination of the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used in a bench scale tests. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the shipping requirements and for comparison to the bench scale reformer (BSR) test sample selection requirements.

BANNING DL

2011-02-11

66

Bench-scale studies of in-duct mercury capture using cupric chloride-impregnated carbons.  

PubMed

A brominated activated carbon (Darco Hg-LH) and cupric chloride-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl2-ACs) sorbent have been tested in a bench-scale entrained-flow reactor system which was developed for simulating in-flight mercury capture in ducts upstream of particulate matter control devices. The bench-scale experimental system has been operated with the conditions of a residence time of 0.75 s and a gas temperature of 140 degrees C to simulate typical conditions in the duct of coal-fired exhaust gas. In addition, sorbent deposition on walls which can occur in a laboratory-scale system more than in a full-scale system was significantly reduced so that additional mercury capture by the deposited sorbent was minimized. In the entrained-flow system, CuCl2-ACs demonstrated similar performance in Hg adsorption and better performance in Hg0 oxidation than Darco Hg-LH. In addition, the carbon content of those sorbents was found to determine their Hg adsorption capability in the entrained-flow system. The bench-scale entrained-flow system was able to demonstrate the important Hg adsorption and oxidation characteristics of the tested sorbents. PMID:19475977

Lee, Sang-Sup; Lee, Joo-Youp; Keener, Tim C

2009-04-15

67

Thermal inactivation of Bacillus anthracis surrogate spores in a bench-scale enclosed landfill gas flare.  

PubMed

A bench-scale landfill flare system was designed and built to test the potential for landfilled biological spores that migrate from the waste into the landfill gas to pass through the flare and exit into the environment as viable. The residence times and temperatures of the flare were characterized and compared to full-scale systems. Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus atrophaeus, nonpathogenic spores that may serve as surrogates for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent for anthrax, were investigated to determine whether these organisms would be inactivated or remain viable after passing through a simulated landfill flare. High concentration spore solutions were aerosolized, dried, and sent through a bench-scale system to simulate the fate of biological weapon (BW)-grade spores in a landfill gas flare. Sampling was conducted downstream of the flare using a bioaerosol collection device containing sterile white mineral oil. The samples were cultured, incubated for seven days, and assessed for viability. Results showed that the bench-scale system exhibited good similarity to the real-world conditions of an enclosed standard combustor flare stack with a single orifice, forced-draft diffusion burner. All spores of G. stearothermophilus and B. atrophaeus were inactivated in the flare, indicating that spores that become re-entrained in landfill gas may not escape the landfill as viable, apparently becoming completely inactivated as they exit through a landfill flare. PMID:22442931

Tufts, Jenia A McBrian; Rosati, Jacky A

2012-02-01

68

Fermentation Bench-scale to pilot-scale capabilities for the conversion of biomass to sugars, fuels, and chemicals  

E-print Network

Fermentation Bench-scale to pilot-scale capabilities for the conversion of biomass to sugars, fuels 40 30 20 10 0 Concentration(g/L) 0 2 4 6 Time (days) Fermentation applications · Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation testing - Different enzyme mixtures - Pretreated lignocellulosic feedstocks at low and high solids

69

Filtration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The North Carolina Community College System BioNetwork's interactive eLearning tools (IETs) are reusable chunks of training that can be deployed in a variety of courses or training programs. IETs are designed to enhance, not replace hands-on training. Learners are able to enter a hands-on lab experience better prepared and more confident. This particular IET delves into filtration in which visitors review basic filtration concepts, construct gravity and vacuum filtration units, and record the procedures in a virtual lab notebook. At the end of the module, those who complete it successfully will get a certificate.

2013-08-05

70

Sustainable oil and grease removal from synthetic stormwater runoff using bench-scale bioretention studies.  

PubMed

One of the principal components of the contaminant load in urban stormwater runoff is oil and grease (O&G) pollution, resulting from vehicle emissions. A mulch layer was used as a contaminant trap to remove O&G (dissolved and particulate-associated naphthalene, dissolved toluene, and dissolved motor oil hydrocarbons) from a synthetic runoff during a bench-scale infiltration study. Approximately 80 to 95% removal of all contaminants from synthetic runoff was found via sorption and filtration. Subsequently, approximately 90% of the sorbed naphthalene, toluene, oil, and particulate-associated naphthalene was biodegraded within approximately 3, 4, 8, and 2 days after the event, respectively, based on decreases in contaminant concentrations coupled with increases of microbial populations. These results indicate the effectiveness and sustainability of placing a thin layer of mulch on the surface of a bioretention facility for reducing O&G pollution from urban stormwater runoff. PMID:16566522

Hong, Eunyoung; Seagren, Eric A; Davis, Allen P

2006-02-01

71

77 FR 38857 - Design, Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Normal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Normal Atmosphere...Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Normal Atmosphere...Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Normal...

2012-06-29

72

76 FR 82323 - Design, Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units AGENCY: Nuclear...Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Postaccident...design, inspection, and testing of air filtration and iodine adsorption units of...

2011-12-30

73

C-018H LERF filtration test plan. Revision 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The following outlines the plan to test the polymeric backwash filtration system at the LERF. These tests will determine if the ETF filter design is adequate. If the tests show that the design is adequate, the task will be complete. If the tests show that the technology is inadequate, it may be necessary to perform further tests to qualify other

T. P. Moberg; C. V. King

1994-01-01

74

C-018H LERF filtration test plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The following outlines the plan to test the polymeric backwash filtration system at the LERF. These tests will determine if the ETF filter design is adequate. If the tests show that the design is adequate, the task will be complete. If the tests show that the technology is inadequate, it may be necessary to perform further tests to qualify other candidate filtration technologies (e.g., polymeric tubular ultrafiltration, centrifugal ultrafiltration). The criteria to determine the success or failure of the backwash filter will be based on the system`s ability to remove the bacteria and inorganic contaminants from the evaporator process condensate. The tests are designed to qualify the design basis of the filtration technology that will be used in the ETF.

Moberg, T.P.; King, C.V.

1994-08-26

75

Filtration  

SciTech Connect

In the extraction of coal using a liquid solvent oil, filtration can be assisted by using a filter aid which is of coal origin. The filter aid is produced by high temperature processing of coal or an ash-rich coal-derived residue under conditions at which the ash component of the coal or residue does not fuse. A preferred starting material is filter cake from a coal extraction process.

Clarke, J.W.; Parsons, D.A.

1981-11-17

76

PILOT PLANT TESTING OF ELECTROSTATIC FABRIC FILTRATION AT HARRINGTON STATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper gives results of pilot plant tests of electrostatic fabric filtration (ESFF) at Harrington Station, near Amarillo, Texas. In early 1983, the pilot baghouse at Harrington Station was modified to conduct a testing program for ESFF. The tests conducted there successfully d...

77

Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier. Fourth quarterly report, July 1, 1985--September 30, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. The proposed program is composed of three major technical tasks. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion.

Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

1985-12-31

78

Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench- scale coal gasifier. Second quarterly project report, January 1, 1985--March 31, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. The proposed program is composed of three major technical tasks. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion. (VC)

Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

1985-12-31

79

Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier. Fifth quarterly report, October 1, 1985--December 31, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is currently sporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. the proposed program is composed of three major technical task. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion.

Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

1985-12-31

80

Analytical liquid test sample filtration apparatus  

DOEpatents

A liquid sample filtration apparatus includes: a) a module retaining filter elements; b) a filter clamping and fluid injection apparatus positioned relative to the module to engage a filter element thereon, and includes a pair of first and second opposing engageable members to sealing engage a filter element therebetween; c) an inlet tube connected to an opposing engageable member; d) an outlet tube connected to an opposing engageable member; e) a motor to move the module relative to the filter clamping and injection apparatus to register filter elements on the module to the clamping and injection apparatus; and f) a motor associated with the filter clamping and injection apparatus to move the opposing engageable members into substantial sealing fluid communication relative to a filter element on the module. An apparatus for engaging opposing ends of a filter element includes: a) a member having a recess configured to engage one end of a filter element, including a first fluid passage communicating with the recess to pass fluid between the recess and externally of the member; and b) a second member positioned in opposing juxtaposition relative to the other member, and having a projection sized and shaped to matingly fit within the other member recess, the second member projection including a second recess configured to engage the other end of the filter element, the second member including a second fluid passage communicating with the second recess to pass fluid between the second recess and externally of the second member.

Lohnes, Brent C. (Soda Springs, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Michael L. (Menan, ID)

1996-01-01

81

Analytical liquid test sample filtration apparatus  

DOEpatents

A liquid sample filtration apparatus includes: (a) a module retaining filter elements; (b) a filter clamping and fluid injection apparatus positioned relative to the module to engage a filter element thereon, and includes a pair of first and second opposing engageable members to engage a filter element there between; (c) an inlet tube connected to an opposing engageable member; (d) an outlet tube connected to an opposing engageable member; (e) a motor to move the module relative to the filter clamping and injection apparatus to register filter elements on the module to the clamping and injection apparatus; and (f) a motor associated with the filter clamping and injection apparatus to move the opposing engageable members into substantial sealing fluid communication relative to a filter element on the module. An apparatus for engaging opposing ends of a filter element includes: (a) a member having a recess configured to engage one end of a filter element, including a first fluid passage communicating with the recess to pass fluid between the recess and externally of the member; and (b) a second member positioned in opposing juxtaposition relative to the other member, and having a projection sized and shaped to matingly fit within the other member recess, the second member projection including a second recess configured to engage the other end of the filter element, the second member including a second fluid passage communicating with the second recess to pass fluid between the second recess and externally of the second member. 8 figs.

Lohnes, B.C.; Turner, T.D.; Klingler, K.M.; Clark, M.L.

1996-01-09

82

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

A bench-scale system was designed and built to test an aminosilicone-based solvent. A model was built of the bench-scale system and this model was scaled up to model the performance of a carbon capture unit, using aminosilicones, for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) for a pulverized coal (PC) boiler at 550 MW. System and economic analysis for the carbon capture unit demonstrates that the aminosilicone solvent has significant advantages relative to a monoethanol amine (MEA)-based system. The CCS energy penalty for MEA is 35.9% and the energy penalty for aminosilicone solvent is 30.4% using a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the energy penalty for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to 29%. The increase in cost of electricity (COE) over the non-capture case for MEA is ~109% and increase in COE for aminosilicone solvent is ~98 to 103% depending on the solvent cost at a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the increase in COE for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to ~95-100%.

Wood, Benjamin; Genovese, Sarah; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Farnum, Rachael; Sing, Surinder; Wilson, Paul; Buckley, Paul; Acharya, Harish; Chen, Wei; McDermott, John; Vipperia, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

2013-12-31

83

Bench-scale testing of DOE/PETC`s GranuFlow Process for fine coal dewatering and handling. 1: Results using a high-gravity solid-bowl centrifuge  

SciTech Connect

Most advanced fine-coal cleaning processes involve the use of water. Utility companies are concerned not only with the lower Btu content of the resulting wet, cleaned coal, but more importantly with its handleability problems. Solutions to these problems would enhance the utilization of fine-coal cleaning processes in the utility industry. This paper describes testing of the GranuFlow Process, developed and patented by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the US Department of Energy, using a high-gravity solid bowl centrifuge for dewatering and reconstitution of fine-cleaned-coal slurry at 300 lb per hour in PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility. Fine-cleaned-coal slurry was treated with a bitumen emulsion before dewatering in a high-gravity solid-bowl centrifuge. The treated products appeared to be dry and in a free-flowing granular form, while the untreated products were wet, lumpy, sticky, and difficult to handle. Specifically, test results indicated that the moisture content, handleability, and dust reduction of the dewatered coal product improved as the addition of emulsion increased from 2% to 8%. The improvement in handleability was most visible for the 200 mesh (75 micron) x 0 coal, when compared with 150 mesh (106 micron) x 0, 65 mesh (212 micron) x 0 or 28 mesh (600 micron) x 0 coals. Test results also showed that the moisture content was dramatically reduced (26--37% reduction) for the four different sizes of coals at 6 or 8% emulsion addition. Because of the moisture reduction and the granular form of the product, the freezing problem was also alleviated.

Wen, W.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Lowman, R.H.; Elstrodt, R. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

1995-12-31

84

Bench-Scale Testing of Attrition Resistant Moving Bed Sorbents  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems with cold-gas cleanup have now reached the early stages of commercialization. The foundation for this was successful completion of the Cool Water Coal Gasification Program several years ago. Destec Energy, Inc., a subsidiary of Dow Chemical Company, has a plant in operation in Louisiana, and the 2 Wabash River Plant in Indiana is now starting up. A similar plant based on the Shell gasification technology is operating in the Netherlands. In two new plants now under construction, the Tampa Electric Plant in Florida and the Sierra Pacific Power Plant in Nevada, incorporating hot-gas cleanup technology is desirable. Unfortunately, some nagging problems remain with both sulfur sorbent and particle filter technology that may result in the use of cold-gas, rather than hot-gas, cleanup in these plants. With sulfur sorbents, the main problems are with mechanical property degradation and/or loss of sulfur capacity over many sulfidation-regeneration cycles. The sorbents receiving the most attention are all zinc based. They include various zinc titanate formulations and proprietary materials developed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) staff and the Phillips Petroleum Company. The investigators on this project are now completing their third year of effort on a superstrong zinc titanate sorbent. Prior to this year, various formulations were prepared and evaluated for their potential use in fixed- and fluidized-bed hot-gas desulfurization systems. A unique feature, the reason for the high strength, is that the zinc titanate is contained in a matrix of titanium dioxide. Its crush strength is more than 6 times that prior investigators achieved.

Swisher, J.H. [E& A Associates, Murphysboro, IL (United States); Gupta, R.P. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1996-12-31

85

Oxygen-controlled Biosurfactant Production in a Bench Scale Bioreactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rhamnolipids have been pointed out as promising biosurfactants. The most studied microorganisms for the aerobic production of these molecules are the bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. The aim of this work was to produce a rhamnolipid-type biosurfactant in a bench-scale bioreactor by one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from oil environments. To study the microorganism growth and production dependency on oxygen, a nondispersive oxygenation device was developed, and a programmable logic controller (PLC) was used to set the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. Using the data stored in a computer and the predetermined characteristics of the oxygenation device, it was possible to evaluate the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and the specific OUR (SOUR) of this microorganism. These rates, obtained for some different DO concentrations, were then compared to the bacterial growth, to the carbon source consumption, and to the rhamnolipid and other virulence factors production. The SOUR presented an initial value of about 60.0 mg02/gdw h. Then, when the exponential growth phase begins, there is a rise in this rate. After that, the SOUR reduces to about 20.0 mg02/gdw h. The carbon source consumption is linear during the whole process.

de Kronemberger, Frederico Araujo; Anna, Lidia Maria Melo Santa; Fernandes, Ana Carolina Loureiro Brito; de Menezes, Reginaldo Ramos; Borges, Cristiano Piacsek; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães

86

Unified membrane fouling index for low pressure membrane filtration of natural waters: principles and methodology.  

PubMed

Membrane filtration is considered an important technology that can contribute to the sustainability of water supplies. However, its continued development necessitates the establishment of proper techniques for the assessment of membrane fouling. Unified Membrane Fouling Index (UMFI) was developed in this study in order to quantify and assess the fouling of low-pressure membranes (LPM) observed at various scales of water treatment. The foundation of UMFI is a revised Hermia model applied to both constant pressure and constant flux filtration. The adoption of UMFI makes it possible to simplify and standardize the bench-scale testing of membrane fouling potential by directly using the commercial LPM of interest. This approach can overcome a major challenge to fouling assessment, i.e., the membrane-specificity of fouling potential, which has not been wholly addressed by existing fouling indices. The fundamentals of UMFI are presented in this paper, together with the methodology for bench-scale testing. The application of UMFI to the assessment of the fouling of a LPM by a natural surface water is also discussed. Good agreement between bench-scale UMFI and pilot-scale UMFI was found, suggesting the validity of this new scientific concept for environmental applications. PMID:18323092

Huang, Haiou; Young, Thayer A; Jacangelo, Joseph G

2008-02-01

87

Bench-scale co-processing economic assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The UOP Co-Processing scheme is a single-stage slurry catalyzed process in which petroleum vacuum resid and coal are simultaneously upgraded to a high-quality synthetic oil. A highly active dispersed catalyst has been developed which enables the operation of the co-processing unit at relatively moderate and high temperatures and relatively high pressure. Under the current contract, a multi-year research program was undertaken to study the technical and economic feasibility of this technology. All the contractual tasks were completed. Autoclave experiments were carried out to evaluate dispersed vanadium catalysts, molybdenum catalysts, and a less costly UOP-proprietary catalyst preparation technique. Autoclave experiments were also carried out in support of the continuous pilot plant unit operation and to study the effects of the process variables (pressure, temperature, and metal loading on the catalyst). A total of 24 continuous pilot plant runs were made. Research and development efforts during the pilot plant operations were concentrated on addressing the cost effectiveness of the UOP single-stage slurry catalyzed co-processing concept based on UOP experience gained in the previous DOE contract. To this end, effect of catalyst metal concentration was studied and a highly-active Mo-based catalyst was developed. This catalyst enabled successful long-term operation (924 hours) of the continuous bench-scale plant at highly severe operating conditions of 3,000 psig, 465{degree}C temperature, and 2:1 resid-to-MAF (moisture- and ash-free) coal ratio with 0.1 wt % active metal. The metal loading of the catalyst was low enough to consider the catalyst as a disposable slurry catalyst. Also, liquid recycle was incorporated in the pilot plant design to increase the, reactor back mixing and to increase the flow of liquid through the reactor (to introduce turbulence in the reactor) and to represent the design of a commercial-scale reactor.

Gala, H.B.; Marker, T.L.; Miller, E.N.

1994-11-01

88

Design of a bench-scale apparatus for processing carbon black derived from scrap tires  

E-print Network

The focus of this work is to design a bench-scale apparatus, for laboratory applications, that will perform solid processing operations for carbon black obtained through the thermal catalytic depolymerization of scrap tires. These operations...

Woodrow, Philip Travis

1996-01-01

89

ALTERNATIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES FOR REMEDIATION OF CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED MATERIALS: BENCH-SCALE TREATABILITY STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Bench-scale biotreatability studies were performed to determine the most effective of two bioremediation application strategies to ameliorate creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils present at the American Creosote Works Superfund site, Pensacola, Florida: olid-ph...

90

Actinide Recovery Experiments with Bench-Scale Liquid Cadmium Cathode in Fission Product-Laden Molten Salt  

SciTech Connect

This article summarizes the observations and analytical results from a series of bench- scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments that recovered transuranic elements together with uranium from a molten electrolyte laden with real fission products. Variable parameters such as the ratio of Pu3+/U3+ in the electrolyte, liquid cadmium cathode voltage, and feed materials were tested in the LCC experiments. Actinide recovery efficiency and Pu/U ratio in the liquid cadmium cathode product under variable conditions are reported in the article. Separation factors for actinides and rare earth elements in the salt/cadmium system are also presented.

S. X. Li; S. D. Herrmann; R. W. Benedict; K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

2009-02-01

91

Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation. Final technical progress report, July 1, 1992--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The present work effort relates to an investigation of surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in overall coal conversions and the product quality. Based on the results of a Phase 1 preliminary study on the effect of several surfactants on coal liquefaction, sodium lignosulfonate was chosen as the surfactant for a detailed parametric study to be conducted at JPL using a batch autoclave reactor. These tests primarily related to thermal liquefaction of coal. The results of JPL autoclave test runs showed an increase in overall conversions from 5 to 15% due to surfactant addition over the base case of coal alone. A continuous-flow bench scale coal liquefaction process run was conducted over a 5-day period at Hydrocarbon Research Incorporated (HRI). This test showed that the surfactant is suitable for an industrial continuous recycle process, and does not interfere with the supported catalyst. After the bench scale test, a series of autoclave runs were conducted with coprocessing the surfactant and the Ni-Mo catalyst. These experiments showed that high conversions and product quality can be maintained at milder processing conditions. Based on results of the autoclave test runs, the overall product values were obtained for two stage reactors at 400{degrees}C. The best product value was realized for the two-stage case (e) which showed an 8% improvement over the base case.

Hickey, G.S.; Sharma, P.K. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States)

1994-03-31

92

Treatment studies of plutonium-bearing INEEL waste surrogates in a bench-scale arc furnace  

SciTech Connect

Since 1989, the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) has been included on the National Priority List for remediation. Arc- and plasma-heated furnaces are being considered for converting the radioactive mixed waste buried in the SDA to a stabilized-vitreous form. Nonradioactive, surrogate SDA wastes have been melted during tests in these types of furnaces, but data are needed on the behavior of transuranic (TRU) constituents, primarily plutonium, during thermal treatment. To begin collecting this data, plutonium-spiked SDA surrogates were processed in a bench-scale arc furnace to quantify the fate of the plutonium and other hazardous and nonhazardous metals. Test conditions included elevating the organic, lead, chloride, and sodium contents of the surrogates. Blends having higher organic contents caused furnace power levels to fluctuate. An organic content corresponding to 50% INEEL soil in a soil-waste blend was the highest achievable before power fluctuations made operating conditions unacceptable. The glass, metal, and off-gas solids produced from each surrogate blend tested were analyzed for elemental (including plutonium) content and the partitioning of each element to the corresponding phase was calculated.

Freeman, C.J.

1997-05-01

93

Pilot tests on the catalytic filtration of dioxins.  

PubMed

Tests were conducted to study the removal efficiencies (REs) of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from flue gas during a test program involving a pilot-scale catalytic filter (CF) module and a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI). The REs attained with the CF on a side stream and a conventional activated carbon (AC) injection and baghouse filtration system in the full-scale MSWI are evaluated via simultaneous sampling and analysis of both gas- and particle-phase PCDD/Fs. Flue gas without AC is supplied to the pilot-scale CF module for evaluating its RE capabilities. The REs achieved with the CF at 180 °C are 96.80 and 99.50%, respectively, for the gas phase and the particulate contained. The gas-phase PCDD/F RE rises significantly at 200 and 220 °C. The air/cloth (A/C) ratio defined as is the gas flow rate (m(3)/min) divided by the filtration area (m(2)) also affects the PCDD/F RE, especially in the gas phase. At 180 °C, a RE of gas-phase PCDD/Fs of 95.94% is attained with the CF at 0.8 m/min, yet it decreases at higher A/C ratios (1 and 1.2 m/min). A significantly lower toxic equivalency (TEQ) concentration (0.71 ng I-TEQ/g) was measured in the filter dust of the CF module compared to that collected by the AC adsorption system (4.18 ng I-TEQ/g), apparently because of the destruction of gas-phase PCDD/Fs by the catalyst. PMID:24617498

Hung, Pao Chen; Chang, Shu Hao; Lin, Syuan Hong; Buekens, Alfons; Chang, Moo Been

2014-04-01

94

DEGRADATION OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS UNDER BENCH-SCALE COMPOST CONDITIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The relationship between biomass growth and degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, and subsequent toxicity reduction, was evaluated in 10 in-vessel, bench-scale compost units. Field soil was aquired from the Reilly Tar and Chemical Company Superfund site...

95

Comparison of complex effluent treatability in different bench scale microbial electrolysis cells  

E-print Network

Comparison of complex effluent treatability in different bench scale microbial electrolysis cells 2014 Accepted 5 August 2014 Available online 13 August 2014 Keywords: Microbial electrolysis cells Industrial wastewater Treatability Mini microbial electrolysis cells Wastewater screening a b s t r a c

96

Bench-Scale Evaluation of Peracetic Acid and Twin Oxide ? as Disinfectants in Drinking Water  

EPA Science Inventory

Chlorine is widely used as an inexpensive and potent disinfectant in the United States for drinking water. However, chlorine has the potential for forming carcinogenic and mutagenic disinfection by-products (DBPs). In this study, bench scale experiments were conducted at the U.S...

97

BENCH SCALE FIXATION OF SOILS FROM THE TACOMA TAR PITS SUPRFUND SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents the results of bench-scale soil fixation study conducted with materials from the Tacoma Tar Pits SuperfundSite. Chemical fixation (also called stabilization/solidification)is a relatively new technique for remediating contaminated soils. It entails both immo...

98

OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF THE EPA OWNED BENCH SCALE PILOT PLANT FOR EVALUATING SCR DENOX CATALYSTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses the use of EPA's bench-scale pilot plant to evaluate catalysts used in the ammonia (NH3)-based technology and process for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides. A key objective was to establish the performance of SCR catalysts on U.S. uels and...

99

SOLVENT EXTRACTION AND SOIL WASHING TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SOILS FROM WOOD PRESERVING SITES: BENCH SCALE STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Bench-scale solvent extraction and soil washing studies were performed on soil samples obtained from three abandoned wood preserving sites that included in the NPL. The soil samples from these sites were contaminated with high levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pentachlo...

100

BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a one- or two-stage catalytic reduction process for efficiently converting to elemental sulfur up to 98 percent or more of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) contained in the regeneration offgas streams produced in advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems. The DSRP reacts the regeneration offgas with a small slipstream of coal gas to effect the desired reduction. In this project the DSRP was demonstrated with actual coal gas (as opposed to the simulated laboratory mixtures used in previous studies) in a 75-mm, 1-L size fixed-bed reactor. Integrated with this testing, a US Department of Energy/Research Triangle Institute (DOE/RTI) patented zinc titanate-based fluidizable sorbent formulation was tested in a 75-mm (3-in.) diameter fluidized-bed reactor, and the regeneration offgas from that test was treated with the bench-unit DSRP. The testing was conducted at the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)-Morgantown in conjunction with test campaigns of the pilot-scale gasifier there. The test apparatus was housed in a mobile laboratory built in a specially equipped office trailer that facilitated moving the equipment from RTI in North Carolina to the West Virginia test site. A long duration test of the DSRP using actual coal gas and simulated regeneration offgas showed no degradation in efficiency of conversion to elemental sulfur after 160 h of catalyst exposure. An additional exposure (200 h) of that same catalyst charge at the General Electric pilot gasifier showed only a small decline in performance. That problem is believed to have been caused by tar and soot deposits on the catalyst, which were caused by the high tar content of the atypical fixed-bed gasifier gas. A six-fold larger, single-stage skid-mounted DSRP apparatus was fabricated for additional, larger-scale slipstream testing.

NONE

1998-05-01

101

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO{sub 2} capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a bench-scale continuous CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. SiVance LLC was sub-contracted to provide the GAP-1m material and conduct an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP-1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA) were also identified for analysis. All of the solvent components and DDBSA are listed on the EPA’s TSCA Inventory allowing companies to manufacture and use the chemicals commercially. The toxicological effects of each component were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. An engineering and control system, including environmental abatement, was described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

2013-12-31

102

Bench-scale arc melter for R&D in thermal treatment of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

A small dc arc melter was designed and constructed to run bench-scale investigations on various aspects of development for high-temperature (1,500-1,800{degrees}C) processing of simulated transuranic-contaminated waste and soil located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Several recent system design and treatment studies have shown that high-temperature melting is the preferred treatment. The small arc melter is needed to establish techniques and procedures (with surrogates) prior to using a similar melter with the transuranic-contaminated wastes in appropriate facilities at the site. This report documents the design and construction, starting and heating procedures, and tests evaluating the melter`s ability to process several waste types stored at the RWMC. It is found that a thin graphite strip provides reliable starting with initial high current capability for partially melting the soil/waste mixture. The heating procedure includes (1) the initial high current-low voltage mode, (2) a low current-high voltage mode that commences after some slag has formed and arcing dominates over the receding graphite conduction path, and (3) a predominantly Joule heating mode during which the current can be increased within the limits to maintain relatively quiescent operation. Several experiments involving the melting of simulated wastes are discussed. Energy balance, slag temperature, and electrode wear measurements are presented. Recommendations for further refinements to enhance its processing capabilities are identified. Future studies anticipated with the arc melter include waste form processing development; dissolution, retention, volatilization, and collection for transuranic and low-level radionuclides, as well as high vapor pressure metals; electrode material development to minimize corrosion and erosion; refractory corrosion and/or skull formation effects; crucible or melter geometry; metal oxidation; and melt reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions.

Kong, P.C.; Grandy, J.D.; Watkins, A.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1993-05-01

103

Sustainable Oil and Grease Removal from Synthetic Stormwater Runoff Using Bench-Scale Bioretention Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the principal components of the contaminant load in urban stormwater runoff is oil and grease (O&G) pollution, resulting from vehicle emissions. A mulch layer was used as a contaminant trap to remove O&G (dissolved and particulate-associated naphthalene, dissolved toluene, and dissolved motor oil hydrocarbons) from a synthetic runoff during a bench-scale infiltration study. Approximately 80 to 95% removal

Eunyoung Hong; Eric A. Seagren; Allen P. Davis

104

Screening of phenylpyruvic acid producers and optimization of culture conditions in bench scale bioreactors.  

PubMed

Alpha keto acids are deaminated forms of amino acids that have received significant attention as feed and food additives in the agriculture and medical industries. To date, their production has been commonly performed at shake-flask scale with low product concentrations. In this study, production of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), which is the alpha keto acid of phenylalanine was investigated. First, various microorganisms were screened to select the most efficient producer. Thereafter, growth parameters (temperature, pH, and aeration) were optimized in bench scale bioreactors to maximize both PPA and biomass concentration in bench scale bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Among the four different microorganisms evaluated, Proteus vulgaris was the most productive strain for PPA production. Optimum temperature, pH, and aeration conditions were determined as 34.5 °C, 5.12, and 0.5 vvm for PPA production, whereas 36.9 °C, pH 6.87, and 0.96 vvm for the biomass production. Under these optimum conditions, PPA concentration was enhanced to 1,054 mg/L, which was almost three times higher than shake-flask fermentation concentrations. Moreover, P. vulgaris biomass was produced at 3.25 g/L under optimum conditions. Overall, this study demonstrated that optimization of growth parameters improved PPA production in 1-L working volume bench-scale bioreactors compared to previous studies in the literature and was a first step to scale up the production to industrial production. PMID:24861313

Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Elias, Ryan J

2014-11-01

105

Effect of temperature and disinfection strategies on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in a bench-scale drinking water distribution system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The establishment of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), a group of autotrophic microorganisms responsible for nitrification in chloraminated distribution systems, was studied in a bench-scale distribution system. The potential significance of temperature and disinfectant residual associated with chloramination in full-scale drinking water distribution systems was assessed. Biofilm development was primarily monitored using AOB abundance and nitrite concentrations. The bench-scale system was initially

Katarina D. M Pintar; Robin M Slawson

2003-01-01

106

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Second topical report, Results of bench-scale screening of additives  

SciTech Connect

ADA Technologies, Inc. (ADA) has completed the bench-scale testing phase of a program to evaluate additives that will improve the collection of fine particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A bench-scale ESP was installed at the Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL) combustion research and development facility in Library, PA in order to conduct the evaluation. During a two-week test, four candidate additives were injected into the flue gas ahead of a 100 acfm ESP to determine the effect on fly ash collectability. Two additives were found to reduce the emissions from the ESP. Additives ``C`` and ``D`` performed better than initially anticipated -- reducing emissions initially by 17%. Emissions were reduced by 27% after the ESP was modified by the installation of baffles to minimize sneakage. In addition to the measured improvements in performance, no detrimental effects (i.e., electrode fouling) were observed in the operation of the ESP during the testing. The measures of success identified for the bench-scale phase of the program have been surpassed. Since the additives will affect only non-rapping reentrainment particle losses, it is expected that an even greater improvement in particle collection will be observed in larger-scale ESPs. Therefore, positive results are anticipated during the pilot-scale phase of the program and during a future full-scale demonstration test. A preliminary economic analysis was performed to evaluate the cost of the additive process and to compare its costs against alternative means for reducing emissions from ESPs. The results show that conditioning with additive C at a rate of 0.05% (wt. additive to wt. fly ash) is much less expensive than adding new ESP capacity, and more cost competitive than existing chemical conditioning processes. Preliminary chemical analysis of conditioned fly ash shows that it passes the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure criteria.

Durham, M.D.

1993-08-13

107

EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to dissolve solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct steam injection to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. For wastes that have significantly high chromium content, the caustic leaching and slurry dewatering is followed by adding sodium permanganate to UFP-VSL-T02A, and the slurry is subjected to oxidative leaching at nominally ambient temperature. The purpose of the oxidative leaching is to selectively oxidize the poorly alkaline-soluble Cr(III) believed to be the insoluble form in Hanford tank sludge to the much more alkaline-soluble Cr(VI), e.g., chromate. The work described in this report provides the test results that are related to the efficiency of the oxidative leaching process to support process modeling based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed both at the lab-bench scale and in the PEP. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to oxidative leaching chemistry to support a scale factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. Owing to schedule constraints, the PEP test data to be included in this report are limited to those from Integrated Tests A (T01 A/B caustic leaching) and B (T02A caustic leaching).

Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-14

108

A bench-scale assessment for phosphorus release control of sediment by an oxygen-releasing compound (ORC).  

PubMed

The effects of oxygen-releasing compound (ORC) on the control of phosphorus (P) release as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of P fractions in sediment were studied through a bench-scale test. An ORC with an extended oxygen-releasing capacity was prepared. The results of the oxygen-releasing test showed that the ORC provided a prolonged period of oxygen release with a highly effective oxygen content of 60.6% when compared with powdery CaO2. In the bench-scale test, an ORC dose of 180 g·m(-2) provided a higher inhibition efficiency for P release within 50 days. With the application of the ORC, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and redox potential (ORP) of the overlying water were notably improved, and the dissolved total phosphorus (DTP) was maintained below 0.689 mg·L(-1) compared to 2.906 mg·L(-1) without the ORC treatment. According to the P fractions distribution, the summation of all detectable P fractions in each sediment layer exhibited an enhanced accumulation tendency with the application of ORC. Higher phosphorus retention efficiencies were observed in the second and third layers of sediment from days 10 to 20 with the ORC. Phosphorus was trapped mainly in the form of iron bound P (Fe-P) and organically bound P (O-P) in sediment with the ORC, whereas the effects of the ORC on exchangeable P (EX-P), apatite-associated P (A-P) and detrital P (De-P) in the sediment sample were not significant. The microbial activities of the sediment samples demonstrated that both the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in the upper sediment layer increased with the ORC treatment, which indicated that the mineralization of P was accelerated and the microbial biomass was increased. As the accumulation of P suppressed the release of P, the sediment exhibited an increased P retention efficiency with the application of the ORC. PMID:25438131

Yang, Jie; Lin, Feng K; Yang, Lei; Hua, Dan Y

2015-01-01

109

Design of Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

The major goal of the project is to design and optimize a bench-scale process for novel silicone CO{sub 2}-capture solvents and establish scalability and potential for commercialization of post-combustion capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. This system should be capable of 90% capture efficiency and demonstrate that less than 35% increase in the cost of energy services can be achieved upon scale-up. Experiments were conducted to obtain data required for design of the major unit operations. The bench-scale system design has been completed, including sizing of major unit operations and the development of a detailed Process and Instrument Diagram (P&ID). The system has been designed to be able to operate over a wide range of process conditions so that the effect of various process variables on performance can be determined. To facilitate flexibility in operation, the absorption column has been designed in a modular manner, so that the height of the column can be varied. The desorber has also been designed to allow for a range of residence times, temperatures, and pressures. The system will be fabricated at Techniserv Inc.

Wood, Benjamin

2012-06-30

110

Preliminary tests of overburden material filtration and capture bag concept: Phase II  

SciTech Connect

The experimental work described in this report was performed to provide test data for the Nuclear Emergency Search Team (NEST) Damage Limitation Working Group. These tests extended our previous test results of shock absorption and aerosol filtration under transient air-flow conditions. Two types of experiments were run using two separate apparatus. Nylon fabric capture bags were structurally tested on a small shock tube similar to the shock tube used in the Phase I tests but capable of higher-pressure shocks. The various filter media were tested for steady-state aerosol filtration efficiency during high pressure drops using the Phase I blowdown tube modified for thin (2.54 cm or 1 in.) media samples.

Horak, H.L.; Gregory, W.S.; Smith, P.R.; Grothus, H.

1981-12-01

111

Bench-scale co-processing. Quarterly report No. 11, October 1, 1990--December 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this contract is to extend and optimize UOP`s single-stage, slurry-catalyzed co-processing scheme. The particular emphasis is one evaluating alternative and disposable slurry-catalyst systems. During the current quarter, Lloydminster vacuum resid was processed without the presence of coal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the manner in which the resid is upgraded at high-severity conditions to help understand the function of the resid during co-processing. This report coves Bench-Scale Runs 30 to 34. In Runs 30 to 34, Lloydminster vacuum resid was processed without the presence of coal using a 0.05 wt % molybdenum-based catalyst at 465{degrees}C.

Piasecki, C.A.; Gatsis, J.G.

1992-02-19

112

Bench-Scale Monolith Autothermal Reformer Catalyst Screening Evaluations in a Micro-Reactor With Jet-A Fuel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solid oxide fuel cell systems used in the aerospace or commercial aviation environment require a compact, light-weight and highly durable catalytic fuel processor. The fuel processing method considered here is an autothermal reforming (ATR) step. The ATR converts Jet-A fuel by a reaction with steam and air forming hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) to be used for production of electrical power in the fuel cell. This paper addresses the first phase of an experimental catalyst screening study, looking at the relative effectiveness of several monolith catalyst types when operating with untreated Jet-A fuel. Six monolith catalyst materials were selected for preliminary evaluation and experimental bench-scale screening in a small 0.05 kWe micro-reactor test apparatus. These tests were conducted to assess relative catalyst performance under atmospheric pressure ATR conditions and processing Jet-A fuel at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 3.5, a value higher than anticipated to be run in an optimized system. The average reformer efficiencies for the six catalysts tested ranged from 75 to 83 percent at a constant gas-hourly space velocity of 12,000 hr 1. The corresponding hydrocarbon conversion efficiency varied from 86 to 95 percent during experiments run at reaction temperatures between 750 to 830 C. Based on the results of the short-duration 100 hr tests reported herein, two of the highest performing catalysts were selected for further evaluation in a follow-on 1000 hr life durability study in Phase II.

Tomsik, Thomas M.; Yen, Judy C.H.; Budge, John R.

2006-01-01

113

Mercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Studies  

E-print Network

Mercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot Addition of halogens or halides has been reported to promote mercury removal in coal-fired power plants mercury in the gas phase upon introduction of KI, indicating that the oxidation product HgI2 was captured

Li, Ying

114

Fast Pyrolysis of Corn Straw for Bio-oil Production in a Bench-scale Fluidized Bed Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Corn straw was pyrolyzed in a bench-scale fluidized bed reactor. In the experiments, the influence of pyrolysis temperature, biomass particle size, and vapors residence time on the product distribution was investigated. In addition, optimization of the key parameters for corn straw fast pyrolysis for bio-oil production was conducted according to orthogonal experiment design. Results showed that pyrolysis temperature and vapors

R. Liu; C. Deng; J. Wang

2009-01-01

115

Filtration sizes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and surrogate viruses used to test barrier materials.  

PubMed Central

Filters with well-defined holes were used to determine the effective diameters in buffer of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 1, and four bacteriophages (phi X174, T7, PRD1, and phi 6), which may serve as surrogate viruses for testing barrier materials. Bacteriophages phi 6 and PRD1 most closely model human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in filtration size. PMID:1610199

Lytle, C D; Tondreau, S C; Truscott, W; Budacz, A P; Kuester, R K; Venegas, L; Schmukler, R E; Cyr, W H

1992-01-01

116

Pore-scale and continuum modeling of gas flow pattern obtained by high-resolution optical bench-scale experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-resolution optical bench-scale experiments were conducted in order to investigate local gas flow pattern and integral flow properties caused by point-like gas injection into water-saturated glass beads. The main goal of this study was to test the validity of the continuum approach for two-fluid flow in macroscopic homogeneous media. Analyzing the steady state experimental gas flow pattern that satisfies the necessary coherence condition by image processing and calibrating the optical gas distribution by the gravimetrical gas saturation, it was found that a pulse-like function yields the best fit for the lateral gas saturation profile. This strange behavior of a relatively sharp saturation transition is in contradiction to the widely anticipated picture of a smooth Gaussian-like transition, which is obtained by the continuum approach. This transition is caused by the channelized flow structure, and it turns out that only a narrow range of capillary pressure is realized by the system, whereas the continuum approach assumes that within the representative elementary volume the whole spectrum of capillary pressures can be realized. It was found that the stochastical hypothesis proposed by Selker et al. (2007) that bridges pore scale and continuum scale is supported by the experiments. In order to study channelized gas flow on the pore scale, a variational treatment, which minimizes the free energy of an undulating capillary, was carried out. On the basis of thermodynamical arguments the geometric form of a microcapillary, macrochannel formation and a length-scale-dependent transition in gas flow pattern from coherent to incoherent flow are discussed.

Geistlinger, Helmut; Lazik, Detlef; Krauss, Gunnar; Vogel, Hans-JöRg

2009-04-01

117

Probabilistic inversion of electrical resistivity data from bench-scale experiments: On model parameterization for CO2 sequestration monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a well-established method for geophysical characterization and has shown potential for monitoring geologic CO2 sequestration, due to its sensitivity to electrical resistivity contrasts generated by liquid/gas saturation variability. In contrast to deterministic ERT inversion approaches, probabilistic inversion provides not only a single saturation model but a full posterior probability density function for each model parameter. Furthermore, the uncertainty inherent in the underlying petrophysics (e.g., Archie's Law) can be incorporated in a straightforward manner. In this study, the data are from bench-scale ERT experiments conducted during gas injection into a quasi-2D (1 cm thick), translucent, brine-saturated sand chamber with a packing that mimics a simple anticlinal geological reservoir. We estimate saturation fields by Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling with the MT-DREAM(ZS) algorithm and compare them quantitatively to independent saturation measurements from a light transmission technique, as well as results from deterministic inversions. Different model parameterizations are evaluated in terms of the recovered saturation fields and petrophysical parameters. The saturation field is parameterized (1) in cartesian coordinates, (2) by means of its discrete cosine transform coefficients, and (3) by fixed saturation values and gradients in structural elements defined by a gaussian bell of arbitrary shape and location. Synthetic tests reveal that a priori knowledge about the expected geologic structures (as in parameterization (3)) markedly improves the parameter estimates. The number of degrees of freedom thus strongly affects the inversion results. In an additional step, we explore the effects of assuming that the total volume of injected gas is known a priori and that no gas has migrated away from the monitored region.

Breen, S. J.; Lochbuehler, T.; Detwiler, R. L.; Linde, N.

2013-12-01

118

Disinfectant susceptibility testing of avian and swine Campylobacter isolates by a filtration method.  

PubMed

The susceptibility testing of disinfectants against Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains from broilers and pigs was investigated. The filtration method European standard EN 1040 was adapted to Campylobacter cultures and validated with reference strains. Two disinfectants were tested: 1% benzalkonium chloride active matter, as quaternary ammonium compound, and 0.63% sodium hypochlorite as chlorine-releasing agent. Both disinfectants were effective against the 34 Campylobacter strains tested after 5 min exposure under in vitro conditions. No link between resistance to disinfectants and antibiotics could be observed. PMID:14516706

Avrain, Laëtitia; Allain, Lionel; Vernozy-Rozand, Christine; Kempf, Isabelle

2003-10-01

119

Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

2014-09-01

120

Bench-Scale Electrochemical System for Generation of CO and Syn-Gas  

SciTech Connect

A bench-scale system for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 has been developed which produces CO and H2 (syn-gas) mixtures. The system is equipped with a gas-diffusion electrode which partially alleviates some of the mass-transport issues associated with CO2 delivery to the cathode. The positive effect of temperature was discovered where at 70°C a reduction in cell voltage of 1.57 V (compared to ambient) was observed at 70 mA cm-2. Controlling the flow of CO2 made it possible to maintain set H2:CO ratios with CO accounting for 25-90% of the product and H2 accounting for 10-75%. The cell, after an initial stabilization period of 40 min, displays reproducible, stable behavior. The current cell design brings the current densities for CO2 reduction closer to what is currently achieved in industrial alkaline electrolysis cells. This report discusses the electrolyte, electrode materials and variables which have been found to be significant in the production of CO and syn-gas mixtures.

Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

2011-06-01

121

Safety analysis of the CSTR-1 bench-scale coal liquefaction unit  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the CSTR-1 bench scale unit located in Building 167 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. It was apparent that considerable effort was expended in the design and construction of the unit, and in the development of operating procedures, with regard to safety. Exhaust ventilation, H/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S monitoring, overpressure protection, overtemperature protection, and interlock systems have been provided. Present settings on the pressure and temperature safety systems are too high, however, to insure prevention of vessel deformation or damage in all cases. While the occurrence of catastrophic rupture of a system pressure vessel (e.g., reactor, high pressure separators) is unlikely, the potential consequences to personnel are severe. Feasibility of providing shielding for these components should be considered. A more probable mode of vessel failure in the event of overpressure or overtemperature and failure of the safety system is yielding of the closure bolts followed by high pressure flow across the mating surfaces. As a minimum, shielding should be designed to restrict travel of resultant spray. The requirements for personal protective equipment are presently stated in rather broad and general terms in the operating procedures. Safe practices and procedures would be more assured if specific requirements were stated and included for each operational step. Recommendations were developed for all hazards triggered by the guidelines.

Hulburt, D.A.

1981-05-01

122

Filtration effects on the alkali metal content of biocrude oil  

SciTech Connect

The production of fuels and chemicals from biomass feedstocks is one of the areas of renewable energy research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Fast pyrolysis is one of the thermochemical conversion methods being developed at NREL for recovering the stored energy in biomass. The physical properties of thermochemically derived biomass fuels are very important if these fuels are to be used for electrical power generation, in steam boilers, or diesel fuel. The alkali metal content of the biocrude is very critical if it is going to be used as a turbine fuel to avoid damaging or wearing turbine blades. To study the origin of alkali metals, calcium and other trace inorganic content of biocrude, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) was pyrolyzed in a bench-scale fluidized bed reactor at 500{degrees}C. After pyrolysis, cold filtration and leaching tests were carried out on die biocrude derived from the switchgrass. Cold filtration and leaching test results showed that the char particles in the oil are the main cause of the high alkali metal contents. The inorganics are sequestered in the char particles and do not leach into the oil phase. These char particles are of submicron size and cannot be easily removed by cold filtration. Consequently, a small hot gas filtration unit was attached to the fluidized bed reactor to remove the char particles in situ. An analysis of die hot gas filtered pyrolysis oils for alkali metals and ash showed that alkali metal content can be reduced to less than 10 ppm compared to 250-300 ppm for a cyclone separated oil.

Besler-Gueran, S.; Agblevor, F.A.; Scahill, J.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-31

123

Detection of pathogenic Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis using water filtration, animal and bait testing.  

PubMed

The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can be challenging to detect at endangered amphibian reintroduction sites. Pre-release Bd detection can be confounded by imperfect animal sampling and the absence of animals. In Study 1, we used historical Bd-positive sites, to concurrently evaluate water filtrates and mouth bar (tadpoles) or skin swab (caudates) samples for Bd using molecular beacon realtime PCR. In Study 2, during a natural outbreak, we used PCR to detect Bd from zoospore-attracting keratin baits (three avian, three snake species). In Study 1, no captured animals (n=116) exhibited clinical signs, although 10.6% were positive, representing three of seven species sampled. In contrast, 5.4% of water filters (n=56) were Bd-positive. In Study 2, after short incubation times, a single duck down feather tested Bd-positive. In conclusion, Bd was detected in asymptomatic amphibians and water filtrate at two sites, and from water only, at two other sites. With continued refinement, semi-quantitative Bd water filtrate screening could better define zoospore-specific disease risk, allowing better characterization of the free-living phase of the organism's life cycle. Finally, these results suggest wild aquatic birds (e.g., waterfowl) should be systematically explored as a means of Bd spread. Since large numbers of aquatic birds migrate, even low Bd transfer rates could be a significant means for disease dissemination. PMID:25231013

Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Feldman, Sanford H; Heffron, Meghan; Hammond, Meagan; Ruehling, Margaret P Roth; Grayson, Kristine L; Mitchell, Joseph C

2014-01-01

124

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily demonstrated. In addition to the experimental studies, the technical challenges pertinent to fouling of slurry-handling equipment and the design of the crystallizer and stripper were addressed through consultation with vendors and engineering analyses. A process flow diagram of the Hot-CAP was then developed and a TEA was performed to compare the energy use and cost performance of a nominal 550-MWe subcritical pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plant without CO{sub 2} capture (DOE/NETL Case 9) with the benchmark MEA-based post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC; DOE/NETL Case 10) and the Hot-CAP-based PCC. The results revealed that the net power produced in the PC + Hot-CAP is 609 MWe, greater than the PC + MEA (550 MWe). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the PC + Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} transportation and storage, is 120.3 mills/kWh, a 60% increase over the base PC plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The LCOE increase for the Hot-CAP is 29% lower than that for MEA. TEA results demonstrated that the Hot-CAP is energy-efficient and cost-effective compared with the benchmark MEA process.

Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O'Brien, Kevin

2014-03-31

125

A central composite rotatable design analysis of lipase catalyzed synthesis of lauroyl lactic acid at bench-scale level  

Microsoft Academic Search

Porcine Pancreas lipase (PPL) was employed for the reaction between lactic acid and lauric acid at bench-scale level. A Response Surface Methodological (RSM) study was conducted by employing a five-level, five variable, central composite rotatable design (CCRD) in order to understand the esterification behavior of PPL in the lauroyl lactic acid synthesis. Five important variables were considered, namely, enzyme\\/substrate (E\\/S)

K. R. Kiran; B. Manohar; S. Divakar

2001-01-01

126

Chemotaxis increases vertical migration and apparent transverse dispersion of bacteria in a bench-scale microcosm.  

PubMed

The success of in situ bioremediation is often limited by the inability to bring bacteria in contact with the pollutant, which they will degrade. A bench-scale model aquifer was used to evaluate the impact of chemotaxis on the migration of bacteria toward the source of a chemical pollutant. The model was packed with sand and aqueous media was pumped across horizontally, simulating groundwater flow in a homogenous aquifer. A vertical gradient in chemoattractant was created by either a continuous injection of sodium benzoate or a pulse injection of sodium acetate. A pulse of chemotactic Pseudomonas putida F1 or a non-chemotactic mutant of the same species was injected below the attractant. The eluent was sampled at the microcosm outlet to generate vertical concentration profiles of the bacteria and chemoattractant. Moment analysis was used to determine the center and variance of the bacterial profiles. The center of the chemotactic bacterial population was located at an average of 0.74 ± 0.07 cm closer to the level at which the chemoattractant was injected than its non-chemotactic mutant in benzoate experiments (P < 0.015) and 0.4 ± 0.2 cm closer in acetate experiments (P < 0.05). The transverse dispersivity of the chemotactic bacteria was 4 ± 1 × 10(-3) cm higher in benzoate experiments than the transverse dispersivity of the non-chemotactic mutant and 1 ± 2 × 10(-3) cm higher in acetate experiments. These results underscore the contribution of chemotaxis to improve transport of bacteria to contaminant sources, potentially enhancing the effectiveness of in situ bioremediation. PMID:21495010

Strobel, Kathryn L; McGowan, Sara; Bauer, Robert D; Griebler, Christian; Liu, Jun; Ford, Roseanne M

2011-09-01

127

Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene.  

PubMed

The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc=0.233±0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development. PMID:25084057

Hegele, P R; Mumford, K G

2014-09-01

128

Basic Study on Anaerobic Biological Filtration Using a Floating Filter Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experiment of anaerobic filtration using a floating media was carried out in this study. In the present system, a bench-scale column of 50 mm in diameter and of 1500 mm in height and a floating media consisting of S-shaped polystyrene pieces were employed. The purpose of this study was to collect the basic data of anaerobic biological filtration using a floating

Weimin Xie; Qunhui Wang; Huiling Liu; Masao Kondo; Yukihide Ohsumi; Hiroaki I. Ogawa

2004-01-01

129

Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design (Presentation)  

EPA Science Inventory

Rain garden design manuals and guidelines typically recommend using native soils or engineered media that meet specifications for low content of clay, silt, fine and very fine sands, and organic matter. These characteristics promote stormwater infiltration and sorption of heavy ...

130

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing  

SciTech Connect

Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,'' there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

Not Available

1991-09-01

131

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing  

SciTech Connect

Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,`` there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

Not Available

1991-09-01

132

BENCH-SCALE TESTING OF SORBENT ADDITIVES FOR TRACE METAL CAPTURE AND RETENTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The suitability of six minerals; silica, diatomaceous earth, kaolin, bauxite, alumina and attapulgite clay, as potential sorbents for the capture and immobilization of trace metals was evaluated. he behavior of five trace metals; arsenic, cadmium, chromium,, lead and nickel was t...

133

BENCH-SCALE PERFORMANCE TESTING AND ECONOMIC ANALYSES OF ELECTROSTATIC DRY COAL CLEANING  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of preliminary performance evaluations and economic analyses of the Advanced Energy Dynamics (AED) electrostatic dry coal-cleaning process. Grab samples of coal feed product coals were obtained from 25 operating physical coal cleaning (PCC) plants. These ...

134

SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

ROBBINS RA

2011-02-11

135

Influence of the apparent molecular size of aquatic humic substances on colour removal by coagulation and filtration.  

PubMed

This study aims to verify the influence of the apparent molecular size of aquatic humic substances (AHSs) on the effectiveness of coagulation with aluminium sulphate and ferric chloride. Coagulation-filtration tests using the jar test and bench-scale sand filters were carried out with water samples having a true colour of approximately 100 Hazen units and prepared with AHSs of different molecular sizes. Stability diagrams are presented showing regions of > or = 90% and > or = 95% apparent colour removal delineated for each water sample using plots of total metal ion concentration (Al3+ and Fe3+) versus coagulation pH. To achieve the same degree of colour removal, the water samples with smaller apparent molecular sizes and a higher percentage of fulvic acids required higher dosages of both aluminium sulphate and ferric chloride. PMID:22439564

Rigobello, Eliane Sloboda; Dantas, Angela Di Bernardo; Di Bernardo, Luiz; Vieira, Eny Maria

2011-12-01

136

In-situ Subaqueous Capping of Mercury-Contaminated Sediments in a Fresh-Water Aquatic System, Part I-Bench-Scale Microcosm Study to Assess Methylmercury Production  

EPA Science Inventory

Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absenc...

137

Bench-scale evaluation of drinking water treatment parameters on iron particles and water quality.  

PubMed

Discoloration of water resulting from suspended iron particles is one of the main customer complaints received by water suppliers. However, understanding of the mechanisms of discoloration as well as role of materials involved in the process is limited. In this study, an array of bench scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of the most common variables (pH, PO4, Cl2 and DOM) on the properties of iron particles and suspensions derived from the oxygenation of Fe(II) ions in NaHCO3 buffered synthetic water systems. The most important factors as well as their rank influencing iron suspension color and turbidity formation were identified for a range of water quality parameters. This was accomplished using a 2(4) full factorial design approach at a 95% confidence level. The statistical analysis revealed that phosphate was found to be the most significant factor to alter color (contribution: 37.9%) and turbidity (contribution: 45.5%) in an iron-water system. A comprehensive study revealed that phosphate and chlorine produced iron suspension with reduced color and turbidity, made ?-potential more negative, reduced the average particle size, and increased iron suspension stability. In the presence of DOM, color was observed to increase but a reverse trend was observed to decrease the turbidity and to alter particle size distribution. HPSEC results suggest that higher molecular weight fractions of DOM tend to adsorb onto the surfaces of iron particles at early stages, resulting in alteration of the surface charge of iron particles. This in turn limits particles aggregation and makes iron colloids highly stable. In the presence of a phosphate based corrosion inhibitor, this study demonstrated that color and turbidity resulting from suspended iron were lower at a pH value of 6.5 (compared to pH of 8.5). The same trend was observed in presence of DOM. This study also suggested that iron colloid suspension color and turbidity in chlorinated drinking water systems could be lower than non-chlorinated systems. PMID:24075475

Rahman, M Safiur; Gagnon, Graham A

2014-01-01

138

Urban water reuse: microbial pathogens control by direct filtration and ultraviolet disinfection.  

PubMed

Physicochemical treatment efficiency for unrestricted urban water reuse was evaluated at a conventional activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Pilot plant set-up consisted of an alum coagulation step, granular media upflow flocculation and direct downflow dual-media filtration followed by ultraviolet disinfection (dose of 95 mJ cm?²). Optimum aluminum sulfate dosage of 10 mg L?¹ and coagulation pH 7.0 were preset based on bench scale tests. Under WWTP stable operation, water quality met United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) suggested guidelines for unrestricted urban reuse regarding turbidity (mean value 1.3 NTU) and suspended solids (mean value 2.1 mg L?¹). When WWTP overall plant performance dropped from 90 to 80% (although BOD value stayed below 6 mg O? L?¹, suggesting unrestricted reuse), solids breakthrough in filtrate was observed. Microorganism removal rates were: total coliforms 60.0%, Escherichia coli 63.0%, Giardia spp. 81.0%, and helminth eggs 62.5%; thus organisms still remained in filtrate. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection efficiency was 4.1- and 3.8-log for total coliforms and E. coli, respectively. Considering low UV efficiency obtained for helminths and the survival of protozoa and helminths in the environment, effluent quality presents risk to public health if destined for unrestricted urban reuse. PMID:25252350

de Lima Isaac, Ricardo; Dos Santos, Luciana Urbano; Tosetto, Mariana S; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Guimarães, José Roberto

2014-09-01

139

Filtration Investigation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore how engineering has developed various means to remove impurities from water. Learners work in teams of "engineers" to design and build their own "filtration system" out of everyday items. Working with "muddy" water, learners develop a design, and then build and test a system to remove as much impurities from the water as possible. Learners view their own tests and those of other teams, evaluate their results, and present findings to the group. The group with the clearest "filtered" water is considered to have developed the best filter system.
Safety note: Be sure to stress that the "filtered" water, no matter how clear, is not suitable for drinking. For younger students, do not provide charcoal as a filtration option.

IEEE

2014-05-22

140

Field tested milliliter-scale blood filtration device for point-of-care applications.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present a low cost and equipment-free blood filtration device capable of producing plasma from blood samples with mL-scale capacity and demonstrate its clinical application for hepatitis B diagnosis. We report the results of in-field testing of the device with 0.8-1?ml of undiluted, anticoagulated human whole blood samples from patients at the National Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Hanoi, Vietnam. Blood cell counts demonstrate that the device is capable of filtering out 99.9% of red and 96.9% of white blood cells, and the plasma collected from the device contains lower red blood cell counts than plasma obtained from a centrifuge. Biochemistry and immunology testing establish the suitability of the device as a sample preparation unit for testing alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), urea, hepatitis B "e" antigen (HBeAg), hepatitis B "e" antibody (HBe Ab), and hepatitis B surface antibody (HBs Ab). The device provides a simple and practical front-end sample processing method for point-of-care microfluidic diagnostics, enabling sufficient volumes for multiplexed downstream tests. PMID:24404044

Gong, Max M; Macdonald, Brendan D; Vu Nguyen, Trung; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Sinton, David

2013-01-01

141

Radioactive Bench-scale Steam Reformer Demonstration of a Monolithic Steam Reformed Mineralized Waste Form for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste - 12306  

SciTech Connect

Hanford currently has 212,000 m{sup 3} (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive mixed waste stored in the Hanford tank farm. This waste will be processed to produce both high-level and low-level activity fractions, both of which are to be vitrified. Supplemental treatment options have been under evaluation for treating portions of the low-activity waste, as well as the liquid secondary waste from the low-activity waste vitrification process. One technology under consideration has been the THOR{sup R} fluidized bed steam reforming process offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (TTT). As a follow-on effort to TTT's 2008 pilot plant FBSR non-radioactive demonstration for treating low-activity waste and waste treatment plant secondary waste, TTT, in conjunction with Savannah River National Laboratory, has completed a bench scale evaluation of this same technology on a chemically adjusted radioactive surrogate of Hanford's waste treatment plant secondary waste stream. This test generated a granular product that was subsequently formed into monoliths, using a geo-polymer as the binding agent, that were subjected to compressibility testing, the Product Consistency Test and other leachability tests, and chemical composition analyses. This testing has demonstrated that the mineralized waste form, produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay using the TTT process, is as durable as low-activity waste glass. Testing has shown the resulting monolith waste form is durable, leach resistant, and chemically stable, and has the added benefit of capturing and retaining the majority of Tc-99, I-129, and other target species at high levels. (authors)

Evans, Brent; Olson, Arlin; Mason, J. Bradley; Ryan, Kevin [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC - 106 Newberry St. SW, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States); Jantzen, Carol; Crawford, Charles [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNL), LLC, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2012-07-01

142

Study on bio-filtration system for livestock wastewater and the water quality testing technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper introduced the processing of the domestic and international livestock wastewater. The actuality of environmental problems caused by livestock husbandry was discussed and the relationship between husbandry and sustainable development was remarked on. From the point of ecosystem, dealing with livestock wastewater harmlessly with bio-filtration system is advised. A bio-filtration system is set up based on the analysis of a typical and simple water treatment system. The system mainly consists of a solid removal basin and a planting filter. We elect ryegrass as the planting-filter, because it gets best sod, mechanic filtration and bio-filtration. Effects of static bio-filtration were studied in ryegrass. Under this system, to achieve preferable purification efficiency, the wastewater concentration and the area of planting which suited for pasture growth will be provided. Near infrared spectra was used to analyze the water quality, about chemical oxygen demand (CODcr). A set of 20 samples of livestock wastewater with different concentrations was taken from the Animal Institution of Zhejiang Agricultural Science Organization, and the partial least square (PLS) was used to develop predictive models. To validate these models, some samples were used. SEP were 22, 32 and r2 values using the validation set of data were 0.9895, 0.9985 for COD of wastewater.

Cen, Haiyan; Bao, Yidan; He, Yong; Wang, Kaiying

2006-09-01

143

Filtration Fundamentals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines how choice of commercial swimming-pool filtration systems is driven by the project-specific needs of the pools. Also highlighted are definitions of specific terms used when discussing filtration systems. Questions that pool designers can answer to make filtration-system purchasing decisions are listed. (GR)

Ward, Ken; Hunsaker, Scot

1997-01-01

144

Co-Firing of Sewage Sludge with Bark in A Bench-Scale Bubbling Fluidized BED — A Study of Deposits and Emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been shown that addition of either sulfur and/or aluminosilicates such as kaolinite may reduce alkali induced deposit formation when firing biomass fuels. Sewage sludge is a fuel containing substantial amounts of sulfur and aluminosilicates, such as zeolites. In this work different amounts of sewage sludge (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8%en) were co-fired with bark in a bench-scale BFB. SO2 and HCl emissions were measured and deposits were sampled during 3 hrs with an air-cooled probe with a surface temperature of 500°C at two different locations with flue gas temperatures of 850°C and 650°C, respectively. The test results showed that an increase of the share of sewage sludge to the fuel mixture increased theformation of HCl and simultaneously decreased the Cl-content in the deposits. Usually this is considered to be a sign of sulfation of alkali chlorides. However, the increase of HCl canalso be caused by AI-silicates capturing alkali, thus releasing Cl as HCl to the gas phase. AIthough, sulfur increased in the fuel input with an increased share of sewage sludge, this was not reflected in the gaseous emissions as may be expected. Up to 4%en sewage sludge was fired together with bark without increasing the sulfur content in theemissions. At higher shares of sewage sludge the sulfur emissions increased linearly with an increase of sewage sludge. The amount of water soluble potassium fed into the boiler remained relatively constant in the different tests. This potassium is usually released as volatile salts. Nevertheless, the amount found in deposits decreased with an increase in sludge feeding. In this paper it was shown that interaction of potassium with AI-silicates in the bed is a probable cause for the decrease of potassium in the deposits, while both the sulfation of potassium chlorides and possibly also, the alkali capture by AI-silicates can weaken the deposition of Cl.

Yrjas, Patrik; Aho, Martti; Zevenhoven, Maria; Taipale, Raili; Silvennoinen, Jaani; Hupa, Mikko

145

Relating feedstock composition to product slate and composition in catalytic cracking: 1. Bench scale experiments with liquid chromatographic fractions from Wilmington, CA, >650{degree}F resid  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic cracking behavior of compound types in the >650{degree}F resid from a Wilmington, CA, 14.2{degree} API crude was investigated. Liquid Chromatography (LC) was used to separate the resid into eight fractions. These fractions were used as feedstocks for a bench scale fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) unit. Gasoline was produced almost exclusively from neutral (65 % of whole resid) components. Acidic and basic types were partially converted to coke plus small amounts of C{sub l} and C{sub 2} gases, with the balance primarily carrying over as heavy liquid products. Gasoline composition depended on the type and quantity of polar compounds present in the feed because both acidic and basic compounds inhibited cracking reactions ({beta}-scission, hydrogen transfer, etc.) to varying degrees. In accordance with prior work, basic nitrogen compounds exhibited the largest inhibitory effect on cracking. Their effect is dependent on concentrations up to a limiting value which may correspond to saturation of susceptible catalyst sites. On an equal weight basis, the effect of high boiling (high molecular weight) bases was less than those occurring in the 650--1000{degree}F distillate range. Partitioning of nitrogen present in acidic (e.g. carbazole) forms in the feed into liquid products was greater than for basic nitrogen. Thiophenic forms of sulfur partitioned more into liquid and less into gaseous (H{sub 2}S) products than sulfide-type sulfur. Coke yield was approximately proportional to microcarbon residue test results for all feeds. Ongoing work with additional feedstocks has indicated behavior similar to that of Wilmington. Selected Wilmington liquid products are undergoing detailed analysis in order to determine relationships between feed versus product composition, particularly with respect to acidic and basic types.

Green, J.B.; Zagula, E.J.; Reynolds, J.W.; Wandke, H.H.; Young, L.L.; Chew, H.

1993-09-01

146

In situ encapsulation bench-scale demonstration report FY-94 (for TTP-ID 142012)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the test objectives, procedures, and results of the laboratory-scale tests of in situ waste encapsulation of buried waste using a synthetic analogue of natural cement. The products of the reaction FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O + Ca(OH){sub 2} = gypsum and iron oxide/hydroxide were examined as a possible waste encapsulation material for application at the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This technique for transuranic waste encapsulation is being pursued by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration as a possible candidate containment and stabilization method for geologic time. The data indicate that the iron waste encapsulation materials tested are appropriate choices for the intended purpose. Based on these observations and conclusions, full-scale tests are recommended to determine the performance of the iron waste isolation materials under field conditions and for extended time periods. The viscosity of the reagents indicates that jet grouting is probably an appropriate application method.

Weidner, J.R.; Shaw, P.G.

1995-01-01

147

SCREENING/FLOTATION TREATMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS. VOLUME I. BENCH SCALE AND PILOT PLANT INVESTIGATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A four-layer sinusoidal sandwich plate structure, reinforced with micro concrete grout next to the skin faces and hydrostatically pressurized with hydraulic fluid internally is subjected to transverse load tests. The plate is simply supported on all four sides, and its stiffness ...

148

WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the grouts for measurements. All of the cured grouts were measured for bleed and set. All of the cured grouts satisfied the bleed and set requirements, where no bleed water was observed on any of the grout samples after one day and all had set within 3 days of curing. This data indicates, for a well mixed product, bleed and set requirement are satisfied for the range of acidic feeds tested in this task. The yield stress measurements provide both an indication on the mixability of the salt solution with dry materials and an indication of how quickly the grout is starting to form structure. The inability to properly mix these two streams into a well mixed grout product will lead to a non-homogeneous mixture that will impact product quality. Product quality issues could be unmixed regions of dry material and hot spots having high concentrations of americium 241. Mixes that were more difficult to incorporate typically resulted in grouts with higher yield stresses. The mixability from these tests will provide Waste Solidification Building (WSB) an indication of which grouts will be more challenging to mix. The first yield stress measurements were statistically compared to a list of variables, specifically the batched chemicals used to make the acidic solutions. The first yield stress was also compared to the physical properties of the acidic solutions, physical and pH properties of the neutralized/pH adjusted solutions, and chemical and physical properties of the grout.

Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

2009-03-20

149

Performance of bench-scale membrane bioreactor under real work conditions using pure oxygen: viscosity and oxygen transfer analysis.  

PubMed

Pure oxygen to supply the aerobic condition was used in the performance of a bench-scale submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR). The pilot plant was located in the wastewater treatment plant of the city of Granada (Spain) and the experimental work was divided into two stages (Unsteady state and steady state conditions). Operation parameters (MLSS, MLVSS and dissolved oxygen concentration) and physical characteristics (temperature, conductivity, pH, COD and BOD(5)) were daily monitored. The results showed the capacity of the MBR systems to remove organic material under a hydraulic retention time of 18.46 h and sludge retention time of 18.6 days. Therefore, Viscosity of the sludge and alphakLa-factor of the aeration, were determinate in the steady stage condition to understand the behavior of the system when pure oxygen has been used to supply the aerobic conditions of the MBR system showed an alpha-factor of 0.238 when the viscosity of the system was 4.04 Cp. PMID:20148266

Rodríguez, F A; Martínez-Toledo, M V; González-López, J; Hontoria, E; Poyatos, J M

2010-09-01

150

Recycling of polyethene and polypropene in a novel bench-scale rotating cone reactor by high-temperature pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

The high-temperature pyrolysis of polyethene (PE), polypropene (PP), and mixtures of these polymers was studied in a novel bench-scale rotating cone reactor (RCR). Experiments showed that the effect of the sand or reactor temperature on the product spectrum obtained is large compared to the effect of other parameters (for instance, residence time). In general, it can be concluded that the amount of polymer converted into propene and butene decreases with higher cracking severity (higher temperatures or longer residence times), while the fraction methane increases. About 80 wt% of the polymer is converted into gas at a reactor temperature of 898 K, while 20 wt% is converted into intermediate waxlike compounds or aromatics in the case of PE. The gas yield increases slightly with the reactor and/or sand temperature to 88 wt% at higher temperatures. The total amount of alkenes decreases with increasing cracking intensity, which suggests that the reactor should be operated at the lowest possible temperature. The results indicate that the reactor offers a few significant advantages compared to other reactors (no fluidization gas necessary, good solid-polymer mixing, no cyclones necessary) and a competitive product spectrum. However, significant improvements are still possible to make the reactor concept technically and economically more attractive.

Westerhout, R.W.J.; Waanders, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). Faculty of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). Faculty of Chemical Engineering

1998-06-01

151

15N NMR investigation of the reduction and binding of TNT in an aerobic bench scale reactor simulating windrow composting  

USGS Publications Warehouse

T15NT was added to a soil of low organic carbon content and composted for 20 days in an aerobic bench scale reactor. The finished whole compost and fulvic acid, humic acid, humin, and lignocellulose fractions extracted from the compost were analyzed by solid-state CP/MAS and DP/MAS 15N NMR. 15N NMR spectra provided direct spectroscopic evidence for reduction of TNT followed by covalent binding of the reduced metabolites to organic matter of the composted soil, with the majority of metabolite found in the lignocellulose fraction, by mass also the major fraction of the compost. In general, the types of bonds formed between soil organic matter and reduced TNT amines in controlled laboratory reactions were observed in the spectra of the whole compost and fractions, confirming that during composting TNT is reduced to amines that form covalent bonds with organic matter through aminohydroquinone, aminoquinone, heterocyclic, and imine linkages, among others. Concentrations of imine nitrogens in the compost spectra suggestthat covalent binding bythe diamines 2,4DANT and 2,6DANT is a significant process in the transformation of TNT into bound residues. Liquid-phase 15N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid and humin fractions provided possible evidence for involvement of phenoloxidase enzymes in covalent bond formation.

Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.A.

2002-01-01

152

Bench-scale study of active mine water treatment using cement kiln dust (CKD) as a neutralization agent.  

PubMed

The overall objective of this study was to investigate the potential impact on settled water quality of using cement kiln dust (CKD), a waste by-product, to replace quicklime in the active treatment of acidic mine water. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the treatment performance of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)(2)) slurries generated using four different CKD samples compared to a control treatment with quicklime (CaO) in terms of reducing acidity and metals concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) samples taken from the effluent of a lead/zinc mine in Atlantic Canada. Results of the study showed that all of the CKD samples evaluated were capable of achieving greater than 97% removal of total zinc and iron. The amount of solid alkaline material required to achieve pH targets required for neutralization of the AMD was found to be higher for treatment with the CKD slurries compared to the quicklime slurry control experiments, and varied linearly with the free lime content of the CKD. The results of this study also showed that a potential benefit of treating mine water with CKD could be reduced settled sludge volumes generated in the active treatment process, and further research into the characteristics of the sludge generated from the use of CKD-generated calcium hydroxide slurries is recommended. PMID:22133839

Mackie, Allison L; Walsh, Margaret E

2012-02-01

153

Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations, and process engineering. Final report, February 1977-December 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The sulfur-iodine water-splitting cycle is characterized by the following three reactions: 2H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2HI; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + 1/2 O/sub 2/; and 2HI ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/. This cycle was developed at General Atomic after several critical features in the above reactions were discovered. These involved phase separations, catalytic reactions, etc. Estimates of the energy efficiency of this economically reasonable advanced state-of-the-art processing unit produced sufficiently high values (to approx.47%) to warrant cycle development effort. The DOE contract was largely directed toward the engineering development of this cycle, including a small demonstration unit (CLCD), a bench-scale unit, engineering design, and costing. The work has resulted in a design that is projected to produce H/sub 2/ at prices not yet generally competitive with fossil-fuel-produced H/sub 2/ but are projected to be favorably competitive with respect to H/sub 2/ from fossil fuels in the future.

Norman, J.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Allen, C.L.

1982-05-01

154

Treatability study for the bench-scale solidification of nonincinerable LDR low-level mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this report is the solidification of nonincinerable, land disposal restricted (LDR) low-level mixed waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Benchscale solidification was performed on samples of this mixed waste, which was done under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act treatability study. Waste forms included liquids, sludges, and solids, and treatment techniques included the use of conventional Portland cement and sulphur polymer cement (SPC). A total of 113 monoliths were made under the experimental design matrix for this study; 8 of these were ``blank`` monoliths (contained no waste). Thus, 105 monoliths were used to solidify 21.6 kg of mixed waste; 92 were made with Portland cement systems, and 13 were made with SPC. Recipes for all monoliths are given, and suggested recipes (as based on the minimized leaching of toxic components) are summarized. In most cases, the results presented herein indicate that solidification was successful in immobilizing toxic metals, thereby transforming low-level mixed waste into low-level nonhazardous waste. The ultimate goal of this project is to use appropriate solidification techniques, as described in the literature, to transform low-level mixed waste to low-level nonhazardous waste by satisfying pertinent disposal requirements for this waste. Disposal requirements consider the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure tests, a free liquids test, and radiological analyses. This work is meaningful in that it will provide a basis for the disposal of waste that is currently categorized as LDR low-level mixed waste.

Gering, K.L.

1993-01-01

155

Treatability study for the bench-scale solidification of nonincinerable LDR low-level mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this report is the solidification of nonincinerable, land disposal restricted (LDR) low-level mixed waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Benchscale solidification was performed on samples of this mixed waste, which was done under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act treatability study. Waste forms included liquids, sludges, and solids, and treatment techniques included the use of conventional Portland cement and sulphur polymer cement (SPC). A total of 113 monoliths were made under the experimental design matrix for this study; 8 of these were blank'' monoliths (contained no waste). Thus, 105 monoliths were used to solidify 21.6 kg of mixed waste; 92 were made with Portland cement systems, and 13 were made with SPC. Recipes for all monoliths are given, and suggested recipes (as based on the minimized leaching of toxic components) are summarized. In most cases, the results presented herein indicate that solidification was successful in immobilizing toxic metals, thereby transforming low-level mixed waste into low-level nonhazardous waste. The ultimate goal of this project is to use appropriate solidification techniques, as described in the literature, to transform low-level mixed waste to low-level nonhazardous waste by satisfying pertinent disposal requirements for this waste. Disposal requirements consider the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure tests, a free liquids test, and radiological analyses. This work is meaningful in that it will provide a basis for the disposal of waste that is currently categorized as LDR low-level mixed waste.

Gering, K.L.

1993-01-01

156

Co-Firing of Sewage Sludge with Bark in A Bench-Scale Bubbling Fluidized BED — A Study of Deposits and Emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a It has been shown that addition of either sulfur and\\/or aluminosilicates such as kaolinite may reduce alkali induced deposit\\u000a formation when firing biomass fuels. Sewage sludge is a fuel containing substantial amounts of sulfur and aluminosilicates,\\u000a such as zeolites. In this work different amounts of sewage sludge (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8%en) were co-fired with bark in a bench-scale

Patrik Yrjas; Martti Aho; Maria Zevenhoven; Raili Taipale; Jaani Silvennoinen; Mikko Hupa

2010-01-01

157

Bench-scale evaluation of alternative biological treatment processes for the remediation of pentachlorophenol- and creosote-contaminated materials: Solidphase bioremediation. [Pentachlorophenol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bench-scale biotreatability studies were performed to evaluate the potential for using a solid-phase bioremediation process to ameliorate pentachlorophenol-(PCP-) and creosote-contaminated sediment and surface soil present at the American Creosote Works Superfund site, Pensacola, FL. The effects of tilling and fertilization on the rate and extent of biodegradation of PCP and 42 targeted creosote constituents by indigenous microflora were monitored by

James G. Mueller; Suzanne E. Lantz; Beat O. Blattmann; Peter J. Chapman

1991-01-01

158

Bench-scale evaluation of alternative biological treatment processes for the remediation of pentachlorophenol- and creosote-contaminated materials: Slurry-phase bioremediation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Performance data on slurry-phase bioremediation of pentachlorophenol (PCP)- and creosote-contaminated sediment and surface soil were generated at the bench-scale level. Aqueous slurries, containing 0.05% Triton X-100 to facilitate the soil washing process and to help stabilize the suspensions, were prepared from sediment and surface soil freshly obtained from the American Creosote Works Superfund site at Pensacola, Florida. Excluding PCP, benzo(b)fluoranthene,

James G. Mueller; Suzanne E. Lantz; Beat O. Blattmann; Peter J. Chapman

1991-01-01

159

The Recovery of Ammonia and Hydrogen Sulflde from Ground-Level Area Sources Using Dynamic Isolation Flux Chambers: Bench-Scale Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Controlled bench-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the recovery of ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulflde (H2S) from dynamic isolation flux chambers. H2S (80–4000 ppb) and NH3 (5000–40,000 ppb) samples were diffused through the flux chamber to simulate ground level area source emissions while measuring the inlet and outlet flux chamber concentrations simultaneously. Results showed that the recovery of H2S

Sergio C. Capareda; Cale N. Boriack; Saqib Mukhtar; Atilla Mutlu; Bryan W. Shaw; Ronald E. Lacey; Calvin B. Parnell Jr

2005-01-01

160

Bench-scale gasification of cedar wood--part II: effect of operational conditions on contaminant release.  

PubMed

Here, we present the evolution profile of tar in the product gas during cedar biomass gasification. We also discuss the evolution of other contaminants (H(2)S, COS, NH(3), HCN, and HCl). The cedar wood was gasified under various operating conditions in a bench-scale externally heated updraft gasifier; this was followed by thermal reforming. Tar levels in the product gas were significantly affected by the operating conditions used. At a gasification temperature of 923 K, there was no clear relation between the evolution of phenolic tar in the product gas as a function of residence time. The evolution of PAH tar at a low gasification temperature was lower than the evolution of phenolic tar. With increasing temperature, the proportion of PAH tar content became significant. At a gasification temperature of 1223 K, increasing the residence time reduced the content of PAH tar owing to a catalytic effect associated with ash generation at high temperatures. Increasing the steam-to-carbon (S/C) ratio under thermal conditions had a slight effect on PAH conversion. However, increasing the equivalence ratio (ER) effectively reduced the tar levels. The conversion of fuel-sulfur and fuel-nitrogen to volatile-sulfur and volatile-nitrogen, respectively, increased with increasing S/C ratio and ER. The evolutions of COS and HCN gases were much smaller than the evolution of H(2)S and NH(3). The evolution of HCl in the product gas decreased slightly with increasing ER. Increasing the S/C ratio decreased the HCl levels in the product gas. The effect of temperature on contaminant levels could not be fully understood due to limited availability of experimental data at various temperatures. We also compare our findings with data in the literature. PMID:22980959

Aljbour, Salah H; Kawamoto, Katsuya

2013-01-01

161

The effects of physical separtation treatment on the removal of uranium from contaminated soils at Fernald: A bench-scale study  

SciTech Connect

A bench-scale treatability study incorporating the use of physical separation techniques and chemical dispersants/extractants was conducted on uranium contaminated soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. The soils contained approximately 497 and 450 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of total uranium, respectively. Geotechnical characterization indicated that 77.4 and 74.6 percent of the soil was in the less that 50 micrometer ({mu}m) size fraction for the ID-A and ID-B soils, respectively. An initial characterization effort indicated that uranium was distributed among all particle size fractions. After each soil was dispersed in water, it was noted that the uranium concentrated in the sand and clay fractions for the ID-A soil (1028 and 1475 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively) and the clay fraction for ID-B soil (2710 mg kg{sup -1}). Four 1 millimolar (mM) sodium reagent solutions (sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, and a sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite mixture) and potable water were evaluated for effectiveness in dispersing each soil into single grain separates and extracting total uranium from each of the resulting particle size fractions. Dilute sodium solutions were more effective than water in dispersing the soil. The use of dispersants, as compared to water, on the less than 2 mm size fraction causes a shift in the distribution of uranium out of the sand fraction and into the silt and clay fractions for ID-A soil and into the clay fraction for the ID-B soil. Attrition scrubbing tests were conducted on the less than 2 mm size fraction for the ID-A and ID-B soils using water and three alkaline extraction solutions, sodium pyrophosphate, sodium carbonate/bicarbonate, and ammonium carbonate/bicarbonate. There was little difference among the chemical extractants on their effectiveness in removing uranium from the greater than 53 {mu}m (sand) or less than 53 {mu}m (silt and clay) soil fraction.

Sadler, K.G. [IT Corporation, Knoxville, TN (United States); Krstich, M.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1994-12-31

162

Microwave Digestion--Vacuum Filtration-Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy as a sensitive method for forensic diatom test.  

PubMed

Diagnosis of drowning is one of the most difficult issues in forensic practice. A number of methods have been developed over the years to determine whether a person was drowned. Microwave Digestion-Vacuum Filtration-Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy (MD-VF-Auto SEM) method we developed is a new qualitative and quantitative method of diatom test for diagnosis of drowning. The new method is based on microwave digestion technique, vacuum filtration, and automated SEM, which would achieve a maximal recovery of diatoms and identify diatoms easily by SEM with high resolution. This study was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of this method, the recovery of diatom, and loss ratio of centrifugation, which were compared using the MD-VF-Auto SEM method and the conventional acid digestion method. Two groups of samples were designed in the study. Groups A (n?=?20) and B (n?=?20) were performed by MD-VF-Auto SEM method and the conventional acid digestion method, respectively. In addition, another eight water samples were centrifuged, and the diatoms in the supernatant and precipitate were counted and measured, respectively, in order to find out how many diatoms were lost after centrifugation. The difference between the two groups was statistically highly significant, and about 34 % of diatoms were lost after centrifugation at 4,000 rpm for 15 min. The results showed that the MD-VF-Auto SEM method was more sensitive and specific. PMID:22885954

Zhao, Jian; Liu, Chao; Hu, Sunlin; He, Shuwen; Lu, Siya

2013-03-01

163

Numerical simulation of competitive aerobic / anaerobic hydrocarbon plume biodegradation in two-dimensional bench scale lab-experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The biodegradation of oxidizable hydrocarbon contaminants in the subsurface requires the presence of compatible microbial communities as well as sufficient amounts of electron acceptors and nutrients. In this context, transverse mixing, driven by dispersion and diffusion, is one of the main mechanisms governing the availability of dissolved electron acceptors at a hydrocarbon plume fringe. Aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons limited by transverse mixing has been studied experimentally in 2D bench-scale flow-through tanks, filled with a saturated porous medium. Flow of groundwater through the tanks was induced by pumping water at one side through injection ports, and simultaneously extracting water at the other side of the tank. An ethylbenzene plume was established by injection through the central inlet port. A mixture of unlabeled and fully deuterium-labeled isotopomers was used in order to investigate the spatial distribution of degradation processes via monitoring of compound-specific stable isotope fractionation. In the first phase of the experiment, aerobic biodegradation was studied. For this purpose, the tank was recharged with water containing oxygen as a dissolved electron acceptor and the aerobic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 was inoculated. Later, nitrate was added to the recharge water as an additional electron acceptor and the denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1 was amended to study competitive aerobic/anaerobic biodegradation. A numerical reactive transport model of the experiment was set up for a model based interpretation of the observed degradation patterns. In a sensitivity analysis, the influence of the relevant hydrodynamic parameters on the observable distributions of ethylbenzene isotopomers, oxygen and nitrate was studied. Subsequent model calibration allowed for a good agreement with ethylbenzene concentrations measured at the tank outlet ports as well as oxygen concentrations, which were measured at several profiles perpendicular to the flow direction along the plume. Simulated microbial growth was strongest near the central tank inlet, where both, oxygen and ethylbenzene were available at high concentrations, and along the transverse mixing zone at the fringe of the developed ethylbenzene plume. Model based interpretation of the aerobic/anaerobic phase with competitive biodegradation proved to be ambiguous due to uncertainties regarding the actual stoichiometry of the specific denitrification reaction. Also, the simulated isotopic patterns were very sensitive to the assumed initial distribution of the A. aromaticum EbN1 biomass. Ethylbenzene concentrations and isotopic patterns predicted by the numerical model match the measurements quite well for the first half of the aerobic/anaerobic phase. A distinct increase in biodegradation dynamics later on hints at a change in biodegradation dynamics during the course of the experiment.

Beyer, C.; Ballarini, E.; Bauer, R.; Griebler, C.; Bauer, S.

2011-12-01

164

Bench-scale biodegradation tests to assess natural attenuation potential of 1,4-dioxane at three sites in California.  

PubMed

1,4-Dioxane (dioxane) is relatively recalcitrant to biodegradation, and its physicochemical properties preclude effective removal from contaminated groundwater by volatilization or adsorption. Through this microcosm study, we assessed the biodegradation potential of dioxane for three sites in California. Groundwater and sediment samples were collected at various locations at each site, including the presumed source zone, middle and leading edge of the plume. A total of 16 monitoring wells were sampled to prepare the microcosms. Biodegradation of dioxane was observed in 12 of 16 microcosms mimicking natural attenuation within 28 weeks. Rates varied from as high as 3,449 ± 459 µg/L/week in source-zone microcosms to a low of 0.3 ± 0.1 µg/L/week in microcosms with trace level of dioxane (<10 µg/L as initial concentration). The microcosms were spiked with (14)C-labeled dioxane to assess the fate of dioxane. Biological oxidizer-liquid scintillation analysis of bound residue infers that (14)C-dioxane was assimilated into cell material only in microcosms exhibiting significant dioxane biodegradation. Mineralization was also observed per (14)CO2 recovery (up to 44 % of the amount degraded in 28 weeks of incubation). Degradation and mineralization activity significantly decreased with increasing distance from the contaminant source area (p < 0.05), possibly due to less acclimation. Furthermore, both respiked and repeated microcosms prepared with source-zone samples from Site 1 confirmed relatively rapid dioxane degradation (i.e., 100 % removal by 20 weeks). These results show that indigenous microorganisms capable of degrading dioxane are present at these three sites, and suggest that monitored natural attenuation should be considered as a remedial response. PMID:25280838

Li, Mengyan; Van Orden, E Tess; DeVries, David J; Xiong, Zhong; Hinchee, Rob; Alvarez, Pedro J

2015-02-01

165

Interim Report on Uranium Metal Segregation Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the preliminary results of laboratory and bench-scale vendor testing to evaluate the effectiveness of the gravity mineral concentration technology for removing and concentrating uranium metal from K Basin sludge.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Elmore, Monte R.

2004-04-18

166

Bench-Scale Synthetic Optimization of 1,2-bis(2-aminophenylthio)ethane (APO-Link) Used in the Production of APO-BMI Resin  

SciTech Connect

The diamine reagent 1,2-bis(2-aminophenylthio)ethane is no longer commercially available but still required for the synthesis of the bismaleimide resin, APO-BMI, used in syntactic foams. In this work, we examined the hydrolysis of benzothiazole followed the by reaction with dichloroethane or dibromoethane. We also studied the deprotonation of 2-aminothiophenol followed by the reaction with dibromoethane. We optimized the latter for scale-up by scrutinizing all aspects of the reaction conditions, work-up and recrystallization. On bench-scale, our optimized procedure consistently produced a 75-80% overall yield of finely divided, high purity product (>95%).

Hilary Wheeler; Crystal Densmore

2007-07-31

167

Bench-scale evaluation of alternative biological treatment processes for the remediation of pentachlorophenol- and creosote-contaminated materials: Solid-phase bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale biotreatability studies were performed to evaluate potential for a solid-phase bioremediation process to ameliorate pentachlorophenol (PCP)- and creosote-contaminated sediment and surface soil at the American Creosote Works Superfund site, Pensacola, Florida. Surface soil and sediment were contaminated with approximately 1 and 7% (weight basis) organic pollutants, respectively, but the more recalcitrant creosote constituents (i.e., high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) were proportionately higher in the surface soil indicative of creosote weathering. Data suggest that full-scale site remediation employing solid-phase bioremediation strategies may not effectively meet acceptable treatment standards in the time defining these studies.

Mueller, J.G.; Lantz, S.E.; Blattmann, B.O.; Chapman, P.J.

1991-01-01

168

Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the solvent selection, fermentation, and product recovery studies performed thus far in the development of a bench scale unit for the production of ethanol from coal-derived synthesis gas. Several additional solvents have been compared for their ability to extract ethanol from aqueous solutions of ethanol in water and fermentation permeate. The solvent 2,6-dimethyl-4-heptanol still appears to be the solvent of choice. Liquid-liquid equilibrium data have been collected for ethanol and 2,6-dimethyl-4-heptanol.

Not Available

1994-06-01

169

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS CENTER TECHNOLOGY SPECIFIC TEST PLAN: REMOVAL OF MICROBIOLOGICL AND PARTICULATE CONTAMINANTS BY MEMBRANE FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This document is the Environmental technology Verification (ETV) Technology Specific test Plan (TSTP) for evaluation of water treatment equipment for removal of microbiological and particulate contaminants using membrane filtration. This TSTP is to be used as a guide in the dev...

170

Waste water filtration enhancement  

SciTech Connect

Removal of submicron particles from process solutions and waste water is now economically achievable using a new Tyvek{reg sign} media in conventional filtration equipment. This new product greatly enhances filtration and allows use of the much improved filter aids and polymers which were recently developed. It has reduced operating costs and ensures a clean effluent discharge to the environment. This significant technical development is especially important to those who discharge to a small stream with low 7Q10 flow and must soon routinely pass the Toxicity tests that are being required by many States for NPDES permit renewal. The Savannah River Plant produces special nuclear materials for the US Government. Aluminum forming and metal finishing operations in M-Area, that manufacture fuel and target assemblies for the nuclear reactors, discharge to a waste water treatment facility using BAT hydroxide precipitation and filtration. The new Tyvek{reg sign} media and filter aids have achieved 55% less solids in the filtrate discharged to Tims Branch Creek, 15% less hazardous waste (dry filter cake), 150%-370% more filtration capacity, 74% lower materials purchase cost, 10% lower total M-Area manufacturing cost, and have improved safety. Performance with the improved polymers is now being evaluated.

Martin, H.L.

1989-01-01

171

Comparative evaluation of three tests for the detection of Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNF1 and CNF2) using filtrates of cultures treated with mitomycin C.  

PubMed

Necrotizing Escherichia coli (NTEC) strains grown in the presence of mitomycin C released cell associated necrotizing factors CNF1 and CNF2 to culture medium. Using culture filtrates from 96 mitomycin C treated E. coli strains, we have found that a modified HeLa cell assay was a more sensitive and specific method for the detection of CNF1 and CNF2 than the Vero cell assay and the rabbit skin test. PMID:2120109

Blanco, J; Blanco, M; González, E A; Alonso, M P; Garabal, J I

1990-06-01

172

Bond strength to root dentin and fluid filtration test of AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems  

PubMed Central

Objectives To investigate the bond strength and seal ability produced by AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems to root canal dentin. Material and Methods Sixty extracted single-root human teeth, instrumented manually to size 40, were divided into three groups (n=20) according to the sealer used; G1: AH Plus, G2: EndoREZ, and G3: RealSeal sealers. After filling using the lateral condensation technique, each sealer group was randomly divided into two subgroups according to the tests applied (n=10 for µPush-out test and n=10 for fluid filtration test). A fluid filtration method was used for quantitative evaluation of apical leakage. Four 1-mm-thick slices (cervical and medium level) were obtained from each root sample and a µPush-out test was performed. Failure modes were examined under microscopy at 40x, and a one-way ANOVA was applied to analyze the permeability. Non-parametrical statistics for related (Friedman's and Wilcoxon's rank tests) or unrelated samples (Kruskal-Wallis' and Mann-Whitney's tests) allowed for comparisons of µPush-out strength values among materials at the different levels. Statistical significance was accepted for p values <.05. Results There are no significant differences among fluid filtration of the three sealers. The sealer/core material does not significantly influence the µPush-out bond strength values (F=2.49; p=0.10), although statistically significant differences were detected with regard to root level (Chi2=23.93; p<0.001). AH Plus and RealSeal obtained higher bond strength to intraradicular dentin in the medium root slices. Conclusions There are no significant differences between the permeability and global µPush-out bond strength to root canal dentin achieved by AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems. PMID:24037078

MAHDI, Alaa Abdul; BOLAÑOS-CARMONA, Victoria; GONZALEZ-LOPEZ, Santiago

2013-01-01

173

Implications of a Multi-well Tracer Test in the Transport of Pathogens at a Riverbank Filtration Experiment Site.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study tracks the transport of bromide and microspheres mimicking pathogens in an arid environment. The study site uses the Rio Grande that experiences significant annual fluctuations in both water quantity and quality. The pumping well is 17 m from the stream bank and the water table was 2 m below the stream surface. The aquifer is medium and fine-grained sand comprising two flow units. Observation wells are screened over 1 or 1.5 m intervals. The average hydraulic conductivity was about 2 x 10-3 m/s based on a test analysis, however, the responses indicated that sediment heterogeneities affected the hydraulic behavior. A 427 hour tracer test using bromide and fluorescent microspheres provides initial results that are relevant to the transport of pathogens through the subsurface under riverbank filtration conditions. Bromide was injected into an observation well at the channel margin. Differently colored fluorescent microspheres (0.25nm, 1?m, 6?m and 10?m) were injected into the stream bottom and into two observation wells. Conclusions from the tracer test are: 1) Both bromide and microspheres continued to be observed throughout the 18 days of the experiment. 2) The bromide recovery in the pumping well and in the deeper observation wells showed early and late peaks with a long tails indicating that the geological medium at the field site behaves like a double-porosity medium allowing the tracer to move relatively quickly through the higher conductivity units while being significantly retarded in the low hydraulic conductivity units. 3) Some wells showed consistently higher concentrations of bromide. 4) The 1? micospheres were abundant in the observation wells and allowed tracing of flowpaths. These showed multiple peaks similar to the bromide results. This indicates highly preferential transport paths in the sediment. 5) Microspheres from the three injection sites had distinctly different transport paths and rates. 6) Both bromide and microspheres appeared in the stream soon after injection, moving apparently against an 2-m head difference. 7) The 6 ? and 10 ? microspheres were observed in low concentrations and were episodically detected in the stream and in two widely spaced observation wells. The significance of these results is that: 1) Inorganic microspheres may mimic the episodic occurrence of microorganisms in wells. 2) Even in this relatively homogeneous aquifer, preferential transport within the aquifer results in highly divergent transport paths and rates. Microspheres from one of the injection sites traveled essentially perpendicular to the expected transport direction. 3) Even small variations in the sand grain size can effectively compartmentalize the aquifer. The next steps of this project will include field studies to observe the migration and persistence of selected organisms (E.coli, enterococci, coliphages, cysts, oocysts and enteroviruses) in the pumping well and observation wells under different pumping rates. Continued combined chemical sampling along with the microbial sampling will document the whether changes in water chemistry alter the behavior of the organisms.

Langford, R. P.; Pillai, S.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Widmer, K.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Lerhner, T.

2003-12-01

174

Rate and reaction probability of the surface reaction between ozone and dihydromyrcenol measured in a bench scale reactor and a room-sized chamber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low volatility terpenoids emitted from consumer products can react with ozone on surfaces and may significantly alter concentrations of ozone, terpenoids and reaction products in indoor air. We measured the reaction probability and a second-order surface-specific reaction rate for the ozonation of dihydromyrcenol, a representative indoor terpenoid, adsorbed onto polyvinylchloride (PVC), glass, and latex paint coated spheres. The reaction probability ranged from (0.06-8.97) × 10 -5 and was very sensitive to humidity, substrate and mass adsorbed. The average surface reaction probability is about 10 times greater than that for the gas-phase reaction. The second-order surface-specific rate coefficient ranged from (0.32-7.05) × 10 -15 cm 4 s -1 molecule -1and was much less sensitive to humidity, substrate, or mass adsorbed. We also measured the ozone deposition velocity due to adsorbed dihydromyrcenol on painted drywall in a room-sized chamber, Based on that, we calculated the rate coefficient ((0.42-1.6) × 10 -15 cm 4 molecule -1 s -1), which was consistent with that derived from bench-scale experiments for the latex paint under similar conditions. We predict that more than 95% of dihydromyrcenol oxidation takes place on indoor surfaces, rather than in building air.

Shu, Shi; Morrison, Glenn C.

2012-02-01

175

Bench-scale evaluation of alternative biological treatment processes for the remediation of pentachlorophenol- and creosote-contaminated materials: Solid-phase bioremediation. [Pentachlorophenol  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale biotreatability studies were performed to evaluate the potential for using a solid-phase bioremediation process to ameliorate pentachlorophenol-(PCP-) and creosote-contaminated sediment and surface soil present at the American Creosote Works Superfund site, Pensacola, FL. The effects of tilling and fertilization on the rate and extent of biodegradation of PCP and 42 targeted creosote constituents by indigenous microflora were monitored by gas chromatographic analysis of organic extracts of soil and sediment; changes in microbial populations were also recorded. Specially designed landfarming chambers allowed for the quantitative analysis of targeted pollutants lost through abiotic processes. In general, solid-phase bioremediation resulted in slow and predictable losses of targeted pollutants (i.e., low molecular weight creosote constituents were more readily biodegraded than higher molecular weight contaminants), and the more recalcitrant pollutants (e.g., PCP) tended to persist. Performance data from these studies suggest that full-scale site remediation employing solid-phase bioremediation strategies in the time defining these studies. (90 days).

Mueller, J.G.; Lantz, S.E. (Southern Bio Products, Inc., Gulf Breeze, FL (United States)); Blattmann, B.O. (Technical Resources, Inc., Gulf Breeze, FL (United States)); Chapman, P.J. (Environmental Protection Agency, Gulf Breeze, FL (United States))

1991-06-01

176

Effect of fluidising velocity on the combustion of rice husk in a bench-scale fluidised bed combustor for the production of amorphous rice husk ash.  

PubMed

This study was focused on investigating the optimum fluidising velocity during the combustion of rice husk in a bench-scale fluidised bed combustor (ID 210mm) to obtain low carbon ash in the amorphous form. When all other parameters are held constant, the optimum fluidizing velocity aids in almost complete combustion, thereby releasing the entrapped carbon for further conversion. This results in ash with consistently low carbon content (less than 2wt%). The range of fluidising velocities investigated was from as low as 1.5U(mf) to as high as 8U(mf). It was found that the optimum fluidising velocity was approximately 3.3U(mf) as the mixing of rice husk with the bed was good with a high degree of penetration into the sand bed. The resulting ash retained its amorphous form with low residual carbon content (at 2.88wt%) and minimal sand contamination as shown by the X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:17379511

Rozainee, M; Ngo, S P; Salema, A A; Tan, K G; Ariffin, M; Zainura, Z N

2008-03-01

177

Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Three bacteria, Clostridium ljungdahlii and isolates ERI-8 and 0-52, have been utilized in CSTR studies in order to directly compare the performance of the bacteria in continuous culture in converting synthesis gas components to ethanol. C. ljungdahlii is able to produce higher concentrations of ethanol than the other bacteria, largely because medium development with this bacterium has been ongoing for 2--3 years. However, both of the ERI isolates are quite promising for ethanol production and, therefore, will be studied further in the CSTR. A comparison of the energy costs for various ethanol recovery techniques has been made for use in the bench scale system. The techniques considered include direct distillation, extraction with various solvents followed by distillation, air stripping followed by distillation, pervaporation followed by distillation, reverse osmosis and temperature swing extraction. Extraction with a solvent possessing a relatively high distribution coefficient for ethanol and a high separation factor (relative ability to extract ethanol in favor of water), followed by distillation, is the most desirable technology.

Not Available

1993-09-01

178

Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation. Third quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

A phase 11 study has been initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of, quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This report covers the third quarter of work. The major accomplishments were (1) completion of coal liquefaction autoclave reactor runs and related analysis with Illinois {number_sign}6 coal at a processing temperature of 375{degree}C, and pressures of 1800 and 1500 psig, (2) completion and analysis of two autoclave reactor runs to observe the synergistic effect of the surfactant and an iron catalyst, and (3) setting up a subcontract with HRI Inc. to test the surfactant enhanced liquefaction process in a continuous flow reactor.

Hickey, G.S.; Sharma, P.K.

1993-04-20

179

Effects of turbulence modelling on prediction of flow characteristics in a bench-scale anaerobic gas-lift digester.  

PubMed

Flow in a gas-lift digester with a central draft-tube was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different turbulence closure models. The k-? Shear-Stress-Transport (SST), Renormalization-Group (RNG) k-?, Linear Reynolds-Stress-Model (RSM) and Transition-SST models were tested for a gas-lift loop reactor under Newtonian flow conditions validated against published experimental work. The results identify that flow predictions within the reactor (where flow is transitional) are particularly sensitive to the turbulence model implemented; the Transition-SST model was found to be the most robust for capturing mixing behaviour and predicting separation reliably. Therefore, Transition-SST is recommended over k-? models for use in comparable mixing problems. A comparison of results obtained using multiphase Euler-Lagrange and singlephase approaches are presented. The results support the validity of the singlephase modelling assumptions in obtaining reliable predictions of the reactor flow. Solver independence of results was verified by comparing two independent finite-volume solvers (Fluent-13.0sp2 and OpenFOAM-2.0.1). PMID:23624047

Coughtrie, A R; Borman, D J; Sleigh, P A

2013-06-01

180

Rotary filtration system  

DOEpatents

A rotary filtration apparatus for filtering a feed fluid into permeate is provided. The rotary filtration apparatus includes a container that has a feed fluid inlet. A shaft is at least partially disposed in the container and has a passageway for the transport of permeate. A disk stack made of a plurality of filtration disks is mounted onto the shaft so that rotation of the shaft causes rotation of the filtration disks. The filtration disks may be made of steel components and may be welded together. The shaft may penetrate a filtering section of the container at a single location. The rotary filtration apparatus may also incorporate a bellows seal to prevent leakage along the shaft, and an around the shaft union rotary joint to allow for removal of permeate. Various components of the rotary filtration apparatus may be removed as a single assembly.

Herman, David T. (Aiken, SC); Maxwell, David N. (Aiken, SC)

2011-04-19

181

In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, MeHg levels decreased on the time scale of days to weeks. • Capping materials should sequester MeHg produced and not contribute to the production of MeHg.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States)] [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States); Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)] [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

2013-08-15

182

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF CONTROL OF BIOAEROSOLS IN HVAC SYSTEMS, FILTRATION GROUP, AEROSTAR FP-98 MINIPLEAT V-BLANK FILTER  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the AeroStar FP-98 Minipleat V-Bank Filter air filter for dust and bioaerosol filtration manufactured by Filtration Group. The pressure drop across the filter was 137 Pa clean and 348 Pa ...

183

The testing of metal-ceramic porous filters for the sterile filtration of air with the aid of a dichromate aerosol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stringent requirements are imposed for filtration material used for the sterilization of air from the point of view of effectiveness in trapping particles, mechanical sturdiness, and thermal stability while maintaining a low resistance to the stream. Fibrous, porous, and membranous materials are used as filtration materials. As a rule high effectiveness is possessed by materials with a small distinguishing size,

G. L. Motina; V. A. Eremina; D. M. Zhuravlev; V. A. Yakovlev; E. S. Bylinkina

1973-01-01

184

High-temperature, high-pressure testing of zinc titanate in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor for 100 cycles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are being advanced worldwide to produce electricity from coal owing to their potential for superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. A key component of these plants is a hot-gas desulfurization system employing efficient regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents. Leading sorbent candidates include zinc ferrite and zinc titanate.

R. P. Gupta; S. K. Gangwal

1993-01-01

185

7. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTRATION ROOM IN FILTRATION PLANT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. OBLIQUE INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTRATION ROOM IN FILTRATION PLANT (#1773), LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING PUMP NO. 1 AND METERING EQUIPMENT - Presidio Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, East of Lobos Creek at Baker Beach, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

186

DEVELOPMENT OF A CROSSFLOW FILTER TO REMOVE SOLIDS FROM RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE: COMPARISON OF TEST DATA WITH OPERATING EXPERIENCE - 9119  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the Savannah River Site (SRS) began treatment of liquid radioactive waste from its Tank Farms. To treat waste streams containing {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and actinides, SRS developed the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The Actinide Removal Process contacts the waste with monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and select actinides. After MST contact, the process filters the resulting slurry to remove the MST (with sorbed strontium and actinides) and any entrained sludge. The filtrate is transported to the MCU to remove cesium. The solid particle removed by the filter are concentrated to {approx} 5 wt %, washed to reduce the concentration of dissolved sodium, and transported to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. The authors conducted tests with 0.5 {micro} and 0.1 {micro} Mott sintered stainless steel crossflow filter at bench-scale (0.19 ft{sup 2} surface area) and pilot-scale (11.2 ft{sup 2}). The collected data supported design of the filter for the process and identified preferred operating conditions for the full-scale process (230 ft{sup 2}). The testing investigated the influence of operating parameters, such as filter pore size, axial velocity, transmembrane pressure, and solids loading, on filter flux, and validated the simulant used for pilot-scale testing. The conclusions from this work follow: (1) The 0.1 {micro} Mott sintered stainless steel filter produced higher flux than the 0.5 {micro} filter. (2) The filtrate samples collected showed no visible solids. (3) The filter flux with actual waste is comparable to the filter flux with simulated waste, with the simulated waste being conservative. This result shows the simulated sludge is representative of the actual sludge. (4) When the data is adjusted for differences in transmembrane pressure, the filter flux in the Actinide Removal Process is comparable to the filter flux in the bench-scale and pilot-scale testing. (5) Filter flux increased with transmembrane pressure, increased with axial velocity, and decreased with concentration in agreement with classical crossflow filtration theories.

Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Samuel Fink, S; Julius Lacerna, J

2009-03-01

187

Centrifugal membrane filtration -- Task 9  

SciTech Connect

The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to demonstrate applications for the SpinTek technology within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the SpinTek STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{micro}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the SpinTek ST-IIL centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. An extended test run of 100 hr performed on a surrogate tank waste solution showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

NONE

1996-08-01

188

High Temperature Particle Filtration Technology  

SciTech Connect

High temperature filtration can serve to improve the economic, environmental, and energy performance of chemical processes. This project was designed to evaluate the stability of filtration materials in the environments of the production of dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS). In cooperation with Dow Corning, chemical environments for the fluidized bed reactor where silicon is converted to DDS and the incinerator where vents are cornbusted were characterized. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) an exposure system was developed that could simulate these two environments. Filter samples obtained from third parties were exposed to the environments for periods up to 1000 hours. Mechanical properties before and after exposure were determined by burst-testing rings of filter material. The results indicated that several types of filter materials would likely perform well in the fluid bed environment, and two materials would be good candidates for the incinerator environment.

Besmann, T.M.

2001-11-13

189

Water Filtration Products  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

American Water Corporation manufactures water filtration products which incorporate technology originally developed for manned space operations. The formula involves granular activated charcoal and other ingredients, and removes substances by catalytic reactions, mechanical filtration, and absorption. Details are proprietary. A NASA literature search contributed to development of the compound. The technology is being extended to a deodorizing compound called Biofresh which traps gas and moisture inside the unit. Further applications are anticipated.

1986-01-01

190

COMPARISONS OF VARIOUS FILTRATION MEDIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The report reviews use of filtering materials in diatomaceous earth (DE) filtration, slow sand filtration, and coagulation-rapid rate filtration. For DE filtration, increased effluent clarity (lower turbidity) is generally attained at the expense of increased rates of head loss i...

191

Evaluation of double filtration plasmapheresis, thermofiltration, and low-density lipoprotein adsorptive methods by crossover test in the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia patients.  

PubMed

A comparative assessment has been made regarding efficacy and safety of the double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP), thermofiltration (TFPP), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) adsorptive (PA) methods by making a crossover test on heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients. Treatments by DFPP, TFPP (secondary membrane Evalux 5A), and PA (Liposorber LA-40) were carried out 5 times each, with a 2-week interval, in 5 patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. The same plasma separator (Plasmacure PS-60, polysulfone) was used in all cases, and the volume of plasma processed was set at 4 L. High removal rates were obtained of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides TG, and apolipoprotein B (apoB) by all three methods, and no differences were observed. Lipoprotein (a), apoA-2, apoC-3, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin M (IgM) showed significantly high removal rates by the DFPP and TFPP methods compared with the PA method. The sieving coefficient of albumin and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol at 2 and 4 L of plasma processed exhibited high permeabilities using all three methods. Supplementing albumin was not necessary. An increase of the transmembrane pressure was observed in 1 case treated by DFPP but was not observed when using the TFPP or PA method. No changes were observed in serum interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) before and after treatment by any of the three methods. No remarkable side effects were observed using either the DFPP or TFPP method. The DFPP and TFPP methods showed efficacy and safety that was not inferior to the PA method in conventional LDL apheresis, and the dead-end method of the filter operation without the discarding of plasma was shown to be possible. PMID:8860710

Suzuki, M; Yamane, S; Matsugane, T; Nobuto, T; Azuma, N; Nishide, T; Shinomiya, M; Saito, K; Sasaki, N; Nosé, Y

1996-04-01

192

Filtration of A Hanford AN-104 Sample  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) conducted ultrafiltration tests with samples from the Hanford Site's AN-104 tank. The test objectives were to measure filter flux during dewatering and the removal of soluble species during washing. The filtration tests were conducted with the Cells Unit Filter (CUF) currently installed in Cell 16 of the SRTC High Activity Caves. Following filtration, personnel performed inhibited water washing to remove soluble species. Because of the limited volume of concentrated slurry, the washing was performed with a volumetric flask rather than a crossflow filter.Following the washing, personnel chemically cleaned the filter with 1 M nitric acid and periodically measured the clean water flux.

Poirier, MichaelR

2004-03-01

193

Filtration of a Hanford AN-104 Sample  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) conducted ultrafiltration tests with samples from the Hanford Site's 241-AN-104 tank. The test objectives were to measure filter flux during dewatering and the removal of soluble species during washing. The filtration tests were conducted with the Cells Unit Filter (CUF) currently installed in Cell 16 of the SRTC High Activity Caves. Following filtration, personnel performed inhibited water washing to remove soluble species. Because of the limited volume of concentrated slurry, the washing was performed with a volumetric flask rather than a crossflow filter. Following the washing, personnel chemically cleaned the filter with 1 M nitric acid and periodically measured the clean water flux.

POIRIER, MICHAEL

2004-04-19

194

HOW DO I RUN A PROPER JAR TEST PROCEDURE?  

EPA Science Inventory

The jar test has been and is ah important drinking water treatment plant design, process control, and research tool. n the drinking water field, the jar test is described as a "bench-scale" simulation of full-scale coagulation/flocculation/ sedimentation water treatment processes...

195

FILTRATION PARAMETERS FOR DUST CLEANING FABRICS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes laboratory and pilot scale testing of bag filter fabrics. Filtration performance data and mathematical modeling parameters are given for four Polish fabrics tested with cement dust, coal dust, flyash, and talc. Conclusions include: (1) The process of clean ai...

196

Water Treatment Technology - Filtration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on filtration provides instructional materials for six competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purposes of sedimentation basins and flocculation…

Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

197

40 CFR 63.1571 - How and when do I conduct a performance test or other initial compliance demonstration?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...previous test results provided the tests are representative of current...bench-scale or pilot-scale test data representative of the process...to: (i) Use of material balances based on process stoichiometry... If you do a performance test to demonstrate...

2013-07-01

198

40 CFR 63.1571 - How and when do I conduct a performance test or other initial compliance demonstration?  

...previous test results provided the tests are representative of current...bench-scale or pilot-scale test data representative of the process...to: (i) Use of material balances based on process stoichiometry... If you do a performance test to demonstrate...

2014-07-01

199

40 CFR 63.1571 - How and when do I conduct a performance test or other initial compliance demonstration?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...previous test results provided the tests are representative of current...bench-scale or pilot-scale test data representative of the process...to: (i) Use of material balances based on process stoichiometry... If you do a performance test to demonstrate...

2011-07-01

200

40 CFR 63.1571 - How and when do I conduct a performance test or other initial compliance demonstration?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...previous test results provided the tests are representative of current...bench-scale or pilot-scale test data representative of the process...to: (i) Use of material balances based on process stoichiometry... If you do a performance test to demonstrate...

2012-07-01

201

40 CFR 63.1571 - How and when do I conduct a performance test or other initial compliance demonstration?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...previous test results provided the tests are representative of current...bench-scale or pilot-scale test data representative of the process...to: (i) Use of material balances based on process stoichiometry... If you do a performance test to demonstrate...

2010-07-01

202

Evaluation of skin test for chromoblastomycosis using antigens prepared from culture filtrates of Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Phialophora verrucosa, Wangiella dermatitidis and Exophiala jeanselmei  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antigenic substances were prepared from culture filtrates ofFonsecaea pedrosoi, Phialophora verrucosa, Wangiella dermatitidis andExophiala jeanselmei. These antigenic substances were evaluated for detecting cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity in rats experimentally-infected withF. pedrosoi, P. verrucosa, W. dermatitidis, E. jeanselmei, Cladosporium carrionii andFonsecaea compactum and in patients with chromoblastomycosis caused byF. pedrosoi. TheF. pedrosoi antigen elicited positive reactions in all of the animals infected

T. Iwatsu; M. Miyaji; H. Taguchi; S. Okamoto

1982-01-01

203

Quantifying oil filtration effects on bearing life  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rolling-element bearing life is influenced by the number, size, and material properties of particles entering the Hertzian contact of the rolling element and raceway. In general, rolling-element bearing life increases with increasing level of oil filtration. Based upon test results, two equations are presented which allow for the adjustment of bearing L(sub 10) or catalog life based upon oil filter rating. It is recommended that where no oil filtration is used catalog life be reduced by 50 percent.

Needelman, William M.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

1991-01-01

204

Concealed glomerular filtration  

PubMed Central

1. An increase in apparent renal clearances is frequently observed on restoring urine flow after a period of anuria or on increasing it after oliguria. An analysis of such `peaks' in clearance has been made in experiments on anaesthetized dogs, using two preparations of labelled vitamin B12 and urine collections of 1-2 min. [57Co]B12 was infused throughout the experiments, while [58Co]B12 was given as a single injection during periods of anuria or oliguria induced by noradrenaline infusion, haemorrhage or aortic obstruction. 2. The apparent high clearance in the first minute or two of restored or increased flow is an artifact explained by inclusion in the peak of material filtered earlier, but not excreted. By means of the integrated plasma concentration ratio of the two B12 isotopes during the period of low or absent flow, the excess B12 in the peak may be reapportioned between the period before the 58Co was injected and the period after it. 3. The findings indicate that filtration may temporarily continue during anuria, but this is concealed as a result of failure of onward flow of filtrate. In oliguria a similar concealment of filtration may result from the cessation of onward flow in some nephrons. PMID:16783915

Brewin, E. G.; Ekins, R. P.; Nashat, F. S.; Portal, R. W.

1966-01-01

205

Near-Tank Treatment of Hanford Tank Waste: Pilot-Scale Testing - 12107  

SciTech Connect

In order to reduce the number of high level waste canisters that will have to be produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, supplemental waste treatment technologies are being investigated. One such technology is the Near-Tank Treatment System, which uses continuous sludge leaching, filtration, and ion exchange to process the waste in a simple, compact system. The Near Tank Treatment System is ideally suited for handling Hanford tanks with large amounts of boehmite, a difficult aluminum phase to dissolve. A pilot-scale Near Tank Treatment System was constructed and tested with a boehmite and iron oxyhydroxide waste simulant to evaluate the robustness and effectiveness of the system. The data from the pilot-scale tests were also used to assess scale-up from previously performed bench-scale tests. It should be noted that any work involving the use of simulated HLW has inherent limitations. For this work, every attempt was made to ensure that the simulant mimicked the actual waste performance as closely as possible. However, there are always limitations in the ability to The NTTS Demonstration Test established that all the subsystems could be operated concurrently to process the waste simulant. The NTTS had a stable performance during the Demonstration Test that required very little external manipulation once a steady state was achieved. The CSL demonstrated effectively 90% dissolution of the hard to leach boehmite phase. The cross flow filtration system was able to deliver decontaminated salt solution to the NTCR system. The NTCR system exceeded the design basis by providing effluent below the detection limit beyond the design basis required time. The NTTS system was successfully demonstrated and has shown that leaching and decontamination of the subsequent permeate can be readily achieved using relatively small footprint equipment in an at tank application. (authors)

Schonewill, P.P.; Edwards, M.K.; Shimskey, R.W.; Peterson, R.A. [Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Smith, C.; Tranbarger, R. [Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, Pasco, Washington 99301 (United States)

2012-07-01

206

Internal filtration, filtration fraction, and blood flow resistance in high- and low-flux dialyzers.  

PubMed

It was the aim to examine the fluid flow in blood and dialysate compartments of highly permeable hollow fiber dialyzers where internal filtration contributes to solute removal but where excessive filtration bears a risk of cell activation and damage. Flow characteristics of high- (HF) and low-flux (LF) dialyzers were studied in lab-bench experiments using whole bovine blood. Measurements obtained under different operating conditions and under zero net ultrafiltration were compared to theoretical calculations obtained from a mathematical model. Experimental resistances in the blood compartment were within ±2% of those calculated from the model when dialysate was used as a test fluid. With whole blood, the experimental resistances in the blood compartment were only 81.8 ± 2.8% and 83.7 ± 4.3% of those calculated for the LF and HF dialyzer, respectively. Surprisingly, measured blood flow resistance slightly but significantly decreased with increasing flow rate (p < 0.001). Mathematical modeling confirmed this decrease both in LF and HF dialyzers which was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in internal filtration fraction, while overall internal filtration increased. The increase in internal filtration when increasing blood flow is associated with a beneficial reduction in internal filtration fraction. Concerns of increased hemoconcentration when increasing blood flow therefore appear to be unwarranted. PMID:24254583

Schneditz, Daniel; Zierler, Edda; Vanholder, Raymond; Eloot, Sunny

2014-01-01

207

POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING  

SciTech Connect

During the past quarter, several modifications were made to the TES unit and the materials handling system. The cylindrical electrodes were replaced by a set of screen electrodes to provide a more uniform electrostatic field. The problem with the recycle conveyor neutralizing the particle charge was also corrected by replacing it with a bucket elevator. In addition, problems with the turbocharger were corrected by increasing the number of charging stages from one to two. These modifications have significantly improved the separation performance and have permitted the POC-scale unit to achieve results in line with those obtained by the bench-scale separator. The testing phase of the project was continued at a rapid pace during this quarter. The test work showed that the modifications to the TES unit and the reduction in feed size from 28 mesh to 35 mesh resulted in significant overall improvement in yield and combustible recovery compared to the data reported in the last quarter. At that time, there was a significant discrepancy between the bench-scale and the pilot-scale results. The pilot-scale test work is now approaching the bench scale test results. However, further pilot-scale test work is required to further improve the results and duplicate the bench-scale test work.

R.-H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; A.D. Walters

2000-01-01

208

Direct liquefaction of biomass: results from operation of continuous bench scale unit in liquefaction of water slurries of Douglas fir wood  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's continuous liquefaction unit (CLU) has been successfully operated since July 1981. The operation has been single pass, feeding water slurries of prehydrolyzed Douglas fir wood (LBL process). Significant differences from results with the oil slurry, high oil and water recycle process (PERC process) tested at Albany, Oregon, have been found. The LBL process, at practicable temperatures and residence times, makes somewhat less wood oil and considerably more water-soluble product than does PERC. Consumption of carbon monoxide in LBL, other than by water gas shift reaction, is minimal, as opposed to several tenths of a mole per 100 grams of wood in PERC. Replacement of carbon monoxide with hydrogen as reactant gas makes little or no difference in yield distribution or product analysis. Progress in characterizing the oil and water-soluble product, the overall stoichiometry of the LBL and PERC processes, and the role of formate ion is described.

Schaleger, L L; Figueroa, C; Davis, H G

1982-05-01

209

Dynamic Optical Filtration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A dynamic optical filtration system and method effectively blocks bright light sources without impairing view of the remainder of the scene. A sensor measures light intensity and position so that selected cells of a shading matrix may interrupt the view of the bright light source by a receptor. A beamsplitter may be used so that the sensor may be located away from the receptor. The shading matrix may also be replaced by a digital micromirror device, which selectively sends image data to the receptor.

Chretien, Jean-Loup (Inventor); Lu, Edward T. (Inventor)

2005-01-01

210

Dynamic optical filtration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A dynamic optical filtration system and method effectively blocks bright light sources without impairing view of the remainder of the scene. A sensor measures light intensity and position so that selected cells of a shading matrix may interrupt the view of the bright light source by a receptor. A beamsplitter may be used so that the sensor may be located away from the receptor. The shading matrix may also be replaced by a digital micromirror device, which selectively sends image data to the receptor.

Chretien, Jean-Loup (Inventor); Lu, Edward T. (Inventor)

2005-01-01

211

The Water Filtration Process  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This demonstration is designed to demonstrate the procedures that municipal water plants use to purify water for drinking. Students will discover that water treatment plants typically clean water by taking it through the processes of aeration, coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, and disinfection. They also learn that water in lakes, rivers, and swamps often contains impurities that make it look and smell bad. The water may also contain bacteria and other microbiological organisms that can cause disease. Consequently, water from surface sources must be cleaned before it can be consumed by people.

212

Industrial Membrane Filtration and Short-bed Fractal Separation Systems for Separating Monomers from Heterogeneous Plant Material  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale displacement of petroleum will come from low-cost cellulosic feedstocks such as straw and corn stover crop residues. This project has taken a step toward making this projection a reality by reducing capital and energy costs, the two largest cost factors associated with converting cellulosic biomass to chemicals and fuels. The technology exists for using acid or enzyme hydrolysis processes to convert biomass feedstock (i.e., waste cellulose such as straw, corn stover, and wood) into their base monomeric sugar building blocks, which can, in turn, be processed into chemicals and fuels using a number of innovative fermentation technologies. However, while these processes are technically possible, practical and economic barriers make these processes only marginally feasible or not feasible at all. These barriers are due in part to the complexity and large fixed and recurring capital costs of unit operations including filtration, chromatographic separation, and ion exchange. This project was designed to help remove these barriers by developing and implementing new purification and separation technologies that will reduce the capital costs of the purification and chromatographic separation units by 50% to 70%. The technologies fundamental to these improvements are: (a) highly efficient clarification and purification systems that use screening and membrane filtration to eliminate suspended solids and colloidal material from feed streams and (b) fractal technology based chromatographic separation and ion exchange systems that can substitute for conventional systems but at much smaller size and cost. A non-hazardous ''raw sugar beet juice'' stream (75 to 100 gal/min) was used for prototype testing of these technologies. This raw beet juice stream from the Amalgamated Sugar LLC plant in Twin Falls, Idaho contained abrasive materials and membrane foulants. Its characteristics were representative of an industrial-scale heterogeneous plant extract/hydrolysis stream, and therefore was an ideal model system for developing new separation equipment. Subsequent testing used both synthetic acid hydrolysate and corn stover derived weak acid hydrolysate (NREL produced). A two-phased approach was used for the research and development described in this project. The first level of study involved testing the new concepts at the bench level. The bench-scale evaluations provided fundamental understanding of the processes, building and testing small prototype systems, and determining the efficiency of the novel processes. The second level of study, macro-level, required building larger systems that directly simulated industrial operations and provided validation of performance to minimize financial risk during commercialization. The project goals and scope included: (1) Development of low-capital alternatives to conventional crop-based purification/separation processes; and (2) Development of each process to the point that transition to commercial operation is low risk. The project reporting period was January 2001 to December 2004. This included a one year extension of the project (without additional funding).

Kearney, M; Kochergin, V; Hess, R; Foust, T; Herbst, R; Mann, N

2005-03-31

213

Validation Testing of the Nitric Acid Dissolution Step Within the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report involved comprehensive bench-scale testing of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) dissolution of actual sludge materials from the Hanford K East (KE) Basin to confirm the baseline chemical pretreatment process. In addition, process monitoring and material balance information was collected to support the development and refinement of process flow diagrams. The testing was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for the US Department of Energy's Office of Spent Fuel Stabilization (EM-67) and Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to assist in the development of the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process. The baseline chemical pretreatment process for K Basin sludge is nitric acid dissolution of all particulate material passing a 1/4-in. screen. The acid-insoluble fraction (residual solids) will be stabilized (possibly by chemical leaching/rinsing and grouting), packaged, and transferred to the Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The liquid fraction is to be diluted with depleted uranium for uranium criticality safety and iron nitrate for plutonium criticality safety, and neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The liquid fraction and associated precipitates are to be stored in the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) pending vitrification. It is expected that most of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), associated with some K Basin sludges, will remain with the residual solids for ultimate disposal to ERDF. Filtration and precipitation during the neutralization step will further remove trace quantities of PCBs within the liquid fraction. The purpose of the work discussed in this report was to examine the dissolution behavior of actual KE Basin sludge materials at baseline flowsheet conditions and validate the.dissolution process step through bench-scale testing. The progress of the dissolution was evaluated by measuring the solution electrical conductivity and concentrations of key species in the dissolver solutions as a function of reaction (dissolution) time, by analyzing offgas generation rate and composition, and by analyzing intermittent and final acid-insoluble solids at the end of the dissolution. The testing was conducted in a system designed to assess parameters that can influence sludge dissolution and provide information that can be used to determine operating conditions for the actual system.

AJ Schmidt; CH Delegard; KL Silvers; PR Bredt; CD Carlson; EW Hoppe; JC Hayes; DE Rinehart; SR Gano; BM Thornton

1999-03-24

214

Vibrating membrane filtration as improved technology for microalgae dewatering.  

PubMed

The effect of shear-enhanced filtration by vibratory process in microalgae dewatering is presented in this paper. The aim of this research was to investigate the technical performance and improvement of vibrating membrane filtration compared with conventional tangential cross-flow filtration in microalgae concentration. An industrial-scale available commercial set-up was used. Several membrane materials as polyethersulfone, polyacrylonitrile, etc., and mean pore sizes (from 7000Da to 0.2?m) were tested and compared in both filtration set-ups. Experiments were carried-out with Nannochloropsis gaditana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum microalgae. It has been demonstrated that, even if the choice of the membrane depends on its cut-off, its material and the type of microalgae filtrated, dynamic filtration is always the best technology over a conventional one. If with conventional filtration permeability values were in the vicinity of 10L/h/m(2)/bar in steady state phase, with dynamic filtration these values increased to 30L/h/m(2)/bar or more. PMID:24561630

Nurra, Claudia; Clavero, Ester; Salvadó, Joan; Torras, Carles

2014-04-01

215

Biological Filtration for Ozone and Chlorine DBP Removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents results from a water treatment pilot testing program in Winnipeg, Canada (pop. 650,000) which evaluated a DAF\\/ozone\\/deep bed filtration process. As part of the testing program, biological filtration using GAC and anthracite media was assessed for the removal of ozone DBPs and background chlorine DBPs (due to upstream chlorination of the source water). The results were used

Paul Wobma; David Pernitsky; Bill Bellamy; Kelly Kjartanson; Keith Sears

2000-01-01

216

MICROBIOLOGY AND DRINKING WATER FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Concerns about waterborne viruses and protozoan cysts developed in the third quarter of the twentieth century, and filtration research for microorganism control in the 1960's through 1980's has reflected these concerns. The chapter briefly reviews historical filtration research f...

217

A PERSPECTIVE OF RIVERBANK FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Riverbank filtration is a process in which pumping of wells located along riverbanks induce a portion of the river water to flow toward the pumping wells. The process has many similarities to the slow sand filtration process. River water contaminants are attenuated due to a combi...

218

Bench-scale synthesis of nanoscale materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel flow-through hydrothermal method used to synthesize nanoscale powders is introduced by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The process, Rapid Thermal Decomposition of precursors in Solution (RTDS), uniquely combines high-pressure and high-temperature conditions to rapidly form nanoscale particles. The RTDS process was initially demonstrated on a laboratory scale and was subsequently scaled up to accommodate production rates attractive to industry. The process is able to produce a wide variety of metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The powders are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopic methods, surface-area measurements, and x-ray diffraction. Typical crystallite sizes are less than 20 nanometers, with BET surface areas ranging from 100 to 400 sq m/g. A description of the RTDS process is presented along with powder characterization results. In addition, data on the sintering of nanoscale ZrO2 produced by RTDS are included.

Buehler, M. F.; Darab, J. G.; Matson, D. W.; Linehan, J. C.

1994-01-01

219

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

2003-05-21

220

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Shaber

2003-05-01

221

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg

2003-05-01

222

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.

2003-05-21

223

40 CFR 141.173 - Filtration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Filtration. 141.173 Section 141...DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving...or More People § 141.173 Filtration. A public water...

2011-07-01

224

40 CFR 141.173 - Filtration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration. 141.173 Section 141...DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving...or More People § 141.173 Filtration. A public water...

2010-07-01

225

40 CFR 141.73 - Filtration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration. 141.73 Section 141.73 Protection...NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.73 Filtration. A public water system that...

2010-07-01

226

40 CFR 141.73 - Filtration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Filtration. 141.73 Section 141.73 Protection...NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.73 Filtration. A public water system that...

2011-07-01

227

Filtration Technologies in the Automotive Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The filtration in the automotive industry is diverse. Many filters are used either for the filtration of air or liquid in\\u000a the tank, engine or cabine. This paper will focus on air filtration and more specifically on engine air filtration. After\\u000a a brief presentation of the basic filtration principles, the filtration technologies used in this field of the automotive\\u000a industry

E. Jandos; M. Lebrun; C. Brzezinski; S. Canizares

228

MINIPILOT SOLAR SYSTEM: DESIGN/OPERATION OF SYSTEM AND RESULTS OF NON-SOLAR TESTING AT MRI  

EPA Science Inventory

Prior to this project, MRI had carried out work for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the conceptual design of a solar system for solid waste disposal and a follow-on project to study the feasibility of bench-scale testing of desorption of organics from soil with destr...

229

Filtration model of plastic flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A filtration model for plastic flow based on the idea of a deformed material considered as a two-phase heterogeneous medium has been suggested. In this approach, the wave displacement is regarded as a shock transition in the medium. One of the phases (the excited one) is responsible for system restructuring, and the other phase (the normal one) is unrelated to structural transformations. The plastic wave is the result of the interaction of these two phases. The governing equations for the filtration model are obtained. They include the laws of momentum and mass conservation, as well as the filtration ratio of the phases.

Sarychev, Vladimir D.; Nevskii, Sergey A.; Cheremushkina, Elena V.; Gromov, Victor E.; Aifantis, Elias C.

2014-12-01

230

Test procedures and instructions for Hanford tank waste supernatant cesium removal  

SciTech Connect

This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed supernatant liquor from tank 251-AW-101 in a bench-scale column.Cesium sorbents to be tested include resorcinol-formaldehyde resin and crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-022, Hanford Tank Waste Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

Hendrickson, D.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-31

231

Test procedures and instructions for Hanford complexant concentrate supernatant cesium removal using CST  

SciTech Connect

This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Complexant Concentrate supernatant liquor from tank 241-AN-107, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-023, Hanford Complexant Concentrate Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

Hendrickson, D.W.

1997-01-08

232

Tests of US rock salt for long-term stability of CAES reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This is a report on laboratory tests to assess the effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) on rock salt within the US. The project included a conventional laboratory test phase, with triaxial test machines, and a bench-scale test phase performed in salt mines in southern Louisiana. Limited numerical modeling also was performed to serve as a guide in selecting test layouts and for interpreting test data.

Gehle, R.M.; Thoms, R.L.

1986-01-01

233

Pig manure treatment by filtration.  

PubMed

A study of new pig manure treatment and filtration process was carried out. The advantage of the worked out technology is the method of incorporation of crystalline phase into solid organic part of manure. The obtained new solid phase of manure contains about 50% of crystalline phase forming a filtration aid that enables high effectiveness of manure filtration. The filtration rate of manure separation into solid and liquid fractions with pressure filter may achieve 1300-3000 kg/m(2)/h. The method makes it possible to maintain an overall average pollutant removal performance 90% for the chemical oxygen demand COD, > 99% for the suspended solids SS, to 47% for the total nitrogen content. The obtained results showed that the proposed technology being efficient and simple offers a possible solution to pig manure problems. PMID:24432343

Kowalski, Zygmunt; Makara, Agnieszka; Matýsek, Dalibor; Hoffmann, Józef; Hoffmann, Krystyna

2013-01-01

234

Nanofiber filter media for air filtration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanofibers have higher capture efficiencies in comparison to microfibers in the submicron particle size range of 100-500 nm because of small fiber diameter and increased surface area of the fibers. Pressure drop across the filter increases tremendously with decrease in fiber diameter in the continuum flow regime. Nanofibers with fiber diameter less than 300 nm are in the slip flow regime as a consequence of which steep increase in pressure drop is considerably reduced due to slip effect. The outlet or inlet gases have broad range of particle size distribution varying from few micrometers to nanometers. The economic benefits include capture of a wide range of particle sizes in the gas streams using compact filters composed of nanofibers and microfibers. Electrospinning technique was used to successfully fabricate polymeric and ceramic nanofibers. The nanofibers were long, continuous, and flexible with diameters in the range of 200--300 nm. Nanofibers were added to the filter medium either by mixing microfibers and nanofibers or by directly electrospinning nanofibers as thin layer on the surface of the microfiber filter medium. Experimental results showed that either by mixing Nylon 6 nanofibers with B glass fibers or by electrospinning Nylon 6 nanofibers as a thin layer on the surface of the microfiber medium in the surface area ratio of 1 which is 0.06 g of nanofibers for 2 g of microfibers performed better than microfiber filter media in air filtration tests. This improved performance is consistent with numerical modeling. The particle loading on a microfibrous filter were studied for air filtration tests. The experimental and modeling results showed that both pressure drop and capture efficiency increased with loading time. Nanofiber filter media has potential applications in many filtration applications and one of them being hot gas filtration. Ceramic nanofibers made of alumina and titania nanofibers can withstand in the range of 1000°C. Ceramic nanofibers filter media were fabricated by mixing alumina microfibers (SAFFIL) and alumina nanofibers. The appropriate binders were tested for ceramic filter media. The ceramic filter media were tested for aerosol filtration.

Raghavan, Bharath Kumar

235

The influence of Seitz filtration on the activity of hydatid fluid antigen.  

PubMed

Filtration of hydatid fluid through Seitz EK filter pads results in an initial retention of a part of sensitizing proteins on the filter disc. Filtration through membrane filters allows the passage of most of the proteins of the fluid and may be considered as a more satisfactory procedure for the preparation of antigen for Casoni skin tests. Membrane filtrates are likewise reactive in indirect haemagglutination tests. PMID:999356

Garabedian, G A; Zekian-Arslanian, B

1976-12-01

236

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

SciTech Connect

The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

Fisk, William J.

2013-10-01

237

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

SciTech Connect

The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

Fisk, William J.

2013-10-01

238

Water Filtration and Purity of Water  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, presented by the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, introduces the concept of water purity. In this activity, students will test a sample of water collected from a local water supply and test its purity and evaluate its safety for consumption by looking for pollutants. Before starting, students should have a grasp on how to convert nanoscale measurements. This lab will take two 50 minute classroom sessions. Teacher Preparation Guides, Student Guides, Water Filtration Presentation, and Next Generation Manufacturing Standards for this lesson are included. 

2014-08-12

239

GEOTEXTILE FILTRATION PERFORMANCE FOR LAGOON SLUDGES AND LIQUID ANIMAL MANURES DEWATERING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maintenance and control of liquid levels in anaerobic lagoons and storage ponds is enhanced by pretreatment with liquid-solid separation or periodic removal of accumulated sludges. Until local disposal or nutrient recycling options become available, sludges can be contained, dewatered, and stored using geotextile filtration. A geotextile filtration testing method termed a hanging-bag test was used to treat dairy lagoon sludge,

K. B. Cantrell; J. P. Chastain; K. P. Moore

240

Study of water quality improvements during riverbank filtration at three midwestern United States drinking water utilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Riverbank filtration (RBF) is a process during which surface water is subjected to subsurface flow prior to extraction from wells. During infiltration and soil passage, surface water is subjected to a combination of physical, chemical, and biological processes such as filtration, dilution, sorption, and biodegradation that can significantly improve the raw water quality (Tufenkji et al, 2002; Kuehn and Mueller, 2000; Kivimaki et al, 1998; Stuyfzand, 1998). Transport through alluvial aquifers is associated with a number of water quality benefits, including removal of microbes, pesticides, total and dissolved organic carbon (TOC and DOC), nitrate, and other contaminants (Hiscock and Grischek, 2002; Tufenkji et al., 2002; Ray et al, 2002; Kuehn and Mueller, 2000; Doussan et al, 1997; Cosovic et al, 1996; Juttner, 1995; Miettinen et al, 1994). In comparison to most groundwater sources, alluvial aquifers that are hydraulically connected to rivers are typically easier to exploit (shallow) and more highly productive for drinking water supplies (Doussan et al, 1997). Increased applications of RBF are anticipated as drinking water utilities strive to meet increasingly stringent drinking water regulations, especially with regard to the provision of multiple barriers for protection against microbial pathogens, and with regard to tighter regulations for disinfection by-products (DBPs), such as trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). In the above context, research was conducted to document the water quality benefits during RBF at three major river sources in the mid-western United States, specifically with regard to DBP precursor organic matter and microbial pathogens. Specific objectives were to: 1. Evaluate the merits of RBF for removing/controlling DBP precursors and certain other drinking water contaminants (e.g. microorganisms). 2. Evaluate whether RBF can improve finished drinking water quality by removing and/or altering natural organic matter (NOM) in a manner that is not otherwise accomplished through conventional processes of drinking water treatment (e.g. coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation). 3. Evaluate changes in the character of NOM upon ground passage from the river to the wells. The experimental approach entailed monitoring the performance of three different RBF systems along the Ohio, Wabash, and Missouri Rivers in the Midwestern United States and involved a cooperative effort between the American Water Works Company, Inc. and Johns Hopkins University. Samples of the river source waters and the bank-filtered well waters were analyzed for a range of water quality parameters including TOC, DOC, UV-absorbance at 254-nm (UV-254), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC), biologically assimilable organic carbon (AOC), inorganic species, DBP formation potential, and microorganisms. In the second year of the project, river waters were subjected to a bench-scale conventional treatment train consisting of coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, glass-fiber filtration, and ozonation. The treated river waters were compared with the bank-filtered waters in terms of TOC, DOC, UV-254, and DBP formation potential. In the third and fourth years of the project, NOM from the river and well waters was characterized using the XAD-8 resin adsorption fractionation method (Leenheer, 1981; Thurman &Malcolm, 1981). XAD-8 adsorbing (hydrophobic) and non-adsorbing (hydrophilic) fractions of the river and well waters were compared with respect to DOC, UV-254, and DBP formation potential to determine whether RBF alters the character of the source water NOM upon ground passage and if so, which fractions are preferentially removed. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of RBF at removing the organic precursors to potentially carcinogenic DBPs. When compared to a bench-scale conventional treatment train optimized for turbidity removal, RBF performed as well as the treatment at one of the sites and significantly better than the treatment at the other two sites in terms of removal of organic carbon and DBP precursor ma

Weiss, W.; Bouwer, E.; Ball, W.; O'Melia, C.; Lechevallier, M.; Arora, H.; Aboytes, R.; Speth, T.

2003-04-01

241

40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...The direct integrity test must have a sensitivity sufficient to verify the log treatment...filtration process by the State, where sensitivity is defined as the maximum log removal...verified by a direct integrity test. Sensitivity must be determined using the...

2013-07-01

242

40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...The direct integrity test must have a sensitivity sufficient to verify the log treatment...filtration process by the State, where sensitivity is defined as the maximum log removal...verified by a direct integrity test. Sensitivity must be determined using the...

2010-07-01

243

40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...The direct integrity test must have a sensitivity sufficient to verify the log treatment...filtration process by the State, where sensitivity is defined as the maximum log removal...verified by a direct integrity test. Sensitivity must be determined using the...

2012-07-01

244

40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...The direct integrity test must have a sensitivity sufficient to verify the log treatment...filtration process by the State, where sensitivity is defined as the maximum log removal...verified by a direct integrity test. Sensitivity must be determined using the...

2011-07-01

245

Filtrates and Residues: Gel Filtration--An Innovative Separation Technique.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gel filtration is a form of liquid chromatography that separates molecules primarily on the basis of their size. Advantages of using this technique, theoretical aspects, and experiments (including procedures used) are discussed. Several questions for students to answer (with answers) are also provided. (JN)

Blumenfeld, Fred; Gardner, James

1985-01-01

246

Demand Controlled Filtration in an Industrial Cleanroom  

SciTech Connect

In an industrial cleanroom, significant energy savings were realized by implementing two types of demand controlled filtration (DCF) strategies, one based on particle counts and one on occupancy. With each strategy the speed of the recirculation fan filter units was reduced to save energy. When the control was based on particle counts, the energy use was 60% of the baseline configuration of continuous fan operation. With simple occupancy sensors, the energy usage was 63% of the baseline configuration. During the testing of DCF, no complaints were registered by the operator of the cleanroom concerning processes and products being affected by the DCF implementation.

Faulkner, David; DiBartolomeo, Dennis; Wang, Duo

2007-09-01

247

STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE  

EPA Science Inventory

Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

248

ELECTROSTATIC STIMULATION OF FABRIC FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper gives results of an investigation of the concept of electrostatic stimulation of fabric filtration (ESFF) at pilot scale. The pilot unit consisted of a conventional baghouse in parallel with an ESFF baghouse, allowing direct comparison. Reported results are for pulse-cl...

249

Health benefits of particle filtration  

EPA Science Inventory

This product was developed under an interagency agreement between the U.S. EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews o...

250

Improving IAQ Via Air Filtration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides tips on using air filtration to control indoor air quality in educational facilities, including dedicated spaces with unique air quality conditions such as in libraries, museums and archival storage areas, kitchens and dining areas, and laboratories. The control of particulate contaminants, gaseous contaminants, and moisture buildup are…

Monk, Brian

1999-01-01

251

Emulsions for interfacial filtration.  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

2006-11-01

252

METC/Shell Cooperative Agreement CRADA 93-011 high temperature high pressure filtration and sorbent test program. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/Shell CRADA 93-011. Online particulate monitoring began in August 1993 and ended in October 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in six MGCR runs (No. 5 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.07 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, (Modular Gas Cleanup Rig), from the FBG, pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit.

NONE

1995-06-01

253

Treatment of gasoline residuals by granular activated carbon based biological filtration  

SciTech Connect

The use of granular activated carbon (GAC) as a support medium in the treatment of gasoline residuals is investigated. A bench-scale column provided the experimental results and the system was operated using prehumidification of the incoming gas stream only. The average and maximum elimination capacities of the biofilter were high compared to published bench scale results for compost biofilters. Plate counts show that both bacterial and fungal numbers increased as the column operated. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Medina, V.F.; Webster, T.; Devinny, J.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ramaratnam, M. [Westates Carbon, City of Commerce, CA (United States)

1995-02-01

254

METC CFD simulations of hot gas filtration  

SciTech Connect

Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the fluid/particle flow in several hot gas filtration vessels will be presented. These simulations have been useful in designing filtration vessels and in diagnosing problems with filter operation. The simulations were performed using the commercial code FLUENT and the METC-developed code MFIX. Simulations of the initial configuration of the Karhula facility indicated that the dirty gas flow over the filter assemblage was very non-uniform. The force of the dirty gas inlet flow was inducing a large circulation pattern that caused flow around the candles to be in opposite directions on opposite sides of the vessel. By introducing a system of baffles, a more uniform flow pattern was developed. This modification may have contributed to the success of the project. Several simulations of configurations proposed by Industrial Filter and Pump were performed, varying the position of the inlet. A detailed resolution of the geometry of the candles allowed determination of the flow between the individual candles. Recent simulations in support of the METC/CeraMem Cooperative Research and Development Agreement have analyzed the flow in the vessel during the cleaning back-pulse. Visualization of experiments at the CeraMem cold-flow facility provided confidence in the use of CFD. Extensive simulations were then performed to assist in the design of the hot test facility being built by Ahlstrom/Pyropower. These tests are intended to demonstrate the CeraMem technology.

O`Brien, T.J.

1995-06-01

255

Low Cost Ceramics:Low Cost Ceramics: Applications in Water FiltrationApplications in Water Filtration  

E-print Network

Mechanical Properties Thermal PropertiesThermal Properties ResultsResults #12;Part IPart I Water FiltrationWaterLow Cost Ceramics:Low Cost Ceramics: Applications in Water FiltrationApplications in Water (Mech. Engineering) #12;OutlineOutline I. Water FiltrationI. Water Filtration Motivation

Petta, Jason

256

Acoustically driven filtration of particulate suspensions in porous media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel method of filtration of liquid suspensions containing micron to millimeter size particles has been developed. A resonant ultrasonic field, applied across a highly porous medium, has been used to trap fine particles inside the large pores (relative to the particle size) of the medium. Three types of porous media, unconsolidated bed of 3 mm glass beads, consolidated open pore aluminum mesh, and reticulated polyester polyurethane foam were investigated as the test media. Reasonable filtration efficiencies were achieved for model aqueous suspensions of 325 mesh polystyrene particles in all three porous media. The expected trends of filtration performance with respect to suspension flow rate, its concentration, and the acoustic field intensity were confirmed. The Filtration phenomena was found to be limited by non-physical saturation of porous media. At saturation, the particles collected inside the media were found to exhibit macroscopic vibrations which allows them to escape with the carrier fluid. The highly porous POLY foam (95% porosity) was found to be the best media for suspension studied in terms of the duration of particle retention and percentage filtration efficiencies. The aluminum mesh performed slightly poorer. The unconsolidated porous media collected the least amount of solids. A simple theoretical development based on particle trajectory around an infinitely long cylindrical fiber, in the presence of acoustic field, has been initiated. In principle, the new filtration method is similar to high gravity magnetic separation but the acoustic method has a wider scope due to inherent acoustic contrast present in most suspensions. The low pressure drop, ease of operation, amenability to large scale operation and reasonable filtration efficiency make the new method highly attractive and suitable for practical applications.

Gupta, Sanjay

1997-12-01

257

A New Test Method for Material Flammability Assessment in Microgravity and Extraterrestrial Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this research is to modify the well-instrumented standard cone configuration to provide a reproducible bench-scale test environment that simulates the buoyant or ventilation flow that would be generated by or around a burning surface in a spacecraft or extraterrestrial gravity level. We will then develop a standard test method with pass-fail criteria for future use in spacecraft materials flammability screening. (For example, dripping of molten material will be an automatic fail.)

Olson, S. L.; Beeson, H. D.; Haas, J. P.; Baas, J. S.

2004-01-01

258

QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF HEPA FILTRATION UNITS AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

A study was conducted to determine-the filtering efficiencies of 31 high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units in use at asbestos-abatement projects. article-removal efficiencies for these units ranged from 90.53 to > 99.99 percent. ineteen (61%) of the units tested ...

259

On-site engineering report of the slurry-phase biological reactor for pilot-scale testing on contaminated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pilot-scale test of the slurry-phase bioremediation technology was performed by ECOVA Corporation (ECOVA) at the U.S. EPA Test and Evaluation (T E) facility from May 8 through July 10, 1991 (12 weeks). The slurry-phase bioreactors were tested on a creosote-contaminated soil from the Burlington Northern Superfund Site in Brainerd, Minnesota. The results of the bench-scale study (performed by ECOVA

M. Dosani; J. Hessling; M. L. Smith; A. Jones; W. R. Mahaffey

1993-01-01

260

Sioux City Riverbank Filtration Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The City of Sioux City (City) obtains a large percentage of their drinking water supply from both a horizontal collector well system and vertical wells located adjacent to the Missouri River. These wells are set in either the Missouri Alluvium or the Dakota Sandstone aquifer. Several of the collector well laterals extend out beneath the Missouri River, with the laterals being over twenty feet below the river channel bottom. Due to concerns regarding ground water under direct surface water influence, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) required the City to expand their water treatment process to deal with potential surface water contaminant issues. With the extensive cost of these plant upgrades, the City and Olsson Associates (OA) approached the IDNR requesting approval for assessing the degree of natural riverbank filtration for water treatment. If this natural process could be ascertained, the level of treatment from the plant could be reduced. The objective of this study was to quantify the degree of surface water (i.e. Missouri River) filtration due to the underlying Missouri River sediments. Several series of microscopic particulate analysis where conducted, along with tracking of turbidity, temperature, bacteria and a full scale particle count study. Six particle sizes from six sampling points were assessed over a nine-month period that spanned summer, fall and spring weather periods. The project was set up in two phases and utilized industry accepted statistical analyses to identify particle data trends. The first phase consisted of twice daily sample collection from the Missouri River and the collector well system for a one-month period. Statistical analysis of the data indicated reducing the sampling frequency and sampling locations would yield justifiable data while significantly reducing sampling and analysis costs. The IDNR approved this modification, and phase II included sampling and analysis under this reduced plant for an eight-month period. Final statistical analyses of the nine months of data indicate up to a four-log particle reduction occurs through river bank filtration. Consequently, Missouri River sediments within the City's well field are very effective in water filtration. This information was submitted to the IDNR for review and approval. Subsequently, the IDNR approved 4.0 log removal for Giardia and 3.5 log removal for Cryptosporidium through the riverbank and treatment plant. The City and IDNR have agreed on subrogate parameters for monitoring purposes.

Mach, R.; Condon, J.; Johnson, J.

2003-04-01

261

Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem  

PubMed Central

Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, inexpensive, biodegradable, and disposable material – can remove bacteria from water by simple pressure-driven filtration. Approximately 3 cm3 of sapwood can filter water at the rate of several liters per day, sufficient to meet the clean drinking water needs of one person. The results demonstrate the potential of plant xylem to address the need for pathogen-free drinking water in developing countries and resource-limited settings. PMID:24587134

Chambers, Valerie; Venkatesh, Varsha; Karnik, Rohit

2014-01-01

262

Monitoring bioremediation in creosote-contaminated soils using chemical analysis and toxicity tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Three soils with a history of creosote contamination (designated NB, TI and AC) were treated in bench-scale microcosms using\\u000a conditions (nutrient amendment, moisture content and temperature) which had promoted mineralization of?14C-pyrene in a preliminary study. Bioremediation was monitored using the solid-phase Microtox test, seed germination and earthworm\\u000a survival assays, SOS-chromotest, Toxi-chromotest and a red blood cell (RBC) haemolysis assay. Contaminant

T M Phillips; D Liu; A G Seech; H Lee; J T Trevors

2000-01-01

263

COMPARISON OF SOME FILTRATION PROCESSES APPROPRIATE FOR GIARDIA CYST REMOVAL  

EPA Science Inventory

Slow sand filtration, diatomaceous earth (DE) filtration, and coagulation-filtration (including conventional treatment, direct filtration, and in-line filtration), have been evaluated for Giardia cyst removal at pilot plant and/or field scale. Properly designed and operated, the ...

264

Recirculating Air Filtration Significantly Reduces Exposure to Airborne Nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

Background Airborne nanoparticles from vehicle emissions have been associated with adverse effects in people with pulmonary and cardiovascular disease, and toxicologic studies have shown that nanoparticles can be more hazardous than their larger-scale counterparts. Recirculating air filtration in automobiles and houses may provide a low-cost solution to reducing exposures in many cases, thus reducing possible health risks. Objectives We investigated the effectiveness of recirculating air filtration on reducing exposure to incidental and intentionally produced airborne nanoparticles under two scenarios while driving in traffic, and while generating nanomaterials using gas-phase synthesis. Methods We tested the recirculating air filtration in two commercial vehicles when driving in traffic, as well as in a nonventilation room with a nanoparticle generator, simulating a nanomaterial production facility. We also measured the time-resolved aerosol size distribution during the in-car recirculation to investigate how recirculating air filtration affects particles of different sizes. We developed a recirculation model to describe the aerosol concentration change during recirculation. Results The use of inexpensive, low-efficiency filters in recirculation systems is shown to reduce nanoparticle concentrations to below levels found in a typical office within 3 min while driving through heavy traffic, and within 20 min in a simulated nanomaterial production facility. Conclusions Development and application of this technology could lead to significant reductions in airborne nanoparticle exposure, reducing possible risks to health and providing solutions for generating nanomaterials safely. PMID:18629306

Pui, David Y.H.; Qi, Chaolong; Stanley, Nick; Oberdörster, Günter; Maynard, Andrew

2008-01-01

265

SOLUBLE MANGANESE REMOVAL BY POROUS MEDIA FILTRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Filtration experiments were conducted to investigate soluble manganese removal in granular media filtration; sand, manganese oxide coated sand (MOCS), sand + MOCS (1:1) and granular activated carbon (GAC) were used as filter media. Manganese removal, manganese oxide accumulation, turbidity removal, and regeneration of MOCS under various conditions were examined. Soluble manganese removal by the MOCS column was rapid and efficient;

J. Kim; S. Jung

2008-01-01

266

NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN SLOW SAND FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), including the Surface Water Treatment Rule, have helped to renew the interest in the use of slow sand filtration (SSF) for treating surface waters for small communities. low sand filtration is not a...

267

Detection of damage of a filter by visualization of filtration process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with testing of filters on the basis of visualization of filtration process. A filtration material can be damaged by flow of the filtered medium, high pressure drop and long-term adverse conditions. These negative effects can cause extensive damage of the filtration textile and filtration efficiency decreases. The filter can be also fractured during manufacturing, processing or by improper manipulation. A testing of a purposely damaged filtration textile is described in the article. Experiments were performed on the filtration setup which permits an optical entrance to the position where a sample of filter is placed. A laser sheet is directed into this place. Scattered light from seeding particles in front of and behind the filter is captured by a digital camera. Images from the camera are analyzed and the filtration efficiency versus time and also versus position can be obtained. Measuring chain including light scattering theory and measuring of light intensity by a digital camera are also discussed in the article.

Bílek, P.; Šidlof, P.

2014-03-01

268

1. Perspective view southwest of filtration bed with earth mounded ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Perspective view southwest of filtration bed with earth mounded over facility. Armory Street appears in the foreground. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

269

21 CFR 177.2910 - Ultra-filtration membranes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ultra-filtration membranes. 177.2910 Section 177.2910...Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2910 Ultra-filtration membranes. Ultra-filtration membranes identified in paragraphs...

2010-04-01

270

40 CFR 141.174 - Filtration sampling requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration sampling requirements. 141...DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving...or More People § 141.174 Filtration sampling requirements....

2010-07-01

271

21 CFR 177.2910 - Ultra-filtration membranes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultra-filtration membranes. 177.2910 Section 177.2910...Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2910 Ultra-filtration membranes. Ultra-filtration membranes identified in paragraphs...

2011-04-01

272

40 CFR 141.174 - Filtration sampling requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Filtration sampling requirements. 141...DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving...or More People § 141.174 Filtration sampling requirements....

2011-07-01

273

Screening culture filtrates of fungi for activity against Tylenchulus semipenetrans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Culture f iltrates of 20 fungi isolated from citrus soils were screened for their activity against Tylenchulus semipenetrans in both in vitro and greenhouse tests. The filtrates of Talaromyces cyanescens (isolates 2-4 and 2-5), Paecilomyces lilacinus, Chaetomium robustum, Acremonium strictum, Engyodontium album, Myrothecium verrucaria, Emericella rugulosa, and Tarracomyces gigaspora consistently inhibited the motility of second-stage juveniles at various concentrations of

S. Verdejo-Lucas; A. Viera; A. M. Stchigel; F. J. Sorribas

274

Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In coal preparation plant circuits, fine coal particles are aggregated either by oil agglomeration or by flocculation. In a new hydrophobic agglomeration process, recently developed hydrophobic latices are utilized. While the selectivity of such aggregation processes determines the beneficiation results, the degree of aggregation has a strong effect on fine coal filtration. The aim of this research was to study the fundamentals and analyze the common grounds for these processes, including the potential effect of the coal surface properties. The selective flocculation tests, in which three types of coal, which differed widely in surface wettability, and three additives (hydrophobic latices, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte) were utilized, showed that coal wettability plays a very important role in selective flocculation. The abstraction of a hydrophobic latex on coal and silica revealed that the latex had a much higher affinity towards hydrophobic coal than to hydrophilic mineral matter. As a result, the UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated only hydrophobic coal particles while the polyelectrolyte (PAM) flocculated all the tested coal samples and minerals, showing no selectivity in the fine coal beneficiation. The oil agglomeration was tested using kerosene emulsified with various surfactants (e.g. cationic, anionic and non-ionic). Surfactants enhance not only oil emulsification, hence reducing oil consumption (down to 0.25--0.5%), but also entirely change the electrokinetic properties of the droplets and affect the interaction energy between oil droplets and coal particles. Consequently, the results found in the course of the experimental work strongly indicate that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. Oil agglomeration of the Ford-4 ultrafine coal showed that even at extremely low oil consumption (0.25 to 0.5%), a clean coal product with an ash content around 5% at over 99.9% coal recovery could be obtained in a one-stage separation by screening the agglomerated product. If a conventional oil agglomeration process is used instead, oil consumption as high as 30% is needed to obtain comparable results. In the tests on filtration and dewatering of ultrafine and fine coals, the effect of chemical additives and coal surface properties was investigated. The tests revealed very significant differences in the filtration of ultrafine (-45 mum) and fine (-500 mum) coals. The moisture contents in the filter cakes in the tests with ultrafine coal were around 40% (irrespective of the coal surface properties), while for the fine coal the moisture content fluctuated around 18% (Ford-4) and 30% (Ford-13). The results revealed that the hydrophobic latex and the emulsified oils could not only successfully beneficiate the ultrafine coal but also significantly increase filtration rate and/or reduce moisture content of the filter cake. Among the chemicals tested, the emulsified oils were found to be the most promising not only for the beneficiation but also for filtration and dewatering processes. Surfactants were found to only slightly affect the filtration of fine coal. However, they can influence filtration very profoundly if utilized to emulsify the oil which is used to agglomerate coal prior to its filtration.

Yu, Zhimin

275

Use of hollow fiber tangential flow filtration for the recovery and concentration of HIV virus-like particles produced in insect cells.  

PubMed

Attenuated viruses, inactivated viruses and virus like particles (VLPs) are known to be efficient vaccines partially due to their particulate structure. A potential HIV vaccine candidate engineered as a VLP (HIV gag-VLP) and produced in insect cells is currently under preclinical trials demanding large amounts. Due to their extreme fragility and sensitivity to shear forces the recovery and concentration of these extracellular enveloped particles of approximately 120 nm in size is challenging. The current bench scale gradient ultracentrifugation and precipitation methods have been found unsuitable for larger scale processes. In this study a two-step tangential flow filtration (TFF) process using hollow fibers was developed for the clarification and concentration of HIV gag-VLPs. The first step is microfiltration for cell removal and the second step is ultrafiltration for concentrating the HIV gag-VLPs. The chosen parameters for the microfiltration step were hollow fiber membranes of 0.45 ?m cut off 5000 s(-1) shear force and a flux of 10 LMH. The chosen parameters for the ultrafiltration step were a 500 kDa cut off membrane, 6000 s(-1) shear force and a trans-membrane pressure (TMP) of 1.25 bar. The utilization of these parameters provided with concentrated HIV-gag VLPs from 2L of starting cell suspension within 6h of processing time. These downstream processing conditions are extremely valuable for the further large-scale purification process development for HIV gag-VLPs and other particulate bioproducts. PMID:24157258

Negrete, Alejandro; Pai, Amrita; Shiloach, Joseph

2014-01-01

276

Filtration effects on ball bearing life and condition in a contaminated lubricant  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ball bearings were fatigue tested with a noncontaminated MIL-L-23699 lubricant and with a contaminated MIL-L-23699 lubricant under four levels of filtration. The test filters had absolute particle removal ratings of 3, 30, 49, and 105 microns. Aircraft turbine engine contaminants were injected into the filter's supply line at a constant rate of 125 milligrams per bearing hour. Bearing life and running track condition generally improved with finer filtration. The experimental lives of 3- and 30-micron filter bearings were statistically equivalent, approaching those obtained with the noncontaminated lubricant bearings. Compared to these bearings, the lives of the 49-micron bearings were statistically lower. The 105-micron bearings experienced gross wear. The degree of surface distress, weight loss, and probable failure mode were dependent on filtration level, with finer filtration being clearly beneficial.

Loewenthal, S. H.; Moyer, D. W.

1978-01-01

277

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE (WTP-SW) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford’s WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular products (both simulant and radioactive) were tested and a subset of the granular material (both simulant and radioactive) were stabilized in a geopolymer matrix. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following: ? ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) testing of granular and monolith; ? ASTM C1308 accelerated leach testing of the radioactive monolith; ? ASTM C192 compression testing of monoliths; and ? EPA Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The significant findings of the testing completed on simulant and radioactive WTP-SW are given below: ? Data indicates {sup 99}Tc, Re, Cs, and I

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2014-08-21

278

Test procedures and instructions for single shell tank saltcake cesium removal with crystalline silicotitanate  

SciTech Connect

This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake from tanks 24 t -BY- I 10, 24 1 -U- 108, 24 1 -U- 109, 24 1 -A- I 0 1, and 24 t - S-102, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline siticotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-024, Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake Cesium Removal Test Plan.

Duncan, J.B.

1997-01-07

279

Evaluation of hyperbaric filtration for fine coal dewatering. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to investigate the fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction in fine coal dewatering, to conduct laboratory and pilot plant studies on the applicability of hyperbaric filter systems and to develop process conditions for dewatering of fine clean coal to less than 20% moisture. The program consisted of three phases, namely Phase 1 -- Model Development, Phase 2 -- Laboratory Studies, Phase 3 -- Pilot Plant Testing. The Pennsylvania State University led efforts in Phase 1, the University of Kentucky in Phase 2, and CONSOL Inc. in Phase 3 of the program. All three organizations were involved in all the three phases of the program. The Pennsylvania State University developed a theoretical model for hyperbaric filtration systems, whereas the University of Kentucky conducted experimental studies to investigate fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction and application of high pressure filter in fine coal dewatering. The optimum filtration conditions identified in Phase 1 and 2 were tested in two of the CONSOL Inc. coal preparation plants using an Andritz Ruthner portable hyperbaric filtration unit.

Parekh, B.K. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Hogg, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fonseca, A. [CONSOL Inc. (United States)

1996-08-15

280

SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: BENGART AND MEMEL (BENCH-SCALE), GULFPORT (BENCH AND PILOT-SCALE), MONTANA POLE (BENCH-SCALE), AND WESTERN PROCESSING (BENCH-SCALE) TREATABILITY STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

This document presents summary data on the results of various treatability studies (bench and pilot scale), conducted at three different sites where soils were contaminated with dioxins or PCBs. The synopsis is meant to show rough performance levels under a variety of differen...

281

Linear Thermodynamics of Rodlike DNA Filtration  

E-print Network

Linear thermodynamics transportation theory is employed to study filtration of rodlike DNA molecules. Using the repeated nanoarray consisting of alternate deep and shallow regions, it is demonstrated that the complex ...

Li, Zirui

282

A Decade of Dabin Air Filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article Volker Bräunling, Freudenberg Nonwovens Group, Germany, provides an overview of cabin air filtration worldwide and presents some characteristics and problems of this application. Technical solutions for particulate and combination filters are also discussed.

Volker Bräunling

2000-01-01

283

ADVANCED FILTRATION OF PULP MILL WASTES  

EPA Science Inventory

Laboratory and pilot plants studies of reverse osmosis (hyperfiltration) and ultrafiltration of pulp mill wastes were performed by International Paper Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (subcontractor). Decker filtrates were treated with dynamically formed reverse osmosis ...

284

New developments in slow sand filtration  

SciTech Connect

Recent regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), including the Surface Water Treatment Rule, have helped to renew the interest in the use of slow sand filtration (SSF) for treating surface waters for small communities. Slow sand filtration is not a new process, but is one that has been used to treat water effectively since the early 1800's. Interest in slow sand filtration in the United States has increased dramatically in the past thirteen years. New analytical techniques, such as particle counting, improved turbidity, improved growth media for microbiological analysis, and advanced techniques for measuring organic constituents allowed for more detailed studies than were possible in the early 1900's. The new work led to the publication of design manuals and task committee reports describing slow sand filtration in detail.

Fox, K.R.

1993-01-01

285

Coal filtration process and dewatering aids therefore  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a method for dewatering an aqueous slurry of solid coal particulates wherein the aqueous slurry contains between about 10 and 60 percent of solid coal particulates and a dewatering aid is added to the slurry followed by vacuum filtration thereof to produce a filter cake of the coal particulates. The improvement for lowering the water content of the filter cake comprises adding to the slurry prior to filtration an effective amount of a dewatering aid selected.

Keys, R.O.

1990-01-09

286

The Hodge Filtration and Cyclic Homology  

Microsoft Academic Search

We relate the ‘Hodge filtration’ of the cohomology of a complex algebraic variety X to the ‘Hodge decomposition’ of its cyclic homology. If X is smooth and projective,\\u000a$$HC_n^{(i)} (X) $$\\u000a is the quotient of the Betti cohomology\\u000a$$H^{2i - n} (X(\\\\mathbb{C});\\\\mathbb{C}) $$\\u000a by the \\u000a$$(i + 1)^{st} $$\\u000a piece of the Hodge filtration.

Charles Weibel

1997-01-01

287

Pressure Filtration of Australian Bagasse Pulp  

Microsoft Academic Search

A one-dimensional pressure filtration model that can be used to predict the behaviour of bagasse pulp has been developed and\\u000a verified in this study. The dynamic filtration model uses steady state compressibility parameters determined experimentally\\u000a by uniaxial loading. The compressibility parameters M and N for depithed bagasse pulp were determined to be in the ranges 3000–8000 kPa and 2.5–3.0 units, respectively.

Thomas J. Rainey; William O. S. Doherty; D. Mark Martinez; Richard J. Brown; Neil A. Kelson

2011-01-01

288

Laboratory testing of a fluidized-bed dry-scrubbing process for the removal of acidic gases from a simulated incinerator flue gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of bench-scale tests was conducted to evaluate a dry, fluidized-bed, scrubbing process for removing acidic gases from incinerator flue gas. The acidic gases studied were sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, chloride, and phosphorous pentoxide. These gases were found to react readily with lime in a bubbling bed operating at 540 to 650\\/degree\\/C (1000 to 1200\\/degree\\/F). Superficial gas velocity, bed temperature,

W. M. Bradshaw; R. P. Krishnan; J. M. Young; G. B. Mohrman

1988-01-01

289

Effect of filtration on rolling-element-bearing life in contaminated lubricant environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fatigue tests were conducted on groups of 65 millimeter-bore ball bearings under four levels of filtration with and without a contaminated MIL-L-23699 lubricant. The baseline series used noncontaminated oil with 49 micron absolute filtration. In the remaining tests contaminants of the composition found in aircraft engine filters were injected into the filter's supply line at a constant rate of 125 milligrams per bearing-hour. The test filters had absolute particle removal ratings of 3, 30, 49, and 105 microns (0.45, 10, 30, and 70 microns nominal), respectively. Bearings were tested at 15,000 rpm under 4580 newtons radial load. Bearing life and running tract condition generally improved with finer filtration. The 3 and 30 micron filter bearings in a contaminated lubricant had statistically equivalent lives, approaching those from the baseline tests. The experimental lives of 49 micron bearings were approximately half the baseline bearing's lives. Bearings tested with the 105 micron filter experienced wear failures. The degree of surface distress, weight loss, and probable failure mode were found to be dependent on filtration level, with finer filtration being clearly beneficial.

Loewenthal, S. H.; Moyer, D. W.; Sherlock, J. J.

1978-01-01

290

POC-scale testing of a dry triboelectrostatic separator for fine coal cleaning  

SciTech Connect

During the past quarter, the installation, testing and shakedown phases of commissioning the TES unit were completed (Tasks 4, 5.1 and 5.2). A representative from Carpco Inc. was on site to provide training in the operation of the test unit and assist with the initial test runs. Problems have been encountered with the recycle conveyor generating dust that neutralizes the particle charge. Testing has continued by batch feeding the unit while the recycle conveying problem is being solved. Good separations have been achieved while operating in this mode. Comparison tests have also been carried out using a bench-scale triboelectrostatic separator in parallel with the POC Carpco unit.

R.-H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; A.D. Walters

1999-10-01

291

Enhanced performance of crumb rubber filtration for ballast water treatment.  

PubMed

Waste-tire-derived crumb rubber was utilized as filter media to develop an efficient filter for ballast water treatment. In this study, the effects of coagulation, pressure filtration and dual-media (gravity) filtration on the performance of the crumb rubber filtration were investigated. The removal efficiencies of turbidity, phytoplankton and zooplankton, and head loss development were monitored during the filtration process. The addition of a coagulant enhanced the removal efficiencies of all targeted matter, but resulted in substantial increase of head loss. Pressure filtration increased filtration rates to 220 m(3)h(-1)m(-2) for 8-h operation and improved the zooplankton removal. Dual-media (crumb rubber/sand) gravity filtration also improved the removal efficiencies of phytoplankton and zooplankton over mono-media gravity crumb rubber filtration. However, these filtration techniques alone did not meet the criteria for removing indigenous organisms from ballast water. A combination of filtration and disinfection is suggested for future studies. PMID:19117590

Tang, Zhijian; Butkus, Michael A; Xie, Yuefeng F

2009-03-01

292

GPS Data Filtration Method for Drive Cycle Analysis Applications  

SciTech Connect

When employing GPS data acquisition systems to capture vehicle drive-cycle information, a number of errors often appear in the raw data samples, such as sudden signal loss, extraneous or outlying data points, speed drifting, and signal white noise, all of which limit the quality of field data for use in downstream applications. Unaddressed, these errors significantly impact the reliability of source data and limit the effectiveness of traditional drive-cycle analysis approaches and vehicle simulation software. Without reliable speed and time information, the validity of derived metrics for drive cycles, such as acceleration, power, and distance, become questionable. This study explores some of the common sources of error present in raw onboard GPS data and presents a detailed filtering process designed to correct for these issues. Test data from both light and medium/heavy duty applications are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed filtration process across the range of vehicle vocations. Graphical comparisons of raw and filtered cycles are presented, and statistical analyses are performed to determine the effects of the proposed filtration process on raw data. Finally, an evaluation of the overall benefits of data filtration on raw GPS data and present potential areas for continued research is presented.

Duran, A.; Earleywine, M.

2013-02-01

293

ELECTROSTATIC EFFECTS IN FABRIC FILTRATION: VOLUME II. TRIBOELECTRIC MEASUREMENTS AND BAG PERFORMANCE (ANNOTATED DATA)  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the construction and application of a bench-scale, single-bag, experimental filter. It also describes several complementary evaluation procedures and their data. Especially significant are the methods for, and results of, electrical determinations that are no...

294

Paradoxical glomerular filtration of carbon nanotubes  

PubMed Central

The molecular weight cutoff for glomerular filtration is thought to be 30–50 kDa. Here we report rapid and efficient filtration of molecules 10–20 times that mass and a model for the mechanism of this filtration. We conducted multimodal imaging studies in mice to investigate renal clearance of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) construct covalently appended with ligands allowing simultaneous dynamic positron emission tomography, near-infrared fluorescence imaging, and microscopy. These SWCNTs have a length distribution ranging from 100 to 500 nm. The average length was determined to be 200–300 nm, which would yield a functionalized construct with a molecular weight of ?350–500 kDa. The construct was rapidly (t1/2 ? 6 min) renally cleared intact by glomerular filtration, with partial tubular reabsorption and transient translocation into the proximal tubular cell nuclei. Directional absorption was confirmed in vitro using polarized renal cells. Active secretion via transporters was not involved. Mathematical modeling of the rotational diffusivity showed the tendency of flow to orient SWCNTs of this size to allow clearance via the glomerular pores. Surprisingly, these results raise questions about the rules for renal filtration, given that these large molecules (with aspect ratios ranging from 100:1 to 500:1) were cleared similarly to small molecules. SWCNTs and other novel nanomaterials are being actively investigated for potential biomedical applications, and these observations—that high aspect ratio as well as large molecular size have an impact on glomerular filtration—will allow the design of novel nanoscale-based therapeutics with unusual pharmacologic characteristics. PMID:20566862

Ruggiero, Alessandro; Villa, Carlos H.; Bander, Evan; Rey, Diego A.; Bergkvist, Magnus; Batt, Carl A.; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Deen, William M.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

2010-01-01

295

BENCH SCALE DEVELOPMENT OF MEYERS PROCESS FOR COAL DESULFURIZATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of coal desulfurization experiments to determine the feasibility and advantages of combining gravity separation of coal with chemical desulfurization. The investigations led to the definition of the Gravichem Process, a combination physical/chemical coal ...

296

BENCH SCALE STUDIES OF LIMESTONE INJECTION FOR SO2 CONTROL  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of experiments in a boiler simulator furnace, indicating that the parameters of major importance to SO2 capture are thermal environment, calcium/sulfur ratio, and sorbent composition. Thermal environment (local temperature) had a strong effect on the util...

297

Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated SRS soil  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been charactered by the Department of Enregy (DOE) - Office of Technology Development (OTD) to investigate vitrification technology for the treatment of Low Level Mixed Wastes (LLMW). In fiscal year 1995, LLW streams containing mercury and organics were targeted. This report will present the results of studies with mercury contaminated waste. In order to successfully apply vitrification technology to LLMW, the types and quantities of glass forming additives necessary for producing homogeneous glasses from the wastes had to be determined, and the treatment for the mercury portion had to also be determined. The selected additives had to ensure that a durable and leach resistant waste form was produced, while the mercury treatment had to ensure that hazardous amounts of mercury were not released into the environment.

Cicero, C.A.

1996-05-08

298

Bench-Scale Demonstration of Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs.

Jeffrey W. Portzer; Santosh K. Gangwal

1998-12-01

299

INTRODUCTION Chronic kidney disease impairs glomerular filtration  

E-print Network

INTRODUCTION Chronic kidney disease impairs glomerular filtration rate (GFR) which is detected as elevated serum levels of kidney biomarkers such as creatinine and cystatin C. Prior studies have related poor kidney function to cognitive decline and generalized brain atrophy. However, so far, there have

Thompson, Paul

300

Solute partitioning and filtration by extracellular matrices  

PubMed Central

The physiology of glomerular filtration remains mechanistically obscure despite its importance in disease. The correspondence between proteinuria and foot process effacement suggests podocytes as the locus of the filtration barrier. If so, retained macromolecules ought to accumulate at the filtration barrier, an effect called concentration polarization. Literature data indicate macromolecule concentrations decrease from subendothelial to subepithelial glomerular basement membrane (GBM), as would be expected if the GBM were itself the filter. The objective of this study was to obtain insights into the possible role of the GBM in protein retention by performing fundamental experimental and theoretical studies on the properties of three model gels. Solute partitioning and filtration through thin gels of a commercially available laminin-rich extracellular matrix, Matrigel, were measured using a polydisperse polysaccharide tracer molecule, Ficoll 70. Solute partitioning into laminin gels and lens basement membrane (LBM) were measured using Ficoll 70. A novel model of a laminin gel was numerically simulated, as well as a mixed structure-random-fiber model for LBM. Experimental partitioning was predicted by numerical simulations. Sieving coefficients through thin gels of Matrigel were size dependent and strongly flux dependent. The observed flux dependence arose from compression of the gel in response to the applied pressure. Gel compression may alter solute partitioning into extracellular matrix at physiologic pressures present in the glomerular capillary. This suggests a physical mechanism coupling podocyte structure to permeability characteristics of the GBM. PMID:19587146

Hofmann, Christina L.; Ferrell, Nicholas; Schnell, Lisa; Dubnisheva, Anna; Zydney, Andrew L.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Roy, Shuvo

2009-01-01

301

Plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system  

DOEpatents

The present invention is directed to a novel method for cleaning a filter surface using a plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system. The method involves utilizing plasma discharges to induce short electric pulses of nanoseconds duration at high voltages. These electrical pulses generate strong Shockwaves that disintegrate and dislodge particulate matter located on the surface of the filter.

Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Yang, Yong

2014-07-22

302

Filtration engineering study to upgrade the ETF  

SciTech Connect

Filtration technologies are evaluated which have potential to augment or upgrade the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The study was written in anticipation of treating future waste waters that have high fouling potentials. The Three ultrafilters judged to be capable of treating future waste waters are: hollow fiber, tubular, and centrifugal

McDonald, F.N.N.

1995-10-18

303

ELECTROSTATIC STIMULATION OF FABRIC FILTRATION - AN UPDATE  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper gives results of an investigation of the concept of electrostatic stimulation of fabric filtration (ESFF) on a slipstream of a pulverized-coal-fired boiler using reverse-air-cleaned woven fiberglass filter bags. Operation was demonstrated using ESFF at a glass-to-cloth ...

304

Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Schwille, John A.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M.

2002-01-01

305

Gel Filtration Chromatography: A Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a rapid, visual demonstration of protein separation by gel filtration chromatography. The procedure separates two highly colored proteins of different molecular weights on a Sephadex G-75 in 45 minutes. This time includes packing the column as well. Background information, reagents needed, procedures used, and results obtained are…

Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; Schonbeck, Niels D.

1984-01-01

306

Riverbank Filtration Case Study at Louisville, Kentucky  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of NOM and disinfection byproduct precursor removal indicate that more than a 50-percent reduction in disinfection byproduct precursors can be achieved through the RBF process at Louisville with a filtration depth of 15 m. Biodegradation and the physical removal of particulate matter at the river\\/aquifer interface are the primary mechanisms for NOM and disinfection byproduct precursor removal. Adsorption

Jack Wang

307

FILTRATION OF 'GIARDIA' CYSTS AND OTHER SUBSTANCES. VOLUME 1. DIATOMACEOUS EARTH FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The effectiveness of diatomaceous earth filtration of drinking water was studied under various operating conditions for removal of Giardia cysts, total coliform bacteria, standard plate count bacteria, turbidity, and particles. Seven grades of diatomaceous earth were used. Temper...

308

21 CFR 177.2910 - Ultra-filtration membranes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... (d) Ultra-filtration membranes shall be maintained in a... (e) Ultrafiltration membranes identified in paragraph...to 13 percent of alcohol at temperatures not to exceed 21 °C (70...of the ultra-filtration membranes, the label or...

2012-04-01

309

21 CFR 177.2910 - Ultra-filtration membranes.  

... (d) Ultra-filtration membranes shall be maintained in a... (e) Ultrafiltration membranes identified in paragraph...to 13 percent of alcohol at temperatures not to exceed 21 °C (70...of the ultra-filtration membranes, the label or...

2014-04-01

310

21 CFR 177.2910 - Ultra-filtration membranes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... (d) Ultra-filtration membranes shall be maintained in a... (e) Ultrafiltration membranes identified in paragraph...to 13 percent of alcohol at temperatures not to exceed 21 °C (70...of the ultra-filtration membranes, the label or...

2013-04-01

311

7. WEYMOUTH FILTRATION PLANT, BUILDING 1 INTERIOR: LA VERNE CONTROL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. WEYMOUTH FILTRATION PLANT, BUILDING 1 INTERIOR: LA VERNE CONTROL ROOM, REGULATES DISTRIBUTION OF WATER, CONTROLS POWER HOUSES. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

312

The effect of saline infusion and hemorrhage on glomerular filtration pressure and single nephron filtration rate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single nephron filtration rate (GFRs) and effective glomerular filtration pressure (EFP) measured as the difference between intratubular stop-flow (SFP) and free-flow pressures (FFP), were determined in control rats and following saline infusion or hemorrhage. Infusion of isotonic or 4% NaCl increased EFP and GFRs without significantly affecting TF\\/P inulin. These findings could not be related to changes in arterial blood

K. H. Gertz; M. Brandis; G. Braun-Schubert; J. W. Boylan

1969-01-01

313

“Zebrafishing” for Novel Genes Relevant to the Glomerular Filtration Barrier  

PubMed Central

Data for genes relevant to glomerular filtration barrier function or proteinuria is continually increasing in an era of microarrays, genome-wide association studies, and quantitative trait locus analysis. Researchers are limited by published literature searches to select the most relevant genes to investigate. High-throughput cell cultures and other in vitro systems ultimately need to demonstrate proof in an in vivo model. Generating mammalian models for the genes of interest is costly and time intensive, and yields only a small number of test subjects. These models also have many pitfalls such as possible embryonic mortality and failure to generate phenotypes or generate nonkidney specific phenotypes. Here we describe an in vivo zebrafish model as a simple vertebrate screening system to identify genes relevant to glomerular filtration barrier function. Using our technology, we are able to screen entirely novel genes in 4–6 weeks in hundreds of live test subjects at a fraction of the cost of a mammalian model. Our system produces consistent and reliable evidence for gene relevance in glomerular kidney disease; the results then provide merit for further analysis in mammalian models. PMID:24106712

Staggs, Lynne; Schroder, Patricia; Kaufeld, Jessica; Haller, Hermann; Schiffer, Mario

2013-01-01

314

2. View east of filtration bed building. Access bridge to ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. View east of filtration bed building. Access bridge to earth covering over reinforced concrete roof is at center right of photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

315

22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

316

Digital Receptor Image Quality Evaluation: Effect of Different Filtration Schemes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The International Electrotechnical Commission provides a standard measurement methodology to provide performance intercomparison between imaging systems. Its formalism specifies beam quality based on half value layer attained by target kVp and additional Al filtration. Similar beam quality may be attained more conveniently using a filtration combination of Cu and Al. This study aimed to compare the two filtration schemes by

Simon Murphy; Olav Christianson; Maxwell Amurao; Ehsan Samei

2010-01-01

317

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and  

E-print Network

LBNL-2939E Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment of California. #12;1 Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment efficiency. Results show that when improved filtration is used in combination with an economizer, the indoor

318

Slipstream testing of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to continue further development of the zinc titanate fluidized-bed desulfurization (ZTFBD) and the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) technologies for hot gas cleanup in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generating systems. There are three main goals of this project: development of an integrated, skid-mounted, bench-scale ZTFBD/DSRP reactor system; testing the integrated system over an extended period with a slipstream of coal gas from an operating gasifier to quantify the degradation in performance, if any, caused by the trace contaminants present in coal gas (including heavy metals, chlorides, fluorides, and ammonia); and design, fabrication, and commissioning of a larger, pilot-plant scale DSRP reactor system capable of operating on a six-fold volume of gas greater than the reactors used in the bench-scale field tests. The results so far on the first phase are limited to design and construction of the test apparatus. This report describes DSRP technology and equipment that will be used to test it.

Gangwal, S.K.; Portzer, J.W.; Howe, G.B. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Chen, D.H. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States); McMillian, M.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1994-10-01

319

Enhancement of the membrane filtration index (MFI) method for determining the clogging potential of turbid urban stormwater and reclaimed water used for aquifer storage and recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Well clogging is a potential impediment to the use of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) wells. With filtration of suspended solids the most frequently reported form of clogging, methods to predict its impact serve as useful management tools. In this study, the Membrane Filtration Index (MFI), a standard test of the rate at which water clogs a membrane filter, has

Peter Dillon; Paul Pavelic; Gudrun Massmann; Karen Barry; Ray Correll

2001-01-01

320

Filtration, Vacuum (ChemPages Lab)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Filtration, Vacuum: this is a resource in the collection "ChemPages Laboratory Resources". Filtration is a technique used to separate a solid from a liquid. The solid is separated from the liquid phase by passing the mixture over a filtering media. The mixture can be forced through the filter by either gravity or reduced pressure on one side of the filter (by creating a vacuum). It is possible to separate a solid from a liquid by either technique, however there are advantages to each technique. The ChemPages Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

321

Filtration, Gravity (ChemPages Lab)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Filtration, Gravity: this is a resource in the collection "ChemPages Laboratory Resources". Filtration is a technique used to separate a solid from a liquid. The solid is separated from the liquid phase by passing the mixture over a filtering media. The mixture can be forced through the filter by either gravity or reduced pressure on one side of the filter (by creating a vacuum). It is possible to separate a solid from a liquid by either technique, however there are advantages to each technique. The ChemPages Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

322

EPA FABRIC FILTRATION STUDIES: 1. PERFORMANCE OF NON-WOVEN NYLON FILTER BAGS  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the potential of various new fabrics as baghouse filters and to obtain data for their use, by the fabric filtration community. The testing consisted of simulating a baghouse operation in a carefully controlled laboratory setting...

323

The Mayo Clinic quadratic equation improves the prediction of glomerular filtration rate in diabetic subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Although recommended, both the Cockcroft and Gault formula (CG) and the modifica- tion of diet in renal disease (MDRD) equation are not ideally predictive of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in diabetic subjects; we tested whether the new Mayo Clinic Quadratic (MCQ) equation performed better. Methods. In 200 diabetic subjects with a wide range of renal function, GFR was measured

Vincent Rigalleau; Catherine Lasseur; Christelle Raffaitin; Caroline Perlemoine; Nicole Barthe; Philippe Chauveau; Christian Combe; Henri Gin

2007-01-01

324

REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: ARS CFU-50 APC ELECTROFLOCCULATION AND FILTRATION WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

ETV testing of the ARS CFU-50 APC Electroflocculation and Filtration Water Treatment System (ARS CFU-50 APC) for arsenic removal was conducted at the Town of Bernalillo Well #3 site from April 18 through May 2, 2006. The source water was chlorinated groundwater from two supply w...

325

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROGRAM: Stormwater Source Area Treatment Device - Arkal Pressurized Stormwater Filtration System  

EPA Science Inventory

Performance verification testing of the Arkal Pressurized Stormwater Filtration System was conducted under EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program on a 5.5-acre parking lot and grounds of St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The system consists of a water sto...

326

Glomerular filtration in the isolated perfused kidney  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glomerular hemodynamics were studied of isolated perfused kidneys of 12-wk-old normotensive (NR) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats, using Pluronic F108 (BASF, Wyandotte, MI, USA) as a plasma expander. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), proximal tubular hydrostatic pressure (PT) and glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure (PGC) were approximately linearly related with renal perfusion pressure.PGC measured directly by micropuncture was comparable toPGC calculated from

H. M. Brink; W. M. Moons; J. F. G. Slegers

1983-01-01

327

Nanofibers in Filtration Applications in Transportation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanofiber is a broad phrase generally referring to a fiber with a diameter less than 1 micron. While glass fibers have existed in the sub-micron range for some time and polymeric meltblown fibers are just beginning to break the micron barrier, Donaldson Company has used Ultra-Web? nanofibers with sub-half-micron diameters for air filtration in commercial, industrial and defense applications for

Timothy Grafe; Mark Gogins; Marty Barris; James Schaefer; Canepa Donaldson

2001-01-01

328

Pressure filtration of Si 3N 4  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pressure filtration is receiving increasing scientific and technological interest as a promising forming technique in the field of technical oxide and non-oxide ceramics. In this study various aspects of pressure slip casting of Si3N4 were examined; in particular, slip behaviour, casting curves at different pressures (up to 10 MPa) and physical and microstructural characteristics of pressureless-sintered cast bodies. The rheological

A. Salomoni; I. Stamenkovic; S. M. Castanho; R. Moreno

1997-01-01

329

Potable Water Biotechnology, Membrane Filtration and Biofiltration  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Membrane filtration is considered as a simplified drinking water treatment process, which can remove organic impurities, as\\u000a well as metal ions and other ions. Nowadays, membrane processes are increasingly employed for removal of bacteria and other\\u000a microorganisms, particulate material and natural organic matter, which can impart color, tastes, and odors to the water and\\u000a react with disinfectants to form disinfection

Puangrat Kajitvichyanukul; Nazih K. Shammas; Yung-Tse Hung; Lawrence K. Wang; Jirapat Ananpattarachai

330

Particle count and size alteration for membrane fouling reduction in non-conventional water filtration.  

PubMed

If coagulation is not completely successful and produces aggregates which are too small, fouling may increase. In some cases, a deep-bed filter could perhaps provide a solution. The paper examines these effects using experimental results for different waters. Activated sludge effluents, stormy seawater containing microalgae and spent filter backwash water (SFBW) were coagulated by alum or ferric chloride. Sand filtration tests were carried out. Tests were performed in a membrane filtration stirred cell, filtration pilot plant equipped with SDI analyzer (seawater) and pilot UF plant (SFBW). For activated sludge effluent, alum residual ratio curves of turbidity and total particle count (TPC) followed one another. With ferric chloride, low coagulant dosage showed negative turbidity removal. Contact granular filtration reduced membrane fouling intensity. Increasing the dose resulted in higher improvement in membrane flux. For seawater, a filter run period under storm conditions reached 35 hours with satisfactory filtrate quality. An iron chloride dose of 0.3 mg/l during normal conditions and 0.5 mg/l for stormy condition should be injected, mixed well before the filters, while maintaining 10 m/hr filtration rate and pH 6.8 value. For SFBW, alum flocculation pretreatment of SFBW was effective in reducing turbidity, TPC, viruses and protozoa. SFBW settling prior to flocculation did not enhance turbidity and TPC removal. The largest remaining particle fraction after alum flocculation was 3-10 microm in size, both Cryptosporidium and Giardia are found in this size range. Coagulation enhanced the removal of small size particles, a positive impact on reducing membrane fouling potential. PMID:15686031

Adin, A

2004-01-01

331

On-sun test results from second-generation and advanced-concepts alkali-metal pool-boiler receivers  

SciTech Connect

Two 75-kW{sub t} alkali-metal pool-boiler solar receivers have been successfully tested at Sandia National Laboratories` National Solar Thermal Test Facility. The first one, Sandia`s `` second-generation pool-boiler receiver,`` was designed to address commercialization issues identified during post-test assessment of Sandia`s first-generation pool-boiler receiver. It was constructed from Haynes alloy 230 and contained the alkali-metal alloy NaK-78. The absorber`s wetted side had a brazed-on powder-metal coating to stabilize boiling. This receiver was evaluated for boiling stability, hot- and warm-restart behavior, and thermal efficiency. Boiling was stable under all conditions. All of the hot restarts were successful. Mild transient hot spots observed during some hot restarts were eliminated by the addition of 1/3 torr of xenon to the vapor space. All of the warm restarts were also successful. The heat-transfer crisis that damaged the first receiver did not recur. Thermal efficiency was 92.3% at 750{degrees}C with 69.6 kW{sub t} solar input. The second receiver tested, Sandia`s ``advanced-concepts receiver,`` was a replica of the first-generation receiver except that the cavities, which were electric-discharge-machined in the absorber for boiling stability, were eliminated. This step was motivated by bench-scale test results that showed that boiling stability improved with increased heated-surface area, tilt of the heated surface from vertical, and added xenon. The bench-scale results suggested that stable boiling might be possible without heated-surface modification in a 75-kW{sub t} receiver. Boiling in the advanced-concepts receiver with 1/3 torr of xenon added has been stable under all conditions, confirming the bench-scale tests.

Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.; Cordeiro, P.G.; Dudley, V.E.; Rawlinson, K.S.

1994-05-01

332

Filtrations of Formal Languages by Arithmetic Progressions  

E-print Network

A filtration of a formal language L by a sequence s maps L to the set of words formed by taking the letters of words of L indexed only by s. We consider the languages resulting from filtering by all arithmetic progressions. If L is regular, then we prove that only finitely many distinct languages result. By contrast, there exist CFL's that give infinitely many distinct languages as a result. We use our technique to prove a similar result for the operation diag, which extracts the diagonal of words of square length.

Mousavi, Hamoon

2011-01-01

333

CCMR: Advanced Nanomaterials towards Water Filtration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Block copolymer derived nanostructured materials provide a unique platform for novel membranes used for water filtration. One challenge in this field is the high cost of block copolymers and the necessity to orient the pore structure Using polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) we constructed a model membrane to examine the relationship between its macromolecular structure and function. Our model membrane has uniform porosity, tunable pore sizes, and adjustable mechanical and chemical properties in order to achieve optimum performance. We demonstrate the process of finding a suitable solvent system and generating a porous, nanostructured membrane . The resulting membrane shows promise for selective separations on the nanometer scale.

Li, Yuk Mun

2010-08-15

334

Development of an Indexing Media Filtration System for Long Duration Space Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effective maintenance of air quality aboard spacecraft cabins will be vital to future human exploration missions. A key component will be the air cleaning filtration system which will need to remove a broad size range of particles including skin flakes, hair and clothing fibers, other biological matter, and particulate matter derived from material and equipment wear. In addition, during surface missions any extraterrestrial planetary dust, including dust generated by near-by ISRU equipment, which is tracked into the habitat will also need to be managed by the filtration system inside the pressurized habitat compartments. An indexing media filter system is being developed to meet the demand for long-duration missions that will result in dramatic increases in filter service life and loading capacity, and will require minimal crew involvement. These features may also benefit other closed systems, such as submarines, and remote location terrestrial installations where servicing and replacement of filter units is not practical. The filtration system consists of three stages: an inertial impactor stage, an indexing media stage, and a high-efficiency filter stage, packaged in a stacked modular cartridge configuration. Each stage will target a specific range of particle sizes that optimize the filtration and regeneration performance of the system. An 1/8th scale and full-scale prototype of the filter system have been fabricated and have been tested in the laboratory and reduced gravity environments that simulate conditions on spacecrafts, landers and habitats. Results from recent laboratory and reducegravity flight tests data will be presented.

Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

2013-01-01

335

Development of an Indexing Media Filtration System for Long Duration Space Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effective maintenance of air quality aboard spacecraft cabins will be vital to future human exploration missions. A key component will be the air cleaning filtration system which will need to remove a broad size range of particles derived from multiple biological and material sources. In addition, during surface missions any extraterrestrial planetary dust, including dust generated by near-by ISRU equipment, which is tracked into the habitat will also need to be managed by the filtration system inside the pressurized habitat compartments. An indexing media filter system is being developed to meet the demand for long-duration missions that will result in dramatic increases in filter service life and loading capacity, and will require minimal crew involvement. The filtration system consists of three stages: an inertial impactor stage, an indexing media stage, and a high-efficiency filter stage, packaged in a stacked modular cartridge configuration. Each stage will target a specific range of particle sizes that optimize the filtration and regeneration performance of the system. An 1/8th scale and full-scale prototype of the filter system have been fabricated and have been tested in the laboratory and reduced gravity environments that simulate conditions on spacecrafts, landers and habitats. Results from recent laboratory and reduce-gravity flight tests data will be presented. The features of the new filter system may also benefit other closed systems, such as submarines, and remote location terrestrial installations where servicing and replacement of filter units is not practical.

Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

2013-01-01

336

Comparison of Garnet Bead Media Filtration and Multimedia Filtration for Turbidity and Microbial Pathogen Removal  

EPA Science Inventory

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (EPA?s) National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) in Cincinnati, Ohio is evaluating drinking water filtration systems to determine their capability to meet the requirements of the Long-Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule ...

337

FILTRATION OF 'GIARDIA' CYSTS AND OTHER SUBSTANCES. VOLUME 3. RAPID RATE FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The efficiency of rapid rate filtration for removal of Giardia lamblia cysts, standard plate count bacteria, total coliform bacteria, and turbidity was determined experimentally under a wide range of operating conditions. Percent removal was evaluated by means of a lab-scale pilo...

338

ALTERNATE HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTRATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

In Phase IIA of this project, CeraMem has further developed and scaled up ceramic HEPA filters that are appropriate for use on filtration of vent gas from HLW tanks at DOE sites around the country. This work included procuring recrystallized SiC monoliths, developing membrane and cement materials, and defining a manufacturing process for the production of prototype full sizes HEPA filters. CeraMem has demonstrated that prototype full size filters can be manufactured by producing 9 full size filters that passed DOP aerosol testing at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. One of these filters was supplied to the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) for process tests using simulated HLW tank waste. SRTC has reported that the filter was regenerable (with some increase in pressure drop) and that the filter retained its HEPA retention capability. CeraMem has also developed a Regenerable HEPA Filter System (RHFS) design and acceptance test plan that was reviewed by DOE personnel. The design and acceptance test plan form the basis of the system proposal for follow-on work in Phase IIB of this project.

Bruce Bishop; Robert Goldsmith; Karsten Nielsen; Phillip Paquette

2002-08-16

339

Building, Testing, and Post Test Analysis of Durability Heat Pipe No.6  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Thermal Program at Sandia supports work developing dish/Stirling systems to convert solar energy into electricity. Heat pipe technology is ideal for transferring the energy of concentrated sunlight from the parabolic dish concentrators to the Stirling engine heat tubes. Heat pipes can absorb the solar energy at non-uniform flux distributions and release this energy to the Stirling engine heater tubes at a very uniform flux distribution thus decoupling the design of the engine heater head from the solar absorber. The most important part of a heat pipe is the wick, which transports the sodium over the heated surface area. Bench scale heat pipes were designed and built to more economically, both in time and money, test different wicks and cleaning procedures. This report covers the building, testing, and post-test analysis of the sixth in a series of bench scale heat pipes. Durability heat pipe No.6 was built and tested to determine the effects of a high temperature bakeout, 950 C, on wick corrosion during long-term operation. Previous tests showed high levels of corrosion with low temperature bakeouts (650-700 C). Durability heat pipe No.5 had a high temperature bakeout and reflux cleaning and showed low levels of wick corrosion after long-term operation. After testing durability heat pipe No.6 for 5,003 hours at an operating temperature of 750 C, it showed low levels of wick corrosion. This test shows a high temperature bakeout alone will significantly reduce wick corrosion without the need for costly and time consuming reflux cleaning.

MOSS, TIMOTHY A.

2002-03-01

340

Electromagnetically Modified Filtration of Aluminum Melts—Part I: Electromagnetic Theory and 30 PPI Ceramic Foam Filter Experimental Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present work, laboratory-scale continuous filtration tests of liquid A356 aluminum alloy have been performed. The tests were conducted using standard 30 PPI (pores per inch) ceramic foam filters combined with magnetic flux densities (~0.1 and 0.2 T), produced using two different induction coils operated at 50 Hz AC. A reference filtration test was also carried out under gravity conditions, i.e., without an applied magnetic field. The obtained results clearly prove that the magnetic field has a significant affect on the distribution of SiC particles. The influence of the electromagnetic Lorentz forces and induced bulk metal flow on the obtained filtration efficiencies and on the wetting behavior of the filter media by liquid aluminum is discussed. The magnitudes of the Lorentz forces produced by the induction coils are quantified based on analytical and COMSOL 4.2® finite element modeling.

Kennedy, Mark William; Akhtar, Shahid; Bakken, Jon Arne; Aune, Ragnhild E.

2013-06-01

341

Supercritical water oxidation benchscale testing metallurgical analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes metallurgical evaluation of witness wires from a series of tests using supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) to process cutting oil containing a simulated radionuclide. The goal of the tests was to evaluate the technology`s ability to process a highly chlorinated waste representative of many mixed waste streams generated in the DOE complex. The testing was conducted with a bench-scale SCWO system developed by the Modell Development Corporation. Significant test objectives included process optimization for adequate destruction efficiency, tracking the radionuclide simulant and certain metals in the effluent streams, and assessment of reactor material degradation resulting from processing a highly chlorinated waste. The metallurgical evaluation described herein includes results of metallographic analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis of witness wires exposed to the SCWO environment for one test series.

Norby, B.C.

1993-02-01

342

Task 9 - centrifugal membrane filtration. Semi-annual report April 1--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses a centrifugal membrane filtration technology developed by SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. The Tank Waste Focus Area was chosen for study. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{mu}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. The performance of the unit was evaluated with a statistical test design that determined the effect of temperature, pressure, membrane rotational speed, and solids loading on permeate flux. All four variables were found to be statistically significant, with the magnitude of the effect in the order of temperature, solids loading, rotor speed, and pressure. Temperature, rotor speed, and pressure had an increasing effect on flux with increasing value, while increases in solids loading showed a decrease in permeate flux. Significant interactions between rotor speed and solids loading and pressure and solids loading were also observed. The regression equation derived from test data had a correlation coefficient of 0.934, which represents a useful predictive capability for integrating the technology into DOE cleanup efforts. An extended test run performed on surrogate waste showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

Stepan, D.J.; Moe, T.A.; Collings, M.E.

1997-05-01

343

Integration and testing of hot desulfurization and entrained-flow gasification for power generation systems  

SciTech Connect

This second Topical Report describes the work that was completed between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1990 in a Cooperative Agreement between Texaco and the US Department of Energy that began on September 30, 1987. During the period that is covered in this report, the development and optimization of in-situ and external desulfurization processes were pursued. The research effort included bench scale testing, PDU scoping tests, process economic studies and advanced instrument testing. Two bench scale studies were performed at the Research Triangle Institute with zinc titanate sorbent to obtain data on its cycle life, sulfur capacity, durability and the effect of chlorides. These studies quantify sulfur capture during simulated air and oxygen-blown gasification for two zinc titanate formulations. Eight PDU runs for a total of 20 days of operation were conducted to evaluate the performance of candidate sorbents for both in-situ and external desulfurization. A total of 47 tests were completed with oxygen and air-blown gasification. Candidate sorbents included iron oxide for in-situ desulfurization and calcium based and mixed metal oxides for external desulfurization. Gasifier performance and sorbent sulfur capture are compared for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation.

Robin, A.M.; Kassman, J.S.; Leininger, T.F.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Wu, C.M.; Yang, P.P.

1991-09-01

344

Hemolysis during membrane plasma separation with pulsed flow filtration enhancement.  

PubMed

The use of pulsed blood flow in membrane plasmapheresis permits enhancement of plasma filtration yet may result in high levels of hemolysis due to large increases in instantaneous transmembrane pressure (TMP). This work investigates the occurrence of hemolysis as a function of TMP and wall shear rates (gamma w) for both steady and pulsed blood flow conditions. Two types of hollow fiber filters with identical polypropylene membranes but different lengths and membrane areas (0.1 and 0.25 m2) were tested. Fresh citrated bovine blood was circulated through the fibers at various blood flowrates and TMP in a single pass circuit using a pulsation generator, made of a single roller peristaltic pump. The free hemoglobin concentration of the plasma, Hbm, was measured from permeate samples collected at each set of TMP and gamma w conditions. It was found that the net hemolysis generated by the filtration was proportional to the membrane area. This justified the introduction of an hemolysis index, IH, equal to the plasma hemoglobin per unit membrane area. The boundary for the occurrence of hemolysis was thus defined by setting IH = 30 mg/dl.m2. For both steady and pulsed flow conditions the hemolysis boundaries were found to be straight lines in the TMP-gamma w plane. They were identical for the two filters under steady flow but different for pulsed flow. At the same time mean wall shear rates hemolysis occurred at a lower time mean TMP under pulsed flow conditions than under steady flow conditions. PMID:7869728

Philip, J L; Jaffrin, M Y; Ding, L

1994-11-01

345

Pattern formation in reverse filtration combustion.  

PubMed

Using a pore-network simulator we study pattern formation in reverse filtration combustion in porous media. The two-dimensional pore network includes all relevant pore-level mechanisms, including heat transfer through the pore space and the solid matrix, fluid and mass transfer through the pore space, and reaction kinetics of a solid fuel embedded in the pores. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic cases are considered, the latter modeled with the inclusion of heat losses from the pore network to the ambient. The simulation results show the development of unstable, fingered patterns of the burned fuel, similar to previously reported in the literature in the related problem of reverse combustion in a Hele-Shaw cell. We study the sensitivity of the patterns obtained on a number of parameters, including the Peclet number. The results on finger spacing and finger width are analyzed in terms of a selection principle, similar to that used in the theory for unstable Laplacian growth. PMID:16241542

Lu, Chuan; Yortsos, Yannis C

2005-09-01

346

Pattern formation in reverse filtration combustion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a pore-network simulator we study pattern formation in reverse filtration combustion in porous media. The two-dimensional pore network includes all relevant pore-level mechanisms, including heat transfer through the pore space and the solid matrix, fluid and mass transfer through the pore space, and reaction kinetics of a solid fuel embedded in the pores. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic cases are considered, the latter modeled with the inclusion of heat losses from the pore network to the ambient. The simulation results show the development of unstable, fingered patterns of the burned fuel, similar to previously reported in the literature in the related problem of reverse combustion in a Hele-Shaw cell. We study the sensitivity of the patterns obtained on a number of parameters, including the Peclet number. The results on finger spacing and finger width are analyzed in terms of a selection principle, similar to that used in the theory for unstable Laplacian growth.

Lu, Chuan; Yortsos, Yannis C.

2005-09-01

347

Dynamical Systems, Cytokine Storms, and Blood Filtration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various infections and non-infectious diseases can trigger immune cells and the proteins (cytokines) the cells use to communicate with each other to be caught in a positive feedback loop; this ``cytokine storm'' is frequently fatal. By examining the network of cytokine-immune cell interactions we will illustrate why anti-mediator drugs have been generally ineffective in stopping this feedback. A more effective approach may be to try and reduce interactions by dampening many signals at once by filtering the cytokines out of the blood directly (think dialysis). We will argue that feedback on an out of control nonlinear dynamical system is easier to understand than its normal healthy state and apply filtration to a toy model of immune response.

Foster, Glenn; Hubler, Alfred

2008-03-01

348

Crumbling Masculinities: Adaptations, Filtration, and the Crisis of Masculinity  

Microsoft Academic Search

My thesis project, titled Crumbling Masculinities: Adaptations, Filtration, and the Crisis of Masculinity, addresses the construction of masculinity through what I label “filtration.” By building on the work of gender scholars like Michael Kimmel, Judith Butler, and Eve Sedgwick, this thesis seeks to show that society teaches individuals to play gender roles by filtering either feminine or masculine traits accordingly.

Jared Neil Champion

2006-01-01

349

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration  

E-print Network

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Christoph Beckermann Associate Beckermann, C., "Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration," in Proceedings of the 46th, 1992. #12;Abstract This paper presents an analysis of water modeling of steel pouring to study (1) air

Beckermann, Christoph

350

Unified Theory for Gel Electrophoresis and Gel Filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unified theory for gel electrophoresis and gel filtration: The behavior of macromolecules in gel filtration and gel electrophoresis may be predicted from Ogston's model for a random meshwork of fibers. This model has been generalized to apply to nonspherical molecules and to several gel types. The model provides equations for inter-relationships between mobility, partition coefficient, gel concentration, and molecular radius;

David Rodbard; Andreas Chrambach

1970-01-01

351

RIVERBANK FILTRATION: FATE OF DBP PRECURSORS AND SELECTED MICROORGANISMS  

EPA Science Inventory

The fate of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors and selected microorganisms during riverbank filtration (RBF) was monitored at three different mid-Western drinking water utilities. At all three sites, filtration (RBF) was monitored at three different mid-Western drinking wa...

352

THE ROLE OF FILTRATION IN PREVENTING WATERBORNE DISEASE  

EPA Science Inventory

Filtration is an important treatment process in the removal of pathogenic microorganisms and the prevention of waterborne disease. Historically, filtration was responsible for reducing death and illness from waterborne disease in 1871 in Germany. Other early examples in the U.S. ...

353

STORMWATER TREATMENT AT CRITICAL AREAS: EVALUATION OF FILTRATION MEDIA  

EPA Science Inventory

Past research has identified urban runoff as a major contributor to the degradation of urban streams and rivers. Filtration, especially "slow" filtration, is of interest for stormwater runoff treatment because filters will work on intermittent flows without significant loss of ca...

354

Introduction of Filtration Systems in Container Nurseries for Nonchemical  

E-print Network

horticultural industry. The plants are cultivated outdoors in containers in special areas (container stands BIO FILTER ® ) and constructed wetlands with different plant species. Samples and sampling ­ Water and of the different filtration systems like filtration capacity, necessity and frequency of cleaning of the filter

Standiford, Richard B.

355

Purification of contaminated water by filtration through porous glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Method for purifying water that is contaminated with mineral salts and soluble organic compounds is described. Method consists of high pressure filtration of contaminated water through stabilized porous glass membranes. Procedure for conducting filtration is described. Types of materials by percentage amounts removed from the water are identified.

Wydeven, T.; Leban, M. I.

1972-01-01

356

Characterization of filtration and regeneration behavior of rigid ceramic filters and particle properties at high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

For power generation with combined cycles or production of so called advanced materials by vapor phase synthesis particle separation at high temperatures is of crucial importance. There, systems working with rigid ceramic barrier filters are either of thermodynamical benefit to the process or essential for producing materials with certain properties. A hot gas filter test rig has been installed to investigate the influence of different parameters e.g. temperature, dust properties, filter media and filtration and regeneration conditions into particle separation at high temperatures. These tests were conducted both with commonly used filter candles and with filter discs made out of the same material. The filter disc is mounted at one side of the test rig. That is why both filters face the same raw gas conditions. The filter disc is flown through by a cross flow arrangement. This bases upon the conviction that for comparison of filtration characteristics of candles with filter discs or other model filters the structure of the dust cakes have to be equal. This way of conducting investigations into the influence of the above mentioned parameters on dust separation at high temperatures follows the new standard VDI 3926. There, test procedures for the characterization of filter media at ambient conditions are prescribed. The paper mainly focuses then on the influence of particle properties (e.g. stickiness etc.) upon the filtration and regeneration behavior of fly ashes with rigid ceramic filters.

Pilz, T. [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Mechanische Verfahrenstechnik und Mechanik

1995-12-31

357

Characterization and modification of particulate properties to enhance filtration performance  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of project activities that occurred during the period from March 1 through May 31, 1989. The organization of this report generally follows the outline of work presented in the Project Work Plan. Work performed during this period included tests under Task 2 -- Parametric Tests of Ashes and Fabrics, and Task 3 -- Survey of Methods to Modify Particle Filtration Properties. Discussion of the Task 2 work has been organized topically, rather than adhering to the activities specified in the Work Plan. Cohesive ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority's 160 MW Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustor at the Shawnee Plant in Paducah, Kentucky was obtained during this quarter and has been analyzed in the laboratory. The second phase of the abstract search and review of pertinent articles included in activity 3.1 is nearly complete. A summary of this phase of the literature search is included in this report. A variety of potential conditioning agents have been evaluated during this reporting period. These agents include sodium bicarbonate, hydrated lime, various grades of fine silica powder, gasifier char, glass beads and glass fibers. The three source ashes have been mixed with these agents in different concentrations and using various mixing techniques. These tests are continuing, and this report contains a summary of the combinations evaluated during this past quarter. 17 figs., 7 tabs.

Snyder, T.R.; Robinson, M.S.; Vann Bush, P.

1989-06-22

358

40 CFR 141.717 - Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components. 141...Toolbox Components § 141.717 Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components. (a...sequential softening stages prior to filtration. Both softening stages must...

2011-07-01

359

40 CFR 141.717 - Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components. 141...Toolbox Components § 141.717 Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components. (a...sequential softening stages prior to filtration. Both softening stages must...

2010-07-01

360

75 FR 28295 - Cummins Filtration, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower and Spherion Staffing...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration [TA-W-72,144] Cummins Filtration, Including On-Site Leased Workers...2009, applicable to workers of Cummins Filtration, including on-site leased workers...Lake Mills, Iowa location of Cummins Filtration to provide procurement and...

2010-05-20

361

Pilot-Scale Evaluation of Hyperbaric Filtration of Ultra Fine Clean Coal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pilot scale evaluation of continuous pressure filtration was conducted on minus 200 mesh clean coal recovered by column flotation using an Andritz-Ruthner trailer mounted hyperbaric filter. Results showed that increasing vessel pressure for a given cake formation angle (CFA), increased cake thickness and throughput, while decreasing cake moisture. Baseline testing concluded that filter operating parameters-of 3 bar pressure, 1.5

J. G. GROPPO; B. K. PAREKH

1996-01-01

362

EXPERIMENTS ON CAKE DEVELOPMENT IN CROSSFLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self cleaning through the action of wall shear stress, which is created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduces permeability. Low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site and the Waste Treatment Plant at the Hanford Site. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date, increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter axial flowrate, which is limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, which is limited by space and increases the required pump load. In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on startup techniques and filter cake development. This paper discusses those filter studies. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, and filter cleaning. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, which were both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to demonstrate increases in filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today. This paper describes the selection of a challenging simulated waste and crossflow filter tests to demonstrate how performance can be improved over current operation.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

2011-04-14

363

Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Older People  

PubMed Central

We aimed at reviewing age-related changes in kidney structure and function, methods for estimating kidney function, and impact of reduced kidney function on geriatric outcomes, as well as the reliability and applicability of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in older patients. CKD is associated with different comorbidities and adverse outcomes such as disability and premature death in older populations. Creatinine clearance and other methods for estimating kidney function are not easy to apply in older subjects. Thus, an accurate and reliable method for calculating eGFR would be highly desirable for early detection and management of CKD in this vulnerable population. Equations based on serum creatinine, age, race, and gender have been widely used. However, these equations have their own limitations, and no equation seems better than the other ones in older people. New equations specifically developed for use in older populations, especially those based on serum cystatin C, hold promises. However, further studies are needed to definitely accept them as the reference method to estimate kidney function in older patients in the clinical setting. PMID:24772439

Fusco, Sergio; Corica, Francesco; Marino, Antonio; Maggio, Marcello; Mari, Vincenzo; Corsonello, Andrea

2014-01-01

364

Analysis of Basis Weight Uniformity of Microfiber Nonwovens and Its Impact on Permeability and Filtration Properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is widely recognized that nonwoven basis weight non-uniformity affects various properties of nonwovens. However, few studies can be found in this topic. The development of uniformity definition and measurement methods and the study of their impact on various web properties such as filtration properties and air permeability would be beneficial both in industrial applications and in academia. They can be utilized as a quality control tool and would provide insights about nonwoven behaviors that cannot be solely explained by average values. Therefore, for quantifying nonwoven web basis weight uniformity we purse to develop an optical analytical tool. The quadrant method and clustering analysis was utilized in an image analysis scheme to help define "uniformity" and its spatial variation. Implementing the quadrant method in an image analysis system allows the establishment of a uniformity index that can be used to quantify the degree of uniformity. Clustering analysis has also been modified and verified using uniform and random simulated images with known parameters. Number of clusters and cluster properties such as cluster size, member and density was determined. We also utilized this new measurement method to evaluate uniformity of nonwovens produced with different processes and investigated impacts of uniformity on filtration and permeability. The results of quadrant method shows that uniformity index computed from quadrant method demonstrate a good range for non-uniformity of nonwoven webs. Clustering analysis is also been applied on reference nonwoven with known visual uniformity. From clustering analysis results, cluster size is promising to be used as uniformity parameter. It is been shown that non-uniform nonwovens has provide lager cluster size than uniform nonwovens. It was been tried to find a relationship between web properties and uniformity index (as a web characteristic). To achieve this, filtration properties, air permeability, solidity and uniformity index of meltblown and spunbond samples was measured. Results for filtration test show some deviation between theoretical and experimental filtration efficiency by considering different types of fiber diameter. This deviation can occur due to variation in basis weight non-uniformity. So an appropriate theory is required to predict the variation of filtration efficiency with respect to non-uniformity of nonwoven filter media. And the results for air permeability test showed that uniformity index determined by quadrant method and measured properties have some relationship. In the other word, air permeability decreases as uniformity index on nonwoven web increase.

Amirnasr, Elham

365

Laboratory testing of a fluidized-bed dry-scrubbing process for the removal of acidic gases from a simulated incinerator flue gas  

SciTech Connect

A series of bench-scale tests was conducted to evaluate a dry, fluidized-bed, scrubbing process for removing acidic gases from incinerator flue gas. The acidic gases studied were sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, chloride, and phosphorous pentoxide. These gases were found to react readily with lime in a bubbling bed operating at 540 to 650/degree/C (1000 to 1200/degree/F). Superficial gas velocity, bed temperature, bed depth, sorbent type, and sorbent conversion strongly affected the degree of acidic gas removal. Sorbent utilization was inhibited by the occlusion of the particle surface by reaction products. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Bradshaw, W.M.; Krishnan, R.P.; Young, J.M.; Mohrman, G.B.

1988-11-01

366

Experimental study on filtration and continuous regeneration of a particulate filter system for heavy-duty diesel engines.  

PubMed

This study investigated the filtration and continuous regeneration of a particulate filter system on an engine test bench, consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF). Both the DOC and the CDPF led to a high conversion of NO to NO2 for continuous regeneration. The filtration efficiency on solid particle number (SPN) was close to 100%. The post-CDPF particles were mainly in accumulation mode. The downstream SPN was sensitively influenced by the variation of the soot loading. This phenomenon provides a method for determining the balance point temperature by measuring the trend of SPN concentration. PMID:25499491

Tang, Tao; Zhang, Jun; Cao, Dongxiao; Shuai, Shijin; Zhao, Yanguang

2014-12-01

367

ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER ORCA WATER TECHNOLOGIES KEMLOOP 1000 COAGULATION AND FILTRATION WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

Verification testing of the ORCA Water Technologies KemLoop 1000 Coagulation and Filtration Water Treatment System for arsenic removal was conducted at the St. Louis Center located in Washtenaw County, Michigan, from March 23 through April 6, 2005. The source water was groundwate...

368

[Mechanism of membrane fouling and filtration characteristics in a membrane bioreactor for industrial wastewater treatment].  

PubMed

The influence of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS), soluble microbial product (SMP), extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), colloidal particles and other factors contributed to membrane fouling was analyzed in this pilot test by membrane bioreactor (MBR) process for the leather printing and dyeing industrial park mixed wastewater treatment. The results showed that slight membrane fouling occurred after 120-day experiment with an observable increase in membrane resistance R20 from 1.5 x 10(12) m(-1) to 1.8 x 10(12) m(-1). Also, a linear correlation was found between the proportion of colloidal particles concentration in TOC of MBR former solution and membrane filtration resistance change. However, the change of MLSS, SMP, EPS and other factors was not correlated with the membrane filtration resistance change. Therefore, the colloidal particle was considered to be the main factor causing membrane fouling, which attached to the membrane surface and deposited to block the membrane pore. PMID:23745399

Fan, Ju-Hong; Yu, Su-Lin; Zhang, Pei-Shuai; Lan, Ya-Qiong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Liu-Jun

2013-03-01

369

Conservation laws for two-phase filtration models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper is devoted to investigation of group properties of a one-dimensional model of two-phase filtration in porous medium. Along with the general model, some of its particular cases widely used in oil-field development are discussed. The Buckley-Leverett model is considered in detail as a particular case of the one-dimensional filtration model. This model is constructed under the assumption that filtration is one-dimensional and horizontally directed, the porous medium is homogeneous and incompressible, the filtering fluids are also incompressible. The model of "chromatic fluid" filtration is also investigated. New conservation laws and particular solutions are constructed using symmetries and nonlinear self-adjointness of the system of equations.

Baikov, V. A.; Ibragimov, N. H.; Zheltova, I. S.; Yakovlev, A. A.

2014-02-01

370

RIVERBANK FILTRATION: EFFECT OF GROUND PASSAGE ON NOM CHARACTER  

EPA Science Inventory

Research was conducted to explore the effect of underground travel on the character of the natural organic matter (NOM) originating from the river water source during riverbank filtration (RBF) at three Midwestern US drinking water utilities. Measurements of biodegradable dissolv...

371

Cost Analysis Procedures for Use in Promoting Fine Filtration Media  

E-print Network

The field project is a cost analysis procedures manual to be used within {company name} to quantify the cost of operations and materials for current and recommended dust collection practices. The estimated benefits from changing filtration medias...

Renfert, David A.

2006-05-19

372

Weighted Functional Brain Network Modeling via Network Filtration  

E-print Network

), 26 autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 11 pediatric control (PedCon) children ob- tained through Learning #12;Figure 1: Schematic diagram of proposed functional brain network filtration framework using

Chung, Moo K.

373

EVALUATION OF FILTRATION AND DISTILLATION METHODS FOR RECYCLING AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT  

EPA Science Inventory

This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive engine coolants at a New Jersey Department of Transportation garage. he specific recycling units evaluated are based on the technologies of filtration and distilla...

374

A CONTINUED INVESTIGATION OF ELECTRICALLY STIMULATED FABRIC FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The report summarizes three experiments performed by Southern Research Institute under a cooperative agreement with EPA. First was a demonstration of electrostatically stimulated fabric filtration (ESFF) used to collect particulate matter (PM) from fossil fuel electrical power pl...

375

Improved filtration membranes through self-organizing amphiphilic comb copolymers  

E-print Network

The operating cost of a membrane filtration system is generally determined by two major factors: the permeability of the membrane to water, and the lifetime of the membrane. Both of these are strongly affected by the ...

Asatekin Alexiou, Ayse

2009-01-01

376

Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II  

SciTech Connect

A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

R. A. Christini

1999-12-30

377

A numerical, laboratory, and field study of riverbed filtration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Riverbed filtration is an appealing alternative to conventional riverbank and surface water intake systems, offering advantages of high flow rates, natural filtering, and undiminished performance under ice conditions. Its proper functioning requires careful study and monitoring of river flow dynamics, subsurface characteristics, and the interactions between these surface water and groundwater components. A research effort has been underway at INRS to develop principles and guidelines for the design, operation, and maintenance of riverbed filtration systems. A pilot system has just been completed in the Montmorency River near Quebec City (Canada). The installation consists of 4 horizontal wells (or drains), each of 20 m length and 30 cm diameter, placed 4 m apart, at a depth of 1.5 m within the riverbed sediments, and in a direction orthogonal to river flow. The housing trench for each drain is 2 m wide and 2.10 m deep and is composed of 90 cm of gravel topped with 70 cm of sifted alluvial sediments and a 50 cm protective layer of pebbles extracted from the sifted sediments. The average annual water level in the river is 1.2 m, while its mean head during low flow periods is 90 cm. The pilot installation is instrumented with multilevel pressure and temperature sensors and several flowmeters for continuous monitoring in both drainage and backwash modes. In gravity drainage (water intake) mode, the yield is expected to exceed the municipal demand criterion of 35 000 m3/d. Backwash operations, needed to unclog the trenches of fine sediments that can accumulate during water intake, are considered critical to maintaining the design performance targets for the system. Prior to construction of the pilot system, flow patterns, pressure responses, and turbidity behavior in both drainage and backwash modes were extensively studied in laboratory (sand column and sand box) and numerical (SEEP2D) experiments. These tests were fundamental to defining the design parameters and instrumentation features of the pilot system. More detailed lab and numerical simulation studies will be undertaken in tandem with the pilot system operation. The presentation will give an overview of the findings from the prior laboratory and numerical experiments and present initial results from the operation of the pilot system.

Racine, C.; Lefebvre, R.; Martel, R.; Paniconi, C.

2012-04-01

378

Plasma dia-filtration for severe sepsis.  

PubMed

The mortality rate in severe sepsis is 30-50%, and independent liver and renal dysfunction impacts significantly on hospital and intensive care mortality. If 4 or more organs fail, mortality is > 90%. Recently, we reported a novel plasmapheresis--plasma diafiltration (PDF)--the concept of which is plasma filtration with dialysis. PDF employs a plasma separator that has a sieving coefficient of 0.3 for albumin and which requires flowing dialysate outside the hollow fiber. For substitute liquid, 1,200 ml of fresh frozen plasma followed by 50 ml of 25% albumin solution is used for 8 h as 1 session. In a single-center study, 24 patients with septic shock were admitted to the ICU, then 37.7 +/- 30.0 h later, 7 patients received PDF. The patients' Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores had increased from 14.9 +/- 3.6 on ICU admission to 17.1 +/- 3.0 before PDF procedure. PDF was performed, with an average of 7.4 +/- 4.4 sessions (range 3-15) per patient. Five patients survived after day 28, thus the 28-day mortality rate was 29%. In our multicenter study, 33 patients with severe sepsis who simultaneously suffered from liver dysfunction were enrolled and received PDF. On average, 12.0 +/- 16.4 sessions (range 2-70) per patient were performed. The 28-day mortality rate was 36.4%, while the predicted death rate was 68.0 +/- 17.7%. These findings suggest that PDF is a simple modality and may become a useful strategy for treatment of patients with septic multiple organ failure. PMID:20473002

Eguchi, Yutaka

2010-01-01

379

DQE of wireless digital detectors: Comparative performance with differing filtration schemes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Wireless flat panel detectors are gaining increased usage in portable medical imaging. Two such detectors were evaluated and compared with a conventional flat-panel detector using the formalism of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1) for measuring modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) using two different filtration schemes.Methods: Raw images were acquired for three image receptors (DRX-1C and DRX-1, Carestream Health; Inc., Pixium 4600, Trixell) using a radiographic system with a well-characterized output (Philips Super80 CP, Philips Healthcare). Free in-air exposures were measured using a calibrated radiation meter (Unfors Mult-O-Meter Type 407, Unfors Instruments AB). Additional aluminum filtration and a new alternative combined copper-aluminum filtration were used to conform the x ray output to IEC-specified beam quality definitions RQA5 and RQA9. Using the IEC 62220-1 formalism, each detector was evaluated at X{sub N}/2, X{sub N}, and 2X{sub N}, where the normal exposure level to the detector surface (X{sub N}) was set to 8.73 ?Gy (1.0 mR). The prescribed edge test device was used to evaluate the MTF, while the NNPS was measured using uniform images. The DQE was then calculated from the MTF and NNPS and compared across detectors, exposures, and filtration schemes.Results: The three DR systems had largely comparable MTFs with DRX-1 demonstrating lower values above 1.0 cycles/mm. At each exposure, DRX-1C and Pixium detectors demonstrated better noise performance than that of DRX-1. Zero-frequency DQEs for DRX-1C, Pixium, and DRX-1 detectors were approximately 74%, 63%, and 38% for RQA5 and 50%, 42%, and 28% for RQA9, respectively.Conclusions: DRX-1C detector exhibited superior DQE performance compared to Pixium and DRX-1. In terms of filtration, the alternative filtration was found to provide comparable performance in terms of rank ordering of different detectors with the added convenience of being less bulky for in-the-field measurements.

Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Murphy, Simon; Christianson, Olav [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2013-08-15

380

Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose: evaluation of cellulase culture filtrates under use conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Culture filtrates from three mutant strains of Trichoderma reesei grown on lactose and on cellulose were compared under use conditions on four cellulose substrates. Cellulose culture filtrates contained five to six times as much cellulase as lactose culture filtrates. Unconcentrated cellulose culture filtrates produced up to 10% sugar solutions from 15% cellulose in 24 h. Specific activity in enzyme assays

Mary Mandels; John E. Medeiros; Raymond E. Andreotti; Frank H. Bissett

1981-01-01

381

TMIST-2 Transport Test  

SciTech Connect

In anticipation of the TMIST-2 experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor, there was a need to determine if the tritium that is expected to be observed at the outlet of the experiment would be seen or if it may be lost on its way from the experiment in the core to the measurement station. To assist in resolving that issue, a bench-scale experiment was conducted in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility using deuterium and a mass spectrometer in lieu of tritium with ion chambers, bubblers, and scintillation counting. The experiment replicated the concentration of the hydrogen isotope, the flow rates anticipated, and the residence times. It was found that there was initial uptake on tubing walls, presumably due to oxidation of the hydrogen isotopes to water and adsorption or isotopic exchange, but that saturates relatively quickly, and once saturated, the concentration of deuterium at the outlet of the tubing system was essentially the same as it was at the experiment inlet under the conditions modeled in the experiment.

Glen R. Longhurst

2008-02-01

382

Using the developed cross-flow filtration chip for collecting blood plasma under high flow rate condition and applying the immunoglobulin E detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a cross-flow filtration chip for separating blood cells (white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets) and obtaining blood plasma from human blood. Our strategy is to flow the sample solution in parallel to the membrane, which can generate a parallel shear stress to remove the clogging microparticles on the membrane, so the pure sample solution is obtained in the reservoir. The cross-flow filtration chip includes a cross-flow layer, a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane, and a reservoir layer. The three layers are packaged in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) frame to create the cross-flow filtration chip. Various dilutions of the blood sample (original, 2 × , 3 × , 5 × , and 10×), pore sizes with different diameters (1?µm, 2?µm, 4?µm, 7?µm, and 10?µm), and different flow rates (1?mL/min, 3?mL/min, 5?mL/min, 7?mL/min, and 10?mL/min) are tested to determine their effects on filtration percentage. The best filtration percentage is 96.2% when the dilution of the blood sample is 10 × , the diameter of pore size of a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane is 2?µm, and the flow rate is 10?mL/min. Finally, for the clinical tests of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentration, the cross-flow filtration chip is used to filter the blood of the allergy patients to obtain the blood plasma. This filtered blood plasma is compared with that obtained using the conventional centrifugation based on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results reveal that these two blood separation methods have similar detection trends. The proposed filtration chip has the advantages of low cost, short filtration time, and easy operation and thus can be applied to the separation of microparticles, cells, bacteria, and blood.

Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hung, Chia-Wei; Wu, Chun-Han; Lin, Yu-Cheng

2014-09-01

383

Membrane treatment of the bleaching plant (EPO) filtrate of a kraft pulp mill.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of membrane technology to treat oxygen and peroxide-reinforced extraction stage (EPO) filtrate from a kraft pulp mill bleach plant. Three different types of tubular membranes were tested in a pilot plant: (i) tight ultrafiltration (UF); (ii) open UF followed by nanofiltration (UF + NF); and (iii) nanofiltration (NF). According to the separation performance, considering the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour removal, permeate flux, operational simplicity and cost, the results indicated that the best option for treatment of (EPO) filtrates was the tight UF membrane. This membrane obtained a COD removal of 79% with a colour reduction of 86%. The effect of (EPO) filtrate UF treatment on the mill effluent treatment plant was evaluated. Compared with the actual mill effluent, the results indicated that if the UF permeate was recycled in the bleaching area, the COD reduction efficiency increased by 7%, the final effluent colour decreased by 8%, the biological sludge production decreased by 18%, and the energy consumption decreased by 40%. In the tertiary treatment plant, the coagulant dosage decreased by 40%, and the tertiary sludge production decreased by 46%. PMID:25225931

Quezada, Rafael; Silva, Claudio Mudado; Passos Rezende, Ana Augusta; Nilsson, Leif; Manfredi, Mauro

2014-01-01

384

The Adaptor Protein Grb2 Is Not Essential for the Establishment of the Glomerular Filtration Barrier  

PubMed Central

The kidney filtration barrier is formed by the combination of endothelial cells, basement membrane and epithelial cells called podocytes. These specialized actin-rich cells form long and dynamic protrusions, the foot processes, which surround glomerular capillaries and are connected by specialized intercellular junctions, the slit diaphragms. Failure to maintain the filtration barrier leads to massive proteinuria and nephrosis. A number of proteins reside in the slit diaphragm, notably the transmembrane proteins Nephrin and Neph1, which are both able to act as tyrosine phosphorylated scaffolds that recruit cytoplasmic effectors to initiate downstream signaling. While association between tyrosine-phosphorylated Neph1 and the SH2/SH3 adaptor Grb2 was shown in vitro to be sufficient to induce actin polymerization, in vivo evidence supporting this finding is still lacking. To test this hypothesis, we generated two independent mouse lines bearing a podocyte-specific constitutive inactivation of the Grb2 locus. Surprisingly, we show that mice lacking Grb2 in podocytes display normal renal ultra-structure and function, thus demonstrating that Grb2 is not required for the establishment of the glomerular filtration barrier in vivo. Moreover, our data indicate that Grb2 is not required to restore podocyte function following kidney injury. Therefore, although in vitro experiments suggested that Grb2 is important for the regulation of actin dynamics, our data clearly shows that its function is not essential in podocytes in vivo, thus suggesting that Grb2 rather plays a secondary role in this process. PMID:23226445

Bisson, Nicolas; Ruston, Julie; Jeansson, Marie; Vanderlaan, Rachel; Hardy, W. Rod; Du, Jianmei; Hussein, Samer M.; Coward, Richard J.; Quaggin, Susan E.; Pawson, Tony

2012-01-01

385

POC-scale testing of a dry triboelectrostatic separator for fine coal cleaning. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) developed a triboelectrostatic separation (TES) process which is capable of removing mineral matter from coal without using water. A distinct advantage of this dry coal cleaning process is that it does not entail costly steps of dewatering which is a common problem associated with conventional fine coal cleaning processes. It is the objective of this project to conduct a series of proof-of-concept (POC) scale tests at a throughput of 200--250 kg/hr and obtain scale- up information. Prior to the POC testing, bench-scale test work will be conducted with the objective of increasing the separation efficiency and throughput, for which changes in the basic designs for the charger and the separator may be necessary. The bench- and POC- scale test work will be carried out to evaluate various operating parameters and establish a reliable scale-up procedure. The scale-up data will be used to analyze the economic merits of the TES process. At present, the project is at the stage of engineering design (Task 3). Work accomplished during this reporting period include the construction of a Faraday Cage for measurement of particle charges (Subtask 3.1), construction of a bench-scale triboelectrostatic separator (Subtask 3.2) and development of a theoretical model for predicting motion of charged particles in a non-uniform electrostatic field (Subtask 3.2). This model will be useful for designing the POC module.

Yoon, R.-H.; Mesenyashin, A.; Yan, E.S.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.

1996-10-01

386

Integration and testing of hot desulfurization and entrained-flow gasification for power generation systems. Phase 2, Process optimization: Volume 1, Program summary and PDU operations  

SciTech Connect

This second Topical Report describes the work that was completed between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1990 in a Cooperative Agreement between Texaco and the US Department of Energy that began on September 30, 1987. During the period that is covered in this report, the development and optimization of in-situ and external desulfurization processes were pursued. The research effort included bench scale testing, PDU scoping tests, process economic studies and advanced instrument testing. Two bench scale studies were performed at the Research Triangle Institute with zinc titanate sorbent to obtain data on its cycle life, sulfur capacity, durability and the effect of chlorides. These studies quantify sulfur capture during simulated air and oxygen-blown gasification for two zinc titanate formulations. Eight PDU runs for a total of 20 days of operation were conducted to evaluate the performance of candidate sorbents for both in-situ and external desulfurization. A total of 47 tests were completed with oxygen and air-blown gasification. Candidate sorbents included iron oxide for in-situ desulfurization and calcium based and mixed metal oxides for external desulfurization. Gasifier performance and sorbent sulfur capture are compared for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation.

Robin, A.M.; Kassman, J.S.; Leininger, T.F.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Wu, C.M.; Yang, P.P.

1991-09-01

387

Testing  

MedlinePLUS

... curesma.org > learn about sma > causes & diagnoses > testing Testing An SMA diagnosis must be confirmed through genetic ... and must be identified through further testing. Prenatal Testing Prenatal testing is used to determine if a ...

388

Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethysmography of supine healthy male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n = 6) and during placebo infusion (n = 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 +/- 4 to 2,568 +/- 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion: mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3%, respectively, relative to preinfusion baseline values (p less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however, was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20% with ANP infusion, whereas blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/ arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, pharmacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchnic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

1995-01-01

389

Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethys-mography of supine health male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n equals 6) and during placebo infusion (n equals 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 plus or minus 4 to 2,568 plus or minus 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion; mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3 percent respectively, relative to pre-infusion baseline values (p is less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20 percent with ANP infusion, wheras blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, phamacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

1995-01-01

390

Silver nanoparticle-doped zirconia capillaries for enhanced bacterial filtration.  

PubMed

Membrane clogging and biofilm formation are the most serious problems during water filtration. Silver nanoparticle (Agnano) coatings on filtration membranes can prevent bacterial adhesion and the initiation of biofilm formation. In this study, Agnano are immobilized via direct reduction on porous zirconia capillary membranes to generate a nanocomposite material combining the advantages of ceramics being chemically, thermally and mechanically stable with nanosilver, an efficient broadband bactericide for water decontamination. The filtration of bacterial suspensions of the fecal contaminant Escherichia coli reveals highly efficient bacterial retention capacities of the capillaries of 8 log reduction values, fulfilling the requirements on safe drinking water according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Maximum bacterial loading capacities of the capillary membranes are determined to be 3×10(9)bacterialcells/750mm(2) capillary surface until back flushing is recommendable. The immobilized Agnano remain accessible and exhibit strong bactericidal properties by killing retained bacteria up to maximum bacterial loads of 6×10(8)bacterialcells/750mm(2) capillary surface and the regenerated membranes regain filtration efficiencies of 95-100%. Silver release is moderate as only 0.8% of the initial silver loading is leached during a three-day filtration experiment leading to average silver contaminant levels of 100?g/L. PMID:25579912

Wehling, Julia; Köser, Jan; Lindner, Patrick; Lüder, Christian; Beutel, Sascha; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

2015-03-01

391

Effect of membrane filtration artifacts on dissolved trace element concentrations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Among environment scientists, the current and almost universally accepted definition of dissolved constituents is an operational one; only those materials which pass through a 0.45-??m membrane filter are considered to be dissolved. Detailed laboratory and field studies on Fe and Al indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration, other than just pore size, can substantially alter 'dissolved' trace element concentrations; these include: filter type, filter diameter, filtration method, volume of sample processed, suspended sediment concentration, suspended sediment grain-size distribution, concentration of colloids and colloidally associated trace elements and concentration of organic matter. As such, reported filtered-water concentrations employing the same pore size filter may not be equal. Filtration artifacts may lead to the production of chemical data that indicate seasonal or annual 'dissolved' chemical trends which do not reflect actual environmental conditions. Further, the development of worldwide averages for various dissolved chemical constituents, the quantification of geochemical cycles, and the determination of short- or long-term environmental chemical trends may be subject to substantial errors, due to filtration artifacts, when data from the same or multiple sources are combined. Finally, filtration effects could have a substantial impact on various regulatory requirements.

Horowitz, Arthur J.; Elrick, Kent A.; Colberg, Mark R.

1992-01-01

392

Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria  

SciTech Connect

High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1993-08-01

393

Induction and detection of delayed dermal hypersensitivity in guinea-pig immunized with Blastomyces dermatitidis lysate and filtrate antigens.  

PubMed

Guinea-pigs were immunized using yeast phase antigens (lysate and filtrate preparations) from two strains of Blastomyces dermatitidis (T-58 and Le). Following a sensitization period, the animals were skin tested on days 40 and 216 using T-58 and Le yeast and mycelial phase lysate and filtrate antigen preparations for the detection of delayed dermal hypersensitivity (DTH). Using the Friedman's analysis of variance by rank test, significant differences were found in the efficacy of the immunogens to induce DTH in the animals when skin tested on both occasions (P < 0.05). Optimal reactivity was observed in guinea-pigs immunized with Le yeast lysate (mean axes of induration ranging from 12.0 to 18.8 mm and 7.0 to 18.5 mm on day 40 and 216, respectively) and T-58 yeast filtrate (mean axes of induration ranging from 7.5 to 18.0 mm and 8.0 to 17.0 mm on day 40 and 216, respectively) when the immunogens were administered with adjuvant. When the same data was analysed using the Friedman's test with regard to evaluating the efficacy of the skin test antigens to detect DTH, significant differences were found between them (P < 0.05) with optimal results using the Le mycelial filtrate and yeast lysate antigens (mean axes of induration ranging from 7.0 to 16.5 mm and 7.5 to 14.5 mm, respectively) when skin testing was done on day 40. When skin testing was done on day 216, the T-58 and Le mycelial lysate antigens gave optimal results (mean axes of induration ranging from 9.0 to 18.5 mm and 7.5 to 15.0 mm, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7650574

Abuodeh, R O; Scalarone, G M

1995-01-01

394

Reducing formation damage through two-stage polymer filtration  

SciTech Connect

Formation damage resulting from the use of unfiltered polymers during gravel pack completion operations has been addressed as it relates to HEC completion fluids. However, other filtered polymer systems exhibit properties which, in specific applications, may out perform HEC systems. Thus, the performance characteristics of six commonly used polymer systems, hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), clarified xanthan gum (XC), HEC/XC blends, crosslinked carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose (CMHEC), hydroxypropyl guar (HPG), and standard xanthan gum (XCD), required additional evaluation. Fluid modelling was employed using a new two-stage filtration process (gel filtration) in which the viscosified fluids were optimally sheared and fine-filtered to improve sand placement efficiency and reduce formation damage. The data obtained from this study establishes mixing and filtration design criteria for optimizing completion techniques such as gravel packing, sand washing, polymer diverting, and lost circulation control.

Houchin, L.R.; Hudson, L.M.; Caothien, S.; Daddazio, G.; Hashemi, R.

1986-01-01

395

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. On this report, results are discussed for sonically assisted crossflow filtration of V-1067 resid, diluted with No. 2 fuel oil, and sonically assisted batch filtrations of solids concentrates from continuous cross-flow filtration experiments.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01

396

Digital Receptor Image Quality Evaluation: Effect of Different Filtration Schemes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Electrotechnical Commission provides a standard measurement methodology to provide performance intercomparison between imaging systems. Its formalism specifies beam quality based on half value layer attained by target kVp and additional Al filtration. Similar beam quality may be attained more conveniently using a filtration combination of Cu and Al. This study aimed to compare the two filtration schemes by their effects on image quality in terms of signal-difference-to-noise ratio, spatial resolution, exposure index, noise power spectrum, modulation transfer function, and detective quantum efficiency. A comparative assessment of the images was performed by analyzing commercially available image quality assessment phantom and by following the IEC 62220-3 formalism.

Murphy, Simon; Christianson, Olav; Amurao, Maxwell; Samei, Ehsan

2010-04-01

397

Optical, real-time monitoring of the glomerular filtration rate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An easy and accurate assessment of the renal function is a critical requirement for detecting the initial functional decline of the kidney induced by acute or chronic renal disease. A method for measuring the glomerular filtration rate is developed with the accuracy of clearance techniques and the convenience of plasma creatinine. The renal function is measured in rats as the rate of clearance determined from time-resolved transcutaneous fluorescence measurements of a new fluorescent glomerular filtration agent. The agent has a large dose-safety coefficient and the same space distribution and clearance characteristics as iothalamate. This new approach is a convenient and accurate way to perform real-time measurements of the glomerular filtration rate to detect early kidney disease before the renal function becomes severely and irreversibly compromised.

Rabito, Carlos A.; Chen, Yang; Schomacker, Kevin T.; Modell, Mark D.

2005-10-01

398

On the Gorenstein Property of the Fiber Cone to Filtrations  

E-print Network

Let $(A, \\mathfrak{m})$ be a Noetherian local ring and $\\mathfrak{F}=(I_{n})_{n\\geq 0}$ a filtration. In this paper, we study the Gorenstein properties of the fiber cone $F(\\mathfrak{F})$, where $\\mathfrak{F}$ is a Hilbert filtration. Suppose that $F(\\mathfrak{F})$ and $G(\\mathfrak{F})$ are Cohen-Macaulay. If in addition, the associated graded ring $G(\\mathfrak{F})$ is Gorenstein; similarly to the $I$-adic case, we obtain a necessary and sufficient condition, in terms of lengths and minimal number of generators of ideals, for Gorensteiness of the fiber cone. Moreover, we find a description of the canonical module of $F(\\mathfrak{F})$ and show that even in the Hilbert filtration case, the multiplicity of the canonical module of the fiber cone is upper bounded by multiplicity of the canonical modules of the associated graded ring.

Lima, P H

2012-01-01

399

The effect of membrane filtration on dissolved trace element concentrations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The almost universally accepted operational definition for dissolved constituents is based on processing whole-water samples through a 0.45-??m membrane filter. Results from field and laboratory experiments indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration, other than just pore size (e.g., diameter, manufacturer, volume of sample processed, amount of suspended sediment in the sample), can produce substantial variations in the 'dissolved' concentrations of such elements as Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, and Ni. These variations result from the inclusion/exclusion of colloidally- associated trace elements. Thus, 'dissolved' concentrations quantitated by analyzing filtrates generated by processing whole-water through similar pore- sized membrane filters may not be equal/comparable. As such, simple filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane filter may no longer represent an acceptable operational definition for dissolved chemical constituents. This conclusion may have important implications for environmental studies and regulatory agencies.

Horowitz, A.J.; Lum, K.R.; Garbarino, J.R.; Hall, G.E.M.; Lemieux, C.; Demas, C.R.

1996-01-01

400

Characterization of Filtration Scale-Up Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The scale-up performance of sintered stainless steel crossflow filter elements planned for use at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were characterized in partial fulfillment (see Table S.1) of the requirements of Test Plan TP RPP WTP 509. This test report details the results of experimental activities related only to filter scale-up

Richard C. Daniel; Justin M. Billing; Maria L. Luna; Kirk J. Cantrell; Reid A. Peterson; Michael L. Bonebrake; Rick W. Shimskey; Lynette K. Jagoda

2009-01-01

401

Filtration of sodium-fire aerosols  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different filter devices have been developed and tested with respect to their use in the off-gas system of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors to prevent the escape of sodium-fire aerosols that might be formed in case of an accident. The testing results have shown that the use of a multilayer sand bed filter is still the best method to filter limited

A. Alexas; S. Jordan; W. Lindner

1979-01-01

402

ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

2014-06-05

403

Drilling fluid containing a copolymer filtration control agent  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to an aqueous drilling fluid composition, a filtration control agent for utilization in said aqueous drilling fluid, and a method of forming a filter cake on the wall of a well for the reduction of filtrate from said drilling fluid, by utilization of a copolymer of: (1) a (Meth) acrylamido alkyl sulfonic acid or alkali metal salt thereof; and (2) a (Meth) acrylamide or n-alkyl (Meth) acrylamide. The copolymer may be cross-linked with a quaternary ammonium salt cross-linking agent.

Enright, D.P.; Lucas, J.M.; Perricone, A.C.

1981-10-06

404

Fractionation of culture filtrate antigens of Aspergillus fumigatus.  

PubMed

Polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and two-dimensional crossed immunoelectrophoresis (2D-CIE) of crude culture filtrate antigens prepared from three clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus revealed a striking similarity in the number and nature of their antigenic components, notwithstanding the wide differences in their total protein contents. The antigenic components, which are largely proteins and glycoproteins, varied from 9-10 in number depending on the isolate. A prominent glycoprotein band, common to all the three isolates, merits further purification and detailed study. The serodiagnostic value of culture filtrate antigens of A. fumigatus vis-a-vis mycelial antigens, has been discussed. PMID:2081627

Chandrashekara, K V; Kumari, S

1990-01-01

405

The effect of various mud filtrates on the permeability of sandstone cores  

E-print Network

tests may not indicate a permanent, effect on well productivity. The author shows that the oil permeability of sands i'rom three reservoirs, after invasi. on by water, was restored by flow of oil at pressure gradients of from 6 to IB psi per inch... to the swelling of the intergranular clays in the vicinity of the well bore as a result oi" the reaction between the clays and the invading drilling mud filtrates. The permeability reduction in the water-sensitive sands is generally attributed to the hydration...

Pfile, Robert Ambrose

2012-06-07

406

Stimulation of Tentoxin Synthesis by Aged-Culture Filtrates and Continued Synthesis in the Presence of Protein Inhibitors  

PubMed Central

Tentoxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide produced by Alternaria alternata (Fries) Keissler, induces chlorosis in certain seedling plants. It can be extracted from culture filtrates of the fungus. Tentoxin production is stimulated and increased by using a mixture of aged culture filtrates and modified Richards solution. Aged culture filtrates can be obtained from 3-week-old or older cultures of A. alternata in modified Richards solution or Pratts solution. A mixture of aged culture filtrate and fresh medium in the ratio 2:3 gives the maximal enhancement of tentoxin production. This growth system provided us with a model for studying the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on tentoxin production. Two antibiotics which inhibit protein synthesis at the ribosomal level were tested on growth, protein synthesis, and tentoxin production in A. alternata cultures. Cycloheximide at concentrations of 500 ?g/ml or emetine at concentrations of 250 ?g/ml did not inhibit tentoxin synthesis, although they stopped mycelial growth and protein synthesis of the fungus at the logarithmic growth stage in the enhancement medium. These results led us to conclude that tentoxin, like certain other bioactive cyclic peptides, is synthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthesis mechanism. PMID:16346993

Sheu, Jyh-Tsing; Talburt, Dwight E.

1986-01-01

407

Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

Underkoffler, V.S.

1986-12-01

408

Successful Treatment of Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Using Cascade Filtration Plasmapheresis  

PubMed Central

Objective: The aim of this study was to report the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) apheresisusing a cascade filtration system in pediatric patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), and toclarify the associated adverse effects and difficulties. Material and Methods: LDL-C apheresis using a cascade filtration system was performed in 3 pediatric patientswith homozygous FH; in total, 120 apheresis sessions were performed. Results: Cascade filtration therapy significantly reduced the mean LDL-C values from 418 ± 62 mg/dL to 145 ± 43 mg/dL (p= 0.011). We observed an acute mean reduction in the plasma level of total cholesterol (57.9%), LDL-C (70.8%),and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (40.7%). Treatments were well tolerated. The most frequent clinicaladverse effects were hypotension in 3 sessions (2.5%), chills (1.7%) in 2 sessions, and nausea/vomiting in 3 sessions(2.5%). Conclusion: Our experience using the cascade filtration system with 3 patients included good clinical outcomes andlaboratory findings, safe usage, and minor adverse effects and technical problems. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385721

Karda?1, Fatih; Çetin, Aysun; Solmaz, Musa; Büyüko?lan, Rüksan; Kaynar, Leylagül; Kendirci, Mustafa; Eser, Bülent; Ünal, Ali

2012-01-01

409

Serodiagnostic Potential of Culture Filtrate Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our studies of the humoral responses of tuberculosis (TB) patients have defined the repertoire of culture filtrate antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are recognized by antibodies from cavitary and noncavitary TB patients and demonstrated that the profile of antigens recognized changes with disease progression (K. Samanich et al., J. Infect. Dis. 178:1534-1538, 1998). We have identified several antigens with strong

K. M. Samanich; M. A. Keen; V. D. Vissa; J. D. Harder; J. S. Spencer; J. T. Belisle; S. Zolla-Pazner; S. Laal

2000-01-01

410

PRESSURE DROP REDUCTION BY ELECTRICAL ENHANCEMENT OF FABRIC FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses economic studies of electrostatic augmentation of fabric filtration (ESFF) that indicate that the reduced rate of pressure drop rise can lead to lower capital and operating costs. (ESFF has been evaluated in the laboratory and at various pilot scales over the ...

411

The use of multiobjective optimization to improve wine filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiobjective optimization method was applied to achieve high quality wines using membrane filtration. Different Hungarian wines were filtered by ceramic cross-flow membrane filters with changed recycle rates. The quality parameters of wines (polyphenol, protein, colloid and tartaric acid concentrations, etc.) and the permeate flux were measured as functions of membrane pore size, recycle flow rate and pretreatment of wine. The

S. Gergely; E. Bekassy-Molnar; Gy. Vatai

2003-01-01

412

AUTOMOTIVE AND HEAVY-DUTY ENGINE COOLANT RECYCLING BY FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. he specific recycling units evaluated are a fleet-size unit and a portable unit, both based on the technology of chemical filtration...

413

Engineering Optimisation of cryptosporidium filtration under simulated swimming  

E-print Network

Engineering M.Res. Optimisation of cryptosporidium filtration under simulated swimming pool / Saleh Altowaijri. Ph.D. 2013 Rolling contact fatigue detection via high frequency acoustic emission-scale modelling of ceramic composite layers and reinforced concrete slabs subjected to blast loading / Zainorizuan

Martin, Ralph R.

414

Linear-size approximations to the vietoris-rips filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Vietoris-Rips filtration is a versatile tool in topological data analysis. It is a sequence of simplicial complexes built on a metric space to add topological structure to an otherwise disconnected set of points. It is widely used because it encodes useful information about the topology of the underlying metric space. This information is often extracted from its so-called persistence

Donald R. Sheehy

2012-01-01

415

Pesticide removal by combined ozonation and granular activated carbon filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the seventies, new water treatment processes have been introduced in the production of drinking water from surface water. Their major aim was to adequately cope with the disinfection of this water, and\\/or with the removal of pesticides and other organic micropollutants from it. This research focused on Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) filtration, which is a combination of ozonation and

E. Orlandini

1999-01-01

416

Fabrication of nanofiber meltblown membranes and their filtration properties  

E-print Network

fiber diameter ranging between 1 and 2 mm. Determining routes for making nano- or submicron-fibers using a typical die design. We find that production of nano-meltblown membranes with an average fiber size that of the control. These results show significant promise for the use of nano-meltblown fibers in filtration

Khan, Saad A.

417

Particle Deposition in Laminar Crossflow Filtration of Power Law Slurry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theoretical model for predicting the probability of particle deposition in crossflow filtration of power law slurry is developed. The model is based on the critical angle of friction between depositing particles, which can be estimated by analyzing the forces exerted on the particles. The binding force between the particles due to polymer adsorption plays an important role in the

Kuo-Jen Hwang; Wei-Ming Lu

1997-01-01

418

Pressure filtration of ceramic pastes. 4: Treatment of experimental data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of data processing method based on the algorithm proposed by Kalman and its application to the filtration process at constant pressure are described, as well as the advantages of this method. This technique is compared to the least squares method. The operation allows the precise parameter adjustment of the equation in direct relationship to the specific resistance of the cake.

Torrecillas, A. S.; Polo, J. F.; Perez, A. A.

1984-01-01

419

Hybrid filtration method for pre-treatment of stormwater.  

PubMed

In this study the hybrid filtration process (combining fibre filter with deep bed dual media filtration) was investigated as pre-treatment to stormwater. This process was investigated in-terms of reduction in turbidity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colour, headloss development across the filters, suspended solids removal, organic matter removal, nutrients and heavy matter (such as iron, copper, lead, zinc) removal efficiency. A comparison was made between the hybrid filter with single media (sand) deep bed filter and fibre filter. It was found that the hybrid filtration system successfully removed turbidity (98%), colour (99%), suspended solids (99%), and DOC (55%). The removal efficiency of heavy metal was relatively low as the concentration of heavy metals present in stormwater was low. The removal efficiency of nitrate, nitrite and phosphorous (as orthophosphate) was 27, 35 and 72% respectively. Hybrid filtration processes showed a better reduction of Modified Fouling Index (MFI) value (from 15.500 s/l(2) to 9 s/l(2)) compared with single media sand, anthracite and fibre filter which were 35 s/l(2), 13 s/l(2)and 14 s/l(2) respectively when operated at FeCl(3) dose of 15 mg/l. PMID:21123925

Johir, M A H; Vigneswaran, S; Kandasamy, J

2010-01-01

420

Field Performance of a Newly Developed Upflow Filtration Device  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this research is to examine the removal capacities of a newly developed Upflow filtration device for treatment of stormwater. The device was developed by engineers at the University of Alabama through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant from the U....

421

DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED ESFF (ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF FABRIC FILTRATION) TECHNOLOGY  

EPA Science Inventory

The report summarizes work on electrical stimulation of fabric filtration (ESFF) with the major objectives of defining the role of some primary variables and understanding the mechanisms of electrostatic enhancement. It was concluded that the magnitude of particle charge has a st...

422

Enhanced ultrafine coal dewatering using flocculation filtration processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ultrafine coal (?150 ?m) can be effectively cleaned using advanced separation techniques such as column flotation, however, dewatering it to below 20 percent moisture level using the conventional dewatering techniques is difficult. A comparative flocculation filtration study was performed for enhancing dewatering of ultrafine coal using vacuum, hyperbaric, and centrifugal filters. The cationic and anionic flocculants were added into the

D. Tao; J. G. Groppo; B. K. Parekh

2000-01-01

423

EVALUATION OF FILTRATION AND DISTILLATION METHODS FOR RECYCLING AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT.  

EPA Science Inventory

This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants at a New Jersey Department of Transportation garage. The specific recycling units evaluated are based on the technologies of filtrat...

424

ADVANCES IN FILTER AID AND PRECOAT FILTRATION TECHNOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of filter aids and precoat filtration is ubiquitous in a wide number of industries, including chemicals, food processing, pharmaceuticals, mining, municipal (potable) water treatment and waste treatment. World Minerals Inc., the parent company of Celite and Harborlite, and other organizations have recently made major advances in filter aid technology. These advances have now pushed the envelope of performance

Thomas E. Sulpizio

425

Combustion wave instability in the filtration combustion of gases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theoretical and experimental approaches to the problem of combustion wave stability in gas filtration combustion are described. An approximate criterion of instability for an initially plane combustion wave front is suggested within the framework of a hydrodynamic model. It is shown that the wave instabiliry cannot be observed if the reactor diameter is under a critical value. The critical value

S. S. Minaev; S. I. Potytnyakov; V. S. Babkin

1994-01-01

426

Solve membrane fouling problems with high-shear filtration  

SciTech Connect

High-shear advancements are allowing membrane separation systems to displace some conventional separation methods such as centrifuging, evaporation, and clarifying. Applications range from wastewater treatment to biological separations. This paper describes fouling problems, tangential flow, high-shear filtration systems, vibration antifouling technology, spinning disc, spinning cylinder, system differences, limitations, costs, and selecting a solids/liquids separator.

Culkin, B.; Plotkin, A.; Monroe, M. [New Logic International, Inc., Emeryville, CA (United States)

1998-01-01

427

RIVERBANK FILTRATION AS A PRETREATMENT FOR NANOFILTRATION MEMBRANES  

EPA Science Inventory

The loss of membrane efficiency due to fouling is one of the main impediments to the development of membrane processes for use in drinking water treatment. Surface waters, in general, have a greater proclivity towards fouling as compared to groundwaters. Riverbank filtration chan...

428

RIVERBANK FILTRATION AS A PRETREATMENT FOR NANOFILTRATION MEMBRANES  

EPA Science Inventory

The loss of membrane efficiency due to fouling is one of the main impediments to the development of membrane processes for use in drinking water treatment. Surface waters, in general, have a greater proclivity towards fouling as compared to groundwaters. Riverbank filtration ch...

429

Fluid-Solid Mass Transfer in Magnetic Filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theoretical model for the process of magnetic filtration of paramagnetic particles suspended in water and a method for determining the kinetic parameters of the model is proposed. To validate the theory, 10 experimental runs were conducted on a cylindrical filter of 300 mm diameter, containing a concentric iron rod of 250 mm diameter and a bed of spherical iron

Jorge Cuéllar; Audelino Alvaro

1995-01-01

430

Slow Sand Filtration: Influences of Selected Process Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological activity within the sand bed had the strongest influence on removal efficiency of total coliform bacteria by slow sand filtration, as determined by six pilot filters (shown above). Temperature, sand bed depth, and sand size also had strong influence. La actividad biológica dentro de la cama de arena ejerce la influencia más grande en la eficiencia de la extracción

William D. Bellamy; David W. Hendricks; Gary S. Logsdon

1985-01-01

431

Culture: A Filtration Process during Communication in Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on the filtration process of culture during communication in education with reference to visual elements. An introduction provides a review of some communication models--graphic representations of theories that attempt to predict and explain the process of communication. These simple models are discussed: Aristotle's model of…

de Lange, Rudi

432

Method for deoiling petrolatum in an ionic field, without filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

UDC 665.772 As a result of studying the interaction between the intermolecular van der Waals field of a solvent and the ionic field of aqueous solutions of alkalis, salts, and acids in the course of crystallization, a method has been developed for deoiling petrolatum without any filtration operation. In contrast to the conventional method, the new method will give increased

R. G. Nigmatullin; P. A. Zolotarev; G. G. Telyashev; A. Kh. Mukhamed'yanova

1995-01-01

433

Principles of Water Recirculation and Filtration in Aquaculture 1  

E-print Network

designs for recirculating systems and most will work effectively if they accomplish: 1) aeration, 2FA12 Principles of Water Recirculation and Filtration in Aquaculture 1 Michael McGee and Charles/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences/University of Florida/Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean. Recirculating

Watson, Craig A.

434

[Filtration characteristics and mechanism of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment].  

PubMed

Filtration characteristics and mechanism of membrane fouling were investigated with MBR mixed liquor. It was found that, the variation of filtration resistance was fit to the standard blocking filtration model in initial process, and then fit to cake filtration model in later process. In dead-end filtration of sludge, the relative flux was in the tendency to the exponential decay along with filtration time, and flux was decreased more quickly at higher pressure. Sludge was compressed during filtration process, and resistance of sludge was increased with the increase in filtration pressure, the compressibility index was obtained as 0.807 8. Quantitative calculations showed that cake resistance made up over 90% of total resistance. In addition, the relative contribution of each of the sludge fractions to membrane was respectively calculated as 87.98 % for suspended solids, 6.20 % for colloids and 5.82% for solutes. Then a possible mechanism underlying membrane fouling was proposed. PMID:17304850

Lin, Hong-jun; Lu, Xiao-feng; Duan, Wei; Shen, Fei

2006-12-01

435

QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF AIR FILTRATION SYSTEMS IN USE AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES: RESEARCH IN PROGRESS  

EPA Science Inventory

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration systems serve as the principal engineering control to remove asbestos particulate from airstreams at abatement projects. owever, little quantitative information is available on the integrity of these air filtration systems in prev...

436

Optical coherence tomographic assessment of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness changes before and after glaucoma filtration surgery  

PubMed Central

Background: Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy (GON) is very common in the glaucoma patients, and impaired effect of glaucoma is measured by the Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) thickness. Objective: The study was conducted to find out the mean RNFL thickness, RNFL thickness in different quadrants, Intra-Ocular Pressure (IOP) changes, and visual field changes after filtration surgery in different ages and genders using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Materials and Methods: The study was an interventional case-series conducted at the Glaucoma Clinic at the Regional Institute of Ophthalmology at Kolkata from March 2009 to August 2010. Fifty-one eyes of 43 open angle glaucoma patients had been selected for clinical and ophthalmologic evaluation. All the eyes of glaucoma patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were registered in the study population. The glaucoma filtration surgery was done in these patients. The RNFL thickness, IOP, visual field changes were measured before and after intervention of filtration surgery. Pre-operative OCT images of RNFL were obtained 0 to 120 days before surgery, and post-operative images were obtained from 60 to 120 days after surgery. Data collected in a standard data collection form included schedule. Results: Paired t-test was used. RNFL thickness was (pre-operative: 52.56 ± 17.40, post-operative: 58.48 ± 20.20, P < 0.0001) significantly increased after filtration surgery measured by OCT with significant reduction of IOP (r = - 0.38, P = 0.005) irrespective of age and gender. Conclusions: An increase in RNFL thickness was observed after glaucoma filtration surgery that correlated with IOP reduction. PMID:24799793

Sarkar, Kumaresh Chandra; Das, Palash; Pal, Ranabir; Shaw, Chattaranjan

2014-01-01

437

Isolation of the toluene degrading bacteria and application to the biotrickling filtration system of off-gas treatment  

SciTech Connect

The period of acclimation in biotrickling filtration system was studied using toluene degrading bacteria. Toluene degrading bacteria were isolated from the test biotrickling filtration apparatus used for the degradation of toluene off-gas. Five colonies found in an agar culture medium were identified to be toluene degrading bacteria; one was classified Acinetobacter genospecies 10 and the other four were Rhodococcus erythropolis. The count of the toluene degrading bacteria was 5.6 x 10 to the power 8th Colony Forming Units/ml-packing space. The toluene elimination activity was found to be 7.4 and 2.0 mg-toluene/g-dry cell/min for colony {number{underscore}sign}1 and colony {number{underscore}sign}2, respectively, using batch vial system. They were higher than that obtained when the original sludge in the test biotrickling filtration apparatus was applied to the same system. The performance of colony {number{underscore}sign}1 was also tested by the test biotrickling filtration system. Urethane foam, which constituted a lattice-like structure internally, was used as the microbial carrier. The artificial off-gas of 100ppm toluene/air was prepared with reagent grade chemical. The space velocity (versus the packed bed) was 100/h. Immediately after the start-up, the removal percentages of toluene was 39%, and it became 84% after two days continuous treatment. This result indicates that addition of colony {number{underscore}sign}1 was thus shown to be an effective means of shortening the acclimation period of a trickle bed biofilter.

Yamashita, Shigeki

1999-07-01

438

Research on the water purification for reclaimed water resource supply-type lakes by the method of recirculation filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the result of suitable filter screening9ÿ A recirculation filtration process with multi-medias was applied to investigate the reactor performance in treating reclaimed water resource supply-type lake water. The results showed that the pollutant removal capabilities for single species packing filter was in the following order: activated carbon> composite inorganic medium>volcanic rock>quartz sand>gravel. A pilot scale test has been

Rihong Liao; Yingjie Shen; Nan Zhan; Cao Liu; Yunfang Huang

2011-01-01

439

Analysis of constant permeate flow filtration using dead-end hollow fiber membranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dead-end filtration of colloids using hollow fibers has been analysed theoretically and experimentally. A mathematical model for constant flux filtration using dead-end hollow fiber membranes has been developed by combining the Hagen–Poiseuille equation, the (standard) filtration equation, and cake filtration theory of Petsev et al. [D.N. Petsev, V.M. Starov, I.B. Ivanov, Concentrated dispersions of charged colloidal particles: sedimentation, ultrafiltration and

S. Chang; A. G. Fane; T. D. Waite

2006-01-01

440

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to demonstrate increases in filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

2011-01-12

441

Bacterial filtration efficiency of green soy protein based nanofiber air filter.  

PubMed

High bacterial filtration efficiency (BFE) filters, based on nanofibers derived from blends of grain proteins and poly-ethylene-oxide (PEO), were produced by an electrospinning process. Specifically, polymer blends consisting of purified soy flour/PEO with a ratio of 7/3 were spun into nanofibers and characterized. A new laboratory based experimental apparatus for testing BFE was designed and used to test BFE of bacterial aerosols consisting of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Performances of soy protein based nanofiber filters with nanofiber mass varying from 1 to 5 g/m2 as well as a nanofiber filters prepared from pure PEO were compared. The results showed that BFE values for filters containing 5 g/m2 protein based nanofibers and PEO nanofiber filter were 100 and 81.5%, respectively. The results also indicated that the BFE increased as the protein content in the nanofiber filter increased. These novel protein based nanofiber filters have demonstrated a clear potential for effective removal and retention of E. coli bacteria during air-filtration. These filters can be effectively deployed in environments such as hospitals and senior residential areas to reduce bacterial infections. PMID:24757959

Lubasova, D; Netravali, A; Parker, J; Ingel, B

2014-07-01

442

Advanced phosphorus removal from membrane filtrates by adsorption on activated aluminium oxide and granulated ferric hydroxide.  

PubMed

The advanced phosphorus (P) removal by adsorption was studied for its suitability as a post-treatment step for membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluents low in P concentration and particle content. Two commercial adsorbents, granulated ferric hydroxide (GFH) and activated aluminium oxide (AA), were studied in batch tests and lab-scale filter tests for P adsorption in MBR filtrates. GFH showed a higher maximum capacity for phosphate and a higher affinity at low P concentrations compared to AA. Competition by inorganic ions was negligible for both adsorbents at the original pH (8.2). When equilibrium P concentrations exceeded 2 mg L(-1) in the spiked MBR filtrates, a precipitation of calcium phosphates occurred additionally to adsorption. During column studies the effluent criteria of 50 microgL(-1) P was reached after a throughput of 8000 bed volumes for GFH and 4000 for AA. Dissolved organic carbon appears to be the strongest competitor for adsorption sites. A partial regeneration and reloading of both adsorbents could be achieved by the use of sodium hydroxide. PMID:15325178

Genz, Arne; Kornmüller, Anja; Jekel, Martin

2004-09-01

443

Membrane filtration of municipal wastewater effluents for implementing agricultural reuse in southern Italy.  

PubMed

Membrane filtration was investigated at field scale in order to assess its effectiveness for reusing municipal effluents in agriculture. The study was started on April 2002 and ended on September 2007, as part of a national R&D project (AQUATEC). Preliminary results, which we already reported elsewhere, concerned the first two project years while this paper refers to the subsequent period. Three different crops (processing tomato, fennel and lettuce) were grown in rotation at a test field located in Apulia (Southern Italy) and irrigated with membrane filtered municipal secondary effluents. The quality of the reclaimed water was monitored chemically and microbiologically, and compared with conventional water pumped from a local well. Both water sources were used in parallel for irrigating two plots of the test field. The results showed that the microbiological quality of the treated wastewater was comparable to or even higher than that of the conventional source. Protozoan (oo)cysts were experimentally identified as effective indicators of possible failures of the filtration system. Moreover, long term heavy metals accumulation trends were monitored in soil and crops, showing that despite some lead and copper accumulation in the soil, no measurable increase of these metals was observed in the edible parts of the crops. PMID:20818054

Lopez, A; Pollice, A; Laera, G; Lonigro, A; Rubino, P

2010-01-01

444

The performance of pumice as a filter bed material under rapid filtration conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deep bed sand filters are used extensively in drinking water and wastewater treatment. In this study, sand and pumice were used as a filtration media under rapid filtration conditions and performance results for both were compared. Turbidity removal performance and head losses were investigated as functions of filtration rate, bed depth and particle size. Under the same experimental conditions such

Burhanettin Farizoglu; Alper Nuhoglu; Ergun Yildiz; Bulent Keskinler

2003-01-01

445

Filtration and flocculation in industrial processes. (Latest citations from Fluidex). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical aspects, system design, evaluations, and standards for filtration and flocculation techniques and equipment used in various industrial processes. Applications include air filtration, dust collection, water filtration, dewatering, and flocculant separation. A variety of filter types and flocculation mechanisms is discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-03-01

446

Research on Filtration Performance of Filter Media Used in Bag Filter for Industrial Furnaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the fine particles as the main control object, the influence of dust load, filtration velocity and structure of filter material on the performance of the bag filter is studied. The results show that in certain dust load, the filtration resistance and filtration velocity has good linear relation and the resistance increases with the increase of dust load. High

Yuan Xin-yan; Shen Heng-gen; Wang Zhen-hua; Hou Wei-li

2010-01-01

447

New generation of biological upflow filtration for the treatment of industrial and municipal wastewater  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of aerated biological upflow filtration in waste water treatment goes back to the beginning of the 1980s. Since that time, filtration technology has already been used successfully as the principal unit in the treatment of potable water in order to eliminate suspended solids. The long term positive experience regarding the application of filtration in the treatment of potable

A. Rüdiger; S. Brinke-Seiferth; I. Sekoulov

448

Environmental Technology Verification: Baghouse filtration products--W.L. Gore & Associates L3650 filtration media (tested November--December 2009)  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. ETV seeks to ach...

449

Mechanics and molecular filtration performance of graphyne nanoweb membranes for selective water purification.  

PubMed

Two-dimensional carbon materials such as the 2D nanoweb-like graphyne membrane are promising as molecular sieves for energy and environmental applications. Based on the application of water purification - the removal of contaminants from wastewater and seawater - here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interplay between mechanical forces, filtration mechanisms, and overall performance for graphyne membranes with different pore sizes. We carry out biaxial tensile tests and verify the superior mechanical robustness and tolerance of graphyne membranes against possible deformations from the membrane installation process. A possible ultimate stress in excess of 15 GPa and an ultimate strain of 1.2-2.7% are determined. We also demonstrate their excellent filtration performance with barrier-free water permeation and perfect rejection of the representative contaminants considered here, including divalent heavy metal salts (copper sulfate), hydrophobic organic chemicals (benzene and carbon tetrachloride), and inorganic monovalent salts (sodium chloride). We find that graphtriyne, with an effective pore diameter of 3.8 Å, exhibits an optimal purification performance, because the contaminant rejection rate is more sensitive to pore size than water permeability. In addition, we find that the hydrophobic graphyne membranes exhibit higher rejection rates for hydrophilic contaminants compared to the hydrophobic ones. This size exclusion effect is a result of the larger hydrated radii of hydrophilic species due to stronger interactions between them and water molecules. Finally, we find that the maximum deformation of graphtriyne at the ultimate strain before material failure has only a minor impact on its filtration performance. One of the advantages of using graphyne for water purification is that no chemical functionalization or defects need to be introduced, which maintains the structural integrity of the membrane, and possibly, the long-term device performance. PMID:24121618

Lin, Shangchao; Buehler, Markus J

2013-12-01

450

40 CFR 141.552 - My system consists of “alternative filtration” and is required to conduct a demonstration-what is...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer... My system consists of “alternative filtration” and is required to conduct a demonstration...If your system consists of alternative filtration(filtration other than slow sand...

2010-07-01

451

40 CFR 141.552 - My system consists of “alternative filtration” and is required to conduct a demonstration-what is...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer... My system consists of “alternative filtration” and is required to conduct a demonstration...If your system consists of alternative filtration(filtration other than slow sand...

2011-07-01

452

Testing the Waters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides information about home drinking water treatment systems to address concerns about the safety and quality of drinking water. Discusses water testing, filtration, product options and selection, water testing resources, water treatment device guidelines, water analysis terminology, and laboratory selection. (MCO)

Finks, Mason

1993-01-01

453

Fluidized-bed filtration for particulate cleanup  

SciTech Connect

Successful development of advanced coal-fired power conversion systems often requires reliable and efficient gas stream-cleanup devices that can remove particulate and gaseous pollutants from high-temperature and high-pressure gas streams. A novel filter concept for particulate cleanup has been developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The filter consists of a fine screened surface immersed in a fluidized bed of granular material. As the gas stream passes through the fluidized bed, a layer of fine granular material is deposited and packed at the screen surface, which provides a natural filter to separate the fine particles from the gas stream. Since the filtering media is the granular material supplied by the fluidized bed, the filter is not subjected to blinding. Cleaning the filter (if necessary) is much easier than with a ceramic filter because the inflowing gas, not the cohesive forces, maintains the filter media at the screen surface. Therefore, the screen surface can be readily cleaned by momentarily interrupting the gas flow. A two-dimensional fluidized-bed filter cold model was designed, constructed, and operated to explore the feasibility of this novel concept. The two-dimensional, transparent unit allowed clear observation of the general fluidized state of the granular material and the conditions under which fines are captured by the particle layer. A series of parametric tests was conducted to provide acceptable operating conditions for the model configuration. Preliminary results are presented in this paper. Effects of various parameters, such as superficial gas velocity, bed depth, particle size, and distance from the filter to the gas distributor, on filter behavior are characterized through differential pressure and differential pressure fluctuation data.

Mei, J.S.; Yue, P.C.; Halow, J.S.

1993-01-01

454

Submicrometre particle filtration with a dc activated plasma textile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plasma textiles are novel fabrics incorporating the advantages of cold plasma and low-cost non-woven or woven textile fabrics. In plasma textiles, electrodes are integrated into the fabric, and a corona discharge is activated within and on the surface of the fabric by applying high voltages above 10 kV between the electrodes. When the plasma textile is activated, submicrometre particles approaching the textile are charged by the deposition of ions and electrons produced by the corona, and then collected by the textile material. A stable plasma discharge was experimentally verified on the surface of the textile that was locally smooth but not rigid. A filtration efficiency close to 100% was observed in experiments conducted on salt particles with diameters ranging from 50 to 300 nm. Unlike conventional fibrous filters, the plasma textile provided uniform filtration in this range, without exhibiting a maximum particle penetration size.

Rasipuram, S. C.; Wu, M.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Levine, J. F.; Jasper, W. J.; Saveliev, A. V.

2014-01-01

455

Calculating the effect of natural attenuation during bank filtration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A modelling concept is presented that enables a quantitative evaluation of transport and natural attenuation processes during bank filtration. The aim is to identify ranges of degradation rates for which bank filtration is effective or ineffective. Such modelling should accompany experimental work, as otherwise the meaning of determined degradation rates for a field situation remains uncertain. The presented concept is a combination of analytical and numerical methods, solving differential equations directly for the steady state. It is implemented using FEMLAB ® code and demonstrates a typical idealized situation with a single well near a straight bank boundary. The method can be applied to confined, to unconfined and to partially confined/unconfined aquifers and may be extended for applications in more complex situations, including a clogging layer, galleries of pumping and recharge wells, etc.

Holzbecher, Ekkehard

2006-11-01

456

Filtration of slime suspension in water-treatment precipitation clarifiers  

SciTech Connect

When water is treated in industrial clarifiers a slime suspension is produced that has a pH 11-12.5 and contains up to 5% solid phase. In order to utilize the excess alkalinity of the suspension and save fresh lime milk, the suspension is used to neutralize the acidic regenerates past the cation-exchanger columns. The operation of the vacuum filter is a narrow part of the wastewater treatment area. The filter cloth often gets choked, the sediment being sticky and difficult to remove from the cloth. We proposed to alter the mode of removal of the slime suspension by submitting it to filtration immediately after its exit from the clarifier. For mixing with the acidic regeneration from the cation-exchanger columns the filtrate was delivered after the vacuum filter.

Trofimenko, M.A.; Tyagnyryadno, L.A.; Korol'kov, N.M.; Zheleznyak, A.B.

1988-02-10

457

Modified approaches for high pressure filtration of fine clean coal  

SciTech Connect

Removal of moisture from fine (minus 28 mesh) clean coal to 20% or lower level is difficult using the conventional vacuum dewatering technique. High pressure filtration technique provides an avenue for obtaining low moisture in fine clean coal. This paper describes a couple of novel approaches for dewatering of fine clean coal using pressure filtration which provides much lower moisture in fine clean coal than that obtained using conventional pressure filter. The approaches involve (a) split stream dewatering and (b) addition of paper pulp to the coal slurry. For Pittsburgh No. 8 coal slurry, split stream dewatering at 400 mesh provided filter cake containing 12.9% moisture compared to 24.9% obtained on the feed material. The addition of paper pulp to the slurry provided filter cake containing about 17% moisture.

Yang, J.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K. [Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31

458

Applicability of estimating glomerular filtration rate equations in pediatric patients: comparison with a measured glomerular filtration rate by iohexol clearance.  

PubMed

Estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) has become popular in clinical medicine as an alternative to measured GFR (mGFR), but there are few studies comparing them in clinical practice. We determined mGFR by iohexol clearance in 81 consecutive children in routine practice and calculated eGFR from 14 standard equations using serum creatinine, cystatin C, and urea nitrogen that were collected at the time of the mGFR procedure. Nonparametric Wilcoxon test, Spearman correlation, Bland-Altman analysis, bias (median difference), and accuracy (P15, P30) were used to compare mGFR with eGFR. For the entire study group, the mGFR was 77.9 ± 38.8 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Eight of the 14 estimating equations demonstrated values without a significant difference from the mGFR value and demonstrated a lower bias in Bland-Altman analysis. Three of these 8 equations based on a combination of creatinine and cystatin C (Schwartz et al. New equations to estimate GFR in children with CKD. J Am Soc Nephrol 2009;20:629-37; Schwartz et al. Improved equations estimating GFR in children with chronic kidney disease using an immunonephelometric determination of cystatin C. Kidney Int 2012;82:445-53; Chehade et al. New combined serum creatinine and cystatin C quadratic formula for GFR assessment in children. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2014;9:54-63) had the highest accuracy with approximately 60% of P15 and 80% of P30. In 10 patients with a single kidney, 7 with kidney transplant, and 11 additional children with short stature, values of the 3 equations had low bias and no significant difference when compared with mGFR. In conclusion, the 3 equations that used cystatin C, creatinine, and growth parameters performed in a superior manner over univariate equations based on either creatinine or cystatin C and also had good applicability in specific pediatric patients with single kidneys, those with a kidney transplant, and short stature. Thus, we suggest that eGFR calculations in pediatric clinical practice use only a multivariate equation. PMID:25445208

Deng, Fang; Finer, Gal; Haymond, Shannon; Brooks, Ellen; Langman, Craig B

2014-10-14

459

FIELD METHODS TO MEASURE CONTAMINANT REMOVAL EFFECTIVENESS OF GAS-PHASE AIR FILTRATION EQUIPMENT - PHASE 1: SEARCH OF LITERATURE AND PRIOR ART  

EPA Science Inventory

The report, Phase 1 of a two-phase research project, gives results of a literature search into the effectiveness of in-field gas-phase air filtration equipment (GPAFE) test methods, including required instrumentation and costs. GPAFE has been used in heating, ventilation, and ...

460

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT HYDRO COMPLIANCE MANAGEMENT, INC. HYDRO-KLEEN FILTRATION SYSTEM, 03/07/WQPC-SWP, SEPTEMBER 2003  

EPA Science Inventory

Verification testing of the Hydro-Kleen(TM) Filtration System, a catch-basin filter designed to reduce hydrocarbon, sediment, and metals contamination from surface water flows, was conducted at NSF International in Ann Arbor, Michigan. A Hydro-Kleen(TM) system was fitted into a ...

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