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Sample records for beneficial rhizobacterium pseudomonas

  1. Mobile genetic elements in the genome of the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 is a plant-associated bacterium that inhabits the rhizosphere of a wide variety of plant species and and produces secondary metabolites suppressive of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens. The Pf-5 genome is rich in features consistent with its commensal lifes...

  2. Mobile genetic elements in the genome of the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 is a plant-associated bacterium that inhabits the rhizosphere of a wide variety of plant species and produces secondary metabolites suppressive of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens. The Pf-5 genome is rich in features consistent with its commensal lifestyle, but has re...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beneficial Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 8569, a Natural Isolate of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus)

    PubMed Central

    Nesemann, Kai; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A.; Thuermer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 8569 represents a natural isolate of the rhizosphere of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in Germany and possesses antagonistic potential toward the fungal pathogen Verticillium. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain DSM 8569, which comprises 5,914 protein-coding sequences. PMID:25814596

  4. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

    2011-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  5. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  6. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol and Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain UM270.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salmerón, Julie E; Hernández-León, Rocio; Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma Del Carmen; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Santoyo, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens strain UM270 was isolated form the rhizosphere of wild Medicago spp. A previous work has shown that this pseudomonad isolate was able to produce diverse diffusible and volatile compounds involved in plant protection and growth promotion. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the rhizobacterium P. fluorescens strain UM270. The sequence covers 6,047,974 bp of a single chromosome, with 62.66 % G + C content and no plasmids. Genome annotations predicted 5,509 genes, 5,396 coding genes, 59 RNA genes and 110 pseudogenes. Genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of genes involved in biological control and plant-growth promoting activities. We anticipate that the P. fluorescens strain UM270 genome will contribute insights about bacterial plant protection and beneficial properties through genomic comparisons among fluorescent pseudomonads. PMID:26767092

  8. Comparative genomic analysis and phenazine production of Pseudomonas chlororaphis, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yawen; Shen, Xuemei; Peng, Huasong; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis HT66, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that produces phenazine-1-carboxamide with high yield, was compared with three genomic sequenced P. chlororaphis strains, GP72, 30-84 and O6. The genome sizes of four strains vary from 6.66 to 7.30 Mb. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences indicated 4833 conserved genes in 5869-6455 protein-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the four strains are closely related to each other. Its competitive colonization indicates that P. chlororaphis can adapt well to its environment. No virulence or virulence-related factor was found in P. chlororaphis. All of the four strains could synthesize antimicrobial metabolites including different phenazines and insecticidal protein FitD. Some genes related to the regulation of phenazine biosynthesis were detected among the four strains. It was shown that P. chlororaphis is a safe PGPR in agricultural application and could also be used to produce some phenazine antibiotics with high-yield. PMID:26484173

  9. Comparative genomic analysis and phenazine production of Pseudomonas chlororaphis, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yawen; Shen, Xuemei; Peng, Huasong; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis HT66, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that produces phenazine-1-carboxamide with high yield, was compared with three genomic sequenced P. chlororaphis strains, GP72, 30–84 and O6. The genome sizes of four strains vary from 6.66 to 7.30 Mb. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences indicated 4833 conserved genes in 5869–6455 protein-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the four strains are closely related to each other. Its competitive colonization indicates that P. chlororaphis can adapt well to its environment. No virulence or virulence-related factor was found in P. chlororaphis. All of the four strains could synthesize antimicrobial metabolites including different phenazines and insecticidal protein FitD. Some genes related to the regulation of phenazine biosynthesis were detected among the four strains. It was shown that P. chlororaphis is a safe PGPR in agricultural application and could also be used to produce some phenazine antibiotics with high-yield. PMID:26484173

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas trivialis Strain IHBB745 with Multiple Plant Growth-Promoting Activities and Tolerance to Desiccation and Alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Arvind; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Vyas, Pratibha; Rahi, Praveen; Thakur, Rishu; Thakur, Namika; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of 6.45 Mb is reported here for Pseudomonas trivialis strain IHBB745 (MTCC 5336), which is an efficient, stress-tolerant, and broad-spectrum plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium. The gene-coding clusters predicted the genes for phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production, and stress response. PMID:26337878

  11. Quorum sensing systems differentially regulate the production of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1201.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuang; Zhou, Lian; Jin, Kaiming; Jiang, Haixia; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 is a newly identified rhizobacterium that produces high levels of the secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. PCA production in liquid batch cultures utilizing a specialized PCA-promoting medium (PPM) typically occurs after the period of most rapid growth, and production is regulated in a quorum sensing (QS)-dependent manner. PA1201 contains two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters phz1 and phz2; both clusters contribute to PCA production, with phz2 making a greater contribution. PA1201 also contains a complete set of genes for four QS systems (LasI/LasR, RhlI/RhlR, PQS/MvfR, and IQS). By using several methods including gene deletion, the construction of promoter-lacZ fusion reporter strains, and RNA-Seq analysis, this study investigated the effects of the four QS systems on bacterial growth, QS signal production, the expression of phz1 and phz2, and PCA production. The possible mechanisms for the strain- and condition-dependent expression of phz1 and phz2 were discussed, and a schematic model was proposed. These findings provide a basis for further genetic engineering of the QS systems to improve PCA production. PMID:27456813

  12. Quorum sensing systems differentially regulate the production of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1201

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuang; Zhou, Lian; Jin, Kaiming; Jiang, Haixia; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 is a newly identified rhizobacterium that produces high levels of the secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. PCA production in liquid batch cultures utilizing a specialized PCA-promoting medium (PPM) typically occurs after the period of most rapid growth, and production is regulated in a quorum sensing (QS)-dependent manner. PA1201 contains two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters phz1 and phz2; both clusters contribute to PCA production, with phz2 making a greater contribution. PA1201 also contains a complete set of genes for four QS systems (LasI/LasR, RhlI/RhlR, PQS/MvfR, and IQS). By using several methods including gene deletion, the construction of promoter-lacZ fusion reporter strains, and RNA-Seq analysis, this study investigated the effects of the four QS systems on bacterial growth, QS signal production, the expression of phz1 and phz2, and PCA production. The possible mechanisms for the strain- and condition-dependent expression of phz1 and phz2 were discussed, and a schematic model was proposed. These findings provide a basis for further genetic engineering of the QS systems to improve PCA production. PMID:27456813

  13. Domain Shuffling in a Sensor Protein Contributed to the Evolution of Insect Pathogenicity in Plant-Beneficial Pseudomonas protegens

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmied, Peter; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Imperiali, Nicola; Maurhofer, Monika; Keel, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens is a biocontrol rhizobacterium with a plant-beneficial and an insect pathogenic lifestyle, but it is not understood how the organism switches between the two states. Here, we focus on understanding the function and possible evolution of a molecular sensor that enables P. protegens to detect the insect environment and produce a potent insecticidal toxin specifically during insect infection but not on roots. By using quantitative single cell microscopy and mutant analysis, we provide evidence that the sensor histidine kinase FitF is a key regulator of insecticidal toxin production. Our experimental data and bioinformatic analyses indicate that FitF shares a sensing domain with DctB, a histidine kinase regulating carbon uptake in Proteobacteria. This suggested that FitF has acquired its specificity through domain shuffling from a common ancestor. We constructed a chimeric DctB-FitF protein and showed that it is indeed functional in regulating toxin expression in P. protegens. The shuffling event and subsequent adaptive modifications of the recruited sensor domain were critical for the microorganism to express its potent insect toxin in the observed host-specific manner. Inhibition of the FitF sensor during root colonization could explain the mechanism by which P. protegens differentiates between the plant and insect host. Our study establishes FitF of P. protegens as a prime model for molecular evolution of sensor proteins and bacterial pathogenicity. PMID:24586167

  14. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Shu-Ting; Chang, Hsing-Hua; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Kamilova, Faina; Lugtenberg, Ben; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN). This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating salt stress for its plant host. To investigate the genetic mechanisms that may explain these observations, we determined the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, examined its gene content, and performed comparative genomics analysis with other Pseudomonas strains. The genome of P. fluorescens PCL1751 consisted of one circular chromosome that is 6,143,950 base-pairs (bp) in size; no plasmid was found. The annotation included 19 rRNA, 70 tRNA, and 5,534 protein-coding genes. The gene content analysis identified a large number of genes involved in chemotaxis and motility, colonization of the rhizosphere, siderophore biosynthesis, and osmoprotectant production. In contrast, the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of phytohormones or antibiotics were not found. Comparison with other Pseudomonas genomes revealed extensive variations in their genome size and gene content. The presence and absence of secretion system genes were highly variable. As expected, the synteny conservation among strains decreased as a function of phylogenetic divergence. The integration of prophages appeared to be an important driver for genome rearrangements. The whole-genome gene content analysis of this plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) provided some genetic explanations to its phenotypic characteristics. The extensive and versatile substrate utilization pathways, together with the presence of many genes involved in competitive root colonization, provided further support for the finding

  15. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host.

    PubMed

    Cho, Shu-Ting; Chang, Hsing-Hua; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Kamilova, Faina; Lugtenberg, Ben; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN). This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating salt stress for its plant host. To investigate the genetic mechanisms that may explain these observations, we determined the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, examined its gene content, and performed comparative genomics analysis with other Pseudomonas strains. The genome of P. fluorescens PCL1751 consisted of one circular chromosome that is 6,143,950 base-pairs (bp) in size; no plasmid was found. The annotation included 19 rRNA, 70 tRNA, and 5,534 protein-coding genes. The gene content analysis identified a large number of genes involved in chemotaxis and motility, colonization of the rhizosphere, siderophore biosynthesis, and osmoprotectant production. In contrast, the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of phytohormones or antibiotics were not found. Comparison with other Pseudomonas genomes revealed extensive variations in their genome size and gene content. The presence and absence of secretion system genes were highly variable. As expected, the synteny conservation among strains decreased as a function of phylogenetic divergence. The integration of prophages appeared to be an important driver for genome rearrangements. The whole-genome gene content analysis of this plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) provided some genetic explanations to its phenotypic characteristics. The extensive and versatile substrate utilization pathways, together with the presence of many genes involved in competitive root colonization, provided further support for the finding

  16. Global control of GacA in secondary metabolism, primary metabolism, secretion systems, and motility in the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xue; Huang, Xianqing; Tang, Lulu; Wu, Daqiang; Xu, Yuquan

    2013-08-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18 can produce a broad spectrum of secondary metabolites, including the antibiotics pyoluteorin (Plt) and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), hydrogen cyanide, and the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin. The antibiotic biosynthesis of M18 is coordinately controlled by multiple distinct regulatory pathways, of which the GacS/GacA system activates Plt biosynthesis but strongly downregulates PCA biosynthesis. Here, we investigated the global influence of a gacA mutation on the M18 transcriptome and related metabolic and physiological processes. Transcriptome profiling revealed that the transcript levels of 839 genes, which account for approximately 15% of the annotated genes in the M18 genome, were significantly influenced by the gacA mutation during the early stationary growth phase of M18. Most secondary metabolic gene clusters, such as pvd, pch, plt, amb, and hcn, were activated by GacA. The GacA regulon also included genes encoding extracellular enzymes and cytochrome oxidases. Interestingly, the primary metabolism involved in the assimilation and metabolism of phosphorus, sulfur, and nitrogen sources was also notably regulated by GacA. Another important category of the GacA regulon was secretion systems, including H1, H2, and H3 (type VI secretion systems [T6SSs]), Hxc (T2SS), and Has and Apr (T1SSs), and CupE and Tad pili. More remarkably, GacA inhibited swimming, swarming, and twitching motilities. Taken together, the Gac-initiated global regulation, which was mostly mediated through multiple regulatory systems or factors, was mainly involved in secondary and primary metabolism, secretion systems, motility, etc., contributing to ecological or nutritional competence, ion homeostasis, and biocontrol in M18. PMID:23708134

  17. Global Control of GacA in Secondary Metabolism, Primary Metabolism, Secretion Systems, and Motility in the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xue; Tang, Lulu; Wu, Daqiang

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18 can produce a broad spectrum of secondary metabolites, including the antibiotics pyoluteorin (Plt) and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), hydrogen cyanide, and the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin. The antibiotic biosynthesis of M18 is coordinately controlled by multiple distinct regulatory pathways, of which the GacS/GacA system activates Plt biosynthesis but strongly downregulates PCA biosynthesis. Here, we investigated the global influence of a gacA mutation on the M18 transcriptome and related metabolic and physiological processes. Transcriptome profiling revealed that the transcript levels of 839 genes, which account for approximately 15% of the annotated genes in the M18 genome, were significantly influenced by the gacA mutation during the early stationary growth phase of M18. Most secondary metabolic gene clusters, such as pvd, pch, plt, amb, and hcn, were activated by GacA. The GacA regulon also included genes encoding extracellular enzymes and cytochrome oxidases. Interestingly, the primary metabolism involved in the assimilation and metabolism of phosphorus, sulfur, and nitrogen sources was also notably regulated by GacA. Another important category of the GacA regulon was secretion systems, including H1, H2, and H3 (type VI secretion systems [T6SSs]), Hxc (T2SS), and Has and Apr (T1SSs), and CupE and Tad pili. More remarkably, GacA inhibited swimming, swarming, and twitching motilities. Taken together, the Gac-initiated global regulation, which was mostly mediated through multiple regulatory systems or factors, was mainly involved in secondary and primary metabolism, secretion systems, motility, etc., contributing to ecological or nutritional competence, ion homeostasis, and biocontrol in M18. PMID:23708134

  18. Roles of Rhizoxin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol in Suppression of Fusarium spp. by the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases and produces at least 10 different secondary metabolites, including several with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutatio...

  19. Metabolic and Transcriptomic Changes Induced in Arabidopsis by the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SS1011[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    van de Mortel, Judith E.; de Vos, Ric C.H.; Dekkers, Ester; Pineda, Ana; Guillod, Leandre; Bouwmeester, Klaas; van Loon, Joop J.A.; Dicke, Marcel; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic resistance induced in plants by nonpathogenic rhizobacteria is typically effective against multiple pathogens. Here, we show that root-colonizing Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 (Pf.SS101) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) against several bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) and the insect pest Spodoptera exigua. Transcriptomic analysis and bioassays with specific Arabidopsis mutants revealed that, unlike many other rhizobacteria, the Pf.SS101-induced resistance response to Pst is dependent on salicylic acid signaling and not on jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling. Genome-wide transcriptomic and untargeted metabolomic analyses showed that in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis plants treated with Pf.SS101, approximately 1,910 genes and 50 metabolites were differentially regulated relative to untreated plants. Integration of both sets of “omics” data pointed to a prominent role of camalexin and glucosinolates in the Pf.SS101-induced resistance response. Subsequent bioassays with seven Arabidopsis mutants (myb51, cyp79B2cyp79B3, cyp81F2, pen2, cyp71A12, cyp71A13, and myb28myb29) disrupted in the biosynthesis pathways for these plant secondary metabolites showed that camalexin and glucosinolates are indeed required for the induction of Pst resistance by Pf.SS101. Also for the insect S. exigua, the indolic glucosinolates appeared to play a role in the Pf.SS101-induced resistance response. This study provides, to our knowledge for the first time, insight into the substantial biochemical and temporal transcriptional changes in Arabidopsis associated with the salicylic acid-dependent resistance response induced by specific rhizobacteria. PMID:23073694

  20. Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strains with only Few Plant-Beneficial Properties Are Favored in the Maize Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Vacheron, Jordan; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Dubost, Audrey; Gonçalves-Martins, Maximilien; Muller, Daniel; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhance plant health and growth using a variety of traits. Effective PGPR strains typically exhibit multiple plant-beneficial properties, but whether they are better adapted to the rhizosphere than PGPR strains with fewer plant-beneficial properties is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that strains with higher numbers of plant-beneficial properties would be preferentially selected by plant roots. To this end, the co-occurrence of 18 properties involved in enhanced plant nutrition, plant hormone modulation, or pathogen inhibition was analyzed by molecular and biochemical methods in a collection of maize rhizosphere and bulk soil isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas. Twelve plant-beneficial properties were found among the 698 isolates. Contrarily to expectation, maize preferentially selected pseudomonads with low numbers of plant-beneficial properties (up to five). This selection was not due to the predominance of strains with specific assortments of these properties, or with specific taxonomic status. Therefore, the occurrence of only few plant-beneficial properties appeared favorable for root colonization by pseudomonads. PMID:27610110

  1. Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strains with only Few Plant-Beneficial Properties Are Favored in the Maize Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Vacheron, Jordan; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Dubost, Audrey; Gonçalves-Martins, Maximilien; Muller, Daniel; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhance plant health and growth using a variety of traits. Effective PGPR strains typically exhibit multiple plant-beneficial properties, but whether they are better adapted to the rhizosphere than PGPR strains with fewer plant-beneficial properties is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that strains with higher numbers of plant-beneficial properties would be preferentially selected by plant roots. To this end, the co-occurrence of 18 properties involved in enhanced plant nutrition, plant hormone modulation, or pathogen inhibition was analyzed by molecular and biochemical methods in a collection of maize rhizosphere and bulk soil isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas. Twelve plant-beneficial properties were found among the 698 isolates. Contrarily to expectation, maize preferentially selected pseudomonads with low numbers of plant-beneficial properties (up to five). This selection was not due to the predominance of strains with specific assortments of these properties, or with specific taxonomic status. Therefore, the occurrence of only few plant-beneficial properties appeared favorable for root colonization by pseudomonads. PMID:27610110

  2. Transcription factors WRKY70 and WRKY11 served as regulators in rhizobacterium Bacillus cereus AR156-induced systemic resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun-Hao; Huang, Zi-Yang; Xie, Ping; Gu, Chun; Li, Ke; Wang, Da-Chen; Yu, Yi-Yang; Fan, Zhi-Hang; Wang, Chun-Juan; Wang, Yun-Peng; Guo, Ya-Hui; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The activation of both the SA and JA/ETsignalling pathways may lead to more efficient general and broad resistance to Pst DC3000 by non-pathogenic rhizobacteria. However, the mechanisms that govern this simultaneous activation are unclear. Using Arabidopsis as a model system, two transcription factors, WRKY11 and WRKY70, were identified as important regulators involved in Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) triggered by Bacillus cereus AR156. The results revealed that AR156 treatment significantly stimulated the transcription of WRKY70, but suppressed that of WRKY11 in Arabidopsis leaves. Furthermore, they were shown to be required for AR156 enhancing the activation of cellular defence responses and the transcription level of the plant defence response gene. Overexpression of the two transcription factors in Arabidopsis also showed that they were essential for AR156 to elicit ISR. AR156-triggered ISR was completely abolished in the double mutant of the two transcription factors, but still partially retained in the single mutants, indicating that the regulation of the two transcription factors depend on two different pathways. The target genes of the two transcription factors and epistasis analysis suggested that WRKY11 regulated AR156-triggered ISR through activating the JA signalling pathway, and WRKY70 regulated the ISR through activating the SA signalling pathway. In addition, both WRKY11 and WRKY70 modulated AR156-triggered ISR in a NPR1-dependent manner. In conclusion, WRKY11 and WRKY70 played an important role in regulating the signalling transduction pathways involved in AR156-triggered ISR. This study is the first to illustrate the mechanism by which a single rhizobacterium elicits ISR by simultaneously activating both the SA and JA/ET signalling pathways. PMID:26433201

  3. Root-Secreted Malic Acid Recruits Beneficial Soil Bacteria1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Thimmaraju; Czymmek, Kirk J.; Paré, Paul W.; Bais, Harsh P.

    2008-01-01

    Beneficial soil bacteria confer immunity against a wide range of foliar diseases by activating plant defenses, thereby reducing a plant's susceptibility to pathogen attack. Although bacterial signals have been identified that activate these plant defenses, plant metabolites that elicit rhizobacterial responses have not been demonstrated. Here, we provide biochemical evidence that the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate l-malic acid (MA) secreted from roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) selectively signals and recruits the beneficial rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis FB17 in a dose-dependent manner. Root secretions of l-MA are induced by the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst DC3000) and elevated levels of l-MA promote binding and biofilm formation of FB17 on Arabidopsis roots. The demonstration that roots selectively secrete l-MA and effectively signal beneficial rhizobacteria establishes a regulatory role of root metabolites in recruitment of beneficial microbes, as well as underscores the breadth and sophistication of plant-microbial interactions. PMID:18820082

  4. Plant growth promoting rhizobacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Weston, David

    2015-08-11

    The present invention is directed to the Pseudomonas fluorescens strain GM30 deposited under ATCC Accession No. PTA-13340, compositions containing the GM30 strain, and methods of using the GM30 strain to enhance plant growth and/or enhance plant resistance to pathogens.

  5. Epistatic interactions between ancestral genotype and beneficial mutations shape evolvability in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Danna R; Toll-Riera, Macarena; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-07-01

    The idea that interactions between mutations influence adaptation by driving populations to low and high fitness peaks on adaptive landscapes is deeply ingrained in evolutionary theory. Here, we investigate the impact of epistasis on evolvability by challenging populations of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones bearing different initial mutations (in rpoB conferring rifampicin resistance, and the type IV pili gene network) to adaptation to a medium containing l-serine as the sole carbon source. Despite being initially indistinguishable in fitness, populations founded by the two ancestral genotypes reached different fitness following 300 generations of evolution. Genome sequencing revealed that the difference could not be explained by acquiring mutations in different targets of selection; the majority of clones from both ancestors converged on one of the following two strategies: (1) acquiring mutations in either PA2449 (gcsR, an l-serine-metabolism RpoN enhancer binding protein) or (2) protease genes. Additionally, populations from both ancestors converged on loss-of-function mutations in the type IV pili gene network, either due to ancestral or acquired mutations. No compensatory or reversion mutations were observed in RNA polymerase (RNAP) genes, in spite of the large fitness costs typically associated with mutations in rpoB. Although current theory points to sign epistasis as the dominant constraint on evolvability, these results suggest that the role of magnitude epistasis in constraining evolvability may be underappreciated. The contribution of magnitude epistasis is likely to be greatest under the biologically relevant mutation supply rates that make back mutations probabilistically unlikely. PMID:27230588

  6. LasI/R and RhlI/R Quorum Sensing in a Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Beneficial to Plants▿

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Laura; Bertani, Iris; De Sordi, Luisa; Schwager, Stephan; Eberl, Leo; Venturi, Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses three quorum-sensing (QS) systems which are key in the expression of a large number of genes, including many virulence factors. Most studies of QS in P. aeruginosa have been performed in clinical isolates and have therefore focused on its role in pathogenicity. P. aeruginosa, however, is regarded as a ubiquitous organism capable of colonizing many different environments and also of establishing beneficial associations with plants. In this study we examined the role of the two N-acyl homoserine lactone systems known as RhlI/R and LasI/R in the environmental rice rhizosphere isolate P. aeruginosa PUPa3. Both the Rhl and Las systems are involved in the regulation of plant growth-promoting traits. The environmental P. aeruginosa PUPa3 is pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models, and only the double las rhl mutants are attenuated for virulence. In fact it was established that the two QS systems are not hierarchically organized and that they are both important for the colonization of the rice rhizosphere. This is an in-depth genetic and molecular study of QS in an environmental P. aeruginosa strain and highlights several differences with QS regulation in the clinical isolate PAO1. PMID:19525275

  7. Soil components mitigate the antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles towards a beneficial soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6.

    PubMed

    Calder, Alyssa J; Dimkpa, Christian O; McLean, Joan E; Britt, David W; Johnson, William; Anderson, Anne J

    2012-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are widely used for their antimicrobial activity and consequently the particles will become environmental contaminants. This study evaluated in sand and soil matrices the toxicity of 10nm spherical Ag NPs (1 and 3 mg Ag/L) toward a beneficial soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. In sand, both NP doses resulted in loss in bacterial culturability whereas in a loam soil, no cell death was observed. Amendments of sand with clays (30% v/v kaolinite or bentonite) did not protect the bacterium when challenged with Ag NPs. However, culturability of the bacterium was maintained when the Ag NP-amended sand was mixed with soil pore water or humic acid. Imaging by atomic force microscopy revealed aggregation of single nanoparticles in water, and their embedding into background material when suspended in pore water and humic acids. Zeta potential measurements supported aggregation and surface charge modifications with pore water and humic acids. Measurement of soluble Ag in the microcosms and geochemical modeling to deduce the free ion concentration revealed bacterial culturability was governed by the predicted free Ag ion concentrations. Our study confirmed the importance of Ag NPs as a source of ions and illustrated that processes accounting for protection in soil against Ag NPs involved distinct NP- and ion-effects. Processes affecting NP bioactivity involved surface charge changes due to sorption of Ca²⁺ from the pore water leading to agglomeration and coating of the NPs with humic acid and other organic materials. Removal of bioactive ions included the formation of soluble Ag complexes with dissolved organic carbon and precipitation of Ag ions with chloride in pore water. We conclude that mitigation of toxicity of Ag NPs in soils towards a soil bacterium resides in several interactions that differentially involve protection from the Ag NPs or the ions they produce. PMID:22591989

  8. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for Nitrogen Fixation and its Application to Improve Plant Growth under Nitrogen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Setten, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Fox, Ana Romina; Lisi, Christian; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Pagano, Elba; Díaz-Paleo, Antonio; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops. PMID:23675499

  9. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE AGGA LOCUS INVOLVED IN AGGLUTINATION ND ADHERENCE OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA, A BENEFICIAL FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONAD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An isolate of Pseudomonas putida, which rapidly adheres to plant roots is agglutinated by a glycoprotein from root surfaces. gglutination is presented and adherence to the root surface is diminished by Tn5 insertion in mutant 5123. wo cosmid clones from wild type P putida and 2.7...

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM 223

    PubMed Central

    Roquigny, Roxane; Arseneault, Tanya; Gadkar, Vijay J.; Novinscak, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM 223 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with biocontrol activity against various plant pathogens. It produces the antimicrobial metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is involved in the biocontrol of Streptomyces scabies, the causal agent of common scab of potato. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. fluorescens LBUM 223. PMID:25953163

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM223.

    PubMed

    Roquigny, Roxane; Arseneault, Tanya; Gadkar, Vijay J; Novinscak, Amy; Joly, David L; Filion, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM223 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with biocontrol activity against various plant pathogens. It produces the antimicrobial metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is involved in the biocontrol of Streptomyces scabies, the causal agent of common scab of potato. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. fluorescens LBUM223. PMID:25953163

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636, a Strain with Biocontrol Capabilities against Late Blight of Potato

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Christopher K.; Novinscak, Amy; Gadkar, Vijay J.; Joly, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Herein provided is the full-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636. This strain is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) which produces phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, an antibiotic involved in the biocontrol of numerous plant pathogens, including late blight of potato caused by the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. PMID:27231373

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636, a Strain with Biocontrol Capabilities against Late Blight of Potato.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Christopher K; Novinscak, Amy; Gadkar, Vijay J; Joly, David L; Filion, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Herein provided is the full-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636. This strain is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) which produces phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, an antibiotic involved in the biocontrol of numerous plant pathogens, including late blight of potato caused by the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. PMID:27231373

  14. The rhizobacterium Arthrobacter agilis produces dimethylhexadecylamine, a compound that inhibits growth of phytopathogenic fungi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Becerra, Crisanto; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes I; López-Bucio, José; Flores-Cortez, Idolina; Santoyo, Gustavo; Hernández-Soberano, Christian; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    Plant diseases caused by fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea and the oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi affect agricultural production worldwide. Control of these pests can be done by the use of fungicides such as captan, which may have deleterious effects on human health. This study demonstrates that the rhizobacterium Arthrobacter agilis UMCV2 produces volatile organic compounds that inhibit the growth of B. cinerea in vitro. A single compound from the volatile blends, namely dimethylhexadecylamine (DMHDA), could inhibit the growth of both B. cinerea and P. cinnamomi when supplied to the growth medium in low concentrations. DMHDA also inhibited the growth of beneficial fungi Trichoderma virens and Trichoderma atroviride but at much higher concentrations. DMHDA-related aminolipids containing 4, 8, 10, 12, and 14 carbons in the alkyl chain were tested for their inhibitory effect on the growth of the pathogens. The results show that the most active compound from those tested was dimethyldodecylamine. This effect correlates with a decrease in the number of membrane lipids present in the mycelium of the pathogen including eicosanoic acid, (Z)-9-hexadecenoic acid, methyl ester, and (Z)-9-octadecenoic acid, methyl ester. Strawberry leaflets treated with DMHDA were not injured by the compound. These data indicate that DMHDA and related compounds, which can be produced by microorganisms may effectively inhibit the proliferation of certain plant pathogens. PMID:23674267

  15. Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid via the Indole-3-Acetamide Pathway in the Plant-Beneficial Bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 Is Inhibited by ZnO Nanoparticles but Enhanced by CuO Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jia; McLean, Joan E.; Britt, David W.; Zhan, Jixun; Anderson, Anne J.

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 produces indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a plant growth regulator. However, the pathway involved in IAA production in this bacterium has not been reported. In this paper we describe the involvement of the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) pathway in IAA production in P. chlororaphis O6 and the effects of CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). Sublethal levels of CuO and ZnO NPs differentially affected the levels of IAA secreted in medium containing tryptophan as the precursor. After 15 h of growth, CuO NP-exposed cells had metabolized more tryptophan than the control and ZnO NP-challenged cells. The CuO NP-treated cells produced higher IAA levels than control cultures lacking NPs. In contrast, ZnO NPs inhibited IAA production. Mixing of CuO and ZnO NPs resulted in an intermediate level of IAA production relative to the levels in the separate CuO and ZnO NP treatments. The effect of CuO NPs on IAA levels could be duplicated by ions at the concentrations released from the NPs. However, ion release did not account for the inhibition caused by the ZnO NPs. The mechanism underlying changes in IAA levels cannot be accounted for by effects on transcript accumulation from genes encoding a tryptophan permease or the IAM hydrolase in 15-h cultures. These findings raise the issue of whether sublethal doses of NPs would modify the beneficial effects of association between plants and bacteria. PMID:22210218

  16. Construction of a heterologous gene expression system in the banana rhizobacterium strain GW-3 and its colonization ability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuguang; Xia, Qiyu; Zhang, He; Lu, Xuehua; Sun, Jianbo; Zhang, Xin

    2014-03-01

    Rhizobacteria inhabiting the rhizosphere are beneficial to their host plants, and can potentially serve as biocontrol agents to control plant diseases. We isolated the rhizobacterium strain GW-3, which was the dominant bacterium in the rhizosphere soils of healthy banana plants. Then, we constructed an expression system with a kanamycin resistance gene to express a heterologous protein in GW-3. Using the green fluorescent protein gene as the reporter, we monitored expression of the heterologous protein by detecting fluorescence intensity and conducting western blot analyses. The standard fluorescence intensity of the recombinant strain reached 1,482 ± 3.49 RFU. To study the colonization ability of GW-3, we inoculated this bacterium into sterilized and unsterilized rhizosphere soils and monitored the bacterial population over 25 days. The populations of GW-3 in rhizosphere soils first increased, then decreased, and finally reached a balance. Laser scanning confocal microscope analyses of fluorescence in banana roots after inoculation with GW-3 confirmed that the recombinant GW-3 strain stably colonized banana root surfaces. Analyses of the bacterial population in unsterilized rhizosphere soils showed that the recombinant GW-3 strain was still the dominant bacterium in banana rhizosphere soils at 25 days after inoculation. Together, these results showed that this expression system can be used to express a heterologous protein at high levels in a dominant rhizobacterium. By incorporating relevant resistance genes into the expression system, this method could be used to genetically engineer GW-3 to control banana wilt disease. PMID:24081912

  17. Comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance, immunofluorescent colony staining, and a transgenic marker (bioluminescence) for monitoring the environmental fate of rhizobacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffee, W F; Bauske, E M; van Vuurde, J W; van der Wolf, J M; van den Brink, M; Kloepper, J W

    1997-01-01

    Field releases of the wild-type plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens 89B-27, its bioluminescent derivative GEM-8 (89B-27::Tn4431), and a spontaneous rifampin-resistant variant estimating the wild-type population. Seed and root samples were taken 0, 7, 14, 21, or 28, 35 or 42, and 70 days after planting in each year and processed for enumeration by spiral plating or immunofluorescent colony staining (IFC). In both years, the populations of 89B-27, R34, and GEM-8, as measured by IFC, were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from each other at each sampling time. However, the populations of R34 and GEM-8, as measured by spiral plating and differentiation based on their respective phenotypes, were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the wild-type populations and their IFC-determined populations. These data indicate that traditional marker systems may underestimate populations and hence the survival and colonization of genetically marked bacteria. PMID:9097457

  18. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS006.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Bernal, Johan F; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:26607897

  19. Effects of a rhizobacterium on the growth of and chromium remediation by Lemna minor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Yan; Ma, Jiong

    2015-07-01

    Duckweed has shown great potential for both energy and environmental applications, particularly in wastewater treatment and fuel ethanol production. A rhizobacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. MH3, has been reported to associate with the duckweed Lemna minor for symbiotic growth. The aim of this work is to study the effects of rhizobacterium MH3 on L. minor growth and chromium (Cr) remediation. It appeared to have a synergism between the rhizobacterium MH3 and duckweed; the presence of strain MH3 promoted the growth of duckweeds by increasing both the frond number and dry weight of duckweed by more than 30%, while duckweed in turn provided essential carbon source and energy for the growth of rhizobacterium MH3. Under Cr(VI) exposure, particularly at higher Cr(VI) concentrations, Exiguobacterium sp. MH3 significantly alleviated the harmful effects of the stress on the duckweed by promoting duckweed growth and preventing duckweed from excessive uptake of Cr. Potential mechanisms were also discussed in light of the genome sequence of strain MH3, and it was speculated that siderophores and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) secreted by strain MH3 might contribute to promoting duckweed growth. PMID:25631740

  20. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS006

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Bernal, Johan F.; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:26607897

  1. Genome Analysis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Subsp. plantarum UCMB5113: A Rhizobacterium That Improves Plant Growth and Stress Management

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Adnan; Manzoor, Shahid; Asari, Shashidar; Bejai, Sarosh; Meijer, Johan; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain UCMB5113 is a Gram-positive rhizobacterium that can colonize plant roots and stimulate plant growth and defense based on unknown mechanisms. This reinforcement of plants may provide protection to various forms of biotic and abiotic stress. To determine the genetic traits involved in the mechanism of plant-bacteria association, the genome sequence of UCMB5113 was obtained by assembling paired-end Illumina reads. The assembled chromosome of 3,889,532 bp was predicted to encode 3,656 proteins. Genes that potentially contribute to plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, acetoin synthesis and siderophore production were identified. Moreover, annotation identified putative genes responsible for non-ribosomal synthesis of secondary metabolites and genes supporting environment fitness of UCMB5113 including drug and metal resistance. A large number of genes encoding a diverse set of secretory proteins, enzymes of primary and secondary metabolism and carbohydrate active enzymes were found which reflect a high capacity to degrade various rhizosphere macromolecules. Additionally, many predicted membrane transporters provides the bacterium with efficient uptake capabilities of several nutrients. Although, UCMB5113 has the possibility to produce antibiotics and biosurfactants, the protective effect of plants to pathogens seems to be indirect and due to priming of plant induced systemic resistance. The availability of the genome enables identification of genes and their function underpinning beneficial interactions of UCMB5113 with plants. PMID:25119988

  2. Application of Pseudomonas fluorescens to Blackberry under Field Conditions Improves Fruit Quality by Modifying Flavonoid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Seco, Daniel; Zhang, Yang; Gutierrez-Mañero, Francisco J.; Martin, Cathie; Ramos-Solano, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Application of a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR), Pseudomonas fluorescens N21.4, to roots of blackberries (Rubus sp.) is part of an optimised cultivation practice to improve yields and quality of fruit throughout the year in this important fruit crop. Blackberries are especially rich in flavonoids and therefore offer potential benefits for human health in prevention or amelioration of chronic diseases. However, the phenylpropanoid pathway and its regulation during ripening have not been studied in detail, in this species. PGPR may trigger flavonoid biosynthesis as part of an induced systemic response (ISR) given the important role of this pathway in plant defence, to cause increased levels of flavonoids in the fruit. We have identified structural genes encoding enzymes of the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid biosynthetic pathways catalysing the conversion of phenylalanine to the final products including flavonols, anthocyanins and catechins from blackberry, and regulatory genes likely involved in controlling the activity of pathway branches. We have also measured the major flavonols, anthocyanins and catechins at three stages during ripening. Our results demonstrate the coordinated expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes with the accumulation of anthocyanins, catechins, and flavonols in developing fruits of blackberry. Elicitation of blackberry plants by treatment of roots with P.fluorescens N21.4, caused increased expression of some flavonoid biosynthetic genes and an accompanying increase in the concentration of selected flavonoids in fruits. Our data demonstrate the physiological mechanisms involved in the improvement of fruit quality by PGPR under field conditions, and highlight some of the genetic targets of elicitation by beneficial bacteria. PMID:26559418

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pantoea sp. Strain AS-PWVM4

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Indu; Kaur, Sukhvir; Devi, Usha; Kumar, Navinder; Sharma, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Nonpathogenic Pantoea spp. have been shown to confer biofertilizer and biocontrol activities, indicating their potential for increasing crop yield. Herein, we provide the high-quality genome sequence of Pantoea sp. strain AS-PWVM4, a Gram-negative motile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium isolated from a pomegranate plant. The 4.9-Mb genome contains genes related to plant growth promotion and the synthesis of siderophores. PMID:24309733

  4. dRNA-Seq Reveals Genomewide TSSs and Noncoding RNAs of Plant Beneficial Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ben; Förstner, Konrad; Vogel, Jörg; Borriss, Rainer; Wu, Xiao-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum FZB42 is a representative of Gram-positive plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that inhabit plant root environments. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms of bacteria-plant symbiosis, we have systematically analyzed the primary transcriptome of strain FZB42 grown under rhizosphere-mimicking conditions using differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq). Our analysis revealed 4,877 transcription start sites for protein-coding genes, identified genes differentially expressed under different growth conditions, and corrected many previously mis-annotated genes. We also identified a large number of riboswitches and cis-encoded antisense RNAs, as well as trans-encoded small noncoding RNAs that may play important roles in the gene regulation of Bacillus. Overall, our analyses provided a landscape of Bacillus primary transcriptome and improved the knowledge of rhizobacteria-host interactions. PMID:26540162

  5. A Novel Interaction between Plant-Beneficial Rhizobacteria and Roots: Colonization Induces Corn Resistance against the Root Herbivore Diabrotica speciosa

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Franciele; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G. V.; Paré, Paul W.; Sanches, Patrícia A.; Kamiya, Aline C.; Tonelli, Mateus; Nardi, Cristiane; Bento, José Mauricio S.

    2014-01-01

    A number of soil-borne microorganisms, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria, establish mutualistic interactions with plants, which can indirectly affect other organisms. Knowledge of the plant-mediated effects of mutualistic microorganisms is limited to aboveground insects, whereas there is little understanding of what role beneficial soil bacteria may play in plant defense against root herbivory. Here, we establish that colonization by the beneficial rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense affects the host selection and performance of the insect Diabrotica speciosa. Root larvae preferentially orient toward the roots of non-inoculated plants versus inoculated roots and gain less weight when feeding on inoculated plants. As inoculation by A. brasilense induces higher emissions of (E)-β-caryophyllene compared with non-inoculated plants, it is plausible that the non-preference of D. speciosa for inoculated plants is related to this sesquiterpene, which is well known to mediate belowground insect-plant interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a beneficial rhizobacterium inoculant indirectly alters belowground plant-insect interactions. The role of A. brasilense as part of an integrative pest management (IPM) program for the protection of corn against the South American corn rootworm, D. speciosa, is considered. PMID:25405495

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of a Biocontrol Rhizobacterium, Chryseobacterium kwangjuense Strain KJ1R5, Isolated from Pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Hongjae; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Mannaa, Mohamed; Sang, Mee Kyung; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Ki Deok

    2016-01-01

    Strain KJ1R5 of the rhizobacterium ITALIC! Chryseobacterium kwangjuenseis an effective biocontrol agent against Phytophthora blight of pepper caused by a destructive soilborne oomycete, ITALIC! Phytophthora capsici Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain KJ1R5, which contains genes related to biocontrol, plant growth promotion, and environmental stress adaptation. PMID:27103726

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Biocontrol Rhizobacterium, Chryseobacterium kwangjuense Strain KJ1R5, Isolated from Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Hongjae; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Mannaa, Mohamed; Sang, Mee Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Strain KJ1R5 of the rhizobacterium Chryseobacterium kwangjuense is an effective biocontrol agent against Phytophthora blight of pepper caused by a destructive soilborne oomycete, Phytophthora capsici. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain KJ1R5, which contains genes related to biocontrol, plant growth promotion, and environmental stress adaptation. PMID:27103726

  8. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activities against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9 Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain Co1-6, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties. PMID:26272562

  10. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus methylotrophicus FKM10, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Apple Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengqiang; Hu, Xiuna; Liu, Kai; Hou, Qihui; Yang, Qianqian

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus methylotrophicus FKM10 is a strain of plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with antimicrobial activity, which was isolated from apple rhizosphere. Here, we present the genome sequence of B. methylotrophicus FKM10. Two scaffolds were finally assembled, and several functional genes related to its antimicrobial activity were discovered. PMID:26868409

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3, a Strain of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium with Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Wang, Chengqiang; Guo, Haimeng; Xia, Zhilin; Ye, Jiangping; Liu, Kai; Yang, Yanan; Hou, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hu; Wang, Jun; Du, Binghai; Ding, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of D. tsuruhatensis MTQ3. Several functional genes related to antimicrobial activity and environment adaption have been found in the genome. This is the first genome sequence of D. tsuruhatensis related to PGPR. PMID:26251486

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacillus brevis DZQ7, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Wang, Chengqiang; Hou, Xiaoyang; Xia, Zhilin; Ye, Jiangping; Liu, Kai; Liu, Hu; Wang, Jun; Guo, Haimeng; Yu, Xiaoning; Yang, Yanan; Du, Binghai; Ding, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacillus brevis DZQ7 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. brevis DZQ7. Several functional genes related to antimicrobial activity were identified in the genome. PMID:26294619

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus methylotrophicus FKM10, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Apple Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengqiang; Hu, Xiuna; Liu, Kai; Hou, Qihui; Yang, Qianqian; Ding, Yanqin; Du, Binghai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus methylotrophicus FKM10 is a strain of plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with antimicrobial activity, which was isolated from apple rhizosphere. Here, we present the genome sequence of B. methylotrophicus FKM10. Two scaffolds were finally assembled, and several functional genes related to its antimicrobial activity were discovered. PMID:26868409

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain Co1-6, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Jansson, Janet K; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties. PMID:26272562

  16. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Choi, Hye Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho; Murphy, John F.; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS) is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90–166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90–166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90–166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL) or -degrading (AiiA) genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90–166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90–166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90–166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90–166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90–166. PMID:25288945

  17. The Beneficiation of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senger, April J.

    2014-01-01

    When the challenge of adapting curriculum to meet the requirements of the Common Core State Standards were presented, this author immediately sought out the assistance of experts in another field: the school library staff. It was apparent that staff needed to practice the beneficiation of the current curriculum to meet the CCSS requirements.…

  18. Process for beneficiating coal

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, L.E.; Fox, K.M.; Herman, D.E.; McGarry, P.E.

    1982-06-01

    Mine run coal is pulverized and the extended surfaces of the coal particles are rendered hydrophobic and oilophilic by a chemical bonding and graft polymerization reaction with a water insoluble organic polymerizable monomer under peroxidation influence in a predominantly water reaction medium. The mineral ash present in the coal and particularly the iron pyrites remains hydrophilic and is separated from the polymeric organic surface bonded coal product in a water washing step wherein the washed coal floats on and is recovered from the water phase and the ash is removed with the separated wash water in a critical wash step. Excess water is removed from the beneficiated hydrophobic surface-altered coal product mechanically. The hydrophobic and oilophilic organic polymeric surface bonded coating about the coal particles is fortified by inclusion of additional unbound free fatty acids by further small additions thereof. The carboxylic acid groups present in the coal-oil product are thereafter converted to a metal soap. The beneficiated coal product can be used ''dry,'' or additional quantities of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel can be incorporated with the ''dry'' beneficiated coal product to produce a flowable fluid or liquid coal product having the rheological property of marked thixotropy. Introduction of this physically induced property into the liquid coal-oil-mixture prevents settling out of the heavier coal particles from the relatively ash-free fluid fuel composition under extended storage periods.

  19. Apparatus for beneficiating coal

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, L.E.; Fox, K.M.; Herman, D.E.; McGarry, P.E.

    1985-08-20

    Mine run coal is pulverized and the extended surfaces of the coal particles are rendered hydrophobic and oilophilic by a chemical bonding and graft polymerization reaction with a water insoluble organic polymerizable monomer under peroxidation influence in a predominantly water reaction medium. The mineral ash present in the coal and particularly the iron pyrites remains hydrophilic and is separated from the polymeric organic surface bonded coal product in a water washing step wherein the washed coal floats on and is recovered from the water phase and the ash is removed with the separated wash water in a critical wash step. Excess water is removed from the beneficiated hydrophobic surface-altered coal product mechanically. The hydrophobic and oilophilic organic polymeric surface bonded coating about the coal particles is fortified by inclusion of additional unbound free fatty acids by further small additions thereof. The carboxylic acid groups present in the coal-oil product are thereafter converted to a metal soap. The beneficiated coal product can be used ''dry'', or additional quantities of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel can be incorporated with the ''dry'' beneficiated coal product to produce a flowable fluid or liquid coal product having the rheological property of marked thixotropy. Introduction of this physically induced property into the liquid coal-oil-mixture prevents settling out of the heavier coal particles from the relatively ash-free fluid fuel composition under extended storage periods.

  20. Biological Control of Apple Anthracnose by Paenibacillus polymyxa APEC128, an Antagonistic Rhizobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Soo; Balaraju, Kotnala; Jeon, Yongho

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the suppression of the disease development of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. acutatum in harvested apples using an antagonistic rhizobacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa APEC128 (APEC128). Out of 30 bacterial isolates from apple rhizosphere screened for antagonistic activity, the most effective strain was APEC128 as inferred from the size of the inhibition zone. This strain showed a greater growth in brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth compared to other growth media. There was a reduction in anthracnose symptoms caused by the two fungal pathogens in harvested apples after their treatment with APEC128 in comparison with non-treated control. This effect is explained by the increased production of protease and amylase by APEC128, which might have inhibited mycelial growth. In apples treated with different APEC128 suspensions, the disease caused by C. gloeosporioides and C. acutatum was greatly suppressed (by 83.6% and 79%, respectively) in treatments with the concentration of 1 × 108 colony forming units (cfu)/ml compared to other lower dosages, suggesting that the suppression of anthracnose development on harvested apples is dose-dependent. These results indicated that APEC128 is one of the promising agents in the biocontrol of apple anthracnose, which might help to increase the shelf-life of apple fruit during the post-harvest period. PMID:27298600

  1. Plant methyl salicylate induces defense responses in the rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a rhizobacterium that promotes plant growth and health. Cultivation of B. subtilis with an uprooted weed on solid medium produced pleat-like architectures on colonies near the plant. To test whether plants emit signals that affect B. subtilis colony morphology, we examined the effect of plant-related compounds on colony morphology. Bacillus subtilis formed mucoid colonies specifically in response to methyl salicylate, which is a plant-defense signal released in response to pathogen infection. Methyl salicylate induced mucoid colony formation by stimulating poly-γ-glutamic acid biosynthesis, which formed enclosing capsules that protected the cells from exposure to antimicrobial compounds. Poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis depended on the DegS-DegU two-component regulatory system, which activated DegSU-dependent gene transcription in response to methyl salicylate. Bacillus subtilis did not induce plant methyl salicylate production, indicating that the most probable source of methyl salicylate in the rhizosphere is pathogen-infected plants. Methyl salicylate induced B. subtilis biosynthesis of the antibiotics bacilysin and fengycin, the latter of which exhibited inhibitory activity against the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We propose that B. subtilis may sense plants under pathogen attack via methyl salicylate, and express defense responses that protect both B. subtilis and host plants in the rhizosphere. PMID:25181478

  2. Biological Control of Apple Anthracnose by Paenibacillus polymyxa APEC128, an Antagonistic Rhizobacterium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Soo; Balaraju, Kotnala; Jeon, Yongho

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigated the suppression of the disease development of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. acutatum in harvested apples using an antagonistic rhizobacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa APEC128 (APEC128). Out of 30 bacterial isolates from apple rhizosphere screened for antagonistic activity, the most effective strain was APEC128 as inferred from the size of the inhibition zone. This strain showed a greater growth in brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth compared to other growth media. There was a reduction in anthracnose symptoms caused by the two fungal pathogens in harvested apples after their treatment with APEC128 in comparison with non-treated control. This effect is explained by the increased production of protease and amylase by APEC128, which might have inhibited mycelial growth. In apples treated with different APEC128 suspensions, the disease caused by C. gloeosporioides and C. acutatum was greatly suppressed (by 83.6% and 79%, respectively) in treatments with the concentration of 1 × 10(8) colony forming units (cfu)/ml compared to other lower dosages, suggesting that the suppression of anthracnose development on harvested apples is dose-dependent. These results indicated that APEC128 is one of the promising agents in the biocontrol of apple anthracnose, which might help to increase the shelf-life of apple fruit during the post-harvest period. PMID:27298600

  3. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  4. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Varian, Bernard J.; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M.; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:26933816

  5. Electrostatic Beneficiation of Coal

    SciTech Connect

    D. Lindquist; K. B. Tennal; M. K. Mazumder

    1998-10-29

    It was suggested in the proposal that small particles, due to low inertia, may not impact on the surfaces of the tribocharger. They would, thus, not receive charge and would not be beneficiated in the electrostatic separation. A milling process was proposed in which the small particles are stirred together with larger carrier beads producing the desired contact charge exchange. A force is necessary for removing the coal particles from the carrier beads. In copying machines electrostatic force is used to pull toner particles away horn iron carrier particles which are held back by magnetic force. Aerodynamic force is used in test instruments for measuring the charge to mass ratio on toners. A similar system of milling and removal is desired for use with the small coal particles. The carrier beads need to be made of copper rather than iron. This complicates the separation process since copper is non-magnetic. We are working on coating of iron beads with a layer of copper. Dr. Robert Engleken of Arkansas State University has supplied us with several test batches of copper-coated iron in the size range of -40 +70 mesh. ` We are currently testing whether the milling process used with the copper coated iron beads produces the desired charge on the coal particles.

  6. Beneficial uses of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.

    1991-10-01

    An overall decline in technical literacy within the American public has come at a time when technological advances are accelerating in the United States and around the world. This had led to a large communication gulf between the general public and the technologists. Nowhere is this more evident then with the topic of radiation. Regrettably, too few people know about sources of radiation, the pervasiveness, amounts, and variabilities, and do not have a true understanding of the environment in which we live. Nor do many people know that radiation has been used in beneficial ways for decades around the world. While the general public does not know of the scientific applications to which radiation has been deployed, it nevertheless had benefited tremendously from these efforts. Thanks to the well know properties of radiation, scientific ingenuity has found many uses of radiation in chemical and agricultural research, biomedical research, in the diagnoses and treatment of hundreds of types of diseases, in industrial applications, food irradiation, and many others. This paper provides a sample of the types of uses to which radiation has been used to help advance the betterment of humankind.

  7. Beneficiation of lunar ilmenite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, Joaquin

    1991-01-01

    One of the most important commodities lacking in the moon is free oxygen which is required for life and used extensively for propellent. Free oxygen, however, can be obtained by liberating it from the oxides and silicates that form the lunar rocks and regolith. Ilmenite (FeTiO3) is considered one of the leading candidates for production of oxygen because it can be reduced with a reasonable amount of energy and it is an abundant mineral in the lunar regolith and many mare basalts. In order to obtain oxygen from ilmenite, a method must be developed to beneficiate ilmenite from lunar material. Two possible techniques are electrostatic or magnetic methods. Both methods have complications because lunar ilmenite completely lacks Fe(3+). Magnetic methods were tested on eucrite meteorites, which are a good chemical simulant for low Ti mare basalts. The ilmenite yields in the experiments were always very low and the eucrite had to be crushed to xxxx. These data suggest that magnetic separation of ilmenite from fine grain lunar basalts would not be cost effective. Presently, experiments are being performed with electrostatic separators, and lunar regolith is being waited for so that simulants do not have to be employed.

  8. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia.

    PubMed

    Varian, Bernard J; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-03-15

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:26933816

  9. Pseudomonas 2007 Meeting Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas is an important genus of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the third most common nosocomial pathogen in our society, associated with chronic and eventually fatal lung disease in cystic fibrosis patients, while Pseudomonas syringae species are prominent plant pathogens. The fluorescen...

  10. Mössbauer spectroscopic study of 57Fe metabolic transformations in the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; Kovács, Krisztina; Biró, Borbála; Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő

    2014-04-01

    Preliminary 57Fe transmission Mössbauer spectroscopic data were obtained for the first time for live cells of the plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (wild-type strain Sp245) grown aerobically with 57FeIII-nitrilotriacetate (NTA) complex as a sole source of iron. The results obtained have shown that live cells actively reduce part of the assimilated iron(III) to iron(II), the latter amounting up to 33 % of total cellular iron after 18 h of growth, and 48 % after additional 3 days of storage of the dense wet cell suspension in nutrient-free saline solution in air at room temperature (measured at 80 K). The cellular iron(II) was found to be represented by two quadrupole doublets of different high-spin forms, while the parameters of the cellular iron(III) were close to those typical for bacterioferritins.

  11. Iron-regulated metabolites produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r are not required for eliciting induced systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Djavaheri, Mohammad; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Versluis, C; Meyer, J-M; Loon, L C; Bakker, Peter A H M

    2012-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r produces several iron-regulated metabolites, including the fluorescent siderophore pseudobactin (Psb374), salicylic acid (SA), and pseudomonine (Psm), a siderophore that contains a SA moiety. After purification of Psb374 from culture supernatant of WCS374r, its structure was determined following isoelectrofocusing and tandem mass spectrometry, and found to be identical to the fluorescent siderophore produced by P. fluorescens ATCC 13525. To study the role of SA and Psm production in colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana roots and in induced systemic resistance (ISR) against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) by strain WCS374r, mutants disrupted in the production of these metabolites were obtained by homologous recombination. These mutants were further subjected to transposon Tn5 mutagenesis to generate mutants also deficient in Psb374 production. The mutants behaved similar to the wild type in both their Arabidopsis rhizosphere-colonizing capacity and their ability to elicit ISR against Pst. We conclude that Psb374, SA, and Psm production by P. fluorescens WCS374r are not required for eliciting ISR in Arabidopsis. PMID:23170230

  12. Augmenting iron accumulation in cassava by the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (GBO3).

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mônica A; Medeiros, Flavio H V; Carvalho, Samuel P; Guilherme, Luiz R G; Teixeira, William D; Zhang, Huiming; Paré, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta), a major staple food in the developing world, provides a basic carbohydrate diet for over half a billion people living in the tropics. Despite the iron abundance in most soils, cassava provides insufficient iron for humans as the edible roots contain 3-12 times less iron than other traditional food crops such as wheat, maize, and rice. With the recent identification that the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (strain GB03) activates iron acquisition machinery to increase metal ion assimilation in Arabidopsis, the question arises as to whether this plant-growth promoting rhizobacterium also augments iron assimilation to increase endogenous iron levels in cassava. Biochemical analyses reveal that shoot-propagated cassava with GB03-inoculation exhibit elevated iron accumulation after 140 days of plant growth as determined by X-ray microanalysis and total foliar iron analysis. Growth promotion and increased photosynthetic efficiency were also observed for greenhouse-grown plants with GB03-exposure. These results demonstrate the potential of microbes to increase iron accumulation in an important agricultural crop and is consistent with idea that microbial signaling can regulate plant photosynthesis. PMID:26300897

  13. Augmenting iron accumulation in cassava by the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (GBO3)

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Mônica A.; Medeiros, Flavio H. V.; Carvalho, Samuel P.; Guilherme, Luiz R. G.; Teixeira, William D.; Zhang, Huiming; Paré, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta), a major staple food in the developing world, provides a basic carbohydrate diet for over half a billion people living in the tropics. Despite the iron abundance in most soils, cassava provides insufficient iron for humans as the edible roots contain 3–12 times less iron than other traditional food crops such as wheat, maize, and rice. With the recent identification that the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (strain GB03) activates iron acquisition machinery to increase metal ion assimilation in Arabidopsis, the question arises as to whether this plant-growth promoting rhizobacterium also augments iron assimilation to increase endogenous iron levels in cassava. Biochemical analyses reveal that shoot-propagated cassava with GB03-inoculation exhibit elevated iron accumulation after 140 days of plant growth as determined by X-ray microanalysis and total foliar iron analysis. Growth promotion and increased photosynthetic efficiency were also observed for greenhouse-grown plants with GB03-exposure. These results demonstrate the potential of microbes to increase iron accumulation in an important agricultural crop and is consistent with idea that microbial signaling can regulate plant photosynthesis. PMID:26300897

  14. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain PA23

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Peter C.; Villenueva, Jacylyn; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain PA23 is a plant-beneficial bacterium that is able to suppress disease caused by the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum through a process known as biological control. Here we present a 7.1-Mb assembly of the PA23 genome. PMID:25035328

  15. Pseudomonas screening assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  16. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  17. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  18. Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by bacterial genus Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Razia Alam; Rafique, Mazhar; Rehman, Abdul; Munis, Muhammad Farooq Hussain; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Chaudhary, Hassan Javed

    2016-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus pesticide commonly used in agriculture. It is noxious to a variety of organisms that include living soil biota along with beneficial arthropods, fish, birds, humans, animals, and plants. Exposure to chlorpyrifos may cause detrimental effects as delayed seedling emergence, fruit deformities, and abnormal cell division. Contamination of chlorpyrifos has been found about 24 km from the site of its application. There are many physico-chemical and biological approaches to remove organophosphorus pesticides from the ecosystem, among them most promising is biodegradation. The 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethylthiophosphate (DETP) as primary products are made when chlorpyrifos is degraded by soil microorganisms which further break into nontoxic metabolites as CO(2), H(2)O, and NH(3). Pseudomonas is a diversified genus possessing a series of catabolic pathways and enzymes involved in pesticide degradation. Pseudomonas putida MAS-1 is reported to be more efficient in chlorpyrifos degradation by a rate of 90% in 24 h among Pseudomonas genus. The current review analyzed the comparative potential of bacterial species in Pseudomonas genus for degradation of chlorpyrifos thus, expressing an ecofriendly approach for the treatment of environmental contaminants like pesticides. PMID:26837064

  19. Beneficial uses of CFB ash

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.J.; Cotton, J.L. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Coal-fired generation accounts for almost 55 percent of the electricity produced in the United States. It has been estimated that over 90 million tons of coal combustion waste by-products were generated in 1990. Currently, only 30% of coal combustion waste is recycled for various beneficial applications. The remaining waste is primarily managed in landfills and surface impoundments. Circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology will play an important role in supplying power for future load growth and Title 4 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments compliance. CFB ash by-products have many beneficial uses. This paper describes potential applications of CFB ashes based on the ash characteristics. The beneficial uses of CFB ash discussed in this study include agricultural applications, acidic waste stabilizer, ash rock, sludge stabilizer, strip mine reclamation, and structural fill.

  20. Buildings, Beneficial Microbes, and Health.

    PubMed

    Peccia, Jordan; Kwan, Sarah E

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria and fungi in buildings exert an influence on the human microbiome through aerosol deposition, surface contact, and human and animal interactions. As the identities and functions of beneficial human microbes emerge, the consequences of building design, operation, and function must be understood to maintain the health of occupants in buildings. PMID:27397930

  1. Bacteriophytochrome controls carotenoid-independent response to photodynamic stress in a non-photosynthetic rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Kateriya, Suneel; Singh, Vijay Shankar; Tanwar, Meenakshi; Agarwal, Shweta; Singh, Hina; Khurana, Jitendra Paul; Amla, Devinder Vijay; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of the role of bacteriophytochrome (BphP) in inducing carotenoid synthesis in Deinococcus radiodurans in response to light the role of BphPs in other non-photosynthetic bacteria is not clear yet. Azospirillum brasilense, a non-photosynthetic rhizobacterium, harbours a pair of BphPs out of which AbBphP1 is a homolog of AtBphP1 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. By overexpression, purification, biochemical and spectral characterization we have shown that AbBphP1 is a photochromic bacteriophytochrome. Phenotypic study of the ΔAbBphP1 mutant showed that it is required for the survival of A. brasilense on minimal medium under red light. The mutant also showed reduced chemotaxis towards dicarboxylates and increased sensitivity to the photooxidative stress. Unlike D. radiodurans, AbBphP1 was not involved in controlling carotenoid synthesis. Proteome analysis of the ΔAbBphP1 indicated that AbBphP1 is involved in inducing a cellular response that enables A. brasilense in regenerating proteins that might be damaged due to photodynamic stress. PMID:23173079

  2. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of four representative plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some Pseudomonas strains function as predominant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Within this group, Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas fluorescens are non-pathogenic biocontrol agents, and some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains are PGPR. P. chlororaphis GP72 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with a fully sequenced genome. We conducted a genomic analysis comparing GP72 with three other pseudomonad PGPR: P. fluorescens Pf-5, P. aeruginosa M18, and the nitrogen-fixing strain P. stutzeri A1501. Our aim was to identify the similarities and differences among these strains using a comparative genomic approach to clarify the mechanisms of plant growth-promoting activity. Results The genome sizes of GP72, Pf-5, M18, and A1501 ranged from 4.6 to 7.1 M, and the number of protein-coding genes varied among the four species. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) analysis assigned functions to predicted proteins. The COGs distributions were similar among the four species. However, the percentage of genes encoding transposases and their inactivated derivatives (COG L) was 1.33% of the total genes with COGs classifications in A1501, 0.21% in GP72, 0.02% in Pf-5, and 0.11% in M18. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that GP72 and Pf-5 were the most closely related strains, consistent with the genome alignment results. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences (CDSs) between GP72 and Pf-5 revealed 3544 conserved genes. There were fewer conserved genes when GP72 CDSs were compared with those of A1501 and M18. Comparisons among the four Pseudomonas species revealed 603 conserved genes in GP72, illustrating common plant growth-promoting traits shared among these PGPR. Conserved genes were related to catabolism, transport of plant-derived compounds, stress resistance, and rhizosphere colonization. Some strain-specific CDSs were related to different kinds of biocontrol activities or plant growth promotion. The GP72 genome

  4. Managing urban biosolids: Beneficial uses

    SciTech Connect

    Forste, J.B.

    1998-07-01

    Biosolids (the primarily organic product produced by wastewater treatment processes that can be beneficially recycled) are becoming a significant challenge for operators of both small and large urban wastewater facilities. More stringent water quality standards, coupled with increasingly sensitive environmental and public health considerations, have made the treatment and use/disposal of solids from treatment processes a growing and complex field of environmental management.

  5. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Croff, A.G.; Haire, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% {sup 235}U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope {sup 235}U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a {sup 235}U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved.

  6. Identification and Plant Interaction of a Phyllobacterium sp., a Predominant Rhizobacterium of Young Sugar Beet Plants.

    PubMed

    Lambert, B; Joos, H; Dierickx, S; Vantomme, R; Swings, J; Kersters, K; Van Montagu, M

    1990-04-01

    The second most abundant bacterium on the root surface of young sugar beet plants was identified as a Phyllobacterium sp. (Rhizobiaceae) based on a comparison of the results of 39 conventional identification tests, 167 API tests, 30 antibiotic susceptibility tests, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic fingerprints of total cellular proteins with type strains of Phyllobacterium myrsinacearum and Phyllobacterium rubiacearum. It was found on 198 of 1,100 investigated plants between the 2nd and 10th leaf stage on three different fields in Belgium and one field in Spain. Densities ranged from 2 x 10 to 2 x 10 CFU/g of root. Five isolates exerted a broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activity. DNA-DNA hybridizations showed that Phyllobacterium sp. does not contain DNA sequences that are homologous with the attachment genes chvA, chvB, the transferred-DNA (T-DNA) hormone genes iaaH and ipt from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, iaaM from A. tumefaciens and Pseudomonas savastanoi, or the nitrogenase genes nifHDK from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Phyllobacterium sp. produces indolylacetic acid in in vitro cultures and induces auxinlike effects when cocultivated with callus tissue of tobacco. When Phyllobacterium sp. was transformed with a Ti plasmid derivative, it gained the capacity to induce tumors on Kalanchoe daigremontiana. The potential role of Phyllobacterium sp. in this newly recognized niche is discussed. PMID:16348158

  7. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  12. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 Reveals New Insight into Antifungal Compounds Involved in Biocontrol.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Claudia E; Ramos, Cayo; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1606 is a rhizobacterium that has biocontrol activity against many soilborne phytopathogenic fungi. The whole genome sequence of this strain was obtained using the Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing platform and was assembled using SOAP denovo software. The resulting 6.66-Mb complete sequence of the PCL1606 genome was further analyzed. A comparative genomic analysis using 10 plant-associated strains within the fluorescent Pseudomonas group, including the complete genome of P. chlororaphis PCL1606, revealed a diverse spectrum of traits involved in multitrophic interactions with plants and microbes as well as biological control. Phylogenetic analysis of these strains using eight housekeeping genes clearly placed strain PCL1606 into the P. chlororaphis group. The genome sequence of P. chlororaphis PCL1606 revealed the presence of sequences that were homologous to biosynthetic genes for the antifungal compounds 2-hexyl, 5-propyl resorcinol (HPR), hydrogen cyanide, and pyrrolnitrin; this is the first report of pyrrolnitrin encoding genes in this P. chlororaphis strain. Single-, double-, and triple-insertional mutants in the biosynthetic genes of each antifungal compound were used to test their roles in the production of these antifungal compounds and in antagonism and biocontrol of two fungal pathogens. The results confirmed the function of HPR in the antagonistic phenotype and in the biocontrol activity of P. chlororaphis PCL1606. PMID:25679537

  13. Electrostatic Beneficiation of Lunar Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steve; Captain, James; Captain, Janine; Arens, Ellen; Quinn, Jacqueline; Calle, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Electrostatic beneficiation of lunar regolith is a method allowing refinement of specific minerals in the material for processing on the moon. The use of tribocharging the regolith prior to separation was investigated on the lunar simulant MLS-I by passing the dust through static mixers constructed from different materials; aluminum, copper, stainless steel, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The amount of charge acquired by the simulant was dependent upon the difference in the work function of the dust and the charging material. XPS and SEM were used to characterize the simulant after it was sieved into five size fractions (> 100 pm, 75-100 pm, 50- 75 pm, 50-25 pm, and < 25 pm), where very little difference in surface composition was observed between the sizes. Samples of the smallest (< 25 pm) and largest (> 100 pm) size fractions were beneficiated through a charge separator using the aluminum (charged the simulant negatively) and PTFE (charged positively) mixers. The mass fractions of the separated simulant revealed that for the larger particle size, significant unipolar charging was observed for both mixers, whereas for the smaller particle sizes, more bipolar charging was observed, probably due to the finer simulant adhering to the inside of the mixers shielding the dust from the charging material. Subsequent XPS analysis of the beneficiated fractions showed the larger particle size fraction having some species differentiation, but very little difference for the smaller.size. Although MLS-1 was made to have similar chemistry to actual lunar dust, its mineralogy is quite different. On-going experiments are using NASA JSC-1 lunar simulant. A vacuum chamber has been constructed, and future experiments are planned in a simulated lunar environment.

  14. Induction of Drought Tolerance in Cucumber Plants by a Consortium of Three Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Gu, Chun; Niu, Dong-Dong; Liu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Yun-Peng; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Our previous work showed that a consortium of three plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) strains (Bacillus cereus AR156, Bacillus subtilis SM21, and Serratia sp. XY21), termed as BBS for short, was a promising biocontrol agent. The present study investigated its effect on drought tolerance in cucumber plants. After withholding watering for 13 days, BBS-treated cucumber plants had much darker green leaves and substantially lighter wilt symptoms than control plants. Compared to the control, the BBS treatment decreased the leaf monodehydroascorbate (MDA) content and relative electrical conductivity by 40% and 15%, respectively; increased the leaf proline content and the root recovery intension by 3.45-fold and 50%, respectively; and also maintained the leaf chlorophyll content in cucumber plants under drought stress. Besides, in relation to the control, the BBS treatment significantly enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and mitigated the drought-triggered down-regulation of the expression of the genes cAPX, rbcL, and rbcS encoding cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxy/oxygenase (Rubisco) large and small subunits, respectively, in cucumber leaves. However, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity was undetected in none of the culture solutions of three BBS constituent strains. These results indicated that BBS conferred induced systemic tolerance to drought stress in cucumber plants, by protecting plant cells, maintaining photosynthetic efficiency and root vigor and increasing some of antioxidase activities, without involving the action of ACC deaminase to lower plant ethylene levels. PMID:23285089

  15. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Folliculitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hot Tub Rash ( Pseudomonas Folliculitis) Information for adults A ... the skin and small pus-filled lesions. Overview Hot tub rash ( Pseudomonas folliculitis) is an infection of ...

  16. Polymicrobial Ventriculitis Involving Pseudomonas fulva

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Vu, Catphuong Cathy L.; Carlson, Renee Donahue; Kraft, Colleen S.; Anderson, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Infections due to Pseudomonas fulva remain a rare but emerging concern. A case of ventriculitis due to Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas fulva following placement of an external ventricular drain is described. Similar to other reports, the organism was initially misidentified as Pseudomonas putida. The infection was successfully treated with levofloxacin. PMID:24648556

  17. Biocontrol activity of Paenibacillus polymyxa AC-1 against Pseudomonas syringae and its interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chi Eun; Kwon, Suk Yoon; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-04-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa AC-1 (AC-1) is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that has been used as a soil inoculant for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi and to promote plant growth. In this study, we examine the effects of AC-1 on the bacterial phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae and internal colonization of AC-1 by counting bacterial populations that colonize plants. AC-1 inhibited the growth of both P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) and P. syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) in a concentration-dependent manner in in vitro assays. Upon treatment of AC-1 dropping at root tip of axenically grown Arabidopsis, we found that most of the AC-1 was detected in interior of leaves of Arabidiopsis plants rather than roots after 5 days post infection, indicating systemic spreading of AC-1 occur. We examined further AC-1 colonization patterns in Arabidopsis mutants deficient in phytohormone signaling pathways. These results indicated that abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways positively and negatively contributed, respectively, to AC-1 colonization of leaves, whereas epiphytic accumulation of AC-1 around root tissues was not affected. This study shows that AC-1 is an effective biocontrol agent to suppress P. syringae growth, possibly owing to its colonization patterns as a leaf-inhabiting endophyte. The results showed in this work will help to expand our understanding of the mode of action of AC-1 as a biological control agent and consequently, its application in agriculture. PMID:26946374

  18. Pseudomonas psychrotolerans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Elke; Kämpfer, Peter; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2004-09-01

    Three yellow-pigmented, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterial strains, C36T, C37 and C39, were isolated in the Medical Clinic for Small Animals and Ungulates at the University for Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain C36T was shown to belong to the genus Pseudomonas; Pseudomonas oleovorans DSM 1045T was the nearest relative (99.5 % sequence similarity). Other Pseudomonas species shared <97 % sequence similarity with strain C36T. The presence of Q-9 as the major ubiquinone, the predominance of putrescine and spermidine in its polyamine patterns and its fatty acid profile [i.e. the predominance of C(16 : 0), summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or 2-OH C(15 : 0) iso), C(18 : 1)omega7c and the presence of 3-OH C(10 : 0), 3-OH C(12 : 0) and 2-OH C(12 : 0)] were in agreement with identification of this strain as a member of the genus Pseudomonas. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and the results of genomic fingerprinting clearly differentiated strain C36T from its phylogenetic relative P. oleovorans DSM 1045T. Results from DNA-DNA hybridization showed that strain C36T represents a species that is distinct from P. oleovorans DSM 1045T. These data demonstrate that strain C36T represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas psychrotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C36T (= LMG 21977T = DSM 15758T). Additionally, physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and genomic fingerprints indicate that P. oleovorans ATCC 29347 may not be a member of the species P. oleovorans sensu stricto. PMID:15388721

  19. Wastewater privatization: A beneficial alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeman, R.F.; Drewry, W.A.

    1999-07-01

    Municipalities with wastewater operations face increasing requirements to maximize efficiency, implement capital improvements, and ensure environmental compliance. Privatization is a relatively unused alternative offering benefits in the areas of cost-effective operations, flexible financing, technology access, and compliance assurance. Recent executive direction and tax code changes have opened new doors for mutually beneficial public-private partnerships. Wastewater privatization has historically consisted of short-term contract agreements for treatment operations, but looming infrastructure recapitalization and development requirements have catalyzed an exploration of non-traditional alternatives that include private sector financing, development, and operation of entire wastewater systems, The purpose of this paper is to show why privatization must be considered, evaluate the different levels available, and generate an analytical aid for communities taking their first look at privatization opportunities.

  20. Coal beneficiation by gas agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Meiyu, Shen

    2003-10-14

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  1. 7 CFR 1434.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., title and control of the honey and beneficial interest in the honey, as specified in 7 CFR 1434.6, must... REGULATIONS FOR HONEY § 1434.6 Beneficial interest. (a) To be eligible to receive marketing assistance loans under this part a producer must have the beneficial interest in the honey that is tendered to CCC for...

  2. 7 CFR 1434.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., title and control of the honey and beneficial interest in the honey, as specified in 7 CFR 1434.6, must... REGULATIONS FOR HONEY § 1434.6 Beneficial interest. (a) To be eligible to receive marketing assistance loans under this part a producer must have the beneficial interest in the honey that is tendered to CCC for...

  3. 7 CFR 1434.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., title and control of the honey and beneficial interest in the honey, as specified in 7 CFR 1434.6, must... REGULATIONS FOR HONEY § 1434.6 Beneficial interest. (a) To be eligible to receive marketing assistance loans under this part a producer must have the beneficial interest in the honey that is tendered to CCC for...

  4. 7 CFR 1434.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., title and control of the honey and beneficial interest in the honey, as specified in 7 CFR 1434.6, must... REGULATIONS FOR HONEY § 1434.6 Beneficial interest. (a) To be eligible to receive marketing assistance loans under this part a producer must have the beneficial interest in the honey that is tendered to CCC for...

  5. 7 CFR 1434.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., title and control of the honey and beneficial interest in the honey, as specified in 7 CFR 1434.6, must... REGULATIONS FOR HONEY § 1434.6 Beneficial interest. (a) To be eligible to receive marketing assistance loans under this part a producer must have the beneficial interest in the honey that is tendered to CCC for...

  6. Optimizing Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degradation by Flavonoid-Induced Cells of the Rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A

    PubMed Central

    Hijri, Mohamed; Sylvestre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that many plant secondary metabolites may act as signal molecules to trigger the bacterial ability to metabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during the rhizoremediation process. However, the bases for the PCB rhizoremediation process are still largely unknown. The rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A is unable to use flavanone as a growth substrate. However, on the basis of an assay that monitors the amount of 4-chlorobenzoate produced from 4-chlorobiphenyl by cells grown co-metabolically on flavanone plus sodium acetate, this flavonoid was previously found to be a potential inducer of the U23A biphenyl catabolic pathway. In this work, and using the same assay, we identified ten other flavonoids that did not support growth, but that acted as inducers of the U23A biphenyl pathway, and we confirmed flavonoid induction of the biphenyl catabolic pathway using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on the bphA gene. We also examined the effect of the growth co-substrate on flavonoid induction. Sodium acetate was replaced by glucose, mannose, sucrose, or mannitol, which are sugars found in plant root exudates. The data showed that the level of induction of strain U23A biphenyl-degrading enzymes was significantly influenced by the nature and concentration of the flavonoid in the growth medium, as well as by the substrate used for growth. Sucrose allowed for an optimal induction response for most flavonoids. Some flavonoids, such as flavone and isoflavone, were better inducers of the biphenyl catabolic enzymes than biphenyl itself. We also found that all flavonoids tested in this work were metabolized by strain U23A during co-metabolic growth, but that the metabolite profiles, as well as the level of efficiency of degradation, differed for each flavonoid. To obtain insight into how flavonoids interact with strain U23A to promote polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation, we determined the concentration of flavanone at

  7. Study of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution: Implication for the analysis of ferritin-like iron cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Tugarova, A. V.; Biró, B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Kamnev, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a comparative study of two samples of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (strain Sp245) prepared in different conditions and of human liver ferritin using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated the presence of ferritin-like iron (i.e. iron similar to that found in ferritin-like proteins) in the bacterium. Mössbauer spectra of these samples were fitted in two ways: as a rough approximation using a one quadrupole doublet fit (the homogeneous iron core model) and using a superposition of quadrupole doublets (the heterogeneous iron core model). Both results demonstrated differences in the Mössbauer parameters for mammalian ferritin and for bacterial ferritin-like iron. Moreover, some differences in the Mössbauer parameters were observed between the two samples of A. brasilense Sp245 related to the differences in their preparation conditions.

  8. Involvement of Pyochelin and Pyoverdin in Suppression of Pythium-Induced Damping-Off of Tomato by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 7NSK2

    PubMed Central

    Buysens, S.; Heungens, K.; Poppe, J.; Hofte, M.

    1996-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa 7NSK2 produces three siderophores when iron is limited: the yellow-green fluorescent pyoverdin, the salicylate derivative pyochelin, and salicylic acid. This Pseudomonas strain was shown to be an efficient antagonist of Pythium-induced damping-off. The role of pyoverdin and pyochelin in the suppression of Pythium splendens was investigated by using various siderophore-deficient mutants derived from P. aeruginosa 7NSK2 in a bioassay with tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). To provide more insight into the role of pyochelin in antagonism, mutant KMPCH, deficient in the production of pyoverdin and pyochelin, was complemented for pyochelin production. The complementing clone was further characterized by subcloning and transposon mutagenesis and used to generate a pyochelin-negative, pyoverdin-positive mutant by marker exchange. All mutants were able to reduce Pythium-induced preemergence damping-off to some extent. Production of either pyoverdin or pyochelin proved to be necessary to achieve wild-type levels of protection against Pythium-induced postemergence damping-off. Mutant KMPCH inhibited P. splendens but was less active than the parental strain. This residual protection could be due to the production of salicylic acid. Since pyoverdin and pyochelin are both siderophores, siderophore-mediated iron competition could explain the observed antagonism and the apparent interchangeability of the two compounds. We cannot, however, exclude the possibility that both siderophores act in an indirect way. PMID:16535275

  9. Induction of defense gene homologues in wheat roots during interactions with pseudomonas fluorescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens directly inhibit soilborne fungal pathogens of Triticum aestivum (wheat) during colonization of the wheat rhizosphere, but until now the impact of these beneficial bacteria on wheat gene expression was unknown. To test the hypothesis that P. fluorescens i...

  10. Beneficial trait stability in entomopathogenic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of beneficial traits such as virulence, reproductive potential, and environmental tolerance are key factors in determining an organism’s ability to produce high levels of efficacy in biological control. Deterioration or loss of beneficial traits during laboratory or industrial culture prod...

  11. Making beneficial fungi resistant to fungicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike phytopathogenic fungi such as scab and Phytophthora, some fungi that are found in the orchard are beneficial. These beneficial fungi such as Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum are natural control agents of various insect pests including the pecan weevil. However, these fungi can be...

  12. Beneficial Insects and Spiders of Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of integrated pest management programs is dependent on the availability of biological information on beneficial insects and natural enemies of agricultural pests. This cooperative effort between ARS and UAF represents the first manual on beneficial insects and natural enemies of pest...

  13. Role of Gluconic Acid Production in the Regulation of Biocontrol Traits of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0▿

    PubMed Central

    de Werra, Patrice; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2009-01-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 promotes the growth of various crop plants and protects them against root diseases caused by pathogenic fungi. The main mechanism of disease suppression by this strain is the production of the antifungal compounds 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) and pyoluteorin (PLT). Direct plant growth promotion can be achieved through solubilization of inorganic phosphates by the production of organic acids, mainly gluconic acid, which is one of the principal acids produced by Pseudomonas spp. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of gluconic acid production in CHA0. Therefore, mutants were created with deletions in the genes encoding glucose dehydrogenase (gcd) and gluconate dehydrogenase (gad), required for the conversion of glucose to gluconic acid and gluconic acid to 2-ketogluconate, respectively. These enzymes should be of predominant importance for rhizosphere-colonizing biocontrol bacteria, as major carbon sources provided by plant root exudates are made up of glucose. Our results show that the ability of strain CHA0 to acidify its environment and to solubilize mineral phosphate is strongly dependent on its ability to produce gluconic acid. Moreover, we provide evidence that the formation of gluconic acid by CHA0 completely inhibits the production of PLT and partially inhibits that of DAPG. In the Δgcd mutant, which does not produce gluconic acid, the enhanced production of antifungal compounds was associated with improved biocontrol activity against take-all disease of wheat, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. This study provides new evidence for a close association of gluconic acid metabolism with antifungal compound production and biocontrol activity in P. fluorescens CHA0. PMID:19376896

  14. [Meningoencephalitis caused by Pseudomonas cepacia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Monrás, Miriam Fina; Batlle Almodóvar, María del Carmen; González, Cernero; Tamargo Martínez, Isis; Meneses, Félix Dickinson

    2006-01-01

    A case of meningoencephalitis of bacterial etiology caused by Pseudomonas cepacia was described. The strain was received at the Reference Laboratory of Bacterial Acute Respiratory Infections of "Pedro Kouri" Institute of Tropical Medicine, where its microbiological identification was confirmed. This isolation was a finding in an adult immunocompetent patient. The evolution was favourable with no sequelae for his future life. Pseudomona cepacia has been associated with respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Patients with Pseudomonas cepacia may be asymptomatic or present fatal acute and fulminant infection. PMID:23427437

  15. Biology of Pseudomonas stutzeri

    PubMed Central

    Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar, Antoni; Bosch, Rafael; García-Valdés, Elena; Palleroni, Norberto J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is a nonfluorescent denitrifying bacterium widely distributed in the environment, and it has also been isolated as an opportunistic pathogen from humans. Over the past 15 years, much progress has been made in elucidating the taxonomy of this diverse taxonomical group, demonstrating the clonality of its populations. The species has received much attention because of its particular metabolic properties: it has been proposed as a model organism for denitrification studies; many strains have natural transformation properties, making it relevant for study of the transfer of genes in the environment; several strains are able to fix dinitrogen; and others participate in the degradation of pollutants or interact with toxic metals. This review considers the history of the discovery, nomenclatural changes, and early studies, together with the relevant biological and ecological properties, of P. stutzeri. PMID:16760312

  16. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Is a Plant Growth Promotion Factor Produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens B161

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Okhee; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Jung-Gun; Jeong, Yeonhwa; Moon, Jae Sun; Park, Chang Seuk; Hwang, Ingyu

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens B16 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium. To determine the factors involved in plant growth promotion by this organism, we mutagenized wild-type strain B16 using ΩKm elements and isolated one mutant, K818, which is defective in plant growth promotion, in a rockwool culture system. A cosmid clone, pOK40, which complements the mutant K818, was isolated from a genomic library of the parent strain. Tn3-gusA mutagenesis of pOK40 revealed that the genes responsible for plant growth promotion reside in a 13.3-kb BamHI fragment. Analysis of the DNA sequence of the fragment identified 11 putative open reading frames, consisting of seven known and four previously unidentified pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) biosynthetic genes. All of the pqq genes showed expression only in nutrient-limiting conditions in a PqqH-dependent manner. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis of culture filtrates confirmed that wild-type B16 produces PQQ, whereas mutants defective in plant growth promotion do not. Application of wild-type B16 on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants cultivated in a hydroponic culture system significantly increased the height, flower number, fruit number, and total fruit weight, whereas none of the strains that did not produce PQQ promoted tomato growth. Furthermore, 5 to 1,000 nm of synthetic PQQ conferred a significant increase in the fresh weight of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings, confirming that PQQ is a plant growth promotion factor. Treatment of cucumber leaf discs with PQQ and wild-type B16 resulted in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that PQQ acts as an antioxidant in plants. PMID:18055583

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... becoming more difficult to treat because of increasing antibiotic resistance. Selecting the right antibiotic usually requires that a ... to help educate people about Pseudomonas infections, and antibiotic resistance, and to encourage prevention activities and healthy behaviors ...

  18. Modulation of host immunity by beneficial microbes.

    PubMed

    Zamioudis, Christos; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2012-02-01

    In nature, plants abundantly form beneficial associations with soilborne microbes that are important for plant survival and, as such, affect plant biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Classical examples of symbiotic microbes are mycorrhizal fungi that aid in the uptake of water and minerals, and Rhizobium bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. Several other types of beneficial soilborne microbes, such as plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria and fungi with biological control activity, can stimulate plant growth by directly suppressing deleterious soilborne pathogens or by priming aboveground plant parts for enhanced defense against foliar pathogens or insect herbivores. The establishment of beneficial associations requires mutual recognition and substantial coordination of plant and microbial responses. A growing body of evidence suggests that beneficial microbes are initially recognized as potential invaders, after which an immune response is triggered, whereas, at later stages of the interaction, mutualists are able to short-circuit plant defense responses to enable successful colonization of host roots. Here, we review our current understanding of how symbiotic and nonsymbiotic beneficial soil microbes modulate the plant immune system and discuss the role of local and systemic defense responses in establishing the delicate balance between the two partners. PMID:21995763

  19. Regulation of expression and biochemical characterization of a beta-class carbonic anhydrase from the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simarjot; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Tripathi, Anil K

    2009-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA; [EC 4.2.1.1]) is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing the reversible hydration of CO(2) to bicarbonate, a reaction that supports various biochemical and physiological functions. Genome analysis of Azospirillum brasilense, a nonphotosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing, rhizobacterium, revealed an ORF with homology to beta-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Biochemical characteristics of the beta-class CA of A. brasilense, analysed after cloning the gene (designated as bca), overexpressing in Escherichia coli and purifying the protein by affinity purification, revealed that the native recombinant enzyme is a homotetramer, inhibited by the known CA inhibitors. CA activity in A. brasilense cell extracts, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that bca was constitutively expressed under aerobic conditions. Lower beta-galactosidase activity in A. brasilense cells harbouring bca promoter: lacZ fusion during the stationary phase or during growth on 3% CO(2) enriched air or at acidic pH indicated that the transcription of bca was downregulated by the stationary phase, elevated CO(2) levels and acidic pH conditions. These observations were also supported by RT-PCR analysis. Thus, beta-CA in A. brasilense seems to be required for scavenging CO(2) from the ambient air and the requirement of CO(2) hydration seems to be higher for the cultures growing exponentially at neutral to alkaline pH. PMID:19694814

  20. Applying carbon dioxide, plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium and EDTA can enhance the phytoremediation efficiency of ryegrass in a soil polluted with zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junkang; Feng, Renwei; Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Ruigang

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the use of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2), plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54 (PGPR) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to enhance the phytoextraction efficiency of ryegrass in response to multiple heavy metal (or metalloid)-polluted soil containing zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). All of the single or combined CO2, PGPR and EDTA treatments promoted ryegrass growth. The stimulation of ryegrass growth by CO2 and PGPR could primarily be attributed to the regulation of photosynthesis rather than decreased levels of Zn, As and Cd in the shoots. Most treatments seemed to reduce the Zn, As and Cd contents in the shoots, which might be associated with enhanced shoot biomass, thus causing a "dilution effect" regarding their levels. The combined treatments seemed to perform better than single treatments in removing Zn, As, Cd and Pb from soil, judging from the larger biomass and relatively higher total amounts (TAs) of Zn, As, Cd and Pb in both the shoots and roots. Therefore, we suggest that the CO2 plus PGPR treatment will be suitable for removing Zn, As, Cd and Pb from heavy metal (or metalloid)-polluted soils using ryegrass as a phytoremediation material. PMID:24762567

  1. Rhizobacterium-mediated growth promotion and expression of stress enzymes in Glycine max L. Merrill against Fusarium wilt upon challenge inoculation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shekhar; Vaishnav, Anukool; Kasotia, Amrita; Kumari, Sarita; Gaur, Rajarshi Kumar; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Wilt disease of soybean caused by a very common soil-borne fungus, Fusarium oxysporum is one of the most destructive diseases of the crop. The aim of the present study was to characterize plant growth-promotion activities and induced resistance of a rhizobacterial strain for the soybean plant against F. oxysporum. Rhizobacterium strain SJ-5 exhibited plant growth-promotion characteristics and antagonistic activity against the test pathogen on dual plate assay. It was identified as a Carnobacterium sp. A 950 bp PCR product was amplified from Carnobacterium sp. strain SJ-5, using zwittermicin A self-resistance gene-specific primers (zmaR). The strain produced indole 3-acetic acid (19 μg/ml) in the presence of salt stress and exhibited growth in Dworkin and Foster salt medium amended with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) through ACC deaminase activity (277 nmol/mg/h) as compared to the control. Strain seeds treated with the strain significantly enhanced the quorum of healthy plants after challenge inoculation at 14 days after seeding. An increase in the activity of stress enzymes after challenge inoculation with the test pathogen is reported. Treatment with the bacterium resulted in an increase in the chlorophyll content in the leaves in comparison with challenge-inoculated plants. PMID:23933805

  2. Mining and beneficiation of lunar ores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Williams, R. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Giles, D.

    1979-01-01

    The beneficiation of lunar plagioclase and ilmenite ores to feedstock grade permits a rapid growth of the space manufacturing economy by maximizing the production rate of metals and oxygen. A beneficiation scheme based on electrostatic and magnetic separation is preferred over conventional schemes, but such a scheme cannot be completely modeled because beneficiation processes are empirical and because some properties of lunar minerals have not been measured. To meet anticipated shipping and processing needs, the peak lunar mining rate will exceed 1000 tons/hr by the fifth year of operation. Such capabilities will be best obtained by automated mining vehicles and conveyor systems rather than trucks. It may be possible to extract about 40 kg of volatiles (60 percent H2O) by thermally processing the less than 20 micron ilmenite concentrate extracted from 130 tons of ilmenite ore. A thermodynamic analysis of an extraction process is presented.

  3. [Potentially beneficial effects of climate changes].

    PubMed

    Hitz, Mette Friberg; Jensen, Jens Erik Beck

    2009-10-26

    Climate changes have many unbeneficial effects on human health, but may also have beneficial effects. An increased mean temperature reduces the incidence of death due to hypothermia and cardiovascular disease and may increase exercise frequency. As the ozone layer decreases, the synthesis of vitamin D in the organism will also increase. An increased level of plasma vitamin D has beneficial effects on bone- and muscle health, seems to reduce cancer incidence and mortality and reduces the prevalence of autoimmune- and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19857402

  4. The Roles of Beneficiation in Lunar Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural feedstocks used for any process are intrinsically variable. They may also contain deleterious components or low concentrations of desired fractions. For these three reasons it is standard industrial practice to beneficiate feedstocks. This is true across all industries which trans-form raw materials into standardized units. On the Moon there are three natural resources: vacuum, radiation and regolith. To utilize in situ resources on the Moon it is reasonable to presume some beneficiation of the regolith (ground rock) resource will be desirable if not essential. As on Earth, this will require fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry of the relevant processes, which are exceeding complex in detail. Further, simulants are essential test articles for evaluation of components and systems planned for lunar deployment. Simulants are of course made from geologic feedstocks. Therefore, there is variation, deleterious components and incorrect concentrations of desired fractions in the feedstocks used for simulants. Thus, simulant production can benefit from beneficiation of the input feedstocks. Beneficiation of geologic feedstocks is the subject of extractive metallurgy. Clearly, NASA has two discrete interests pertaining to the science and technology of extractive metallurgy.

  5. [Prebiotics: concept, properties and beneficial effects].

    PubMed

    Corzo, N; Alonso, J L; Azpiroz, F; Calvo, M A; Cirici, M; Leis, R; Lombó, F; Mateos-Aparicio, I; Plou, F J; Ruas-Madiedo, P; Rúperez, P; Redondo-Cuenca, A; Sanz, M L; Clemente, A

    2015-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients (oligosaccharides) that reach the colon and are used as substrate by microorganisms producing energy, metabolites and micronutrients used for the host; in addition they also stimulate the selective growth of certain beneficial species (mainly bifidobacteria and lactobacilli) in the intestinal microbiota. In this article, a multidisciplinary approach to understand the concept of prebiotic carbohydrates, their properties and beneficial effects in humans has been carried out. Definitions of prebiotics, reported by relevant international organizations and researchers, are described. A comprehensive description of accepted prebiotics having strong scientific evidence of their beneficial properties in humans (inulin-type fructans, FOS, GOS, lactulose and human milk oligosaccharides) is reported. Emerging prebiotics and those which are in the early stages of study have also included in this study. Taken into account that the chemical structure greatly influences carbohydrates prebiotic properties, the analytical techniques used for their analysis and characterization are discussed. In vitro and in vivo models used to evaluate the gastrointestinal digestion, absorption resistance and fermentability in the colon of prebiotics as well as major criteria to design robust intervention trials in humans are described. Finally, a comprehensive summary of the beneficial effects of prebiotics for health at systemic and intestinal levels is reported. The research effort on prebiotics has been intensive in last decades and has demonstrated that a multidisciplinary approach is necessary in order to claim their health benefits. PMID:25659062

  6. 7 CFR 1421.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., title and control of the commodity and beneficial interest in the commodity as specified in 7 CFR 1421.6..., feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or other facilities as determined by CCC... entities such as a dairy, feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or...

  7. 7 CFR 1421.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., title and control of the commodity and beneficial interest in the commodity as specified in 7 CFR 1421.6..., feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or other facilities as determined by CCC... entities such as a dairy, feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or...

  8. 7 CFR 1421.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., title and control of the commodity and beneficial interest in the commodity as specified in 7 CFR 1421.6..., feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or other facilities as determined by CCC... entities such as a dairy, feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or...

  9. 7 CFR 1421.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., title and control of the commodity and beneficial interest in the commodity as specified in 7 CFR 1421.6..., feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or other facilities as determined by CCC... entities such as a dairy, feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or...

  10. 7 CFR 1421.6 - Beneficial interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., title and control of the commodity and beneficial interest in the commodity as specified in 7 CFR 1421.6..., feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or other facilities as determined by CCC... entities such as a dairy, feedlot, ethanol plant, wool pool, feed mill, feed or grain bank, or...

  11. Beneficial Biofilms: Wastewater and Other Industrial Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the use of beneficial biofilms for the production of industrial chemicals such as ethanol, butanol, lactic acid, acetic acid/vinegar, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. It also emphasizes application of biofilm reactors for treatment of dairy industry wastewater, oily sea water...

  12. Introduction: Mass production for beneficial organisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are numerous organisms that are beneficial to humans and the environment. Some of these organisms can be cultured on a large scale. However, certain key aspects in production technology and maximization of cost efficiency are lacking for many organisms. The purpose of this book is to assemb...

  13. Induced Systemic Resistance by Beneficial Microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beneficial microbes in the microbiome of plant roots improve plant health. Induced systemic esistance (ISR) emerged as an important mechanism by which selected plant growth–promoting bacteria and fungi in the rhizosphere prime the whole plant body for enhanced defense against a broad range of pathog...

  14. Chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, R C; Montie, T C

    1979-01-01

    Chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa RM46 has been studied, and conditions required for chemotaxis have been defined, by using the Adler capillary assay technique. Several amino acids, organic acids, and glucose were shown to be attractants of varying effectiveness for this organism. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was absolutely required for chemotaxis, and magnesium was also necessary for a maximum response. Serine taxis was greatest when the chemotaxis medium contained 1.5 X 10(-5) M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 0.005 M magnesium chloride. It was not necessary to include methionine in the chemotaxis medium. The strength of the chemotactic responses to glucose and to citrate was dependent on prior growth of the bacteria on glucose and citrate, respectively. Accumulation in response to serine was inhibited by the addition of succinate, citrate, malate, glucose, pyruvate, or methionine to the chemotaxis medium. Inhibition by succinate was not dependent on the concentration of attractant in the capillary. However, the degree to which glucose and citrate inhibited serine taxis was dependent on the carbon source utilized for growth. Further investigation of this inhibition may provide information about the mechanisms of chemotaxis in P. aeruginosa. PMID:104961

  15. Assessment of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens for management of Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum on watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates Clinto 1R, Wayne 1R and Wood 1R, which produce the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), can suppress soilborne diseases and promote plant growth. Consequently, these beneficial bacterial isolates were tested on watermelon plants for suppression of Meloidogy...

  16. A Type VI Secretion System Is Involved in Pseudomonas fluorescens Bacterial Competition

    PubMed Central

    Decoin, Victorien; Barbey, Corinne; Bergeau, Dorian; Latour, Xavier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole; Merieau, Annabelle

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion systems are crucial mediators of bacterial interactions with other organisms. Among them, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and appears to inject toxins into competitor bacteria and/or eukaryotic cells. Major human pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, express T6SSs. Bacteria prevent self-intoxication by their own T6SS toxins by producing immunity proteins, which interact with the cognate toxins. We describe here an environmental P. fluorescens strain, MFE01, displaying an uncommon oversecretion of Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) and VgrG (valine-glycine repeat protein G) into the culture medium. These proteins are characteristic components of a functional T6SS. The aim of this study was to attribute a role to this energy-consuming overexpression of the T6SS. The genome of MFE01 contains at least two hcp genes (hcp1 and hcp2), suggesting that there may be two putative T6SS clusters. Phenotypic studies have shown that MFE01 is avirulent against various eukaryotic cell models (amebas, plant or animal cell models), but has antibacterial activity against a wide range of competitor bacteria, including rhizobacteria and clinical bacteria. Depending on the prey cell, mutagenesis of the hcp2 gene in MFE01 abolishes or reduces this antibacterial killing activity. Moreover, the introduction of T6SS immunity proteins from S. marcescens, which is not killed by MFE01, protects E. coli against MFE01 killing. These findings suggest that the protein encoded by hcp2 is involved in the killing activity of MFE01 mediated by effectors of the T6SS targeting the peptidoglycan of Gram-negative bacteria. Our results indicate that MFE01 can protect potato tubers against Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which causes tuber soft rot. Pseudomonas fluorescens is often described as a major PGPR (plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium), and our results suggest that there may be a connection between

  17. A type VI secretion system is involved in Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterial competition.

    PubMed

    Decoin, Victorien; Barbey, Corinne; Bergeau, Dorian; Latour, Xavier; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Orange, Nicole; Merieau, Annabelle

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion systems are crucial mediators of bacterial interactions with other organisms. Among them, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and appears to inject toxins into competitor bacteria and/or eukaryotic cells. Major human pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, express T6SSs. Bacteria prevent self-intoxication by their own T6SS toxins by producing immunity proteins, which interact with the cognate toxins. We describe here an environmental P. fluorescens strain, MFE01, displaying an uncommon oversecretion of Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) and VgrG (valine-glycine repeat protein G) into the culture medium. These proteins are characteristic components of a functional T6SS. The aim of this study was to attribute a role to this energy-consuming overexpression of the T6SS. The genome of MFE01 contains at least two hcp genes (hcp1 and hcp2), suggesting that there may be two putative T6SS clusters. Phenotypic studies have shown that MFE01 is avirulent against various eukaryotic cell models (amebas, plant or animal cell models), but has antibacterial activity against a wide range of competitor bacteria, including rhizobacteria and clinical bacteria. Depending on the prey cell, mutagenesis of the hcp2 gene in MFE01 abolishes or reduces this antibacterial killing activity. Moreover, the introduction of T6SS immunity proteins from S. marcescens, which is not killed by MFE01, protects E. coli against MFE01 killing. These findings suggest that the protein encoded by hcp2 is involved in the killing activity of MFE01 mediated by effectors of the T6SS targeting the peptidoglycan of Gram-negative bacteria. Our results indicate that MFE01 can protect potato tubers against Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which causes tuber soft rot. Pseudomonas fluorescens is often described as a major PGPR (plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium), and our results suggest that there may be a connection between

  18. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePlus

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  19. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  20. Evidence for ferritin as dominant iron-bearing species in the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 provided by low-temperature/in-field Mössbauer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Krisztina; Kamnev, Alexander A; Pechoušek, Jiří; Tugarova, Anna V; Kuzmann, Ernő; Machala, Libor; Zbořil, Radek; Homonnay, Zoltán; Lázár, Károly

    2016-02-01

    For the ubiquitous diazotrophic rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which has been attracting the attention of researchers worldwide for the last 35 years owing to its significant agrobiotechnological and phytostimulating potential, the data on iron acquisition and its chemical speciation in cells are scarce. In this work, for the first time for azospirilla, low-temperature (at 80 K, 5 K, as well as at 2 K without and with an external magnetic field of 5 T) transmission Mössbauer spectroscopic studies were performed for lyophilised biomass of A. brasilense (wild-type strain Sp7 grown with (57)Fe(III) nitrilotriacetate complex as the sole source of iron) to enable quantitative chemical speciation analysis of the intracellular iron. In the Mössbauer spectrum at 80 K, a broadened quadrupole doublet of high-spin iron(III) was observed with a few percent of a high-spin iron(II) contribution. In the spectrum measured at 5 K, a dominant magnetically split component appeared with the parameters typical of ferritin species from other bacteria, together with a quadrupole doublet of a superparamagnetic iron(III) component and a similarly small contribution from the high-spin iron(II) component. The Mössbauer spectra recorded at 2 K (with or without a 5 T external field) confirmed the assignment of ferritin species. About 20% of total Fe in the dry cells of A. brasilense strain Sp7 were present in iron(III) forms superparamagnetic at both 5 and 2 K, i.e. either different from ferritin cores or as ferritin components with very small particle sizes. PMID:26769130

  1. Multiple impacts of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 on nutrient and ABA relations of Pisum sativum

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Ian C.

    2012-01-01

    Resolving the physiological mechanisms by which rhizobacteria enhance plant growth is difficult, since many such bacteria contain multiple plant growth-promoting properties. To understand further how the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase (ACCd)-containing rhizobacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 affects plant growth, the flows and partitioning of mineral nutrients and abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA metabolism were studied in pea (Pisum sativum) plants following rhizosphere bacterial inoculation. Although root architecture was not affected, inoculation increased root and shoot biomass, and stomatal conductance, by 20, 15, and 24%, respectively, and increased N, P, K, Ca, and Mg uptake by 16, 81, 50, 46, and 58%, respectively. P deposition in inoculated plant roots was 4.9 times higher than that in uninoculated controls. Rhizobacterial inoculation increased root to shoot xylem flows and shoot to root phloem flows of K by 1.8- and 2.1-fold, respectively. In control plants, major sinks for K deposition were the roots and upper shoot (43% and 49% of total uptake, respectively), while rhizobacterial inoculation increased K distribution to the lower shoot at the expense of other compartments (xylem, phloem, and upper shoot). Despite being unable to metabolize ABA in vitro, V. paradoxus 5C-2 decreased root ABA concentrations and accumulation by 40–60%. Although inoculation decreased xylem ABA flows, phloem ABA flows increased. Whether bacterial ACCd attenuates root to shoot ABA signalling requires further investigation, since ABA is critical to maintain growth of droughted plants, and ACCd-containing organisms have been advocated as a means of minimizing growth inhibition of plants in drying soil. PMID:23136167

  2. Process of beneficiating coal and product

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, L.E.; Fox, K.M.; McGarry, P.E.

    1981-12-08

    Mine run coal is pulverized and the extended surfaces of the coal particles are rendered hydrophobic and oilophilic by a chemical bonding and graft polymerization reaction with a water unsoluble organic polymerizable monomer under peroxidation influence in a predominantly water reaction medium. The mineral ash present in the coal, particularly the iron pyrites, remains hydrophilic and is separated from the polymeric organic surface bonded coal product in a water washing step wherein the washed coal floats on and is recovered from the water phase and the ash is removed with the separated wash water in a critical wash step. The hydrophobic and oilophilic organic polymeric surface bonded coating about the coal particles is fortified by inclusion of additional unbound free fatty acids by further small additions thereof. Excess water is removed from the beneficiated hydrophobic surface-altered coal product mechanically, and the carboxylic acid groups present in the coal-oil product are thereafter converted to a metal soap. The beneficiated coal product can be used ''dry'', or additional quantities of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel can be incorporated with the ''dry'' beneficiated coal product to produce a flowable fluid or liquid coal product having the rheological property of marked thixotropy. Introduction of this physically induced property into the liquid coal-oil-mixture prevents settling out of the heavier coal particles from the relatively ash-free fluid fuel composition under extended storage periods.

  3. Verticillium dahliae alters Pseudomonas spp. populations and HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of strawberry.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Nadine J; Gadkar, Vijay J; Filion, Martin

    2010-11-01

    The production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) by beneficial root-associated bacteria is an important mechanism for the biological control of plant pathogens. However, little is known about the biotic factors affecting HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of plants. In this study, real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to investigate the effect of the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae on hcnC (encoding for HCN biosynthesis) gene expression in Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. Strawberry plants were inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 and (or) V. dahliae and grown in pots filled with nonsterilized field soil. RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil sampled at 0, 15, 30, and 45 days following inoculation with V. dahliae and used for qRT-PCR analyses. Populations of V. dahliae and Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 were also monitored using a culture-independent qPCR approach. hcnC expression was detected at all sampling dates. The presence of V. dahliae had a significant stimulation effect on hcnC gene expression and also increased the population of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. However, the V. dahliae population was not altered by the presence of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate the effect of a plant pathogen on HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere soil. PMID:21076481

  4. Type III Secretion System and Virulence Markers Highlight Similarities and Differences between Human- and Plant-Associated Pseudomonads Related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida

    PubMed Central

    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this secretion system in plant-associated P. fluorescens raise the question of whether clinical isolates may also harbor T3SSs. In this study, isolates associated with clinical infections and identified in hospitals as belonging to P. fluorescens were compared with fluorescent pseudomonads harboring T3SSs isolated from plants. Bacterial isolates were tested for (i) their genetic relationships based on their 16S rRNA phylogeny, (ii) the presence of T3SS genes by PCR, and (iii) their infectious potential on animals and plants under environmental or physiological temperature conditions. Two groups of bacteria were delineated among the clinical isolates. The first group encompassed thermotolerant (41°C) isolates from patients suffering from blood infections; these isolates were finally found to not belong to P. fluorescens but were closely related and harbored highly conserved T3SS genes belonging to the Ysc-T3SS family, like the T3SSs from P. aeruginosa. The second group encompassed isolates from patients suffering from cystic fibrosis; these isolates belonged to P. fluorescens and harbored T3SS genes belonging to the Hrp1-T3SS family found commonly in plant-associated P. fluorescens. PMID:25636837

  5. Type III secretion system and virulence markers highlight similarities and differences between human- and plant-associated pseudomonads related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida.

    PubMed

    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Plésiat, Patrick; Lemanceau, Philippe; Latour, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this secretion system in plant-associated P. fluorescens raise the question of whether clinical isolates may also harbor T3SSs. In this study, isolates associated with clinical infections and identified in hospitals as belonging to P. fluorescens were compared with fluorescent pseudomonads harboring T3SSs isolated from plants. Bacterial isolates were tested for (i) their genetic relationships based on their 16S rRNA phylogeny, (ii) the presence of T3SS genes by PCR, and (iii) their infectious potential on animals and plants under environmental or physiological temperature conditions. Two groups of bacteria were delineated among the clinical isolates. The first group encompassed thermotolerant (41°C) isolates from patients suffering from blood infections; these isolates were finally found to not belong to P. fluorescens but were closely related and harbored highly conserved T3SS genes belonging to the Ysc-T3SS family, like the T3SSs from P. aeruginosa. The second group encompassed isolates from patients suffering from cystic fibrosis; these isolates belonged to P. fluorescens and harbored T3SS genes belonging to the Hrp1-T3SS family found commonly in plant-associated P. fluorescens. PMID:25636837

  6. Integrating Beneficiation into Regolith Conveyance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Mantovani, James H.; Townsend, I. I.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Regolith conveyance includes hauler/dumpers, hoppers, augers, pneumatic transport subsystems, and other elements. The features of the conveyance and the time the material stream spend in conveyance may be used synergistically to perform beneficiation, pre-processing (such as heating), and other tasks, thus reducing the mass and complexity of the overall ISRU system. Since the cost of spaceflight is largely driven by the cost of launching mass out of Earth's gravity well, the conveyance system should be leveraged in this way to the maximum extent.

  7. Tribocharging Lunar Soil for Electrostatic Beneficiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Future human lunar habitation requires using in situ materials for both structural components and oxygen production. Lunar bases must be constructed from thermal-and radiation-shielding materials that will provide significant protection from the harmful cosmic energy which normally bombards the lunar surface. In addition, shipping oxygen from Earth is weight-prohibitive, and therefore investigating the production of breathable oxygen from oxidized mineral components is a major ongoing NASA research initiative. Lunar regolith may meet the needs for both structural protection and oxygen production. Already a number of oxygen production technologies are being tested, and full-scale bricks made of lunar simulant have been sintered. The beneficiation, or separation, of lunar minerals into a refined industrial feedstock could make production processes more efficient, requiring less energy to operate and maintain and producing higher-performance end products. The method of electrostatic beneficiation used in this research charges mineral powders (lunar simulant) by contact with materials of a different composition. The simulant acquires either a positive or negative charge depending upon its composition relative to the charging material.

  8. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  9. Beneficial use of sludge in building components

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, J.E.

    1983-12-01

    Results are presented of a study in which sludge was introduced in the manufacture of brick. More than 300 bench-scale, sludge-amended bricks were produced with initial volumetric sludge additions of from 16% to 50%. These specimens looked, felt, and smelled like standard bricks, and those with sludge additions of 30% or less were found capable of meeting the appropriate technical standards. Three full-scale runs have been completed by a commercial manufacturer, and almost one million bricks have been produced. These bricks were found comparable to normal, unadulterated bricks; in fact, the incorporation of sludge was believed to be beneficial due to related improvements in the brick's water absorption properties. The name 'biobrick' is used to refer to the new product.

  10. Are self-explanations always beneficial?

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Deanna; Katz, Jared

    2009-07-01

    We present evidence suggesting that the effect of self-explanations on learning is not always beneficial and, in fact, in some contexts has a detrimental effect. Over eight sessions, fourth-graders engaged in investigation of a database with the goal of identifying causal effects. In a separate task, children in one condition also generated self-explanations regarding the mechanisms underlying the causal effects they believed to be present. In a comparison condition, they did not. On a transfer task, children in the no-explanations condition showed superior causal inference performance. The findings are discussed as reflecting the development of "data-reading" skill with which an emphasis on explanations may interfere. PMID:19386318

  11. Biosolids management: Beneficial use comes of age

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, C.O.

    1996-12-01

    The most important issues facing the biosolids management industry today are costs, odors and public perception. Of these, public perception has the biggest effect on the industry -- in the way biosolids are generated, used, destroyed, transported and reused. Even in the way they have been named. Officially, sludge is a term affixed to the product that comes out of sewage treatment plants and biosolids is what the processed end product is called. Although it sounds like two different things, the terms are used interchangeably. Still called sludge by some environmental professionals in the water and wastewater industries, biosolids is the official term for sludge being marketed to the public. And apparently it`s working. After years of public misperceptions, biosolids education and public relations programs thrust the organics into the Age of Beneficial Use.

  12. Enhancement of surface properties for coal beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Aplan, F.F.

    1990-01-01

    The main objective of this research project is to study ways to modify surface properties of coal, pyrite and ash-forming mineral matter for beneficiation of fine coal. Since the differences in surface properties of coal and mineral matter are utilized in several oil based preparation technologies, such as: froth flotation, emulsion flotation, spherical agglomeration and liquid-liquid separation, another objective is to delineate the role of oil. The following studies are behind carried out to achieve the objectives: Investigation of the natural hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite; development and evaluation of enhanced coal hydrophobicity; development and evaluation of reagents xanthates which modulate the hydrophobicity of pyrite; and development and evaluation of emulsion processes and their underlying principles.

  13. Electrostatic Separator for Beneficiation of Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Arens, Ellen; Trigwell, Steve; Captain, James

    2010-01-01

    A charge separator has been constructed for use in a lunar environment that will allow for separation of minerals from lunar soil. In the present experiments, whole lunar dust as received was used. The approach taken here was that beneficiation of ores into an industrial feedstock grade may be more efficient. Refinement or enrichment of specific minerals in the soil before it is chemically processed may be more desirable as it would reduce the size and energy requirements necessary to produce the virgin material, and it may significantly reduce the process complexity. The principle is that minerals of different composition and work function will charge differently when tribocharged against different materials, and hence be separated in an electric field.

  14. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

  15. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

  16. Produced Water Management and Beneficial Use

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Brown; Carol Frost; Thomas Hayes; Leo Heath; Drew Johnson; David Lopez; Demian Saffer; Michael Urynowicz; John Wheaton; Mark Zoback

    2007-10-31

    Large quantities of water are associated with the production of coalbed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. The chemistry of co-produced water often makes it unsuitable for subsequent uses such as irrigated agriculture. However, co-produced waters have substantial potential for a variety of beneficial uses. Achieving this potential requires the development of appropriate water management strategies. There are several unique characteristics of co-produced water that make development of such management strategies a challenge. The production of CBM water follows an inverse pattern compared to traditional wells. CBM wells need to maintain low reservoir pressures to promote gas production. This need renders the reinjection of co-produced waters counterproductive. The unique water chemistry of co-produced water can reduce soil permeability, making surface disposal difficult. Unlike traditional petroleum operations where co-produced water is an undesirable by-product, co-produced water in the PRB often is potable, making it a highly valued resource in arid western states. This research project developed and evaluated a number of water management options potentially available to CBM operators. These options, which focus on cost-effective and environmentally-sound practices, fall into five topic areas: Minimization of Produced Water, Surface Disposal, Beneficial Use, Disposal by Injection and Water Treatment. The research project was managed by the Colorado Energy Research Institute (CERI) at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and involved personnel located at CERI, CSM, Stanford University, Pennsylvania State University, the University of Wyoming, the Argonne National Laboratory, the Gas Technology Institute, the Montana Bureau of Mining and Geology and PVES Inc., a private firm.

  17. Phylogenomics and systematics in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Gomila, Margarita; Peña, Arantxa; Mulet, Magdalena; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The genus Pseudomonas currently contains 144 species, making it the genus of Gram-negative bacteria that contains the largest number of species. Currently, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) is the preferred method for establishing the phylogeny between species and genera. Four partial gene sequences of housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB, and rpoD) were obtained from 112 complete or draft genomes of strains related to the genus Pseudomonas that were available in databases. These genes were analyzed together with the corresponding sequences of 133 Pseudomonas type strains of validly published species to assess their correct phylogenetic assignations. We confirmed that 30% of the sequenced genomes of non-type strains were not correctly assigned at the species level in the accepted taxonomy of the genus and that 20% of the strains were not identified at the species level. Most of these strains had been isolated and classified several years ago, and their taxonomic status has not been updated by modern techniques. MLSA was also compared with indices based on the analysis of whole-genome sequences that have been proposed for species delineation, such as tetranucleotide usage patterns (TETRA), average nucleotide identity (ANIm, based on MUMmer and ANIb, based on BLAST) and genome-to-genome distance (GGDC). TETRA was useful for discriminating Pseudomonas from other genera, whereas ANIb and GGDC clearly separated strains of different species. ANIb showed the strongest correlation with MLSA. The correct species classification is a prerequisite for most diversity and evolutionary studies. This work highlights the necessity for complete genomic sequences of type strains to build a phylogenomic taxonomy and that all new genome sequences submitted to databases should be correctly assigned to species to avoid taxonomic inconsistencies. PMID:26074881

  18. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C.; Silver, S. )

    1990-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a K{sub m} of 40 {mu}M CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  19. Quantitative mineralogical characterization of chrome ore beneficiation plant tailing and its beneficiated products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    Mineralogical characterization and liberation of valuable minerals are primary concerns in mineral processing industries. The present investigation focuses on quantitative mineralogy, elemental deportment, and locking-liberation characteristics of the beneficiation of tailings from a chrome ore beneficiation plant in the Sukinda region, Odisha; methods used for the study of the beneficiated tailings are QEMSCAN®, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and mineral chemistry by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The tailing sample was fine grained (69.48wt% below 45 μm size), containing 20.25wt% Cr2O3 and 39.19wt% Fe2O3, with a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 0.51. Mineralogical investigations using QEMSCAN studies revealed that chromite, goethite, and gibbsite are the dominant mineral phases with minor amounts of hematite, kaolinite, and quartz. The sample contained 34.22wt% chromite, and chromite liberation is more than 80% for grains smaller than 250 μm in size. Based on these results, it was predicted that liberated chromite and high-grade middling chromite particles could be separated from the gangue by various concentration techniques. The tailing sample was beneficiated by hydrocyclone, tabling, wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS), and flotation in order to recover the chromite. A chromite concentrate with 45.29wt% Cr2O3 and a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 1.85 can be produced from these low-grade chromite ore beneficiation plant rejects.

  20. [Pseudomonas folliculitis after spa bath exposure].

    PubMed

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-06-25

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of folliculitis. Pseudomonas folliculitis can develop after contact with contaminated water from swimming pools, hot tubs and spa baths. Systemic therapy may be indicated in patients with widespread lesions, systemic symptoms or in immunosuppressed patients. We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect. PMID:22735119

  1. County develops beneficial use program for sludge disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W. ); Jepson, C.B. )

    1993-08-01

    This article describes a program of sewage sludge disposal that is beneficial and deals with contract services necessary for the hauling and marketing of sludge products. The topics of the article include dealing with insurance, obtaining the best price, quality of sludge, beneficial uses of sludge, and future plans for new methods of beneficial use.

  2. Role of ssh53, 61, 85, and 127 loci in root colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of our research is to elucidate the molecular basis of the interactions between the host plant and beneficial rhizosphere-inhabiting 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)-producing Pseudomonas bacteria. Certain DAPG-producing strains of P. fluorescens colonize plant roots and suppress soilborne...

  3. Nanoscale particles in technological processes of beneficiation

    PubMed Central

    Adushkin, Vitaly V; Golub', Anatoly P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Cavitation is a rather common and important effect in the processes of destruction of nano- and microscale particles in natural and technological processes. A possible cavitation disintegration of polymineral nano- and microparticles, which are placed into a liquid, as a result of the interaction of the particles with collapsed cavitation bubbles is considered. The emphasis is put on the cavitation processes on the interface between liquid and fine solid particles, which is suitable for the description of the real situations. Results: The results are illustrated for the minerals that are most abundant in gold ore. The bubbles are generated by shock loading of the liquid heated to the boiling temperature. Possibilities of cavitation separation of nano- and microscale monomineral fractions from polymineral nano- and microparticles and of the use of cavitation for beneficiation are demonstrated. Conclusion: The cavitation disintegration mechanism is important because the availability of high-grade deposits in the process of mining and production of noble metals is decreasing. This demands for an enhancement of the efficiency in developing low-grade deposits and in reprocessing ore dumps and tailings, which contain a certain amount of noble metals in the form of finely disseminated fractions. The cavitation processes occuring on the interface between liquid and fine solid particles are occasionally more effective than the bulk cavitation processes that were considered earlier. PMID:24778972

  4. Genomics of Secondary Metabolism in Pseudomonas spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas is a heterogeneous genus of bacteria known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and its prolific production of secondary metabolites. The structurally diverse chemical structures produced by Pseudomonas spp. result from biosynthetic processes with unusual features that have revealed no...

  5. Pseudomonas blight discovered on raspberry in Watsonville

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the winter (February) of 2013, a field of raspberries in Watsonville was discovered to be infected with Pseudomonas syringae, the causal agent of Pseudomonas blight disease. This was the first documentation of this disease on raspberry in our region. The infection of raspberry plants is manifeste...

  6. Various effects of fluorescent bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas containing ACC deaminase on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Magnucka, Elżbieta G; Pietr, Stanisław J

    2015-12-01

    The study evaluates the effect of rhizobacteria having 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCd) on the development of wheat seedlings. This enzyme has been proposed to play a key role in microbe-plant association. Three fluorescent pseudomonads containing this deaminase were selected from 70 strains of pseudomonads isolated from rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rape (Brassica napus L.). These bacteria, varied significantly in the ability to both biosynthesize auxins and hydrolyze ACC. Among them, Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. brassicacearum strain RZ310 presented the highest activities of ACC deaminase during 96h of growth in liquid Dworkin and Foster (DF) salt medium. Additionally, this rape rhizosphere strain did not produce indoles. Two other isolates, Pseudomonas sp. PO283 and Pseudomonas sp. PO366, secreted auxins only in the presence of their precursor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and four other protein-encoding genes indicated that these wheat rhizosphere isolates belonged to the fluorescent Pseudomonas group. Moreover, the effects of these strains on wheat seedling growth under in vitro conditions were markedly dependent on both their cell suspensions used to grain inoculation and nutrient conditions. Strains tested had beneficial influence on wheat seedlings mainly at low cell densities. In addition, access to nutrients markedly changed bacteria action on cereal growth. Their presence generally favored the positive effects of pseudomonads on length and the estimated biomasses of wheat coleoptiles. Despite these general rules, impacts of each isolate on the growth parameters of cereal seedlings were unique. PMID:25983132

  7. Ferrofluid effect on Pseudomonas pyoverdine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Antoniea; Vlahovici, Al.; Creanga, Dorina-Emilia

    2005-03-01

    The magnetic fluid effect on some pigmented pathogen germs has been investigated. The fluorescence of the pyoverdine pigment obtained from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, cultivated in the presence of different magnetic fluid concentrations, was enhanced by magnetic fluid concentrations of 0.0015-1 ml/l. The antimicrobial activity of pyoverdine, when tested by means of agar diffusimetric method against Sarcina lutea, was found increased for relatively high concentrations of magnetic fluid; in the case of Staphylococcus aureus the pyoverdine antimicrobial activity was not dependent on the magnetic fluid concentration.

  8. Pseudomonas--an opportunistic foe.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    An honest account of some of the lessons learned in how to protect patients, staff, and visitors, against waterborne Pseudomonas aeruginosa by effectively monitoring a large healthcare facility's water supply, identifying potential 'trigger points', harnessing the expertise of a multidisciplinary team, encouraging all staff to 'go the extra mile' preventatively, and above all, 'going beyond compliance', was provided by George McCracken, head of Estates Risk and Environment at the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust--in whose Royal Jubilee Maternity Hospital three young babies died after an outbreak of the bacteraemia in early 2012--at a recent Water Management Society conference. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports. PMID:24516937

  9. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and

  10. Beneficiation of ilmenite from lumar analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramadorai, G.; Dean, R.

    1992-01-01

    must be emphasized that improved grades and recoveries can be obtained with the -400 mesh fines. However, beneficiation of these extremely fine materials is not possible in a practical process scheme.

  11. Maltose metabolism of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Guffanti, A A; Corpe, W A

    1975-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens W uses maltose exclusively by hydrolyzing it to glucose via an inducible alpha-glucosidase (alpha-D-glucoside glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.20). No evidence for phosphorolytic cleavage or oxidation to maltobionic acid was found in this organism. The alpha-glucosidase was totally intracellular and was most active at pH of 7.0. Induction occurred when cells were incubated with maltotriose or maltose. Induction was rapid and easily detectable within the first 5 min after the addition of the inducer. Glucose and its derivatives did not repress induction. Cells growing on DL-alanine or succinate plus maltose exhibited lower levels of alpha-glucosidase than those grown on maltose alone or maltose plus glucose. Induction required both messenger ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis. PMID:240805

  12. Siderophore production by Pseudomonas pseudomallei.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H M; Chaowagul, W; Sokol, P A

    1991-01-01

    Eighty-four strains of Pseudomonas pseudomallei isolated from patients with melioidosis were examined for siderophore production. All the strains were shown to produce siderophore both on chrome azurol S agar plates and in liquid medium under iron-deficient conditions. Chemical assays indicated that the siderophore belongs to the hydroxamate class. Addition of iron to the culture medium resulted in increased culture growth with markedly decreased yield of siderophore. Siderophore produced by strain U7 was purified by gel filtration chromatography, and the molecular weight was estimated to be 1,000. When this partially purified siderophore was added to culture medium, it promoted iron uptake by P. pseudomallei in the presence of EDTA and enhanced growth of the organism in the presence of transferrin. We have given this siderophore the trivial name malleobactin. PMID:1825486

  13. Genome sequence reveals that Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 possesses a large and diverse array of systems for rhizosphere function and host interaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from the sugar-beet rhizosphere. This bacterium has been extensively studied as a model strain for genetic regulation of secondary metabolite production in P. fluorescens, as a candidate biocontrol agent against phytopathogens, and as a heterologous host for expression of genes with biotechnological application. The F113 genome sequence and annotation has been recently reported. Results Comparative analysis of 50 genome sequences of strains belonging to the P. fluorescens group has revealed the existence of five distinct subgroups. F113 belongs to subgroup I, which is mostly composed of strains classified as P. brassicacearum. The core genome of these five strains is highly conserved and represents approximately 76% of the protein-coding genes in any given genome. Despite this strong conservation, F113 also contains a large number of unique protein-coding genes that encode traits potentially involved in the rhizocompetence of this strain. These features include protein coding genes required for denitrification, diterpenoids catabolism, motility and chemotaxis, protein secretion and production of antimicrobial compounds and insect toxins. Conclusions The genome of P. fluorescens F113 is composed of numerous protein-coding genes, not usually found together in previously sequenced genomes, which are potentially decisive during the colonisation of the rhizosphere and/or interaction with other soil organisms. This includes genes encoding proteins involved in the production of a second flagellar apparatus, the use of abietic acid as a growth substrate, the complete denitrification pathway, the possible production of a macrolide antibiotic and the assembly of multiple protein secretion systems. PMID:23350846

  14. Glyphosate catabolism by Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Shinabarger, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The pathway for the degradation of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine) by Pseudomonas sp. PG2982 has been determined using metabolic radiolabeling experiments. Radiorespirometry experiments utilizing (3-/sup 14/C) glyphosate revealed that approximately 50-59% of the C3 carbon was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Fractionation of stationary phase cells labeled with (3-/sup 14/C)glyphosate revealed that from 45-47% of the assimilated C3 carbon is distributed to proteins and that amino acids methionine and serine are highly labeled. The nucleic acid bases adenine and guanine received 90% of the C3 label that was incorporated into nucleic acids, and the only pyrimidine base labeled was thymine. Pulse labeling of PG2982 cells with (3-/sup 14/C)glyphosate revealed that (3-/sup 14/C)sarcosine is an intermediate in glyphosate degradation. Examination of crude extracts prepared from PG2982 cells revealed the presence of an enzyme that oxidizes sarcosine to glycine and formaldehyde. These results indicate that the first step in glyphosate degradation by PG2982 is cleavage of the carbon-phosphorus bond, resulting in the release of sarcosine and a phosphate group. The phosphate group is utilized as a source of phosphorus, and the sarcosine is degraded to glycine and formaldehyde. Phosphonate utilization by Pseudomonas sp. PG2982 was investigated. Each of the ten phosphonates tested were utilized as a sole source of phosphorus by PG2982. Representative compounds tested included alkylphosphonates, 1-amino-substituted alkylphosphonates, amino-terminal phosphonates, and an arylphosphonate. PG2982 cultures degraded phenylphosphonate to benzene and produced methane from methylphosphonate. The data indicate that PG2982 is capable of cleaving the carbon-phosphorus bond of several structurally different phosphonates.

  15. Beneficiation-hydroretort processing of US oil shales, engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.R.; Riley, R.H.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes a beneficiation facility designed to process 1620 tons per day of run-of-mine Alabama oil shale containing 12.7 gallons of kerogen per ton of ore (based on Fischer Assay). The beneficiation facility will produce briquettes of oil shale concentrate containing 34.1 gallons of kerogen per ton (based on Fischer Assay). The beneficiation facility will produce briquettes of oil shale concentrate containing 34.1 gallons of kerogen per ton (based on Fischer Assay) suitable for feed to a hydroretort oil extraction facility of nominally 20,000 barrels per day capacity. The beneficiation plant design prepared includes the operations of crushing, grinding, flotation, thickening, filtering, drying, briquetting, conveying and tailings empoundment. A complete oil shale beneficiation plant is described including all anticipated ancillary facilities. For purposes of determining capital and operating costs, the beneficiation facility is assumed to be located on a generic site in the state of Alabama. The facility is described in terms of the individual unit operations with the capital costs being itemized in a similar manner. Additionally, the beneficiation facility estimated operating costs are presented to show operating costs per ton of concentrate produced, cost per barrel of oil contained in concentrate and beneficiation cost per barrel of oil extracted from concentrate by hydroretorting. All costs are presented in fourth quarter of 1988 dollars.

  16. RNAi at work: Targeting invertebrate pests and beneficial organisms' diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invertebrates present two types of large scale RNAi application opportunities: pest control and beneficial insect health. The former involves the introduction of sustainable applications to keep pest populations low, and the latter represents the challenge of keeping beneficial organisms healthy. RN...

  17. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  18. [Vasculitis caused by Pseudomonas: a case report].

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Y; Gutiérrez, M; Martínez, T; Bodoque, M; Gómez, J M; Moreno, A

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomona vasculitis is an exceptional disease. Only a few cases have been reported, non with oropharyngeal involvement. The case of a 30-year-old, HIV-positive man who suddenly developed septicemia and necrotizing lesions with tissue destruction of the oropharynx is reported. Histological study confirmed vasculitis. Pseudomona aeruginosa was isolated in peripheral blood and in the biopsy of the palatal lesion. Antibiotic treatment produced satisfactory results. PMID:8991411

  19. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  20. Capsule production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, associated almost exclusively with chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, possess a capsule composed of alginic acid similar to one produced by Azotobacter vinelandii. Recent reports have provided evidence that the biosynthetic pathway for alginate in P. aeruginosa may differ from the pathway proposed for A. vinelandii in that synthesis in P. aeruginosa may occur by way of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Incorporation of isotope from (6-/sup 14/C)glucose into alginate by both P. aueroginosa and A. vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either (1-/sup 14/C)/sup -/ or (2-/sup 14/C)glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate biosynthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner-Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. The enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa appear to be unchanged whether alignate is actively produced or not and activities do not differ significantly from nonmucoid strain PAO.

  1. Acceptance for Beneficial Use Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-04-19

    This Acceptance for Beneficial Use documents that Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid ''P'' is ready for field use. This document does not cover the field installation or operational testing.

  2. Inhibition of primary roots and stimulation of lateral root development in Arabidopsis thaliana by the rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166 is through both auxin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun-Lin; Park, Hyo-Bee; Lee, Jong Suk; Ryu, Sangryeol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2010-03-01

    The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 was previously reported to promote plant growth and induce resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the influence of strain 90-166 on root development was studied in vitro. We observed inhibition of primary root elongation, enhanced lateral root emergence, and early emergence of second order lateral roots after inoculation with strain 90-166 at a certain distance from the root. Using the DR5::GUS transgenic A. thaliana plant and an auxin transport inhibitor, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, the altered root development was still elicited by strain 90-166, indicating that this was not a result of changes in plant auxin levels. Intriguingly, indole-3-acetic acid, a major auxin chemical, was only identified just above the detection limit in liquid culture of strain 90-166 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Focusing on bacterial determinants of the root alterations, we found that primary root elongation was inhibited in seedlings treated with cell supernatant (secreted compounds), while lateral root formation was induced in seedlings treated with lysate supernatant (intracellular compounds). Further study revealed that the alteration of root development elicited by strain 90-166 involved the jasmonate, ethylene, and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Collectively, our results suggest that strain 90-166 can contribute to plant root development via multiple signaling pathways. PMID:20108166

  3. Growth and (137)Cs uptake of four Brassica species influenced by inoculation with a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus pumilus in three contaminated farmlands in Fukushima prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Aung, Han Phyo; Djedidi, Salem; Oo, Aung Zaw; Aye, Yi Swe; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Sohzoh; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea

    2015-07-15

    The effectiveness of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus pumilus regarding growth promotion and radiocesium ((137)Cs) uptake was evaluated in four Brassica species grown on different (137)Cs contaminated farmlands at Fukushima prefecture in Japan from June to August 2012. B. pumilus inoculation did not enhance growth in any of the plants, although it resulted in a significant increase of (137)Cs concentration and higher (137)Cs transfer from the soil to plants. The Brassica species exhibited different (137)Cs uptake abilities in the order Komatsuna>turnip>mustard>radish. TF values of (137)Cs ranged from 0.018 to 0.069 for all vegetables. Komatsuna possessed the largest root surface area and root volume, and showed a higher (137)Cs concentration in plant tissue and higher (137)Cs TF values (0.060) than the other vegetables. Higher (137)Cs transfer to plants was prominent in soil with a high amount of organic matter and an Al-vermiculite clay mineral type. PMID:25847170

  4. Induced drought tolerance through wild and mutant bacterial strain Pseudomonas simiae in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sarita; Vaishnav, Anukool; Jain, Shekhar; Varma, Ajit; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on the overproducing mutant of a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae strain AU (MTCC-12057) for significant drought tolerance in mung bean plants. Five mutants namely AU-M1, AU-M2, AU-M3, AU-M4 and AU-M5 were made after treatment of wild type strain with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Mutant strain AU-M4 was recorded for enhanced ACC deaminase (ACC-D) activity, indole acetic acid (IAA) production and inorganic phosphate (Pi) solubilization compared to wild strain and other four mutant strains under drought condition. AU-M4 showed higher phosphate solubilization index (8.17) together with higher ACC-D activity (98 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (69.35 µg/ml) compared with the wild type P. simiae strain AU ACC-D activity (79 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (38.98 µg/ml) respectively. In this report, we investigated the effect of both wild and mutant type bacterial strain on mung bean plants under drought stress. Results showed that mutant AU-M4 and wild type strain AU inoculated plants exhibited superior tolerance against drought stress, as shown by their enhanced plant biomass (fresh weight), higher water content, higher proline accumulation and lower osmotic stress injury. Mutant AU-M4 and wild strain AU inoculated plants reduced the ethylene level by 59 and 45% respectively, compared to the control under stress condition. Furthermore, bacterial inoculated plants showed enhanced induced systemic drought tolerance by reducing stomata size and net photosynthesis resulting higher water content in mung bean plants that may help in survival of plants during drought condition. To mitigate the effects of drought stress, use of PGPR will be needed to ensure sufficient production of food from crop plants. Taking current leads available, concerted future research is needed in this area, particularly on field evaluation with application of potential microorganisms. PMID:26712619

  5. Glycerophospholipid synthesis and functions in Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, Tatiana; D'Heygère, François; Feuilloley, Marc J; Orange, Nicole; Heipieper, Hermann J; Duclairoir Poc, Cécile

    2015-09-01

    The genus Pseudomonas is one of the most heterogeneous groups of eubacteria, presents in all major natural environments and in wide range of associations with plants and animals. The wide distribution of these bacteria is due to the use of specific mechanisms to adapt to environmental modifications. Generally, bacterial adaptation is only considered under the aspect of genes and protein expression, but lipids also play a pivotal role in bacterial functioning and homeostasis. This review resumes the mechanisms and regulations of pseudomonal glycerophospholipid synthesis, and the roles of glycerophospholipids in bacterial metabolism and homeostasis. Recently discovered specific pathways of P. aeruginosa lipid synthesis indicate the lineage dependent mechanisms of fatty acids homeostasis. Pseudomonas glycerophospholipids ensure structure functions and play important roles in bacterial adaptation to environmental modifications. The lipidome of Pseudomonas contains a typical eukaryotic glycerophospholipid--phosphatidylcholine -, which is involved in bacteria-host interactions. The ability of Pseudomonas to exploit eukaryotic lipids shows specific and original strategies developed by these microorganisms to succeed in their infectious process. All compiled data provide the demonstration of the importance of studying the Pseudomonas lipidome to inhibit the infectious potential of these highly versatile germs. PMID:26148574

  6. In Vitro Screening for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Potent Biocontrol and Plant Growth Promoting Strains of Pseudomonas and Bacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Praveen Kumar, G.; Mir Hassan Ahmed, S. K.; Desai, Suseelendra; Leo Daniel Amalraj, E.; Rasul, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has been identified as a group of microbes that are used for plant growth enhancement and biocontrol for management of plant diseases. The inconsistency in performance of these bacteria from laboratory to field conditions is compounded due to the prevailing abiotic stresses in the field. Therefore, selection of bacterial strains with tolerance to abiotic stresses would benefit the end-user by successful establishment of the strain for showing desired effects. In this study we attempted to isolate and identify strains of Bacillus and Pseudomonas spp. with stress tolerance and proven ability to inhibit the growth of potential phytopathogenic fungi. Screening of bacterial strains for high temperature (50°C), salinity (7% NaCl), and drought (−1.2 MPa) showed that stress tolerance was pronounced less in Pseudomonas isolates than in Bacillus strains. The reason behind this could be the formation of endospores by Bacillus isolates. Tolerance to drought was high in Pseudomonas strains than the other two stresses. Three strains, P8, P20 and P21 showed both salinity and temperature tolerance. P59 strain possessed promising antagonistic activity and drought tolerance. The magnitude of antagonism shown by Bacillus isolates was also higher when compared to Pseudomonas strains. To conclude, identification of microbial candidate strains with stress tolerance and other added characteristic features would help the end-user obtain the desired beneficial effects. PMID:26904731

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in disease.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Isabella, Vincent M; Lewis, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that is the focus of intense research because of its prominent role in disease. Due to its relatively large genome and flexible metabolic capabilities, this organism exploits numerous environmental niches. It is an opportunistic pathogen that sets upon the human host when the normal immune defenses are disabled. Its deadliness is most apparent in cystic fibrosis patients, but it also is a major problem in burn wounds, chronic wounds, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, surface growth on implanted biomaterials, and within hospital surface and water supplies, where it poses a host of threats to vulnerable patients (Peleg and Hooper, N Engl J Med 362:1804-1813, 2010; Breathnach et al., J Hosp Infect 82:19-24, 2012). Once established in the patient, P. aeruginosa can be especially difficult to treat. The genome encodes a host of resistance genes, including multidrug efflux pumps (Poole, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 3:255-264, 2001) and enzymes conferring resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibotics (Vahdani et al., Annal Burns Fire Disast 25:78-81, 2012), making therapy against this gram-negative pathogen particularly challenging due to the lack of novel antimicrobial therapeutics (Lewis, Nature 485: 439-440, 2012). This challenge is compounded by the ability of P. aeruginosa to grow in a biofilm, which may enhance its ability to cause infections by protecting bacteria from host defenses and chemotherapy. Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections. PMID:24096885

  8. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed Central

    García-Valdés, E; Cozar, E; Rotger, R; Lalucat, J; Ursing, J

    1988-01-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridization demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons. Images PMID:3202629

  9. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Valdes, E.; Cozar, E.; Rotger, R. Lalucat, J. ); Ursing, J. )

    1988-10-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridizations demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons.

  10. Siderophore-mediated cooperation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Buckling, Angus; Harrison, Freya; Vos, Michiel; Brockhurst, Michael A; Gardner, Andy; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh

    2007-11-01

    Why should organisms cooperate with each other? Helping close relatives that are likely to share the same genes (kin selection) is one important explanation that is likely to apply across taxa. The production of metabolically costly extracellular iron-scavenging molecules (siderophores) by microorganisms is a cooperative behaviour because it benefits nearby conspecifics. We review experiments focusing on the production of the primary siderophore (pyoverdin) of the opportunistic bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which test kin selection theories that seek to explain the evolution of cooperation. First, cooperation is indeed favoured when individuals interact with their close relatives and when there is competition between groups of cooperators and noncooperators, such that the benefit of cooperation can be realized. Second, the relative success of cheats and cooperators is a function of their frequencies within populations. Third, elevated mutation rates can confer a selective disadvantage under conditions when cooperation is beneficial, because high mutation rates reduce how closely bacteria are related to each other. Fourth, cooperative pyoverdin production is also shown to be favoured by kin selection in vivo (caterpillars), and results in more virulent infections. Finally, we briefly outline ongoing and future work using this experimental system. PMID:17919300

  11. Mining and beneficiation: A review of possible lunar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Peter G.

    1991-01-01

    Successful exploration of Mars and outer space may require base stations strategically located on the Moon. Such bases must develop a certain self-sufficiency, particularly in the critical life support materials, fuel components, and construction materials. Technology is reviewed for the first steps in lunar resource recovery-mining and beneficiation. The topic is covered in three main categories: site selection; mining; and beneficiation. It will also include (in less detail) in-situ processes. The text described mining technology ranging from simple diggings and hauling vehicles (the strawman) to more specialized technology including underground excavation methods. The section of beneficiation emphasizes dry separation techniques and methods of sorting the ore by particle size. In-situ processes, chemical and thermal, are identified to stimulate further thinking by future researchers.

  12. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Levasseur, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of advanced coal-cleaning technologies aimed at expanding the use of the nation`s vast coal reserves in an environmentally and economically acceptable manner. Because of the lack of practical experience with deeply beneficiated coal-based fuels, PETC has contracted Combustion Engineering, Inc. to perform a multi-year project on `Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.` The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels (BCs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs.

  13. Cytokinin production by Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 determines biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; Tafner, Richard; Moreno, María V; Stenglein, Sebastian A; García de Salamone, Inés E; Nelson, Louise M; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Plant beneficial microbes mediate biocontrol of diseases by interfering with pathogens or via strengthening the host. Although phytohormones, including cytokinins, are known to regulate plant development and physiology as well as plant immunity, their production by microorganisms has not been considered as a biocontrol mechanism. Here we identify the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 to efficiently control P. syringae infection in Arabidopsis, allowing maintenance of tissue integrity and ultimately biomass yield. Microbial cytokinin production was identified as a key determinant for this biocontrol effect on the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen. While cytokinin-deficient loss-of-function mutants of G20-18 exhibit impaired biocontrol, functional complementation with cytokinin biosynthetic genes restores cytokinin-mediated biocontrol, which is correlated with differential cytokinin levels in planta. Arabidopsis mutant analyses revealed the necessity of functional plant cytokinin perception and salicylic acid-dependent defence signalling for this biocontrol mechanism. These results demonstrate microbial cytokinin production as a novel microbe-based, hormone-mediated concept of biocontrol. This mechanism provides a basis to potentially develop novel, integrated plant protection strategies combining promotion of growth, a favourable physiological status and activation of fine-tuned direct defence and abiotic stress resilience. PMID:26984671

  14. Cytokinin production by Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 determines biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Großkinsky, Dominik K.; Tafner, Richard; Moreno, María V.; Stenglein, Sebastian A.; García de Salamone, Inés E.; Nelson, Louise M.; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Plant beneficial microbes mediate biocontrol of diseases by interfering with pathogens or via strengthening the host. Although phytohormones, including cytokinins, are known to regulate plant development and physiology as well as plant immunity, their production by microorganisms has not been considered as a biocontrol mechanism. Here we identify the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 to efficiently control P. syringae infection in Arabidopsis, allowing maintenance of tissue integrity and ultimately biomass yield. Microbial cytokinin production was identified as a key determinant for this biocontrol effect on the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen. While cytokinin-deficient loss-of-function mutants of G20-18 exhibit impaired biocontrol, functional complementation with cytokinin biosynthetic genes restores cytokinin-mediated biocontrol, which is correlated with differential cytokinin levels in planta. Arabidopsis mutant analyses revealed the necessity of functional plant cytokinin perception and salicylic acid-dependent defence signalling for this biocontrol mechanism. These results demonstrate microbial cytokinin production as a novel microbe-based, hormone-mediated concept of biocontrol. This mechanism provides a basis to potentially develop novel, integrated plant protection strategies combining promotion of growth, a favourable physiological status and activation of fine-tuned direct defence and abiotic stress resilience. PMID:26984671

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  16. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Zoe A; Seviour, Robert J; Tucci, Joseph; Petrovski, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA. PMID:27313312

  17. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Zoe A.; Seviour, Robert J.; Tucci, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA. PMID:27313312

  18. Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. and Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov., isolated from raw cow's milk.

    PubMed

    von Neubeck, M; Huptas, C; Glück, C; Krewinkel, M; Stoeckel, M; Stressler, T; Fischer, L; Hinrichs, J; Scherer, S; Wenning, M

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of the microbiota of raw cow's milk and semi-finished milk products yielded seven isolates assigned to the genus Pseudomonas that formed two individual groups in a phylogenetic analysis based on partial rpoD and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The two groups could be differentiated from each other and also from their closest relatives as well as from the type species Pseudomonas aeruginosa by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization and average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values calculated from draft genome assemblies. ANIb values within the groups were higher than 97.3 %, whereas similarity values to the closest relatives were 85 % or less. The major cellular lipids of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol; the major quinone was Q-9 in both strains, with small amounts of Q-8 in strain WS4917T. The DNA G+C contents of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were 58.08 and 57.30 mol%, respectively. Based on these data, strains WS4917T, WS4995 ( = DSM 29141 = LMG 28434), WS4999, WS5001 and WS5002 should be considered as representatives of a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas helleri is strain WS4917T ( = DSM 29165T = LMG 28433T). Strains WS4993T and WS4994 ( = DSM 29140 = LMG 28438) should be recognized as representing a second novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis is strain WS4993T ( = DSM 29166T = LMG 28437T). PMID:26675012

  19. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  20. New Pseudomonas spp. Are Pathogenic to Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Beiki, Farid; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Rahimian, Heshmat; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Five putative novel Pseudomonas species shown to be pathogenic to citrus have been characterized in a screening of 126 Pseudomonas strains isolated from diseased citrus leaves and stems in northern Iran. The 126 strains were studied using a polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterizations and phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis. The pathogenicity of these strains against 3 cultivars of citrus is demonstrated in greenhouse and field studies. The strains were initially grouped phenotypically and by their partial rpoD gene sequences into 11 coherent groups in the Pseudomonas fluorescens phylogenetic lineage. Fifty-three strains that are representatives of the 11 groups were selected and analyzed by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. The individual and concatenated partial sequences of the three genes were used to construct the corresponding phylogenetic trees. The majority of the strains were identified at the species level: P. lurida (5 strains), P. monteilii (2 strains), P. moraviensis (1 strain), P. orientalis (16 strains), P. simiae (7 strains), P. syringae (46 strains, distributed phylogenetically in at least 5 pathovars), and P. viridiflava (2 strains). This is the first report of pathogenicity on citrus of P. orientalis, P. simiae, P. lurida, P. moraviensis and P. monteilii strains. The remaining 47 strains that could not be identified at the species level are considered representatives of at least 5 putative novel Pseudomonas species that are not yet described. PMID:26919540

  1. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  2. New Pseudomonas spp. Are Pathogenic to Citrus.

    PubMed

    Beiki, Farid; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Rahimian, Heshmat; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Five putative novel Pseudomonas species shown to be pathogenic to citrus have been characterized in a screening of 126 Pseudomonas strains isolated from diseased citrus leaves and stems in northern Iran. The 126 strains were studied using a polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterizations and phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis. The pathogenicity of these strains against 3 cultivars of citrus is demonstrated in greenhouse and field studies. The strains were initially grouped phenotypically and by their partial rpoD gene sequences into 11 coherent groups in the Pseudomonas fluorescens phylogenetic lineage. Fifty-three strains that are representatives of the 11 groups were selected and analyzed by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. The individual and concatenated partial sequences of the three genes were used to construct the corresponding phylogenetic trees. The majority of the strains were identified at the species level: P. lurida (5 strains), P. monteilii (2 strains), P. moraviensis (1 strain), P. orientalis (16 strains), P. simiae (7 strains), P. syringae (46 strains, distributed phylogenetically in at least 5 pathovars), and P. viridiflava (2 strains). This is the first report of pathogenicity on citrus of P. orientalis, P. simiae, P. lurida, P. moraviensis and P. monteilii strains. The remaining 47 strains that could not be identified at the species level are considered representatives of at least 5 putative novel Pseudomonas species that are not yet described. PMID:26919540

  3. Pseudomonas septicaemia following tribal tatoo marks.

    PubMed

    Mathur, D R; Sahoo, A

    1984-09-01

    It is tradition in Northern Nigeria to make tribal tatoo marks on the face of a newborn, commonly on both sides of the angle of the mouth. A case of fatal septicaemia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa following such tribal tatoo marks is reported. PMID:6506210

  4. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 189

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 189 is a potent inhibitor of the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the complete, finished sequence of the 6.8-Mbp genome of this strain, consisting of a single contiguous molecule. Strain 189 is closely related to previously sequenced strains of P. chlororaphis. PMID:27340063

  5. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida toward chlorinated benzoates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Parales, R.E.; Dispensa, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The chlorinated aromatic acids 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-chlorobenzoate are chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. These compounds are detected by a chromosomally encoded chemotactic response to benzoate which is inducible by {beta}-ketoadipate, and intermediate of benzoate catabolism. Plasmid pAC27, encoding enzymes for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation, does not appear to carry genes for chemotaxis toward chlorinated compounds.

  6. THE ROLE OF BENEFICIAL MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN GRAPEVINE NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are beneficial organisms that colonize plant roots. The fungus actually grows within the root itself, within the space between the cell walls and cell membranes of the root cortex. Their fungal filaments or hyphae extend outside of the root into the soil. This increases ...

  7. The non-target impact of spinosyns on beneficial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Antonio; Mommaerts, Veerle; Smagghe, Guy; Viñuela, Elisa; Zappalà, Lucia; Desneux, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    Spinosyn-based products, mostly spinosad, have been widely recommended by extension specialists and agribusiness companies; consequently, they have been used to control various pests in many different cropping systems. Following the worldwide adoption of spinosad-based products for integrated and organic farming, an increasing number of ecotoxicological studies have been published in the past 10 years. These studies are primarily related to the risk assessment of spinosad towards beneficial arthropods. This review takes into account recent data with the aim of (i) highlighting potentially adverse effects of spinosyns on beneficial arthropods (and hence on ecosystem services that they provide in agroecosystems), (ii) clarifying the range of methods used to address spinosyn side effects on biocontrol agents and pollinators in order to provide new insights for the development of more accurate bioassays, (iii) identifying pitfalls when analysing laboratory results to assess field risks and (iv) gaining increasing knowledge on side effects when using spinosad for integrated pest management (IPM) programmes and organic farming. For the first time, a thorough review of possible risks of spinosad and novel spinosyns (such as spinetoram) to beneficial arthropods (notably natural enemies and pollinators) is provided. The acute lethal effect and multiple sublethal effects have been identified in almost all arthropod groups studied. This review will help to optimise the future use of spinosad and new spinosyns in IPM programmes and for organic farming, notably by preventing the possible side effects of spinosyns on beneficial arthropods. PMID:23109262

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL BENEFICIATION PLANTS FOR SO2 EMISSIONS CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article describes an optimization model for estimating the properties and cost of washed coal from coal beneficiation plants of varying levels of complexity. he design and technical description of the plant performance model are presented, together with cost algorithms for th...

  9. Beneficial effects of berryfruit polyphenols on neuronal behavioral aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is becoming increasingly clear that although there is a great deal of research being devoted to elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in aging, practical information on how to forestall or reverse the deleterious effects of aging may be years away. Therefore, it may be beneficial to dete...

  10. EFFECTS OF MICROBIAL PESTICIDES ON NON-TARGET BENEFICIAL ARTHROPODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formulation, testing protocol, lethal effects, sub-lethal effects, ecological relationships and selectivity of microbial pesticides on non-target, beneficial arthropod natural enemies of insect and mite pests are reviewed for viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa. It was foun...

  11. Beneficial Insects and Insect Pollinators on Milkweed in South Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect pollinators are essential for the reproduction of more than two-thirds of the world’s crops, and beneficial insects play an important role in managing pest insects in agricultural farmscapes. These insects depend on nectar for their survival in these farmscapes. The flowers of tropical milkwe...

  12. Acceptance for Beneficial Use Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid M

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-24

    This document is a Final Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the readiness of Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid ''M''. All the testing and documentation for PIC skid ''M'' is completed and the skid is ready for use in the field for pumping of tank U-102.

  13. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Viall, A.J.; Richards, J.M.

    2000-07-18

    A process is described for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  14. Factitious foods to reduce production costs of beneficial insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article reports the use of factitious foods such as Tenebrio molitor pupa, E. kuehniella eggs, Ephestia eggs, and or Artemia franciscana eggs for the rearing of beneficial insect such as Podisus maculiventris, spined soldier bug and several ladybird predators belonging to the Coccinellidae fam...

  15. Beneficial Effects of Tactile Stimulation on Early Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caulfield, Rick

    2000-01-01

    Reviews selected research on the beneficial effects of tactile stimulation on infants. Examines the results of studies with animals, preterm infants, cocaine- and HIV-exposed preterm infants, and normal full-term infants. Briefly discusses caregiving implications and offers suggestions on how caregivers can incorporate tactile stimulation in…

  16. Enhancing the health-beneficial qualities of whole grain rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various pre- and post-harvest approaches (i.e. pre-germination of whole grains and reduced milling degree) to enhancing the health beneficial compounds of whole grain and milled rice have been reported. A discussion of the results from our pre-harvest efforts is as follows. The majority of rice cons...

  17. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Viall, Arthur J.; Richards, Jeff M.

    2000-01-01

    A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  18. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Viall, A.J.; Richards, J.M.

    1999-01-26

    A process is described for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. 3 figs.

  19. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Viall, Arthur J.; Richards, Jeff M.

    1999-01-01

    A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  20. Control of the peachtree borer using beneficial nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa, is a major pest of peaches and other stone fruits. Our research indicates that entomopathogenic nematodes, also known as beneficial nematodes, can be used effectively to control the insect. We conducted replicated experiments in randomized block designs ov...

  1. USING MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY TO OPTIMIZE ARTIFICIAL DIETS FOR BENEFICIAL INSECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An optimized artificial diet is key for the production of high quality beneficial insects at affordable cost. Using a Drosophila microarray chip with 7000 unigenes, several hundred dietary regulated genes were identified in Perillus bioculatus that fed on a suboptimal artificial diet. These dietary ...

  2. The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp strain affects the pathogenesis-related gene expression of the take-all fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici on wheat roots

    PubMed Central

    Daval, Stéphanie; Lebreton, Lionel; Gazengel, Kévin; Boutin, Morgane; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Sarniguet, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The main effects of antagonistic rhizobacteria on plant pathogenic fungi are antibiosis, fungistasis or an indirect constraint through the induction of a plant defence response. To explore different biocontrol mechanisms, an in vitro confrontation assay was conducted with the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp as a biocontrol agent of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) on wheat roots. In parallel with the assessment of disease extension, together with the bacterial and fungal root colonization rates, the transcript levels of candidate fungal pathogenicity and plant-induced genes were monitored during the 10-day infection process. The bacterial inoculation of wheat roots with the Pf29Arp strain reduced the development of Ggt-induced disease expressed as attack frequency and necrosis length. The growth rates of Ggt and Pf29Arp, monitored through quantitative polymerase chain reaction of DNA amounts with a part of the Ggt 18S rDNA gene and a specific Pf29Arp strain detection probe, respectively, increased throughout the interactions. Bacterial antagonism and colonization had no significant effect on root colonization by Ggt. The expression of fungal and plant genes was quantified in planta by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction during the interactions thanks to the design of specific primers and an innovative universal reference system. During the early stages of the tripartite interaction, several of the fungal genes assayed were down-regulated by Pf29Arp, including two laccases, a β-1,3-exoglucanase and a mitogen-activated protein kinase. The plant host glutathione-S-transferase gene was induced by Ggt alone and up-regulated by Pf29Arp bacteria in interaction with the pathogen. We conclude that Pf29Arp antagonism acts through the alteration of fungal pathogenesis and probably through the activation of host defences. PMID:21726382

  3. The genomic basis of adaptation to the fitness cost of rifampicin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; Heilbron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance carries a fitness cost that must be overcome in order for resistance to persist over the long term. Compensatory mutations that recover the functional defects associated with resistance mutations have been argued to play a key role in overcoming the cost of resistance, but compensatory mutations are expected to be rare relative to generally beneficial mutations that increase fitness, irrespective of antibiotic resistance. Given this asymmetry, population genetics theory predicts that populations should adapt by compensatory mutations when the cost of resistance is large, whereas generally beneficial mutations should drive adaptation when the cost of resistance is small. We tested this prediction by determining the genomic mechanisms underpinning adaptation to antibiotic-free conditions in populations of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa that carry costly antibiotic resistance mutations. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that populations founded by high-cost rifampicin-resistant mutants adapted via compensatory mutations in three genes of the RNA polymerase core enzyme, whereas populations founded by low-cost mutants adapted by generally beneficial mutations, predominantly in the quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator gene lasR. Even though the importance of compensatory evolution in maintaining resistance has been widely recognized, our study shows that the roles of general adaptation in maintaining resistance should not be underestimated and highlights the need to understand how selection at other sites in the genome influences the dynamics of resistance alleles in clinical settings. PMID:26763710

  4. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database.

    PubMed

    Winsor, Geoffrey L; Griffiths, Emma J; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K; Shay, Julie A; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. PMID:26578582

  5. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database

    PubMed Central

    Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Griffiths, Emma J.; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K.; Shay, Julie A.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. PMID:26578582

  6. Technologies for Beneficial Microorganisms Inocula Used as Biofertilizers

    PubMed Central

    Malusá, E.; Sas-Paszt, L.; Ciesielska, J.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing need for environmentaly friendly agricultural practices is driving the use of fertilizers based on beneficial microorganisms. The latter belong to a wide array of genera, classes, and phyla, ranging from bacteria to yeasts and fungi, which can support plant nutrition with different mechanisms. Moreover, studies on the interactions between plant, soil, and the different microorganisms are shedding light on their interrelationships thus providing new possible ways to exploit them for agricultural purposes. However, even though the inoculation of plants with these microorganisms is a well-known practice, the formulation of inocula with a reliable and consistent effect under field conditions is still a bottleneck for their wider use. The choice of the technology for inocula production and of the carrier for the formulation is key to their successful application. This paper focuses on how inoculation issues can be approached to improve the performance of beneficial microorganisms used as a tool for enhancing plant growth and yield. PMID:22547984

  7. Beneficial use of landfill gas at the Burnsville sanitary landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Michels, M.; Morely, J.; Kitts, S.

    1995-08-01

    A beneficial use study was conducted to determine the most economical method of converting landfill gas to energy at the Burnsville Sanitary Landfill. The existing 98.5-acre landfill is permitted for nine million cubic yards of municipal solid waste and estimated to generate significant quantities of landfill gas. The beneficial use study reviewed four options to utilize the landfill gas, as follows; generate electric power and utilize on site; generate electric power and sell to local utility; clean up the landfill gas and sell to natural gas company; and sell landfill gas to nearby asphalt and concrete plants in the summer months, then to 15 commercial businesses for heat in the winter months. The study concluded that it is most economical to generate electricity and sell power to the local utility. Since May 1994, 3.2 megawatts of power have been generated. Upon site closure, the potential for 4.8 megawatts of power generation may exist.

  8. Energy Drink Consumption: Beneficial and Adverse Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Alsunni, Ahmed Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has been increasing dramatically in the last two decades, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults. Energy drinks are aggressively marketed with the claim that these products give an energy boost to improve physical and cognitive performance. However, studies supporting these claims are limited. In fact, several adverse health effects have been related to energy drink; this has raised the question of whether these beverages are safe. This review was carried out to identify and discuss the published articles that examined the beneficial and adverse health effects related to energy drink. It is concluded that although energy drink may have beneficial effects on physical performance, these products also have possible detrimental health consequences. Marketing of energy drinks should be limited or forbidden until independent research confirms their safety, particularly among adolescents. PMID:26715927

  9. Acceptance for Beneficial Use Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid N

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-03-13

    This is a final Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid ''N''. PIC skid ''N'' is ready for pumping tank U-109. All the testing and documentation has been completed as required on the AE3U checklist. This AE3U covers only the readiness of the PIC skid ''N''. Other U-farm preparations including dilution tank fabrication, portable exhauster readiness, leak detection, valve pit preparation, and the Operation Control Station readiness are not part of this ABU. PIC skid ''N'' is a new skid fabricated and tested at Site Fabrication Services. The skid controls the jet pump and monitors various instruments associated with the pumping operation. This monitoring includes leak detection along the waste transfer route and flammable gases in the pump pit. This Acceptance for Beneficial Use documents that Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid ''N'' is ready for field use. This document does not cover the field installation or operational testing.

  10. Frequent Replenishment Sustains the Beneficial Microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jessamina E.; Fischer, Caleb N.; Miles, Jessica; Handelsman, Jo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report that establishment and maintenance of the Drosophila melanogaster microbiome depend on ingestion of bacteria. Frequent transfer of flies to sterile food prevented establishment of the microbiome in newly emerged flies and reduced the predominant members, Acetobacter and Lactobacillus spp., by 10- to 1,000-fold in older flies. Flies with a normal microbiome were less susceptible than germfree flies to infection by Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Augmentation of the normal microbiome with higher populations of Lactobacillus plantarum, a Drosophila commensal and probiotic used in humans, further protected the fly from infection. Replenishment represents an unexplored strategy by which animals can sustain a gut microbial community. Moreover, the population behavior and health benefits of L. plantarum resemble features of certain probiotic bacteria administered to humans. As such, L. plantarum in the fly gut may serve as a simple model for dissecting the population dynamics and mode of action of probiotics in animal hosts. PMID:24194543

  11. Biosolids recycling: Beneficial technology for a better environment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The booklet is written to provide an understanding of the great value that can be derived from the beneficial use of biosolids. The booklet then briefly discusses important aspects of its new regulation (40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 503) that govern the final use or disposal of biosolids. It concludes with a discussion of the scientific basis of the rule and names of people and references to contact for additional information regarding the rule and risk assessment.

  12. Potential beneficial uses of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) water.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K J; Whitman, Ashley J; Kniss, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    The CBNG well water is typically managed by discharging into nearby disposal ponds. The CBNG well water could potentially be very useful in the water-limited regions (e.g., arid and semi-arid), but beneficial uses may be hindered by water quality problems. Objectives of this research were to: (1) examine trend analysis of nine years of CBNG well water at discharge (outfall) points and in corresponding disposal ponds, (2) evaluate geochemical processes, (3) identify potential water quality issues, and (4) find potential beneficial uses. The CBNG well water at discharge points and in corresponding disposal ponds was measured on-site for pH and electrical conductivity (EC). These water samples were also analyzed in the laboratory for calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), copper (Cu), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Total dissolved solids (TDS) were calculated from EC measurements. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) was calculated from Na, Ca, and Mg concentrations. Trend analyses of outfalls and disposal ponds were conducted separately so that the differences in trends could be compared. Trends in CBNG well water at discharge points are not always the same as trends in CBNG disposal ponds: environmental and geochemical processes play an important role in the water quality of these well waters. Overall trend analyses suggest that CBNG well water at discharge points in all basins of the Powder River Basin meets beneficial use criteria, except for SAR and to some extent EC, for aquatic life, livestock and wildlife watering, and irrigation. The CBNG well water in disposal ponds across all basins meets criteria for all beneficial uses except for As, pH, SAR, and to some extent EC for irrigation, aquatic life, and livestock and wildlife watering. PMID:24280972

  13. Inferring the age of a fixed beneficial allele.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Louise; Foll, Matthieu; Ewing, Gregory B; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the age and strength of beneficial alleles is central to understanding how adaptation proceeds in response to changing environmental conditions. Several haplotype-based estimators exist for inferring the age of segregating beneficial mutations. Here, we develop an approximate Bayesian-based approach that rather estimates these parameters for fixed beneficial mutations in single populations. We integrate a range of existing diversity, site frequency spectrum, haplotype- and linkage disequilibrium-based summary statistics. We show that for strong selective sweeps on de novo mutations the method can estimate allele age and selection strength even in nonequilibrium demographic scenarios. We extend our approach to models of selection on standing variation, and co-infer the frequency at which selection began to act upon the mutation. Finally, we apply our method to estimate the age and selection strength of a previously identified mutation underpinning cryptic colour adaptation in a wild deer mouse population, and compare our findings with previously published estimates as well as with geological data pertaining to the presumed shift in selective pressure. PMID:26576754

  14. Chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-bacteria associations.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Birgit E; Hynes, Michael F; Alexandre, Gladys M

    2016-04-01

    Beneficial plant-microbe associations play critical roles in plant health. Bacterial chemotaxis provides a competitive advantage to motile flagellated bacteria in colonization of plant root surfaces, which is a prerequisite for the establishment of beneficial associations. Chemotaxis signaling enables motile soil bacteria to sense and respond to gradients of chemical compounds released by plant roots. This process allows bacteria to actively swim towards plant roots and is thus critical for competitive root surface colonization. The complete genome sequences of several plant-associated bacterial species indicate the presence of multiple chemotaxis systems and a large number of chemoreceptors. Further, most soil bacteria are motile and capable of chemotaxis, and chemotaxis-encoding genes are enriched in the bacteria found in the rhizosphere compared to the bulk soil. This review compares the architecture and diversity of chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-associated bacteria and discusses their relevance to the rhizosphere lifestyle. While it is unclear how controlling chemotaxis via multiple parallel chemotaxis systems provides a competitive advantage to certain bacterial species, the presence of a larger number of chemoreceptors is likely to contribute to the ability of motile bacteria to survive in the soil and to compete for root surface colonization. PMID:26797793

  15. Microbial Beneficiation of Salem Iron Ore Using Penicillium purpurogenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M.; Pradhan, M.; Sukla, L. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2011-02-01

    High alumina and silica content in the iron ore affects coke rate, reducibility, and productivity in a blast furnace. Iron ore is being beneficiated all around the world to meet the quality requirement of iron and steel industries. Choosing a beneficiation treatment depends on the nature of the gangue present and its association with the ore structure. The advanced physicochemical methods used for the beneficiation of iron ore are generally unfriendly to the environment. Biobeneficiation is considered to be ecofriendly, promising, and revolutionary solutions to these problems. A characterization study of Salem iron ore indicates that the major iron-bearing minerals are hematite, magnetite, and goethite. Samples on average contains (pct) Fe2O3-84.40, Fe (total)-59.02, Al2O3-7.18, and SiO2-7.53. Penicillium purpurogenum (MTCC 7356) was used for the experiment . It removed 35.22 pct alumina and 39.41 pct silica in 30 days in a shake flask at 10 pct pulp density, 308 K (35 °C), and 150 rpm. In a bioreactor experiment at 2 kg scale using the same organism, it removed 23.33 pct alumina and 30.54 pct silica in 30 days at 300 rpm agitation and 2 to 3 l/min aeration. Alumina and silica dissolution follow the shrinking core model for both shake flask and bioreactor experiments.

  16. Beneficiating value-added products from combustion fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Y.; McMahan, L.; Gray, D.; Fauth, T.A.; Link, K.; Champagne, J.; Schoffstall, M.R.

    1999-07-01

    Two separation techniques, a dry triboelectrostatic and a wet agglomeration column technique, were developed for beneficiating value-added products from combustion fly ashes. The dry triboelectrostatic separation of fly ash derived from both coal combustion and the combustion of coal mixed with 10 wt.% biomass were conducted. Two different types of triboelectrostatic separators - parallel plate and louvered plate separators - were used for this study. It was found that the quality of separation was dependent upon the nature of fly ash and the configuration of the separator utilized. The development of an oil agglomeration process for the recovery of unburned carbon from fly ash required the optimization of the process. The beneficiation was performed using the six-foot agglomeration column under batch mode conditions. A systematic study on the effects of agglomerant, agitation speeds, air flows, feed rates and agglomerant/ash ratios on the quality of beneficiation was conducted. Preliminary results indicate that the unburned carbon products with the purity of 66 to 71% and the yields of 55 to 57% could be obtained under the optimum conditions studied. Selected applications (i.e., activated carbon, molecular sieves and catalytic application) from the fly ash derived products were explored.

  17. Shale-oil-recovery systems incorporating ore beneficiation. Final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, M.A.; Klumpar, I.V.; Peterson, C.R.; Ring, T.A.

    1982-10-01

    This study analyzed the recovery of oil from oil shale by use of proposed systems which incorporate beneficiation of the shale ore (that is concentration of the kerogen before the oil-recovery step). The objective was to identify systems which could be more attractive than conventional surface retorting of ore. No experimental work was carried out. The systems analyzed consisted of beneficiation methods which could increase kerogen concentrations by at least four-fold. Potentially attractive low-enrichment methods such as density separation were not examined. The technical alternatives considered were bounded by the secondary crusher as input and raw shale oil as output. A sequence of ball milling, froth flotation, and retorting concentrate is not attractive for Western shales compared to conventional ore retorting; transporting the concentrate to another location for retorting reduces air emissions in the ore region but cost reduction is questionable. The high capital and energy cost s results largely from the ball milling step which is very inefficient. Major improvements in comminution seem achievable through research and such improvements, plus confirmation of other assumptions, could make high-enrichment beneficiation competitive with conventional processing. 27 figures, 23 tables.

  18. Designing recombinant Pseudomonas strains to enhance biodesulfurization.

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, M E; Ferrández, A; De Lorenzo, V; García, J L; Díaz, E

    1997-01-01

    The dsz biodesulfurization cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 has been engineered under the control of heterologous broad-host-range regulatory signals to alleviate the mechanism of sulfur repression, and it was stably inserted into the chromosomes of different Pseudomonas strains. The recombinant bacteria were able to desulfurize dibenzothiophene more efficiently than the native host. Furthermore, these new biocatalysts combine relevant industrial and environmental traits, such as production of biosurfactants, with the enhanced biodesulfurization phenotype. PMID:9371464

  19. Tryptophan Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Rodriguez, Karien J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated in the pathology of chronic wounds. Both the d and l isoforms of tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on tissue culture plates, with an equimolar ratio of d and l isoforms producing the greatest inhibitory effect. Addition of d-/l-tryptophan to existing biofilms inhibited further biofilm growth and caused partial biofilm disassembly. Tryptophan significantly increased swimming motility, which may be responsible in part for diminished biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:23318791

  20. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  1. Adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens onto nanophase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Thomas J.; Tong, Zonghua; Liu, Jin; Banks, M. Katherine

    2005-07-01

    Nanobiotechnology is a growing area of research, primarily due to the potentially numerous applications of new synthetic nanomaterials in engineering/science. Although various definitions have been given for the word 'nanomaterials' by many different experts, the commonly accepted one refers to nanomaterials as those materials which possess grains, particles, fibres, or other constituent components that have one dimension specifically less than 100 nm. In biological applications, most of the research to date has focused on the interactions between mammalian cells and synthetic nanophase surfaces for the creation of better tissue engineering materials. Although mammalian cells have shown a definite positive response to nanophase materials, information on bacterial interactions with nanophase materials remains elusive. For this reason, this study was designed to assess the adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens on nanophase compared to conventional grain size alumina substrates. Results provide the first evidence of increased adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens on alumina with nanometre compared to conventional grain sizes. To understand more about the process, polymer (specifically, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid or PLGA) casts were made of the conventional and nanostructured alumina surfaces. Results showed similar increased Pseudomonas fluorescens capture on PLGA casts of nanostructured compared to conventional alumina as on the alumina itself. For these reasons, a key material property shown to enhance bacterial adhesion was elucidated in this study for both polymers and ceramics: nanostructured surface features.

  2. Pseudomonas putida Stimulates Primordia on Agaricus bitorquis.

    PubMed

    Colauto, Nelson B; Fermor, Terry R; Eira, Augusto F; Linde, Giani A

    2016-04-01

    Casing layer is one step of Agaricus bisporus cultivation where there is a competitive environment with a high number of microorganisms and diversity interacting with mycelia. It is suggested that a minimal community of these microorganisms would be necessary to stimulate fructification. However, A. bisporus is not able to produce primordia in sterile casing layers or Petri dishes. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize bacterial microbiota of casing layers from A. bisporus cultivation, isolate, identify and characterize the bacteria responsible for the stimulation of primordium and their action mechanism using Agaricus bitorquis as a primordium stimulation model. Bacterial and Pseudomonas spp. communities of different casing layers of A. bisporus cultivation were collected and quantified. It was concluded that Pseudomonas spp. corresponds to 75-85% of bacterial population of the casing layers in A. bisporus cultivation and among those 12% are Pseudomonas putida. Four biochemical assays were used to identify P. putida. In vitro primordium stimulation of living P. putida and non-living bacterial suspensions, after chemical or physical treatments, was tested using A. bitorquis as a primordium stimulation model. Primordium stimulation assay was registered by photographs, and micrographs of vertical cut of primordium were registered by scanning electron microscope. Interaction of living P. putida with A. bitorquis mycelia is capable of stimulating primordial instead of non-living bacterial suspensions. Stimulation of A. bitorquis primordia does not imply or is related to mycelial growth inhibition, but a hierarchical relation of primordium succession and development is suggested. PMID:26742772

  3. Using Pseudomonas spp. for Integrated Biological Control.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Stack, James P

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades as model organisms for biological control of plant disease. Currently, there are three commercial formulations of pseudomonads registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for plant disease suppression, Bio-Save 10 LP, Bio-Save 11 LP, and BlightBan A506. Bio-Save 10 LP and Bio-Save 11 LP, products of Jet Harvest Solutions, Longwood, FL, contain Pseudomonas syringae strains ESC-10 and ESC-11, respectively. These products are applied in packinghouses to prevent postharvest fungal diseases during storage of citrus, pome, stone fruits, and potatoes. BlightBan A506, produced by NuFarm Americas, Burr Ridge, IL, contains P. fluorescens strain A506. BlightBan A506 is applied primarily to pear and apple trees during bloom to suppress the bacterial disease fire blight. Combining BlightBan A506 with the antibiotic streptomycin improves control of fire blight, even in areas with streptomycin-resistant populations of the pathogen. BlightBan A506 also may reduce fruit russet and mild frost injury. These biocontrol products consisting of Pseudomonas spp. provide moderate to excellent efficacy against multiple production constraints, are relatively easy to apply, and they can be integrated with conventional products for disease control. These characteristics will contribute to the adoption of these products by growers and packinghouses. PMID:18944382

  4. [Identification of the Pseudomonas genus bacteria by computer analysis].

    PubMed

    Kotsofliak, O I; Reva, O N; Kiprianova, E A; Smirnov, V V

    2003-01-01

    A computer program for the simplified phenotypic identification of Pseudomonas has been developed. The information concerning 66 species included in up-to-date Pseudomonas genus characterized by 113 tests was accumulated in a database. The identification key is represented in interactive mode on a website http://www.imv.kiev.ua/PsmIK/default.htm. The program was used for the identification of 46 Pseudomonas strains isolated from rhizosphere. For 23 more strains unidentified by conventional technique, the level of similarity was 67-74%. This fact allows suggesting that they might be representatives of new Pseudomonas species. PMID:15077543

  5. Improved large-scale production of vitamin B12 by Pseudomonas denitrificans with betaine feeding.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Tai; Liu, Dong-Hong; Li, Yong-Liang; Chu, Ju; Wang, Yong-Hong; Zhuang, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Si-Liang

    2008-11-01

    The strategy of betaine control for vitamin B12 large-scale fermentation by Pseudomonas denitrificans was investigated in this paper. The results obtained in shake-flask experiments demonstrated that betaine could greatly stimulate vitamin B12 biosynthesis but had an inhibition to cell growth. Based on the influence of betaine on the fermentation of P. denitrificans, betaine feeding was a beneficial strategy to solve the inconsistency between cell growth and vitamin B12 production. As a result, an effective and economical strategy of betaine feeding was established for vitamin B12 fermentation in 120-m3 fermenter, in which betaine was continuously fed to maintain betaine concentration of the broth at the range of 5-7g/l during 50-140h of fermentation. PMID:18440227

  6. Role of Vfr in the regulation of antifungal compound production by Pseudomonas fluorescens FD6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxia; Ji, Yanyan; Xiao, Qi; Chng, Soonie; Tong, Yunhui; Chen, Xijun; Liu, Fengquan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens FD6 has been shown to possess many beneficial traits involved in the biocontrol of fungal plant pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea and Monilinia fructicola. Vfr (virulence factor regulator) a highly conserved global regulator of gram-negative bacteria, such as the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is required for the expression of many important virulence traits. The role of Vfr in the regulation of biocontrol traits, such as the production of antibiotics to control fungal pathogens by antagonistic bacteria, has not been elucidated. This study investigated the effect of a vfr mutant derived from P. fluorescens FD6 to better understand the regulation of some important biocontrol traits associated with the bacterium. Biochemical studies indicated that the production of the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin and pyoluteorin, was markedly enhanced in the vfr mutant. The vfr mutation also increased biofilm production, swimming motility and the expression of exopolysaccharide-associated gene (pelA, pslA and pslB) transcripts, but reduced protease production. Wheat rhizosphere and root tip colonization by the vfr mutant was higher than that by the wild type at 7 and 21days after inoculation. These findings demonstrate that Vfr modulates the expression of several key traits and the production of important antibiotics involved in the biocontrol potential of P. fluorescens FD6. PMID:27296968

  7. Is Beneficial Elitism Beneficial?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Jack A.

    1988-01-01

    Discussing Ralph Smith's monograph EXCELLENCE IN ART EDUCATION: IDEAS AND INITIATIVES, the author criticizes the reliance on "classics" or "masterpieces" for art education. Stating that Smith's elitism is unbeneficial, Hobbs advocates a mixture of the classics and local and popular art with a disposition to interpret and criticize. (GEA)

  8. High quality draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T) type strains.

    PubMed

    Peña, Arantxa; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Mulet, Magdalena; Gomila, Rosa M; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; García-Valdés, Elena; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas has the highest number of species out of any genus of Gram-negative bacteria and is phylogenetically divided into several groups. The Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch includes at least 13 species of environmental and industrial interest, plant-associated bacteria, insect pathogens, and even some members that have been found in clinical specimens. In the context of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project, we present the permanent, high-quality draft genomes of the type strains of 3 taxonomically and ecologically closely related species in the Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch: Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T). All three genomes are comparable in size (4.6-4.9 Mb), with 4,119-4,459 protein-coding genes. Average nucleotide identity based on BLAST comparisons and digital genome-to-genome distance calculations are in good agreement with experimental DNA-DNA hybridization results. The genome sequences presented here will be very helpful in elucidating the taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of the Pseudomonas putida species complex. PMID:27594974

  9. Beneficial insect borders provide northern bobwhite brood habitat.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Christopher E; Plush, Charles J; Orr, David B; Reberg-Horton, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Strips of fallow vegetation along cropland borders are an effective strategy for providing brood habitat for declining populations of upland game birds (Order: Galliformes), including northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), but fallow borders lack nectar-producing vegetation needed to sustain many beneficial insect populations (e.g., crop pest predators, parasitoids, and pollinator species). Planted borders that contain mixes of prairie flowers and grasses are designed to harbor more diverse arthropod communities, but the relative value of these borders as brood habitat is unknown. We used groups of six human-imprinted northern bobwhite chicks as a bioassay for comparing four different border treatments (planted native grass and prairie flowers, planted prairie flowers only, fallow vegetation, or mowed vegetation) as northern bobwhite brood habitat from June-August 2009 and 2010. All field border treatments were established around nine organic crop fields. Groups of chicks were led through borders for 30-min foraging trials and immediately euthanized, and eaten arthropods in crops and gizzards were measured to calculate a foraging rate for each border treatment. We estimated arthropod prey availability within each border treatment using a modified blower-vac to sample arthropods at the vegetation strata where chicks foraged. Foraging rate did not differ among border treatments in 2009 or 2010. Total arthropod prey densities calculated from blower-vac samples did not differ among border treatments in 2009 or 2010. Our results showed plant communities established to attract beneficial insects should maximize the biodiversity potential of field border establishment by providing habitat for beneficial insects and young upland game birds. PMID:24376759

  10. Beneficial Insect Borders Provide Northern Bobwhite Brood Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Moorman, Christopher E.; Plush, Charles J.; Orr, David B.; Reberg-Horton, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Strips of fallow vegetation along cropland borders are an effective strategy for providing brood habitat for declining populations of upland game birds (Order: Galliformes), including northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), but fallow borders lack nectar-producing vegetation needed to sustain many beneficial insect populations (e.g., crop pest predators, parasitoids, and pollinator species). Planted borders that contain mixes of prairie flowers and grasses are designed to harbor more diverse arthropod communities, but the relative value of these borders as brood habitat is unknown. We used groups of six human-imprinted northern bobwhite chicks as a bioassay for comparing four different border treatments (planted native grass and prairie flowers, planted prairie flowers only, fallow vegetation, or mowed vegetation) as northern bobwhite brood habitat from June-August 2009 and 2010. All field border treatments were established around nine organic crop fields. Groups of chicks were led through borders for 30-min foraging trials and immediately euthanized, and eaten arthropods in crops and gizzards were measured to calculate a foraging rate for each border treatment. We estimated arthropod prey availability within each border treatment using a modified blower-vac to sample arthropods at the vegetation strata where chicks foraged. Foraging rate did not differ among border treatments in 2009 or 2010. Total arthropod prey densities calculated from blower-vac samples did not differ among border treatments in 2009 or 2010. Our results showed plant communities established to attract beneficial insects should maximize the biodiversity potential of field border establishment by providing habitat for beneficial insects and young upland game birds. PMID:24376759

  11. Beneficial microstructured titania photoanodes for improving DSSC performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Saquib

    Critical assessment of economically viable renewable energy sources is essential for the development of a globally sustainable society. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) offer a viable alternative to traditional silicon and thin film photovoltaic (PV) technologies owing to their potential low cost and facile manufacturing. The two main challenges in enhancing device cell performance lie in improving the open circuit voltage (VOC), and suppressing recombination in the semiconductor TiO2 matrix. This thesis explores the latter challenge through investigation of a novel microstructured TiO2 photoanode system. In this research, we have synthesized CTAB-templated mesoporous, anatase, high surface area TiO2 using an acidic precursor to enhance dye adsorption. Through simple supramolecular self-assembly of the TiO2 particles during the synthesis, we have discovered a self-assembled system of TiO2 nanocrystallite aggregates with high surface area, which when applied as the photoanode in DSSCs, result in a novel high-roughness film beneficial for dye adsorption, and also lead to enhanced intrinsic light-scattering within the film itself. The TiO2 nanocrystallites are highly crystalline, with good interconnectivity for improved electron conduction. An additional unique and beneficial feature inherent of this novel photoanode film is its hierarchical meso- and macro-porosity, leading to improved electrolyte percolation through the TiO2 matrix---thereby providing better access to dye molecules for regeneration to occur more effectively (enhanced charge transfer). In all, we have fabricated a TiO2 system through a one-step process that incorporates key beneficial microstructural features crucial for enhancing DSSC behavior. We have further carried out critical TiCl4 surface treatment studies of this porous electrode structure of TiO2 aggregates to understand and improve upon recombination kinetics in the photonanode film matrix, together with enhancing its intrinsic light

  12. Beneficial use of coal combustion products continues to grow

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M.

    2008-07-01

    In August 2007 the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) released results of the Coal Combustion Products Production (CCP) and use survey. Production was 124,795,000 tons while beneficial use was 54,203,000 tons, a utilization rate of over 43%, 3% higher than in 2005. The article includes graphs of 40 years of CCP production and use and projected trade of CCP utilization until 2011. It also gives 2006 figures for Production and use of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, FGD gypsum and other FGD products, and FBC ash. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Conditioning of carbonaceous material prior to physical beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Warzinski, Robert P.; Ruether, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A carbonaceous material such as coal is conditioned by contact with a supercritical fluid prior to physical beneficiation. The solid feed material is contacted with an organic supercritical fluid such as cyclohexane or methanol at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature and pressures of 1 to 4 times the critical pressure. A minor solute fraction is extracted into critical phase and separated from the solid residuum. The residuum is then processed by physical separation such as by froth flotation or specific gravity separation to recover a substantial fraction thereof with reduced ash content. The solute in supercritical phase can be released by pressure reduction and recombined with the low-ash, carbonaceous material.

  14. Siderotyping of fluorescent pseudomonads: characterization of pyoverdines of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida strains from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J M; Stintzi, A; Coulanges, V; Shivaji, S; Voss, J A; Taraz, K; Budzikiewicz, H

    1998-11-01

    Five independent fluorescent pseudomonad isolates originating from Antarctica were analysed for their pyoverdine systems. A pyoverdine-related siderotyping, which involved pyoverdine-induced growth stimulation, pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake, pyoverdine analysis by electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing, revealed three different pyoverdine-related siderotypes among the five isolates. One siderotype, including Pseudomonas fluorescens 1W and P. fluorescens 10CW, was identical to that of P. fluorescens ATCC 13525. Two other strains, P. fluorescens 9AW and Pseudomonas putida 9BW, showed identical pyoverdine-related behaviour to each other, whereas the fifth strain, P. fluorescens 51W, had unique features compared to the other strains or to a set of 12 fluorescent Pseudomonas strains used as comparison material. Elucidation of the structure of the pyoverdines produced by the Antarctic strains supported the accuracy of the siderotyping methodology by confirming that pyoverdines from strains 1W and 10CW had the same structures as the P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 pyoverdine, whereas the 9AW and 9BW pyoverdines are probably identical with the pyoverdine of P. fluorescens strain 244. Pyoverdine from strain 51W appeared to be a novel pyoverdine since its structure was different from all previously established pyoverdine structures. Together with the conclusion that the Antarctic Pseudomonas strains have no special features at the level of their pyoverdines and pyoverdine-mediated iron metabolism compared to worldwide strains, the present work demonstrates that siderotyping provides a rapid means of screening for novel pyoverdines. PMID:9846748

  15. Genomics of Secondary Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas spp. are prolific producers of secondary metabolites, and the availability of genomic sequences now opens the door for discovery of novel natural products with potential roles in the ecology and plant growth promoting properties of these bacteria. The rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas f...

  16. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Marta; Wolf, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE) is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells. PMID:26441897

  17. Recombineering using RecET from Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  18. The Gac Regulon of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 showed that 702 genes were differentially regulated (FC>4, P<0.0001) in a gacS::Tn5 mutant, with 300 and 402 genes up- and down-regulated, respectively. Similar to the Gac-regulon of four other Pseudomonas species, genes involved in motility, b...

  19. CONSERVATION OF THE RESPONSE REGULATOR GENE GACA IN PSEUDOMONAS SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regulator gene gacA influences production of several secondary metabolites in Pseudomonas spp. Primers and a probe for the gacA gene of Pseudomonas spp. were developed and a gacA fragment was sequenced from 10 strains isolated from different plant-associated environments. PCR analysis and Sou...

  20. Prostaglandin signaling suppresses beneficial microglial function in Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jenny U; Woodling, Nathaniel S; Wang, Qian; Panchal, Maharshi; Liang, Xibin; Trueba-Saiz, Angel; Brown, Holden D; Mhatre, Siddhita D; Loui, Taylor; Andreasson, Katrin I

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells of the CNS, perform critical inflammatory and noninflammatory functions that maintain normal neural function. For example, microglia clear misfolded proteins, elaborate trophic factors, and regulate and terminate toxic inflammation. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, beneficial microglial functions become impaired, accelerating synaptic and neuronal loss. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to microglial dysfunction is an important objective for identifying potential strategies to delay progression to AD. The inflammatory cyclooxygenase/prostaglandin E2 (COX/PGE2) pathway has been implicated in preclinical AD development, both in human epidemiology studies and in transgenic rodent models of AD. Here, we evaluated murine models that recapitulate microglial responses to Aβ peptides and determined that microglia-specific deletion of the gene encoding the PGE2 receptor EP2 restores microglial chemotaxis and Aβ clearance, suppresses toxic inflammation, increases cytoprotective insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling, and prevents synaptic injury and memory deficits. Our findings indicate that EP2 signaling suppresses beneficial microglia functions that falter during AD development and suggest that inhibition of the COX/PGE2/EP2 immune pathway has potential as a strategy to restore healthy microglial function and prevent progression to AD. PMID:25485684

  1. DECONTAMINATING AND PROCESSING DREDGED MATERIAL FOR BENEFICIAL USE

    SciTech Connect

    CLESCERI,N.L.; STERN,E.A.; FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.

    2000-07-01

    Management of contaminated dredged material is a major problem in the Port of New York and New Jersey. One component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed by creation of a product suitable for beneficial use. This concept is the focus of a project now being carried out by the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region 2, the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District, the US Department of Energy-Brookhaven National Laboratory, and regional university groups that have included Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rutgers University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Stevens Institute of Technology. The project has gone through phased testing of commercial technologies at the bench scale (15 liters) and pilot scale (1.5--500 m{sup 3}) levels. Several technologies are now going forward to large-scale demonstrations that are intended to treat from 23,000 to 60,000 m{sup 3}. Selections of the technologies were made based on the effectiveness of the treatment process, evaluation of the possible beneficial use of the treated materials, and other factors. Major elements of the project are summarized here.

  2. Is Vitamin C Beneficial to Patients with CAP?

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Li, Guoping

    2016-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly and children. Vitamin C is known as a physiological antioxidant, regulating innate immune system in the lung. Vitamin C has been used to prevent and treat CAP. However, the use of vitamin C for preventing and treating CAP has been a subject of controversy. We aim to review the most significant findings about vitamin C supplementation in patients with pneumonia based on literature from the PubMed. First, we reviewed recent advances about the role of oxidative stress in CAP. Oxidative stress is a crucial component of the host defense system and inflammatory response. However, excessive oxidative stress can cause a systemic inflammatory response leading to tissue damage. The degree of oxidative stress has been associated with the severity of CAP. Vitamin C is beneficial to the host defense system by regulating the innate immunity in the lungs. We also discuss the prophylactic use of vitamin C for pneumonia. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the pneumonia risk in patients with vitamin C deficiency. However, it is not beneficial for prophylactic use of vitamin C to prevent pneumonia in the well-nourished population. Finally, we summarize the effect of vitamin C on mechanical ventilation used during respiratory failure. Administration of vitamin C decreases the duration of mechanical ventilation by decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:27363830

  3. [Alcohol--when it's beneficial to your health?].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmumt; Pypno, Damian; Bugaj, Bartosz; Cabała, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Ethyl alcohol is the most commonly used psychoactive agent. It's average consumption in Poland totaled 9.67 liters per capita in 2013. Ethanol's biotransformation rate in an adult ranges from 7 to 10 grams per hour. The basic metabolism takes place in the liver through the oxidation involving NAD+. The alcohol is transformed first into acetaldehyde and then into acetic acid. In higher blood concentrations or in alcoholism, cytochrome's P-450 coenzyme CYP2E1 also plays an important role in this process. Alcohol is responsible for nearly 50% of annual deaths, mostly caused by an accident due to alcohol intoxication while driving. Studies were performed to determine the influence ethanol has on the human body and how it impacts the progression of illnesses such as senile dementia, cardiovascular diseases or osteoporosis. Scientists' attention was drawn to the possibility of ethyl alcohol's usage resulting in a reduction in an overall mortality rate, however the beneficial effects were observed only during a slight and moderate consumption. Higher doses of alcohol were associated with a decline in patient's condition. The purpose of this dissertation is an attempt to answer the question, whether the alcohol can be beneficial to the user's health and if so, in what doses? The importance of this topic comes from the fact that due to the alcohol being widely available, determining the influence it has on human body is vital for public health. Original articles and reviews were used to summarize the results of studies regarding the topic. PMID:26802685

  4. Beneficial effect of sesame oil on heavy metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Victor Raj Mohan; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2014-02-01

    Heavy metals become toxic when they are not metabolized by the body and accumulate in the soft tissue. Chelation therapy is mainly for the management of heavy metal-induced toxicity; however, it usually causes adverse effects or completely blocks the vital function of the particular metal chelated. Much attention has been paid to the development of chelating agents from natural sources to counteract lead- and iron-induced hepatic and renal damage. Sesame oil (a natural edible oil) and sesamol (an active antioxidant) are potently beneficial for treating lead- and iron-induced hepatic and renal toxicity and have no adverse effects. Sesame oil and sesamol significantly inhibit iron-induced lipid peroxidation by inhibiting the xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radical generation. In addition, sesame oil is a potent inhibitor of proinflammatory mediators, and it attenuates lead-induced hepatic damage by inhibiting nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-1β levels. Because metal chelating therapy is associated with adverse effects, treating heavy metal toxicity in addition with sesame oil and sesamol may be better alternatives. This review deals with the possible use and beneficial effects of sesame oil and sesamol during heavy metal toxicity treatment. PMID:23744838

  5. Characterization and Beneficiation Studies of a Low Grade Bauxite Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. S.; Das, B.

    2014-10-01

    A low grade bauxite sample of central India was thoroughly characterized with the help of stereomicroscope, reflected light microscope and electron microscope using QEMSCAN. A few hand picked samples were collected from different places of the mine and were subjected to geochemical characterization studies. The geochemical studies indicated that most of the samples contain high silica and low alumina, except a few which are high grade. Mineralogically the samples consist of bauxite (gibbsite and boehmite), ferruginous mineral phases (goethite and hematite), clay and silicate (quartz), and titanium bearing minerals like rutile and ilmenite. Majority of the gibbsite, boehmite and gibbsitic oolites contain clay, quartz and iron and titanium mineral phases within the sample as inclusions. The sample on an average contains 39.1 % Al2O3 and 12.3 % SiO2, and 20.08 % of Fe2O3. Beneficiation techniques like size classification, sorting, scrubbing, hydrocyclone and magnetic separation were employed to reduce the silica content suitable for Bayer process. The studies indicated that, 50 % by weight with 41 % Al2O3 containing less than 5 % SiO2 could be achieved. The finer sized sample after physical beneficiation still contains high silica due to complex mineralogical associations.

  6. Awareness and benefits drive increasing CCP beneficial use

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    The American Coal Ash Association recently released its annual Coal Combustion Product Production and Use Survey, reporting that 123.1 million tons of CCPs were produced in 2005. About 40% were used beneficially or 49.6 million tons. This represents a slight 0.21% increase from 2004 when 49 million tons of CCPs were used, of 122.4 million tons produced. An increase of 0.53% was reported for 2004. The use of coal combustion products, reported in 15 survey categories, creates a wide array of extraordinary environmental, economic and technical advantages that meet US industry and government objectives. Fly ash use accounts for 13 of 15 categories tracked by the survey. Of 71.1 million tons produced, 29 million was used in such applications as concrete products, structural fills and cement raw feed for clinker. Bottom ash production amounted to 17.6 million tons in 2005 - a slight 2.3% rise - while utilisation dropped 7% from 8 to 7.5 million tons. Of 11.8 million tons produced, 77.4% or 9.2 million tons of FGD gypsum was used in 2005. Boiler slag has the highest ratio of beneficial use at 96.6%. Of the 1.96 million tons produced, 1.89 million tons was used in 2005. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 4 photos.

  7. Siderotyping of Antarctic fluorescent Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, V A; Meyer, J M

    2004-07-01

    Five fluorescent Pseudomonas strains isolated from Antarctica have been previously recognized as producing three structurally different pyoverdines. In the present work, siderotyping procedures have been used to classify these strains, together with 1282 isolates of different origins, into siderovars. The strain biodiversity encountered within each siderovar, as well as the potential taxonomic value of the siderovars, are described and discussed. It is concluded that a majority of antarctic strains are commonly distributed worldwide. One strain, however, presenting a particular pyoverdine structure found in a unique other isolate, was apparently much more specific to cold environment. PMID:15559975

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection mimicking erythema annulare centrifugum.

    PubMed

    Czechowicz, R T; Warren, L J; Moore, L; Saxon, B

    2001-02-01

    A 3-year-old girl receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukaemia developed a rapidly expanding red annular plaque on her thigh, initially without signs of systemic toxicity or local pain. Subsequently she developed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis and purpura at the leading edge of the plaque. Skin biopsy showed an extensive necrotizing vasculitis with numerous Gram-negative bacilli in the blood vessel walls. In immunocompromised individuals, skin biopsy and culture of cutaneous lesions for bacteria and fungi should be considered even in the absence of signs of systemic toxicity or multiple lesions. PMID:11233725

  9. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proteome during Anaerobic Growth‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Guina, Tina; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Nguyen, Hai; Eng, Jimmy; Miller, Samuel I.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope-coded affinity tag analysis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins expressed during anaerobic growth. Out of the 617 proteins identified, 158 were changed in abundance during anaerobic growth compared to during aerobic growth, including proteins whose increased expression was expected based on their role in anaerobic metabolism. These results form the basis for future analyses of alterations in bacterial protein content during growth in various environments, including the cystic fibrosis airway. PMID:16291692

  10. Chromate resistance plasmid in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, L H; Chakrabarty, A M; Ehrlich, H L

    1983-01-01

    Chromate resistance of Pseudomonas fluorescens LB300, isolated from chromium-contaminated sediment in the upper Hudson River, was found to be plasmid specified. Loss of the plasmid (pLHB1) by spontaneous segregation or mitomycin C curing resulted in a simultaneous loss of chromate resistance. Subsequent transformation of such strains with purified pLHB1 plasmid DNA resulted in a simultaneous re-acquisition of the chromate resistance phenotype and the plasmid. When pLHB1 was transferred by conjugation to Escherichia coli, the plasmid still conferred chromate resistance. PMID:6309741

  11. Transposon mutagenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotease genes.

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, M J; Jagger, K S; Warren, R L

    1984-01-01

    Transposon Tn5 was used to generate protease-deficient insertion mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The presence of Tn5 in the chromosome of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated by transduction and DNA-DNA hybridization. The altered protease production and kanamycin resistance were cotransduced into a wild-type P. aeruginosa strain. A radiolabeled probe of Tn5 DNA hybridized to specific BamHI fragments isolated from the insertion mutants. Two independently isolated Tn5 insertion mutants had reduced protease production, partially impaired elastase activity, and no immunologically reactive alkaline protease. Images PMID:6317657

  12. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Abd El-Aziz, M.; Badr, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2007-02-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Consequently, Au NPs were formed due to reduction of gold ion by bacterial cell supernatant of P. aeruginos ATCC 90271, P. aeruginos (2) and P. aeruginos (1). The UV-Vis. and fluorescence spectra of the bacterial as well as chemical prepared Au NPs were recorded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the range of 15-30 nm. The process of reduction being extracellular and may lead to the development of an easy bioprocess for synthesis of Au NPs.

  13. Postoperative infant septicemia caused by Pseudomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2).

    PubMed

    Freney, J; Hansen, W; Etienne, J; Vandenesch, F; Fleurette, J

    1988-06-01

    Pseudomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) were both isolated from the same blood culture of a 5-month-old infant, 8 days after open-heart surgery. He quickly responded to appropriate antibiotics. Carbon substrate assimilation tests and fatty acid analysis clearly differentiated these two rarely pathogenic organisms. PMID:3384937

  14. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOAL-CALIGENES KF707

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. hese results are attributed to differences in the...

  15. Genome Survey and Characterization of Endophytic Bacteria Exhibiting a Beneficial Effect on Growth and Development of Poplar Trees ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Garafola, Craig; Monchy, Sébastien; Newman, Lee; Hoffman, Adam; Weyens, Nele; Barac, Tanja; Vangronsveld, Jaco; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The association of endophytic bacteria with their plant hosts has a beneficial effect for many different plant species. Our goal is to identify endophytic bacteria that improve the biomass production and the carbon sequestration potential of poplar trees (Populus spp.) when grown in marginal soil and to gain an insight in the mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated a collection of 78 bacterial endophytes isolated from poplar and willow trees. As representatives for the dominant genera of endophytic gammaproteobacteria, we selected Enterobacter sp. strain 638, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia R551-3, Pseudomonas putida W619, and Serratia proteamaculans 568 for genome sequencing and analysis of their plant growth-promoting effects, including root development. Derivatives of these endophytes, labeled with gfp, were also used to study the colonization of their poplar hosts. In greenhouse studies, poplar cuttings (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra DN-34) inoculated with Enterobacter sp. strain 638 repeatedly showed the highest increase in biomass production compared to cuttings of noninoculated control plants. Sequence data combined with the analysis of their metabolic properties resulted in the identification of many putative mechanisms, including carbon source utilization, that help these endophytes to thrive within a plant environment and to potentially affect the growth and development of their plant hosts. Understanding the interactions between endophytic bacteria and their host plants should ultimately result in the design of strategies for improved poplar biomass production on marginal soils as a feedstock for biofuels. PMID:19060168

  16. OXIDATIVE ASSIMILATION OF GLUCOSE BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Margaret G.; Campbell, J. J. R.

    1962-01-01

    Duncan, Margaret G. (The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) and J. J. R. Campbell. Oxidative assimilation of glucose by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Bacteriol. 84:784–792. 1962—Oxidative assimilation of glucose by washed-cell suspensions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied using C14-labeled substrate. At the time of glucose disappearance, only small amounts of radioactivity were present in the cells, and α-ketoglutaric acid accumulated in the supernatant fluid. Most of the material synthesized by the cells during oxidative assimilation was nitrogenous, the ammonia being supplied by the endogenous respiration. The cold trichloroacetic acid-soluble fraction and the lipid fraction appeared to be important during the early stages of oxidative assimilation, and the largest percentage of the incorporated radioactivity was found in the protein fraction. In the presence of added ammonia, assimilation was greatly increased and no α-ketoglutaric acid was found in the supernatant fluid. Sodium azide partially inhibited incorporation into all major cell fractions, and at higher concentrations depressed the rate of glucose oxidation. During oxidative assimilation, chloramphenicol specifically inhibited the synthesis of protein. Oxidative assimilation of glucose by this organism did not appear to involve the synthesis of a primary product such as is found in the majority of bacteria. PMID:16561965

  17. Methylmercury degradation by Pseudomonas putida V1.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Lucélia; Yu, Ri-Qing; Crane, Sharron; Giovanella, Patricia; Barkay, Tamar; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2016-08-01

    Environmental contamination of mercury (Hg) has caused public health concerns with focuses on the neurotoxic substance methylmercury, due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. The goals of the present study were to examine: (i) the transformation of methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate and mercuric chloride by cultures of Pseudomonas putida V1, (ii) the presence of the genes merA and merB in P. putida V1, and (iii) the degradation pathways of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Strain V1 cultures readily degraded methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercury acetate, and reduced mercuric chloride into gaseous Hg(0). However, the Hg transformation in LB broth by P. putida V1 was influenced by the type of Hg compounds. The merA gene was detected in P. putida V1, on the other hand, the merB gene was not detected. The sequencing of this gene, showed high similarity (100%) to the mercuric reductase gene of other Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, tests using radioactive (14)C-methylmercury indicated an uncommon release of (14)CO2 concomitant with the production of Hg(0). The results of the present work suggest that P. putida V1 has the potential to remove methylmercury from contaminated sites. More studies are warranted to determine the mechanism of removal of methylmercury by P. putida V1. PMID:27062344

  18. Beneficiation and extraction of nonterrestrial materials, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    A review of options for processing extraterrestrial materials was dominated by industrial materials scientist who tried to identify which processes utilizing space materials could be implemented in the near term. The most practical process seem to us to be the extraction of lunar oxygen and the extraction of metals and ceramics from the residues of the reduction process. The growth of space activity will be accompanied by increased demand for liquid oxygen for each round trip to the Moon. The oxygen and the intermediary product water will be needed for the life support at the base. The reduced metals and ceramics may be considered byproducts or may develop into primary products. Some of the same processes would be directly applicable to recovery of products from asteroids. We also discussed other processes for directly utilizing asteroid metals. Some of the topics covered include beneficiation and oxygen extraction methods, metallurgy, and extraterrestrial cement.

  19. Glutamine supplementation in sick children: is it beneficial?

    PubMed

    Mok, Elise; Hankard, Régis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a critical appraisal of the literature on Glutamine (Gln) supplementation in various conditions or illnesses that affect children, from neonates to adolescents. First, a general overview of the proposed mechanisms for the beneficial effects of Gln is provided, and subsequently clinical studies are discussed. Despite safety, studies are conflicting, partly due to different effects of enteral and parenteral Gln supplementation. Further insufficient evidence is available on the benefits of Gln supplementation in pediatric patients. This includes premature infants, infants with gastrointestinal disease, children with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome, malnutrition/diarrhea, cancer, severe burns/trauma, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, methodological issues have been noted in some studies. Further mechanistic data is needed along with large randomized controlled trials in select populations of sick children, who may eventually benefit from supplemental Gln. PMID:22175008

  20. Glutamine Supplementation in Sick Children: Is It Beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Elise; Hankard, Régis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a critical appraisal of the literature on Glutamine (Gln) supplementation in various conditions or illnesses that affect children, from neonates to adolescents. First, a general overview of the proposed mechanisms for the beneficial effects of Gln is provided, and subsequently clinical studies are discussed. Despite safety, studies are conflicting, partly due to different effects of enteral and parenteral Gln supplementation. Further insufficient evidence is available on the benefits of Gln supplementation in pediatric patients. This includes premature infants, infants with gastrointestinal disease, children with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome, malnutrition/diarrhea, cancer, severe burns/trauma, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, methodological issues have been noted in some studies. Further mechanistic data is needed along with large randomized controlled trials in select populations of sick children, who may eventually benefit from supplemental Gln. PMID:22175008

  1. Hydrochloric acid method of beneficiating magnesite using a pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sertin, V.A.; Galkin, Y.M.; Gemusova, I.B.; Glezer, E.B.; Khaltyurin, V.A.; Kislitsyn, V.I.; Rodde, T.V.; Simonov, K.V.; Vetlugina, N.A.; Yurlova, L.N.; Zakutinskii, V.L.

    1985-07-01

    One feature of the HCl treatment of magnesite is the possibility of using the main mass of HCl in a closed cycle. Regeneration of the HCl takes place during the thermal hydrolysis of the purified solution of magnesium chloride. In accordance with the plan drawn up by the Eastern Institute of Refractories and the Ukranian Institute of Chemistry, a pilot plant has been built at the Magnesite Combine; this has been mastered and is used for the hydrochloric acid treatment of magnesite; the annual productivity of the equipment is 400 tons. Some features of the process of dissolution of natural and caustic magnesite in HCL and the sintering of the beneficiated product have been considered elsewhere. This paper pays particular attention to the apparatus-process character and considers in more detail the hydrolysis of magnesium chloride.

  2. Beneficially reusing LLRW the Savannah River Site Stainless Steel Program

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1993-09-09

    With 68 radioactively contaminated excess Process Water Heat Exchangers the Savannah River Site launched its program to turn potential LLRW metal liabilities into assets. Each Heat Exchanger contains approximately 100 tons of 304 Stainless Steel and could be disposed as LLRW by land burial. Instead the 7000 tons of metal will be recycled into LLRW, HLW, and TRU waste containers thereby eliminating the need for near term land disposal and also eliminating the need to add more clean metal to the waste stream. Aspects of the partnership between DOE and Private Industry necessary to accomplish this new mission are described. A life cycle cost analysis associated with past practices of using carbon steel containers to indefinitely store material (contributing to the creation of today`s legacy waste problems) is presented. The avoided cost calculations needed to support the economics of the ``Indifference`` decision process in assessing the Beneficial Reuse option relative to the Burial option are described.

  3. Beneficial and harmful roles of bacteria from the Clostridium genus.

    PubMed

    Samul, Dorota; Worsztynowicz, Paulina; Leja, Katarzyna; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria of the Clostridium genus are often described only as a biological threat and a foe of mankind. However, many of them have positive properties and thanks to them they may be used in many industry branches (e.g., in solvents and alcohol production, in medicine, and also in esthetic cosmetology). During the last 10 years interest in application of C. botulinum and C. tetani in medicine significantly increased. Currently, the structure and biochemical properties of neurotoxins produced by these bacterial species, as well as possibilities of application of such toxins as botulinum as a therapeutic factor in humans, are being intensely researched. The main aim of this article is to demonstrate that bacteria from Clostridium spp. are not only pathogens and the enemy of humanity but they also have many important beneficial properties which make them usable among many chemical, medical, and cosmetic applications. PMID:24432307

  4. Acceptance for Beneficial Use Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid L

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-11-17

    This is a final Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid ''L''. PIC skid ''L'' is ready for pumping tank U-105. All the testing and documentation has been completed as required on the ABU checklist. This ABU covers only the readiness of the PIC skid ''L''. Other U-farm preparations including dilution tank fabrication, portable exhauster readiness, leak detection, valve pit preparation, and the Operation Control Station readiness are not part of this ABU. PIC skid ''L'' is a new skid fabricated and tested at Site Fabrication Services. The skid controls the jet pump and monitors various instruments associated with the pumping operation. This monitoring includes leak detection along the waste transfer route and flammable gases in the pump pit.

  5. Rate of fixation of beneficial mutations in sexual populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia, Joseilme F.; de Oliveira, Viviane M.; Sátiro, Caio; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2009-06-01

    We have investigated the rate of substitution of advantageous mutations in populations of haploid organisms where the rate of recombination can be controlled. We have verified that in all the situations recombination speeds up adaptation through recombination of beneficial mutations from distinct lineages in a single individual, and so reducing the intensity of clonal interference. The advantage of sex for adaptation is even stronger when deleterious mutations occur since now recombination can also restore genetic background free of deleterious mutations. However, our simulation results demonstrate that evidence of clonal interference, as increased mean selective effect of fixed mutations and reduced likelihood of fixation of small-effect mutations, are also present in sexual populations. What we see is that this evidence is delayed when compared to asexual populations.

  6. Physical beneficiation of char and chemically conditioned coal

    SciTech Connect

    Warzinski, R.P.; Cavallaro, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    Demineralization of coals and coal-derived chars is part of an effort to develop alternative fuels from coal. Pyrolysis and some gasification processes yield chars containing a large fraction of the calorific value of the feed coal and essentially all of its mineral matter. In the work reported here, three gasification chars produced from anthracite, bituminous, and subbituminous coals have been subjected to specific gravity separation to determine their yield-ash relationships. Either low yields or high ash levels in the float products were observed. Also reported is preliminary work concerning the use of chemical conditioning to enhance the cleanability of coal prior to physical beneficiation. Conditioning of an Illinois No. 6 River King Mine coal with either supercritical methanol or cyclohexane resulted in an improved yield-ash relationship, whereas similar treatment with supercritical toluene had a negative effect.

  7. The beneficial effects of taurine in preventing metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Guo, Junxia; Zhang, Yanzhen; Zhang, Jing

    2016-04-20

    Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, has become a very serious public health concern. A number of studies have provided evidence that taurine has an efficient action against metabolic syndrome, which includes reducing triglycerides to prevent obesity, improving insulin resistance to regulate glucose metabolism, lowering cholesterol (especially decreasing VLDL + LDL cholesterol and increasing HDL cholesterol) to prevent diet-induced hypercholesterolemia, and regulating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the kallikrein-kinin system etc. to reduce blood pressure. This review summarizes the data from in vitro, animal and limited human studies of beneficial effects of taurine on obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and addresses the possible metabolic and molecular mechanisms of the prevention of metabolic syndrome by taurine. PMID:26918249

  8. Sweetgum: An ancient source of beneficial compounds with modern benefits

    PubMed Central

    Lingbeck, Jody M.; O’Bryan, Corliss A.; Martin, Elizabeth M.; Adams, Joshua P.; Crandall, Philip G.

    2015-01-01

    Sweetgum trees are large, deciduous trees found in Asia and North America. Sweetgum trees are important resources for medicinal and other beneficial compounds. Many of the medicinal properties of sweetgum are derived from the resinous sap that exudes when the outer bark of the tree has been damaged. The sap, known as storax, has been used for centuries to treat common ailments such as skin problems, coughs, and ulcers. More recently, storax has proven to be a strong antimicrobial agent even against multidrug resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition to the sap, the leaves, bark, and seeds of sweetgum also possess beneficial compounds such as shikimic acid, a precursor to the production of oseltamivir phosphate, the active ingredient in Tamiflu®–an antiviral drug effective against several influenza viruses. Other extracts derived from sweetgum trees have shown potential as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, and chemopreventive agents. The compounds found in the extracts derived from sweetgum sap suppress hypertension in mice. Extracts from sweetgum seeds have anticonvulsant effects, which may make them suitable in the treatment of epilepsy. In addition to the potential medicinal uses of sweetgum extracts, the extracts of the sap possess antifungal activity against various phytopathogenic fungi and have been effective treatments for reducing nematodes and the yellow mosquito, Aedes aegypti, populations thus highlighting the potential of these extracts as environment-friendly pesticides and antifungal agents. The list of value-added products derived from sweetgum trees can be increased by continued research of this abundantly occurring tree. PMID:26009686

  9. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1990-11-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.'' The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE's laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

  10. Management and treatment of contact lens-related Pseudomonas keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, Mark DP

    2012-01-01

    Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles referring to Pseudomonas keratitis between the years 2007 and 2012 to obtain an overview of the current state of this disease. Keyword searches used the terms “Pseudomonas” + “Keratitis” limit to “2007–2012”, and [“Ulcerative” or “Microbial”] + “Keratitis” + “Contact lenses” limit to “2007–2012”. These articles were then reviewed for information on the percentage of microbial keratitis cases associated with contact lens wear, the frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of microbial keratitis around the world, the most common therapies to treat Pseudomonas keratitis, and the sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The percentage of microbial keratitis associated with contact lens wear ranged from 0% in a study from Nepal to 54.5% from Japan. These differences may be due in part to different frequencies of contact lens wear. The frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of keratitis ranged from 1% in Japan to over 50% in studies from India, Malaysia, and Thailand. The most commonly reported agents used to treat Pseudomonas keratitis were either aminoglycoside (usually gentamicin) fortified with a cephalosporin, or monotherapy with a fluoroquinolone (usually ciprofloxacin). In most geographical areas, most strains of Pseudomonas sp. (≥95%) were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, but reports from India, Nigeria, and Thailand reported sensitivity to this antibiotic and similar fluoroquinolones of between 76% and 90%. PMID:22791973

  11. Pseudomonas helmanticensis sp. nov., isolated from forest soil.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Cuesta, Maria José; Flores-Félix, José David; Mulas, Rebeca; Rivas, Raúl; Castro-Pinto, Joao; Brañas, Javier; Mulas, Daniel; González-Andrés, Fernando; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2014-07-01

    A bacterial strain, OHA11(T), was isolated during the course of a study of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria occurring in a forest soil from Salamanca, Spain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain OHA11(T) shared 99.1% similarity with respect to Pseudomonas baetica a390(T), and 98.9% similarity with the type strains of Pseudomonas jessenii, Pseudomonas moorei, Pseudomonas umsongensis, Pseudomonas mohnii and Pseudomonas koreensis. The analysis of housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB confirmed its phylogenetic affiliation to the genus Pseudomonas and showed similarities lower than 95% in almost all cases with respect to the above species. Cells possessed two polar flagella. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c/iso-C15 : 0 2-OH). The strain was oxidase-, catalase- and urease-positive, positive for arginine dihydrolase but negative for nitrate reduction, β-galactosidase production and aesculin hydrolysis. It was able to grow at 31 °C and at pH 11. The DNA G+C content was 58.1 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values lower than 49% relatedness with respect to the type strains of the seven closest related species. Therefore, the combined genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data support the classification of strain OHA11(T) to a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas helmanticensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is OHA11(T) ( = LMG 28168(T) = CECT 8548(T)). PMID:24744015

  12. Oxidation of substituted phenols by Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6

    SciTech Connect

    Spain, J.C.; Gibson, D.T.

    1988-06-01

    The biodegradation of benzene, toluene, and chlorobenzenes by Pseudomonas putida involves the initial conversion of the parent molecules to cis-dihydrodiols by dioxygenase enzyme systems. The cis-dihydrodiols are then converted to the corresponding catechols by dihydrodiol dehydrogenase enzymes. Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6 uses a similar system for growth on toluene or dichlorobenzenes. We tested the wild-type organisms and a series of mutants for their ability to transform substituted phenols after induction with toluene. When grown on toluene, both wild-type organisms converted methyl-, chloro-, and nitro-substituted phenols to the corresponding catechols. Mutant strains deficient in dihydrodiol dehydrogenase or catechol oxygenase activities also transformed the phenols. Oxidation of phenols was closely correlated with the induction and activity of the toluene dioxygenase enzyme system.

  13. The formation of choline O-sulphate by Pseudomonas C12B and other Pseudomonas species

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Pseudomonas C12B and other Pseudomonas species released larger amounts of a 35S-labelled metabolite into the medium when cultured on growth-limiting concentrations of Na2SO4 as opposed to growth in SO42−-sufficient media. The metabolite was found at all stages of the culture cycle of Pseudomonas C12B and maximum quantities occurred in stationary-phase culture supernatants. The metabolite was not detected when the bacterium was cultured on growth-limiting concentrations of potassium phosphate. The amount of the metabolite present in the medium greatly exceeded that which could be extracted from intact cells and, except for choline chloride, it was independent of the carbon source used for growth. If choline chloride was present in high concentration, then larger amounts of the metabolite were found in the culture medium. The metabolite was not detected extracellularly or intracellularly when the bacterium was grown in SO42−-deficient media containing 5mm-l-cysteine. The same metabolite was also synthesized in vitro only when Pseudomonas C12B extracts were incubated with choline chloride, ATP, MgCl2 and Na235SO4. The metabolite-forming system was not subject to repression by Na2SO4 and was completely inhibited by 0.5mm-l-cysteine and activated by Na2SO4 (up to 1.0mm). The metabolite was identified as choline O-sulphate by electrophoresis, chromatography and isotope-dilution analysis. Another 35S-labelled metabolite was also detected in culture supernatants, but was not identified. PMID:4590202

  14. Pseudomonas-induced corneal ulcers associated with contaminated eye mascaras.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L A; Ahearn, D G

    1977-07-01

    Seven Pseudomonas-induced corneal ulcers were associated with the use of four brands of mascara contaminated with P. aeruginosa. In laboratory studies, preservative systems of three of the four brands were inadequate in comparison with a control mascara of known antimicrobial activity. If the corneal epithelium is scratched during the application of mascara, particularly if the applicator is old, the cornea should be treated immediately and the mascara cultured to detect Pseudomonas. The high incidence of recurrent corneal ulceration in cases of Pseudomonas-induced keratitis indicates that initial chemotherapy should be intensive and maintained until the lesion stabilizes. PMID:409295

  15. Mild oxidative stress is beneficial for sperm telomere length maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Swetasmita; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Neeta; Dada, Rima

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate telomere length in sperm DNA and its correlation with oxidative stress (normal, mild, severe). METHODS: The study included infertile men (n = 112) and age matched fertile controls (n = 102). The average telomere length from the sperm DNA was measured using a quantitative real time PCR based assay. Seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 8-Isoprostane (8-IP) levels were measured by chemiluminescence assay and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: Average sperm telomere length in infertile men and controls was 0.609 ± 0.15 and 0.789 ± 0.060, respectively (P < 0.0001). Seminal ROS levels in infertile was higher [66.61 ± 28.32 relative light units (RLU)/s/million sperm] than in controls (14.04 ± 10.67 RLU/s/million sperm) (P < 0.0001). The 8-IP level in infertile men was significantly higher (421.55 ± 131.29 pg/mL) than in controls (275.94 ± 48.13 pg/mL) (P < 0.001). When correlated to oxidative stress, in normal range of oxidative stress (ROS, 0-21.3 RLU/s/million sperm) the average telomere length in cases was 0.663 ± 0.14, in mild oxidative stress (ROS, 21.3-35 RLU/s/million sperm) it was elevated (0.684 ± 0.12) and in severe oxidative stress (ROS > 35 RLU/s/million sperm) average telomere length was decreased to 0.595 ± 0.15. CONCLUSION: Mild oxidative stress results in lengthening of telomere length, but severe oxidative stress results in shorter telomeres. Although telomere maintenance is a complex trait, the study shows that mild oxidative stress is beneficial in telomere length maintenance and thus a delicate balance needs to be established to maximize the beneficial effects of free radicals and prevent harmful effects of supra physiological levels. Detailed molecular evaluation of telomere structure, its correlation with oxidative stress would aid in elucidating the cause of accelerated telomere length attrition. PMID:27376021

  16. Transferable imipenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Iyobe, S; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1991-01-01

    We isolated an imipenem-resistant strain, GN17203, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain produced a beta-lactamase that hydrolyzed imipenem. The beta-lactamase was encoded by a 31-MDa plasmid, pMS350, which belongs to incompatibility group P-9. The plasmic conferred resistance to beta-lactams, gentamicin, and sulfonamide and was transferable by conjugation to P. aeruginosa but not to Escherichia coli. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 28,000, and the isoelectric point was 9.0. The enzyme showed a broad substrate profile, hydrolyzing imipenem, oxyiminocephalosporins, 7-methoxycephalosporins, and penicillins. The enzyme activity was inhibited by EDTA, iodine, p-chloromercuribenzoate, CuSO4, and HgCl2 but not by clavulanic acid or sulbactam. Images PMID:1901695

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Kalpana Badami; Jayadev, Chaitra

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23803484

  19. Regulation of pyrimidine formation in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2007-10-01

    The regulation of pyrimidine formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was investigated at the level of enzyme synthesis and at the level of activity for the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase. Although pyrimidine supplementation of succinate-grown P. oryzihabitans cells produced little effect on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme activities, pyrimidine limitation experiments undertaken using an orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase mutant strain isolated from P. oryzihabitans ATCC 43272 indicated that repression of enzyme synthesis by pyrimidines was occurring. Following pyrimidine limitation of the succinate-grown decarboxylase mutant strain cells, aspartate transcarbamoylase and dihydroorotase activities were found to increase by about 3-fold while dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase activities were also observed to increase relative to their activities in the mutant strain cells grown on excess uracil. At the level of enzyme activity, aspartate transcarbamoylase in P. oryzihabitans was strongly inhibited by pyrophosphate, ADP, ATP and GTP in the presence of saturating substrate concentrations. PMID:17910097

  20. Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kuwait soil.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Akbar, Abrar

    2015-02-01

    Environmentally ubiquitous bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolved mechanisms to adapt and prevail under diverse conditions. In the current investigation, strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrating high rates of crude oil utilization and tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals were found in both crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated sites in Kuwait, and were dominant in the contaminated sites. The incidence of P. aeruginosa in tested soils implies the definitive pattern of crude oil contamination in the selection of the bacterial population in petroleum-contaminated sites in Kuwait. Surprisingly, the unculturable P. aeruginosa in different soil samples showed significant high similarity coefficients based on 16S-RFLP analyses, implying that the unculturable fraction of existing bacterial population in environmental samples is more stable and, hence, reliable for phylogenetic studies compared to the culturable bacteria. PMID:25014900

  1. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  2. Vesiculation from Pseudomonas aeruginosa under SOS

    PubMed Central

    Maredia, Reshma; Devineni, Navya; Lentz, Peter; Dallo, Shatha F.; Yu, JiehJuen; Guentzel, Neal; Chambers, James; Arulanandam, Bernard; Haskins, William E.; Weitao, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections can be aggravated by antibiotic treatment that induces SOS response and vesiculation. This leads to a hypothesis concerning association of SOS with vesiculation. To test it, we conducted multiple analyses of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type in which SOS is induced by ciprofloxacin and from the LexA noncleavable (lexAN) strain in which SOS is repressed. The levels of OMV proteins, lipids, and cytotoxicity increased for both the treated strains, demonstrating vesiculation stimulation by the antibiotic treatment. However, the further increase was suppressed in the lexAN strains, suggesting the SOS involvement. Obviously, the stimulated vesiculation is attributed by both SOS-related and unrelated factors. OMV subproteomic analysis was performed to examine these factors, which reflected the OMV-mediated cytotoxicity and the physiology of the vesiculating cells under treatment and SOS. Thus, SOS plays a role in the vesiculation stimulation that contributes to cytotoxicity. PMID:22448133

  3. Human targets of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Huimin; Hassett, Daniel J.; Lau, Gee W.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces copious amounts of the redoxactive tricyclic compound pyocyanin that kills competing microbes and mammalian cells, especially during cystic fibrosis lung infection. Cross-phylum susceptibility to pyocyanin suggests the existence of evolutionarily conserved physiological targets. We screened a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library to identify presumptive pyocyanin targets with the expectation that similar targets would be conserved in humans. Fifty S. cerevisiae targets were provisionally identified, of which 60% have orthologous human counterparts. These targets encompassed major cellular pathways involved in the cell cycle, electron transport and respiration, epidermal cell growth, protein sorting, vesicle transport, and the vacuolar ATPase. Using cultured human lung epithelial cells, we showed that pyocyanin-mediated reactive oxygen intermediates inactivate human vacuolar ATPase, supporting the validity of the yeast screen. We discuss how the inactivation of VATPase may negatively impact the lung function of cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:14605211

  4. Amino Acid Transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1969-01-01

    Properties of the transport systems for amino acids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated. Exogenous 14C-labeled amino acids were shown to equilibrate with the internal native amino acid pool prior to incorporation into protein. When added at low external concentrations, the majority of the amino acids examined entered the protein of the cell unaltered. The rates of amino acid transport, established at low concentrations with 18 commonly occurring amino acids, varied as much as 40-fold. The transport process became saturated at high external amino acid concentrations, was temperature-sensitive, and was inhibited by sodium azide and iodoacetamide. Intracellular to extracellular amino acid ratios of 100- to 300-fold were maintained during exponential growth of the population in a glucose minimal medium. When the medium became depleted of glucose, neither extracellular nor intracellular amino acids could be detected. PMID:4974392

  5. Purification of bromoperoxidase from Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed Central

    van Pée, K H; Lingens, F

    1985-01-01

    A Bromoperoxidase has been isolated and purified from Pseudomonas aureofaciens ATCC 15926 mutant strain ACN. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. This bromoperoxidase can utilize bromide ions in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and a halogen acceptor for the catalytic formation of carbon-halogen bonds. The homogeneous enzyme also has peroxidase and catalase activity. Based on the results from gel filtration and ultracentrifugation, the molecular weight of this procaryotic bromoperoxidase is 155,000 to 158,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows a single band having the mobility of a 77,000-molecular-weight species. We thus conclude that this bromoperoxidase exists in solution as a dimeric species. The heme prosthetic group of bromoperoxidase is ferriprotoporphyrin IX. The spectral properties of the native and reduced enzyme are reported. This bromoperoxidase is the first halogenating enzyme purified from procaryotic sources. Images PMID:3972772

  6. Burn sepsis: bacterial interference with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Levenson, S M; Gruber, D K; Gruber, C; Watford, A; Seifter, E

    1981-05-01

    The pathogenicity of several strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for burned rats (3 degrees scald burns, 20% body surface) following topical application of the bacteria to the burn within 1 hour after burning was established. Following this, it was demonstrated that purposeful infection of such 3 degrees scald burns of rats by a strain of Ps. aeruginosa of low virulence (JB-77) protects the rats from the lethal effect of subsequent (48-hour) topical contamination of the burn by a highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa (VA-134) (p less than 0.001). This finding was confirmed in a similar experiment beginning with germfree rats. When the challenge with the highly virulent Ps. aeruginosa strain was 24 hours (rather than 48 hours) after the burning and topical contamination of the burn with the low virulence strain of Ps. aeruginosa, there was little protection (p N.S.). When burned rats were given the low virulence strain of Ps. aeruginosa by gavage right after burning, there was not protection to subsequent (48 hours) challenge by topical application of the highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa to the burn (11/12 vs 12/12 dying). Our finding that purposeful infection of a 3 degrees burn of rats (conventional and also germfree) by a strain of Ps. aeruginosa of low virulence protects from the lethal effect of subsequent (48-hour) topical contamination of the burn by a highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa is due, we believe, to direct bacterial interference between the two strains of pseudomonas. PMID:6785444

  7. Beneficial roles of dietary oleum cinnamomi in alleviating intestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hou, Yongqing; Yi, Dan; Ding, Binying; Zhao, Di; Wang, Zhongxing; Zhu, Huiling; Liu, Yulan; Gong, Joshua; Assaad, Houssein; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamon is a traditional herb used for treatment of many human diseases. The most important chemical compounds of the essential oil are cinnamaldehyde and eugenol. Oleum cinnamomi (OCM, cinnamon oil) is increasingly used as a feed additive to animal diets. Beneficial effects of OCM in protecting tissues from inflammation and injury by endogenous and exogenous agents (such as hydrogen peroxide and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) may result, in part, from its action on regulating amino acid metabolism in cells to favor the synthesis of glutathione (a major low-molecular-weight antioxidant) from cysteine, glycine and glutamate. In support of this notion, results of recent studies indicate that supplementing OCM (50 mg/kg diet) to a corn- and soybean meal-based diet for piglets weaned at 21 days of age enhances intestinal anti-oxidative capacity and reduces the incidence of diarrhea. Additionally, dietary supplementation with OCM ameliorates LPS-induced mucosal barrier dysfunction and mucosal damage in the small intestine. OCM holds great promise for protecting the gut from injury under conditions of inflammation, infections, and oxidative stress. PMID:25553481

  8. Anthocyanins: are they beneficial in treating ethanol neurotoxicity?

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Luo, Jia

    2010-01-01

    Heavy alcohol exposure produces profound damage to the developing central nervous system (CNS) as well as the adult brain. Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) have a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and neurological impairments. FASD currently represents the leading cause of mental retardation. Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) and neurodegeneration in the adult brain. Although the cellular/molecular mechanism underlying ethanol's neurotoxicity has not been fully understood, it is generally believed that oxidative stress plays an important role. Identification of neuroprotective agents that can ameliorate ethanol neurotoxicity is an important step for developing preventive/therapeutic strategies. Targeting ethanol-induced oxidative stress using natural antioxidants is an attractive approach. Anthocyanins, a large subgroup of flavonoids present in many vegetables and fruits, are safe and potent antioxidants. They exhibit diverse potential health benefits including cardioprotection, anti-atherosclerotic activity, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammation properties. Anthocyanins can cross the blood-brain barrier and distribute in the CNS. Recent studies indicate that anthocyanins represent novel neuroprotective agents and may be beneficial in ameliorating ethanol neurotoxicity. In this review, we discuss the evidence and potential of anthocyanins in alleviating ethanol-induced damage to the CNS. Furthermore, we discuss possible underlying mechanisms as well as future research approaches necessary to establish the therapeutic role of anthocyanins. PMID:19590929

  9. Clostridium butyricum: from beneficial to a new emerging pathogen.

    PubMed

    Cassir, N; Benamar, S; La Scola, B

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum, a strictly anaerobic spore-forming bacillus, is a common human and animal gut commensal bacterium, and is also frequently found in the environment. Whereas non-toxigenic strains are currently used as probiotics in Asia, other strains have been implicated in pathological conditions, such as botulism in infants or necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonates. In terms of the latter, within the same species, different strains have antagonist effects on the intestinal mucosa. In particular, short-chain fatty acids, which are products of carbohydrate fermentation, have a dose-dependent paradoxical effect. Moreover, toxin genes have been identified by genome sequencing in pathological strains. Asymptomatic carriage of these strains has also been reported. Herein, we provide an overview of the implications of C. butyricum for human health, from the beneficial to the pathogenic. We focus on pathogenic strains associated with the occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis. We also discuss the need to use complementary microbiological methods, including culture, in order to better assess gut bacterial diversity and identify new emergent enteropathogens at the strain level. PMID:26493849

  10. Evidence against a Beneficial Effect of Irisin in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, Silja; Elsen, Manuela; Gassenhuber, Hans; Sommerfeld, Mark; Schwahn, Uwe; Brockmann, Barbara; Jung, Raphael; Wisløff, Ulrik; Tjønna, Arnt E.; Raastad, Truls; Hallén, Jostein; Norheim, Frode; Drevon, Christian A.; Romacho, Tania; Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue has gained interest as a potential target to treat obesity and metabolic diseases. Irisin is a newly identified hormone secreted from skeletal muscle enhancing browning of white fat cells, which improves systemic metabolism by increasing energy expenditure in mice. The discovery of irisin raised expectations of its therapeutic potential to treat metabolic diseases. However, the effect of irisin in humans is unclear. Analyses of genomic DNA, mRNA and expressed sequence tags revealed that FNDC5, the gene encoding the precursor of irisin, is present in rodents and most primates, but shows in humans a mutation in the conserved start codon ATG to ATA. HEK293 cells transfected with a human FNDC5 construct with ATA as start codon resulted in only 1% full-length protein compared to human FNDC5 with ATG. Additionally, in vitro contraction of primary human myotubes by electrical pulse stimulation induced a significant increase in PGC1α mRNA expression. However, FNDC5 mRNA level was not altered. FNDC5 mRNA expression in muscle biopsies from two different human exercise studies was not changed by endurance or strength training. Preadipocytes isolated from human subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited differentiation to brite human adipocytes when incubated with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 7, but neither recombinant FNDC5 nor irisin were effective. In conclusion, our findings suggest that it is rather unlikely that the beneficial effect of irisin observed in mice can be translated to humans. PMID:24040023

  11. Quantification of Efficiency of Beneficiation of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steve; Lane, John; Captain, James; Weis, Kyle; Quinn, Jacqueline; Watanabe, Fumiya

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic beneficiation of lunar regolith is being researched at Kennedy Space Center to enhance the ilmenite concentration of the regolith for the production of oxygen in in-situ resource utilization on the lunar surface. Ilmenite enrichment of up to 200% was achieved using lunar simulants. For the most accurate quantification of the regolith particles, standard petrographic methods are typically followed, but in order to optimize the process, many hundreds of samples were generated in this study that made the standard analysis methods time prohibitive. In the current studies, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Electron microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) were used that could automatically, and quickly, analyze many separated fractions of lunar simulant. In order to test the accuracy of the quantification, test mixture samples of known quantities of ilmenite (2, 5, 10, and 20 wt%) in silica (pure quartz powder), were analyzed by XPS and EDS. The results showed that quantification for low concentrations of ilmenite in silica could be accurately achieved by both XPS and EDS, knowing the limitations of the techniques. 1

  12. Beneficiation of flotation tailing from Polish copper sulfide ores

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczkiewicz, A.; Sztaba, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Flotation tailing of Polish copper sulfide ores represents more than 90% of the mass of run-of-mine ore. The tailing contains mainly quartz, dolomite, clay minerals, traces of sulfides, and some accessory minerals. Almost all minerals of the tailing are well liberated and, therefore, any further beneficiation process applied to the tailing is expected to be inexpensive. In this work, results of investigations on utilization of flotation tailing using classification and gravity concentration are presented. It is shown that due to classification of flotation tailing in hydrocyclones, the coarse fraction becomes suitable material for gravity separation providing backfill material for underground mines as well as heavy minerals, a source of valuable rare elements. It was also found that heavy minerals separated by gravity methods contain a significant amount of rare elements such as zirconium, titanium, silver, rare earth metals, and uranium. The light fraction of the gravity separation contains well deslimed quartz particles and meets strict requirements for hydraulic filling material used for structural support in underground mines. Evaluation of the cost of the proposed technology indicated that investment to implement the method would provide a return within 2--4 years.

  13. Beneficial role of bacterial endophytes in heavy metal phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Rajkumar, Mani; Zhang, Chang; Freitas, Helena

    2016-06-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that uses plants and their associated microbes to clean up pollutants from the soil, water and air. In recent years, phytoremediation assisted by bacterial endophytes has been highly recommended for cleaning up of metal polluted soils since endophytic bacteria can alleviate metal toxicity in plant through their own metal resistance system and facilitate plant growth under metal stress. Endophytic bacteria improve plant growth in metal polluted soils in two different ways: 1) directly by producing plant growth beneficial substances including solubilization/transformation of mineral nutrients (phosphate, nitrogen and potassium), production of phytohormones, siderophores and specific enzymes; and 2) indirectly through controlling plant pathogens or by inducing a systemic resistance of plants against pathogens. Besides, they also alter metal accumulation capacity in plants by excreting metal immobilizing extracellular polymeric substances, as well as metal mobilizing organic acids and biosurfactants. The present work aims to review the progress of recent research on the isolation, identification and diversity of metal resistant endophytic bacteria and illustrate various mechanisms responsible for plant growth promotion and heavy metal detoxification/phytoaccumulation/translocation in plants. PMID:26989941

  14. Beneficial cilostazol therapeutic effects in mdx dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Túlio de Almeida; Macedo, Aline Barbosa; Fogaça, Aline Reis; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; de Faria, Felipe Meira; Kido, Larissa Akemi; Cagnon, Valéria Helena Alves; Minatel, Elaine

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the possible protective effects of cilostazol against myonecrosis in dystrophic diaphragm muscle in vivo, focusing on oxidative stress, the inflammatory response and angiogenesis. Young mdx mice, the experimental animal for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, received cilostazol for 14 days. A second group of mdx mice and a control group of C57BL/10 mice received a saline solution. In the mdx mice, cilostazol treatment was associated with reduced loss of muscle strength (-34.4%), decreased myonecrosis, reduced creatine kinase levels (-63.3%) and muscle fibres stained for immunoglobulin G in dystrophic diaphragm muscle (-81.1%), and a reduced inflammatory response, with a decreased inflammatory area (-22%), macrophage infiltration (-44.9%) and nuclear factor-κB (-24%) and tumour necrosis factor-α (-48%) content in dystrophic diaphragm muscle. Furthermore, cilostazol decreased oxidative stress and attenuated reactive oxygen species production (-74%) and lipid peroxidation (-17%) in dystrophic diaphragm muscle, and promoted the up-regulation of angiogenesis, increasing the number of microvessels (15%). In conclusion, the present results show that cilostazol has beneficial effects in dystrophic muscle. More research into the potential of cilostazol as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of dystrophinopathies is required. PMID:26639107

  15. Primary beneficiation of tantalite using magnetic separation and acid leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nete, M.; Koko, F.; Theron, T.; Purcell, W.; Nel, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Primary beneficiation was successfully performed prior to dissolution of manganotantalite (sample A) and ferrotantalite (sample C) samples obtained from two different mines in the Naquissupa area, Mozambique. Magnetic separation removed the majority of iron and titanium, whereas H2SO4 leaching removed a large portion of thorium and uranium in these samples. Analytical results indicated that 64.14wt% and 72.04wt% of the total Fe and Ti, respectively, and ˜2wt% each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample C (ferrotantalite) using the magnetic separation method, whereas only 9.64wt% and 8.66wt% of total Fe2O3 and TiO2, respectively, and ˜2wt% each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample A (manganotantalite). A temperature of 50°C and a leaching time of 3 h in the presence of concentrated H2SO4 were observed to be the most appropriate leaching conditions for removal of radioactive elements from the tantalite ores. The results obtained for sample A under these conditions indicated that 64.14wt% U3O8 and 60.77wt% ThO2 were leached into the acidic solution, along with 4.45wt% and 0.99wt% of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5, respectively.

  16. Harmful and beneficial aspects of Parthenium hysterophorus: an update.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema

    2011-07-01

    Parthenium hysterophorus is a noxious weed in America, Asia, Africa and Australia. This weed is considered to be a cause of allergic respiratory problems, contact dermatitis, mutagenicity in human and livestock. Crop production is drastically reduced owing to its allelopathy. Also aggressive dominance of this weed threatens biodiversity. Eradication of P. hysterophorus by burning, chemical herbicides, eucalyptus oil and biological control by leaf-feeding beetle, stem-galling moth, stem-boring weevil and fungi have been carried out with variable degrees of success. Recently many innovative uses of this hitherto notorious plant have been discovered. Parthenium hysterophorus confers many health benefits, viz remedy for skin inflammation, rheumatic pain, diarrhoea, urinary tract infections, dysentery, malaria and neuralgia. Its prospect as nano-medicine is being carried out with some preliminary success so far. Removal of heavy metals and dye from the environment, eradication of aquatic weeds, use as substrate for commercial enzyme production, additives in cattle manure for biogas production, as biopesticide, as green manure and compost are to name a few of some other potentials. The active compounds responsible for hazardous properties have been summarized. The aim of this review article is to explore the problem P. hysterophorus poses as a weed, the effective control measures that can be implemented as well as to unravel the latent beneficial prospects of this weed. PMID:22558530

  17. Modified TMV Particles as Beneficial Scaffolds to Present Sensor Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Claudia; Wabbel, Katrin; Eber, Fabian J.; Krolla-Sidenstein, Peter; Azucena, Carlos; Gliemann, Hartmut; Eiben, Sabine; Geiger, Fania; Wege, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a robust nanotubular nucleoprotein scaffold increasingly employed for the high density presentation of functional molecules such as peptides, fluorescent dyes, and antibodies. We report on its use as advantageous carrier for sensor enzymes. A TMV mutant with a cysteine residue exposed on every coat protein (CP) subunit (TMVCys) enabled the coupling of bifunctional maleimide-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-biotin linkers (TMVCys/Bio). Its surface was equipped with two streptavidin [SA]-conjugated enzymes: glucose oxidase ([SA]-GOx) and horseradish peroxidase ([SA]-HRP). At least 50% of the CPs were decorated with a linker molecule, and all thereof with active enzymes. Upon use as adapter scaffolds in conventional “high-binding” microtiter plates, TMV sticks allowed the immobilization of up to 45-fold higher catalytic activities than control samples with the same input of enzymes. Moreover, they increased storage stability and reusability in relation to enzymes applied directly to microtiter plate wells. The functionalized TMV adsorbed to solid supports showed a homogeneous distribution of the conjugated enzymes and structural integrity of the nanorods upon transmission electron and atomic force microscopy. The high surface-increase and steric accessibility of the viral scaffolds in combination with the biochemical environment provided by the plant viral coat may explain the beneficial effects. TMV can, thus, serve as a favorable multivalent nanoscale platform for the ordered presentation of bioactive proteins. PMID:26734040

  18. Beneficiation and hydroretorting of low grade oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Tippin, R.B.; Hanna, J.; Janka, J.C.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    A new approach to oil recovery from low grade oil shales has been developed jointly by the Mineral Resources Institute (MRI) of The University of Alabama and the HYCRUDE Corporation. The approach is based on the HYTORT process, which utilized hydrogen gas during the retorting process to enhance oil yields from many types of oil shales. The performance of the HYTORT process is further improved by combining it with MRI's froth flotation process. Taking advantage of differences in the surface properties of the kerogen and the inorganic mineral constituents of the oil shales, the MRI process can reject up to three quarters by weight of relatively kerogen-free inorganic fractions of the oil shale before HYTORT processing. The HYTORT and MRI processes are discussed. Results of tests by each process on oil shales of low to moderate inherent kerogen content are presented. Also discussed are the results of the combined processes on an Indiana New Albany oil shale. By combining the two processes, the raw shale which yielded 12 gallons of oil per ton by Fischer Assay was upgraded by flotation to a product yielding 27 gallons of Fischer Assay oil per ton. HYTORT processing of the beneficiated product recovered 54 gallons of oil per ton, an improvement in oil yield by a factor of 4.5 over the raw shale Fischer Assay.

  19. Rapamycin impairs HPD-induced beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Geng-Ruei; Chiu, Yi-Shin; Wu, Ying-Ying; Lin, Yu-Chi; Hou, Po-Hsun; Mao, Frank Chiahung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Rapamycin, which is used clinically to treat graft rejection, has also been proposed to have an effect on metabolic syndrome; however, very little information is available on its effects in lean animals/humans. The purpose of this study was to characterize further the effects of the continuous use of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis in lean C57BL6/J mice. Experimental Approach Mice were fed a high-protein diet (HPD) for 12 weeks to develop a lean model and then were treated daily with rapamycin for 5 weeks while remaining on a HPD. Metabolic parameters, endocrine profiles, glucose tolerance tests, insulin sensitivity index, the expression of the glucose transporter GLUT4 and chromium distribution were measured in vivo. Key Results Lower body weight gain as well as a decreased caloric intake, fat pads, fatty liver scores, adipocyte size and glucose tolerance test values were observed in HPD-fed mice compared with mice fed a high-fat or standard diet. Despite these beneficial effects, rapamycin-treated lean mice showed greater glucose intolerance, reduced insulin sensitivity, lower muscle GLUT4 expression and changes in chromium levels in tissues even with high insulin levels. Conclusion and Implications Our findings demonstrate that continuous rapamycin administration may lead to the development of diabetes syndrome, as it was found to induce hyperglycaemia and glucose intolerance in a lean animal model. PMID:25884889

  20. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Lau, F.S.; Mensinger, M.C. ); Schultz, C.W.; Mehta, R.K.; Lamont, W.E. ); Chiang, S.H.; Venkatadri, R. ); Misra, M. )

    1992-05-01

    The Mineral Resources Institute at the University of Alabama, along with investigators from the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Nevada-Reno, have conducted a research program on the beneficiation, of Eastern oil shales. The objective of the research program was to evaluate and adapt those new and emerging technologies that have the potential to improve the economics of recovering oil from Eastern oil shales. The technologies evaluated in this program can be grouped into three areas: fine grinding kerogen/mineral matter separation, and waste treatment and disposal. Four subtasks were defined in the area of fine grinding. They were as follows: Ultrasonic Grinding, Pressure Cycle Comminution, Stirred Ball Mill Grinding, and Grinding Circuit Optimization. The planned Ultrasonic grinding research was terminated when the company that had contracted to do the research failed. Three technologies for effecting a separation of kerogen from its associated mineral matter were evaluated: column flotation, the air-sparged hydrocyclone, and the LICADO process. Column flotation proved to be the most effective means of making the kerogen/mineral matter separation. No problems are expected in the disposal of oil shale tailings. It is assumed that the tailings will be placed in a sealed pond and the water recycled to the plant as is the normal practice. It may be advantageous, however, to conduct further research on the recovery of metals as by-products and to assess the market for tailings as an ingredient in cement making.

  1. Graphic values for some organic constitutents of beneficiated coal samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlenberger, L.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Graphic techniques exist which can accurately predict values for calorific value, organic sulfur, and possibly other constituents of the organic portion of beneficiated coal sample fractions. These techniques also permit a determination of coal rank to be made without the use of the approximations required in the standard procedure. Fractions of IBC-101 with varying ash contents were produced by froth flotation. The various fractions were analyzed by the coal analysis laboratory and the particular data type was plotted in each case vs. the individual ash content of each fraction, using Lotus 123 and Freelace software packages. Such plots for calorific value and organic sulfur have, so far, been made. These curves and the information they contain are discussed in this report. A comparison of the graphic mineral matter value with the usual one calculated from the Parr approximation has been made. Eventually, the data may lead to an effective way to estimate inorganic carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and other organic constitents of coal. All data will be made available to researchers.

  2. Beneficial effects of blueberries in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Junping; Feinstein, Douglas L; Hejna, Matthew J; Lorens, Stanley A; McGuire, Susan O

    2012-06-13

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of autoimmune disease that presents with pathological and clinical features similar to those of multiple sclerosis (MS) including inflammation and neurodegeneration. This study investigated whether blueberries, which possess immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties, could provide protection in EAE. Dietary supplementation with 1% whole, freeze-dried blueberries reduced disease incidence by >50% in a chronic EAE model (p < 0.01). When blueberry-fed mice with EAE were compared with control-fed mice with EAE, blueberry-fed mice had significantly lower motor disability scores (p = 0.03) as well as significantly greater myelin preservation in the lumbar spinal cord (p = 0.04). In a relapsing-remitting EAE model, blueberry-supplemented mice showed improved cumulative and final motor scores compared to control diet-fed mice (p = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). These data demonstrate that blueberry supplementation is beneficial in multiple EAE models, suggesting that blueberries, which are easily administered orally and well-tolerated, may provide benefit to MS patients. PMID:22243431

  3. Hydrophobic flocculation flotation for beneficiating fine coal and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.; Valdivieso, A.L.

    1998-06-01

    It is shown that hydrophobic flocculation flotation (HFF) is an effective process to treat finely ground ores and slimes so as to concentrate coal and mineral values at a fine size range. The process is based on first dispersing the fine particles suspension, followed by flocculation of fine mineral values or coal in the form of hydrophobic surfaces either induced by specifically adsorbed surfactants or from nature at the conditioning of the slurry with the shear field of sufficient magnitude. The flocculation is intensified by the addition of a small amount of nonpolar oil. finely ground coals, ilmenite slimes, and gold finely disseminated in a slag have been treated by this process. Results are presented indicating that cleaned coal with low ash and sulfur remaining and high Btu recovery can be obtained, and the refractory ores of ilmenite slimes and fine gold-bearing slag can be reasonably concentrated, leading to better beneficiation results than other separation techniques. In addition, the main operating parameters affecting the HFF process are discussed.

  4. Evaluating competing adverse and beneficial outcomes using a mixture model

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Cole, Stephen R.; Moore, Richard D.; Gange, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A competing risk framework occurs when individuals have the potential to experience only one of several mutually exclusive outcomes. Standard survival methods often overestimate the cumulative incidence of events when competing events are censored. Mixture distributions have been previously applied to the competing risk framework to obtain inferences regarding the subdistribution of an event of interest. Often the competing event is treated as a nuisance, but it may be of interest to compare adverse events against the beneficial outcome when dealing with an intervention. In this paper, methods for using a mixture model to estimate an adverse-benefit ratio curve (ratio of the cumulative incidence curves for the two competing events) and the ratio of the subhazards for the two competing events are presented. Both parametric and semi-parametric approaches are described with some remarks for extending the model to include uncertainty in the event type that occurred, left-truncation in order to allow for time-dependent analyses, and uncertainty in the timing of the event resulting in interval censoring. The methods are illustrated with data from a HIV clinical cohort examining whether individuals initiating effective antiretroviral therapy have a greater risk of antiretroviral discontinuation or switching compared to HIV RNA suppression. PMID:18416435

  5. Beneficial effects of footbaths in controlling spasticity after stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Shimodozono, Megumi; Etoh, Seiji; Shimozono, Yurika; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2010-07-01

    Footbaths are considered to provide beneficial thermal therapy for post-stroke patients with spasticity, but their anti-spastic effects have not been investigated comprehensively. The present study aimed to evaluate alterations in motor-neuron excitability using F-wave parameters in post-stroke patients with spastic hemiplegia. Subjects’ legs below the knee joint were immersed in water at 41°C and F-wave recordings were made over the abductor hallucis muscle before, immediately after, and 30 min after thermal treatment. Antidromic stimulation was performed on the tibial nerve at the ankle. Measurements included F-wave amplitude, F-wave/M-response ratio, changes in modified Ashworth scale (MAS), body temperature and surface-skin temperature. The mean values of both F-wave parameters were higher on the affected side before footbath treatment. In post-stroke patients, the mean values of F-wave parameters were significantly reduced after footbath treatment ( P < 0.01). The anti-spastic effects of footbath treatment were indicated by decreased F-wave parameters, in parallel with decreases in MAS. Body temperature was significantly increased both immediately after, and 30 min following footbath treatment in both groups, which appeared to play an important role in decreased spasticity. Surface-skin temperature increased immediately after footbath treatment in both groups and returned to baseline 30 min later. These findings demonstrate that the use of footbaths is an effective nonpharmacological anti-spastic treatment that might facilitate stroke rehabilitation.

  6. A Fatal Case of "Bullous Erysipelas-like" Pseudomonas Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of "bullous erysipelas-like" septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  7. Genetic construction of recombinant Pseudomonas chlororaphis for improved glycerol utilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to improve by genetic engineering the glycerol metabolic capability of Pseudomonas chlororaphis which is capable of producing commercially valuable biodegradable poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) and biosurfactant rhamnolipids (RLs). In the study, glycerol uptake facilitat...

  8. Pseudomonas Folliculitis Associated with Use of Hot Tubs and Spas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history, etiology, diagnosis, histopathology, treatment, and prevention of Pseudomonas Folliculitis, an increasingly common skin infection contracted in hot tubs and, to some extent, in swimming pools. (Author/SM)

  9. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. persicae NCPPB 2254.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenjun; Jiang, Hongshan; Tian, Qian; Hu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. persicae is a pathogen that causes bacterial decline of stone fruit. Here, we report the draft genome sequence for P. syringae pv. persicae, which was isolated from Prunus persica. PMID:26044420

  12. Outbreak of hot-foot syndrome - caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Michl, R K; Rusche, T; Grimm, S; Limpert, E; Beck, J F; Dost, A

    2012-07-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause the hot-foot syndrome, presenting with painful plantar erythematous nodules. Particularly, the mechanically stressed areas of the foot are affected after contact with contaminated water from saunas, swimming pools, hot tubs, etc. We report an outbreak of hot-foot syndrome caused by Pseudomonas in 10 patients. The therapeutic regimens applied reached from local antiseptic therapy to systemic antibiotics. PMID:22187332

  13. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Beneficiation. Topical report for Task 4, Beneficiation research

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Lau, F.S.; Mensinger, M.C.; Schultz, C.W.; Mehta, R.K.; Lamont, W.E.; Chiang, S.H.; Venkatadri, R.; Misra, M.

    1992-05-01

    The Mineral Resources Institute at the University of Alabama, along with investigators from the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Nevada-Reno, have conducted a research program on the beneficiation, of Eastern oil shales. The objective of the research program was to evaluate and adapt those new and emerging technologies that have the potential to improve the economics of recovering oil from Eastern oil shales. The technologies evaluated in this program can be grouped into three areas: fine grinding kerogen/mineral matter separation, and waste treatment and disposal. Four subtasks were defined in the area of fine grinding. They were as follows: Ultrasonic Grinding, Pressure Cycle Comminution, Stirred Ball Mill Grinding, and Grinding Circuit Optimization. The planned Ultrasonic grinding research was terminated when the company that had contracted to do the research failed. Three technologies for effecting a separation of kerogen from its associated mineral matter were evaluated: column flotation, the air-sparged hydrocyclone, and the LICADO process. Column flotation proved to be the most effective means of making the kerogen/mineral matter separation. No problems are expected in the disposal of oil shale tailings. It is assumed that the tailings will be placed in a sealed pond and the water recycled to the plant as is the normal practice. It may be advantageous, however, to conduct further research on the recovery of metals as by-products and to assess the market for tailings as an ingredient in cement making.

  14. Small Beneficial Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Ingestion on Strength.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nora B; Hardy, Michelle A; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Warren, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Collier, NB, Hardy, MA, Millard-Stafford, ML, and Warren, GL. Small beneficial effect of caffeinated energy drink ingestion on strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1862-1870, 2016-Because caffeine ingestion has been found to increase muscle strength, our aim was to determine whether caffeine when combined with other potential ergogenic ingredients, such as those in commercial energy drinks, would have a similar effect. Fifteen young healthy subjects were used in a double-blind, repeated-measures experimental design. Each subject performed 3 trials, ingesting either a caffeinated energy drink, an uncaffeinated version of the drink, or a placebo drink. The interpolated twitch procedure was used to assess maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, electrically evoked strength, and percent muscle activation during MVIC of the knee extensors both before and after drink ingestion, and after a fatiguing bout of contractions; electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the knee extensors during MVIC was also assessed. The mean (±SE) change in MVIC strength from before to after drink ingestion was significantly greater for the caffeinated energy drink compared with placebo [+5.0 (±1.7) vs. -0.5 (±1.5)%] and the difference between the drinks remained after fatigue (p = 0.015); the strength changes for the uncaffeinated energy drink were not significantly different from those of the other 2 drinks at any time. There was no significant effect of drink type on the changes in electrically evoked strength, percent muscle activation, and EMG from before to after drink ingestion. This study indicates that a caffeinated energy drink can increase MVIC strength but the effect is modest and the strength increase cannot be attributed to increased muscle activation. Whether the efficacy of energy drinks can be attributed solely to caffeine remains unclear. PMID:26670991

  15. The beneficial effects of Brassica vegetables on human health.

    PubMed

    Kapusta-Duch, Joanna; Kopeć, Aneta; Piatkowska, Ewa; Borczak, Barbara; Leszczyńska, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The products of plant origin are a rich source of biologically active substances, both nutritive and referred as anti-nutritive. A large group of these compounds are substances with antioxidant activity that fights against free radicals. In the family of Brassicaceae vegetables, Brassica, is the largest and most widely consumed a group of plants in Europe and all over the world. They are characterized by different levels of nutrients. However because of their large and frequent consumption, they may become a significant source of nutrients and bioactive compounds in the daily diet. The beneficial effects of Brassica vegetables on human health have been somewhat linked to phytochemicals. They prevent oxidative stress, induce detoxification enzymes, stimulate immune system, decrease the risk of cancers, inhibit malignant transformation and carcinogenic mutations, as well as, reduce proliferation of cancer cells. Brassica vegetables contain a lot of valuable metabolites, which are effective in chemoprevention of cancer, what has been already documented by numerous studies. Due to the presence of vitamins C and E, carotenoids and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase, these vegetables are considerable source ofantioxidants, and due to the presence of polyphenols and the sulfur-organic compounds exert also antimutagenic action. Moreover, these vegetables are also rich in glucosinolates, which are unstable compounds and undergo degradation into biologically active indoles and isothiocyanates under the influence of enzyme presented in plant tissues- myrosynase. These substances through the induction of enzymatic systems I and II phase of xenobiotics metabolism may affect the elimination or neutralization of carcinogenic and mutagenic factors, and consequently inhibit DNA methylation and cancer development. Despite many healthy benefits upon eating of cruciferous vegetables, it has been also seen a negative impact of their certain

  16. Beneficial role of conflict in radioactive waste management programs

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, B.A.; Williams, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Of the technical, political, and social problems associated with radioactive waste management, least is known about the latter two. Lay persons tend to generalize negative attitudes about other nuclear activity to radioactive waste management. Thus, conflict appears inevitable between the general public, citizen action groups, and decision-makers on radioactive waste management. The basis of conflict, we believe, can be found in the value orientation of certain groups and in differing perceptions of risk. Research on similar controversial issues reveals that conflict may be beneficial in the long run by contributing to the public's participation level and understanding of the issues, and to the decision-makers' appreciation of the lay perspective. The paper is in three parts. First, we review the sources of conflict over radioactive waste management issues. The negative attitudes and fears of the public toward different types of projects involving radioactivity, value conflicts, and differential perceptions of risk are cited as sources. Next we discuss the consequences of conflict in terms of sociological theory. Finally, we discuss how conflict can be directed and managed to produce an informed decision-making process. When the public is sensitized to an issue, when prevailing attitudes on the issue are negative, and when perceived risks are high - all of which are characteristic of waste management issues - specific steps should be taken to establish a legitimate process of communication and interaction between the public and the sponsor agency. When conflict is recognized as inevitable, the goal of a communications program is no longer to avoid it. It is to use the increased awareness to increase knowledge about waste management issues and public participation in decisions so that the final solution is acceptable at some level to all parties.

  17. Intravenous arginine vasopressin in critically ill children: is it beneficial?

    PubMed

    Efrati, Ori; Modan-Moses, Dalit; Vardi, Amir; Matok, Ilan; Bazilay, Zohar; Paret, Gideon

    2004-09-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) may be more effective than epinephrine in shock states and as an end-of-life salvage maneuver. However, there is only limited experience using AVP in children. Our study aim was to evaluate the effect of AVP administration on hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters in critically ill children. Eight critically ill children (1 month to 12 years old) were treated with AVP during the years 2000-2001. Two patients had had head trauma, and six had surgical correction of congenital heart disease. All patients suffered severe septic or cardiogenic shock with a low cardiac output state and were considered to be near death. AVP was administered continuously at a dose of 0.0003-0.002 U/kg/min. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters and vasopressor doses were compared before and after AVP initiation. One patient survived with a good neurologic outcome. Seven patients succumbed while receiving AVP. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased significantly (P < 0.03) following AVP initiation. The epinephrine requirement decreased from 2.3 to 1.7 microg/kg/min. Blood gases improved with a significant (P < 0.05) increase of PaO2. Oxygenation index and PaO2/FiO2 ratio improved significantly, and ventilatory support requirements and positive inspiratory pressure (PIP) decreased significantly. Despite a significant improvement in hemodynamic and ventilatory support parameters, survival to hospital discharge was not achieved when AVP was used in critically ill pediatric patients. We hypothesize that earlier administration of AVP may be more beneficial. PMID:15316389

  18. The beneficial role of retinoids in glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Mallipattu, Sandeep K; He, John Cijiang

    2015-01-01

    The primary etiology of CKD is a direct consequence of initial dysfunction and injury of the glomerulus, the main filtration system. Podocytes are terminally differentiated epithelial cells in the glomerulus, whose major function is the maintenance of this renal filtration barrier. Podocyte injury is implicated in many glomerular diseases including focal segmental glomerular sclerosis and HIV-associated nephropathy. In many of these diseased conditions, the podocyte can either undergo dedifferentiation and proliferation, apoptosis, or cell detachment. Regardless of the initial type of injury, the podocyte ultimately loses its functional capacity to maintain the glomerular filtration barrier. Significant injury resulting in a loss of the podocytes and failure to maintain the renal filtration barrier contributes to progressive kidney disease. Consequently, therapies that prevent podocyte injury and promote their regeneration will have a major clinical impact on glomerular disease. Retinoic acid (RA), which is a derivative of vitamin A, has many cellular functions including induction of cell differentiation, regulation of apoptosis, and inhibition of inflammation and proliferation. RA is required for kidney development and is essential for cellular differentiation in the setting of podocyte injury. The mechanism by which RA directs its beneficial effects is multifactorial, ranging from its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects to a direct effect of upregulating podocyte differentiation markers in the podocyte. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of RA in kidney development and glomerular disease. We also highlight the key mechanism(s) by which RA restores podocyte differentiation markers and ameliorates glomerular disease. PMID:25853135

  19. Beneficial effects of Bacopa monnieri extract on opioid induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Subhan, Fazal; Ullah, Ihsan; Ali, Gowhar; Alam, Javaid; Shah, Rehmat

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of morphine and illicit street heroin and their amelioration by a standardized methanolic extract of Bacopa monnieri (L.) (mBME) in rats. Morphine or street heroin was administered at a dose of 20 mg/kg for 14 and 21 days. mBME (40 mg/kg) or ascorbic acid (50 mg/kg) was administered two hours before morphine or street heroin. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for the standardization of bacoside-A major components in mBME. The antioxidant potential of mBME was evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. Administration of morphine and street heroin resulted in marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and creatinine. Histopathological changes induced by morphine and street heroin after 14 days were of reversible nature while treatment for 21 days was associated with irreversible changes. Pretreatment with mBME or ascorbic acid restored the elevation of serum ALT, AST and creatinine and protected liver and kidneys from the toxicological influence of morphine and street heroin. HPLC analysis showed that mBME contained bacoside-A major components i.e. bacoside-A3 (37.5 μg/mg), bacopaside-II (4.62 μg/mg) and bacopasaponin-C (1.91 μg/mg). The EC50 for the DPPH free radical scavenging assay revealed that mBME possessed strong antioxidant potential. These results concluded that as compared to morphine, street heroin was associated with severe biochemical and histopathological changes in the liver and kidneys. Bacopa monnieri having strong antioxidant potential may provide a beneficial herbal remedy for the efficient management of opioid related hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. PMID:27441247

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of the Antimicrobial Producers Pseudomonas sp. TAA207 and Pseudomonas sp. TAD18 Isolated from Antarctic Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Presta, Luana; Inzucchi, Ilaria; Bosi, Emanuele; Fondi, Marco; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Miceli, Elisangela; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Lo Giudice, Angelina; de Pascale, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the Pseudomonas sp. TAA207 and Pseudomonas sp. TAD18 strains, isolated from Antarctic sediments during a summer campaign near coastal areas of Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica). Genome sequence knowledge allowed the identification of genes associated with the production of bioactive compounds and antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, it will be instrumental for comparative genomics and the fulfillment of both basic and application-oriented investigations. PMID:27469957

  1. Spoilage potential of Pseudomonas species isolated from goat milk.

    PubMed

    Scatamburlo, T M; Yamazi, A K; Cavicchioli, V Q; Pieri, F A; Nero, L A

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas spp. are usually associated with spoilage microflora of dairy products due to their proteolytic potential. This is of particular concern for protein-based products, such as goat milk cheeses and fermented milks. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to characterize the proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from goat milk. Goat milk samples (n=61) were obtained directly from bulk tanks on dairy goat farms (n=12), and subjected to a modified International Organization for Standardization (ISO) protocol to determine the number and proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. Isolates (n=82) were obtained, identified by PCR, and subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with XbaI macro-restriction. Then, the isolates were subjected to PCR to detect the alkaline protease gene (apr), and phenotypic tests were performed to check proteolytic activity at 7°C, 25°C, and 35°C. Mean Pseudomonas spp. counts ranged from 2.9 to 4.8 log cfu/mL, and proteolytic Pseudomonas spp. counts ranged from 1.9 to 4.6 log cfu/mL. All isolates were confirmed to be Pseudomonas spp., and 41 were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens, which clustered into 5 groups sharing approximately 82% similarity. Thirty-six isolates (46.9%) were positive for the apr gene; and 57 (69.5%) isolates presented proteolytic activity at 7°C, 82 (100%) at 25°C, and 64 (78%) at 35°C. The isolates were distributed ubiquitously in the goat farms, and no relationship among isolates was observed when the goat farms, presence of apr, pulsotypes, and proteolytic activity were taken into account. We demonstrated proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. present in goat milk by phenotypic and genotypic tests and indicated their spoilage potential at distinct temperatures. Based on these findings and the ubiquity of Pseudomonas spp. in goat farm environments, proper monitoring and control of Pseudomonas spp. during production are critical. PMID:25497792

  2. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens Species Group Recovery from Human Homes Varies Seasonally and by Environment

    PubMed Central

    Remold, Susanna K.; Purdy-Gibson, Megan E.; France, Michael T.; Hundley, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    By shedding light on variation in time as well as in space, long-term biogeographic studies can help us define organisms’ distribution patterns and understand their underlying drivers. Here we examine distributions of Pseudomonas in and around 15 human homes, focusing on the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups. We describe recovery from 10,941 samples collected during up to 8 visits per home, occurring on average 2.6 times per year. We collected a mean of 141 samples per visit, from sites in most rooms of the house, from the surrounding yards, and from human and pet occupants. We recovered Pseudomonas in 9.7% of samples, with the majority of isolates being from the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups (approximately 62% and 23% of Pseudomonas samples recovered respectively). Although representatives of both groups were recovered from every season, every house, and every type of environment sampled, recovery was highly variable across houses and samplings. Whereas recovery of P. putida group was higher in summer and fall than in winter and spring, P. fluorescens group isolates were most often recovered in spring. P. putida group recovery from soils was substantially higher than its recovery from all other environment types, while higher P. fluorescens group recovery from soils than from other sites was much less pronounced. Both species groups were recovered from skin and upper respiratory tract samples from healthy humans and pets, although this occurred infrequently. This study indicates that even species that are able to survive under a broad range of conditions can be rare and variable in their distributions in space and in time. For such groups, determining patterns and causes of stochastic and seasonal variability may be more important for understanding the processes driving their biogeography than the identity of the types of environments in which they can be found. PMID:26023929

  3. Comparative sensitivity and resistance of some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas stutzeri to antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Russell, A. D.; Mills, A. P.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the sensitivities to various antibiotic and non-antibiotic substances of some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. stutzeri, the latter including strains isolated from eye and other cosmetic products and from other sources. Whereas P. aeruginosa strains showed a high resistance to cetrimide and to benzalkonium chloride, the P. stutzeri strains were generally more sensitive to these and to chlorhexidine. The P. stutzeri strains were also more sensitive to the various antibiotics tested. The loss of the ability to transfer an R factor by two strains of P. aeruginosa caused no significant change in their drug sensitivity pattern. PMID:4369876

  4. Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns-Triggered Root Responses Mediate Beneficial Rhizobacterial Recruitment in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Kitto, Sherry L.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Kearns, Daniel B.; Wu, Yu-Sung; Bais, Harsh P.

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrated that foliar infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 induced malic acid (MA) transporter (ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 [ALMT1]) expression leading to increased MA titers in the rhizosphere of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). MA secretion in the rhizosphere increased beneficial rhizobacteria Bacillus subtilis FB17 (hereafter FB17) titers causing an induced systemic resistance response in plants against P. syringae pv tomato DC3000. Having shown that a live pathogen could induce an intraplant signal from shoot-to-root to recruit FB17 belowground, we hypothesized that pathogen-derived microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) may relay a similar response specific to FB17 recruitment. The involvement of MAMPs in triggering plant innate immune response is well studied in the plant’s response against foliar pathogens. In contrast, MAMPs-elicited plant responses on the roots and the belowground microbial community are not well understood. It is known that pathogen-derived MAMPs suppress the root immune responses, which may facilitate pathogenicity. Plants subjected to known MAMPs such as a flagellar peptide, flagellin22 (flg22), and a pathogen-derived phytotoxin, coronatine (COR), induced a shoot-to-root signal regulating ALMT1 for recruitment of FB17. Micrografts using either a COR-insensitive mutant (coi1) or a flagellin-insensitive mutant (fls2) as the scion and ALMT1pro:β-glucuronidase as the rootstock revealed that both COR and flg22 are required for a graft transmissible signal to recruit FB17 belowground. The data suggest that MAMPs-induced signaling to regulate ALMT1 is salicylic acid and JASMONIC ACID RESISTANT1 (JAR1)/JASMONATE INSENSITIVE1 (JIN1)/MYC2 independent. Interestingly, a cell culture filtrate of FB17 suppressed flg22-induced MAMPs-activated root defense responses, which are similar to suppression of COR-mediated MAMPs-activated root defense, revealing a diffusible bacterial component that may

  5. The Pseudomonas fluorescens Siderophore Pyoverdine Weakens Arabidopsis thaliana Defense in Favor of Growth in Iron-Deficient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Trapet, Pauline; Avoscan, Laure; Klinguer, Agnès; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Chervin, Christian; Mazurier, Sylvie; Lemanceau, Philippe; Wendehenne, David; Besson-Bard, Angélique

    2016-05-01

    Pyoverdines are siderophores synthesized by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Under iron-limiting conditions, these high-affinity ferric iron chelators are excreted by bacteria in the soil to acquire iron. Pyoverdines produced by beneficial Pseudomonas spp. ameliorate plant growth. Here, we investigate the physiological incidence and mode of action of pyoverdine from Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12 on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. Pyoverdine was provided to the medium in its iron-free structure (apo-pyoverdine), thus mimicking a situation in which it is produced by bacteria. Remarkably, apo-pyoverdine abolished the iron-deficiency phenotype and restored the growth of plants maintained in the iron-deprived medium. In contrast to a P. fluorescens C7R12 strain impaired in apo-pyoverdine production, the wild-type C7R12 reduced the accumulation of anthocyanins in plants grown in iron-deficient conditions. Under this condition, apo-pyoverdine modulated the expression of around 2,000 genes. Notably, apo-pyoverdine positively regulated the expression of genes related to development and iron acquisition/redistribution while it repressed the expression of defense-related genes. Accordingly, the growth-promoting effect of apo-pyoverdine in plants grown under iron-deficient conditions was impaired in iron-regulated transporter1 and ferric chelate reductase2 knockout mutants and was prioritized over immunity, as highlighted by an increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea This process was accompanied by an overexpression of the transcription factor HBI1, a key node for the cross talk between growth and immunity. This study reveals an unprecedented mode of action of pyoverdine in Arabidopsis and demonstrates that its incidence on physiological traits depends on the plant iron status. PMID:26956666

  6. Effectiveness of beneficial plant-microbe interactions under hypobaric and hypoxic conditions in an advanced life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, Olathe; Stasiak, Michael; Cottenie, Karl; Trevors, Jack; Dixon, Mike

    An assembled microbial community in the hydroponics solution of an advanced life support system may improve plant performance and productivity in three ways: (1) exclusion of plant pathogens from the initial community, (2) resistance to infection, and (3) plant-growth promotion. However, the plant production area is likely to have a hypobaric (low pressure) and hypoxic (low oxygen) atmosphere to reduce structural mass and atmosphere leakage, and these conditions may alter plant-microbe interactions. Plant performance and productivity of radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) grown under hypobaric and hypoxic conditions were investigated at the University of Guelph's Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility. Changes in the microbial communities that routinely colonized the re-circulated nutrient solution, roots, and leaves of radishes in these experiments were quantified in terms of similarity in community composition, abundance of bacteria, and community diversity before and after exposure to hypobaric and hypoxic conditions relative to communities maintained at ambient growth conditions. The microbial succession was affected by extreme hypoxia (2 kPa oxygen partial pressure) while hypobaria as low as 10 kPa total pressure had little effect on microbial ecology. There were no correlations found between the physiological profile of these unintentional microbial communities and radish growth. The effects of hypobaric and hypoxic conditions on specific plant-microbe interactions need to be determined before beneficial gnotobiotic communities can be developed for use in space. The bacterial strains Tal 629 of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and WCS417 of Pseudomonas fluorescens, and the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. raphani will be used in future experiments. B. japonicum Tal 629 promotes radish growth in hydroponics systems and P. fluorescens WCS417 induces systemic resistance to fusarium wilt (F. oxysporum f. sp. raphani) in radish under ambient

  7. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel

    PubMed Central

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24214409

  8. Genome comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa large phages.

    PubMed

    Hertveldt, Kirsten; Lavigne, Rob; Pleteneva, Elena; Sernova, Natalia; Kurochkina, Lidia; Korchevskii, Roman; Robben, Johan; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim; Krylov, Victor N; Volckaert, Guido

    2005-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage EL is a dsDNA phage related to the giant phiKZ-like Myoviridae. The EL genome sequence comprises 211,215 bp and has 201 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). The EL genome does not share DNA sequence homology with other viruses and micro-organisms sequenced to date. However, one-third of the predicted EL gene products (gps) shares similarity (Blast alignments of 17-55% amino acid identity) with phiKZ proteins. Comparative EL and phiKZ genomics reveals that these giant phages are an example of substantially diverged genetic mosaics. Based on the position of similar EL and phiKZ predicted gene products, five genome regions can be delineated in EL, four of which are relatively conserved between EL and phiKZ. Region IV, a 17.7 kb genome region with 28 predicted ORFs, is unique to EL. Fourteen EL ORFs have been assigned a putative function based on protein similarity. Assigned proteins are involved in DNA replication and nucleotide metabolism (NAD+-dependent DNA ligase, ribonuclease HI, helicase, thymidylate kinase), host lysis and particle structure. EL-gp146 is the first chaperonin GroEL sequence identified in a viral genome. Besides a putative transposase, EL harbours predicted mobile endonucleases related to H-N-H and LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases associated with group I intron and intein intervening sequences. PMID:16256135

  9. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  10. Periplasmic glucans of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Talaga, P; Fournet, B; Bohin, J P

    1994-01-01

    We report the initial characterization of glucans present in the periplasmic space of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (strain R32). These compounds were found to be neutral, unsubstituted, and composed solely of glucose. Their size ranges from 6 to 13 glucose units/mol. Linkage studies and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses demonstrated that the glucans are linked by beta-1,2 and beta-1,6 glycosidic bonds. In contrast to the periplasmic glucans found in other plant pathogenic bacteria, the glucans of P. syringae pv. syringae are not cyclic but are highly branched structures. Acetolysis studies demonstrated that the backbone consists of beta-1,2-linked glucose units to which the branches are attached by beta-1,6 linkages. These periplasmic glucans were more abundant when the osmolarity of the growth medium was lower. Thus, P. syringae pv. syringae appears to synthesize periplasmic glucans in response to the osmolarity of the medium. The structural characteristics of these glucans are very similar to the membrane-derived oligosaccharides of Escherichia coli, apart from the neutral character, which contrasts with the highly anionic E. coli membrane-derived oligosaccharides. PMID:7961404

  11. Spontaneous release of lipopolysaccharide by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, J E; Kuzio, J; Milazzo, F H; Kropinski, A M

    1983-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO grown in glucose mineral salts medium released lipopolysaccharide which was chemically and immunologically similar to the cellular lipopolysaccharide. In addition, it possessed identical phage E79-inactivating properties. Through neutralization of phage activity and hemolysis inhibition assays, the organism was found to liberate lipopolysaccharide at a constant rate during log-phase growth equivalent to 1.3 to 2.2 ng/10(8) cells over a growth temperature range of 25 to 42 degrees C. At 19 degrees C, a lipopolysaccharide was released which was deficient in phage-inactivating activity but retained its immunological properties. Chemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide extracted from cells grown at 19 degrees C showed a deficiency in the O-side-chain component fucosamine. Gel exclusion chromatography of the polysaccharide fraction derived from lipopolysaccharide isolated from cells grown at 19 degrees C exhibited a decreased content of side-chain polysaccharide as well as a difference in the hexosamine:hexose ratio. The results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis confirmed these results as well as establishing that an essentially normal distribution of side-chain repeating unit lengths were to be found in the 19 degrees C preparation. These results suggest a decrease in the frequency of capping R-form lipopolysaccharide at 19 degrees C. Images PMID:6409883

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm: potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Garima; Rao, Saloni; Bansal, Ankiti; Dang, Shweta; Gupta, Sanjay; Gabrani, Reema

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen that has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense mechanisms. It is frequently related to nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bacteremia. The biofilm formed by the bacteria allows it to adhere to any surface, living or non-living and thus Pseudomonal infections can involve any part of the body. Further, the adaptive and genetic changes of the micro-organisms within the biofilm make them resistant to all known antimicrobial agents making the Pseudomonal infections complicated and life threatening. Pel, Psl and Alg operons present in P. aeruginosa are responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular polysaccharide which plays an important role in cell-cell and cell-surface interactions during biofilm formation. Understanding the bacterial virulence which depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors is essential to know the potential drug targets for future studies. Current novel methods like small molecule based inhibitors, phytochemicals, bacteriophage therapy, photodynamic therapy, antimicrobial peptides, monoclonal antibodies and nanoparticles to curtail the biofilm formed by P. aeruginosa are being discussed in this review. PMID:24309094

  13. Nitrite inhibition of denitrification by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, J.S.; Julio, S.M.; Reis, M.A.M. |

    1995-05-05

    Using a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a model system nitrite inhibition of denitrification was studied. A mineral media with acetate and nitrate as sole electron donor and acceptor, respectively, was used. Results obtained in continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR) operated at pH values between 6.6 and 7.8 showed that growth inhibition depended only on the nitrite undissociated fraction concentration (nitrous acid). A mathematical model to describe this dependence is put forward. The maximum nitrous acid concentration compatible with cell growth and denitrification activity was found to be 66 {mu}g N/L. Denitrification activity was partially associated with growth, as described by the Luedeking-Piret equation. However, when the freshly inoculated reactor was operated discontinuously, nitrite accumulation caused growth uncoupling from denitrification activity. The authors suggest that these results can be interpreted considering that (a) nitrous acid acts as a proton uncoupler; and (b) cultures continuously exposed to nitrous acid prevent the uncoupling effect but not the growth inhibition. Examination of the growth dependence on nitrite concentration at pH 7.0 showed that adapted cultures (growth on CSTR) are less sensitive to nitrous acid inhibition than the ones cultivated in batch.

  14. Ribotype analysis of Pseudomonas pseudomallei isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, M M; Goebel, L A; Godfrey, A J; Choawagul, W; White, N J; Woods, D E

    1993-01-01

    No epidemiological typing system to differentiate among Pseudomonas pseudomallei isolates has been available. Ribotype analysis was developed and used to examine 74 clinical and 10 environmental isolates of P. pseudomallei from Thailand. Six P. pseudomallei ribotypes were identified from restriction fragment polymorphisms of EcoRI chromosomal digests. The predominant ribotype, A, was found in 59 of the isolates examined. By using patterns from hybridizations with SalI, HindIII, and PstI restriction digests, isolates of ribotype A were subdivided into a further five subtypes, giving a total of 10 differentiable P. pseudomallei types. In 23 of 34 melioidosis patients studied, multiple P. pseudomallei isolates were present. In all but one of these patients, a single ribotype of the organism was present. Isolation of two different ribotypes of P. pseudomallei from one patient, one each in sputum and urine, suggests that superinfection may have occurred. The ribotype was shown to be conserved during the course of antibiotic treatments in seven patients studied, although the antibiotic sensitivity patterns in the isolates from these patients varied. The prevalence of subtype A1 in clinical and environmental specimens suggests that this strain may be predominant in this geographical location. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the ribotyping method for epidemiological studies of P. pseudomallei. Images PMID:7679401

  15. Shear-enhanced adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Rusconi, Roberto; Shen, Yi; Forsyth, Alison; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first step in the development of surface-associated communities known as biofilms, which are the cause of many problems in medical devices and industrial water systems. However the underlying mechanisms of initial bacterial attachment are not fully understood. We have investigated the effects of hydrodynamics on the probability of adsorption and detachment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 on model surfaces under flow, in straight microfluidic channels, and measured the distribution of bacteria residence time as a function of the shear rate. Our main discovery is a counter-intuitive enhanced adhesion as the shear stress is increased over a wide range of shear rates. In order to identify the origin of this phenomenon, we have performed experiments with several mutant strains. Our results show that shear-enhanced adhesion is not regulated by primary surface organelles, and that this process is not specific to a certain type of surface, but rather appears a general feature of the adhesive behavior of P. aeruginosa. These results suggest that shear-induced adhesion could be a very widespread strategy in nature.

  16. Biodegradation of acyclic isoprenoids by Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, S G; Lau, E P; Watt, D S; Fall, R R

    1978-01-01

    The ability of various pseudomonads to utilize acyclic isoprenoids as a sole carbon source was investigated. Tests for utilization of acyclic isoprenols such as citronellol and geraniol were complicated by toxic effects of these alcohols, and most species tested were killed by exposure to citronellol or geraniol (0.1%, vol/vol) in liquid culture. In the case of Pseudomonas citronellolis, sensitivity to isoprenols is reduced by prior induction of the isoprenoid degradative pathway via either growth on succinate in the presence of citronellol or growth on citronellic acid. For this species, citronellic acid proved to be the best isoprenoid growth substrate tested. Geraniol utilization as a taxonomic indicator for different subgroups of pseudomonads is discussed. Only a few of the species tested were able to utilize acyclic isoprenoids. Two species which utilize C10 acyclic isoprenoids, P. aeruginosa and P. mendocina, were shown to contain the inducible enzyme geranyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, one of the unique enzymes in the isoprenol degradative pathway known to occur in P. citronellolis. Of the species which utilized geranitol, none showed definite growth on the homologous C15 and C20 isoprenols. PMID:681275

  17. Extracellular Enzyme Secretion by Pseudomonas lemoignei

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M. W.; Merrick, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The ability of succinate to repress the secretion of Pseudomonas lemoignei poly-β-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase was a function of pH. Repression only occurred when the pH of the medium was 7.0 or less. At a higher pH, lack of sensitivity to succinate concentration may have been due to a limited ability to transport succinate. Actively secreting cultures (at pH 7.4) continued to secrete enzyme for approximately 30 min after the pH was rapidly decreased to pH 6.8, even though sufficient succinate was present to repress enzyme synthesis. Similarly, after the addition of rifampin to secreting cultures, there was a 30-min delay before secretion was inhibited. Evidence is presented which suggests that continued secretion may be the result of depolymerase messenger ribonucleic acid accumulation within the cells. Studies with chloramphenicol indicated that de novo protein synthesis is necessary for the secretion of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase and that exoenzyme is not released from a preformed pool. Studies with various inhibitors of protein synthesis indicated that synthesis of exoenzyme is 5 to 10 times more susceptible to inhibition than is the synthesis of cell-associated proteins. PMID:4152045

  18. Pseudomonas biofilms: possibilities of their control.

    PubMed

    Masák, Jan; Čejková, Alena; Schreiberová, Olga; Rezanka, Tomáš

    2014-07-01

    Genus Pseudomonas includes a large number of species that can be encountered in biotechnological processes as well as in the role of serious human or plant pathogens. Pseudomonads easily form biofilms on various types of surfaces. The biofilm phenotype is characterized by an increased resistance to environmental influences including resistance to antibiotics and other disinfectants, causing a number of problems in health care, food industry, and other areas. Considerable attention is therefore paid to the possibilities of eradication/destruction of pseudomonads biofilms both in terms of understanding the mechanisms of biofilm formation and at the level of finding suitable antibiofilm tools applicable in practice. The first part of this review is devoted to an overview of the regulatory mechanisms that are directly or indirectly involved in the formation of biofilm. The most effective approaches to suppressing the formation of biofilm that do not cause the development of resistance are based on the application of substances that interfere with the regulatory molecules or block the appropriate regulatory mechanisms involved in biofilm development by the cells. Pseudomonads biofilm formation is, similar to other microorganisms, a sophisticated process with many regulatory elements. The suppression of this process therefore also requires multiple antibiofilm tools. PMID:24754832

  19. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gilbertsen, Adam; Williams, Bryan

    2014-12-01

    Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice. PMID:25587430

  20. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  1. Surface attachment induces Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Siryaporn, Albert; Kuchma, Sherry L.; O’Toole, George A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infects every type of host that has been examined by deploying multiple virulence factors. Previous studies of virulence regulation have largely focused on chemical cues, but P. aeruginosa may also respond to mechanical cues. Using a rapid imaging-based virulence assay, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa activates virulence in response to attachment to a range of chemically distinct surfaces, suggesting that this bacterial species responds to mechanical properties of its substrates. Surface-activated virulence requires quorum sensing, but activating quorum sensing does not induce virulence without surface attachment. The activation of virulence by surfaces also requires the surface-exposed protein PilY1, which has a domain homologous to a eukaryotic mechanosensor. Specific mutation of the putative PilY1 mechanosensory domain is sufficient to induce virulence in non–surface-attached cells, suggesting that PilY1 mediates surface mechanotransduction. Triggering virulence only when cells are both at high density and attached to a surface—two host-nonspecific cues—explains how P. aeruginosa precisely regulates virulence while maintaining broad host specificity. PMID:25385640

  2. Clonal complex Pseudomonas aeruginosa in horses.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Timothy J; Gibson, Justine S; Moss, Susan; Greer, Ristan M; Cobbold, Rowland N; Wright, John D; Ramsay, Kay A; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with infectious endometritis in horses. Although infectious endometritis is often considered a venereal infection, there is relatively limited genotypic-based evidence to support this mode of transmission. The study sought to determine the relatedness between genital P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a limited geographical region using molecular strain typing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR typing was performed on 93 isolates collected between 2005 and 2009 from 2058 thoroughbred horses (including 18 stallions) at 66 studs. While P. aeruginosa was not detected in the stallions, 53/93 (57%) mares harbouring P. aeruginosa had clonally related strains, which included a single dominant genotype detected in 42 (45%) mares from 13 different studs. These novel findings suggest that most equine genital P. aeruginosa infections in this region may have been acquired from mechanisms other than direct horse to horse transmission. Instead, other potential acquisition pathways, as well as strain specific adaptation to the equine genital tract, should be investigated. PMID:21183294

  3. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 Gene Collection

    PubMed Central

    LaBaer, Joshua; Qiu, QingQing; Anumanthan, Anukanth; Mar, Wenhong; Zuo, Dongmei; Murthy, T.V.S.; Taycher, Helen; Halleck, Allison; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Lory, Stephen; Brizuela, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common inhabitant of soil and water, is an opportunistic pathogen of growing clinical relevance. Its genome, one of the largest among bacteria [5570 open reading frames (ORFs)] approaches that of simple eukaryotes. We have constructed a comprehensive gene collection for this organism utilizing the annotated genome of P. aeruginosa PA01 and a highly automated and laboratory information management system (LIMS)-supported production line. All the individual ORFs have been successfully PCR-amplified and cloned into a recombination-based cloning system. We have isolated and archived four independent isolates of each individual ORF. Full sequence analysis of the first isolate for one-third of the ORFs in the collection has been completed. We used two sets of genes from this repository for high-throughput expression and purification of recombinant proteins in different systems. The purified proteins have been used to set up biochemical and immunological assays directed towards characterization of histidine kinases and identification of bacterial proteins involved in the immune response of cystic fibrosis patients. This gene repository provides a powerful tool for proteome- and genome-scale research of this organism, and the strategies adopted to generate this repository serve as a model for building clone sets for other bacteria. PMID:15489342

  4. Resistance of Pseudomonas to Quaternary Ammonium Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Frank W.; Geftic, Sam G.; Gelzer, Justus

    1971-01-01

    Tube dilution experiments showed that benzalkonium chloride (BC)-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in the presence of 1,000 μg of BC per ml were at least 20 times more sensitive to polymyxin B and colistin sulfate than the BC-sensitive (BCS) parent strain. BCS cells selected for resistance to 500 μg of polymyxin B per ml remained sensitive to BC. There was little difference in the amount of carbenicillin, gentamicin sulfate, or rifampin needed to prevent growth of either the BCS or BC-resistant (BCR) strains. Growth of BCR cells was inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetate at a concentration of 400 μg/ml or less, whereas the BCS strain grew at ethylenediaminetetraacetate levels of 10,000 μg/ml. Phenylmercuric acetate and thimerosal inhibited growth of BCR and BCS cells at concentrations of 10 μg/ml or less. BCR cells were cross-resistant to >1,000 μg/ml concentrations of five other quaternary ammonium compounds, including three with C16 alkyls and two with alkyl groups of shorter length. The BCS strain was also resistant to >1,000 μg/ml concentrations of the three quaternary ammonium compounds with C16 alkyl groups but, in addition to BC, was inhibited by 200 μg/ml levels or less of the two quaternary ammonium compounds containing alkyl groups of less than 16 carbon atoms. PMID:4998348

  5. Role of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) in sensitising Pseudomonas aeruginosa to UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Meichtry, Martín; Pizarro, Ramón A; Costa, Cristina S

    2015-01-01

    One of the main stress factors that bacteria face in the environment is solar ultraviolet-A (UVA) radiation, which leads to lethal effects through oxidative damage. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of 2-heptyl-3-hydroxi-4-quinolone (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal or PQS) in the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to UVA radiation. PQS is an intercellular quorum sensing signal associated to membrane vesicles which, among other functions, regulates genes related to iron acquisition, forms stable complexes with iron and participates in oxidative phenomena. UVA exposure of the wild-type PAO1 strain and a pqsA mutant unable to produce PQS revealed a sensitising role for this signal. Research into the mechanism involved in this phenomenon revealed that catalase, an essential factor in the UVA defence, is not related to PQS-mediated UVA sensitivity. Absorption of UVA by PQS produced its own photo-degradation, oxidation of the probe 2',7'- dichlorodihydrofluorescein and generation of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion, suggesting that this signal could be acting as an endogenous photosensitiser. The results presented in this study could explain the high sensitivity to UVA of P. aeruginosa when compared to enteric bacteria. PMID:25535873

  6. Interference with Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis inhibits virulence factor expression by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, M. Worth; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that controls numerous virulence factors through intercellular signals. This bacterium has two quorum-sensing systems (las and rhl), which act through the intercellular signals N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), respectively. P. aeruginosa also produces a third intercellular signal that is involved in virulence factor regulation. This signal, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone [referred to as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS)], is a secondary metabolite that is part of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing hierarchy. PQS can induce both lasB (encodes LasB elastase) and rhlI (encodes the C4-HSL synthase) in P. aeruginosa and is produced maximally during the late stationary phase of growth. Because PQS is an intercellular signal that is part of the quorum-sensing hierarchy and controls multiple virulence factors, we began basic studies designed to elucidate its biosynthetic pathway. First, we present data that strongly suggest that anthranilate is a precursor for PQS. P. aeruginosa converted radiolabeled anthranilate into radioactive PQS, which was bioactive. We also found that an anthranilate analog (methyl anthranilate) would inhibit the production of PQS. This analog was then shown to have a major negative effect on elastase production by P. aeruginosa. These data provide evidence that precursors of intercellular signals may provide viable targets for the development of therapeutic treatments that will reduce P. aeruginosa virulence. PMID:11573001

  7. Efflux as a glutaraldehyde resistance mechanism in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Amit; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Bibby, Kyle J

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in microbial biofilm control is biocide resistance. Phenotypic adaptations and physical protective effects have been historically thought to be the primary mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance in bacterial biofilms. Recent studies indicate the presence of genetic mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance, but very little is known about the contributory genetic factors. Here, we demonstrate that efflux pumps contribute to glutaraldehyde resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The RNA-seq data show that efflux pumps and phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis metabolic pathways were induced upon glutaraldehyde exposure. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of efflux pumps potentiates glutaraldehyde activity, suggesting that efflux activity contributes to glutaraldehyde resistance. Additionally, induction of known modulators of biofilm formation, including phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis, may contribute to biofilm resistance and resilience. Fundamental understanding of the genetic mechanism of biocide resistance is critical for the optimization of biocide use and development of novel disinfection strategies. Our results reveal genetic components involved in glutaraldehyde resistance and a potential strategy for improved control of biofilms. PMID:25824217

  8. Nucleic Acid Similarities Among Pseudomonas pseudomallei, Pseudomonas multivorans, and Actinobacillus mallei1

    PubMed Central

    Rogul, M.; Brendle, J. J.; Haapala, D. K.; Alexander, A. D.

    1970-01-01

    Annealing experiments on membrane filters were carried out with deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) from selected strains of the nomen-species of Pseudomonas, Actinobacillus, Chromobacterium, and Micrococcus, with the use of DNA of Pseudomonas pseudomallei and Actinobacillus mallei as reference materials. Under the usual conditions employed in these experiments, the results were not quantitatively reproducible. Incorporation of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) into the incubation medium greatly increased differences in comparative binding. DNA binding in agar matrices was examined in the presence and absence of DMSO at various incubation temperatures. It was found that the greatest specificity, stability, and total binding for DNA containing high amounts of guanine and cytosine occurred in the presence of DMSO. Under the most stringent annealing conditions permitted in agar, DNA species from P. pseudomallei and A. mallei in the presence of DMSO demonstrated interspecific relative bindings of 76 to 86% when compared to the homologous reactions. The thermal elution midpoints (Em) of these duplexed interspecific DNA species were quite close to the homologous Em values. The relative bindings of P. multivorans DNA types to either reference DNA ranged between 6 to 27%, and the Em values were 4 to 7 C less than those for the homologous reactions. PMID:5438051

  9. Catabolism of Naphthalenesulfonic Acids by Pseudomonas sp. A3 and Pseudomonas sp. C22

    PubMed Central

    Brilon, C.; Beckmann, W.; Knackmuss, H.-J.

    1981-01-01

    Naphthalene and two naphthalenesulfonic acids were degraded by Pseudomonas sp. A3 and Pseudomonas sp. C22 by the same enzymes. Gentisate is a major metabolite. Catabolic activities for naphthalene, 1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, and 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid are induced by growth with naphthalene, 1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, methylnaphthalene, or salicylate. Gentisate is also an inducer in strain A3. Inhibition kinetics show that naphthalene and substituted naphthalenes are hydroxylated by the same naphthalene dioxygenase. Substrates with nondissociable substituents such as CH3, OCH3, Cl, or NO2 are hydroxylated in the 7,8-position, and 4-substituted salicylates are accumulated. If CO2H, CH2CO2H, or SO3H are substituents, hydroxylation occurs with high regioselectivity in the 1,2-position. Thus, 1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene-2-carboxylic acids are formed quantitatively from the corresponding naphthalenecarboxylic acids. Utilization of naphthalenesulfonic acids proceeds by the same regioselective 1,2-dioxygenation which labilizes the C—SO3− bond and eliminates sulfite. PMID:16345814

  10. Efflux as a Glutaraldehyde Resistance Mechanism in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Amit; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in microbial biofilm control is biocide resistance. Phenotypic adaptations and physical protective effects have been historically thought to be the primary mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance in bacterial biofilms. Recent studies indicate the presence of genetic mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance, but very little is known about the contributory genetic factors. Here, we demonstrate that efflux pumps contribute to glutaraldehyde resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The RNA-seq data show that efflux pumps and phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis metabolic pathways were induced upon glutaraldehyde exposure. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of efflux pumps potentiates glutaraldehyde activity, suggesting that efflux activity contributes to glutaraldehyde resistance. Additionally, induction of known modulators of biofilm formation, including phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis, may contribute to biofilm resistance and resilience. Fundamental understanding of the genetic mechanism of biocide resistance is critical for the optimization of biocide use and development of novel disinfection strategies. Our results reveal genetic components involved in glutaraldehyde resistance and a potential strategy for improved control of biofilms. PMID:25824217

  11. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Saiman, L.; Cacalano, G.; Prince, A. )

    1990-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment.

  12. Increased Sheep Lung Vascular Permeability Caused by Pseudomonas Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, Kenneth L.; Woolverton, William C.; Blake, Lynn H.; Staub, Norman C.

    1974-01-01

    In awake sheep, we compared the responses of lung lymph flow and lymph and plasma protein concentrations to steady state elevations of pulmonary vascular pressures made by inflating a left atrial balloon with those after an intravenous infusion of 105-1010Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lymph flow increased when pressure was increased, but lymph-plasma protein concentration ratios always fell and lymph protein flow (lymph flow × lymph protein concentration) increased only slightly. After Pseudomonas, sheep had transient chills, fever, leukopenia, hypoxemia, increased pulmonary artery pressure and lymph flow and decreased left atrial pressure and lymph protein concentration, 3-5 h after Pseudomonas, when vascular pressures and lymph protein concentrations had returned to near base line, lymph flow increased further to 3-10 times base line and remained at a steady level for many hours. During this steady state period, lymph-plasma protein concentration ratios were similar to base line and lymph protein flow was higher than in the increased pressure studies. Two sheep died of pulmonary edema 7 and 9 h after Pseudomonas, but in 16 studies, five other sheep appeared well during the period of highest lymph flow and all variables returned to base line in 24-72 h. Six serial indicator dilution lung water studies in five sheep changed insignificantly from base line after Pseudomonas. Postmortem lung water was high in the two sheep dead of pulmonary edema and one other, but six sheep killed 1-6 h after Pseudomonas had normal lung water. Because of the clear difference between the effects of increased pressure and Pseudomonas on lymphplasma protein concentration ratios and lymph protein flow, we conclude that Pseudomonas causes a prolonged increase in lung vessel permeability to protein. Because we saw lung lymph flow as high as 10 times base line without pulmonary edema, we conclude that lung lymphatics are a sensitive high-capacity mechanism for removing excess filtered fluid. An

  13. MEASURING THE DISPERSAL AND REENTRAINMENT OF RECOMBINANT PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE AT CALIFORNIA TEST SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dispersal of genetically engineered Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated during and after spray applications onto plants at Brentwood and Tulelake, California. ive different sampling devices were used to evaluate the dispersal within and around te...

  14. Degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by two strains of Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Nwinyi, Obinna C; Ajayi, Oluseyi O; Amund, Olukayode O

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to isolate competent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons degraders that can utilize polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons of former industrial sites at McDoel Switchyard in Bloomington, Indiana. Using conventional enrichment method based on soil slurry, we isolated, screened and purified two bacterial species strains PB1 and PB2. Applying the ribotyping technique using the 16S rRNA gene analysis, the strains were assigned to the genus Pseudomonas (Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2). Both isolates showed promising metabolic capacity on pyrene sprayed MS agar plates during the preliminary investigations. Using time course studies in the liquid cultures at calculated concentrations 123, 64, 97 and 94ppm for naphthalene, chrysene, fluroanthene and pyrene, P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 showed partial utilization of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Naphthalene was degraded between 26% and 40%, chrysene 14% and 16%, fluroanthene 5% and 7%; pyrene 8% and 13% by P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 respectively. Based on their growth profile, we developed a model R(2)=1 to predict the degradation rate of slow polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon-degraders where all the necessary parameters are constant. From this investigation, we confirm that the former industrial site soil microbial communities may be explored for the biorestoration of the industrial site. PMID:27245129

  15. Pseudomonas soli sp. nov., a novel producer of xantholysin congeners.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; García-López, Marina; Carmona, Cristina; Sousa, Thiciana da S; de Pedro, Nuria; Cautain, Bastien; Martín, Jesús; Vicente, Francisca; Reyes, Fernando; Bills, Gerald F; Genilloud, Olga

    2014-09-01

    A chemoorganotrophic Gram-negative bacterium was isolated by means of a diffusion sandwich system from a soil sample from the Sierra Nevada National Park, Spain. Strain F-279,208(T) was oxidase and catalase positive, strictly aerobic, non-spore-forming and motile by single polar flagellum. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD genes revealed that strain F-279,208(T) belongs to the Pseudomonas putida group with Pseudomonas mosselii and Pseudomonas entomophila as its closest relatives. DNA-DNA hybridization assays and phenotypic traits confirmed that this strain belongs to a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F-279,208(T) (=DSM 28043(T)=LMG 27941(T)), and during fermentation it produces xantholysins, a family of lipodepsipeptides. The major compound, xantholysin A, showed an interesting activity in a RCC4 kidney tumor cell line with inactivation of VHL linked with the HIF pathway, without any cytotoxic effects against other human tumor cell lines tested including, liver, pancreas and breast. PMID:25097020

  16. Flagellin gene sequence variation in the genus Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Bellingham, N F; Morgan, J A; Saunders, J R; Winstanley, C

    2001-07-01

    Flagellin gene (fliC) sequences from 18 strains of Pseudomonas sensu stricto representing 8 different species, and 9 representative fliC sequences from other members of the gamma sub-division of proteobacteria, were compared. Analysis was performed on N-terminal, C-terminal and whole fliC sequences. The fliC analyses confirmed the inferred relationship between P. mendocina, P. oleovorans and P. aeruginosa based on 16S rRNA sequence comparisons. In addition, the analyses indicated that P. putida PRS2000 was closely related to P. fluorescens SBW25 and P. fluorescens NCIMB 9046T, but suggested that P. putida PaW8 and P. putida PRS2000 were more closely related to other Pseudomonas spp. than they were to each other. There were a number of inconsistencies in inferred evolutionary relationships between strains, depending on the analysis performed. In particular, whole flagellin gene comparisons often differed from those obtained using N- and C-terminal sequences. However, there were also inconsistencies between the terminal region analyses, suggesting that phylogenetic relationships inferred on the basis of fliC sequence should be treated with caution. Although the central domain of fliC is highly variable between Pseudomonas strains, there was evidence of sequence similarities between the central domains of different Pseudomonas fliC sequences. This indicates the possibility of recombination in the central domain of fliC genes within Pseudomonas species, and between these genes and those from other bacteria. PMID:11518318

  17. Pseudomonas tuomuerensis sp. nov., isolated from a bird's nest.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu-Hua; Zhang, De-Chao; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhou, Hui-Ling; Zhou, Yu-Guang

    2009-01-01

    Strain 78-123T was isolated from a sample of a bird's nest situated on the bank of Qiongtailan River in the region of Tuomuer Peak of Tianshan Mountain in the Xin-jiang Uygur Autonomous Region in north-western China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that strain 78-123T was related to members of the genus Pseudomonas. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain 78-123T and Pseudomonas mendocina ATCC 25411T, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JCM 5968T and Pseudomonas alcaliphila AL15-21T was 97.1, 97.4 and 97.5 %, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH, C(18 : 1)omega7c and C(12 : 0). The G+C content was 60.4 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data, the novel species Pseudomonas tuomuerensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 78-123T (=CGMCC 1.1365T =JCM 14085T). PMID:19126738

  18. Vaccination against respiratory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Grimwood, Keith; Kyd, Jennelle M; Owen, Suzzanne J; Massa, Helen M; Cripps, Allan W

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a major clinical problem globally, particularly for patients with chronic pulmonary disorders, such as those with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (nCFB) and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, critically ill and immunocompromised patients are also at significant risk of P. aeruginosa infection. For almost half a century, research efforts have focused toward development of a vaccine against infections caused by P. aeruginosa, but a licensed vaccine is not yet available. Significant advances in identifying potential vaccine antigens have been made. Immunisations via both the mucosal and systemic routes have been trialled in animal models and their effectiveness in clearing acute infections demonstrated. The challenge for translation of this research to human applications remains, since P. aeruginosa infections in the human respiratory tract can present both as an acute or chronic infection. In addition, immunisation prior to infection may not be possible for many patients with CF, nCFB or COPD. Therefore, development of a therapeutic vaccine provides an alternative approach for treatment of chronic infection. Preliminary animal and human studies suggest that mucosal immunisation may be effective as a therapeutic vaccine against P. aeruginosa respiratory infections. Nevertheless, more research is needed to improve our understanding of the basic biology of P. aeruginosa and the mechanisms needed to upregulate the induction of host immune pathways to prevent infection. Recognition of variability in the host immune responses for a range of patient health conditions at risk from P. aeruginosa infection is also required to support development of a successful vaccine delivery strategy and vaccine. Activation of mucosal immune responses may provide improved efficacy of vaccination for P. aeruginosa during both acute exacerbations and chronic infection. PMID:25483510

  19. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration. Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem) have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin) have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc.) induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor. Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa provide useful

  20. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration. Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem) have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin) have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc.) induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor. Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa provide useful

  1. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. PMID:20580207

  2. Chromosomal Organization and Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Boccard, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed. PMID:23658532

  3. Surface action of gentamicin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kadurugamuwa, J L; Clarke, A J; Beveridge, T J

    1993-01-01

    The mode of action of gentamicin has traditionally been considered to be at the 30S ribosomal level. However, the inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis alone appears to be insufficient to entirely explain the bactericidal effects. Bacteriolysis is also mediated through perturbation of the cell surface by gentamicin (J.L. Kadurugamuwa, J.S. Lam, and T.J. Beveridge, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 37:715-721, 1993). In order to separate the surface effect from protein synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, we chemically conjugated bovine serum albumin (BSA) to gentamicin, making the antibiotic too large to penetrate through the cell envelope to interact with the ribosomes of the cytoplasm. Furthermore, this BSA-gentamicin conjugate was also used to coat colloidal gold particles as a probe for electron microscopy to study the surface effect during antibiotic exposure. High-performance liquid chromatography confirmed the conjugation of the protein to the antibiotic. The conjugated gentamicin and BSA retained bactericidal activity and inhibited protein synthesis on isolated ribosomes in vitro but not on intact cells in vivo because of its exclusion from the cytoplasm. When reacted against the bacteria, numerous gentamicin-BSA-gold particles were clearly seen on the cell surfaces of whole mounts and thin sections of cells, while the cytoplasm was devoid of such particles. Disruption of the cell envelope was also observed since gentamicin-BSA and gentamicin-BSA-gold destabilized the outer membrane, evolved outer membrane blebs and vesicles, and formed holes in the cell surface. The morphological evidence suggests that the initial binding of the antibiotic disrupts the packing order of lipopolysaccharide of the outer membrane, which ultimately forms holes in the cell envelope and can lead to cell lysis. It is apparent that gentamicin has two potentially lethal effects on gram-negative cells, that resulting from inhibition of protein synthesis and that resulting from

  4. Boron and Fish Oil Have Different Beneficial Effects on Strength and Trabecular Microarchitecture of Bone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent findings suggest that boron and long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have similar beneficial effects on bone strength and trabecular microarchitecture. Thus, an experiment was performed to confirm the beneficial effects and to determine whether dietary fatty acid composition would a...

  5. 17 CFR 270.3c-5 - Beneficial ownership by knowledgeable employees and certain other persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beneficial ownership by knowledgeable employees and certain other persons. 270.3c-5 Section 270.3c-5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.3c-5 Beneficial ownership...

  6. Electrostatic beneficiation of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Lindquist, D.; Tennal, K.B.

    1996-07-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following: modification to the electrostatic separator; review of DOE specifications for minimum beneficiation and calculations of grinding requirements based on washability; two-pass beneficiation; analysis of different sieve fractions; measurement of charge to mass ratio as a function of height of deposition; and charging of coal against different materials.

  7. 75 FR 11207 - Policy Statement on Obtaining and Retaining Beneficial Ownership Information for Anti-Money...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... this provision. Special Due Diligence Programs for Certain Foreign Accounts, 72 FR 44768-44775 (August... COMMISSION Policy Statement on Obtaining and Retaining Beneficial Ownership Information for Anti-Money... retaining beneficial ownership information for anti-money laundering purposes. DATES: Effective Date:...

  8. 17 CFR 240.14c-7 - Providing copies of material for certain beneficial owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for certain beneficial owners. 240.14c-7 Section 240.14c-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) § 240.14c-7 Providing copies of material for certain beneficial...

  9. 17 CFR 240.14c-7 - Providing copies of material for certain beneficial owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for certain beneficial owners. 240.14c-7 Section 240.14c-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) § 240.14c-7 Providing copies of material for certain beneficial...

  10. 17 CFR 240.14c-7 - Providing copies of material for certain beneficial owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for certain beneficial owners. 240.14c-7 Section 240.14c-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) § 240.14c-7 Providing copies of material for certain beneficial...

  11. 17 CFR 240.14c-7 - Providing copies of material for certain beneficial owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for certain beneficial owners. 240.14c-7 Section 240.14c-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) § 240.14c-7 Providing copies of material for certain beneficial...

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF Pseudomonas spp. AS AMOEBA-RESISTANT MICROORGANISMS IN ISOLATES OF Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Vinicius José; Corção, Gertrudes; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a “Trojan horse” of the microbial world. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of Pseudomonas as an amoeba-resistant microorganism in 12 isolates of Acanthamoeba. All isolates showed the genus Pseudomonas spp. as amoeba-resistant microorganisms. Thus, one can see that the Acanthamoeba isolates studied are hosts of Pseudomonas. PMID:25651331

  13. 40 CFR 180.1145 - Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1145 Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Pseudomonas syringae is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance on all raw...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1145 - Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1145 Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Pseudomonas syringae is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance on all raw...

  15. 40 CFR 180.1145 - Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1145 Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Pseudomonas syringae is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance on all raw...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1145 - Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1145 Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Pseudomonas syringae is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance on all raw...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1145 - Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1145 Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Pseudomonas syringae is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance on all raw...

  18. Genetically enhanced cellulase production in Pseudomonas cellulosa using recombinant DNA technology

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1999-01-01

    An enhanced strain of Pseudomonas celllulosa was obtained by introducing a recombinant genetic construct comprising a heterologous cellulase gene operably connected to a promoter into ATCC 55702, mutagenizing the transformants by treatment with MNNG, and selecting a high cellulase producing transformant. The transformant, designated Pseudomonas cellulosa ATCC XXXX, exhibits enhanced levels of cellulase production relative to the untransformed Pseudomonas cellulosa strain #142 ATCC 55702.

  19. [Characterization of manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na-Na; Bai, Yao-Hui; Liang, Jin-Song; Luo, Jin-Ming; Liu, Rui-Ping; Hu, Cheng-Zhi; Yuan, Lin-Jiang

    2014-02-01

    A manganese-oxidizing bacteria (QJX-1) was isolated from the soil of a manganese mine. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1 by 16S rDNA sequencing. Experimental results showed that the Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1 has a multi-copper oxidase gene CumA, which is an essential component for manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas sp. Under the condition of low initial inoculum level (D600, 0.020), 5.05 mg x L(-1 Mn2+ could be oxidized by QJX-1 within 48 h with a conversion rate of as high as 99.4%. In comparison with the eutrophic conditions, the oligotrophic condition dramatically increased the biological manganese oxidation rate. Biofilm formation by employing the quartz sand could further improve the oxidation rate of Mn2+. Based on these results, it is speculated that biological manganese oxidation in underground water treatment is comparatively high. PMID:24812972

  20. CXCR1 Regulates Pulmonary Anti-Pseudomonas Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Carevic, M; Öz, H; Fuchs, K; Laval, J; Schroth, C; Frey, N; Hector, A; Bilich, T; Haug, M; Schmidt, A; Autenrieth, S E; Bucher, K; Beer-Hammer, S; Gaggar, A; Kneilling, M; Benarafa, C; Gao, J L; Murphy, P M; Schwarz, S; Moepps, B; Hartl, D

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen causing disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) and other lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the pulmonary host defense mechanisms regulating anti-P. aeruginosa immunity remain incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate, by studying an airway P. aeruginosa infection model, in vivo bioluminescence imaging, neutrophil effector responses and human airway samples, that the chemokine receptor CXCR1 regulates pulmonary host defense against P. aeruginosa. Mechanistically, CXCR1 regulates anti-Pseudomonas neutrophil responses through modulation of reactive oxygen species and interference with Toll-like receptor 5 expression. These studies define CXCR1 as a novel, noncanonical chemokine receptor that regulates pulmonary anti-Pseudomonas host defense with broad implications for CF, COPD and other infectious lung diseases. PMID:26950764

  1. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  2. Microbial degradation of quinoline and methylquinolines. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aislabie, J.; Bej, A.K.; Hurst, H.; Rothenburger, S.; Atlas, R.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Several bacterial cultures were isolated that are able to degrade quinoline and to transform or to degrade methylquinolines. The degradation of quinoline by strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa QP and Pseudomonas. putida QP produced hydroxyquinolines, a transient pink compound, and other undetermined products. The quinoline-degrading strains of P. aeruginosa QP and P. putida QP hydroxylated a limited number of methylquinolines but could not degrade them, nor could they transform 2-methylquinoline, isoquinoline, or pyridine. Another pseudomonad, Pseudomonas sp. strain MQP, was isolated that could degrade 2-methylquinoline. P. aeruginosa QP was able to degrade or to transform quinoline and a few methylquinolines in a complex heterocyclic nitrogen-containing fraction of a shale oil. All of the quinoline- and methylquinoline-degrading strains have multiple plasmids including a common 250-kilobase plasmid. The 225-, 250-, and 320-kilobase plasmids of the P. aeruginosa QP strain all contained genes involved in quinoline metabolism.

  3. Metabolism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride in Pseudomonas strain B1.

    PubMed Central

    van Ginkel, C G; van Dijk, J B; Kroon, A G

    1992-01-01

    A bacterium (strain B1) utilizing hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride as a carbon and energy source was isolated from activated sludge and tentatively identified as a Pseudomonas sp. This bacterium only grew on alkyltrimethylammonium salts (C12 to C22) and possible intermediates of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride breakdown such as hexadecanoate and acetate. Pseudomonas strain B1 did not grow on amines. Simultaneous adaptation studies suggested that the bacterium oxidized only the alkyl chain of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride. This was confirmed by the stoichiometric formation of trimethylamine from hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride. The initial hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride oxygenase activity, measured by its ability to form trimethylamine, was NAD(P)H and O2 dependent. Finally, assays of aldehyde dehydrogenase, hexadecanoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, and isocitrate lyase in cell extracts revealed the potential of Pseudomonas strain B1 to metabolize the alkyl chain via beta-oxidation. PMID:1444422

  4. Biotransformation of Tributyltin chloride by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2

    PubMed Central

    Khanolkar, Dnyanada S.; Naik, Milind Mohan; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial isolate capable of utilizing tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) as sole carbon source was isolated from estuarine sediments of west coast of India and identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri based on biochemical tests and Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. This isolate was designated as strain DN2. Although this bacterial isolate could resist up to 3 mM TBTCl level, it showed maximum growth at 2 mM TBTCl in mineral salt medium (MSM). Pseudomonas stutzeri DN2 exposed to 2 mM TBTCl revealed significant alteration in cell morphology as elongation and shrinkage in cell size along with roughness of cell surface. FTIR and NMR analysis of TBTCl degradation product extracted using chloroform and purified using column chromatography clearly revealed biotransformation of TBTCl into Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTCl2) through debutylation process. Therefore, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2 may be used as a potential bacterial strain for bioremediation of TBTCl contaminated aquatic environmental sites. PMID:25763027

  5. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas sp. to caffeine and related methylxanthines.

    PubMed

    Dash, Swati Sucharita; Sailaja, Nori Sri; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas sp. isolated from soil of coffee plantation area has been shown to degrade higher concentrations of caffeine ( approximately 15 g l(-1)) by N-demethylation at a rate higher than what has been reported for any strain so far. This strain exhibits positive chemotaxis towards caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) in swarm plate assay and modified capillary assay in a dose dependant manner. Related methylxanthines and xanthine also act as chemoattractants for the strain with the highest relative chemotactic response (RCR) seen for xanthine. Chemotaxis in Pseudomonas sp. is possibly plasmid mediated as indicated by positive chemotaxis of plasmid transformed E. coli DH5alpha. The chemotactic abilities of Pseudomonas sp. combined with higher rates of degradation of caffeine can be used in the development of strategies for biodecaffeination of caffeine containing wastes. PMID:18383225

  6. No Vacancy: How beneficial microbes cooperate with immunity to provide colonization resistance to pathogens#

    PubMed Central

    Sassone-Corsi, Martina; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian intestine harbors a community of trillions of microbes, collectively known as the gut microbiota, which co-evolved with the host in a mutually beneficial relationship. Among the numerous gut microbial species, certain commensal bacteria are known to provide health benefits to the host when administered in adequate amounts, and as such are labeled “probiotics”. Here we review some of the mechanisms by which probiotics and other beneficial commensals provide colonization resistance to pathogens. The battle for similar nutrients and the bacterial secretion of antimicrobials provide a direct means of competition between beneficial and harmful microbes. Beneficial microbes can also indirectly diminish pathogen colonization by stimulating the development of innate and adaptive immunity as well as the function of the mucosal barrier. Altogether, we gather and present evidence that beneficial microbes cooperate with host immunity in an effort to shut out pathogens. PMID:25888704

  7. No vacancy: how beneficial microbes cooperate with immunity to provide colonization resistance to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sassone-Corsi, Martina; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2015-05-01

    The mammalian intestine harbors a community of trillions of microbes, collectively known as the gut microbiota, which coevolved with the host in a mutually beneficial relationship. Among the numerous gut microbial species, certain commensal bacteria are known to provide health benefits to the host when administered in adequate amounts and, as such, are labeled "probiotics." We review some of the mechanisms by which probiotics and other beneficial commensals provide colonization resistance to pathogens. The battle for similar nutrients and the bacterial secretion of antimicrobials provide a direct means of competition between beneficial and harmful microbes. Beneficial microbes can also indirectly diminish pathogen colonization by stimulating the development of innate and adaptive immunity, as well as the function of the mucosal barrier. Altogether, we gather and present evidence that beneficial microbes cooperate with host immunity in an effort to shut out pathogens. PMID:25888704

  8. Pseudomonas chengduensis sp. nov., isolated from landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Zhou, Yan; He, Xiaohong; Hu, Xiaohong; Li, Daping

    2014-01-01

    Strain MBR(T) was isolated from landfill leachate in a solid-waste disposal site in Chengdu, Sichuan, China. An analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was closely related to members of the genus Pseudomonas, sharing the highest sequence similarities with Pseudomonas toyotomiensis HT-3(T) (99.8 %), Pseudomonas alcaliphila AL15-21(T) (99.7 %) and Pseudomonas oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) (99.4 %). Multi-locus sequence analysis based on three housekeeping genes (gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) provided higher resolution at the species level than that based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which was further confirmed by less than 70 % DNA-DNA relatedness between the new isolate and P. toyotomiensis HT-3(T) (61.3 %), P. alcaliphila AL15-21(T) (51.5 %) and P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) (57.8 %). The DNA G+C content of strain MBR(T) was 61.9 mol% and the major ubiquinone was Q-9. The major cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0, and C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c. Polyphasic analysis indicates that strain MBR(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas chengduensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MBR(T) ( = CGMCC 2318(T) = DSM 26382(T)). PMID:24021726

  9. Co-evolutionary dynamics between public good producers and cheats in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kümmerli, R; Santorelli, L A; Granato, E T; Dumas, Z; Dobay, A; Griffin, A S; West, S A

    2015-12-01

    The production of beneficial public goods is common in the microbial world, and so is cheating--the exploitation of public goods by nonproducing mutants. Here, we examine co-evolutionary dynamics between cooperators and cheats and ask whether cooperators can evolve strategies to reduce the burden of exploitation, and whether cheats in turn can improve their exploitation abilities. We evolved cooperators of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, producing the shareable iron-scavenging siderophore pyoverdine, together with cheats, defective in pyoverdine production but proficient in uptake. We found that cooperators managed to co-exist with cheats in 56% of all replicates over approximately 150 generations of experimental evolution. Growth and competition assays revealed that co-existence was fostered by a combination of general adaptions to the media and specific adaptions to the co-evolving opponent. Phenotypic screening and whole-genome resequencing of evolved clones confirmed this pattern, and suggest that cooperators became less exploitable by cheats because they significantly reduced their pyoverdine investment. Cheats, meanwhile, improved exploitation efficiency through mutations blocking the costly pyoverdine-signalling pathway. Moreover, cooperators and cheats evolved reduced motility, a pattern that likely represents adaptation to laboratory conditions, but at the same time also affects social interactions by reducing strain mixing and pyoverdine sharing. Overall, we observed parallel evolution, where co-existence of cooperators and cheats was enabled by a combination of adaptations to the abiotic and social environment and their interactions. PMID:26348785

  10. Community-based interference against integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human salivary microbial biofilm.

    PubMed

    He, X; Hu, W; He, J; Guo, L; Lux, R; Shi, W

    2011-12-01

    As part of the human gastrointestinal tract, the oral cavity represents a complex biological system and harbors diverse bacterial species. Unlike the gut microbiota, which is often considered a health asset, studies of the oral commensal microbiota have been largely limited to their implication in oral conditions such as dental caries and periodontal disease. Less emphasis has been given to their potential beneficial roles, especially the protective effects against oral colonization by foreign or pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we used salivary microbiota derived from healthy human subjects to investigate protective effects against colonization and integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, into developing or pre-formed salivary biofilms. When co-cultivated in saliva medium, P. aeruginosa persisted in the planktonic phase, but failed to integrate into the salivary microbial community during biofilm formation. Furthermore, in saliva medium supplemented with sucrose, the oral microbiota inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa by producing lactic acid. More interestingly, while pre-formed salivary biofilms were able to prevent P. aeruginosa colonization, the same biofilms recovered from mild chlorhexidine gluconate treatment displayed a shift in microbial composition and showed a drastic reduction in protection. Our study indicates that normal oral communities with balanced microbial compositions could be important in effectively preventing the integration of foreign or pathogenic bacterial species, such as P. aeruginosa. PMID:22053962

  11. Examining the fate of released Pseudomonas putida F1 in rhizosphere environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Davis, L.C.; Erickson, L.E.

    1997-12-31

    Bioremediation, especially plant-based bioremediation, is receiving increasing attention because compared to traditional soil and groundwater remediation techniques, it is rapid, safe, and cost-effective. A soil microcosm study was conducted to see the fate of released bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida F1 in soil. Although the P. p F1 population died off to low levels within the experimental period, the presence of alfalfa and poplar trees helped the survival of P. p F1 in soil. The P. p F1 populations were significantly higher (p = 0.05) in soil samples from the poplar tree soil microcosms than from unplanted control soil microcosms. There was no significant difference observed between soil microcosms planted with alfalfa and unplanted control. The better survival of P. p F1 in planted soil is due to the rhizosphere effect, and therefore, is dependent on the root density in soil. This study shows the beneficial effect of vegetation on the survival of a laboratory cultured strain under conditions close to field condition.

  12. Quantitative analysis of chemotaxis towards toluene by Pseudomonas putida in a convection-free microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaopu; Atencia, Javier; Ford, Roseanne M

    2015-05-01

    Chemotaxis has been shown to be beneficial for the migration of soil-inhabiting bacteria towards industrial chemical pollutants, which they degrade. Many studies have demonstrated the importance of this microbial property under various circumstances; however, few quantitative analyses have been undertaken to measure the two essential parameters that characterize the chemotaxis of bioremediation bacteria: the chemotactic sensitivity coefficient χ(0) and the chemotactic receptor constant K(c). The main challenge to determine these parameters is that χ(0) and K(c) are coupled together in non-linear mathematical models used to evaluate them. In this study we developed a method to accurately measure these parameters for Pseudomonas putida in the presence of toluene, an important pollutant in groundwater contamination. Our approach uses a multilayer microfluidic device to expose bacteria to a convection-free linear chemical gradient of toluene that is stable over time. The bacterial distribution within the gradient is measured in terms of fluorescence intensity, and is then used to fit the parameters Kc and χ(0) with mathematical models. Critically, bacterial distributions under chemical gradients at two different concentrations were used to solve for both parameters independently. To validate the approach, the chemotaxis parameters of Escherichia coli strains towards α-methylaspartate were experimentally derived and were found to be consistent with published results from related work. PMID:25408100

  13. Intranasal Immunization Strategy To Impede Pilin-Mediated Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer C.; Tham, Doris M.; Feng, Weijun; Huang, Fan; Embaie, Selamawit; Liu, Keyi; Dean, Deborah; Hertle, Ralf; FitzGerald, David J.; Mrsny, Randall J.

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections represents a critical unmet medical need for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have examined the tenet that a mucosal immunization approach can reduce interactions of a piliated form of this opportunistic pathogen with respiratory epithelial cells. Vaccinations were performed using ntPEpilinPAK, a protein chimera composed of a nontoxic form of P. aeruginosa exotoxin A (ntPE), where the C-terminal loop amino acid sequence of the PAK strain pilin protein was inserted in place of the ntPE Ib domain. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization of BALB/c mice with ntPEpilinPAK generated both serum and saliva immune responses. A series of in vitro studies showed that diluted samples of saliva obtained from immunized mice reduced pilin-dependent P. aeruginosa binding to polarized human tracheal epithelial cells, protected human pulmonary epithelial cells from cytotoxic actions associated with bacterial challenge, and reduced exotoxin A toxicity. Overall, i.n. administration of ntPEpilinPAK induced mucosal and systemic immune responses that may be beneficial for blocking early stage adhesion and/or infection events of epithelial cell-P. aeruginosa interactions at oropharyngeal surfaces. PMID:16239575

  14. Bacteriophage-based therapy in cystic fibrosis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: rationale and current status

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Brégeon, Fabienne; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the leading causes of the deterioration of the respiratory status of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains in such populations, favored by iterative antibiotic cures, has led to the urgent need for new therapies. Among them, bacteriophage-based therapies deserve a focus. One century of empiric use in the ex-USSR countries suggests that bacteriophages may have beneficial effects against a large range of bacterial infections. Interest in bacteriophages has recently renewed in Western countries, and the in vitro data available suggest that bacteriophage-based therapy may be of significant interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections in CF patients. Although the clinical data concerning this specific population are relatively scarce, the beginning of the first large randomized study evaluating bacteriophage-based therapy in burn infections suggests that the time has come to assess the effectiveness of this new therapy in CF P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Consequently, the aim of this review is, after a brief history, to summarize the evidence concerning bacteriophage efficacy against P. aeruginosa and, more specifically, the in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical trials targeting CF. PMID:26213462

  15. Three small RNAs jointly ensure secondary metabolism and biocontrol in Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Elisabeth; Dubuis, Christophe; Haas, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    In many Gram-negative bacteria, the GacS/GacA two-component system positively controls the expression of extracellular products or storage compounds. In the plant-beneficial rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, the GacS/GacA system is essential for the production of antibiotic compounds and hence for biological control of root-pathogenic fungi. The small (119-nt) RNA RsmX discovered in this study, together with RsmY and RsmZ, forms a triad of GacA-dependent small RNAs, which sequester the RNA-binding proteins RsmA and RsmE and thereby antagonize translational repression exerted by these proteins in strain CHA0. This small RNA triad was found to be both necessary and sufficient for posttranscriptional derepression of biocontrol factors and for protection of cucumber from Pythium ultimum. The same three small RNAs also positively regulated swarming motility and the synthesis of a quorum-sensing signal, which is unrelated to N-acyl-homoserine lactones, and which autoinduces the Gac/Rsm cascade. Expression of RsmX and RsmY increased in parallel throughout cell growth, whereas RsmZ was produced during the late growth phase. This differential expression is assumed to facilitate fine tuning of GacS/A-controlled cell population density-dependent regulation in P. fluorescens. PMID:16286659

  16. Three small RNAs jointly ensure secondary metabolism and biocontrol in Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    PubMed

    Kay, Elisabeth; Dubuis, Christophe; Haas, Dieter

    2005-11-22

    In many Gram-negative bacteria, the GacS/GacA two-component system positively controls the expression of extracellular products or storage compounds. In the plant-beneficial rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, the GacS/GacA system is essential for the production of antibiotic compounds and hence for biological control of root-pathogenic fungi. The small (119-nt) RNA RsmX discovered in this study, together with RsmY and RsmZ, forms a triad of GacA-dependent small RNAs, which sequester the RNA-binding proteins RsmA and RsmE and thereby antagonize translational repression exerted by these proteins in strain CHA0. This small RNA triad was found to be both necessary and sufficient for posttranscriptional derepression of biocontrol factors and for protection of cucumber from Pythium ultimum. The same three small RNAs also positively regulated swarming motility and the synthesis of a quorum-sensing signal, which is unrelated to N-acyl-homoserine lactones, and which autoinduces the Gac/Rsm cascade. Expression of RsmX and RsmY increased in parallel throughout cell growth, whereas RsmZ was produced during the late growth phase. This differential expression is assumed to facilitate fine tuning of GacS/A-controlled cell population density-dependent regulation in P. fluorescens. PMID:16286659

  17. Nanospecific Inhibition of Pyoverdine Siderophore Production in Pseudomonas Chlororaphis O6 by CuO Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Dimkpa, Christian O.; McLean, Joan E.; Britt, David W.; Johnson, William P.; Arey, Bruce W.; Lea, Alan S.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2012-03-01

    As traditional antibiotics become less effective against a growing number of pathogens, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are becoming more widely applied as biocides. NPs of Ag, ZnO, and CuO exhibit dose-dependent antimicrobial activity; however, information is scant on the impact of sublethal levels of NPs on bacteria. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of a sublethal concentration (200 mg/L) of commercial CuO NPs on the expression of genes involved in the production of the fluorescent siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD) in the plant-beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. PVDs are important in microbe-microbe and microbe-plant interactions, and are a virulence factor in pathogenic pseudomonads. Cells challenged with the NPs had reduced amounts of PVD in their periplasm and the external medium. The NPs impaired the expression of genes involved in transport of the PVD precursor through the plasmamembrane, PVD maturation in the periplasm, and export through the outer membrane. Also, expression from one of three predicted Fe-PVD receptors was reduced by the NPs. As these effects were not observed for cells challenged with copper ions, this is a nanoparticlespecific phenomenon mediating cellular reprogramming in bacteria, affecting secondary metabolism and thus associated critical microbial processes. The regulation of bacterial genes and secondary metabolites by sublethal doses of a common metal oxide NP has strong environmental and medical implications.

  18. Pseudomonas zhaodongensis sp. nov., isolated from saline and alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Pan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Kaibiao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Shuang; Fu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Juquan

    2015-03-01

    Strain NEAU-ST5-21(T) was isolated from saline and alkaline soils in Zhaodong City, Heilongjiang Province, China. It was aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and motile with a polar flagellum. It produced yellow-orange colonies with a smooth surface, and grew in the presence of 0-5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 %, w/v), at temperatures of 20-40 °C (optimum 28 °C) and at pH 7-11 (optimum pH 7). Phylogenetic analyses based on the separate 16S rRNA gene sequences and concatenated 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoD gene sequences indicated that strain NEAU-ST5-21(T) belongs to the genus Pseudomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. The most closely related species is Pseudomonas xanthomarina, whose type strain (KMM 1447(T)) showed gene sequence similarities of 99.0 % for 16S rRNA, 81.8 % for gyrB and 85.0 % for rpoD with strain NEAU-ST5-21(T). DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain NEAU-ST5-21(T) and P. xanthomarina DSM 18231(T), Pseudomonas kunmingensis CGMCC 1.12273(T), Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM 5190(T), Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T), Pseudomomas chengduensis CGMCC 2318(T), Pseudomonas alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) and Pseudomonas toyotomiensis DSM 26169(T) were 52±0 % to 25±2 %. The DNA G+C content of strain NEAU-ST5-21(T) was 65 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c, C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c and C16 : 0, the predominant respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 9, and polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, one unknown phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol, one unknown aminolipid, one unknown lipid and a glycolipid. The proposed name is Pseudomonas zhaodongensis sp. nov., NEAU-ST5-21(T) ( = ACCC 06362(T) = DSM 27559(T)) being the type strain. PMID:25574037

  19. Genetic Basis of the Biodegradation of Salicylate in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    The genetic basis of the biodegradation of salicylate in Pseudomonas putida R1 has been studied. This strain utilizes the meta pathway for oxidizing salicylate through formation of catechol and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. The enzymes of the meta pathway are induced by salicylate but not by catechol, and the genes specifying these enzymes are clustered. The gene cluster can be eliminated from some salicylate-positive cells by treatment with mitomycin C and appears to exist inside the cell as an extrachromosomal element. This extrachromosomal gene cluster, termed the SAL plasmid, can be transferred by conjugation from P. putida R1 to a variety of other Pseudomonas species. PMID:4628746

  20. Bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, M. A.; Irannajad, M.; Azadmehr, A. R.; Meshkini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bioleaching is an environmentally friendly method for extraction of metal from ores. In this study, bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a heterotrophic bacterium that can produce various organic acids in an appropriate culture medium, and these acids can operate as leaching agents. The parameters, such as particle size, glucose percentage in the culture medium, bioleaching time, and solid/liquid ratio were optimized. Optimum bioleaching conditions were found as follows: particle size of 150-177 μm, glucose percentage of 6%, bioleaching time of 8 d, and solid/liquid ratio of 1:80. Under these conditions, 53% of copper was extracted.

  1. Pseudomonas corneal ulcer. The causative role of contaminated eye cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Reid, F R; Wood, T O

    1979-09-01

    The clinical significance of contaminated ocular cosmetics is illustrated by the case of a 47-year-old woman in whom a Pseudomonas corneal ulcer developed immediately after she sustained minor corneal trauma with a mascara applicator. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured from the corneal ulcer and the mascara. In addition to the causative role in acute corneal ulcers, contaminated eye cosmetics contribute to chronic external eye infections. Retail eye cosmetics are typically free of contamination when purchased. The inoculation of the cosmetic occurs during normal use. PMID:112953

  2. Can beneficial ends justify lying? Neural responses to the passive reception of lies and truth-telling with beneficial and harmful monetary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lijun; Weber, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Can beneficial ends justify morally questionable means? To investigate how monetary outcomes influence the neural responses to lying, we used a modified, cheap talk sender-receiver game in which participants were the direct recipients of lies and truthful statements resulting in either beneficial or harmful monetary outcomes. Both truth-telling (vs lying) as well as beneficial (vs harmful) outcomes elicited higher activity in the nucleus accumbens. Lying (vs truth-telling) elicited higher activity in the supplementary motor area, right inferior frontal gyrus, superior temporal sulcus and left anterior insula. Moreover, the significant interaction effect was found in the left amygdala, which showed that the monetary outcomes modulated the neural activity in the left amygdala only when truth-telling rather than lying. Our study identified a neural network associated with the reception of lies and truth, including the regions linked to the reward process, recognition and emotional experiences of being treated (dis)honestly. PMID:26454816

  3. Survival of rifampin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida in soil systems.

    PubMed Central

    Compeau, G; Al-Achi, B J; Platsouka, E; Levy, S B

    1988-01-01

    The fate of spontaneous chromosomal rifampin-resistant (Rifr) mutants of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens in sterile and live organic soil from which they were isolated was studied. In sterile native-soil assays, a Rifr mutant of P. putida showed no decrease in competitive fitness when compared with the wild-type parent. However, mutants of P. fluorescens were of two general categories. Group 1 showed no difference from the wild type in terms of growth rate, competitive fitness, and membrane protein composition. Group 2 showed a slower growth rate in both minimal and enriched media and an altered membrane protein profile. These mutants also demonstrated decreased competitive fitness compared with the wild-type strain. In live soil, the Rifr P. putida strain persisted throughout the 38-day test period with a decay rate of 0.7 log10 CFU/g of soil per 10 days. A group 1 Rifr P. fluorescens mutant maintained its inoculated titer for 7 to 10 days and then decayed at a rate of 0.2 to 0.4 log10 CFU/g of soil per 10 days. A group 2 Rifr P. fluorescens mutant remained at its titer for 1 to 5 days before decaying at a two- to threefold-faster rate. These findings indicate that rifampin resistance may not be an innocuous mutation in some pseudomonads and that marked strains should be compared with wild-type parents before being used as monitors of parental strain survival. Colonization of sterile soil with either the wild-type or mutant strain precluded normal colonization of the second added strain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3144244

  4. Differential habitat use and niche partitioning by Pseudomonas species in human homes.

    PubMed

    Remold, Susanna K; Brown, Christopher K; Farris, Justin E; Hundley, Thomas C; Perpich, Jessica A; Purdy, Megan E

    2011-10-01

    Many species of Pseudomonas have the ability to use a variety of resources and habitats, and as a result Pseudomonas are often characterized as having broad fundamental niches. We questioned whether actual habitat use by Pseudomonas species is equally broad. To do this, we sampled extensively to describe the biogeography of Pseudomonas within the human home, which presents a wide variety of habitats for microbes that live in close proximity to humans but are not part of the human flora, and for microbes that are opportunistic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. From 960 samples taken in 20 homes, we obtained 163 Pseudomonas isolates. The most prevalent based on identification using the SepsiTest BLAST analysis of 16S rRNA (http://www.sepsitest-blast.de) were Pseudomonas monteilii (42 isolates), Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, Pseudomonas fulva, and P. aeruginosa (approximately 25 each). Of these, all but P. fulva differed in recovery rates among evaluated habitat types (drains, soils, water, internal vertebrate sites, vertebrate skin, inanimate surfaces, and garbage/compost) and all four species also differed in recovery rates among subcategories of habitat types (e.g., types of soils or drains). We also found that at both levels of habitat resolution, each of these six most common species (the four above plus Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans) were over- or under-represented in some habitats relative to their contributions to the total Pseudomonas collected across all habitats. This pattern is consistent with niche partitioning. These results suggest that, whereas Pseudomonas are often characterized as generalists with broad fundamental niches, these species in fact have more restricted realized niches. Furthermore, niche partitioning driven by competition among Pseudomonas species may be contributing to the observed variability in habitat use by Pseudomonas in this system. PMID:21503776

  5. Pseudomonas gessardii sp. nov. and Pseudomonas migulae sp. nov., two new species isolated from natural mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Verhille, S; Baïda, N; Dabboussi, F; Hamze, M; Izard, D; Leclerc, H

    1999-10-01

    Twenty-five non-identified fluorescent Pseudomonas strains isolated from natural mineral waters were previously clustered into three phenotypic subclusters, XIIIb, XVa and XVc. These strains were characterized genotypically in the present study. DNA-DNA hybridization results and DNA base composition analysis revealed that these strains were members of two new species, for which the names Pseudomonas gessardii sp. nov. (type strain CIP 105469T) and Pseudomonas migulae sp. nov. (type strain CIP 105470T) are proposed. P. gessardii included 13 strains from phenotypic subclusters XVa and XVc. P. migulae included 10 strains from phenotypic subcluster XIIIb. The levels of DNA-DNA relatedness ranged from 71 to 100% for P. gessardii and from 74 to 100% for P. migulae. The G + C content of the DNA of each type strain was 58 mol%. DNA similarity levels, measured with 67 reference strains of Pseudomonas species, were below 55%, with delta Tm values of 13 degrees C or more. The two new species presented basic morphological characteristics common to all pseudomonads. Various phenotypic features were found to differentiate them: P. gessardii strains utilized L-arabitol, myo-inositol, adonitol, xylitol and meso-erythritol as carbon sources, whereas P. migulae strains assimilated L-arabinose, D-xylose, D-saccharate, meso-tartrate, tricarballylate, D-glucuronate, D-galacturonate, phenylacetate and histamine. The complete 16S rRNA sequences of each type strain were determined and compared with those of the type strains of Pseudomonas species. Finally, a phylogenetic tree was inferred from sequence analysis and demonstrated that the two new species fell into the 'Pseudomonas fluorescens intrageneric cluster'. To date, their clinical significance is unknown. PMID:10555337

  6. Dictyostelium discoideum as a surrogate host-microbe model for antivirulence screening in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Toncio, Catalina; Álvarez, Javiera A; Campos, Francisca; Ortíz-Severín, Javiera; Varas, Macarena; Cabrera, Ricardo; Lagos, Carlos F; Chávez, Francisco P

    2016-05-01

    The interest of the pharmaceutical industry in developing new antibiotics is decreasing, as established screening systems which identify compounds that kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria can no longer be used. Consequently, antimicrobial screening using classical minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurements is becoming obsolete. The discovery of antimicrobial agents that specifically target a bacterial pathogen without affecting the host and its beneficial bacteria is a promising strategy. However, few host-microbe models are available for in vivo screening of novel antivirulence molecules. Here we designed high-throughput developmental assays in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum to measure Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and to screen for novel antivirulence molecules without side effects to the host and its beneficial bacteria Klebsiella aerogenes. Thirty compounds were evaluated that had been previously selected by virtual screening for inhibitors of P. aeruginosa PAO1 polyphosphate kinase 1 (PaPPK1) and diverse compounds with combined PPK1 inhibitory and antivirulence activities were identified. This approach demonstrates that D. discoideum is a suitable surrogate host for preliminary high-throughput screening of antivirulence agents and that PPK1 is a suitable target for developing novel antivirulence compounds that can be further validated in mammalian models. PMID:27066943

  7. Role of secondary metabolites in the interaction between Pseudomonas fluorescens and soil microorganisms under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Aurélie; Gross, Harald; Palin, Béatrice; Mehnaz, Samina; Schnepf, Max; Leblond, Pierre; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Aigle, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms can be versatile in their interactions with each other, being variously beneficial, neutral or antagonistic in their effect. Although this versatility has been observed among many microorganisms and in many environments, little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to these changes in behavior. In the present work, we analyzed the mechanism by which the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 shifts from stimulating the growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N to killing the fungus. We show that among the three secondary metabolites produced by the bacterial strain-the siderophores enantio-pyochelin and pyoverdine, and the biosurfactant viscosin-the siderophores are mainly responsible for the antagonistic activity of the bacterium under iron-limited conditions. While the bacterial strain continues to produce beneficial factors, their effects are overridden by the action of their siderophores. This antagonistic activity of the strain P. fluorescens BBC6R8 in iron-depleted environments is not restricted to its influence on L. bicolor, since it was also seen to inhibit the growth of the actinomycete Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877. We show that the strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 uses different strategies to acquire iron, depending on certain biotic and abiotic factors. PMID:27199346

  8. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14). Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center). Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to swarm center cells, tendril

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LMG 5329, a White Line-Inducing Principle-Producing Bioindicator for the Mushroom Pathogen Pseudomonas tolaasii

    PubMed Central

    Rokni-Zadeh, Hassan; Zarrineh, Peyman

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas tolaasii, the causative agent of Agaricus bisporus brown blotch disease, can be identified by the white line reaction, occurring upon confrontation of the tolaasin-producing mushroom pathogen with “Pseudomonas reactans,” producing the lipopeptide white line-inducing principle (WLIP). The draft genome sequence of the WLIP-producing indicator Pseudomonas fluorescens strain LMG 5329 is reported here. PMID:23887909

  10. Beneficial Mutation–Selection Balance and the Effect of Linkage on Positive Selection

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Michael M.; Fisher, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    When beneficial mutations are rare, they accumulate by a series of selective sweeps. But when they are common, many beneficial mutations will occur before any can fix, so there will be many different mutant lineages in the population concurrently. In an asexual population, these different mutant lineages interfere and not all can fix simultaneously. In addition, further beneficial mutations can accumulate in mutant lineages while these are still a minority of the population. In this article, we analyze the dynamics of such multiple mutations and the interplay between multiple mutations and interference between clones. These result in substantial variation in fitness accumulating within a single asexual population. The amount of variation is determined by a balance between selection, which destroys variation, and beneficial mutations, which create more. The behavior depends in a subtle way on the population parameters: the population size, the beneficial mutation rate, and the distribution of the fitness increments of the potential beneficial mutations. The mutation–selection balance leads to a continually evolving population with a steady-state fitness variation. This variation increases logarithmically with both population size and mutation rate and sets the rate at which the population accumulates beneficial mutations, which thus also grows only logarithmically with population size and mutation rate. These results imply that mutator phenotypes are less effective in larger asexual populations. They also have consequences for the advantages (or disadvantages) of sex via the Fisher–Muller effect; these are discussed briefly. PMID:17483432

  11. Specific Genomic Fingerprints of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas Strains Generated by Box Elements

    PubMed Central

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2014-01-01

    Primers corresponding to conserved bacterial repetitive of BOX elements were used to show that BOX-DNA sequences are widely distributed in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains. Phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas was isolated from oil palm fields (tropical soil) in Malaysia. BOX elements were used to generate genomic fingerprints of a variety of Pseudomonas isolates to identify strains that were not distinguishable by other classification methods. BOX-PCR, that derived genomic fingerprints, was generated from whole purified genomic DNA by liquid culture of phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas. BOX-PCR generated the phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas specific fingerprints to identify the relationship between these strains. This suggests that distribution of BOX elements' sequences in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains is the mirror image of their genomic structure. Therefore, this method appears to be a rapid, simple, and reproducible method to identify and classify phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains and it may be useful tool for fast identification of potential biofertilizer strains. PMID:25580434

  12. Frequency of Antibiotic-Producing Pseudomonas spp. in Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Raaijmakers, J. M.; Weller, D. M.; Thomashow, L. S.

    1997-01-01

    The antibiotics phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (Phl) are major determinants of biological control of soilborne plant pathogens by various strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. In this study, we described primers and probes that enable specific and efficient detection of a wide variety of fluorescent Pseudomonas strains that produce various phenazine antibiotics or Phl. PCR analysis and Southern hybridization demonstrated that specific genes within the biosynthetic loci for Phl and PCA are conserved among various Pseudomonas strains of worldwide origin. The frequency of Phl- and PCA-producing fluorescent pseudomonads was determined on roots of wheat grown in three soils suppressive to take-all disease of wheat and four soils conducive to take-all by colony hybridization followed by PCR. Phenazine-producing strains were not detected on roots from any of the soils. However, Phl-producing fluorescent pseudomonads were isolated from all three take-all-suppressive soils at densities ranging from approximately 5 x 10(sup5) to 2 x 10(sup6) CFU per g of root. In the complementary conducive soils, Phl-producing pseudomonads were not detected or were detected at densities at least 40-fold lower than those in the suppressive soils. We speculate that fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. that produce Phl play an important role in the natural suppressiveness of these soils to take-all disease of wheat. PMID:16535555

  13. The Biology and Biological Activity of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis (Pst) is a disease of plants in the family Asteraceae. A distinctive characteristic of this bacterial pathogen is the symptom of apical chlorosis in infected plants, caused by the phytotoxin tagetitoxin. Strains of Pst have been isolated from several plant species ...

  14. MULTIPLE REPLICONS CONSTITUTING THE GENOME OF PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrorestriction fragment analysis of DNA from Pseudomonas cepacia 17616, in conjunction with Southern hybridization experiments using junction n enzyme sites as probes, indicated that this bacterium contains three large circular replicons of 3.4, 2.5, and 0.9 170-kb cryptic plas...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas balearica DSM 6083T

    PubMed Central

    Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Seguí, Carolina; Aliaga, Francisco; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of Pseudomonas balearica SP1402 (DSM 6083T) has been completed and annotated. It was isolated as a naphthalene degrader from water of a lagooning wastewater treatment plant. P. balearica strains tolerate up to 8.5% NaCl and are considered true marine denitrifiers. PMID:27103708

  16. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S.; Dueholm, Morten S.; Christiansen, Gunna; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Nielsen, Per H.; Meyer, Rikke L.; Otzen, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm stiffness 20-fold. Deletion of any one of the individual members of in the fap operon (except the putative chaperone FapA) abolishes this ability to increase biofilm stiffness and correlates with the loss of amyloid. We conclude that amyloid makes major contributions to biofilm mechanical robustness. PMID:26500638

  17. Engineering the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas putida for Arsenic Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Qin, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Guan; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of arsenic has potential health risks through consumption of food. Here, we inserted the arsenite [As(III)] S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase (ArsM) gene into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Recombinant bacteria methylate inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenicals. This has the potential for bioremediation of environmental arsenic and reducing arsenic contamination in food. PMID:23645194

  18. BIOGEOGRAPHY OF 2,4-DIACETYLPHLOROGLUCINOL-PRODUCING PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens producing the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (phlD+) are biocontrol agents of soilborne pathogens and play a key role in the disease suppressiveness of some soils. Considerable variation among isolates has been observed by using genomic fingerprinting techn...

  19. Chemotaxis to furan compounds by furan-degrading Pseudomonas strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two Pseudomonas strains known to utilize furan derivatives were shown to be attracted to furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, furfuryl alcohol, and 2-furoic acid in the absence of furan metabolism. In addition, a LysR-family regulatory protein known to regulate furan metabolic genes was found to be i...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. PMID:27563032

  1. Genomic Analysis of Secondary Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a diverse bacterial species known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and its production of secondary metabolites. The high degree of ecological and metabolic diversity represented in P. fluorescens is reflected in the genomic diversity displayed among strains. Certain st...

  2. EXPRESSION OF DEGRADATIVE GENES OF 'PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA' IN 'CAULOBACTER CRESCENTUS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recombinant plasmid RP4-TOL was transferred into Caulobacter crescentus at a high frequency, and the plasmid was maintained for at least 50 generations. C. crescentus cells which contained RP4-TOL grew on all the aromatic compounds that the plasmid normally allowed Pseudomona...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. PMID:27563032

  4. Corneal ulcer caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Siripanthong, S; Teerapantuwat, S; Prugsanusak, W; Suputtamongkol, Y; Viriyasithavat, P; Chaowagul, W; Dance, D A; White, N J

    1991-01-01

    We report three cases of corneal ulcer caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei. In all cases corneal trauma preceded the development of extensive ulcers, subconjunctival abscesses, and hypopyon. Treatment for a total of 8 weeks with topical and/or parenteral ceftazidime followed by amoxicillin-clavulanic acid produced resolution of infection in each case. PMID:2041966

  5. Detection of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. glycinea in soybean seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is one of 52 that will compose the second edition of the Laboratory Manual for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria from Seeds and other Planting Material, to be published by the American Phytopathological Society. The chapter presents a description of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. ...

  6. Characterization of two small RNAs of Pseudomonas syringae DC3000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are important components of many regulatory pathways and have been shown to have key roles in regulation of factors important for virulence. To date, only a few sRNAs have been described for the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. One approach to identify novel candid...

  7. Shotgun Sequencing of the Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 Transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 is a bacterial plant pathogen capable of causing disease in tomatoes and Arabidopsis. The genome of this bacterium has been sequenced, however as with other genomes, accurate annotation and determination of coding vs. non-coding regions has proven to be...

  8. Elastase Deficiency Phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Canine Otitis Externa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Shana R.; Doetkott, Curt; Rust, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates were assayed for elastase and total matrix protease activity. The elastase activity of canine ear isolates was much less than that of strain PAO1 and that of all other veterinary isolates (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that canine ear isolates have a distinct elastase phenotype. PMID:11329471

  9. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  14. PHENAZINE COMPOUNDS IN FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONAS SPP.: BIOSYNTHESIS AN REGULATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phenazines include upward of 50 pigmented, heterocyclic nitrogen-containing secondary metabolites synthesized by some strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. and a few other bacterial genera. The antibiotic properties of these compounds have been known for over 150 years, but advances within the...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Rice Isolate Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105

    PubMed Central

    McCully, Lucy M.; Bitzer, Adam S.; Spence, Carla A.; Bais, Harsh P.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105, a strain isolated from rice rhizosphere, has shown antagonistic activities against a rice fungal pathogen, and could be important in defense against rice blast. We report the draft genome sequence of EA105, which is an estimated size of 6.6 Mb. PMID:25540352

  16. Pseudomonas guangdongensis sp. nov., isolated from an electroactive biofilm, and emended description of the genus Pseudomonas Migula 1894.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guiqin; Han, Luchao; Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui

    2013-12-01

    A Gram-negative, straight to slightly curved rod-shaped bacterium, motile with peritrichous flagella, designated SgZ-6(T), was isolated from an electroactive biofilm and was characterized by means of a polyphasic approach. Growth occurred with 0-5.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 1 %), at pH 6.0-10.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and at 10-42 °C (optimum 30 °C) in trypticase soya broth. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes identified the isolate as a member of a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain SgZ-6(T) exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to 'Pseudomonas linyingensis' CGMCC 1.10701 (97.5 %), followed by Pseudomonas sagittaria JCM 18195(T) (97.4 %), P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T) (96.6 %), P. tuomuerensis JCM 14085(T) (96.5 %) and P. alcaliphila JCM 10630(T) (96.4 %). Strain SgZ-6(T) showed the highest gyrB gene sequence similarity of 93.7 % to 'P. linyingensis' CGMCC 1.10701 among all type strains of genus Pseudomonas. DNA-DNA pairing studies showed that strain SgZ-6(T) displayed 47.1 and 40.3 % relatedness to 'P. linyingensis' CGMCC 1.10701 and P. sagittaria JCM 18195(T), respectively. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone 9 (Q-9). The whole-cell fatty acids consisted mainly of summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c). The DNA G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.1 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain SgZ-6(T) is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas guangdongensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SgZ-6(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2012022(T) = KACC 16606(T)). An emended description of the genus Pseudomonas is also proposed. PMID:23918787

  17. Beneficial Effects of Probiotic and Food Borne Yeasts on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Pedersen, Line Lindegaard; Jespersen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    Besides being important in the fermentation of foods and beverages, yeasts have shown numerous beneficial effects on human health. Among these, probiotic effects are the most well known health effects including prevention and treatment of intestinal diseases and immunomodulatory effects. Other beneficial functions of yeasts are improvement of bioavailability of minerals through the hydrolysis of phytate, folate biofortification and detoxification of mycotoxins due to surface binding to the yeast cell wall. PMID:22254033

  18. A bacterial symbiont is converted from an inedible producer of beneficial molecules into food by a single mutation in the gacA gene.

    PubMed

    Stallforth, Pierre; Brock, Debra A; Cantley, Alexandra M; Tian, Xiangjun; Queller, David C; Strassmann, Joan E; Clardy, Jon

    2013-09-01

    Stable multipartite mutualistic associations require that all partners benefit. We show that a single mutational step is sufficient to turn a symbiotic bacterium from an inedible but host-beneficial secondary metabolite producer into a host food source. The bacteria's host is a "farmer" clone of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum that carries and disperses bacteria during its spore stage. Associated with the farmer are two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, only one of which serves as a food source. The other strain produces diffusible small molecules: pyrrolnitrin, a known antifungal agent, and a chromene that potently enhances the farmer's spore production and depresses a nonfarmer's spore production. Genome sequence and phylogenetic analyses identify a derived point mutation in the food strain that generates a premature stop codon in a global activator (gacA), encoding the response regulator of a two-component regulatory system. Generation of a knockout mutant of this regulatory gene in the nonfood bacterial strain altered its secondary metabolite profile to match that of the food strain, and also, independently, converted it into a food source. These results suggest that a single mutation in an inedible ancestral strain that served a protective role converted it to a "domesticated" food source. PMID:23898207

  19. Beneficial insects attracted to native flowering buckwheats (Eriogonum Michx) in central Washington.

    PubMed

    James, David G; Seymour, Lorraine; Lauby, Gerry; Buckley, Katie

    2014-08-01

    Native plant and beneficial insect associations are relatively unstudied yet are important in native habitat restoration programs aimed at improving conservation biological control in perennial crops such as wine grapes. Beneficial insects (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) attracted to 10 species of flowering native wild buckwheat (Eriogonum spp.) in central Washington were identified and counted on transparent sticky traps. Combining all categories of beneficial insects, the mean number per trap ranged from 48.5 (Eriogonum umbellatum) to 167.7 (Eriogonum elatum). Three Eriogonum spp. (E. elatum, Eriogonum compositum, and Eriogonum niveum) attracted significantly more beneficial insects than the lowest-ranked species. E. niveum attracted greatest numbers of bees and parasitic wasps, and E. elatum was highly attractive to predatory true bugs and beneficial flies. Blooming periods of Eriogonum spp. extended from mid April to the end of September. This study demonstrates the attraction of beneficial insects to native flowering buckwheats and suggests their potential as a component of habitat restoration strategies to improve and sustain conservation biological control in Washington viticulture. PMID:24960157

  20. Beneficial Insect Attraction to Milkweeds (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis) in Washington State, USA.

    PubMed

    James, David G; Seymour, Lorraine; Lauby, Gerry; Buckley, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Native plant and beneficial insect associations are relatively unstudied yet are important in native habitat restoration programs for improving and sustaining conservation biological control of arthropod pests in agricultural crops. Milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) are currently the focus of restoration programs in the USA aimed at reversing a decline in populations of the milkweed-dependent monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus); however, little is known of the benefits of these plants to other beneficial insects. Beneficial insects (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) attracted to two milkweed species (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis) in central Washington State, WA, USA were identified and counted on transparent sticky traps attached to blooms over five seasons. Combining all categories of beneficial insects, means of 128 and 126 insects per trap were recorded for A. speciosa and A. fascicularis, respectively. Predatory and parasitic flies dominated trap catches for A. speciosa while parasitic wasps were the most commonly trapped beneficial insects on A. fascicularis. Bees were trapped commonly on both species, especially A. speciosa with native bees trapped in significantly greater numbers than honey bees. Beneficial insect attraction to A. speciosa and A. fascicularis was substantial. Therefore, these plants are ideal candidates for habitat restoration, intended to enhance conservation biological control, and for pollinator conservation. In central Washington, milkweed restoration programs for enhancement of D. plexippus populations should also provide benefits for pest suppression and pollinator conservation. PMID:27367733

  1. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity. PMID:25562807

  2. Induction of toluene oxidation activity in pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and pseudomonas sp. strain ENVPC5 by chlorinated solvents and alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    McClay, K.; Streger, S.H.; Steffan, R.J.

    1995-09-01

    Toluene oxidation activity in Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain ENVPC5 was induced by trichloroethylene (TCE), and induction was followed by the degradation of TCE. Higher levels of toluene oxidation activity were achieved in the presence of a supplemental growth substrate such as glutamate, with levels of activity of up to 86% of that observed with toluene-induced cells. Activity in P. mendocina KR1 was also induced by cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, chloroethane, hexane, pentane, and octane, but not by trans-1,2-dichloroethylene. Toluene oxidation was not induced by TCE in Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia G4, P. putida F1, Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV110, or Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV113. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis subsp. nov., and reclassification of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440T as later synonym of Pseudomonas oleovorans ATCC 8062 T.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Spröer, Cathrin; Beck, Brian; Bagley, Susan

    2010-04-01

    Isolate RS1(T) isolated from used metalworking fluid was found to be a Gram-negative, motile, and non-spore forming rod. Based on phylogenetic analyses with 16S rRNA, isolate RS1(T) was placed into the mendocina sublineage of Pseudomonas. The major whole cell fatty acids were C(18:1)omega7c (32.6%), C(16:0) (25.5%), and C(15:0) ISO 2OH/C(16:1)omega7c (14.4%). The sequence similarities of isolate RS1(T) based on gyrB and rpoD genes were 98.9 and 98.0% with Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and 98.5 and 98.1% with Pseudomonas oleovorans, respectively. The ribotyping pattern showed a 0.60 similarity with P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) and 0.63 with P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC17440(T). The DNA G + C content of isolate RS1(T) was 62.2 mol.%. The DNA-DNA relatedness was 73.0% with P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) and 79.1% with P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440(T). On the basis of morphological, biochemical, and molecular studies, isolate RS1(T) is considered to represent a new subspecies of P. oleovorans. Furthermore, based on the DNA-DNA relatedness (>70%), chemotaxonomic, and molecular profile, P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440(T) and P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) should be united under the same name; according to the rules of priority, P. oleovorans, the first described species, is the earlier synonym and P. pseudoalcaligenes is the later synonym. As a consequence, the division of the species P. oleovorans into two novel subspecies is proposed: P. oleovorans subsp. oleovorans subsp. nov. (type strain ATCC 8062(T) = DSM 1045(T) = NCIB 6576(T)), P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis subsp. nov. (type strain RS1(T) = ATCC BAA-1494(T) = DSM 21016(T)). PMID:19936829

  4. Is levofloxacin as active as ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa?

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, G

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro activity of levofloxacin against 300 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized patients, with the exception of those recovered in intensive care or hematology units, was compared to ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin, amikacin, ceftazidime and imipenem. Imipenem showed the best activity (81.6%), followed by piperacillin (80.7%). The activity of levofloxacin was equal to that of ciprofloxacin (75.3%) but was more active than ofloxacin (58.1%). Moreover, the MIC values of levofloxacin did not show any statistical difference using two different inocula. Levofloxacin shows an excellent bactericidal activity being generally within one doubling dilution of the MIC. These results were also confirmed by the time-killing studies. In conclusion, according to the in vitro activity, levofloxacin could be considered a good option for the treatment of infections sustained by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and clinical experiments are required to corroborate our in vitro data. PMID:11399859

  5. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Anna M.; Tata, Renée; Chauviac, François-Xavier; Sutton, Brian J.; Brown, Paul R.

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes. Gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a 177-amino-acid conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function. The structure of this protein (termed pitax) has been solved in space group I222 to 2.25 Å resolution. Pitax belongs to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase family and contains all four sequence motifs conserved among family members. The β-strand structure in one of these motifs (motif A) is disrupted, which is believed to affect binding of the substrate that accepts the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA.

  6. Homology study of two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases from Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Umeda, F; Nishikawa, T; Miyasaka, H; Maeda, I; Kawase, M; Yagi, K

    2001-11-01

    Recently, we have cloned and analyzed two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase genes (phaC1 and phaC2 in the pha cluster) from Pseudomonas aureofaciens. In this report, the deduced amino acid (AA) sequences of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 from P. aureofaciens are compared with those from three other bacterial strains (Pseudomonas sp. 61-3, P. oleovorans and P. aeruginosa) containing the homologous pha cluster. The level of homology of either PHA synthase 1 or PHA synthase 2 was high with each enzyme from these three bacterial strains. Furthermore, multialignment of PHA synthase AA sequences implied that both enzymes of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 were highly conserved in the four strains including P. aureofaciens. PMID:11916262

  7. Porins of Pseudomonas fluorescens MFO as fibronectin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Rebière-Huët, J; Guérillon, J; Pimenta, A L; Di Martino, P; Orange, N; Hulen, C

    2002-09-24

    Bacterial adherence is a complex phenomenon involving specific interactions between receptors, including matricial fibronectin, and bacterial ligands. We show here that fibronectin and outer membrane proteins of Pseudomonas fluorescens were able to inhibit adherence of P. fluorescens to fibronectin-coated wells. We identified at least six fibronectin-binding proteins with molecular masses of 70, 55, 44, 37, 32 and 28 kDa. The presence of native (32 kDa) and heat-modified forms (37 kDa) of OprF was revealed by immuno-analysis and the 44-kDa band was composed of three proteins, their N-terminal sequences showing homologies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa porins (OprD, OprE1 and OprE3). PMID:12393211

  8. Fatty Acids Synthesized from Hexadecane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Ethel M.; Brenner, Rodolfo R.

    1966-01-01

    Romero, Ethel M. (Universidad Nacional de la Plata, La Plata, Argentina), and Rodolfo M. Brenner. Fatty acids synthesized from hexadecane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Bacteriol. 91:183–188. 1966.—The lipids extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa incubated with hexadecane in a mineral medium were separated into a nonpolar and three polar fractions by thin-layer chromatography. The fatty acid composition of the four cellular fractions and that of the lipids excreted into the medium was studied by gas-liquid chromatography. Saturated fatty acids with 14 to 22 carbons were recognized, together with monoenoic, dienoic, and hydroxylated acids. Hydroxylated fatty acids were principally found in two polar fractions containing rhamnose and glucose; the other polar fraction, containing serine, alanine, ethanolamine, and leucine, was richer in monoenoic fatty acids. Octadecadienoic acid was found in the neutral fraction. PMID:4955247

  9. Agricultural plants and soil as a reservoir for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Green, S K; Schroth, M N; Cho, J J; Kominos, S K; Vitanza-jack, V B

    1974-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in 24% of the soil samples but in only 0.13% of the vegetable samples from various agricultural areas of California. The distribution of pyocin types of soil and vegetable isolates was similar to that of clinical strains, and three of the soil isolates were resistant to carbenicillin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiplied in lettuce and bean under conditions of high temperature and high relative humidity (27 C and 80-95% relative humidity) but declined when the temperature and humidity were lowered (16 C, 55-75% relative humidity). The results suggest that soil is a reservior for P. aeruginosa and that the bacterium has the capacity to colonize plants during favorable conditions of temperature and moisture. PMID:4217591

  10. Agricultural Plants and Soil as a Reservoir for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Green, Sylvia K.; Schroth, Milton N.; Cho, John J.; Kominos, Spyros D.; Vitanza-Jack, Vilma B.

    1974-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in 24% of the soil samples but in only 0.13% of the vegetable samples from various agricultural areas of California. The distribution of pyocin types of soil and vegetable isolates was similar to that of clinical strains, and three of the soil isolates were resistant to carbenicillin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiplied in lettuce and bean under conditions of high temperature and high relative humidity (27 C and 80-95% relative humidity) but declined when the temperature and humidity were lowered (16 C, 55-75% relative humidity). The results suggest that soil is a reservior for P. aeruginosa and that the bacterium has the capacity to colonize plants during favorable conditions of temperature and moisture. PMID:4217591

  11. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a neonate: not always pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, Poonam; Yadav, Yogendra; Dhaneria, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a cutaneous manifestation of invasive infection usually caused by pseudomonas, but can be caused by many bacteria, fungal and viral infections. We present the first reported case of EG caused by invasive Escherichia coli in a neonate. A neonate presented with evidence of sepsis and a rapidly evolving 3×3.5 cm2 well-circumscribed haemorrhagic and necrotic ulcer on the left groin. There was evidence of decreased perfusion of the lower limb owing to pressure effect of the ulcer. The child responded well to anticoagulation and antibiotic therapy. It is crucial to clinically suspect EG and promptly start empiric antibiotic therapy covering pseudomonas to decrease the morbidity and mortality. However, other viruses, fungus and bacteria including E coli should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of EG in a neonate. PMID:23715836

  12. The phylogeny of the genera Chryseomonas, Flavimonas, and Pseudomonas supports synonymy of these three genera.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Y; Kudo, Y; Oyaizu, H

    1997-04-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences of Chryseomonas luteola, the type species of the genus Chryseomonas, and Flavimonas oryzihabitans, the type species of the genus Flavimonas, were determined. These sequences were compared with the sequences of 27 representative strains of the genus Pseudomonas. C. luteola and F. oryzihabitans were located in the cluster that contains Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the type species of genus Pseudomonas Migula 1894, and the levels of 16S rRNA sequence homology between P. aeruginosa and the other two species were more than 93.9%. All of the strains of the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto whose sequences have been determined were included in the P. aeruginosa cluster. These results suggested that Chryseomonas, Flavimonas, and Pseudomonas are synonymous, and we concluded that Chryseomonas and Flavimonas are junior subjective synonyms of Pseudomonas. PMID:9103607

  13. Membrane proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Dé, E; Cosette, P; Coquet, L; Siroy, A; Alexandre, S; Duncan, A; Naudin, B; Rihouey, C; Schaumann, A; Junter, G A; Jouenne, T

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known for their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Between mechanisms involved in this resistance, diminished expression of outer membrane proteins and up-regulation of efflux pumps play an important role. The characterization of membrane proteins is consequently necessary because of their importance in the antibiotic resistance but also in virulence. This review presents proteomic investigations aiming to describe the protein content of the membranes of these two bacterial species. PMID:19942379

  14. Empyema Caused by Pseudomonas luteola: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Farid; Shoja, Saeed; Honarvar, Negin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pseudomonas luteola is an uncommon opportunistic pathogen. It is recognized as an uncommon cause of infections in underlying medical disorders. Infections caused by this microorganism are health care associated. Case Presentation: The current study isolated P. luteola from empyema in a patient with tuberculous pleurisy, whose susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole differed from previous reports. Conclusions: P. luteola is resistant to TMP-SMX, but in the present case P. luteola was susceptible to TMP-SMX PMID:25368791

  15. Induction of the copper resistance operon from Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Mellano, M.A.; Cooksey, D.A. )

    1988-09-01

    Cupric sulfate induced mRNA specific to the copper resistance gene cluster previously cloned form Pseudomonas syringea pv. tomato PT23. mRNA from each of the four genes of this cluster responded in a similar manner to induction over time and with different concentrations of cupric sulfate. Promoter fusion constructs indicated the presence of single copper-inducible promoter upstream from the first open reading frame.

  16. Involvement of bioemulsifier in heptadecane uptake in Pseudomonas nautica.

    PubMed

    Patricia, B; Jean-Claude, B

    1999-02-01

    A microbial surfactant was investigated for its potential to enhance the biodegradation of heptadecane. The bioemulsifier used in this study was extracted from culture supernatants of Pseudomonas nautica after growth on heptadecane. The heptadecane uptake rate-could be increased 15-fold by the addition of 1.5 mg protein of bioemulsifier per 100 mg of heptadecane. Scanning electron microscopy showed that bioemulsification was the main mode allowing the transfer of hydrocarbon in the presence of the isolated compound. PMID:10028664

  17. Effects of atmospheric conditions on ice nucleation activity of Pseudomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, E.; Yang, H.; Delort, A.-M.; Amato, P.; Pöschl, U.; Glaux, C.; Koop, T.; Morris, C. E.

    2012-11-01

    Although ice nuclei from bacterial origin are known to be efficient at the highest temperatures known for ice catalysts, quantitative data are still needed to assess their role in cloud processes. Here we studied the effects of three typical cloud conditions (i) acidic pH (ii) NO2 and O3 exposure and (iii) UV-A exposure on the ice nucleation activity (INA) of four Pseudomonas strains. Three of the Pseudomonas syringae strains were isolated from cloud water and the phyllosphere and Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CGina-01 was isolated from Antarctic glacier ice melt. Among the three conditions tested, acidic pH caused the most significant effects on INA likely due to denaturation of the ice nucleation protein complex. Exposure to NO2 and O3 gases had no significant or only weak effects on the INA of two P. syringae strains whereas the INA of P. fluorescens CGina-01 was significantly affected. The INA of the third P. syringae strain showed variable responses to NO2 and O3 exposure. These differences in the INA of different Pseudomonas suggest that the response to atmospheric conditions could be strain-specific. After UV-A exposure, a substantial loss of viability of all four strains was observed whereas their INA decreased only slightly. This corroborates the notion that under certain conditions dead bacterial cells can maintain their INA. Overall, the negative effects of the three environmental factors on INA were more significant at the warmer temperatures. Our results suggest that in clouds where temperatures are near 0 °C, the importance of bacterial ice nucleation in precipitation processes could be reduced by some environmental factors.

  18. Effects of atmospheric conditions on ice nucleation activity of Pseudomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, E.; Yang, H.; Delort, A.-M.; Amato, P.; Pöschl, U.; Glaux, C.; Koop, T.; Morris, C. E.

    2012-04-01

    Although ice nuclei from bacterial origin are known to be efficient at the highest temperatures known for ice catalysts, quantitative data are still needed to assess their role in cloud processes. Here we studied the effects of three typical cloud conditions (i) acidic pH (ii) NO2 and O3 exposure and (iii) UV-A exposure on the ice nucleation activity (INA) of four Pseudomonas strains. Three of the Pseudomonas syringae strains were isolated from cloud water and the phyllosphere and Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CGina-01 was isolated from Antarctic glacier ice melt. Among the three conditions tested, acidic pH caused the most significant effects on INA likely due to denaturation of the ice nucleation protein complex. Exposure to NO2 and O3 gases had no significant or only weak effects on the INA of two P. syringae strains whereas the INA of P. fluorescens CGina-01 was significantly affected. The INA of the third P. syringae strain showed variable responses to NO2 and O3 exposure. These differences in the INA of different Pseudomonas suggest that the response to atmospheric conditions could be strain-specific. After UV-A exposure, a substantial loss of viability of all four strains was observed whereas their INA decreased only slightly. This corroborates the notion that under certain conditions dead bacterial cells can maintain their INA. Overall, the negative effects of the three environmental factors on INA were more significant at the warmer temperatures. Our results suggest that in clouds where temperatures are near 0 °C, the importance of bacterial ice nucleation in precipitation processes could be reduced by some environmental factors.

  19. Pseudomonas putida which can grow in the presence of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Yamamoto, Mami; Horikoshi, Koki )

    1991-05-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain able to grow in the presence of more than 50% toluene was isolated from soil. The strain was tolerant of other toxic solvents, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, alicyclic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, and ethers. The stability of the solvent tolerance of strain IH-2,000 was stimulated by addition of Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} to the medium containing toluene.

  20. [Phlegmonous gastritis. Report of a case induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Ramos Jiménez, F A; Arocena Cedrón, M G; Goikoetxea Artola, J M; Lázaro Aramburu, S; Múgica Barreiros, P

    1992-06-01

    The authors present a case of phlegmonous gastritis in a 65 year old patient. The diagnosis was made in the operating room and the treatment was conservative; no gastric resection was done. This clinical entity is interesting because it is a least frequent pathology, the pathogenic bacteria which was the cause (Pseudomona aeruginosa) has at this time not been reported in the literature, including the favorable outcome of the patient without gastric resection. PMID:1633018

  1. Pyochelin potentiates the inhibitory activity of gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon. PMID:24957826

  2. [Genome plasticity and catabolic potential of pseudomonas cepacia]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This progress report describes efforts directed at understanding the genomic structure of Pseudomonas cepacia. Variously reported are descriptions of the replicons in the genome, organization of macrorestriction fragments comprising the genome, use of a Tn-5- 751S to insertionally inactivate and map selected genes, construction of IS407 derivatives containing a trimethoprim resistance marker and SwaI site, and analysis of nucleotide sequences of IS401 and IS408.

  3. Exploiting the Adaptation Dynamics to Predict the Distribution of Beneficial Fitness Effects.

    PubMed

    John, Sona; Seetharaman, Sarada

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation of asexual populations is driven by beneficial mutations and therefore the dynamics of this process, besides other factors, depends on the distribution of beneficial fitness effects. It is known that on uncorrelated fitness landscapes, this distribution can only be of three types: truncated, exponential and power law. We performed extensive stochastic simulations to study the adaptation dynamics on rugged fitness landscapes, and identified two quantities that can be used to distinguish the underlying distribution of beneficial fitness effects. The first quantity studied here is the fitness difference between successive mutations that spread in the population, which is found to decrease in the case of truncated distributions, remains nearly a constant for exponentially decaying distributions and increases when the fitness distribution decays as a power law. The second quantity of interest, namely, the rate of change of fitness with time also shows quantitatively different behaviour for different beneficial fitness distributions. The patterns displayed by the two aforementioned quantities are found to hold good for both low and high mutation rates. We discuss how these patterns can be exploited to determine the distribution of beneficial fitness effects in microbial experiments. PMID:26990188

  4. Phenotypic comparison of clinical and plant-beneficial strains of Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Bonaterra, Anna; Badosa, Esther; Rezzonico, Fabio; Duffy, Brion; Montesinos, Emilio

    2014-06-01

    Certain strains of Pantoea are used as biocontrol agents for the suppression of plant diseases. However, their commercial registration is hampered in some countries because of biosafety concerns. This study compares clinical and plant-beneficial strains of P. agglomerans and related species using a phenotypic analysis approach in which plant-beneficial effects, adverse effects in nematode models, and toxicity were evaluated. Plant-beneficial effects were determined as the inhibition of apple fruit infection by Penicillium expansum and apple flower infection by Erwinia amylovora. Clinical strains had no general inhibitory activity against infection by the fungal or bacterial plant pathogens, as only one clinical strain inhibited P. expansum and three inhibited E. amylovora. By contrast, all biocontrol strains showed activity against at least one of the phytopathogens, and three strains were active against both. The adverse effects in animals were evaluated in the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne javanica and the bacterial-feeding nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Both models indicated adverse effects of the two clinical strains but not of any of the plant-beneficial strains. Toxicity was evaluated by means of hemolytic activity in blood, and genotoxicity with the Ames test. None of the strains, whether clinical or plant-beneficial, showed any evidence of toxicity. PMID:26418852

  5. Exploiting the Adaptation Dynamics to Predict the Distribution of Beneficial Fitness Effects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation of asexual populations is driven by beneficial mutations and therefore the dynamics of this process, besides other factors, depends on the distribution of beneficial fitness effects. It is known that on uncorrelated fitness landscapes, this distribution can only be of three types: truncated, exponential and power law. We performed extensive stochastic simulations to study the adaptation dynamics on rugged fitness landscapes, and identified two quantities that can be used to distinguish the underlying distribution of beneficial fitness effects. The first quantity studied here is the fitness difference between successive mutations that spread in the population, which is found to decrease in the case of truncated distributions, remains nearly a constant for exponentially decaying distributions and increases when the fitness distribution decays as a power law. The second quantity of interest, namely, the rate of change of fitness with time also shows quantitatively different behaviour for different beneficial fitness distributions. The patterns displayed by the two aforementioned quantities are found to hold good for both low and high mutation rates. We discuss how these patterns can be exploited to determine the distribution of beneficial fitness effects in microbial experiments. PMID:26990188

  6. Influence of zinc on Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptibilities to imipenem.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G L; Louie, A; Baltch, A L; Chu, R C; Smith, R P; Ritz, W J; Michelsen, P

    1993-01-01

    Serial dilution susceptibility testing of imipenem against 59 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, conducted simultaneously on single lots of Difco and BBL Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA), resulted in MICs for 90% of strains tested of 8 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. MICs for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas spp. were also higher on BBL MHA. Quantification of the cation content of the two MHAs by atomic absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that the zinc concentration in BBL MHA was 15 times greater than that measured in Difco MHA (2.61 and 0.17 micrograms/ml, respectively). Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, and copper in the two agars were similar. Addition of zinc to Difco MHA resulted in increases in MICs of imipenem for P. aeruginosa but not in the MICs of ceftazidime or cefpirome for P. aeruginosa (P < 0.01). A lesser zinc effect was seen on the activity of imipenem against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas spp. The activities of ceftazidime and cefpirome were similar on both MHAs when tested against all gram-negative organisms in this study. Thus, the effect of zinc in MHA was clearly demonstrated by a significant increase in the MICs of imipenem for P. aeruginosa, and, to a lesser extent, for other gram-negative bacilli. PMID:8408557

  7. DNA sequence-based analysis of the Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Mulet, Magdalena; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2010-06-01

    Partial sequences of four core 'housekeeping' genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of the type strains of 107 Pseudomonas species were analysed in order to obtain a comprehensive view regarding the phylogenetic relationships within the Pseudomonas genus. Gene trees allowed the discrimination of two lineages or intrageneric groups (IG), called IG P. aeruginosa and IG P. fluorescens. The first IG P. aeruginosa, was divided into three main groups, represented by the species P. aeruginosa, P. stutzeri and P. oleovorans. The second IG was divided into six groups, represented by the species P. fluorescens, P. syringae, P. lutea, P. putida, P. anguilliseptica and P. straminea. The P. fluorescens group was the most complex and included nine subgroups, represented by the species P. fluorescens, P. gessardi, P. fragi, P. mandelii, P. jesseni, P. koreensis, P. corrugata, P. chlororaphis and P. asplenii. Pseudomonas rhizospherae was affiliated with the P. fluorescens IG in the phylogenetic analysis but was independent of any group. Some species were located on phylogenetic branches that were distant from defined clusters, such as those represented by the P. oryzihabitans group and the type strains P. pachastrellae, P. pertucinogena and P. luteola. Additionally, 17 strains of P. aeruginosa, 'P. entomophila', P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. syringae and P. stutzeri, for which genome sequences have been determined, have been included to compare the results obtained in the analysis of four housekeeping genes with those obtained from whole genome analyses. PMID:20192968

  8. Different Ancestries of R Tailocins in Rhizospheric Pseudomonas Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G.K.; Dillen, Yörg; Lambrichts, Ivo; Proost, Paul; Wattiez, Ruddy; De Mot, René

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genomes accommodate a variety of mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophage-related clusters that encode phage tail-like protein complexes playing a role in interactions with eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells. Such tailocins are unable to replicate inside target cells due to the lack of a phage head with associated DNA. A subset of tailocins mediate antagonistic activities with bacteriocin-like specificity. Functional characterization of bactericidal tailocins of two Pseudomonas putida rhizosphere isolates revealed not only extensive similarity with the tail assembly module of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa R-type pyocins but also differences in genomic integration site, regulatory genes, and lytic release modules. Conversely, these three features are quite similar between strains of the P. putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens clades, although phylogenetic analysis of tail genes suggests them to have evolved separately. Unlike P. aeruginosa R pyocin elements, the tailocin gene clusters of other pseudomonads frequently carry cargo genes, including bacteriocins. Compared with P. aeruginosa, the tailocin tail fiber sequences that act as specificity determinants have diverged much more extensively among the other pseudomonad species, mostly isolates from soil and plant environments. Activity of the P. putida antibacterial particles requires a functional lipopolysaccharide layer on target cells, but contrary to R pyocins from P. aeruginosa, strain susceptibilities surpass species boundaries. PMID:26412856

  9. Biological manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida in trickling filters.

    PubMed

    McKee, Kyle P; Vance, Cherish C; Karthikeyan, Raghupathy

    2016-06-01

    Biological oxidation has been researched as a viable alternative for treating waters with high manganese (Mn) concentrations, typically found in mine drainage or in some geological formations. In this study, laboratory-scale trickling filters were constructed to compare the Mn removal efficiency between filters inoculated with the Mn oxidizing bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, and filters without inoculation. Manganese oxidation and removal was found to be significantly greater in trickling filters with Pseudomonas putida after startup times of only 48 h. Mn oxidation in Pseudomonas putida inoculated trickling filters was up to 75% greater than non-inoculated filters. One-dimensional advective-dispersive models were formulated to describe the transport of Mn in trickling filter porous media. Based on the experimental transport parameters obtained, the model predicted that a filter depth of only 16 cm is needed to reduce influent concentration of 10 mg L(-1) to 0.05 mg L(-1). PMID:26943637

  10. Pyoverdine and histicorrugatin-mediated iron acquisition in Pseudomonas thivervalensis.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Sandra; Brandt, Nathalie; Ongena, Marc; Achouak, Wafa; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Budzikiewicz, Herbert

    2016-06-01

    The genome of Pseudomonas thivervalensis LMG 21626(T) has been sequenced and a genomic, genetic and structural analysis of the siderophore mediated iron acquisition was undertaken. Pseudomonas thivervalensis produces two structurally new siderophores, pyoverdine PYOthi which is typical for P. thivervalensis strains and a closely related strain, and the lipopeptidic siderophore histicorrugatin which is also detected in P. lini. Histicorrugatin consists out of an eight amino acid long peptide which is linked to octanoic acid. It is structurally related to the siderophores corrugatin and ornicorrugatin. Analysis of the proteome for TonB-dependent receptors identified 25 candidates. Comparison of the TonB-dependent receptors of P. thivervalensis with the 17 receptors of its phylogenetic neighbor, P. brassicacearum subsp. brassicacearum NFM 421, showed that NFM 421 shares the same set of receptors with LMG 21626(T), including the histicorrugatin receptor. An exception was found for their cognate pyoverdine receptor which can be explained by the observation that both strains produce structurally different pyoverdines. Mass analysis showed that NFM 421 did not produce histicorrugatin, but the analogue ornicorrugatin. Growth stimulation assays with a variety of structurally distinct pyoverdines produced by other Pseudomonas species demonstrated that LMG 21626(T) and NFM 421 are able to utilize almost the same set of pyoverdines. Strain NFM 421 is able utilize two additional pyoverdines, pyoverdine of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 and P. citronellolis LMG 18378(T), these pyoverdines are probably taken up by the FpvA receptor of NFM 421. PMID:27007713

  11. Siderophore production and utilization by milk spoilage Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Brown, A G; Luke, R K J

    2010-04-01

    Many bacteria respond to potentially growth-limiting availability of iron by producing low-molecular-weight iron chelators (siderophores). The aim of this work was to examine the siderophores synthesized and utilized by Pseudomonas spp. implicated in milk spoilage. Twenty isolates of Pseudomonas spp. previously shown to have significant milk spoilage potential were tested for the ability to produce siderophores. Of these, 14 produced pyoverdin and 2 of these also produced pyochelin; 1 produced only pyochelin; 1 produced only salicylate; 2 produced non-pyoverdin, hydroxamate-containing siderophore; and 2 produced chrome azurol sulfonate reactive material that was neither pyoverdin nor pyochelin. There was considerable diversity among the pyoverdins produced. All isolates were shown to utilize iron complexed with exogenous pyoverdin, but usage of particular exogenous pyoverdins differed among isolates. Interference with the iron-uptake systems of the Pseudomonas spp. may be a means by which food spoilage can be slowed, and the pyoverdin system would appear to be a potential target. However, given the diversity of pyoverdins produced and utilized, and the presence of other siderophores, successful interference with bacterial iron acquisition in this context may be challenging. PMID:20338412

  12. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Trantas, Emmanouil A.; Licciardello, Grazia; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Witek, Kamil; Strano, Cinzia P.; Duxbury, Zane; Ververidis, Filippos; Goumas, Dimitrios E.; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Guttman, David S.; Catara, Vittoria; Sarris, Panagiotis F.

    2015-01-01

    The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor) and P. mediterranea (Pmed), are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for genes that encode proteins involved in commercially important chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of type III secretion system and known type III effector-encoding genes from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes. Genome-mining also revealed the presence of gene clusters for biosynthesis of siderophores, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and hydrogen cyanide. A highly conserved quorum sensing system was detected in all strains, although species specific differences were observed. Our study provides the basis for in-depth investigations regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence strategies in the battle between plants and microbes. PMID:26300874

  14. Efficacy of lactoferricin B in controlling ready-to-eat vegetable spoilage caused by Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Federico, Baruzzi; Pinto, Loris; Quintieri, Laura; Carito, Antonia; Calabrese, Nicola; Caputo, Leonardo

    2015-12-23

    The microbial content of plant tissues has been reported to cause the spoilage of ca. 30% of chlorine-disinfected fresh vegetables during cold storage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial peptides in controlling microbial vegetable spoilage under cold storage conditions. A total of 48 bacterial isolates were collected from ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetables and identified as belonging to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Aeromonas media, Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas jessenii, Pseudomonas koreensis, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas simiae and Pseudomonas viridiflava species. Reddish or brownish pigmentation was found when Pseudomonas strains were inoculated in wounds on leaves of Iceberg and Trocadero lettuce and escarole chicory throughout cold storage. Bovine lactoferrin (BLF) and its hydrolysates (LFHs) produced by pepsin, papain and rennin, were assayed in vitro against four Pseudomonas spp. strains selected for their heavy spoiling ability. As the pepsin-LFH showed the strongest antimicrobial effect, subsequent experiments were carried out using the peptide lactoferricin B (LfcinB), well known to be responsible for its antimicrobial activity. LfcinB significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) spoilage by a mean of 36% caused by three out of four inoculated spoiler pseudomonads on RTE lettuce leaves after six days of cold storage. The reduction in the extent of spoilage was unrelated to viable cell density in the inoculated wounds. This is the first paper providing direct evidence regarding the application of an antimicrobial peptide to control microbial spoilage affecting RTE leafy vegetables during cold storage. PMID:26453993

  15. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of raw and beneficiated Eastern oil shales

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

    1991-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with US Department of Energy (DOE) support has developed a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for Eastern oil shales. Bench-scale tests have been conducted with raw and beneficiated shales in an advanced multipurpose research reactor (AMRR). Raw Alabama shale and raw and beneficiated Indiana shales were retorted at 515{degrees}C using hydrogen pressures of 4 and 7 MPa. Shale feed rates to the AMRR were 15 to 34 kg/h. High oils yields and carbon conversions were achieved in all tests. Oil yield from Alabama shale hydroretorted at 7 MPa was 200% of Fischer Assay. Raw and beneficiated Indiana shales hydroretorted at 7 MPa produced oil yields of 170% to 195% of Fischer Assay, respectively. Total carbon conversions were greater than 70% for all tests conducted at 7 MPa.

  16. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of raw and beneficiated Eastern oil shales

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with US Department of Energy (DOE) support has developed a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for Eastern oil shales. Bench-scale tests have been conducted with raw and beneficiated shales in an advanced multipurpose research reactor (AMRR). Raw Alabama shale and raw and beneficiated Indiana shales were retorted at 515{degrees}C using hydrogen pressures of 4 and 7 MPa. Shale feed rates to the AMRR were 15 to 34 kg/h. High oils yields and carbon conversions were achieved in all tests. Oil yield from Alabama shale hydroretorted at 7 MPa was 200% of Fischer Assay. Raw and beneficiated Indiana shales hydroretorted at 7 MPa produced oil yields of 170% to 195% of Fischer Assay, respectively. Total carbon conversions were greater than 70% for all tests conducted at 7 MPa.

  17. Selectivity lists of pesticides to beneficial arthropods for IPM programs in carrot--first results.

    PubMed

    Hautier, L; Jansen, J-P; Mabon, N; Schiffers, B

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve IPM programs in carrot, 7 fungicides, 12 herbicides and 9 insecticides commonly used in Belgium were tested for their toxicity towards five beneficial arthropods representative of most important natural enemies encountered in carrot: parasitic wasps - Aphidius rhopalosiphi (De Stefani-Perez) (Hym., Aphidiidae), ladybirds - Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Col., Coccinellidae), hoverfly - Episyrphus balteatus (Dipt.. Syrphidae), rove beetle - Aleochara bilineata (Col., Staphylinidae) and carabid beetle - Bembidion lampros (Col., Carabidae). Initialy, all plant protection products were tested on inert substrate glass plates or sand according to the insect. Products with a corrected mortality (CM) or a parasitism reduction (PR) lower than 30% were kept for the constitution of positive list (green list). The other compounds were further tested on plant for A. rhopalosiphi, A. bipunctata, E. balteatus and soil for B. lampros and A. bilineata. With these extended laboratory tests results, products were listed in toxicity class: green category [CM or PR < or = 30%], yellow category [30% < CM or PR < or = 60%] and orange category [60% < CM or PR < or = 80%]. Products with toxicity higher than 80% on plants or that reduce parasitism more than 80% on soil were put in red category and are not recommended to Integrated Pest Management programs in carrot. Results showed that all fungicides tested were harmless to beneficials except Tebuconazole, which was slightly harmful for A. bipunctata. Herbicides were also harmless for soil beneficials, except Chlorpropham. This product was very toxic on sand towards A. bilineata and must be tested on soil. All soil insecticides tested were very toxic for ground beneficials and considered as non-selective. Their use in IPM is subject to questioning in view of negative impacts on beneficials. Among foliar insecticides, Dimethoate and Deltamethrin are not recommended for IPM because their high toxicity for all beneficials. The

  18. The Sigma Factor AlgU (AlgT) Controls Exopolysaccharide Production and Tolerance towards Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in the Biocontrol Agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0

    PubMed Central

    Schnider-Keel, Ursula; Lejbølle, Kirsten Bang; Baehler, Eric; Haas, Dieter; Keel, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    A variety of stress situations may affect the activity and survival of plant-beneficial pseudomonads added to soil to control root diseases. This study focused on the roles of the sigma factor AlgU (synonyms, AlgT, RpoE, and ς22) and the anti-sigma factor MucA in stress adaptation of the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0. The algU-mucA-mucB gene cluster of strain CHA0 was similar to that of the pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas syringae. Strain CHA0 is naturally nonmucoid, whereas a mucA deletion mutant or algU-overexpressing strains were highly mucoid due to exopolysaccharide overproduction. Mucoidy strictly depended on the global regulator GacA. An algU deletion mutant was significantly more sensitive to osmotic stress than the wild-type CHA0 strain and the mucA mutant were. Expression of an algU′-′lacZ reporter fusion was induced severalfold in the wild type and in the mucA mutant upon exposure to osmotic stress, whereas a lower, noninducible level of expression was observed in the algU mutant. Overexpression of algU did not enhance tolerance towards osmotic stress. AlgU was found to be essential for tolerance of P. fluorescens towards desiccation stress in a sterile vermiculite-sand mixture and in a natural sandy loam soil. The size of the population of the algU mutant declined much more rapidly than the size of the wild-type population at soil water contents below 5%. In contrast to its role in pathogenic pseudomonads, AlgU did not contribute to tolerance of P. fluorescens towards oxidative and heat stress. In conclusion, AlgU is a crucial determinant in the adaptation of P. fluorescens to dry conditions and hyperosmolarity, two major stress factors that limit bacterial survival in the environment. PMID:11722923

  19. Priming-mediated systemic resistance in cucumber induced by Pseudomonas azotoformans GC-B19 and Paenibacillus elgii MM-B22 against Colletotrichum orbiculare.

    PubMed

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Kim, Eui Nam; Han, Gyung Deok; Kwack, Min Sun; Jeun, Yong Chull; Kim, Ki Deok

    2014-08-01

    Induced systemic resistance (ISR) can be activated by biotic agents, including root-associated beneficial bacteria to inhibit pathogen infection. We investigated priming-mediated ISR in cucumber induced by Pseudomonas azotoformans GC-B19 and Paenibacillus elgii MM-B22 against Colletotrichum orbiculare (causal fungus of anthracnose). In addition, we examined whether this ISR expression was bacterial density-dependent by assessing peroxidase activity in the presence and absence of the pathogen. As a result, root treatment with the ISR-eliciting strains GC-B19 and MM-B22 or the chemical inducer DL-β-amino-n-butyric acid (positive control) significantly inhibited fungal infection process (conidial germination and appressorium formation) and disease severity compared with the non-ISR-eliciting strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PK-B09 (negative control), and MgSO4 solution (untreated control). These treatments effectively induced rapid elicitation of hypersensitive reaction-like cell death with H2O2 generations, and accumulation of defense-related enzymes (β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and peroxidase) in cucumber leaves in the "primed" state against C. orbiculare. In addition, ISR expression was dependent on the bacterial cell density in the rhizosphere. This ISR expression was derived from the presence of sustained bacterial populations ranging from 10(4) to 10(6) cells/g of potting mix over a period of time after introduction of bacteria (10(6) to 10(10) cells/g of potting mix) into the rhizosphere. Taken together, these results suggest that priming-mediated ISR against C. orbiculare in cucumber can be induced in a bacterial density-dependent manner by Pseudomonas azotoformans GC-B19 and Paenibacillus elgii MM-B22. PMID:24502209

  20. Pseudomonas salina sp. nov., isolated from a salt lake.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Hou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Wang, Fang; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, facultatively aerobic bacterium, strain XCD-X85(T), was isolated from Xiaochaidan Lake, a salt lake (salinity 9.9%, w/v) in Qaidam basin, Qinghai province, China. Its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain XCD-X85(T) were non-endospore-forming rods, 0.4-0.6 μm wide and 1.0-1.6 μm long, and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Strain XCD-X85(T) was catalase- and oxidase-positive. Growth was observed in the presence of 0-12.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 1.0-2.0%) and at 4-35 °C (optimum, 25-30 °C) and pH 6.5-10.5 (optimum, pH 8.0-8.5). Strain XCD-X85(T) contained (>10%) summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c), C12 : 0, C16 : 0 and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) as the predominant fatty acids. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 9 (Q-9). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content was 57.4 mol%. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain XCD-X85(T) was associated with the genus Pseudomonas, and showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to Pseudomonas pelagia CL-AP6(T) (99.0%) and Pseudomonas bauzanensis BZ93(T) (96.8%). DNA-DNA relatedness of strain XCD-X85T to P. pelagia JCM 15562(T) was 19 ± 1%. On the basis of the data presented above, it is concluded that strain XCD-X85(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XCD-X85(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12482(T) = JCM 19469(T)). PMID:25985833