Science.gov

Sample records for benign intracranial hypertension

  1. CSF imaging in benign intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    James, A. Everette; Harbert, J. C.; Hoffer, P. B.; DeLand, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The cisternographic images in 10 patients with benign intracranial hypertension were reviewed. Nine were normal. Transfer of labelled tracer from the subarachnoid space was measured in five patients and was found to be abnormal in only two. The relation of these findings to the proposed pathophysiological alterations is discussed. Images

  2. Clarithromycin Culprit of Benign Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Habib Rehman; Mason, Colin; Mulcahy, Riona

    2015-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension is characterized with increase in CSF opening pressure with no specific etiology. It is predominantly found in women of child bearing age and particularly in individuals with obesity. Visual disturbances or loss and associated headaches are common and can lead to blindness if left untreated. Diagnosis can be achieved once other causes of visual loss, headaches and high opening pressures are excluded. Management consists of serial optic disc assessments although no specific treatment is available despite recent trials using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Diet modification and weight management can help in therapy. PMID:26713029

  3. Benign Intracranial Hypertension: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Gary Y.; Million, Stephanie K.

    2012-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) (also known as pseudotumor cerebri and empty sella syndrome) remains a diagnostic challenge to most physicians. The modified Dandy criteria consist of, the classic findings of headache, pulsatile tinnitus, papilledema, and elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, however, these are rarely collectively present in any one patient. Furthermore, these findings can wax and wane over time. Due to the nature of this disease, both signs and symptoms may be intermittent, making definitive diagnosis difficult. Newer imaging studies, particularly the magnetic resonance venogram (MRV) along with a constellation of correlative findings and associated diseases have given new impetus in the diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of this disease. This has led the authors to offer modifications to the classic Dandy criteria. This report presents three representative cases of BIH highlighting many of the newer advances in both diagnosis and treatment of this perplexing disorder. PMID:22928139

  4. [Neuroophthalmological aspects of benign intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Eliseeva, N M; Serova, N K; Gasparian, S S; Shifrin, M A

    2008-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BICH) is characterized by elevated spinal fluid pressure in the absence of space-occupying lesion in the skull, dilated cerebral ventricles, significant neurological disorders, and altered spinal fluid composition. Forty-nine patients with a female predominance were examined. Their age ranged from 4 to 52 years (median 39 years). The most common predictors of BICH were overweight, endocrine disorders, and cerebral sinus thrombosis. Ophthalmoscopically, the patients were found to have early, moderate, and significant papilledema, and secondary optic atrophy. Examination of visual functions revealed these or those disturbances of visual acuity and/or field of vision in 43 of the 49 patients. The incidence and degree of visual disturbances depended on the stage of papilledema. Timely diagnosis and treatment in patients with BICH allows the development of visual disturbances to be prevented in them. PMID:18589651

  5. Risperidone Induced Benign Intracranial Hypertension Leading to Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Sushil Thomas; Kattula, Dheeraj; Mannam, Pavithra; Iyyadurai, Ramya

    2016-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) is a rare but potentially serious condition causing visual loss. Occasionally, medication use has been associated with the occurrence of BIH. We report the case of a 40-year-old obese lady being treated with risperidone for schizophrenia who presented with features of BIH. We report this case, occurring for the 1st time in India, to emphasize that a commonly used atypical antipsychotic drug can rarely cause BIH leading to visual loss. PMID:27335522

  6. Hypervitaminosis A causing benign intracranial hypertension. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhettay, E M; Bakst, C M

    1988-12-01

    Hypervitaminosis A is a well-recognized clinical entity, but the toxic manifestations develop so insidiously and involve so many systems that diagnosis can easily be missed or delayed. A patient with juvenile chronic arthritis developed benign intracranial hypertension and other manifestations of excessive vitamin A intake and made a complete recovery after it was withdrawn. Vitamin A is a non-prescription drug and any history of its ingestion must be obtained during evaluation of papilloedema. A plea is made for the public to be repeatedly reminded that no proposed remedy is safe or effective until it is demonstrated to be so. PMID:3194809

  7. Lumbar subcutaneous shunt: a novel technique for therapeutic decision making in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and benign intracranial hypertension (BIH).

    PubMed

    Ushewokunze, S; Haja Mydin, H N; Prasad, R; Mendelow, A D

    2008-10-01

    Selecting patients who will benefit from a permanent CSF diversion procedure in benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) or communicating hydrocephalus due to normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) has inherent problems. The percutaneous introduction of a lumbar subcutaneous shunt (LSS) under local anaesthesia facilitates both a prolonged CSF drainage under aseptic conditions and also elicits an adequate clinical response. We describe the technique of a lumbar subcutaneous shunt and our experience with its use in patients with BIH and NPH. Postprocedure changes in the patients' clinical status were noted. Patients with a transient clinical improvement underwent a subsequent definitive CSF diversion; those with a sustained clinical improvement or no change in symptoms had no further procedure. PMID:19016120

  8. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  9. Intracranial Hypertension in Children without Papilledema.

    PubMed

    Chelse, Ana B; Epstein, Leon G

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital studied the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children followed in a multispecialty pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic. PMID:26933598

  10. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects. PMID:27523417

  11. Intracranial hypertension: classification and patterns of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (ICH) was systematized in four categories according to its aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms: parenchymatous ICH with an intrinsic cerebral cause; vascular ICH, which has its aetiology in disorders of cerebral blood circulation; ICH caused by disorders of cerebro–spinal fluid dynamics and idiopathic ICH. The increase of intracranial pressure is the first to happen and then intracranial hypertension develops from this initial effect becoming symptomatic; it then acquires its individuality, surpassing the initial disease. The intracranial hypertension syndrome corresponds to the stage at which the increased intracranial pressure can be compensated and the acute form of intracranial hypertension is equivalent to a decompensated ICH syndrome. The decompensation of intracranial hypertension is a condition of instability and appears when the normal intrinsic ratio of intracranial pressure – time fluctuation is changed. The essential conditions for decompensation of intracranial hypertension are: the speed of intracranial pressure increase over normal values, the highest value of abnormal intracranial pressure and the duration of high ICP values. Medical objectives are preventing ICP from exceeding 20 mm Hg and maintaining a normal cerebral blood flow. The emergency therapy is the same for the acute form but each of the four forms of ICH has a specific therapy, according to the pathogenic mechanism and if possible to aetiology. PMID:20108456

  12. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zaitun; Fenton, Eoin; Sattar, Muhammad Taufiq

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation. PMID:23239783

  13. Perspective: Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Provide an update on various features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Design Perspective. Methods Selected articles on the epidemiology, clinical and imaging features, natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed and interpreted in the context of the authors’ clinical and research experience. Results Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is primarily a disease of obese women of childbearing age, but it can affect patients of any weight, sex, and age. Although a relatively rare disorder, idiopathic intracranial hypertension’s associated costs in the U.S. entail hundreds of millions of dollars. Even following treatment, headaches are frequently persistent and may require the continued involvement of a neurologist. Quality of life reductions and depression are common among idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients. However, visual dysfunction, especially visual field abnormalities, represents the major morbidity of this disorder, and serial automated perimetry remains the primary mode of patient monitoring. Patients who are men, black, very obese, or anemic are at higher risk of visual loss. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding idiopathic intracranial hypertension’s pathophysiology. Treatment studies show that lumbar puncture is a valuable treatment (in addition to its crucial diagnostic role) and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, CSF diversion procedures, and cerebral venous stenting. Conclusions Many questions remain unanswered about idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Ongoing studies, especially an ongoing NIH-funded clinical trial of acetazolamide, should provide more insight into this important, yet poorly understood syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. PMID:21696699

  14. Intracranial Hypertension Without Papilledema in Children.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Aronowitz, Catherine; Roach, E Steve

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children. Charts of patients evaluated in a pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic at our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they had presence or absence of optic nerve edema at the time of presentation. Age, body mass index, and opening cerebrospinal fluid pressures were considered continuous variables and compared by Wilcoxon rank sum test because of non-normality. A P-value of 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 228 charts were reviewed; 152 patients met the criteria for intracranial hypertension, and 27 patients (17.8%) met the criteria of headache without optic nerve edema. There was no clinically significant difference in age, body mass index, opening pressure, and modified opening pressure between the 2 groups. PMID:26012507

  15. An Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thurtell, Matthew J.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of unknown etiology often encountered in neurologic practice. It produces non-localizing symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure and, when left untreated, can result in severe irreversible visual loss. It most commonly occurs in obese women of childbearing age, but it can also occur in children, men, non-obese adults, and older adults. While it is frequently associated with obesity, it can be associated with other conditions, such as obstructive sleep apnea and transverse cerebral venous sinus stenoses. Recent identification of subgroups at high risk for irreversible visual loss, including black patients, men, and patients with fulminant forms of IIH, help guide the optimal management and follow-up. Ongoing studies of venous anatomy and physiology in IIH patients, as well as a recently begun randomized clinical treatment trial, should provide more insights into this common yet poorly understood syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. PMID:20944524

  16. [Primary "pseudotumor cerebri" syndrome or idiopathic intracranial hypertension: clinical features and treatment].

    PubMed

    Timmermans, G; Scholtes, F; Andris, C; Martin, D

    2015-10-01

    "Pseudotumor cerebri" generally refers to a syndrome associating signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension, increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and normal CSF composition, without any identifiable intracranial abnormality, particularly by neuroimaging studies. Although the "idiopathic" variant of the syndrome is most common, there are secondary forms where a cause can be found. The term "benign intracranial hypertension" should be abandoned, since permanent visual impairment can complicate the condition. This disaster can be avoided by early recognition and medical or surgical treatment of the disease. This article discusses the terminology, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the syndrome. PMID:26727837

  17. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://www.ihrfoundation.org/hypertension/info/C172 Surgery Optic Nerve Fenestration When sight is at risk and drug therapy has been unsuccessful, an optic nerve fenestration (also called an optic nerve sheath ...

  18. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting as postpartum headache.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mariam; Salahuddin, Ayesha; Mathew, Namitha R; Nandhagopal, Ramachandiran

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum headache is described as headache and neck or shoulder pain during the first 6 weeks after delivery. Common causes of headache in the puerperium are migraine headache and tension headache; other causes include pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, post-dural puncture headache, cortical vein thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome, brain tumor, cerebral ischemia, meningitis, and so forth. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare cause of postpartum headache. It is usually associated with papilledema, headache, and elevated intracranial pressure without any focal neurologic abnormality in an otherwise healthy person. It is more commonly seen in obese women of reproductive age group, but rare during pregnancy and postpartum. We present a case of IIH who presented to us 18 days after cesarean section with severe headache and was successfully managed. PMID:26818168

  19. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  20. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Kieburtz, Karl D.; Corbett, James J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Friedman, Deborah I.; Katz, David M.; Keltner, John L.; Schron, Eleanor B.; McDermott, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, there are no large prospective cohorts of untreated patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) to characterize the disease. OBJECTIVE To report the baseline clinical and laboratory features of patients enrolled in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We collected data at baseline from questionnaires, examinations, automated perimetry, and fundus photography grading. Patients (n = 165) were enrolled from March 17, 2010, to November 27, 2012, at 38 academic and private practice sites in North America. All participants met the modified Dandy criteria for IIH and had a perimetric mean deviation between −2 dB and −7 dB. All but 4 participants were women. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Baseline and laboratory characteristics. RESULTS The mean (SD) age of our patients was 29.0 (7.4) years and 4 (2.4%) were men. The average (SD) body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was 39.9 (8.3). Headache was the most common symptom (84%). Transient visual obscurations occurred in 68% of patients, back pain in 53%, and pulse synchronous tinnitus in 52%. Only 32% reported visual loss. The average (SD) perimetric mean deviation in the worst eye was −3.5 (1.1) dB, (range, −2.0 to −6.4 dB) and in the best eye was −2.3 (1.1) dB (range, −5.2 to 0.8 dB). A partial arcuate visual field defect with an enlarged blind spot was the most common perimetric finding. Visual acuity was 85 letters or better (20/20) in 71% of the worst eyes and 77% of the best eyes. Quality of life measures, including the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 and the Short Form–36 physical and mental health summary scales, were lower compared with population norms. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial represents the largest prospectively analyzed cohort of untreated patients with IIH. Our data show

  1. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, P I; D'Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option. PMID:26752823

  2. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, PI; D’Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option. PMID:26752823

  3. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect. PMID:27283387

  4. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Intracranial Hypertension and Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Cadena, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Sustained intracranial hypertension and acute brain herniation are “brain codes,” signifying catastrophic neurological events that require immediate recognition and treatment to prevent irreversible injury and death. As in cardiac arrest, a brain code mandates the organized implementation of a stepwise management algorithm. The goal of this emergency neurological life support protocol is to implement an evidence-based, standardized approach to the evaluation and management of patients with intracranial hypertension and/or herniation. PMID:26438459

  5. Spontaneous intracranial hypo and hypertensions: an imaging review.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, Viratsinh; Hingwala, Divyata Rajendra; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure changes can manifest as either intracranial hypertension or hypotension. The idiopathic forms are largely under or misdiagnosed. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension occurs due to reduced CSF pressure usually as a result of a spontaneous dural tear. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a syndrome of elevated intracranial tension without hydrocephalus or mass lesions and with normal CSF composition. Neuroimaging plays an important role in excluding secondary causes of raised intracranial tension. As the clinical presentation is varied, imaging may also help the clinician in arriving at the diagnosis of IIH with the help of a few specific signs. In this review, we attempt to compile the salient magnetic resonance imaging findings in these two conditions. Careful observation of these findings may help in early accurate diagnosis and to provide appropriate early treatment. PMID:21891924

  6. The laboratory profile in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Lea; Zohar, Efrat; Glovinsky, Yoseph; Huna-Baron, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    While overweight and female gender play an undisputable role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), the contribution of other factors is still unclear. We have evaluated the laboratory findings of patients with IIH in an attempt to find the influence of abnormalities on the disease course. Included were 82 females after menarche and males older than 18 years who were followed up for at least 1 year. A wide range of laboratory parameters were examined at the time of presentation. The most frequent abnormal laboratory findings were elevated C reactive protein (CRP) (51 %), thrombophilia (31 %), increased plasma cortisol levels (29 %) and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (20 %). Patients with elevated CRP and patients with thrombophilia had an unfavorable visual outcome. Increased cortisol levels and abnormal calcium correlated with a higher rate of recurrence. The visual outcome of patients with elevated LDH was better than those with normal LDH. It seems that certain metabolic, inflammatory and coagulation abnormalities may influence the course of IIH. If confirmed in further studies, these findings could contribute to elucidation of the etiology and prognosis of IIH. PMID:25596710

  7. Risk of intracranial hypertension with intrauterine levonorgestrel

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao; Gustafson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to quantify the risk of intracranial hypertension (ICH) with the intrauterine levonorgestrel (IUL) device Mirena®. Methods: We used the United States Food and Drug Administration’s Adverse Events Reporting System (FAERS) database to quantify a reporting odds ratio (ROR) for ICH and Mirena®. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study using the IMS LifeLink® database, comparing the risk of two oral contraceptives ethinyl estradiol (EE) with Mirena®. A Bayesian sensitivity analysis was performed to account for the effect of body mass index (BMI). Results: The reported odds ratios (ORs) for ICH and papilledema with Mirena® were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–2.25) and 1.50 (95% CI 1.10–2.05), respectively. In the cohort study, the OR for ICH and EE-norgestimate and EE-norethindrone compared with Mirena® were 1.29 (95% CI 0.83–2.00) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04–2.29), respectively. The presence of a strong confounder BMI did not affect the estimated OR (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 0.73–2.41 for EE-norgestimate; OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0.01–1.27 for EE-norethindrone). Conclusion: We found a higher than expected number of reports of ICH with Mirena® in the FAERS database. We also found a similar risk of ICH with Mirena® compared with the oral contraceptive EE-norgestimate. The higher risk of ICH with EE-norethindrone, another oral contraceptive should be further investigated. PMID:26240745

  8. Intradiploic epidermoid cyst with intracranial hypertension syndrome: Report of two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Holguin, J.C.; Medélez-Borbonio, R.; Quintero-Lopez, E.; García-González, U.; Gómez-Amador, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intradiploic epidermoid intracranial cysts (IEIC) derive from ectodermal cells and are covered with stratified squamous epithelium. They are extremely rare, and most common locations are in the occipital, frontal and parietal bones. They have a very slow growth and can be asymptomatic until becoming evident by the deformation produced. The treatment is based on the removal of the lesion, and subsequent histopathological confirmation. Presentation of case Two cases are reported, with intracranial hypertension syndrome, which is very uncommon because of the slow growth of this type of pathology; however, decompensations occurring in the space-occupying lesions at intracranial level explain this type of clinical presentation. Discussion The most common presentation of intracranial intradiploic epidermoid cysts (IEIC) is asymptomatically, which is made evident by the prominence at the level of the soft tissues and then presenting less frequently local pain and cephalea; rarely the size of the lesion can cause focal neurological signs. Conclusion These benign lesions, although they are of low incidence, are seen very rarely in intradiploic locations and above all, of significant size, may produce significant mass effect in patients, which was initially tolerated because of its slow growth, however, they may become decompensate and cause intracranial hypertension syndrome. PMID:26433925

  9. Complete ophthalmoplegia: A rare presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Irfan Yousuf; Verma, Sawan; Wani, Mushtaq; Asimi, Ravouf; Sheikh, Saleem; Wani, Maqbool; Sheikh, Nawaz; Shah, Irfan; Mushtaq, Mudasir

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder defined by clinical criteria that include signs and symptoms isolated to those produced by increased intracranial pressure (ICP; e. g., headache, papilledema, and vision loss), elevated ICP with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and no other cause of intracranial hypertension evident on neuroimaging or other evaluations. The most common signs in IIH are papilledema, visual field loss, and unilateral or bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a case of IIH presenting as headache with vision loss, papilledema, complete ophthalmoplegia with proptosis in one eye, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in the other eye. Patient was managed with acetazolamide, topiramate, and diuretics. Symptoms remained static and she was planned for urgent CSF diversion procedure. PMID:26713027

  10. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension: mechanisms, management, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus, and back and neck pain, but the clinical presentation is highly variable. Although few studies have been done to support evidence-based management, several recent advances have the potential to enhance understanding of the causes of the disease and to guide treatment decisions. Investigators of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) reported beneficial effects of acetazolamide in patients with mild visual loss. Studies have also established weight loss as an effective disease-modifying treatment, and further clinical trials to investigate new treatments are underway. The incidence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is expected to increase as rates of obesity increase; efforts to reduce diagnostic delays and identify new, effective approaches to treatment will be key to meeting the needs of a growing number of patients. PMID:26700907

  11. Finite Element Model for Hydrocephalus and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Hakseung; Park, Dae-Hyeon; Lee, Hack-Jin; Czosnyka, Zofia; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are neuropathies associated with disturbed cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Several finite element (FE) brain models were suggested to simulate the pathological changes in hydrocephalus, but with overly simplified assumptions regarding the properties of the brain parenchyma. This study proposes a two-dimensional FE brain model, capable of simulating both hydrocephalus and IIH by incorporating poro-hyperelasticity of the brain and detailed structural information (i.e., sulci). PMID:27165898

  12. An uncommon case of pediatric neurobrucellosis associated with intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sinopidis, Xenophon; Kaleyias, Joseph; Mitropoulou, Konstantina; Triga, Maria; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Mantagos, Stefanos

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old boy who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension, headache, diplopia, papilledema, and a normal brain MRI. Brucella melitensis in the cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed with PCR assay. We believe that neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when headaches persist following brucellosis. In addition, we suggest that when cerebrospinal fluid culture is negative, PCR may prove to be an optimal alternative tool for an immediate and accurate diagnosis. PMID:22900217

  13. An Uncommon Case of Pediatric Neurobrucellosis Associated with Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sinopidis, Xenophon; Kaleyias, Joseph; Mitropoulou, Konstantina; Triga, Maria; Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Mantagos, Stefanos

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old boy who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension, headache, diplopia, papilledema, and a normal brain MRI. Brucella melitensis in the cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed with PCR assay. We believe that neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when headaches persist following brucellosis. In addition, we suggest that when cerebrospinal fluid culture is negative, PCR may prove to be an optimal alternative tool for an immediate and accurate diagnosis. PMID:22900217

  14. Primary Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Mario A.; Bialer, Omer Y.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is increasingly recognized as a cause of spontaneous cerebrospinal (CSF) leak in the ENT and neurosurgical literature. The diagnosis of IIH in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks is classically made a few weeks after surgical repair of the CSF leak when symptoms and signs of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) appear. Methods Case reports and literature review. Two young obese women developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea related to an empty sella in one, and a cribriform plate encephalocele in the other. Both patients underwent surgical repair of the CSF leak. A few weeks later, they developed chronic headaches and bilateral papilledema. Lumbar punctures showed elevated CSF-opening pressures with normal CSF contents, with temporary improvement of headaches. A man with a three-year history of untreated IIH developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea. He experienced improvement of his headaches and papilledema after a CSF shunting procedure, and the rhinorrhea resolved after endoscopic repair of the leak. Results These cases and the literature review confirm a definite association between IIH and spontaneous CSF leak based on: 1) similar demographics; 2) increased ICP in some patients with spontaneous CSF leak after leak repair; 3) higher rate of leak recurrence in patients with raised ICP; 4) patients with intracranial hypertension secondary to tumors may develop CSF leak, confirming that raised ICP from other causes than IIH can cause CSF leak. Conclusions CSF leak may occasionally keep IIH patients symptom-free; however, classic symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension may develop after the CSF leak is repaired, exposing these patients to a high risk of recurrence of the leak unless an ICP-lowering intervention is performed. PMID:24042170

  15. MS-31INTRACRANIAL MENINGIOMAS COMPLICATED BY HYPERTENSION: FOUR CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Haining; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jiang; Zhao, Jun; Huo, Junli; Zhang, Xiang; Fei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology and mechanism of both meningioma and hypertension are still not fully understood, and their diagnosis and treatment still need to be improved. The phenomenon that some meningiomas can directly lead hypertension was never reported previously. Here we reported four consecutive cases with hypertension secondary to intracranial meningiomas. CASE PRESENTATION: Case 1 was a 62-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.6 cm × 1.5 cm) at left frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 10 years; Case 2 was a 50-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 1.5 cm × 1.2 cm × 1.1 cm) at right parietal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 4 years; Case 3 was a 42-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.7 cm × 2.6 cm × 2.3 cm) in trigonum of left lateral ventricle and with a medical history of hypertension for 3 months; Case 4 was a 56-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.8 cm × 1.5 cm) at bilateral falx of frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 8 years. All the four cases were treated in our hospital from April to June in 2013. After surgical resection of the tumors, blood pressure of all the patients returned to normal level in a short term, and it remained stable for 10 to 12 months of postoperative follow-up period. CONCLUSION: These four cases may present a new clinical syndrome and provide important clinical insights, and also should attract the attention of clinicians, i.e. in patients with hypertension, coexisting intracranial meningiomas should be suspected, and appropriate diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment should be provided; for patients with hypertension secondary to meningiomas, their hypertension can be cured after surgical removal of the tumors.

  16. Update on the pathophysiology and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Biousse, Valérie; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a disease of unknown etiology typically affecting young, obese women, producing a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without identifiable cause. Despite a large number of hypotheses and publications over the past decade, the etiology is still unknown. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding IIH’s pathophysiology. There continues to be no evidence-based consensus or formal guidelines regarding management and treatment of the disease. Treatment studies show that the diagnostic lumbar puncture is a valuable intervention beyond its diagnostic importance, and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, cerebrospinal fluid shunting procedures, and cerebral transverse venous sinus stenting. PMID:22423118

  17. Update on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bidot, Samuel; Bruce, Beau B

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare disorder occurring more frequently in obese women of childbearing age, resulting in increased intracranial pressure (ICP) from an unknown cause. Recent advances in epidemiology, imaging, and treatment have provided a better understanding of IIH in recent years, with better identification of visual risk factors and atypical forms of IIH, including fulminant IIH and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and a randomized clinical trial providing the rationale for the use of acetazolamide. In addition, a revised version of the modified Dandy criteria for the diagnosis of IIH was suggested in 2013, with better definition of IIH in adults and children; however, controversy regarding nomenclature has precluded its acceptance among IIH experts. Finally, questions regarding the best surgical strategy, the indications for venous sinus stenting, and the diagnostic role of the radiologic findings commonly seen in IIH have remained unanswered. PMID:26444398

  18. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taddeo, Terrance A.

    2010-01-01

    During recent long duration missions to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers have reported changes in visual acuity or visual field defects. Exams in the postflight period revealed changes to the visual system and elevated intracranial pressures. As a result, NASA Space Medicine has added a number of tests to be performed in the preflight, inflight and postflight periods for ISS and shuttle missions with the goal of determining the processes at work and any potential mitigation strategies. This discussion will acquaint you with the changes that NASA has made to its medical requirements in order to address the microgravity induced intracranial hypertension and associated visual changes. Key personnel have been assembled to provide you information on this topic. Educational Objectives: Provide an overview of the current Medical Operations requirements and the mitigation steps taken to operationally address the issue.

  19. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Cato, Liam D; Miah, Mohammed A L; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Jensen, Rigmor H; Gonzalez, Ana M; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH. PMID:27186074

  20. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: ongoing clinical challenges and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Julayanont, Parunyou; Karukote, Amputch; Ruthirago, Doungporn; Panikkath, Deepa; Panikkath, Ragesh

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is an uncommon disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure without radiological or laboratory evidence of intracranial pathology except empty sella turcica, optic nerve sheath with filled out cerebrospinal fluid spaces, and smooth-walled nonflow-related venous sinus stenosis or collapse. This condition typically affects obese women. The incidence of IIH is increasing with the rising prevalence of obesity. Persistent headache is the most common symptom. Visual impairment is a serious complication that may not be recognized by the patients. This paper reviews clinical manifestations, diagnostic challenges, and current treatments of IIH in adults. Various imaging modalities have been studied on their validity for detection of IIH and papilledema. This review also includes new studies on medical, surgical, and interventional management of this condition. Acetazolamide and topiramate are the only two medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials about their efficacy in treatment of IIH. In patients who have severe visual impairment or progressive visual deterioration despite medical management, surgical or interventional treatment may be considered. The efficacy and complications of cerebrospinal fluid diversion, optic nerve sheath fenestration, and endovascular venous stenting reported in the last 3 decades have been summarized in this review. Finally, the prospective aspects of biomarkers and treatments are proposed for future research. PMID:26929666

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: ongoing clinical challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Julayanont, Parunyou; Karukote, Amputch; Ruthirago, Doungporn; Panikkath, Deepa; Panikkath, Ragesh

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is an uncommon disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure without radiological or laboratory evidence of intracranial pathology except empty sella turcica, optic nerve sheath with filled out cerebrospinal fluid spaces, and smooth-walled nonflow-related venous sinus stenosis or collapse. This condition typically affects obese women. The incidence of IIH is increasing with the rising prevalence of obesity. Persistent headache is the most common symptom. Visual impairment is a serious complication that may not be recognized by the patients. This paper reviews clinical manifestations, diagnostic challenges, and current treatments of IIH in adults. Various imaging modalities have been studied on their validity for detection of IIH and papilledema. This review also includes new studies on medical, surgical, and interventional management of this condition. Acetazolamide and topiramate are the only two medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials about their efficacy in treatment of IIH. In patients who have severe visual impairment or progressive visual deterioration despite medical management, surgical or interventional treatment may be considered. The efficacy and complications of cerebrospinal fluid diversion, optic nerve sheath fenestration, and endovascular venous stenting reported in the last 3 decades have been summarized in this review. Finally, the prospective aspects of biomarkers and treatments are proposed for future research. PMID:26929666

  2. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in the Middle East: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Almarzouqi, Sumayya J.; Morgan, Michael L.; Lee, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial pressure without any identifiable etiology. It is defined by elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) with normal neuroimaging and normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contents. IIH typically affects young obese women and produces symptoms and signs related to high ICP. Headache and blurred vision are the most common symptoms, and papilledema is the major clinical sign. In this review we examine the epidemiology and demographic features of IIH in Middle Eastern countries and compare and contrast them with the published IIH literature from Western countries. The incidence of IIH in several Middle East countries has been estimated at 2.02–2.2/100,000 in the general population, which is higher than the Western rate. Obesity is a major risk factor globally and it is associated with an increased risk of severe vision loss due to IIH. There has been an increase in obesity prevalence in the Middle East countries mainly affecting the Gulf Council Countries (GCC), which parallels increased industrial development. This rise may be contributing to the increasing incidence of IIH in these countries. Other risk factors may also be contributing to IIH in Middle East countries and the differences and similarities to Western IIH merit further study. PMID:25859136

  3. Quality of life in idiopathic intracranial hypertension at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Galetta, Kristin M.; Balcer, Laura J.; Wall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study purpose was to examine vision-specific and overall health-related quality of life (QOL) at baseline in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial patients who were newly diagnosed and had mild visual loss. We also sought to determine the associations between vision-specific QOL scores and visual symptoms, visual function, pain, headache-related disability, and obesity. Methods: We assessed QOL using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 (NEI-VFQ-25), and 10-Item NEI-VFQ-25 Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement. We compared these results with those of previously reported idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) QOL studies. We assessed relationships between QOL and other clinical characteristics. Results: Among 165 participants with IIH (161 women and 4 men with a mean age ± SD of 29.2 ± 7.5 years), vision-specific QOL scores were reduced compared with published values for disease-free controls. Scores of participants were comparable to published results for patients with multiple sclerosis and a history of optic neuritis. A multiple linear regression model for the NEI-VFQ-25 composite score found that perimetric mean deviation in the best eye, visual acuity in the worst eye, visual symptoms, and pain symptoms (headache, neck pain), but not obesity, were independently associated with QOL. Conclusions: IIH affects QOL at time of diagnosis even in patients with mild visual impairment. Vision-specific QOL in patients with newly diagnosed IIH may be as decreased as that for patients with other neuro-ophthalmic disorders. IIH treatment should target visual loss and other symptoms of increased intracranial pressure associated with reduced QOL. Reduced QOL does not simply reflect obesity, an underlying IIH risk factor. PMID:25995055

  4. Intracranial benign fibrous histiocytoma mimicking parasagittal meningioma: report of two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baoshi; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanwei; You, Gan; Wang, Jiangfei; Wang, Junmei; Jiang, Zhongli; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Primary benign fibrous histiocytoma involving the central nervous system is an exceedingly rare tumor with most cases originating from the dura or parenchymal tissue. Diagnosis of primary benign fibrous histiocytoma is difficult due to its confusing histopathological characteristics. Two cases of primary intracranial benign fibrous histiocytoma mimicking parasagittal meningioma are presented in this report. Both tumors were gross totally resected and the patients showed no evidence of recurrence at follow-up of 12 months. The clinical features and prognosis of this rare tumor that were reported previously in the literature were also reviewed. Histopathological examination coupled with immunohistochemical staining is proved to be the convincing diagnostic method for the primary benign fibrous histiocytoma. Surgical resection is the recommendation for the therapy of the tumor. PMID:26617915

  5. Progressive intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion in a fatal case of cerebral aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report a case of cerebral aspergilloma in a 25-year-old immunoincompetent man admitted to a general intensive care unit. Monitoring of intracranial pressure was instigated and revealed hour-long epochs of severe intracranial hypertension, despite a normal opening pressure, with decreases in cerebral perfusion pressure. We documented that this was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion by transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The present case illustrates that severe intracranial hypertension may evolve despite a normal opening pressure; it furthermore shows that continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure may be used to predict changes in cerebral haemodynamics in critically ill patients with neuroinfection. PMID:24907204

  6. Tonsillar Herniation After Lumbar Puncture in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Borire, Adeniyi A; Hughes, Andrew R; Lueck, Christian J

    2015-09-01

    A 30-year-old woman with coexisting renal tubular acidosis and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), treated with acetazolamide, experienced coning (cerebellar tonsillar herniation) after a lumbar puncture (LP). Brain magnetic resonance imaging at initial diagnosis of IIH showed minor tonsillar descent and computed tomographic venography revealed hypoplasia of the left transverse sinus. The patient previously had three uneventful LPs, all of which showed high opening pressures and normal cerebrospinal fluid composition. In retrospect, it was noted that her serum bicarbonate had fallen to 9 mmol/L (normal: 22-28 mm/L) 1 week before the LP. We hypothesize that the combination of cerebral edema (due to worsening metabolic acidosis), poor venous drainage, and preexisting minor tonsillar descent contributed to her post-LP coning. PMID:25786203

  7. Evolving evidence in adult idiopathic intracranial hypertension: pathophysiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Susan P; Ali, Fizzah; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Botfield, Hannah; Friedman, Deborah I; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare but important disease associated with significant morbidity. There is an expected rise in prevalence in line with the escalating global burden of obesity. Modern revisions in the terminology and diagnostic criteria for IIH help guide clinicians in investigations and researchers in standardising recruitment criteria for clinical trials. The pathophysiology of IIH is incompletely characterised; suggested underpinning mechanisms include the role of cerebrospinal fluid regulation as well as metabolic and endocrinological perspectives. Recent treatment trials are providing insights into the management but debate still surrounds key areas in treatment. This review will provide an up-to-date discussion on the potential pathogenic mechanisms and management of IIH. PMID:26888960

  8. [Intracranial hypertension in severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Blanc, P L; Bedock, B; Jay, S; Martin, A; Marc, J M

    1994-11-19

    We observed two cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma and shock. In one case, coma was present at admission and in the second occurred within 15 hours. In both cases, intracranial hypertension was confirmed with an extradural captor. These findings are in agreement with observations of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Clinical data suggest that brain oedema may occur after a latency period but that clinical expression is much more rare, perhaps favoured by treatment (excessive rehydratation, alkalinization, too sharp drop in blood glucose level). In our cases, despite major fluid infusion, shock persisted requiring norepinephrine. This shock could have been the expression of the severe ketoacidosis or have resulted from an underlying infection. In case of sudden onset coma, a regularly encountered manifestation of brain oedema, respiratory assistance and mannitol infusion must be instituted rapidly. With this type of management, it should be possible to improve the severe prognosis of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:7899292

  9. Intracranial idiopathic hypertension: 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, D; Curone, M; Erbetta, A; Farago', G; Bianchi-Marzoli, S; Ciasca, P; Bussone, G; Chiapparini, L

    2014-05-01

    Standard guidelines for ongoing management, as well as definitive data about the long-term course of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are not available. The aim of this study was to compare several clinical and instrumental variables as assessed at the time of diagnosis and then after 1 year in a sample of IIH patients. A total of 21 patients were studied. Our results confirmed that headache and TVO are the most frequent symptoms in IIH patients, and that overweight is a very common feature. A trend towards a favorable outcome in patients followed for 1 year and treated by usual medical therapy was found: intracranial pressure was lower at follow-up; improvement of headache and transient visual obscurations, as well as of papilledema, was reported in most patients. On the other hand, neuroradiological findings (such as empty sella, perioptic subarachnoid space distension, narrowing of the transverse sinuses) were substantially stable at follow. These findings may be relevant for future research as far as understanding the role of different clinical and instrumental findings as diagnostic items as well as predictors of outcome in IIH. PMID:24867861

  10. Intracranial hypertension: A rare presentation of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Praveen; Nair, Anishkumar; Cherian, Ajith; Sibi, N. S.; Kumar, Ashwini

    2010-01-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with bilateral papilledema, growth retardation and absent secondary sexual characters. He had a past history of fever, headache and fatigue of 6 months duration. The diagnosis of intracranial hypertension (IH) was confirmed by an increased intracranial pressure and normal neuroimaging studies of the brain, except for partial empty sella, prominent perioptic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and buckling of optic nerves. Evaluation showed erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 150 mm/hr, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti dsDNA and anti ribosomal P protein. Renal biopsy revealed diffuse segmental proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) class IV S (A) confirming the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Treatment of LN with intravenous pulse methyl prednisolone and cyclophosphamide was effective in normalizing the CSF pressure, resulting in express and dramatic resolution of symptomatology. In a case of IH, SLE must be considered. IH, growth retardation and absence of sexual characters may be presenting manifestations of a chronic systemic inflammatory disease like SLE. These manifestations may act as a pointer to associated advanced grades of LN, which can be totally asymptomatic and missed without a renal biopsy. PMID:21559160

  11. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Polk, J. D.; Tarver, W.; Gibson, C. R.; Sargsyan, A.; Taddeo, T.; Alexander, D.; Otto, C.

    2010-01-01

    What is the risk? Given that astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic astronauts have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts have some degree of increased intracranial pressure (ICP; intracranial hypertension), and that those susceptible (via eye architecture, anatomy, narrow optic disc) have a high likelihood of developing papilledema (optic disc edema, globe flattening), choroidal folds, and/or hyperopic shifts and that the degree of edema may determine long-term or permanent vision impairment or loss. Back to back panels on this topic have been developed to address this emerging risk. The first panel will focus on the 6 clinical cases with emphasis on ophthalmic findings and imaging techniques used pre-, in-, and post-flight. The second panel will discuss the operational mitigation and medical requirements, the potential role of CO2 on ISS, and the research approach being developed. In total these back to back panels will explore what is known about this risk, what has been done immediately to address it, and how an integrated research model is being developed.

  12. Probable Levofloxacin-associated Secondary Intracranial Hypertension in a Child With Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Louvina E; Schaaf, H Simon; Solomons, Regan; Willemse, Marianne; Mohamed, Nabil; Baboolal, Sandika O; Hesseling, Anneke C; van Toorn, Ronald; Garcia-Prats, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Fluoroquinolones are a key component of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment. We describe the first reported case of probable levofloxacin-associated intracranial hypertension in a 6-year-old girl with pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The case highlights the potential risk of secondary intracranial hypertension in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients who require prolonged fluoroquinolone therapy and the need for ophthalmologic screening in children with suggestive signs and symptoms. PMID:26974890

  13. Pseudotumor cerebri: What We Have Learned from the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Rachel V; Johnson, Meredith A J; Krohel, Gregory B; Johnson, Lenworth N

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is an unexplained increase in intracranial pressure associated with permanent severe visual loss in 25% of cases and debilitating headaches. The condition is often associated with obesity. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, a large, randomized, collaborative clinical trial, evaluated the efficacy of acetazolamide with weight loss versus placebo with weight loss in participants. Herein, we describe the major components of the clinical trial and discuss its shortcomings. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-05.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27128512

  14. Intracranial Hypertension in Children: Etiologies, Clinical Features, and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Masri, Amira; Jaafar, Amani; Noman, Rasha; Gharaibeh, Almutez; Ababneh, Osama H

    2015-10-01

    This retrospective study aimed to describe the clinical presentations, possible causes, and outcomes of children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension who presented to the authors' clinic. The mean age at onset of symptoms in the authors' cohort of 19 children was 6 years (range: 7 months to 12 years). Most patients (90%) were under 11 years old and (84.2%) symptomatic. The probable cause was identified in 7/19 (37.0%) patients. The most common cause was vitamin D deficiency (26.3%). Other associated probably coincidental comorbidities included sinusitis (5/19, 26.3%), hypophosphatasia (1/19), Pyle disease (1/19), and measles vaccine (1/19). Apart from 2 patients who required lumboperitoneal shunt, the cerebrospinal fluid pressure returned to normal in all patients within a period of 6 weeks to 1 year (average, 5 months). Of those who followed up with the authors' ophthalmologist, 30.7% developed optic atrophy or pallor; 75% of these patients had previous ocular comorbidities. PMID:25762586

  15. The Pupillary Light Reflex in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason C.; Moss, Heather E.; McAnany, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) on rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflexes (PLRs). Methods Pupillary light reflexes elicited by full-field, brief-flash stimuli were recorded in 13 IIH patients and 13 normal controls. Subjects were dark-adapted for 10 minutes and the PLR was recorded in response to short-wavelength flashes (0.001 cd/m2: rod condition; 450 cd/m2: melanopsin condition). Subjects were then exposed to a rod-suppressing field and 10 cd/m2 long-wavelength flashes were presented (cone condition). Pupillary light reflexes were quantified as the maximum transient constriction (rod and cone conditions) and the post-illumination pupil constriction (melanopsin condition), relative to the baseline pupil size. Diagnostic power was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results The IIH patients had significantly smaller PLRs under the melanopsin (P < 0.001) and rod (P = 0.04) paradigms; a trend for reduced cone-mediated PLRs was also found (P = 0.08). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated areas under the curves (AUC) of 0.83 (melanopsin-meditated; P = 0.001), 0.71 (rod-mediated; P = 0.07), and 0.77 (cone-mediated; P = 0.02). The AUC (0.90, P < 0.001), sensitivity (85%), and specificity (85%) were high for ROC analysis performed on the mean of the rod, cone, and melanopsin PLRs. Conclusions Pupillary light reflex reductions in IIH patients indicate compromised RGC function. PLR measurement, particularly under rod- and melanopsin-mediated conditions, may be a useful adjunct to standard clinical measures of visual function in IIH. PMID:26746015

  16. The Photopic Negative Response in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.; Park, Jason C.; McAnany, J. Jason

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the photopic negative response (PhNR) as an index of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Methods. Amplitude and implicit time of the PhNR, as elicited by full-field, brief-luminance flashes, was measured in IIH (n = 10) and visually normal control (n = 15) subjects. Visual function was assessed in IIH subjects using standard automated perimetry mean deviation (SAP-MD) scores. Optic nerve structure was evaluated using the Frisén papilledema grading scale (FPG). Macula ganglion cell complex volume (GCCV) was extracted from optical coherence tomography images to assess RGC loss. Results. Median PhNR amplitude was significantly lower in IIH subjects compared with control subjects (P = 0.015, Mann-Whitney Rank Sum [MW]), but implicit time was similar (P = 0.54, MW). In IIH subjects, PhNR amplitude and SAP-MD were correlated (Pearson's r = 0.78, P = 0.008). Ganglion cell complex volume was correlated with both SAP-MD (r = 0.72, P = 0.019) and PhNR amplitude (r = 0.77, P = 0.009). Multivariate linear regression models demonstrated that the correlation between GCCV and PhNR amplitude was improved by accounting for FPG in the model (r = 0.94, P < 0.0001), but the correlation between GCCV and SAP-MD was not (r = 0.74, P = 0.009). Conclusions. Photopic negative response amplitude, which can be decreased in IIH subjects, correlates well with a clinical measure of visual function (SAP-MD). In multivariate models, it correlated with both an imaging measure of chronic ganglion cell injury (GCCV) and a clinical measure of acute optic nerve head pathology (FPG). Further studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of PhNR as a marker for diagnosis and monitoring of IIH. PMID:26047172

  17. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, polycystic-ovary syndrome, and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Aregawi, Dawit; Goldenberg, Naila; Golnik, Karl C; Sieve, Luann; Wang, Ping

    2005-02-01

    We studied thrombophilia, hypofibrinolysis, and polycystic-ovary syndrome (PCOS) in 65 women consecutively referred because of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) as a means of better understanding the origin of IIH, with the ultimate goal of developing novel medical therapies for IIH. Our hypothesis: IIH results in part from inadequate drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resulting from thrombotic obstruction to CSF resorption-outflow, favored by thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. We conducted the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and assessed serologic coagulation measures in 65 women (64 of them white) with IIH, PCR in 102 healthy white female controls (72 children, 30 age-matched adults), and serologic measures in the 30 adults. Of the 65 patients, 37 (57%) were found to have PCOS; 16 (43%) were obese (BMI > or = 30 to < 40), and 19 (51%) were extremely obese (BMI > or = 40). Of the 65 women with IIH, 25 (38%) were homozygous for the thrombophilic C677T MTHFR mutation, compared with 14% of controls (14/102) ( P = .0002). Thrombophilic high concentrations of factor VIII (>150%) were present in 9 of 65 (14%) IIH cases, compared with 0 of 30 controls (0%) (Fisher's p [p f ] = .053). An increased concentration of lipoprotein A (> or = 35 mg/dL), associated with hypofibrinolysis, was present in 19 of 65 IIH cases (29%), compared with 3 of 30 controls (10%) (p f = .039). IIH occurred in 18 of 65 IIH patients taking estrogen-progestin contraceptives (28%), in 6 patients taking hormone-replacement therapy (9%), and in 5 pregnant subjects (8%). We speculate that PCOS, associated with obesity and extreme obesity, is a treatable promoter of IIH. We also speculate that if thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis and subsequent thrombosis are associated with reduced CSF resorption in the arachnoid villi of the brain, thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis-often exacerbated by thrombophilic exogenous estrogens, pregnancy, or the paradoxical hyperestrogenemia of PCOS-are treatable

  18. [Advances in application of non-invasive ophthalmologic technologies in idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Xie, Lindan; Zhang, Xuxiang

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a common neuro-ophthalmologic disorder which leads to significant visual impairment. Clinically, visual manifestation secondary to increased intracranial hypertension generally shows papilledema and the progressive visual impairment subsequently. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion. The methods include lumber puncture (LP), laboratory tests and imaging examination. However, those methods do limit in evaluation and follow-up in IIH. Currently, with the development of diagnostic technology in ophthalmology, Optical Coherence Tomography and B-scan ultrasound have been employed to estimate intracranial hypertension not only in early diagnosis, but also in long-term follow-up examination. The goal of this review is to sumarize the value of various ophthalmologic methods in evaluation and management of IIH. PMID:26696582

  19. Visual Outcome and Recurrence Rate in Children With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Sarit; Shahar, Eli; Schif, Aharon; Yehudian, Shawn

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the visual outcome and recurrence rate of idiopathic intracranial hypertension in children. The study included 68 patients who were diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension according to the modified Dandy criteria. Permanent visual impairment was rare. Three percent remained with mild visual impairment, 4% with minimal visual field defects, and only 1 patient had severe visual impairment. However, 26% had either a prolonged course of disease or a recurring condition. Higher cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure was the only clinical predictor at presentation (P = .04). Recurrence rate was 18%, and in most cases, the second episode occurred during the first year after remission. There was no significant difference between the group of patients with only 1 episode and the group of patients with more than 1 episode. We suggest long-term follow-up after remission, for at least a year, for all children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. PMID:25713004

  20. A practical approach to, diagnosis, assessment and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Susan P; Markey, Keira A; Benzimra, James D; Jacks, Andrew; Matthews, Tim D; Burdon, Michael A; Sinclair, Alex J

    2014-01-01

    Adult patients who present with papilloedema and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure need urgent multidisciplinary assessment including neuroimaging, to exclude life-threatening causes. Where there is no apparent underlying cause for the raised intracranial pressure, patients are considered to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The incidence of IIH is increasing in line with the global epidemic of obesity. There are controversial issues in its diagnosis and management. This paper gives a practical approach to assessing patients with papilloedema, its investigation and the subsequent management of patients with IIH. PMID:24809339

  1. Over-the-counter self-medication leading to intracranial hypertension in a young lady.

    PubMed

    Ramana Reddy, A M; Prashanth, L K; Sharat Kumar, G G; Chandana, G; Jadav, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Intracranial hypertension (idiopathic-IIH and secondary) is a potentially treatable condition. Although various factors such as female gender and obesity, certain drugs have been implicated as risk factors for IIH, there remains a lack of clarity in the exact causal-effect relationship. In India, self-medication by obtaining drugs over the counter due to lack of adequate drug regulation and ignorance of the public is a very common practice with a potential for severe adverse effects. We present a case of a young lady who has developed intracranial hypertension possibly due to self-medication with steroids and cyproheptadine, obtained over the counter. PMID:25288841

  2. Bibrachial amyotrophy and ventral spinal cyst associated with myelomalacia and intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Child, N; McGuinness, B; Kilfoyle, D

    2014-03-01

    It has been recently recognised that patients with ventral intraspinal fluid collections secondary to cerebrospinal fluid leaks can present with bibrachial amyotrophy or mimic Hirayama disease. Here we present two further patients that expand the clinical spectrum of this disorder to include association with myelomalacia and intracranial hypertension. PMID:24100111

  3. Pediatric and adult vision restoration after optic nerve sheath decompression for idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Thomas A; Meeker, Austin R; Sismanis, Dimitrios N; Carruth, Bryant P

    2016-06-01

    To compare presentations of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and efficacy of optic nerve sheath decompression between adult and pediatric patients, a retrospective cohort study was completed All idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients undergoing optic nerve sheath decompression by one surgeon between 1991 and 2012 were included. Pre-operative and post-operative visual fields, visual acuity, color vision, and optic nerve appearance were compared between adult and pediatric (<18 years) populations. Outcome measures included percentage of patients with complications or requiring subsequent interventions. Thirty-one adults (46 eyes) and eleven pediatric patients (18 eyes) underwent optic nerve sheath decompression for vision loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Mean deviation on visual field, visual acuity, color vision, and optic nerve appearance significantly improved across all subjects. Pre-operative mean deviation was significantly worse in children compared to adults (p=0.043); there was no difference in mean deviation post-operatively (p=0.838). Significantly more pediatric eyes (6) presented with light perception only or no light perception than adult eyes (0) (p=0.001). Pre-operative color vision performance in children (19%) was significantly worse than in adults (46%) (p=0.026). Percentage of patients with complications or requiring subsequent interventions did not differ between groups. The consistent improvement after surgery and low rate of complications suggest optic nerve sheath decompression is safe and effective in managing vision loss due to adult and pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Given the advanced pre-operative visual deficits seen in children, one might consider a higher index of suspicion in diagnosing, and earlier surgical intervention in treating pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension. PMID:27163674

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Lumboperitoneal Shunt for Fulminant Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Chandra, Ronil V; Gutman, Matthew; Ligtermoet, Matthew; Seneviratne, Udaya; Kempster, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with severe visual loss from fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Her lumbar puncture opening pressure was 97 cm H2O. Soon after lumboperitoneal shunt surgery, she had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frontal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and neuroimaging findings consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We hypothesize that an abrupt drop in intracranial pressure after lumboperitoneal shunting led to maladjustment of cerebral vascular autoregulation, which caused SAH and PRES. PMID:26919070

  5. Endovascular Interventions for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and Venous Tinnitus: New Horizons.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ferdinand K; Abruzzo, Todd; Ansari, Sameer A

    2016-05-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus from intracranial venous abnormalities is an uncommon cause of pulse synchronous tinnitus. Endovascular therapies may have applications in many of these disease conditions. They have the advantage of being minimally invasive and may selectively eliminate the site of turbulence. Venous stenting has been used successfully to treat venous stenoses with low complication rates and high success rates in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension though randomized controlled data are lacking. Careful exclusion of other causes of tinnitus should be performed before consideration for surgical or endovascular treatment of presumed causative lesions of venous tinnitus. PMID:27154610

  6. [Characteristic neurological features, differential diagnostic criteria and medicinal treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Willenborg, K-D; Nacimiento, W

    2015-10-01

    Persistent headache and loss of visual acuity combined with papilledema are the predominant symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The clinical signs are not different from those seen in other diseases with elevated intracranial pressure. To differentiate primary and secondary forms of increased intracranial pressure neuroimaging procedures and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are absolutely essential according to national and international guidelines. Lumbar puncture reveals an elevated opening pressure in cases of IIH as the only pathological finding. Treatment options are serial lumbar punctures combined with body weight reduction as well as medication with carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as acetazolamide and topiramate or diuretic therapy with furosemide. In some patients surgical options, e.g. optic nerve sheath fenestration, CSF shunting procedures including ventriculoperitoneal and lumboperitoneal shunt systems and bariatric surgery also have to be considered. In recent years modern neuroradiological procedures have also been applied (e.g. venous stenting in cases of sinus obstruction) in some centers. PMID:26377103

  7. CO2 Effects in Space: Relationship to Intracranial Hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 on Earth and in space. The effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 are experienced in almost all bodily systems. In space some of the effects are heightened due to the fluid shifts to the thorax and head. This fluid shift results in increased intracranial pressure, congested cerebral circulation, increased Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) and Intravenous dilatation. The mechanism of the effect of CO2 on CBF is diagrammed, as is the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) production. A listing of Neuroendocrine targets is included.

  8. [Efficiency of high-volume hemofiltration in patients with severe sepsis and intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Musaeva, T S; Berdnikov, A P; Goncharenko, S I; Denisova, E A

    2014-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study in 68 patients (144 procedures) with severe sepsis and intracranial hypertension measured by the pressure in the central retinal vein. The patients underwent high-volume hemofiltration (HV-HF) for extrarenal indications. Increased pressure in the central retinal vein was accompanied by critical points of cerebral perfusion pressure and the growth of neurological deficit with inhibition level of consciousness to coma 1. In this case, IHV-HF may be associated with the formation of the critical points of cerebral perfihsion and severe disorders of microcirculation and the lack of resolution of tissue hypoperfusion. In case of intracranial hypertension IHV-HF is not effective in the category of patients where there is a combination ΔpCO2 > 5.9 mm Hg level and GCS <10 points. PMID:25831703

  9. The diagnosis and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and the associated headache

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Yri, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a challenging disorder with a rapid increasing incidence due to a close relation to obesity. The onset of symptoms is often insidious and patients may see many different specialists before the IIH diagnosis is settled. A summary of diagnosis, symptoms, headache characteristics and course, as well as existing evidence of treatment strategies is presented and strategies for investigations and management are proposed. PMID:27366239

  10. REOPERATION FOR INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN TWIST1 CONFIRMED SAETHRE-CHOTZEN SYNDROME: A 15 YEAR REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Roger H; Ul-Haq, Ehtesham; Wilkie, Andrew OM; Jayamohan, Jayaratnam; Richards, Peter G; Johnson, David; Lester, Tracy; Wall, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Background Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) is a syndromic craniosynostosis defined by a genetic mutation affecting the TWIST1 gene on chromosome 7p21. SCS is typically associated with uni- or bi-coronal synostosis, eyelid ptosis, dysmorphic external ears and other variable facial and limb abnormalities. Surgical management of the craniosynostosis addresses the calvarial deformity and may relieve or reduce risk of intracranial hypertension. The aim of this study was to assess surgical intervention, with particular consideration of reoperation rate for intracranial hypertension, in SCS patients. Method A retrospective casenote analysis was performed on all patients with a confirmed TWIST1 gene abnormality, who attended the Oxford Craniofacial Unit over a 15-year period. Each patient’s mutation and clinical features were recorded. Surgical intervention and sequelae were examined in greater detail. Results Thirty-four patients with genetically confirmed SCS were identified. All had craniosynostosis (bicoronal 76%, unicoronal 18%, bicoronal and sagittal 6%), and the majority had eyelid ptosis, low frontal hairline and external ear anomalies. Thirty-one cases had received surgical intervention. Nine of 26 patients (35%) with minimum 12 month follow-up after primary intervention, and 8 of 19 patients (42%) with minimum 5 year follow-up, developed intracranial hypertension necessitating secondary calvarial surgery. Conclusions Despite standard surgical intervention, patients with SCS have a high rate (35 - 42%) of recurrent intracranial hypertension necessitating further surgical expansion. All patients with either bicoronal synostosis or unicoronal synostosis with syndromic features, should be screened for TWIST1 mutations as this confers a greater risk than non-syndromic synostosis of the same sutures. Regular follow-up of SCS patients throughout the childhood years is essential. PMID:19483581

  11. Cortical astrogliosis and increased perivascular aquaporin-4 in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eide, Per Kristian; Eidsvaag, Vigdis Andersen; Nagelhus, Erlend A; Hansson, Hans-Arne

    2016-08-01

    The syndrome idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) includes symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and impaired vision, usually in overweight persons. The pathogenesis is unknown. In the present prospective observational study, we characterized the histopathological changes in biopsies from the frontal brain cortical parenchyma obtained from 18 IIH patients. Reference specimens were sampled from 13 patients who underwent brain surgery for epilepsy, tumors or acute vascular diseases. Overnight ICP monitoring revealed abnormal intracranial pressure wave amplitudes in 14/18 IIH patients, who underwent shunt surgery and all responded favorably. A remarkable histopathological observation in IIH patients was patchy astrogliosis defined as clusters of hypertrophic astrocytes enclosing a nest of nerve cells. Distinct astrocyte domains (i.e. no overlap between astrocyte processes) were lacking in most IIH biopsy specimens, in contrast to their prevalence in reference specimens. Evidence of astrogliosis in IIH was accompanied with significantly increased aquaporin-4 (AQP4) immunoreactivity over perivascular astrocytic endfeet, compared to the reference specimens, measured with densitometry. Scattered CD68 immunoreactive cells (activated microglia and macrophages) were recognized, indicative of some inflammation. No apoptotic cells were demonstrable. We conclude that the patchy astrogliosis is a major finding in patients with IIH. We propose that the astrogliosis impairs intracranial pressure-volume reserve capacity, i.e. intracranial compliance, and contributes to the IIH by restricting the outflow of fluid from the cranium. The increased perivascular AQP4 in IIH may represent a compensatory mechanism to enhance brain fluid drainage. PMID:27188961

  12. Space Flight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Ophthalmic Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Charles Robert; Mader, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although physiologic and pathologic changes associated with microgravity exposure have been studied extensively, the effect of this environment on the eye is largely unknown. Over the last several years, NASA s Space Medicine Division has documented astronauts presenting with varying degrees of disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, and hyperopic shifts after long-duration space flight. Methods: Before and after long-duration space flight, six astronauts underwent complete eye examinations to include cycloplegic and/or manifest refraction and fundus photography. Five of these astronauts had Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) performed following their missions. Results: Following exposure to space flight of approximately 6-months duration, six astronauts had neuro-ophthalmic findings. These consisted of disc edema in four astronauts, globe flattening in four astronauts, choroidal folds in four astronauts, cotton wool spots in three astronauts, nerve fiber layer thickening by OCT in five astronauts, and decreased near vision in five astronauts. Four of the astronauts with near vision complaints had a hyperopic shift equal to or greater than + 0.50D between pre- and post-mission spherical equivalent refraction in one or both eyes (range +0.50D to +1.50D). These same four had globe flattening by MRI. Conclusions: The findings we describe may have resulted from a rise in intracranial pressure caused by microgravity fluid shifts, and could represent parts of a spectrum of ocular and cerebral responses to extended microgravity.

  13. Cerebral blood flow autoregulation during intracranial hypertension in hypoxic lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.O.; Backofen, J.E.; Koehler, R.C.; Jones, M.D. Jr.; Traystman, R.J. )

    1987-12-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that hypoxic hypoxia interferes with cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation when intracranial pressure (ICP) is elevated in pentobarbital-anesthetized lambs (3 to 9 days old). Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was lowered stepwise from 73 to 23 mmHg in eight normoxic lambs and from 65 to 31 mmHg in eight other hypoxic lambs by ventricular infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid. In normoxic lambs, CBF measured by microspheres labeled with six different radioisotopes was not significantly changed over this range of CPP. In animals made hypoxic, base-line CBF was twice that of normoxic lambs. CBF was unchanged as CPP was reduced to 31 mmHg. Lower levels of CPP were not attained because a pressor response occurred with further elevations of ICP. No regional decrements in blood flow to cortical arterial watershed areas or to more caudal regions, such as cerebellum, brain stem, or thalamus, were detected with elevated ICP. Cerebral O{sub 2} uptake was similar in both groups and did not decrease when CPP was reduced. These results demonstrate that normoxic lambs have a considerable capacity for effective autoregulation of CBF when ICP is elevated. Moreover, cerebral vasodilation in response to a level of hypoxia approximating that normally seen prenatally does not abolish CBF autoregulation when ICP is elevated during the first postnatal week.

  14. Cisternostomy for Management of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury; Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh; Rezaee, Elahe; Hakiminejad, Hasanali; Tavakoli, Maryam; Sadeghpoor, Tayebe

    2016-01-01

    Main goal in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is control of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy is an accepted technique for control of refractory intracranial hypertension in patients with severe TBI. Because of high complication rate after decompressive craniectomy, new techniques such as basal cisternostomy have developed. We herein report a case of severe TBI in a 13-year-old boy treated by cisternostomy. The patient was admitted following a motor vehicle accident. Brain CT scan showed diffuse brain edema, left frontal contusion and posterior interhemispheric subdural hematoma. The patient underwent ICP monitoring. Subsequently, with 26 mmHg mean-value of ICP, he was treated surgically by cisternostomy technique. A progressive improvement of the neurological conditions in the following hours. After 5 days the boy was discharged and in the 3-months follow-up he was completely recovered. Cisternostomy could be an appropriate alternative to decompressive craniectomy for management of intracranial hypertension in patietns with sever TBI. PMID:27540551

  15. [Progressive Intracranial Hypertension due to Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis Following Mild Head Trauma: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Suto, Yuta; Maruya, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mild head trauma without skull fracture or intracranial hematoma is exceptionally rare. We describe an unusual case of progressive intracranial hypertension due to superior sagittal sinus thrombosis following mild head trauma. A 17-year-old boy presented with nape pain a day after a head blow during a gymnastics competition (backward double somersault). On admission, he showed no neurological deficit. CT scans revealed no skull fractures, and there were no abnormalities in the brain parenchyma. However, his headache worsened day-by-day and he had begun to vomit. Lumbar puncture was performed on Day 6, and the opening pressure was 40 cm of water. After tapping 20 mL, he felt better and the headache diminished for a few hours. MR venography performed on Day 8 revealed severe flow disturbance in the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus with multiple venous collaterals. Because of the beneficial effects of lumbar puncture, we decided to manage his symptoms of intracranial hypertension conservatively with repeated lumbar puncture and administration of glycerol. After 7 days of conservative treatment, his symptoms resolved completely, and he was discharged from the hospital. Follow-up MR venography performed on Day 55 showed complete recanalization of the superior sagittal sinus. The exact mechanism of sinus thrombosis in this case is not clear, but we speculate that endothelial damage caused by shearing stress because of strong rotational acceleration or direct impact to the superior sagittal sinus wall may have initiated thrombus formation. PMID:26136327

  16. Cisternostomy for Management of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury; Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh; Rezaee, Elahe; Hakiminejad, Hasanali; Tavakoli, Maryam; Sadeghpoor, Tayebe

    2016-07-01

    Main goal in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is control of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy is an accepted technique for control of refractory intracranial hypertension in patients with severe TBI. Because of high complication rate after decompressive craniectomy, new techniques such as basal cisternostomy have developed. We herein report a case of severe TBI in a 13-year-old boy treated by cisternostomy. The patient was admitted following a motor vehicle accident. Brain CT scan showed diffuse brain edema, left frontal contusion and posterior interhemispheric subdural hematoma. The patient underwent ICP monitoring. Subsequently, with 26 mmHg mean-value of ICP, he was treated surgically by cisternostomy technique. A progressive improvement of the neurological conditions in the following hours. After 5 days the boy was discharged and in the 3-months follow-up he was completely recovered. Cisternostomy could be an appropriate alternative to decompressive craniectomy for management of intracranial hypertension in patietns with sever TBI. PMID:27540551

  17. Modeling of the acute effects of primary hypertension and hypotension on the hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Coley, Stuart C; Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Frangi, Alejandro F; Marzo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamics is a risk factor in intracranial aneurysms (IA). Hypertension and pharmacologically induced hypotension are common in IA patients. This study investigates how hypertension and hypotension may influence aneurysmal hemodynamics. Images of 23 IAs at typical locations were used to build patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics models. The effects of hypotension and hypertension were simulated through boundary conditions by modulating the normotensive flow and pressure waveforms, in turn produced by a 1D systemic vascular model. Aneurysm location and flow pattern types were used to categorize the influence of hypotension and hypertension on relevant flow variables (velocity, pressure and wall shear stress). Results indicate that, compared to other locations, vertebrobasilar aneurysms (VBA) are more sensitive to flow changes. In VBAs, space-averaged velocity at peak systole increased by 30% in hypertension (16-21% in other locations). Flow in VBAs in hypotension decreased by 20% (10-13% in other locations). Momentum-driven hemodynamic types were also more affected by hypotension and hypertension, than shear-driven types. This study shows how patient-specific modeling can be effectively used to identify location-specific flow patterns in a clinically-relevant study, thus reinforcing the role played by modeling technologies in furthering our understanding of cardiovascular disease, and their potential in future healthcare. PMID:25118666

  18. The translaminar pressure gradient in sustained zero gravity, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, John P; Yu, Dao Yi; Morgan, William H

    2012-12-01

    Papilledema has long been associated with elevated intracranial pressure. Classically, tumors, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and obstructive hydrocephalus have led to an increase in intracranial pressure causing optic nerve head edema and observable optic nerve swelling. Recent reports describe astronauts returning from prolonged space flight on the International Space Station with papilledema (Mader et al., 2011) [1]. Papilledema has not been observed in shorter duration space flight. Other recent work has shown that the difference in intraocular pressure (IOP) and cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFp) may be very important in the pathogenesis of diseases of the optic nerve, especially glaucoma (Berdahl and Allingham, 2009; Berdahl, Allingham, et al., 2008; Berdahl et al., 2008; Ren et al., 2009; Ren et al., 2011) [2-6]. The difference in IOP and CSFp across the lamina cribrosa is known as the translaminar pressure difference (TLPD). We hypothesize that in zero gravity, CSF no longer pools in the caudal spinal column as it does in the upright position on earth. Instead, CSF diffuses throughout the subarachnoid space resulting in a moderate but persistently elevated cranial CSF pressure, including the region just posterior to the lamina cribrosa known as the optic nerve subarachnoid space (ONSAS). This small but chronically elevated CSFp could lead to papilledema when CSFp is greater than the IOP. If the TLPD is the cause of optic nerve head edema in astronauts subjected to prolonged zero gravity, raising IOP and/or orbital pressure may treat this condition and protect astronauts in future space travels from the effect of zero gravity on the optic nerve head. Additionally, the same TLPD concept may offer a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment options of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), glaucoma and other diseases of the optic nerve head. PMID:22981592

  19. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in a Prepubertal Pediatric Japanese Patient Complicated by Severe Papilledema

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Akiko; Ikesugi, Kengo; Kondo, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a rare case of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in a prepubertal pediatric patient. Case Report The patient was an 11-year-old Japanese boy. Initially, an ophthalmologist found severe papilledema, and the patient was diagnosed with IIH. He was unresponsive to conservative therapy, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted in the Neurosurgery Department because the visual impairment was severe. Twelve months after the shunt, the improvement in vision was limited due to optic disc atrophy. Conclusion Ophthalmologists need to be more aware of II, especially in cases with severe papilledema that can lead to permanent reduction of vision. PMID:27065853

  20. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marc E.; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G.; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  1. Severe visual loss associated with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zamecki, Katherine J; Frohman, Larry P; Turbin, Roger E

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in pregnancy is often responsive to conservative management and usually carries a favorable prognosis. Pregnant patients may be managed with dietary control, corticosteroid therapy, diuretics, and occasionally serial lumbar puncture. We report an unusual case of permanent visual loss due to IIH in pregnancy, requiring aggressive CSF diversion and bilateral optic nerve sheath fenestration after failure to improve with a brief course of medical management and a lumbar puncture. Despite resolution of the papilledema, the subject’s acuity improved only to 20/40 in the right eye and remained no light perception in the left eye. PMID:19668497

  2. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  3. Assessment and management of cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Vahid

    2013-10-01

    Acute liver failure is uncommon but not a rare complication of liver injury. It can happen after ingestion of acetaminophen and exposure to toxins and hepatitis viruses. The defining clinical symptoms are coagulopathy and encephalopathy occurring within days or weeks of the primary insult in patients without preexisting liver injury. Acute liver failure is often complicated by multiorgan failure and sepsis. The most life-threatening complications are sepsis, multiorgan failure, and brain edema. The clinical signs of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) are nonspecific except for neurologic deficits in impending brain stem herniation. Computed tomography of the brain is not sensitive enough in gauging intracranial hypertension or ruling out brain edema. Intracranial pressure monitoring, transcranial Doppler, and jugular venous oximetry provide valuable information for monitoring ICP and guiding therapeutic measures in patients with encephalopathy grade III or IV. Osmotic therapy using hypertonic saline and mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and propofol sedation are shown to improve ICPs and stabilize the patient for liver transplantation. In this article, diagnosis and management of hepatic encephalopathy and cerebral edema in patients with acute liver failure are reviewed. PMID:23683564

  4. Multiple hemorrhagic intraparenchymal tumors presenting with fatal intracranial hypertension: A rare manifestation of systemic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Tsukasa; Oya, Soichi; Mori, Harushi; Matsui, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epithelioid hemangioendotheliomas (EHE) is an extremely rare tumor that can arise not only intracranially but also systemically. Its radiological characteristics and the mechanism underlying the multiple organ involvement in EHE are poorly understood. Case Description: A 24-year-old woman with a 7-month history of coughing and blood-stained sputum complained of visual disturbance in the right eye that had persisted for 1-month. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed multiple intraparenchymal masses with low-intensity on MR susceptibility-weighted images with minimal enhancement with gadolinium. Systemic computed tomography revealed multiple nodules in both lungs and the liver. Because her neurological status rapidly deteriorated, brain biopsy of the right frontal mass was performed. The pathological diagnosis was EHE. Over the following 3 months, the patient gradually developed disturbance of consciousness. She died at 4 months after admission because of significant intracranial hypertension. Conclusion: Although intracranial EHEs are extremely rare, they should be included in the differential diagnoses of multiple small-sized masses with low-intensity on MR susceptibility-weighted images. We also emphasize that the systemic involvement of this tumor was more compatible with multicentric development than metastasis. PMID:26539307

  5. Venous sinus stenting is a valuable treatment for fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Rory Goodwin, C; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Radvany, Martin G; Gailloud, Philippe; Moghekar, Abhay; Subramanian, Prem S; Miller, Neil R; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Over the past 10 years, transverse sinus stenting has grown in popularity as a treatment for idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Although promising results have been demonstrated in several reported series, the vast majority of patients in these series have been treated on an elective basis rather than in the setting of fulminant disease with acute visual deterioration. We identified four patients who presented with severe acute vision loss between 2008 and 2012 who were treated with urgent transverse sinus stenting with temporary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion with lumbar puncture or lumbar drain as a bridge to therapy. All patients presented with headache, and this was stable or had improved at last follow-up. Three patients had improvement in some or all visual parameters following stenting, whereas one patient who presented with severe acute vision loss and optic disc pallor progressed to blindness despite successful stenting. We hypothesize that she presented too late in the course of the disease for improvement to occur. Although the management of fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension remains challenging, we believe that transverse sinus stenting, in conjunction with temporary CSF diversion, represents a viable treatment option in the acute and appropriate setting. PMID:25579238

  6. NASA's Spaceflight Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension Research Plan: An accelerated Research Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, Christian; Fogarty, J.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J.

    2010-01-01

    To date six long duration astronauts have experienced in flight visual changes and post flight signs of optic disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, hyperoptic shifts and or raised intracranial pressure. In some cases the changes were transient while in others they are persistent with varying degrees of visual impairment. Given that all astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts develop in-flight idiopathic intracranial hypertension to some degree. Those who are susceptible, have an increased likelihood of developing treatment resistant papilledema resulting in visual impairment and possible long-term vision loss. Such an acquired disability would have a profound mission impact and would be detrimental to the long term health of the astronaut. The visual impairment and increased intracranial pressure phenomenon appears to have multiple contributing factors. Consequently, the working "physiological fault bush" with elevated intracranial pressure at its center, is divided into ocular effects, and CNS and other effects. Some of these variables have been documented and or measured through operational data gathering, while others are unknown, undocumented and or hypothetical. Both the complexity of the problem and the urgency to find a solution require that a unique, non-traditional research model be employed such as the Accelerated Research Collaboration(TM) (ARC) model that has been pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. In the ARC model a single entity facilitates and manages all aspects of the basic, translational, and clinical research, providing expert oversight for both scientific and managerial efforts. The result is a comprehensive research plan executed by a multidisciplinary team and the elimination of stove-piped research. The ARC model emphasizes efficient and effective

  7. Lyme disease-related intracranial hypertension in children: clinical and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Obeid, Rawad; Zuccoli, Giulio; Cleves-Bayon, Catalina; Nowalk, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a tick-borne infection that is endemic to multiple areas of the United States. Patients with LD may present with sign and symptoms of intracranial hypertension (IH). The objective of this study is to evaluate the history, clinical findings, CSF analysis, and brain imaging results in pediatric patients with increased intracranial pressure secondary to LD. A retrospective database search was performed using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 9/10 codes to identify patients diagnosed with LD and IH between 2004 and 2014 at a tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging data for each patient were reviewed. Seven patients met inclusion criteria; mean age was 9.6 years (standard deviation 4.0 years); 4/7 patients were male. Average body mass index was 18.8 kg/m(2) (standard deviation 3.0 kg/m(2)). Fever was present in four patients. Four had a history of LD related erythema migrans. All had elevated CSF opening pressure with leukocytosis and lymphocytic predominance. MRI obtained in six patients showed contrast enhancement of various cranial nerves. Tentorial enhancement was noted in all patients. In addition, patients had widening of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve protrusion, and flattening of the posterior globe consistent with increased intracranial pressure. All patients had resolution of their symptoms after initiation of antibiotic therapy. In endemic areas, LD should be included in the differential of IH. MRI can help distinguish IH due to LD from its idiopathic form due to the presence of tentorial and cranial nerve enhancement in the former in addition to abnormal CSF showing leukocytosis with lymphocyte predominance. PMID:26739381

  8. [Treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension by endovascular improvement of venous drainage of the brain].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pérez, M; Henkes, H

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of any known causative factor. Most patients with IIH respond to weight reduction, repeated lumbar punctures and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as acetazolamide and topiramate to reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production. Despite a number of pathogenetic theories, the cause of IIH remains unknown. With the availability of magnetic resonance (MR) venography and cerebral angiography, venous disease is increasingly being discussed as the etiology of IIH, with a high proportion of patients presenting with nonthrombotic unilateral or bilateral dural venous sinus stenoses. Based on this observation, endovascular stenting of stenotic dural sinuses in patients with IIH has gained popularity. Whether dural venous sinus stenoses are the cause or the consequence of increased ICP is still under debate. In patients with failure of conservative treatment or non-compliance, a more aggressive treatment, such as CSF shunting or surgical optic nerve fenestration, should be performed. For approximately 13 years endovascular stenting of the stenotic sinuses has been used and discussed as an alternative and effective treatment of IIH. Since the first report in 2002, individual cases and case series have been published demonstrating that stents immediately lower the venous pressure gradient, which is associated with clinical improvement. This effect occurs within days or weeks and is permanent in many cases. PMID:26400795

  9. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekharan, Chandrasekharan; Renjith, Sanu Watson; Marzook, Ali; Parvathy, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of headache with episodes of transient blurring of vision, and intermittent fever for 4 weeks. On examination she was conscious and febrile, with multiple annular purpuric skin lesions present over the face and back. Neurological examination revealed a bilaterally extensor plantar response, with bilateral papilloedema. Lumbar puncture yielded clear spinal fluid with a very high opening pressure with a normal biochemistry and cytology. Neuroimaging showed evidence of raised intracranial tension. She was provisionally diagnosed to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and started on anticerebral oedema measures. Despite medication, she continued to be symptomatic. On the sixth day of admission, her antinuclear antibody and antidouble-stranded DNA registered positively in high titres. She was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with IIH and was started on corticosteroids, with dramatic recovery of her symptoms and clinical signs. Reports of SLE, the maiden presentation of which is IIH, are rare in the literature. PMID:23376664

  10. Intracranial hypertension as the primary symptom of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiali; Xu, Lingjia; Yin, Xinzhen; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intracranial hypertension (IH) is a neurological disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure. It is a poorly understood syndrome that most commonly manifests nonspecific symptoms such as stroke-like headache, vision changes, nausea, vomiting, and papilledema. IH has been reported in young cancer patients but never in association with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma. Methods: Here, we discuss the case of an 18-year-old girl with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma in which IH was the primary symptom accompanied by the even rarer symptom of cutaneous metastases. We also present a review of the relevant literature. The patient experienced frequent headaches, vomiting, and blurred vision but showed no abnormal findings on cranial imaging studies. Further examination showed multiple skin nodules on the abdomen. Then pathological and immunohistochemical examination of gastroscopic specimens and the biopsied subcutaneous nodules were done. Results: Pathological and immunohistochemical examination of gastroscopic specimens and the biopsied subcutaneous nodules confirmed gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma with skin metastases. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma primarily presenting IH and accompanied by subcutaneous metastases. This case emphasizes the importance of excluding malignancy from the differential diagnosis of IH. PMID:27583897

  11. Brain Slump Caused by Jugular Venous Stenoses Treated by Stenting: A Hypothesis to Link Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicholas; Trivedi, Rikin; Greenwood, Richard; Pickard, John

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension, of which brain slump is an extreme expression, is caused by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The reason the leak develops in the first place, however, is unknown, and some cases can be very difficult to manage. We describe a patient with severe symptoms of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and brain slump documented by magnetic resonance imaging whose clinical syndrome and structural brain anomaly resolved completely after treatment directed exclusively at improving cranial venous outflow. Diagnostics included computed tomography (CT) venography, catheter venography, and jugular venoplasty. CT venography showed narrowing of both internal jugular veins below the skull base. Catheter venography confirmed that these were associated with pressure gradients. Jugular venoplasty performed on two separate occasions as a clinical test gave temporary respite. Lasting remission (2 years of follow-up) was achieved by stenting the dominant internal jugular vein. These findings and this outcome suggest a mechanism for the development of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that would link it to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and have cranial venous outflow obstruction as the underlying cause. PMID:26251803

  12. Brain Slump Caused by Jugular Venous Stenoses Treated by Stenting: A Hypothesis to Link Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Nicholas; Trivedi, Rikin; Greenwood, Richard; Pickard, John

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension, of which brain slump is an extreme expression, is caused by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The reason the leak develops in the first place, however, is unknown, and some cases can be very difficult to manage. We describe a patient with severe symptoms of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and brain slump documented by magnetic resonance imaging whose clinical syndrome and structural brain anomaly resolved completely after treatment directed exclusively at improving cranial venous outflow. Diagnostics included computed tomography (CT) venography, catheter venography, and jugular venoplasty. CT venography showed narrowing of both internal jugular veins below the skull base. Catheter venography confirmed that these were associated with pressure gradients. Jugular venoplasty performed on two separate occasions as a clinical test gave temporary respite. Lasting remission (2 years of follow-up) was achieved by stenting the dominant internal jugular vein. These findings and this outcome suggest a mechanism for the development of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that would link it to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and have cranial venous outflow obstruction as the underlying cause. PMID:26251803

  13. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

    PubMed Central

    Wibroe, Elisabeth A.; Yri, Hanne M.; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Wibroe, Morten A.; Hamann, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP) of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with IIH. Methods We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred on suspicion of IIH from 2011–2013. Subjects included as patients fulfilled Friedman and Jacobson’s diagnostic criteria for IIH. Individuals in whom intracranial hypertension was refuted were included as controls. Lumbar puncture with ICP measurement was performed at inclusion and repeated for patients after three months of treatment. Osmolality was measured with a Vapor Pressure Osmometer. Results We collected 90 CSF samples from 38 newly diagnosed patients and 28 controls. At baseline 27 IIH-samples and at 3 months follow-up 35 IIH-samples were collected from patients. We found no significant differences in osmolality between 1) patients at baseline and controls (p = 0. 86), 2) patients at baseline and after 3 months treatment (p = 0.97), and 3) patients with normalized pressure after 3 months and their baseline values (p = 0.79). Osmolality in individuals with normal ICP from 6–25 cmH2O (n = 41) did not differ significantly from patients with moderately elevated ICP from 26–45 cmH2O (n = 21) (p = 0.86) and patients with high ICP from 46–70 cmH2O (n = 4) (p = 0.32), respectively. There was no correlation between osmolality and ICP, BMI, age and body height, respectively. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg (± 1 SE, 95% confidence interval 267–272) for both patients and controls. Conclusions CSF osmolality was normal in patients with IIH, and there was no relation to treatment, ICP, BMI, age and body height. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg and constitutes a reference for future studies. Changes in CSF osmolality are not responsible for development of IIH. Other underlying pathophysiological mechanisms must be searched. PMID:26808050

  14. A decreased metabolic clearance rate of aldosterone in benign essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nowaczynski, W.; Kuchel, O.; Genest, J.

    1971-01-01

    Aldosterone secretion rate, metabolic clearance rate, and/or plasma concentration were determined in 16 patients with benign, uncomplicated essential hypertension and compared with those of control subjects. The mean metabolic clearance rate of aldosterone in 10 patients was significantly (P < 0.001) lower (mean 867 liters of plasma/day per m2 ±270 SD) than in a group of 7 healthy subjects (mean 1480 liters/day per m2 ±265 SD). Secretion rates in 13 patients (including the 10 already mentioned) tended to be low (83 ±43 vs. 109 ±54 μg/day) and plasma concentrations tended to be high (13.6 ±4.6 vs. 7.5 ±4.8 ng/100 ml), but neither of these differences was statistically significant. The lower metabolic clearance rate could account for elevated plasma concentrations of aldosterone even when the secretion rate is normal or low. Measurement of secretion rate or urinary excretion only is therefore insufficient to establish the presence and/or mode of evolution of hyperaldosteronism. Failure of the aldosterone secretion to adapt fully to a decreased aldosterone metabolic clearance rate (MCR) could explain the state of relative hyperaldosteronism in patients with benign essential hypertension, even when the secretion rate and the urinary excretion rate are in the normal range. PMID:5116208

  15. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for benign intracranial tumours of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Neda; Seely, Anna; Paul, Eldho; Dally, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We present our experience with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) using 15 fractions to treat benign conditions of the cavernous sinus (CS) and emphasise the outcome in terms of cranial nerve (CN) function and toxicity for long term safety and efficacy. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 112 patients with benign tumours of the CS treated with HSRT between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2009. While all tumours involved the CS, a separate analysis was undertaken for meningiomas and pituitary adenomas. The median follow-up was 77 months (range: 2.3-177). Fifty-seven patients (51%) had a diagnosis of meningioma and 55 (49%) had pituitary adenomas. Prior to HSRT, 82 patients (73%) underwent microsurgery. The median tumour volume was 6.6 cm(3) for meningiomas and 3.4 cm(3) for pituitary adenomas (interquartile range: 2.8-7.9), and the mean prescribed dose was 38 Gy (range: 37.5-40.0) to the tumour margin, delivered in 15 fractions. After HSRT, 57% of all preexisting cranial neuropathies either resolved or improved and 38% remained stable, whereas 5% deteriorated. The diagnosis of meningioma was the only variable associated with recovery of cranial neuropathy (p<0.001). Permanent CN complications occurred in three patients (3%). The 5 and 10 year actuarial freedom from progression for patients with meningiomas was 98% and 93%, respectively, and for patients with pituitary adenomas this was 96% and 96%, respectively. We demonstrate low rates of CN morbidity after HSRT and the possibility of resolution or improvement in CN function for common histologies involving the CS. PMID:26113003

  16. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Sinus Stenosis in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Complications, Neurological Outcomes, and Radiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Wang, Tony; Ding, Dale; Durst, Christopher R.; Crowley, R. Webster; Chalouhi, Nohra; Hasan, David M.; Dumont, Aaron S.; Jabbour, Pascal; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may result in a chronic debilitating disease. Dural venous sinus stenosis with a physiologic venous pressure gradient has been identified as a potential etiology in a number of IIH patients. Intracranial venous stenting has emerged as a potential treatment alternative. Methods. A systematic review was carried out to identify studies employing venous stenting for IIH. Results. From 2002 to 2014, 17 studies comprising 185 patients who underwent 221 stenting procedures were reported. Mean prestent pressure gradient was 20.1 mmHg (95% CI 19.4–20.7 mmHg) with a mean poststent gradient of 4.4 mmHg (95% CI 3.5–5.2 mmHg). Complications occurred in 10 patients (5.4%; 95% CI 4.7–5.4%) but were major in only 3 (1.6%). At a mean clinical follow-up of 22 months, clinical improvement was noted in 130 of 166 patients with headaches (78.3%; 95% CI 75.8–80.8%), 84 of 89 patients with papilledema (94.4%; 95% CI 92.1–96.6%), and 64 of 74 patients with visual symptoms (86.5%; 95% CI 83.0–89.9%). In-stent stenosis was noted in six patients (3.4%; 95% CI 2.5–4.3%) and stent-adjacent stenosis occurred in 19 patients (11.4%; 95% CI 10.4–12.4), resulting in restenting in 10 patients. Conclusion. In IIH patients with venous sinus stenosis and a physiologic pressure gradient, venous stenting appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option. Further studies are necessary to determine the long-term outcomes and the optimal management of medically refractory IIH. PMID:26146651

  17. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid: an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2016-05-01

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors that may play a protective role in glaucoma. β-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to increase by chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in animals with experimentally induced ocular hypertension and to cause retinal ganglion cell death, pointing to similarities in molecular cell death mechanisms between glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have reported that intracranial pressure is higher in patients with ocular hypertension compared with controls, giving rise to the idea that elevated intracranial pressure may provide a protective effect for the optic nerve by decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. The speculation that the higher intracranial pressure reported in ocular hypertension patients may protect against glaucoma mainly through a lower trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference remains at least questionable. Here, we present an alternative viewpoint, according to which the protective effect of higher intracranial pressure could be due, at least in part, to a pressure-independent mechanism, namely faster cerebrospinal fluid production leading to increased cerebrospinal fluid turnover with enhanced removal of potentially neurotoxic waste products that accumulate in the optic nerve. This suggests a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, may be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including β-amyloid. If confirmed, then strategies to improve cerebrospinal fluid flow are reasonable and could provide a new therapeutic approach for stopping the neurotoxic β-amyloid pathway in glaucoma. PMID:26691953

  18. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma: Long-term experience and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie . E-mail: stefanie_milker-zabel@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Zabel, Angelika; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To analyze our long-term experience and prognostic factors after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma. Methods and materials: Between January 1985 and December 2001, 317 patients with a median age of 55.7 years were treated with FSRT for intracranial meningioma. The tumor distribution was World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 1 in 48.3%, WHO Grade 2 in 8.2%, and unknown in 43.5%. Of the 317 patients, 97 underwent RT as their primary treatment, 79 underwent postoperative RT (subtotal resection in 38 and biopsy only in 41), and 141 were treated for recurrent disease. The median target volume was 33.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 1.0-412.6 cm{sup 3}). The median total dose was 57.6 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction five times weekly. Results: The median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 1.2-14.3 years). The overall local tumor control rate was 93.1% (295 of 317). Of the 317 patients, 72 had a partial response on CT/MRI and 223 (70.4%) remained stable. At a median of 4.5 years after FSRT, 22 patients (6.9%) had local tumor progression on MRI. Local tumor failure was significantly greater in patients with WHO Grade 2 meningioma (p < 0.002) than in patients with WHO Grade 1 or unknown histologic features. Patients treated for recurrent meningioma showed a trend toward decreased progression-free survival compared with patients treated with primary therapy, after biopsy, or after subtotal resection (p < 0.06). Patients with a tumor volume >60 cm{sup 3} had a recurrence rate of 15.5% vs. 4.3% for those with a tumor volume of {<=}60 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001). In 42.9% of the patients, preexisting neurologic deficits improved. Worsening of preexisting neurologic symptoms occurred in 8.2%. Eight patients developed new clinical symptoms, such as reduced vision, trigeminal neuralgia, and intermittent tinnitus located at the side of the irradiated meningioma after FSRT. Conclusion: These data have demonstrated that FSRT is an

  19. Refractory nausea and vomiting in the setting of well-controlled idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Dennis L; Rosenbaum, Rachel A; Diaz, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 27-year-old woman with a history of recurrent nausea and vomiting in the setting of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) was admitted for control of unremitting nausea and vomiting. Initial antiemetic therapy included optimisation of IIH therapy by titrating acetazolamide, in addition to using ondansetron and metoclopramide as needed, with minimal relief. She was ultimately treated with palonosetron with complete resolution of her acute nausea. Nausea, often treated with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, approved for perioperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea, are used off-label to treat nausea and vomiting outside of those settings. The efficacy of different regimens has been compared in the literature and continues to remain controversial. When choosing from different 5-HT3 antagonists there are other considerations, in addition to efficacy to consider: dosing schedule, half-life, time of onset, duration and cost-to-benefit ratio, and although one 5-HT3 antagonist may not have been effective, another one may be. In our case palonosetron, with a significantly longer half-life than other 5-HT3 antagonists, was effective in resolving nausea when compared with the more commonly used ondansetron. PMID:24895391

  20. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF. PMID:26928128

  1. Baseline Visual Field Findings in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT)

    PubMed Central

    Keltner, John L.; Johnson, Chris A.; Cello, Kimberly E.; Wall, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize visual field (VF) loss at the baseline visit and to evaluate VF quality control (QC) procedures in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT). Methods. The Visual Field Reading Center (VFRC) evaluated 660 baseline VFs (1320 hemifields) from 165 enrolled patients. Three readers independently classified each superior and inferior hemifield and identified any abnormalities. A subset (20%) of the hemifields was reread to evaluate within- and between-reader agreements. The QC system addressed test parameters, patient data, and shipment errors. Results. The majority (60%) of the baseline hemifields consisted of localized nerve fiber bundle-type VF loss. Approximately one-third (31.5%) of all the classifications consisted of partial arcuate defects combined with an enlarged blind spot, making this the most common type of hemifield classification. Inferior hemifield loss was greater than superior loss for both study and nonstudy eyes. Reader agreements were >90% for both inferior and superior hemifields for two out of three readers. Test–retest reliability agreement for individual readers was 95% for both hemifields. There were few QC errors with only 5.48 error points per 100-point VF. Conclusions. The most common type of IIHTT baseline hemifield abnormality was a localized nerve fiber bundle-like defect. Localized inferior hemifield loss was more common than superior hemifield loss. Quality control and within- and between-reader agreement were excellent for the IIHTT (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639). PMID:24781936

  2. Controversies: Optic nerve sheath fenestration versus shunt placement for the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Spitze, Arielle; Lam, Peter; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) has been increasing in prevalence in the past decade, following the obesity epidemic. When medical treatment fails, surgical treatment options must be considered. However, controversy remains as to which surgical procedure is the preferred surgical option – optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting – for the long-term treatment of this syndrome. Purpose: To provide a clinical update of the pros and cons of ONSF versus shunt placement for the treatment of IIH. Design: This was a retrospective review of the current literature in the English language indexed in PubMed. Methods: The authors conducted a PubMed search using the following terms: Idiopathic IIH, pseudotumor cerebri, ONSF, CSF shunts, vetriculo-peritoneal shunting, and lumbo-peritoneal shunting. The authors included pertinent and significant original articles, review articles, and case reports, which revealed the new aspects and updates in these topics. Results: The treatment of IIH remains controversial and lacks randomized controlled clinical trial data. Treatment of IIH rests with the determination of the severity of IIH-related visual loss and headache. Conclusion: The decision for ONSF versus shunting is somewhat institution and surgeon dependent. ONSF is preferred for patients with visual symptoms whereas shunting is reserved for patients with headache. There are positive and negative aspects of both procedures, and a prospective, randomized, controlled trial is needed (currently underway). This article will hopefully be helpful in allowing the reader to make a more informed decision until that time. PMID:25449938

  3. Photographic Reading Center of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT): Methods and Baseline Results

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, William S.; Wall, Michael; McDermott, Michael P.; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Feldon, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the methods used by the Photographic Reading Center (PRC) of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) and to report baseline assessments of papilledema severity in participants. Methods. Stereoscopic digital images centered on the optic disc and the macula were collected using certified personnel and photographic equipment. Certification of the camera system included standardization and calibration using a model eye. Lay readers assessed disc photos of all eyes using the Frisén grade and performed quantitative measurements of papilledema. Frisén grades by PRC were compared with site investigator clinical grades. Spearman rank correlations were used to quantify associations among disc features and selected clinical variables. Results. Frisén grades according to the PRC and site investigator's grades, matched exactly in 48% of the study eyes and 42% of the fellow eyes and within one grade in 94% of the study eyes and 92% of the fellow eyes. Frisén grade was strongly correlated (r > 0.65, P < 0.0001) with quantitative measures of disc area. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure was weakly associated with Frisén grade and disc area determinations (r ≤ 0.31). Neither Frisén grade nor any fundus feature was associated with perimetric mean deviation. Conclusions. In a prospective clinical trial, lay readers agreed reasonably well with physicians in assessing Frisén grade. Standardization of camera systems enhanced consistency of photographic quality across study sites. Images were affected more by sensors with poor dynamic range than by poor resolution. Frisén grade is highly correlated with quantitative assessment of disc area. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:26024112

  4. Visual Field Outcomes for the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT)

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael; Johnson, Chris A.; Cello, Kimberly E.; Zamba, K. D.; McDermott, Michael P.; Keltner, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) showed that acetazolamide provided a modest, significant improvement in mean deviation (MD). Here, we further analyze visual field changes over the 6-month study period. Methods Of 165 subjects with mild visual loss in the IIHTT, 125 had perimetry at baseline and 6 months. We evaluated pointwise linear regression of visual sensitivity versus time to classify test locations in the worst MD (study) eye as improving or not; pointwise changes from baseline to month 6 in decibels; and clinical consensus of change from baseline to 6 months. Results The average study eye had 36 of 52 test locations with improving sensitivity over 6 months using pointwise linear regression, but differences between the acetazolamide and placebo groups were not significant. Pointwise results mostly improved in both treatment groups with the magnitude of the mean change within groups greatest and statistically significant around the blind spot and the nasal area, especially in the acetazolamide group. The consensus classification of visual field change from baseline to 6 months in the study eye yielded percentages (acetazolamide, placebo) of 7.2% and 17.5% worse, 35.1% and 31.7% with no change, and 56.1% and 50.8% improved; group differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions In the IIHTT, compared to the placebo group, the acetazolamide group had a significant pointwise improvement in visual field function, particularly in the nasal and pericecal areas; the latter is likely due to reduction in blind spot size related to improvement in papilledema. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:26934136

  5. Increased Risk of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients With Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Te; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Huang, Wei-Chun; Liou, Wen-Shiung; Tang, Pei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) may be a major predictor of pregnancy-associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). However, the relationship between PIH and long-term ICH risk is unknown. The objective of the study was to determine the association between PIH and ICH and to identify the predictive risk factors. Patients with newly diagnosed PIH were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. PIH patients were divided into gestational hypertension (GH) and preeclampsia groups. The 2 groups were separately compared with matched cohorts of patients without PIH based on age and date of delivery. The occurrence of ICH was evaluated in both cohorts. The overall observational period was from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2013. Among the 23.3 million individuals registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database, 28,346 PIH patients, including 7390 with GH and 20,956 with preeclampsia, were identified. The incidences of ICH were increased in both groups (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 3.72 in the GH group, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.63–3.81, P < 0.0001 and IRR = 8.21 in the preeclampsia group, 95% CI 8.12–8.31, P < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, according to the results of stratification of follow-up years, both groups were associated with a highest risk of ICH at 1 to 5 years of follow-up (IRR = 11.99, 95% CI 11.16–12.88, P < 0.0001 and IRR = 21.83, 95% CI 21.24–22.44, P < 0.0001, respectively). After adjusting for age, parity, severity of PIH, number of PIH occurrences, gestational age, and comorbidities in the multivariate survival analysis using Cox regression model, age ≥30 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, 95% CI 1.27–3.10, P = 0.0026), patients with preeclampsia (HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.22–3.90, P = 0.0089), multiple PIH occurrences (HR 4.08, 95% CI 1.85–9.01, P = 0.0005), hypertension (HR 4.51, 95% CI 1.89–10.74, P = 0.0007), and obesity (HR 7.21, 95

  6. Impact of CO2 on Intracranial Hypertension in Spaceflight. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk [Part 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Polk, James D.; Tarver, William J.; Gibson, Charles R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Taddeo, Terrance A.; Alexander, David J.; Otto, Christian A.

    2010-01-01

    A. CO2 - Acute: Given the history of uneven removal of CO2 from spacecraft areas, there is a history of acute illness that impacts short-term health and performance. 1) Acute CO2 symptoms occur in space flight due to a combination of CO2 scrubbing limitations, microgravity-related lack of convection, and possibly interaction with microgravity-related physiological changes. 2) Reported symptoms mainly include headaches, malaise, and lethargy. Symptoms are treatable with analgesics, rest, temporarily increasing scrubbing capability, and breathing oxygen. This does not treat the underlying pathology. 3)ld prevent occurrence of symptoms. B. CO2 - Chronic: Given prolonged exposure to elevated CO2 levels, there is a history that the long-term health of the crew is impacted. 1) Chronic CO2 exposures occur in space flight due to a combination of CO2 scrubbing limitations and microgravity-related lack of convection, with possible contribution from microgravity-related physiological changes. 2) Since acute symptoms are experienced at levels significantly lower than expected, there are unidentified long-term effects from prolonged exposure to elevated CO2 levels on orbit. There have been long term effects seen terrestrially and research needed to further elucidate long term effects on orbit. 3) Recommended disposition: Research required to further elucidate long term effects. In particular, elucidation of the role of elevated CO2 on various levels of CO2 vasodilatation of intracranial blood vessels and its potential contribution to elevation of intracranial pressure.

  7. Effect of Acetazolamide on Visual Function in Patients With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and Mild Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Acetazolamide is commonly used to treat idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), but there is insufficient information to establish an evidence base for its use. OBJECTIVE To determine whether acetazolamide is beneficial in improving vision when added to a low-sodium weight reduction diet in patients with IIH and mild visual loss. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study of acetazolamide in 165 participants with IIH and mild visual loss who received a low-sodium weight-reduction diet. Participants were enrolled at 38 academic and private practice sites in North America from March 2010 to November 2012 and followed up for 6 months (last visit in June 2013). All participants met the modified Dandy criteria for IIH and had a perimetric mean deviation (PMD) between −2 dB and −7 dB. The mean age was 29 years and all but 4 participants were women. INTERVENTIONS Low-sodium weight-reduction diet plus the maximally tolerated dosage or acetazolamide (up to 4 g/d) or matching placebo for 6 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The planned primary outcome variable was the change in PMD from baseline to month 6 in the most affected eye, as measured by Humphrey Field Analyzer. Perimetric mean deviation is a measure of global visual field loss (mean deviation from age-corrected normal values), with a range of 2 to −32 dB; larger negative values indicate greater vision loss. Secondary outcome variables included changes in papilledema grade, quality of life (Visual Function Questionnaire 25 [VFQ-25] and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey), headache disability, and weight at month 6. RESULTS The mean improvement in PMD was greater with acetazolamide (1.43 dB, from −3.53 dB at baseline to −2.10 dB at month 6; n = 86) than with placebo (0.71 dB, from −3.53 dB to −2.82 dB;n = 79); the difference was 0.71 dB (95% CI, 0 to 1.43 dB; P= .050). Mean improvements in papilledema grade (acetazolamide: −1

  8. Microgravity environment and compensatory: Decompensatory phases for intracranial hypertension form new perspectives to explain mechanism underlying communicating hydrocephalus and its related disorders.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zamzuri; Mustapha, Muzaimi; Abdullah, Jafri M

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis underlying communicating hydrocephalus has been centered on impaired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow secondary to abnormal CSF pulsation and venous hypertension. Hydrodynamic theory of hydrocephalus fares better than traditional theory in explaining the possible mechanisms underlying communicating hydrocephalus. Nonetheless, hydrodynamic theory alone could not fully explain some conditions that have ventriculomegaly but without hydrocephalus. By revisiting brain buoyancy from a fresher perspective, called microgravity environment of the brain, introducing wider concepts of anatomical and physiological compensatory-decompensatory phases for a persistent raise in intracranial pressure, and along with combining these two concepts with the previously well-accepted concepts of Monro-Kellie doctrine, intracranial hypertension, cerebral blood flow, cerebral perfusion pressure, brain compliance and elasticity, cerebral autoregulation, blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers, venous and cardiopulmonary hypertension, Windkessel phenomenon, and cerebral pulsation, we provide plausible explanations to the pathogenesis for communicating hydrocephalus and its related disorders. PMID:24891884

  9. Microgravity environment and compensatory: Decompensatory phases for intracranial hypertension form new perspectives to explain mechanism underlying communicating hydrocephalus and its related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Mustapha, Muzaimi; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis underlying communicating hydrocephalus has been centered on impaired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow secondary to abnormal CSF pulsation and venous hypertension. Hydrodynamic theory of hydrocephalus fares better than traditional theory in explaining the possible mechanisms underlying communicating hydrocephalus. Nonetheless, hydrodynamic theory alone could not fully explain some conditions that have ventriculomegaly but without hydrocephalus. By revisiting brain buoyancy from a fresher perspective, called microgravity environment of the brain, introducing wider concepts of anatomical and physiological compensatory–decompensatory phases for a persistent raise in intracranial pressure, and along with combining these two concepts with the previously well-accepted concepts of Monro–Kellie doctrine, intracranial hypertension, cerebral blood flow, cerebral perfusion pressure, brain compliance and elasticity, cerebral autoregulation, blood–brain and blood–CSF barriers, venous and cardiopulmonary hypertension, Windkessel phenomenon, and cerebral pulsation, we provide plausible explanations to the pathogenesis for communicating hydrocephalus and its related disorders. PMID:24891884

  10. Clinical significance of dynamic monitoring by transcranial doppler ultrasound and intracranial pressure monitor after surgery of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zaiming; Chen, Qianxue; Tian, Daofeng; Wang, Long; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Shenqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surgical method of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HIH) and how to control the postoperative blood pressure. 96 HIH patients were performed the craniotomic hematoma dissection (CHD) and the hematoma-cavity drilling drainage (HCDD), respectively. Meanwhile, the intracranial pressure and mean arterial pressure of each patient were continuously monitored for 7 days, the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 7th and 14th-day average flow velocities and pulsatility indexes of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries were monitored. CHD exhibited the significant difference in the long-term quality of life (ADL classification 6 months later) of patients with hematoma >50 ml than HCDD; furthermore, the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 7th and 14th-day TCD parameter analysis revealed that CHD exhibited better results in relieving the intracranial pressure and improving the cerebral blood flow than HCDD, and the postoperative ICP and MAP monitoring towards all patients could effectively control the blood pressure and prevent the further bleeding. The patients with hematoma >50 ml should choose CHD, and all HIH patients should be routinely performed the ICP and MAP monitoring. PMID:26379963

  11. Managing hypertension: drugs, life-style manipulation or benign neglect? Medical, ethical and economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simpson, F O

    1990-10-01

    Antihypertensive drugs have been of major benefit to people with moderate or severe hypertension and have contributed enormously to fundamental physiological knowledge. Antihypertensive therapy in milder hypertension reduces the incidence of stroke by 40% or more, may reduce myocardial infarction and prevents progression to more severe hypertension or heart failure but is being criticised as not cost-effective. Much of this criticism is based on deductions from inappropriate data. Nevertheless, it is likely that money is in some cases being wasted on the treatment of people who were not truly hypertensive in the first place. It is also likely that drug dosage is often unnecessarily high. Clearly it is vital that treatment is delivered as economically as possible. A reduction in the prevalence of hypertension would be the best way to reduce costs. Obesity and a high alcohol intake are associated with a higher blood pressure at any age. A high salt intake throughout life appears to be associated with a rise in blood pressure in the second half of life and may well be the main factor in hypertension. A radical rethinking of the method of pricing of medical care should be considered, so as to provide incentives to people to adopt life-style measures that lead to avoidance of hypertension (and other cardiovascular risk factors) or, in established hypertension, to a reduction in the need for medication. PMID:2126730

  12. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24-3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309-3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  13. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24–3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309–3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  14. Decompressive craniectomy in the treatment of post-traumatic intracranial hypertension in children: our philosophy and indications.

    PubMed

    Beuriat, P A; Javouhey, E; Szathmari, A; Courtil-Tesseydre, S; Desgranges, F P; Grassiot, B; Hequet, O; Mottolese, C

    2015-12-01

    Decompressive craniotomy (DC) in children is a life-saving procedure for the treatment of refractory intracranial hypertension related to traumatic, ischemic and infectious lesions. Different surgical procedures have been proposed including uni or bilateral hemicraniectomy, bi-frontal, bi-temporal, or bi-parietal craniotomies. DC can avoid the cascade of events related to tissue hypoxia, brain perfusion reduction, hypotension and the evolution of brain edema that can be responsible for brain herniation. The monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is very important to take a decision as well as the value of Trans cranial Doppler (TCD). Repeated TCD in the intensive care unit give important information about the decrease of the cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and facilitates the decision making. The important question is about how long time we have to wait before to perform the DC. Three conditions can be distinguished: 1) ICP stable and TCD with good parameters: the decision can be postponed; 2) ICP>20 mmHg with good TCD and without clinical signs of deterioration: the decision can be postponed; 3) ICP>20 mmHg with altered CPP and degraded TCD value and clinical signs of brain herniation: the surgical procedure is indicated. The decision of a ventricular drainage can also be discussed but in cases of slit ventricles it is preferable to realize a DC to avoid the problems of multiple taps without finding the ventricular system. In some very specific situations, DC has to be contraindicated. The first one is a prolonged cardiopulmonary arrest with a no-flow longer than 15 minutes and irreversible lesions on the TCD or on the CT-scan. The second most common situation is a patient with GCS of 3 on admission associated with bilaterally fixed dilated pupils. In this case TCD is very useful to document the decrease or the absence of diastolic flux that indicates a very poor cerebral perfusion. In case of severe polytraumatism with multiorgan failure, especially in very

  15. Anatomical Variations of the Transverse-Sigmoid Sinus Junction: Implications for Endovascular Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael W; Bartels, Harrison G; Rodriguez, Analiz; Johnson, James E; Janjua, Rashid M

    2016-08-01

    Venous sinus pathology can result in multiple pathological diseases, including idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). There remains a paucity of information on anatomical luminal variations of the major venous sinuses which may contribute to the etiology of certain disease states. Thirty-six transverse and sigmoid sinuses were removed following dissection of 19 unfixed cadaveric heads. Sinuses were opened longitudinally to study luminal variations. A semiquantitative classification system was developed to assess septations and blind pouches. Seventy-nine percent of cadavers had a luminal anatomical variation. Forty-four percent and 42% of sinuses dissected had occurrence of a septations or blind pouches, respectively. Thirty percent of septations and 25% of pouches were classified as large. Incidence of anatomical variations was not statistically significant between cadaver gender or sinus laterality. Luminal variations are present in the transverse and sigmoid sinuses at rates higher than expected. This study is the first to report the presence of blind pouches in the luminal wall of transverse and sigmoid sinuses. These variations can have clinical importance to the endovascular surgeon and may also contribute to the pathophysiological etiology of venous sinus diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1037-1042, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27161529

  16. Intracranial Hypertension in a Patient with a Chiari Malformation Accompanied by Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-09-01

    The Chiari malformation is an infrequently detected congenital anomaly characterized by the downward displacement of the cerebellum with a tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum that may be accompanied by either syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. Surgery, such as foramen magnum decompression, is indicated for a symptomatic Chiari malformation, although an incidental lesion may be followed-up without further treatment. Infrequently, increased intracranial pressure emerges due to hyperthyroidism. A nineteen-year-old girl visited our outpatient clinic presented with a headache, nausea and vomiting. A brain and spinal magnetic resonance image study (MRI) indicated that the patient had a Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. An enlarged thyroid gland was detected on a physical examination, and serum markers indicated Graves' disease. The patient started anti-hyperthyroid medical treatment. Subsequently, the headache disappeared after the medical treatment of hyperthyroidism without surgical intervention for the Chiari malformation. A symptomatic Chiari malformation is indicated for surgery, but a surgeon should investigate other potential causes of the symptoms of the Chiari malformation to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26512271

  17. Intracranial Hypertension in a Patient with a Chiari Malformation Accompanied by Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-01-01

    The Chiari malformation is an infrequently detected congenital anomaly characterized by the downward displacement of the cerebellum with a tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum that may be accompanied by either syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. Surgery, such as foramen magnum decompression, is indicated for a symptomatic Chiari malformation, although an incidental lesion may be followed-up without further treatment. Infrequently, increased intracranial pressure emerges due to hyperthyroidism. A nineteen-year-old girl visited our outpatient clinic presented with a headache, nausea and vomiting. A brain and spinal magnetic resonance image study (MRI) indicated that the patient had a Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. An enlarged thyroid gland was detected on a physical examination, and serum markers indicated Graves' disease. The patient started anti-hyperthyroid medical treatment. Subsequently, the headache disappeared after the medical treatment of hyperthyroidism without surgical intervention for the Chiari malformation. A symptomatic Chiari malformation is indicated for surgery, but a surgeon should investigate other potential causes of the symptoms of the Chiari malformation to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26512271

  18. Mechanism of delayed intracranial hypertension after cerebroventricular infusions in conscious rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, B. A.; Holt, M. R.; Starcevic, V. P.; Keil, L. C.; Severs, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Prior studies showed that cerebroventricular infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 8 microliter/min for 10 min, followed by a 10 min rest and a 24 h infusion of 0.5 microliters/min, raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFp) of conscious, unrestrained rats after about 2 h. Here, we report that the 10 min infusion alone evoked a delayed, prolonged rise in CSFp. Pressure during the infusion itself rose and recovered quickly, as is usually reported. Pressure/volume tests, used to calculate resistance to outflow (Ro) and compliance (C), revealed that infusions increased Ro and decreased C, after a delay (P less than 0.05). The rise in CSFp after infusion was blocked by pretreatment with acetazolamide + ouabain (P less than 0.05), but the delayed changes in Ro and C were unaffected. We suggest that the 10 min infusion of a sterile, balanced salt solution has a primary effect that increases Ro; as CSF synthesis continues, C is exhausted and the delayed rise in CSFp ensues. This non-traumatic method of raising CSFp may be a useful method to study intracranial fluid dynamics.

  19. Diet-induced antisecretory factor prevents intracranial hypertension in a dosage-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ewa; Al-Olama, Mohamed; Hansson, Hans-Arne; Lange, Stefan; Jennische, Eva

    2013-06-28

    Intake of specially processed cereal (SPC) stimulates endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) activity, and SPC intake has proven to be beneficial for a number of clinical conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the dosage relationship between SPC intake and plasma AF activity and to further correlate achieved AF levels to a biological effect. SPC was fed to rats in concentrations of 5, 10 or 15% for 2 weeks. A further group was fed 5% SPC for 4 weeks. AF activity and the complement factors C3c and factor H were analysed in plasma after the feeding period. Groups of rats fed the various SPC concentrations were subjected to a standardised freezing brain injury, known to induce increases in intracranial pressure (ICP). The AF activity in plasma increased after intake of SPC, in a dosage- and time-dependent manner. The complement factors C3c and factor H increased in a time-dependent manner. Measurements of ICP in animals fed with SPC prior to the brain injury showed that the ICP was significantly lower, compared with that of injured rats fed with a standard feed, and that the change was dose and time dependent. AF activity increases, in a dosage- and time-dependent manner, after intake of SPC. The inverse relationship between ICP after a head injury and the percentage of SPC in the feed indicate that the protective effect is, to a large extent, due to AF. PMID:23153478

  20. Over-drainage and persistent shunt-dependency in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension treated with shunts and bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Jonathan; Constantini, Shlomi; Kesler, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may lead to visual impairment. Shunt surgery is indicated for refractory IIH-related symptoms that persist despite medical treatment, or those presenting with significant visual decline. Obesity is a risk factor for IIH; a reduction in weight has been shown to improve papilledema. Bariatric surgery (BS) has been suggested for treating IIH associated with morbid obesity. In this study, we describe a high rate of over-drainage (OD) seen in patients following shunts and BS. Methods: The study cohort includes 13 patients with IIH that underwent shunt surgery for treatment of the IIH-related symptoms. Six patients underwent BS in addition to the shunt surgery (but not concomitantly). Seven patients had only shunt surgeries with no BS. Data were collected retrospectively. Results: BS effectively led to weight reduction (body mass index decreasing from 43 ± 4 to 28 ± 5). Patients undergoing BS had 1–6 (2.5 ± 1.9) shunt revisions for OD following BS, as opposed to 0–3 (1.4 ± 1.1) revisions prior to BS over similar time spans (statistically insignificant difference), and 0–6 (1.6 ± 2.5) revisions among the non-BS patients over a longer time span (statistically insignificant difference). Two patients in the BS group underwent shunt externalization and closure; however, they proved to be shunt-dependent. Conclusions: Patients with IIH that undergo shunt surgery and BS (not concomitantly) may suffer from OD symptoms, necessitating multiple shunt revisions, and valve upgrades. Despite BS being a valid primary treatment for some patients with IIH, among shunted patients, BS may not lead to resolution of IIH-related symptoms and patients may remain shunt-dependent. PMID:26713173

  1. Causes and Prognosis of Visual Acuity Loss at the Time of Initial Presentation in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, John J.; Thurtell, Matthew J.; Longmuir, Reid A.; Garvin, Mona K.; Wang, Jui-Kai; Wall, Michael; Kardon, Randy H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the etiology and prognosis of visual acuity loss in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at presentation and to provide objective measures to predict visual outcome. Methods. A retrospective review of 660 patients with IIH (2009–2013) identified 31 patients (4.7%) with 48 eyes having best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/25 or worse on initial presentation. Fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the optic disc and macula, and perimetry were used to determine the causes and prognosis of vision loss. Segmentation of the macula OCT was performed using the Iowa Reference Algorithm to determine the retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer complex (GCL-IPL) thickness. Results. Outer retinal changes alone caused decreased BCVA at initial presentation in 22 eyes (46%): subretinal fluid in 16, chorioretinal folds in 5, and peripapillary choroidal neovascularization in 1. The vision loss was reversible except for some eyes with chorioretinal folds. Optic neuropathy alone caused decreased BCVA in 10 eyes (21%) and coexisting outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy caused decreased BCVA in 16 eyes (33%). A GCL-IPL thickness less than or equal to 70 μm at initial presentation or progressive thinning of greater than or equal to 10 μm within 2 to 3 weeks compared with baseline correlated with poor visual outcome. Conclusions. Visual acuity loss in IIH can be caused by both outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy. Vision loss from outer retinal changes is mostly reversible. The outcome of patients with coexisting outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy or optic neuropathy alone depends on the degree of optic neuropathy, which can be predicted by the GCL-IPL thickness. PMID:26070058

  2. Baseline OCT Measurements in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, Part I: Quality Control, Comparisons, and Variability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to investigate papilledema in single-site, mostly retrospective studies. We investigated whether spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), which provides thickness and volume measurements of the optic nerve head and retina, could reliably demonstrate structural changes due to papilledema in a prospective multisite clinical trial setting. Methods. At entry, 126 subjects in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) with mild visual field loss had optic disc and macular scans, using the Cirrus SD-OCT. Images were analyzed by using the proprietary commercial and custom 3D-segmentation algorithms to calculate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), total retinal thickness (TRT), optic nerve head volume (ONHV), and retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness. We evaluated variability, with interocular comparison and correlation between results for both methods. Results. The average RNFL thickness > 95% of normal controls in 90% of eyes and the RNFL, TRT, ONH height, and ONHV showed strong (r > 0.8) correlations for interocular comparisons. Variability for repeated testing of OCT parameters was low for both methods and intraclass correlations > 0.9 except for the proprietary GCL thickness. The proprietary algorithm–derived RNFL, TRT, and GCL thickness measurements had failure rates of 10%, 16%, and 20% for all eyes respectively, which were uncommon with 3D-segmentation–derived measurements. Only 7% of eyes had GCL thinning that was less than fifth percentile of normal age-matched control eyes by both methods. Conclusions. Spectral-domain OCT provides reliable continuous variables and quantified assessment of structural alterations due to papilledema. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:25370510

  3. Baseline OCT Measurements in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, Part II: Correlations and Relationship to Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The accepted method to evaluate and monitor papilledema, Frisén grading, uses an ordinal approach based on descriptive features. Part I showed that spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in a clinical trial setting provides reliable measurement of the effects of papilledema on the optic nerve head (ONH) and peripapillary retina, particularly if a 3-D segmentation method is used for analysis.1 We evaluated how OCT parameters are interrelated and how they correlate with vision and other clinical features in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) patients. Methods. A total of 126 subjects in the IIH Treatment Trial (IIHTT) OCT substudy had Cirrus SD-OCT optic disc and macula scans analyzed by using a 3-D segmentation algorithm to derive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, total retinal thickness (TRT), retinal ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCL+IPL) thickness, and ONH volume. The SD-OCT parameter values were correlated with high- and low-contrast acuity, perimetric mean deviation, Frisén grading, and IIH features. Results. At study entry, the average RNFL thickness, TRT, and ONH volume showed significant strong correlations (r ≥ 0.90) with each other. The same OCT parameters showed a strong (r > 0.76) correlation with Frisén grade and a mild (r > 0.24), but significant, correlation with lumbar puncture opening pressure. For all eyes at baseline, neither visual acuity (high or low contrast) nor mean deviation correlated with any OCT measure of swelling or GCL+IPL thickness. Conclusions. In newly diagnosed IIH, OCT demonstrated alterations of the peripapillary retina and ONH correlate with Frisén grading of papilledema. At presentation, OCT measures of papilledema, in patients with newly diagnosed IIH and mild vision loss, do not correlate with clinical features or visual dysfunction. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:25370513

  4. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Registry (GRDR) IHRF Scientific Advisor Awarded NSBRI/NASA Grant to Study Non-Invasive Pressure Monitoring CNN: ... For Future Deep Space Missions IHRF Part Of NASA Research Team On Microgravity-Induced IH Is Vision ...

  5. Primary Intracranial Leptomeningeal Melanomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Lee, Chae-Heuck; Joo, Mee

    2015-01-01

    Primary intracranial malignant melanoma is a very rare and highly aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. A 66-year-old female patient presented a headache that had been slowly progressing for several months. A large benign pigmented skin lesion was found on her back. A brain MRI showed multiple linear signal changes with branching pattern and strong enhancement in the temporal lobe. The cytological and immunohiostochemical cerebrospinal fluid examination confirmed malignant melanoma. A biopsy confirmed that the pigmented skin lesion on the back and the conjunctiva were benign nevi. We report a case of primary intracranial malignant melanoma and review relevant literatures. PMID:26819692

  6. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination. PMID:22696735

  7. Effect of hypertension on bacteria composition of prostate biopsy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer in PSA grey-zone

    PubMed Central

    NI, XIAOFENG; MENG, HONGZHOU; ZHOU, FENG; YU, HAINING; XIANG, JIANJIAN; SHEN, SHENGRONG

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic prostate cancer (PC) is difficult to diagnose by prostate biopsy, even in patients with markedly elevated PSA levels. Therefore, we aimed to identify a new, better technique to detect PC in a more consistent manner. A variety of steps were employed to validate this proposed method, including DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and DGGE band sequencing. Four transperineal prostate biopsy specimens were obtained from male patients. The patients were under the age of 65 and PSA levels were 4–10 ng/ml. We also investigated the bacteria composition of transperineal prostate biopsy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and PC by PCR-DGGE profiling. Sequences from selected bands 2 and 4 both matched with Sphingomonas, which is present in lower amounts in PC without hypertension as compared to PC with hypertension, while there were no particular differences in the BPH group. Specific bacteria from the prostate biopsy tissues provide further confidence in PC diagnosis based on a PCR approach as a diagnostic tool, while hypertension was found to be a disturbing factor that can affect the diagnosis of BPH and PC in grey-zone. PMID:27284421

  8. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oparil, S; Calhoun, D A

    1989-03-01

    An estimated 58 million Americans are at increased risk of morbidity and premature death due to high blood pressure (BP) and require some type of therapy or systematic monitoring. This article focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of hypertension, new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of secondary hypertension, and current views of the most appropriate nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy for essential hypertension. In view of the extremely high prevalence of the disorder, emphasis is placed on efficient and cost-effective strategies for diagnosing and managing the hypertensive patient. Recent evidence indicates that nonpharmacologic therapy, including dietary potassium and calcium supplements, reduction of salt intake, weight loss for the obese patient, regular exercise, a diet high in fiber and low in cholesterol and saturated fats, smoking cessation, and moderation of alcohol consumption produces significant sustained reductions in BP while reducing overall cardiovascular risk. Accordingly, nonpharmacologic antihypertensive therapy should be included in the treatment of all hypertensive patients. In persons with mild hypertension, nonpharmacologic approaches may adequately reduce BP, thereby avoiding the expense and potential side effects of drug therapy. In patients with more severe hypertension, nonpharmacologic therapy, used in conjunction with pharmacologic therapy, can reduce the dosage of antihypertensive medications necessary for BP control. Patients treated with nonpharmacologic therapy only should be followed closely, and if BP control is not satisfactory, drug therapy should be added. The large number of drugs available for use in hypertension treatment, coupled with our rapidly expanding knowledge of the pathophysiology of hypertension and of the adverse effects of these drugs in individual patient groups, make it possible to individualize antihypertensive treatment. When used as monotherapy, most agents

  9. Efficacy of Low Dose Barbiturate Coma Therapy for the Patients with Intractable Intracranial Hypertension Using the Bispectral™ Index Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    An, Hung-Shik; Kang, Jeong-Han; Kim, Moon-Kyu; Oh, Sae-Moon; Park, Se-Hyuck

    2010-01-01

    Objective Barbiturate coma therapy (BCT) is a useful method to control increased intracranial pressure (IICP) patients. However, the complications such as hypotension and hypokalemia have caused conditions that stopped BCT early. The complications of low dose BCT with Bispectral™ index (BIS) monitoring and those of high dose BCT without BIS monitoring have been compared to evaluate the efficacy of low dose BCT with BIS monitoring. Methods We analyzed 39 patients with high dose BCT group (21 patients) and low dose BCT group (18 patients). Because BIS value of 40-60 is general anesthesia score, we have adjusted the target dose of thiopental to maintain the BIS score of 40-60. Therefore, dose of thiopental was kept 1.3 to 2.6 mg/kg/hour during low dose BCT. However, high dose BCT consisted of 5 mg/kg/hour without BIS monitoing. Results The protocol of BCT was successful in 72.2% and 38.1% of low dose and high dose BCT groups, respectively. The complications such as QT prolongation, hypotension and cardiac arrest have caused conditions that stopped BCT early. Hypokalemia showed the highest incidence rate in complications of both BCT. The descent in potassium level were 0.63 ± 0.26 in low dose group, and 1.31 ± 0.48 in high dose group. The treatment durations were 4.89 ± 1.68 days and 3.38 ± 1.24 days in low dose BCT and high dose BCT, respectively. Conclusion It was proved that low dose BCT showed less severe complications than high dose BCT. Low dose BCT with BIS monitoring provided enough duration of BCT possible to control ICP. PMID:20461164

  10. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Neil R; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Caulfield, Mark

    2015-08-22

    Raised blood pressure is the biggest single contributor to the global burden of disease and to global mortality. The numbers of people affected and the prevalence of high blood pressure worldwide are expected to increase over the next decade. Preventive strategies are therefore urgently needed, especially in less developed countries, and management of hypertension must be optimised. Genetic advances in some rare causes of hypertension have been made lately, but the aggregate effect on blood pressure of all the genetic loci identified to date is small. Hence, intervention on key environmental determinants and effective implementation of trial-based therapies are needed. Three-drug combinations can control hypertension in about 90% of patients but only if resources allow identification of patients and drug delivery is affordable. Furthermore, assessment of optimal drug therapy for each ethnic group is needed. PMID:25832858

  11. Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Richard L.; Sullivan, Humbert G.; Miller, J. Douglas

    1978-01-01

    Digital computer simulation is utilized to test hypotheses regarding poorly understood mechanisms of intracranial pressure change. The simulation produces graphic output similar to records from polygraph recorders used in patient monitoring and in animal experimentation. The structure of the model is discussed. The mathematic model perfected by the comparison between simulation and experiment will constitute a formulation of medical information applicable to automated clinical monitoring and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  12. The effects of lumboperitoneal and ventriculoperitoneal shunts on the cranial and spinal cerebrospinal fluid volume in a patient with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nikić, Ines; Radoš, Milan; Frobe, Ana; Vukić, Miroslav; Orešković, Darko; Klarica, Marijan

    2016-01-01

    Lumboperitoneal (LP) and ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts are a frequent treatment modality for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Although these shunts have been used for a long time, it is still not clear how they change the total craniospinal CSF volume and what portions of cranial and spinal CSF are affected. This report for the first time presents the results of a volumetric analysis of the total cranial and spinal CSF space in a patient with IIH. We performed an automated segmentation of the cranial and a manual segmentation of the spinal CSF space first with an LP shunt installed and again after the LP shunt was replaced by a VP shunt. When the LP shunt was in place, the total CSF volume was smaller than when the VP shunt was in place (222.4 cm3 vs 279.2 cm3). The difference was almost completely the result of the spinal CSF volume reduction (49.3 cm3 and 104.9 cm3 for LP and VP, respectively), while the cranial CSF volume was not considerably altered (173.2 cm3 and 174.2 cm3 for LP and VP, respectively). This report indicates that LP and VP shunts in IIH do not considerably change the cranial CSF volume, while the reduction of CSF volume after LP shunt placement affects almost exclusively the spinal part of the CSF system. Our results suggest that an analysis of both the cranial and the spinal part of the CSF space is necessary for therapeutic procedures planning and for an early recognition of numerous side effects that often arise after shunts placement in IIH patients. PMID:27374831

  13. [Intracranial pressure changes during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertention].

    PubMed

    Rylova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    Xenon assures rapid awakening and stable hemodynamics, it also has some neuroprotective effect. This is the reason why it may become an anesthetic of choice in neurosurgery. Still there is little and controversial data on its impact upon ICP. This is the first study of xenon effect upon intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. We report a slight increase in intracranial and a slight decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure during xenon anesthesia and show that cerebrovascular reactivity is preserved. Thus we conclude that xenon anesthesia is safe for neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. PMID:21957614

  14. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Tejpal

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.

  15. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  16. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... together in a delicate balance. A pressure and volume relationship exists between CSF, the brain and the ... approximately 0.3 cc per minute. (The total volume of CSF in the skull at any given ...

  17. [Hypertensive emergencies and urgencies].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara

    2005-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common medical problems affecting approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. Severe hypertension that is a potentially life-threatening condition refers to a hypertensive crisis. Severe hypertension is further classified into hypertensive emergencies or hypertensive urgencies. Hypertensive emergency refers to a severe hypertension that is associated with new or progressive end-organ damage. In these clinical situations, blood pressure should be reduced immediately to prevent or minimize organ dysfunction. Hypertensive urgency refers to severe hypertension without evidence of new or worsening end-organ injury. Blood pressure can be lowered less rapidly in this condition. In this review article it is discussed about clinical assessment of patients under these conditions, evaluating neurological, cardiovascular, renal end-organ damage; how much blood pressure should be lowered, which medication should be used to lower blood pressure, treating hypertensive emergencies and urgencies; and management of specific conditions (acute intracranial events, acute left ventricular dysfunction etc). PMID:15998994

  18. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies. PMID:27443382

  19. Intracranial aneurysms: analysis of results of microneurosurgery.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C B; Loach, A B; O'laoire, S A

    1976-01-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms has a poor prognosis. Operative management of intracranial aneurysms was once considered ineffective. The first 100 cases treated by micorsurgery were analysed to see whether mortality and morbidity were reduced. Modern surgical techniques halved the total mortality but the morbidity was unaltered. Results can be improved by delaying surgery seven days and by treating any hypertension before surgery. PMID:963461

  20. Intracranial germinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Manoj P.; Doughty, Kyle E.; Armstrong, Danielle; Melguizo-Gavilanes, Isaac; Cheek, Brennen S.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Pineal region tumors make up less than 1% of all intracranial neoplasms, with the majority being of germ cell origin. We describe the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of a patient presenting with neurological deficits who was found to have a germinoma of the pineal gland. PMID:25552796

  1. Presence of Essential Hypertension or Diabetes Mellitus Is a Predictor of Intracranial Bleeding in Elderly Patients: A Study of 108 Patients with Isolated Thrombocytopenia from a Single Reference Center

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rajan; Pati, Hara Prasad; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Monga, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Thrombocytopenia poses a significant problem in the elderly. Not only are there varied causes, but it is also associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We carried out a study to learn the causes of isolated thrombocytopenia in elderly patients and to correlate the severity of thrombocytopenia and bleeding manifestations with various etiologic factors and comorbidities. Materials and Methods: A total of 108 patients above 50 years of age presenting with isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet counts of <100x109/L with normal hemoglobin and total leukocyte counts) were enrolled in the study. Detailed history and clinical examinations were carried out for each patient. Complete blood counts were analyzed by automated cell counter. Peripheral smears were examined in all cases. HbsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV testing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was done in all patients. Wherever clinically indicated, bone marrow aspiration biopsy and cytogenetic studies were done. Results: Out of 108 patients, 102 (94.4%) presented with bleeding tendencies. Twenty-nine (26.8%) presented with serious (World Health Organization grade 3/4) bleedings. Major findings were immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 79 (73.1%), myelodysplastic syndrome in 7 (6.5%), drug-induced thrombocytopenia in 7 (6.5%), and connective tissue disorder in 4 (3.7%) cases. Ten patients presented with intracranial bleedings. Upon logistic regression analysis, comorbidities in the form of essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with occurrence of intracranial bleeding. There was no correlation of serious bleedings with platelet counts. Conclusion: Isolated thrombocytopenia in the elderly is associated with significant morbidity. Diligent clinical and laboratory evaluation is required to elucidate the cause of thrombocytopenia in the elderly. Comorbidities in this population are associated with serious bleedings and not low platelet counts as is commonly thought

  2. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    , resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the mortality rate can be 40% to 50%, with severe morbidity of 10% to 20%. The reported overall risk of rupture is 1.9% per year and is higher for women, cigarette smokers, and cocaine users, and in aneurysms that are symptomatic, greater than 10 mm in diameter, or located in the posterior circulation. If left untreated, there is a considerable risk of repeat hemorrhage in a ruptured aneurysm that results in increased mortality. In Ontario, intracranial aneurysms occur in about 1% to 4% of the population, and the annual incidence of SAH is about 10 cases per 100,000 people. In 2004-2005, about 660 intracranial aneurysm repairs were performed in Ontario. Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms Treatment of an unruptured aneurysm attempts to prevent the aneurysm from rupturing. The treatment of a ruptured intracranial aneurysm aims to prevent further hemorrhage. There are 3 approaches to treating an intracranial aneurysm. Small, asymptomatic aneurysms less than 10 mm in diameter may be monitored without any intervention other than treatment for underlying risk factors such as hypertension. Open surgical clipping, involves craniotomy, brain retraction, and placement of a silver clip across the neck of the aneurysm while a patient is under general anesthesia. This procedure is associated with surgical risks and neurological deficits. Endovascular coil embolization, introduced in the 1990s, is the health technology under review. Literature Review Methods The Medical Advisory Secretariat searched the International Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) Database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant systematic reviews. OVID Medline, Medline In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, and Embase were searched for English-language journal articles that reported primary data on the effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of treatments for intracranial aneurysms, obtained in a clinical setting or analyses of primary

  3. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  4. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  5. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  6. Incidence and risk factors for post-traumatic hydrocephalus following decompressive craniectomy for intractable intracranial hypertension and evacuation of mass lesions.

    PubMed

    Honeybul, Stephen; Ho, Kwok M

    2012-07-01

    There continues to be a considerable interest in decompressive craniectomy in the management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Though technically straightforward, the procedure is not without significant complications. In this study we assessed the incidence and risk factors for the development of subdural hygroma and hydrocephalus after decompressive craniectomy. A total of 195 patients who had had a decompressive craniectomy for severe TBI between 2004 and 2010 at the two major trauma centers in Western Australia were considered. Of the 166 patients who survived after the acute hospital stay, 93 (56%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 48,63%) developed subdural hygroma; 45 patients (48%) had unilateral and 48 patients (52%) had bilateral subdural hygromas. Of the 159 patients who survived more than 6 months after surgery, 72 (45%; 95% CI 38,53%) developed radiological evidence of ventriculomegaly, and 26 of these 72 patients (36%; 95% CI 26,48%) developed clinical evidence of hydrocephalus and required a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. Maximum intracranial pressure prior to decompression (p=0.005), subdural hygroma (p=0.012), and a lower admission Glasgow Coma Scale score (p=0.009), were significant risk factors for hydrocephalus after decompressive craniectomy. Hydrocephalus requiring a VP shunt was associated with a higher risk of unfavorable neurological outcomes at 18 months (odds ratio 7.46; 95%CI 1.17,47.4; p=0.033), after adjusting for other factors. Our results showed a clear association between injury severity, subdural hygroma, and hydrocephalus, suggesting that damage to the cerebrospinal fluid drainage pathways contributes to the primary brain injury rather than the margin of the craniectomy as the factor responsible for these complications. PMID:22583391

  7. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  8. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Increased intracranial pressure is a rise in the pressure inside the skull that can result from or cause brain injury. ... Increased intracranial pressure can be due to a rise in pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid. This is ...

  9. Intracranial Vascular Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Mechanical retrievers/aspiration systems: used to remove clots ... passageway between an artery and a vein. intracranial aneurysms, a ballooning out of the wall of an ...

  10. Clinical comparison of tympanic membrane displacement with invasive intracranial pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Shimbles, S; Dodd, C; Banister, K; Mendelow, A D; Chambers, I R

    2005-12-01

    A non-invasive method of assessing intracranial pressure (ICP) would be of benefit to patients with abnormal cerebral pathology that could give rise to changes in ICP. In particular, it would assist the regular monitoring of hydrocephalus patients. This study evaluated a technique using tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) measurements, which has been reported to provide a reliable, non-invasive measure of ICP. A group of 135 hydrocephalus patients was studied, as well as 13 patients with benign intracranial hypertension and a control group of 77 volunteers. TMD measurements were carried out using the Marchbanks measurement system analyser and compared between the groups. In 36 patients, invasive measurements of ICP carried out at the same time were compared with the TMD values. A highly significant relationship was found between TMD and ICP but intersubject variability was high and the predictive value of the technique low. Taking the normal range of ICP to be 10-15 mmHg, the predictive limits of the regression are an order of magnitude wider than this and therefore Vm cannot be used as a surrogate for ICP. In conclusion, TMD measurements do not provide a reliable non-invasive measure of ICP in patients with shunted hydrocephalus. PMID:16311455

  11. Pseudotumor cerebri

    MedlinePlus

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension; Benign intracranial hypertension ... Ferri FF. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:640-641. Pless ML. Pseudotumor cerebri. In: Kliegman ...

  12. High Agatston Calcium Score of Intracranial Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effect of intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) calcification on cognitive impairment is uncertain. Our objective was to investigate whether intracranial ICA calcification is a significant cognitive predictor for cognitive impairment. Global cognition and degrees of intracranial ICA calcification of 579 subjects were assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Agatston calcium scoring method, respectively. Other risk factors for cognitive impairment, including age, education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and body mass index, were documented and analyzed for their associations with cognitive function. In univariate analyses, older age, lower education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and higher intracranial ICA Agatston scores were significantly associated with cognitive impairment. In ordinal logistic regression, only age and total intracranial ICA Agatston score were significant risk factors for cognitive impairment. After adjustment for the other documented risk factors, subjects were 7% (95% CI: 5–10; P < 0.001) and 6% (95% CI: 0–13; P = 0.04) more likely to have lower cognitive category with every year increment of age and every 100-point increment of the total intracranial ICA Agatston score respectively. These results suggest an important role of the intracranial ICA calcification on cognitive impairment. PMID:26426620

  13. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: J Kevin ...

  14. Intracranial ROSAI-DORFMAN Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahzoni, Parvin; Zavareh, Mohsen Hani Tabaei; Bagheri, Marzie; Hani, Neda; Moqtader, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a benign lymphohistiocytosis that often involve lymph nodes and present as massive lymphadenopathy with sinus histiocytosis. The disease is rarely associated with intracranial involvement. Herein, we report a 33-years-old man with recent onset of unconsciousness. According to his past medical history, he was suffering from frontal headache, ataxia and dizziness with no sensory or motor defect since August 2010. At initial work up, MRI showed infiltrating mass in the left parietal region. Microscopically, the mass consisted of infiltration of abundant lymphoplasma cells, neutrophils and some histiocytes scattered in fibrotic background. Emperipolesis (lymphocytophagocytosis) of histiocytic cells made the diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease should be added in the list of differential diagnosis for a dural mass mimicking meningioma or cerebral mass mimicking glioma, therefore, immunohistochemical staining for EMA, S100 and CD1a should be performed to rule out the differential diagnosis. PMID:23267385

  15. Isolated Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taufiq, Md.; Khair, Abul; Begum, Ferdousy; Akhter, Shabnam; Shamim Farooq, Md.; Kamal, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a benign histiocytic proliferative disorder of unknown etiology. This rare condition commonly causes massive cervical lymphadenopathy. Intracranial RDD without any nodal involvement is extremely rare. Case Report. A young Bangladeshi male complained of bilateral complete blindness with left sided deafness for about three years. There was no lymphadenopathy. MRI and CT scan of brain suggested an inflammatory/neoplastic (?meningioma) lesion located at left parasellar region which extended frontally to encircle both optic nerves and also to left prepontine area. Histopathologically the lesion was diagnosed as RDD. The patient was treated with steroid and significant clinical improvement observed. Conclusion. The prognosis of intracranial RDD is not poor. It can be treated with surgery with or without corticosteroids, chemotherapy, and so forth. But as the condition is extremely rare and often misdiagnosed, the clinician, radiologist, and histopathologist should have a suspicion in their mind about the possibility of RDD. PMID:26949555

  16. Orbital and Intracranial Effects of Microgravity: 3T MRI Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, L. A.; Sargsyan, A.; Hasan, K. M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Goals and Objectives of this presentation are: 1. To briefly describe a newly discovered clinical entity related to space flight. 2. To describe normal anatomy and pathologic changes of the optic nerve, posterior globe, optic nerve sheath and pituitary gland related to exposure to microgravity. 3. To correlate imaging findings with known signs of intracranial hypertension.

  17. Current Status of the Application of Intracranial Venous Sinus Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Yuan, Yongjie; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The intracranial venous sinus is an important component of vascular disease. Many diseases involve the venous sinus and are accompanied by venous sinus stenosis (VSS), which leads to increased venous pressure and high intracranial pressure. Recent research has focused on stenting as a treatment for VSS related to these diseases. However, a systematic understanding of venous sinus stenting (VS-Stenting) is lacking. Herein, the literature on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), venous pulsatile tinnitus, sinus thrombosis, high draining venous pressure in dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and tumor-caused VSS was reviewed and analyzed to summarize experiences with VS-Stenting as a treatment. The literature review showed that satisfactory therapeutic effects can be achieved through stent angioplasty. Thus, the present study suggests that selective stent release in the venous sinus can effectively treat these diseases and provide new possibilities for treating intracranial vascular disease. PMID:26516306

  18. Elevated Intracranial Pressure Diagnosis with Emergency Department Bedside Ocular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Amin, D.; McCormick, T.; Mailhot, T.

    2015-01-01

    Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter can aid in the diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure in the emergency department. This case report describes a 21-year-old female presenting with 4 months of mild headache and 2 weeks of recurrent, transient binocular vision loss. Though limited by patient discomfort, fundoscopic examination suggested the presence of blurred optic disc margins. Bedside ocular ultrasound (BOUS) revealed wide optic nerve sheath diameters and bulging optic discs bilaterally. Lumbar puncture demonstrated a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure of 54 cm H2O supporting the suspected diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Accurate fundoscopy can be vital to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected elevated intracranial pressure, but it is often technically difficult or poorly tolerated by the photophobic patient. BOUS is a quick and easily learned tool to supplement the emergency physician's fundoscopic examination and help identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure. PMID:26587297

  19. Elevated Intracranial Pressure Diagnosis with Emergency Department Bedside Ocular Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Amin, D; McCormick, T; Mailhot, T

    2015-01-01

    Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter can aid in the diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure in the emergency department. This case report describes a 21-year-old female presenting with 4 months of mild headache and 2 weeks of recurrent, transient binocular vision loss. Though limited by patient discomfort, fundoscopic examination suggested the presence of blurred optic disc margins. Bedside ocular ultrasound (BOUS) revealed wide optic nerve sheath diameters and bulging optic discs bilaterally. Lumbar puncture demonstrated a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure of 54 cm H2O supporting the suspected diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Accurate fundoscopy can be vital to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected elevated intracranial pressure, but it is often technically difficult or poorly tolerated by the photophobic patient. BOUS is a quick and easily learned tool to supplement the emergency physician's fundoscopic examination and help identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure. PMID:26587297

  20. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  1. Mesothelioma - benign-fibrous

    MedlinePlus

    Mesothelioma - benign; Mesothelioma - fibrous; Pleural fibroma; Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura ... other reasons. Other tests that may show benign mesothelioma include: CT scan of the chest Open lung ...

  2. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  3. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  4. The effect of right internal jugular vein cannulation on intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Woda, R P; Miner, M E; McCandless, C; McSweeney, T D

    1996-10-01

    Access to the central venous circulation is often necessary in patients who have elevated intracranial pressure. It has been suggested that a disadvantage of the internal jugular vein approach to the central circulation may be an elevated intracranial pressure. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the effect of right internal jugular vein cannulation on intracranial pressure in patients who are at risk of intracerebral hypertension. Eleven adult patients studied in the intensive care unit were evaluated. The population included those patients who were admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit requiring intracranial pressure monitoring and central venous access. With the intracranial pressure monitor in place, patients were put in supine and 30 degrees head-up positions while intracranial pressure was recorded. The Queckenstedt maneuver was performed on all patients. A central venous line was then placed in the right internal jugular vein, and intracranial pressure was recorded. The Queckenstedt maneuver was again performed in the study population, and intracranial pressure measurements were recorded for the right, left, and bilateral compression of the internal jugular vein. The results of the intracranial pressure measurements before and after placement of the central venous line were statistically analyzed using single-factor analysis of variance over time. The mean Glasgow coma and Apache II scores for the study groups were 8 +/- 4 and 15 +/- 6, respectively. There were no significant differences in heart rate; cerebral perfusion pressure; or systolic, mean, or diastolic pressures throughout the study period. There was no statistical difference found between the intracranial pressures at any time point throughout the study. Furthermore, no difference was found in percentage change from baseline intracranial pressure data throughout the study period. Our results suggest that cannulation of the right internal jugular vein is a safe

  5. Management of raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, J D; Czosnyka, M

    1993-01-01

    This review has been written at an unfortunate time. Novel questions are being asked of the old therapies and there is an abundance of new strategies both to lower ICP and protect the brain against cerebral ischaemia. In the United Kingdom, the problem is to ensure that appropriate patients continue to be referred to centres where clinical trials of high quality can be undertaken. One of the success stories of the past decade has been the decline in the number of road accidents as a result of seat belt legislation, improvements in car design and the drink/driving laws. Hence, fortunately there are fewer patients with head injuries to treat and it is even more important that patients are appropriately referred if studies to assess efficacy of the new strategies are not to be thwarted. The nihilistic concept that intensive investigation with ICP monitoring for patients with diffuse head injury or brain swelling following evacuation of a haematoma or a contusion has no proven beneficial effect on outcome, requires revision. A cocktail of therapies may be required that can be created only when patients are monitored in sufficient detail to reveal the mechanisms underlying their individual ICP problem. Ethical problems may arise over how aggressively therapy for intracranial hypertension should be pursued and for how long. There has always been the concern that cranial decompression or prolonged barbiturate coma may preserve patients but with unacceptably severe disability. Some patients may be salvaged from herniating with massive cerebral infarction with the use of osmotherapy but is the outcome acceptable? Similar considerations apply to some children with metabolic encephalopathies. Where such considerations have been scrutinised in patients with severe head injury, the whole spectrum of outcomes appears to be shifted so that the number of severe disabilities and persistent vegetative states are not increased. However, it is important to be sensitive to such issues

  6. Intracranial pressure monitoring for traumatic brain injury: available evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Stocchetti, N; Longhi, L; Zanier, E R

    2008-05-01

    Following traumatic brain injury, uncontrollable intracranial hypertension remains the most frequent cause of death. Despite general agreement on the deleterious effects of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), however, the evidence supporting the use of ICP monitoring has recently been questioned. The aim of this review was to evaluate the pros and cons of ICP monitoring and to discuss the hypothetical desirability and feasibility of a trial testing the benefits of ICP monitoring. PMID:18414362

  7. Hypothermia for Increased Intracranial Pressure: Is It Dead?

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos; Robertson, Claudia S

    2016-09-01

    Mild to moderate therapeutic hypothermia (HT) has been used to alleviate intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Its main contribution is thought to be via reduction in cerebral metabolic requirement leading both to favorable oxygen/metabolic delivery-demand ratios as well as a reduction of cerebral blood volume resulting in decreased ICP. Nevertheless, HT is a clinically complex, labor-intensive procedure with numerous potential adverse effects. Furthermore, randomized controlled trials suggest either no effect or harm. These facts challenge the role of HT in TBI. We address this challenge by posing three questions that relate to the overarching value of controlling ICP, the effectiveness of HT in reducing ICP, and the benefit-risk ratio of the intervention. We conclude that HT should not be used as an "early" intervention unless as a part of a clinical trial, although it may still have a role in patients with refractory intracranial hypertension. PMID:27443645

  8. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  9. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  10. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect.

  11. [Secondary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is a common disease and a crucial predisposing factor of cardiovascular diseases. Approximately 10% of hypertensive patients are secondary hypertension, a pathogenetic factor of which can be identified. Secondary hypertension consists of endocrine, renal, and other diseases. Primary aldosteronism, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism result in endocrine hypertension. Renal parenchymal hypertension and renovascular hypertension result in renal hypertension. Other diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are also very prevalent in secondary hypertension. It is very crucial to find and treat secondary hypertension at earlier stages since most secondary hypertension is curable or can be dramatically improved by specific treatment. One should keep in mind that screening of secondary hypertension should be done at least once in a daily clinical practice. PMID:26619670

  12. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Hepatitis C Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD NOTE: This is ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension Portal hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure in ...

  13. Exophytic benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Blaschko, Sarah D; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2011-08-01

    A 60-year-old man had incidental finding of a multilobular 8 × 7 × 7-cm mass identified posterior to the urinary bladder in continuity with the prostate. The man's prostate-specific antigen was 1.87, and he denied any lower urinary tract symptoms. A transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy demonstrated benign prostatic tissue. A computed tomography-guided needle aspiration demonstrated a benign epithelium-lined cyst, likely prostatic in origin. Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a proliferation of prostatic epithelial and stromal cells. Although prostatic hyperplasia is usually restricted to the prostate gland, hyperplastic nodules occasionally protrude outside the prostate and rarely form exophytic pelvic masses. PMID:20869104

  14. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  15. The Benign Hamburger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peaslee, Graham; Lantz, Juliette M.; Walczak, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a case study of food poisoning from hamburgers at the fictitious Jill-at-the-Grill to teach the nuclear science behind food irradiation. Includes case teaching notes on the benign hamburger. (ASK)

  16. Benign positional vertigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical practice guideline: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2008;139(5 Suppl 4):S47-S81. ... BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015: ...

  17. Intracranial extra-axial hemangioma in a newborn: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dalsin, Marcos; Silva, Rafael Sodré; Galdino Chaves, Jennyfer Paula; Oliveira, Francine Hehn; Martins Antunes, Ápio Cláudio; Vedolin, Leonardo Modesti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors, and the intracranial counterpart was described in very few cases. Case Description: A newborn presented with an intracranial tumor associated with an arachnoid cyst, diagnosed by antenatal ultrasound at 37 weeks of gestation. Surgery was indicated due to increased head circumference and bulging fontanelle, and a complete resection of an extra-axial red–brown tumor was performed at the 3rd week of life. Microscopy revealed a hemangioma. Conclusion: Hemangioma is a rare differential diagnosis that must be considered in extra-axial intracranial tumors affecting infants and neonates. The radiological features are not helpful in differentiating from other tumors, and surgery is indicated when the diagnosis is uncertain or whenever there are signs of increased intracranial pressure. PMID:27274403

  18. Fluctuating nature of an orbital venous-lymphatic anomaly in association with intracranial vascular malformations: a classical presentation.

    PubMed

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Wyse, Emily; Merbs, Shannath L; Pearl, Monica Smith

    2015-01-01

    Venous-lymphatic anomalies (VLA) are rare and benign congenital lesions of the lymphatic system, composed of endothelial-lined lymphatic cysts. They are most frequently located in the region of the head and neck, and represent 4% of all orbital masses. In those patients with extensive orbital VLAs, a strong association with intracranial vascular anomalies has been reported. Factors known to suddenly increase the size of these lesions include upper respiratory tract infections or intralesional haemorrhage; however, complete spontaneous regression is rare. We report on the classic presentation of a patient with a fluctuating right orbital VLA in association with an intracranial cavernous malformation and intracranial developmental venous anomaly. PMID:26438679

  19. Intracranial haemorrhage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fairhall, Jacob M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a rare, yet potentially devastating event in pregnancy. There is a risk of maternal mortality or morbidity and a significant risk to the unborn child. The risk of haemorrhage increases during the third trimester and is greatest during parturition and the puerperium. ICH can be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid or intraparenchymal. Causes of bleeding include trauma, arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, preeclampsia/eclampsia and venous thrombosis. Urgent neurosurgical conditions generally outweigh obstetric considerations in management decisions, although anaesthetic and surgical modifications can be made to minimize adverse effects to the fetus.

  20. Iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension after gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Albert; Creedon, Kerry; Sahjpaul, Ramesh

    2014-09-01

    Perineural cysts are common lesions of the sacral spine. They have rarely been reported in a presacral location, leading to their misdiagnosis as a gynecological lesion. The authors report the second such case, in a patient undergoing fenestration of what was presumed to be a benign pelvic cyst, and the resultant high-flow CSF leak that occurred. They describe the clinical presentation and manifestations of intracranial hypotension, as well as the pertinent investigations. They also review the literature for the best management options for this condition. Although they are uncommon, large perineural cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis when examining patients with a pelvic lesion. Appropriate imaging investigations should be performed to rule out a perineural cyst. The CSF leak that occurs from iatrogenic cyst fenestration may not respond to traditional first-line treatments for intracranial hypotension and may require early surgical intervention. The authors would recommend neurosurgical involvement prior to definitive treatment. PMID:24905389

  1. Increased Intracranial Pressure in a Boy with Gorham-Stout Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manisha K.; Mittelstaedt, Brent R.; Valentin, Frank E.; Thomas, Linda P.; Carlson, Christian L.; Faux, Brian M.; Hsieh, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD), also known as vanishing bone disease, is a rare disorder, which most commonly presents in children and young adults and is characterized by an excessive proliferation of lymphangiomatous tissue within the bones. This lymphangiomatous proliferation often affects the cranium and, due to the proximate location to the dura surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, can result in CSF leaks manifesting as intracranial hypotension with clinical symptoms to include orthostatic headache, nausea, and vertigo. We present the case of a boy with GSD and a known history of migraine headaches who presented with persistent headaches due to increased intracranial pressure. Although migraine had initially been suspected, he was eventually diagnosed with intracranial hypertension after developing ophthalmoplegia and papilledema. We describe the first known instance of successful medical treatment of increased intracranial pressure in a patient with GSD. PMID:27194986

  2. Increased Intracranial Pressure in a Boy with Gorham-Stout Disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manisha K; Mittelstaedt, Brent R; Valentin, Frank E; Thomas, Linda P; Carlson, Christian L; Faux, Brian M; Hsieh, David T

    2016-01-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD), also known as vanishing bone disease, is a rare disorder, which most commonly presents in children and young adults and is characterized by an excessive proliferation of lymphangiomatous tissue within the bones. This lymphangiomatous proliferation often affects the cranium and, due to the proximate location to the dura surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, can result in CSF leaks manifesting as intracranial hypotension with clinical symptoms to include orthostatic headache, nausea, and vertigo. We present the case of a boy with GSD and a known history of migraine headaches who presented with persistent headaches due to increased intracranial pressure. Although migraine had initially been suspected, he was eventually diagnosed with intracranial hypertension after developing ophthalmoplegia and papilledema. We describe the first known instance of successful medical treatment of increased intracranial pressure in a patient with GSD. PMID:27194986

  3. Benign Essential Blepharospasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Benign Essential Blepharospasm Research Foundation 637 North 7th Street Suite 102 P.O. ... 832-0788 Fax: 409-832-0890 Dystonia Medical Research Foundation 1 East Wacker Drive Suite 2810 Chicago, IL ...

  4. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Gilday, D L; Ash, J M

    1976-01-01

    There is little information in the literature concerning the role of bone scanning in benign bone neoplasms except for sporadic reports. Since the advent of 99mTc-polyphosphate, bone imaging has proven feasible and useful in locating the cause of bone pain, such as in osteoid osteomas, which are not always radiologically apparent, and in evaluating whether or not a radiologic lesion is indeed benign and solitary. Blood-pool images are particularly important in neoplastic disease, since the absence of hyperemia in the immediate postinjection period favors the diagnosis of a benign neoplasm, as does low-grade uptake on the delayed study. The scan, including pinhole magnification images, is especially valuable in diagnosing lesions in the spine and pelvis, which are poorly seen radiologically. We have studied various types of benign bone tumors, including simple and aneurysmal bone cysts, fibrous cortical defects, and nonossifying fibromas, all of which had minimal or no increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical, unless traumatized. Although osteochondromas and enchondromas showed varied accumulation of activity, the scan was useful in differentiating these from sarcomatous lesions. All osteoid osteomas demonstrated marked activity, and could be accurately located preoperatively, as could the extent of fibrous dysplasia. The bone scan in the reticuloses also showed abnormal accumulation of activity, and aided in arriving at the prognosis and treatment of histiocytic bone lesions. PMID:1082170

  5. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume–pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  6. Monitoring of intracranial pressure in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume-pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  7. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Renal hypertension; Hypertension - renovascular; Renal artery occlusion; Stenosis - renal artery; Renal artery stenosis ... Renal artery stenosis is a narrowing or blockage of the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys. The most ...

  8. Hypertension - overview

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    If left untreated, hypertension can lead to the thickening of arterial walls causing its lumen, or blood passage way, to narrow in diameter. ... the narrowed arterial openings. In addition, people with hypertension may be more susceptible to stroke.

  9. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Renal hypertension; Hypertension - renovascular; Renal artery occlusion; Stenosis - renal artery; Renal artery stenosis ... blood pressure to rise. Risk factors for atherosclerosis: High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes High cholesterol Heavy alcohol use Cocaine ...

  10. Ectopic intracranial germinoma.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Samantha; Wu, Xiao; Kalra, Vivek B; Huttner, Anita J; Malhotra, Ajay

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial ectopic germinomas are often associated with synchronous midline disease. Germinomas involving the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare. The reported imaging appearance is not as varied as one might expect and a review of the literature reveals a few common imaging features amongst most ectopic lesions, including cyst formation. We report a 24-year-old man with panhypopituitarism. Neuroimaging revealed three enhancing lesions involving the pituitary infundibulum, the pineal region, and a parenchymal lesion involving the genu of the corpus callosum. The described ectopic mass, a parenchymal lesion, was associated with small peripheral cysts. Stereotactic biopsy and histopathological evaluation revealed this mass to be a germinoma. Following chemotherapy and radiation therapy, there was near-total resolution of the intracranial disease. Preoperative imaging plays an important role, not only in delineating the extent of disease, but also in assisting in generating an appropriate differential diagnosis. Germinomas in the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare but should be considered in the differential of any young patient with a characteristic cystic and solid intra-axial mass. PMID:27050919

  11. [Childhood hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takemura, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    For accurate diagnosis of childhood hypertension, selection of appropriate manchette size according to the child age and the circumstantial size of upper limb is essentially important. In addition, except for the emergency case of hypertension, repeated measurement of blood pressure would be desirable in several weeks interval. Recently, childhood hypertension might be closely related to the abnormality of maternal gestational period caused by the strict diet and the maternal smoking. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease(DOHaD) theory is now highlighted in the pathogenesis of adulthood hypertension. To prevent hypertension of small-for-date baby in later phase of life, maternal education for child nursing should be conducted. In children, secondary hypertension caused by renal, endocrinologic, or malignant disease is predominant rather than idiopathic hypertension. PMID:26619664

  12. Benign familial hyperphosphatasemia

    SciTech Connect

    Siraganian, P.A.; Mulvihill, J.J.; Mulivor, R.A.; Miller, R.W. )

    1989-03-03

    Elevated alkaline phosphatase activity in serum suggests bone or liver disease or a neoplasm but can also indicate pregnancy or another benign condition. A family with benign hyperphosphatasemia was studied to elucidate the genetics and enzyme defect. Serum total alkaline phosphatase activity was greater than the population mean in all six family members, and more than 7 SDs above the mean in two of four offspring. Monoclonal antibodies to three alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, intestinal, placental, and tissue nonspecific demonstrated markedly increased intestinal alkaline phosphatase levels in all family members and significantly elevated liver/bone/kidney activity in the two offspring. Guanidine hydrochloride denaturation of the liver/bone/kidney component showed high alkaline phosphatase activity from liver in both siblings and from bone in one. The mode of inheritance in this family is obscure, but a complex regulation of the products of two different alkaline phosphatase genes seems likely. Steps toward diagnosis are suggested. Early recognition of this benign biochemical abnormality should help to avoid unnecessary diagnostic tests.

  13. Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Janus, Agnieszka; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a severe medical condition which is estimated to appear in 9-18% of hypertensive patients. Due to higher cardiovascular risk, this disorder requires special diagnosis and treatment. The heterogeneous etiology, risk factors and comorbidities of resistant hypertension stand in need of sophisticated evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and select the best therapeutic options, which should consider lifestyle modifications as well as pharmacological and interventional treatment. After having excluded pseudohypertension, inappropriate blood pressure measurement and control as well as the white coat effect, suspicion of resistant hypertension requires an analysis of drugs which the hypertensive patient is treated with. According to one definition - ineffective treatment with 3 or more antihypertensive drugs including diuretics makes it possible to diagnose resistant hypertension. A multidrug therapy including angiotensin - converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to be effective in resistant hypertension treatment. Nevertheless, optional, innovative therapies, e.g. a renal denervation or baroreflex activation, may create a novel pathway of blood pressure lowering procedures. The right diagnosis of this disease needs to eliminate the secondary causes of resistant hypertension e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, atherosclerosis and renal or hormonal disorders. This paper briefly summarizes the identification of the causes of resistant hypertension and therapeutic strategies, which may contribute to the proper diagnosis and an improvement of the long term management of resistant hypertension. PMID:26935512

  14. Analysis of risk factors for perifocal oedema after endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial arterial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lukic, Snezana; Jankovic, Slobodan; Popovic, Katarina Surlan; Bankovic, Dragic; Popovic, Peter; Mijailovic, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Background Endovascular embolization is a treatment of choice for the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, but sometimes is complicated with perianeurysmal oedema. The aim of our study was to establish incidence and outcomes of perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and to reveal possible risk factors for development of this potentially serious complication. Methods In total 119 adult patients with endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysm (performed at Department for Interventional Neuroradiology, Clinical Center, Kragujevac, Serbia) were included in our study. The embolizations were made by electrolite-detachable platinum coils: pure platinum, hydrophilic and combination of platinum and hydrophilic coils. Primary outcome variable was perianeurysmal oedema visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 7, 30 and 90 days after the embolization. Results The perianurysmal oedema appeared in 47.6% of patients treated with hydrophilic coils, in 21.6% of patients treated with platinum coils, and in 53.8% of those treated with mixed type of the coils. The multivariate logistic regression showed that variables associated with occurrence of perianeurysmal oedema are volume of the aneurysm, hypertension, diabetes and smoking habit. Hypertension is the most important independent predictor of the perianeurysmal oedema, followed by smoking and diabetes. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that older patients with larger unruptured intracranial aneurysms, who suffer from diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and have the smoking habit, are under much higher risk of having perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling. PMID:26834520

  15. Malignant hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009:chap 89. Read More Acute kidney failure Alertness - decreased Angina Heart attack Preeclampsia Pulmonary edema Renovascular hypertension Seizures Stroke Update ...

  16. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  17. Trends in cognitive dysfunction following surgery for intracranial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, Manju; Gupta, Sandhya; Mohanty, Manju; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to prospectively assess the cognitive function of patients with intracranial tumors. Methods: The cognitive status of patients with intracranial tumors were prospectively studied before surgery, and later at 1 and 6 months following surgery, on purposive sampling, using validated post graduate institute (PGI) battery for brain dysfunction (score 0–30) with a higher dysfunction rating score indicating poor cognitive status. Results: Out of 23 patients enrolled, 20 could complete the study. They had substantial cognitive dysfunction before surgery (score 17.1 ± 9.4). Though there was no significant improvement (16.9 ± 9.0) at 1 month, the score improved significantly (10.3 ± 9.2) at 6 months following surgery (P = 0.008). The improvement was relatively subdued in intra-axial, malignant, and radiated tumors. Overall, there was a significant improvement in mental balance (P = 0.048), verbal retention of dissimilar pairs (P = 0.01), and recognition (P = 0.01), while dysfunction persisted in the domains of memory, verbal retention to similar pairs, and visual retention. Conclusion: Patients with intracranial tumors have substantial cognitive dysfunction, which tend to show significant improvement beyond 6 months following surgery, especially among tumors, which were extra-axial, benign, and nonirradiated. PMID:27114854

  18. Benign Metastasizing Leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Moss, Joel

    2016-09-01

    Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is a rare and poorly characterized disease affecting primarily premenopausal women. Asymptomatic patients are often diagnosed incidentally by radiographs or other lung-imaging procedures performed for other indications, and the diagnosis is eventually confirmed by biopsy. Patients with BML are usually treated pharmacologically with antiestrogen therapies or surgically with oophorectomy or hysterectomy. Antiestrogen therapy is typically efficacious and, in general, most patients have a favorable prognosis. Asymptomatic patients with a confirmed diagnosis of BML, may be followed conservatively without treatment. PMID:27514603

  19. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  20. Intracranial complications following mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Eyal, Ana; Kronenberg, Jona

    2004-01-01

    Mastoidectomy is a common surgical procedure in otology. However, postoperative complications of various degrees of severity may occur. We present 4 children who underwent mastoidectomy for middle ear and mastoid disease and developed postoperative intracranial complications. One child was operated on for brain abscess 1 week after the initial mastoidectomy. Another child appeared with seizures 5 days after the initial mastoidectomy and a subdural empyema was drained during revision surgery. Large bone defects with exposed middle cranial fossa dura were found at revision surgery in both cases and Proteus vulgaris and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the mastoid and abscess cavities in these children. A small epidural collection was diagnosed in the third patient 2 days after initial mastoid surgery and was managed with intravenous antibiotics only. The other child was found to have sigmoid sinus thrombosis the day after mastoidectomy that was performed for nonresponsive acute mastoiditis. This child received both intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulants. Timely revision surgery, combinations of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins with vancomycin or metronidazole and the addition of anticoagulants in cases of sinus thrombosis can lead to full recovery. PMID:15689642

  1. Benign follicular tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Oscar; Cardoso, José Carlos; Reis, José Pedro; Ramos, Leonor; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Inês; Baptista, António Poiares

    2015-01-01

    Benign follicular tumors comprise a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a common histogenesis and display morphological features resembling one or several portions of the normal hair follicle, or recapitulate part of its embryological development. Most cases present it as clinically nondescript single lesions and essentially of dermatological relevance. Occasionally, however, these lesions be multiple and represent a cutaneous marker of complex syndromes associated with an increased risk of visceral neoplasms. In this article, the authors present the microscopic structure of the normal hair follicle as a basis to understand the type and level of differentiation of the various follicular tumors. The main clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of benign follicular tumors are then discussed, including dilated pore of Winer, pilar sheath acanthoma, trichoadenoma, trichilemmoma, infundibuloma, proliferating trichilemmal cyst/tumor, trichoblastoma and its variants, pilomatricoma, trichodiscoma/fibrofolliculoma, neurofollicular hamartoma and trichofolliculoma. In addition, the main syndromes presenting with multiple follicular tumors are also discussed, namely Cowden, Birt-Hogg-Dubé, Rombo and Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndromes, as well as multiple tumors of follicular infundibulum (infundibulomatosis) and multiple trichoepitheliomas. Although the diagnosis of follicular tumors relies on histological examination, we highlight the importance of their knowledge for the clinician, especially when in presence of patients with multiple lesions that may be the cutaneous marker of a cancer-prone syndrome. The dermatologist is therefore in a privileged position to recognize these lesions, which is extremely important to provide further propedeutic, appropriate referral and genetic counseling for these patients. PMID:26734858

  2. Management of Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hoak, David A; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is a common cause of stroke worldwide, causing approximately 10 % of strokes in the USA and up to 50 % in Asian populations. Recurrent stroke risks are particularly high in those with a stenosis of 70 % or more and a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke. Warfarin has been associated with higher major hemorrhage rates and no reduction of recurrent stroke compared to aspirin in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. After early trials showed the feasibility of stenting, two randomized trials compared stenting plus medical management to medical management alone in symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Stenting was linked with increased risk and showed no benefit in any subpopulation of patients. Aggressive medical management in the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial was associated with half the risk of stroke compared to that in similar patients in a previous symptomatic intracranial stenosis trial after adjustment of confounding characteristics. Aggressive medical management comprises risk factor control, including a target systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, a low density lipoprotein <70 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1C <7.0 %, and lifestyle management that incorporates exercise, smoking cessation and weight management, and the use of antithrombotics. PMID:27443379

  3. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  4. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation. PMID:18769797

  5. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  6. Treatment of intracranial foreign body.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Dursun, Recep; Kiymaz, Nejmi

    2014-07-01

    Craniospinal penetrating foreign body (FB) injuries are interesting, but rarely observed, cases. They are important in terms of the complications that they may cause. The etiologies of craniospinal penetrating injuries and intracranial FB are also different. Though a sewing needle is more rarely seen in an intracranial FB, it may occur as atttempted infanticide or as a result of an accident especially in early childhood before the closure of fontanels. We detected an intracranial sewing needle in the head radiograph of a case admitted to the emergency department for another reason. We present this case since this is a rare injury and the etiologies of craniospinal penetrating foreign body have different characteristics. PMID:25255596

  7. Intravenous labetolol in treating hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion for procedural sedation.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Moni, Amarnath; Mathews, Lailu; Balaji, Sudarshan

    2016-03-01

    Dexmedetomidine is widely used for procedural sedation because of its unique combination of sedation, analgesia, and anxiolysis with minimal respiratory depression. Transient hypertension has been reported during the use of dexmedetomidine which is usually benign and is taken over by the hypotensive response on continuing the infusion. We report a case of hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion used for procedural sedation, necessitating discontinuation of the infusion and treatment of hypertension. The dilemmas involved in treating hypertension caused by dexmedetomidine are discussed. PMID:26897444

  8. Hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, E B; Escalante, C

    1989-07-01

    Hypertensive crisis is an acute emergency requiring aggressive management. Its incidence has decreased in recent years but still is prevalent in the medical community. From review of past and present treatment regimens, the following recommendations can be considered. (1) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated CHF, sodium nitroprusside is still an excellent agent. It has a rapid onset of action and blood pressure can be easily titrated. Nitroglycerin is also another agent that can be used in this situation. (2) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated aortic dissection, trimethophan camsylate is the preferred agent. An alternative choice is the combination of nitroprusside and labetalol. (3) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated myocardial ischemia, an excellent choice is nitroglycerin. Labetalol also should be considered in this situation. (4) In the treatment of hypertension during pregnancy, hydralazine is still a good choice. Labetalol has also been shown to be efficacious. (5) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated cerebral ischemia, the following drugs should be considered: nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, and labetalol. The most important attribute of these agents is that they are nonsedating and rapid in onset. (6) In the treatment of postoperative hypertension the choices best suited are labetalol, enalapril, nitroprusside, and nitroglycerin. These agents are rapid in onset and all can be administered intravenously. PMID:2670090

  9. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  10. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  11. [Dynamics of intracranial pressure in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A S; Burov, S A; Petrikov, S S; Asratian, S A; Gorshkov, K M; Krylov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the value of ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy. 12 patients with massive ischemic stroke were performed ICP monitoring after decompressive craniotomy. We identified 3 types of ICP dynamics: a) normal ICP, which no need to treat; b) ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more in postoperative period, which can be treated by nonsurgical therapy; c) refractory to therapy ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more with development of intracranial hypertension. We consider that ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy can be useful for optimization of the therapy and correction of intracranial hypertension. PMID:24341041

  12. Transethmoidal encephalocele after reduction of high intracranial pressure in aqueductal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Guive; Alavi, Ehsan; Jalessi, Maryam; Haddadian, Karim; Faramarzi, Faezeh

    2014-01-01

    Acquired non-traumatic transethmoidal encephaloceles are very infrequent lesions that are generally caused by a tumor or hydrocephalus. As far as we know, there is no reported case of encephalocele after CSF diversion in the literature. We present a 25-year-old woman with hydrocephalus due to aquiductal stenosis who was treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Nine months later, she had developed rhinorrhea and on imaging she had a transethmoidal encephalocele. She underwent endonasal endoscopic repair of the defect and removal of herniated parenchyma. CSF diversion to parasellar cisterns is not a known iatrogenic cause of basal encephalocele and is not noted elsewhere as a complication of third ventriculostomy. However, as third ventriculostomy is performed usually for intracranial hypertension treatment and intracranial hypertension itself is a known but rare cause of lacunar skull defect and encephalocele, this co-incidence may occur. PMID:24535796

  13. [Benign endobronchial tumors].

    PubMed

    Nikhtianov, Kh

    1980-01-01

    Endobronchial localizations of benign neoplasms are met with in 24.5 per cent of the cases. Right lung localizations are more frequent. More than half of them are broadly based (57.5 per cent). In most of the cases it is a matter of nonepithelial tumours of which a greater intensity is displayed by hamartomas /7/, vascular /4/ and neurogenic /3/ neoformations. The size of endobronchial tumours varies from 1 to 10 cm. Cases measuring 1-3 cm are the most numerous. Those of the "iceberg" type appear to be larger. The size per se has a relative importance for the clinical picture. Endobronchial tumours exhibit a clear cut clinical picture, and run a clinical course in three stages, determined by the degree of bronchial obturation and longstanding of the condition. The most common symptoms are coughing /80.7 per cent/, expectoration /50.0 per cent/, rales /57.6 per cent/, dullness /38.4 per cent/ and lacking respiration /38.4 per cent/. The nosological entity by itself is less conclusive for the clinical course. The X-ray data have orientation and by no means decisive significance for the diagnosis. The "crab pincers" sign in the bronchial lumen during bronchography has a definite importance. Bronchoscopy in conjunction with biopsy is a dependable method of preoperative diagnosing. It contributes greatly to the nosological diagnosis. Even nowadays, the diagnosis of endobronchial tumours is difficult. A rather exact diagnosis can be made intraoperatively, whereas the most accurate diagnosis is established only after histological study. The treatment of endobronchial benign neoplasms is operative. The number of medium /lobectomies/ and extensive /pulmonectomies/ pulmonary resections is considerable. In case of early diagnosis and intervention, sparing resection is the naturally indicated size of operation - mainly resection and plasty of the bronchi without lobectomy. The advantages of circular resection are substantial. Reconstructive operations of "clarinet" and

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  15. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  16. [Hypertensive retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Genevois, Olivier; Paques, Michel

    2010-01-20

    Acute hypertensive retinopathy should be distinguished from retinal arteriolosclerosis. The presence of microvascular abnormalities in the ocular fundus increases the risk of heart and/or brain attack. At the clinical level, the current classification of chronic hypertensive retinopathy is based on the long-term risk of stroke. In research, a great number of studies are focused on the predictive value of retinal vascular diameters related to the general micro- and macrovascular disease. PMID:20222306

  17. Intracranial haemorrhage and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Cheah, I G; Kasim, M S; Shafie, H M; Khoo, T H

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in child abuse cases in developed countries. However, similar data are not available in most developing countries. This study therefore aimed to determine the incidence of intracranial haemorrhage amongst all cases of child physical abuse, the nature of the injuries incurred, and the morbidity and mortality resulting therefrom. Among 369 cases of physical abuse seen over a 4-year period, 41 (11.4%) had intracranial haemorrhage, of whom 37 (90%) were 2 years old or less. A history of trauma was present in only eight (20%), of which only two were compatible with the injuries incurred. Subdural haemorrhages accounted for 80% of the cases, with skull fractures present in only nine cases. Fifty-four per cent of the 37 children aged 2 years of age or less had no external signs of trauma, but 11 of them had retinal haemorrhages. This is in contrast to the children older than 2 years of age who all had external signs of trauma. The overall prognosis was dismal with an early mortality of almost 30% (13 cases) and at least seven cases with severe neurological sequelae. These findings are comparable with studies from developed countries which have established that non-accidental injury must be considered as a cause of intracranial haemorrhage in any young child, despite the absence of external signs of trauma. PMID:7880096

  18. Intracranial Schwannoma in a Cow

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, S. A.; Kasari, T. R.; Parent, J. M.; Naylor, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A nine year old Hereford crossbred cow with a history of progressive neurological signs was referred to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon. A large intracranial mass, histologically identified as a schwannoma, was found to be compressing the left brain stem and appeared to have arisen from the left fifth cranial nerve. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17422375

  19. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  1. Systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elliott, William J

    2007-04-01

    Hypertension is a growing public health problem worldwide. Only 37% of American hypertensives currently have their blood pressures controlled. Hypertension is traditionally diagnosed in the medical office, but both home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can help. Lifestyle modifications are recommended for everyone who has higher than "normal" blood pressure (<120/80 mm Hg). Voluminous clinical trial data support beginning drug therapy with low-dose chlorthalidone, unless the patient has a specific indication for a different drug. Additional drugs (typically in the sequence, angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker, calcium antagonist, beta-blocker, alpha-blocker, aldosterone antagonist, direct vasodilator, and centrally acting alpha(2)-agonist) can be added to achieve the blood pressure goal (usually <140/90 mm Hg, but <130/80 mm Hg for diabetics and those with chronic kidney disease). Special circumstances exist for treatment of hypertension in pregnancy, in childhood, in the elderly, and in both extremes of blood pressure (pre-hypertension or hypertensive emergencies). PMID:17398315

  2. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  3. Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Bilal; Forde, James C; Thomas, Dominique Dana Marie; Laor, Leanna; Hossack, Tania; Woo, Henry H; Te, Alexis E; Kaplan, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which causes lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), is a common diagnosis among the ageing male population with increasing prevalence. Many risks factors, both modifiable and non-modifiable, can increase the risk of development and progression of BPH and LUTS. The symptoms can be obstructive (resulting in urinary hesitancy, weak stream, straining or prolonged voiding) or irritative (resulting in increased urinary frequency and urgency, nocturia, urge incontinence and reduced voiding volumes), or can affect the patient after micturition (for example, postvoid dribble or incomplete emptying). BPH occurs when both stromal and epithelial cells of the prostate in the transitional zone proliferate by processes that are thought to be influenced by inflammation and sex hormones, causing prostate enlargement. Patients with LUTS undergo several key diagnostic investigations before being diagnosed with BPH. Treatment options for men with BPH start at watchful waiting and progress through medical to surgical interventions. For the majority of patients, the starting point on the treatment pathway will be dictated by their symptoms and degree of bother. PMID:27147135

  4. Baritosis: a benign pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Doig, A T

    1976-01-01

    Baritosis is one of the benign pneumoconioses in which inhaled particulate matter lies in the lungs for years without producing symptoms, abnormal physical signs, incapacity for work, interference with lung function, or liability to develop pulmonary or bronchial infections or other thoracic disease. Owing to the high radio-opacity of barium, the discrete shadows in the chest radiograph are extremely dense. Even in the most well-marked cases with extreme profusion of the opacities, massive shadows do not occur. When exposure to barium dust ceases the opacities begin slowly to disappear. Nine cases of baritosis occurring in a small factory in which barytes was crushed, graded, and milled are described. Two of the cases occurred after only 18 and 21 month's exposure, and 9 of the 10 men employed for more than one and a half years had baritosis. Five of the affected men examined at intervals since their exposure to barytes ceased in 1964 showed marked clearing of their radiological abnormalities. Images PMID:1257935

  5. Hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C

    1995-11-01

    Hypertensive emergencies are uncommon and physiologically diverse. Consequently, it is difficult for most physicians to develop a familiarity with all the different hypertensive crises and with all drugs available for treating them (Table 4). Clinicians should not agonize over which is the perfect therapeutic agent for a particular emergency, but instead, they should focus on scrupulous monitoring and familiarize themselves with a few agents that will serve in most situations. Generally, these agents will be sodium nitroprusside and nitroglycerin. Vigilant neurologic monitoring is mandatory in all hypertensive emergencies. The early symptoms and signs of cerebral hypoperfusion can be vague and subtle, but if recognized, serious complications of therapy can be avoided. Remember, the patient may still be hypertensive. Avoid acute (during the first hour) reductions in MAP of more than 20% whenever possible; subsequent reductions should be gradual. In patients known to have markedly elevated ICP and who need acute reductions in their BP, serious consideration should be given to direct monitoring of the ICP so that CPP can be maintained within safe limits. In general, oral agents should not be used for the treatment of hypertensive emergencies. Intravenous Labetalol and intravenous nicardipine are not suitable for general use in hypertensive emergencies. In special situations (e.g., perioperative hypertension and subarachnoid hemorrhage), however, they may be employed. Their role may expand with further study. Trimethaphan may be superior to nitroprusside for hypertension complicated by elevated ICP or cerebral dysfunction. Realistically, most physicians will continue to use nitroprusside. Intense neurologic monitoring is more important than the specific agent used. Nitroglycerin is the agent of choice for acute ischemic heart disease complicated by severe hypertension; if it fails, use nitroprusside. For aortic dissection, the combination of nitroprusside and IV

  6. Hypertensive urgency: an important aetiology of rebound hypertension.

    PubMed

    Malaty, John; Malaty, Irene A

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year-old African-American man with a history of hypertension, end-stage kidney disease (on haemodialysis) and previous cocaine misuse presented to the emergency room with a sudden onset of severe headache and diaphoresis without other neurological or cardiovascular signs/symptoms. He checked his blood pressure at home and found it to be 230/130. It did not improve despite taking two serial doses of oral clonidine 0.3 mg. Evaluation with head CT and lumbar puncture demonstrated no acute intracranial process, such as subarachnoid haemorrhage. These symptoms started after he took Libido-Max, an over-the-counter supplement for erectile dysfunction. This supplement includes yohimbine, an α-2 antagonist, which counteracts the effects of oral clonidine, one of his routine antihypertensive medications. This led to rebound hypertension and made his hypertensive urgency resistant to oral clonidine. He was successfully treated with intravenous labetalol and his symptoms quickly resolved after lowering of his blood pressure. PMID:25336552

  7. Petrous apex cephalocoele: contribution of coexisting intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Duran, S; Hatipoglu, H G; Cılız, D S; Elverici, E; Sakman, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to show the MRI findings of petrous apex cephalocoele (PAC) and the other intracranial pathologies that coexist with PAC, and to discuss the contribution of the co-existing pathologies to aetiopathogenesis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of our imaging archive for the period from January 2012 to October 2013 revealed 13 patients with PAC (12 females and 1 male; age range, 26–69 years). 11 patients underwent MRI examination of the cranium, and 2 patients underwent MRI examination of the sellar region. We evaluated the lesions for content, signal intensity, enhancement, relation to petrous apex and Meckel's cave. Images were also evaluated for coexisting pathologies. Results: The presenting symptoms included headache, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and trigeminal neuropathy. All patients had PAC. All lesions were located posterolateral to the Meckel's cave and were isointense with CSF signal on all pulse sequences. All lesions were continuous with Meckel's cave. Coexisting pathologies included intracranial aneurysmal dilatation, empty sella, mass in hypophysis, arachnoid cyst, inferior herniation of parahippocampal gyrus and optic nerve sheath CSF distension. Conclusion: Coexistence with other intracranial pathologies supports the possibility of CSF imbalance and/or intracranial hypertension in the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. Advances in knowledge: This study examined the contribution of the co-existing intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. PMID:25651410

  8. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  9. Diagnosing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Padwal, Raj; Cloutier, Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To highlight the 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension. Quality of evidence A systematic search was performed current to August 2014 by a Cochrane Collaboration librarian using the MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The search results were critically appraised by the CHEP subcommittee on blood pressure (BP) measurement and diagnosis, and evidence-based recommendations were presented to the CHEP Central Review Committee for independent review and grading. Finally, the findings and recommendations were presented to the Recommendations Task Force for discussion, debate, approval, and voting. The main recommendations are based on level II evidence. Main message Based on the most recent evidence, CHEP has made 4 recommendations in 2 broad categories for 2015 to improve BP measurement and the way hypertension is diagnosed. A strong recommendation is made to use electronic BP measurement in the office setting to replace auscultatory BP measurement. For patients with elevated office readings, CHEP is recommending early use of out-of-office BP measurement, preferably ambulatory BP measurement, in order to identify early in the process those patients with white-coat hypertension. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostic accuracy are critical to optimizing hypertension management in Canada. The annual updates provided by CHEP ensure that practitioners have up-to-date evidence-based information to inform practice. PMID:26564654

  10. [Portopulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Halank, M; Miehlke, S; Kolditz, M; Hoeffken, G

    2005-07-01

    Patients with portal hypertension may develop pulmonary complications such as hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) or portopulmonary hypertension (PPHT). PPHT is defined as elevated pulmonary pressure, elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and portal hypertension in the absence of other known causes pulmonary hypertension. Various factors such as hyperdynamic circulation, volume overload, and circulating vasoactive mediators are suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of PPHT. The prognosis of patients with severe PPHT is significantly reduced due to the risk of right heart failure. In patients with moderate to severe PPHT liver transplantation is associated with a significantly increased mortality. The chief symptom of PPHT may be dyspnoe in the presence of typical histomorphological alterations comparable with idiopathic pulmonary hypertension. Continuous intravenous application of prostacyclin is currently regarded as the treatment of choice for patients with severe PPHT. Inhaled prostacyclin or its analogue iloprost or oral treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan may be promising alternatives which should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:16001350

  11. Intracranial nonvestibular neurinomas: Young neurosurgeons’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Forhad Hossain; Haque, Mohammod R.; Kawsar, Khandkar A.; Sarker, Mainul H.; Hasan, Mahmudul; Goel, Atul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Neurinoma arising from other than nonvestibular cranial nerves is less prevalent. Here we present our experiences regarding the clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, and the outcome of nonvestibular cranial nerve neurinomas. Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2011, the recorded documents of operated nonvestibular intracranial neurinomas were retrospectively studied for clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, complications, follow-up, and outcomes. Results: The average follow-up was 24.5 months. Total number of cases was 30, with age ranging from 9 to 60 years. Sixteen cases were males and 14 were females. Nonvestibular cranial nerve schwannomas most commonly originated from trigeminal nerve followed by glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve. There were three abducent nerve schwannomas that are very rare. There was no trochlear nerve schwannoma. Two glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve schwannomas extended into the neck through jugular foramen and one extended into the upper cervical spinal canal. Involved nerve dysfunction was a common clinical feature except in trigeminal neurinomas where facial pain was a common feature. Aiming for no new neurodeficit, total resection of the tumor was done in 24 cases, and near-total resection or gross total resection or subtotal resection was done in 6 cases. Preoperative symptoms improved or disappeared in 25 cases. New persistent deficit occurred in 3 cases. Two patients died postoperatively. There was no recurrence of tumor till the last follow-up. Conclusion: Nonvestibular schwannomas are far less common, but curable benign lesions. Surgical approach to the skull base and craniovertebral junction is a often complex and lengthy procedure associated with chances of significant morbidity. But early diagnosis, proper investigations, and evaluation, along with appropriate decision making and surgical planning with microsurgical techniques are the

  12. Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo Yuan; Zong, Miao; Zong, Wen Jing; Sun, Yan Hui; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Hong Bo

    2016-10-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare histioproliferative disorder that only occasionally involves the central nervous system. We present the diagnosis and treatment of five patients with intracranial RDD. The patients were preoperatively misdiagnosed as meningioma or eosinophilic granuloma. All five patients were treated by total or subtotal surgical resection and none of them experienced recurrence. Histopathological examination showed a characteristic emperipolesis, the lymphocytes were engulfed in the S-100 protein and CD68 positive histiocytes, with negative expression of CD1a. Preoperative diagnosis of intracranial RDD is still challenging because the lesion is usually a dural-based lesion that mimics a meningioma. Surgical resection is an effective treatment and radiotherapy, steroid and chemotherapy has not demonstrated reliable therapeutic efficiency. PMID:27561856

  13. Clinical Analysis of Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Joo; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Sung; Lee, Youn-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracranial hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are rare tumors with aggressive behavior, including local recurrence and distant metastasis. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of grossly total resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for these tumors. Methods A total of 13 patients treated for intracranial HPC from January 1995 through May 2013 were included in this retrospective study. We analyzed the clinical presentations, radiologic appearances, treatment results, and follow-up outcomes, as well as reviewed other studies. Results The ages of the patients at the time of diagnosis ranged from 26 to 73 years (mean : 48 years). The majority of the patients were male (92.3%), and the majority of the tumors were located in the parasagittal and falx. The ratio of intracranial HPCs to meningiomas was 13 : 598 in same period, or 2.2%. Seven patients (53.8%) had anaplastic HPCs. Nine patients (69.2%) underwent gross total tumor resection in the first operation without mortality. Eleven patients (84.6%) underwent postoperative adjuvant RT. Follow-up period ranged from 13 to 185 months (mean : 54.3 months). The local recurrence rate was 46.2% (6/13), and there were no distant metastases. The 10-year survival rate after initial surgery was 83.9%. The initial mean Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) was 70.8 and the final mean KPS was 64.6. Conclusion Gross total tumor resection upon initial surgery is very important. We believe that adjuvant RT is helpful even with maximal tumor resection. Molecular biologic analyses and chemotherapy studies are required to achieve better outcomes in recurrent intracranial HPCs. PMID:24294454

  14. Intracranial ependymoma: factors affecting outcome.

    PubMed

    Massimino, Maura; Buttarelli, Francesca R; Antonelli, Manila; Gandola, Lorenza; Modena, Piergiorgio; Giangaspero, Felice

    2009-03-01

    Ependymomas account for 2-9% of all neuroepithelial tumors, amounting to 6-12% of all intracranial tumors in children and up to 30% of those in children younger than 3 years. Recent findings provide evidence that intracranial and spinal ependymomas share similar molecular profiles with the radial glia of their corresponding locations. The management of intracranial ependymoma is still not optimal. The 5-year progression-free survival for children with ependymoma ranges between 30 and 50% with a worse prognosis for patients with residual disease after surgery. The prognostic relevance of most factors are still being debated. Recent studies, in which the current WHO classification criteria were applied, reported the relationship between histological grade and outcome. Biomolecular studies have identified that gain of 1q25 and EGFR overexpression correlate to poor prognosis, whereas low expression of nucleolin correlated with a favorable outcome. Ependymomas have been considered a 'surgical disease', where completeness of excision can be reached in approximately half of the cases. At present the standard treatment is radiation therapy for all patients after gross-total or near-total resection. For high-risk patients, with residual tumor, an interesting, although experimental, approach could be chemotherapy followed by secondary surgery and postoperative conformal irradiation. PMID:19284379

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood ... heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and ... of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  16. Portopulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong; Han, Guohong; Fan, Daiming

    2016-07-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) refers to the condition that pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occur in the stetting of portal hypertension. The development of PoPH is thought to be independent of the severity of portal hypertension or the etiology or severity of liver disease. PoPH results from excessive vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling, and proliferative and thrombotic events within the pulmonary circulation that lead to progressive right ventricular failure and ultimately to death. Untreated PoPH is associated with a poor prognosis. As PoPH is frequently asymptomatic or symptoms are generally non-specific, patients should be actively screened for the presence of PoPH. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography is a useful non-invasive screening tool, but a definitive diagnosis requires invasive hemodynamic confirmation by right heart catheterization. Despite a dearth of randomized, prospective data, an ever-expanding clinical experience shows that patients with PoPH benefit from therapy with PAH-specific medications including with endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and/or prostanoids. Due to high perioperative mortality, transplantation should be avoided in those patients who have severe PoPH that is refractory to medical therapy. PMID:27002212

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anticoagulants (blood-thinning medicine) Calcium channel blockers Diuretics (water pills) Digoxin Your doctor will decide what type of medicine is right for you. In some cases, people who have pulmonary hypertension need surgical treatment. Surgical treatment options include a lung transplant and ...

  18. Hypertensive leucocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rajkumari, Rolinda; Laishram, Deben; Thiyam, Joshna; Javan, Ng

    2013-04-01

    There are studies showing association of high WBC count with the higher incidence of hypertension though a few are done in the Indian population. The present study was conducted with the view to find any significant increase in total leucocyte count and differential leucocyte count in hypertensive patient Twenty-seven hypertensives with 12 males and 15 females and 27 age and sex matched control subjects (normotensive) were studied. Hypertension was defined when the systolic BP > or = 140 mmHg or diastolic BP > or = 90 mmHg or history of taking antihypertensive medicine. Three blood pressure recordings at an interval of 2 minutes were taken after the patient was made to sit for 30 minutes with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer in the left arm. The disappearance of sound was used for diastolic blood pressure. Blood was drawn into EDTA containing vials. Two separate counts were performed: First for total leucocyte count (TLC) and second for determination of percentage of polymorphonuclear cells. For the TLC, 0.5 part of blood mixed with 10 part of Turk's fluid followed by counting of leucocyte in a counting chamber under light microscope. The percentage of polymorphonuclear leucocyte was performed on a slide after making the slide and staining it with Leishman's stain. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was performed using Wintrobe's methods. The first 1 hour reading on the Wintrobe's tube was taken for analysis. The total leucocyte count (TLC) for the study group as compared to the controls were 7413.70 +/- 735.45 cells/cmm and 5236.30 +/- 528.77 cells/ cmm which was statistically significant. The mean percentage neutrophils were 62.04 +/- 4.99 for study group and 53.00 +/- 3.44 for the controls; the mean percentage lymphocytes for the study group and the controls were 34.37 +/- 4.55 and 39.11 +/- 4.40 respectively. Both the mean percentage neutrophils and lymphocytes showed significant differences. The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) also showed

  19. Young Women with a Long Past of Resistant Hypertension Cured after Surgery of Severe Bilateral Ostial Renal Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Simonnet, Blandine; Deharo, Pierre; Rouabah, Karim; Silhol, François; Soler, Raphael; Bartoli, Jean Michel; Lévrier, Olivier; Bartoli, Michel Alain; Magnan, Pierre Edouard; Sarlon-Bartoli, Gabrielle

    2016-07-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is an underdiagnosed disease which can affect young people and with poor prognosis such as dissection or aneurysm rupture if unknown. This case illustrates a multi-vessel FMD with symptomatic severe bilateral ostial renal artery stenosis and intracranial aneurysms. One of the original features is a very late delay to diagnosis with 23 years between onset of hypertension and renal stenosis diagnosis, particularly due to lower quality of initial CT scan with milder and uncommon abnormalities. The experiment neuroradiologist had suspected the diagnosis of renal FMD because she developed intracranial aneurysms and he confirmed this diagnosis with an artery renal contrast injection during an intracranial angiogram Because of very tight and short stenosis, surgery was chosen for treatment and permitted the cure of hypertension, with normal home blood pressure after 6 months. Several particularities of FMD were presented in this case: important delay diagnosis due to rare lesion and lower sensitivity of CT in this form, the possibility to perform an angiography in high suspicion of FMD, poor prognosis risk with intracranial aneurisms and premature birth child, and the choice for surgery with cure of hypertension. We thought that hypertension etiologic evaluation must be repeated in case of resistant hypertension in young patients, particularly when they developed intracranial aneurysms. PMID:27174348

  20. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept. PMID:21862201

  1. Neisseria sicca meningitis following intracranial hemorrhage and ventriculostomy tube placement.

    PubMed

    Carter, J Elliot; Mizell, Kelly N; Evans, Tara N

    2007-12-01

    A normal component of the flora of the oropharynx, Neisseria sicca was first isolated in 1906 and has since been reported as a rare cause of various human infections including endocarditis, pneumonia, sinusitis, sepsis, and urethritis. We report the case of a 44-year-old African-American female with a history of hypertension who presented with complaints of right frontal headache, nausea, photophobia, and vomiting. A computed tomography scan of the patient's brain showed a large subarachnoid hemorrhage, and an arteriogram confirmed a large posterior communicating artery aneurysm. A ventriculostomy tube was placed, and the patient subsequently developed an elevated temperature and elevated white blood cell count. Cerebrospinal fluid studies showed elevated protein and glucose levels and cultures positive for N. sicca. This is only the seventh reported case of culture-proven meningitis related to N. sicca, and the first reported case associated with intracranial hemorrhage and ventriculostomy tube placement. PMID:17904282

  2. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  3. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  4. The rare benign liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Skalicky, T; Treska, V; Liska, V; Sutnar, A; Molacek, J; Mirka, H; Ferda, J; Ohlidalova, K

    2007-01-01

    As opposed to malignant secondary tumors, metastases of the colorectal carcinoma are benign tumors of the liver that are quite rare in the Czech Republic. From the 55 patients operated on since 2000 at our department for benign liver tumors, the most frequent are haemangiomas, focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and hepatocelular adenoma. Only 7.3% of them form a different histological type of a tumor than this most frequently occurring trio of tumors. The authors describe three cases of rather rare liver tumors with benign behavior that have the potential of becoming malignant. It concerns mucin producing biliary tumors, which correspond to the pancreatic intraductal papillary mucin tumor, hepatic cystadenoma with ovarian stroma and a liver hamartoma in an adult patient (Ref 13). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:17694811

  5. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    Salako, Babatunde L.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Cooper, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH), isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH), and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH). Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5%) and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7%) were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2%) was higher among males (P = 0.048). Female subjects were more obese (P < 0.0001) and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations. PMID:25389499

  6. Intracranial volume in craniosynostotic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Burrows, A M; Wigginton, W; Singhal, V K; Losken, H W; Smith, T D; Dechant, J; Towbin, A; Cooper, G M; Towbin, R; Siegel, M I

    1998-05-01

    Although craniosynostosis alters brain growth direction resulting in compensatory changes in the neurocranium, it has been suggested that such compensations occur with little reduction in intracranial volume (ICV). This hypothesis was tested in a rabbit model with nonsyndromic, familial coronal suture synostosis. Cross-sectional three-dimensional computed tomographic head scans were obtained from 79 rabbits (25 normal, 28 with delayed-onset synostosis, and 26 with early-onset synostosis) at 25, 42, and 126 days of age. Intracranial contents were reconstructed and indirect ICV was calculated. Results revealed that by 25 days of age the intracranial contents from early-onset synostosed rabbit skulls showed rostral (anterior) constrictions and a "beaten copper" morphology in the parietal and temporal regions compared with the other two groups. These deformities increased in severity with age. Quantitatively, ICV was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 7% in rabbits with early-onset synostosis compared with both control rabbits and rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis at 25 days of age. By 126 days of age, ICV in rabbits with synostosis was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by 11% in early-onset synostosis and by 8% in delayed-onset synostosis compared with normal rabbits. Results suggest that in rabbits with uncorrected craniosynostosis, compensatory changes in the neurocranium were not adequate to allow normal expansion of the neurocapsular matrix. Further research is needed to determine if ICV reduction is correlated with cerebral atrophy or cerebral spinal fluid (i.e., ventricular or subarachnoid) space compression in this model. PMID:9693554

  7. Transnasal, intracranial penetrating injury treated endoscopically.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Erdem Atalay; Okan, Cinemre; Pelin, Kesapli

    2006-04-01

    Intracranial penetrating injury through the nose is uncommon. We present the case of a four-year-old girl who sustained a transnasal, intracranial penetrating injury with a sharp wooden object. We performed endoscopic removal of the foreign body and repair of the associated cerebrospinal fluid fistula. PMID:16623978

  8. Megadolicho vascular malformation of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1981-01-01

    A patient is presented suffering a hemiparesis. Megadolicho-vascular malformation of the intracranial part of the internal carotid arteries and some of its branches and of the basilar artery was suggested by CT and confirmed by angiography. The value of CT compared with angiography in relation to intracranial megadolicho vascular malformations is discussed. PMID:6273040

  9. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  10. Pathogenesis of benign adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel

    2010-12-01

    Most adrenocortical tumors (ACT) are benign unilateral adrenocortical adenomas, often discovered incidentally. Exceptionally, ACT are bilateral. However bilateral ACT have been very helpful to progress in the pathophysiology of ACT. Although most ACT are of sporadic origin, they may also be part of syndromic and/or hereditary disorders. The identification of the genetics of familial diseases associated with benign ACT has been helpful to define somatic alterations in sporadic ACT: for example, identification of PRKAR1A mutations in Carney complex or alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Coli. Components of the cAMP signaling pathway-for example, adrenocorticotropic-hormone receptors and other membrane receptors, Gs protein, phosphodiesterases and protein kinase A-can be altered to various degrees in benign cortisol-secreting ACT. These progress have been important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of benign ACT, but already have profound implications for clinical management, for example in unraveling the genetic origin of disease in some patients with ACT. They also have therapeutic consequences, and should help to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:21115158

  11. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  12. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kapapa, Thomas; Röhrer, Stefan; Struve, Sabine; Petscher, Matthias; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N = 4) or multiple (N = 6) doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group) who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P ≤ 0.05. Results. (1) Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2) The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3) There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients. PMID:25610644

  13. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  14. Hypertension and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Hypertension A disease that often goes undetected. What is hypertension? Hypertension, also called high blood pressure , is a condition in which the arteries of ...

  15. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  16. Hormones and Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  17. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: diagnosis to management.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Kaustubh; Samant, Rohan; Lee, Ricky W

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension typically occurs from spontaneous CSF leak. CSF volume depletion rather than decrease in CSF pressure is thought to be the main causative feature for intracranial hypotension. More and more cases of intracranial hypotension are getting diagnosed with the advances in the imaging. The advances in the imaging have also led to the better understanding of the dynamic changes that occur with intracranial hypotension. The old theories of CSF overproduction or CSF underproduction have not been substantially associated with intracranial hypotension. It has also led to the fore different atypical clinical features and presentations. Although, it has been known for a long time, the diagnosis is still challenging and dilemma persists over one diagnostic modality over other and the subsequent management. Spontaneous CSF leaks occur at the spinal level and the skull base and other locations are rare. The anatomy of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a very complex process with significant overlap in connective tissue disorders, previous dural weakness or meningeal diverticula. To localize the location of the CSF leak-CT myelography is the modality of choice. CSF cysternography may provide additional confirmation in uncertain cases and also MRI spine imaging may be of significant help in some cases. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension continues to be a diagnostic dilemma and our effort was to consolidate available information on the clinical features, diagnostics, and management for a practicing neurologist for a "15-20 min quick update of the topic". PMID:26661291

  18. Pharmacological management of pain after intracranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Leith, B

    1998-08-01

    Some healthcare professionals continue to believe that patients experience minimal pain and discomfort after intracranial surgery. However, clinical experience indicates that many patients experience significant pain after craniotomy. Despite research which supports the use of morphine as a method of pain control after intracranial surgery, some healthcare professionals continue to administer only codeine, which may be ineffective. Inadequate pain control can be associated with a variety of negative physiological and psychological consequences. Neuroscience nurses are challenged to re-evaluate their current beliefs and practices related to pain and pain control after intracranial surgery. PMID:9791776

  19. Essential Hypertension vs. Secondary Hypertension Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E.; Barratt, Michelle S.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Milewicz, Diane M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. METHODS We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. RESULTS We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the “Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents”) from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3–17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08–19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. PMID:24842390

  20. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III )

    1990-03-01

    With the availability of gamma knife units and the development of modified linear accelerators, there is new interest in radiosurgery, especially as it applies to intracranial tumors. Among its advantages are the ability to precisely localize tumor and through small beam sizes deliver steep dose gradients at the field edges. This sharp dose gradient allows for the prescribed dose of radiation to be given to a tumor while avoiding vital structures only millimeters away. Radiosurgery has produced good results in the treatment of inoperable arteriovenous malformations and can be used as the sole curative therapy for small, radiographically distinct, benign noninvasive tumors. It is also used as salvage therapy in recurrent benign or malignant tumors that have previously been irradiated.

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery of small intracranial tumors: Neuropathological correlation in three patients

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, B.G.; Coffey, R.J.; Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The mechanism by which radiosurgery can stop the growth of some tumors is poorly understood, in part because postmortem neuropathological findings in patients have been reported only rarely. To define further the effects of radiosurgery, we present the correlation among clinical, neuroimaging, and neuropathological data in three patients with different intracranial tumors who died between 2 and 39 weeks after radiosurgery. The target volumes in two patients with malignant tumors showed sharply demarcated coagulative necrosis. In the third patient, who had a benign acoustic nerve tumor, neuropathological examination found intratumoral hemorrhage and cyst formation, but no necrosis. Radiosurgery appears to cause acute necrosis of malignant cells, although its effectiveness may be limited by the infiltrative nature of some tumors. In benign tumors, necrosis following radiosurgery is relatively delayed, and may not be required for growth arrest.

  2. A rare benign ovarian tumour.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) of the ovary is an extremely rare and benign ovarian neoplasm, accounting for 6% of the sex cord stromal ovarian tumours subtype. Usually, it is found during the second and third decades of life. Patients commonly present with pelvic pain, a palpable pelvic mass or menstrual irregularity. We report a case of a 20-year-old woman reporting of mild pelvic pain, with normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a large right adnexal tumour was found, with features suggesting an ovarian sex cord tumour. The patient underwent right salpingo-oophorectomy, diagnosing a SST of the ovary. This paper also reviews the literature, and emphasises the typical pathological and imaging characteristics of these rare benign ovarian lesions, and their impact, in a conservative surgery. PMID:26933186

  3. Benign Pediatric Salivary Gland Lesions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric R; Ord, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland lesions are rare in pediatric patients. In addition, the types of salivary gland tumors are different in their distribution in specific sites in the major and minor salivary glands in children compared with adults. This article reviews benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic salivary gland disorders in pediatric patients to help clinicians to develop an orderly differential diagnosis that will lead to expedient treatment of pediatric patients with salivary gland lesions. PMID:26614702

  4. Remotely-powered intracranial pressure monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1979-01-01

    Implantable RF powered monitor uses capacitive transducer and stiff metal diaphragm that gives high stability for long term intracranial pressure monitoring. Design of monitor reduces risk of infection while improving patient comfort and mobility.

  5. Intracranial complications of transorbital stab wounds.

    PubMed Central

    De Villiers, J C; Sevel, D

    1975-01-01

    Oscular and orbital injuries due to stab wounds may mask underlying serious intracranial damage. The correct clinical assessment and treatment of such cases require the attention of a team comprising a neurosurgeon, ophthalmologist, otolaryngologist, and plastic surgeon. Images PMID:1125159

  6. Influencing factors of immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysms patients after endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Xiang; Lai, Ling-Feng; Zheng, Kuang; Li, Guo-Xiong; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Liang-Ping; Duan, Chuan-Zhi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze influencing factors associated with immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysms patients after endovascular treatment (EVT), providing theoretical evidence and guidance for clinical treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Totally 529 patients met the inclusive criteria, consisting of 338 males and 191 females. Gender; age; history of hypertension, diabetes, and smoking; intracranial atherosclerosis; rupture status, size and location, features of aneurysmal neck, shapes; vasospasm; treatment modality; and degree of aneurysm occlusion were all carefully and completely recorded. All data were investigated in univariate and multivariate logistic regression model to determine whether they were correlated with the degree of aneurysm occlusion. According to aneurysm size, aneurysms were classified as micro-miniature, miniature, and large aneurysms. There were 451 narrow-neck aneurysms and 78 wide-neck aneurysms. Totally 417 were regular and 112 were irregular. And 125 were un-ruptured aneurysms; 404 were ruptured aneurysms. The modalities of treatment were as follows: embolization with coil (n = 415), stent-assisted coil embolization (n = 89), and balloon-assisted coil embolization (n = 25). Univariate analysis showed that aneurysm size, feature of aneurysm neck, shape, and rupture status might affect the immediate occlusion after EVT. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that ruptured aneurysm, tiny aneurysm, and wide-neck aneurysm were independent influencing factors of complete occlusion of intracranial aneurysm. Aneurysm rupture status, size, feature of aneurysmal neck, and shape might be the independent influencing factors of immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysm patients after EVT. Un-ruptured, micro-miniature, narrow-neck, and regular-shaped aneurysms were more probable to be occluded completely. PMID:26100332

  7. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders. PMID:26600442

  8. Idiopathic Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension: An Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwajeong; Rehman, Aseeb Ur; Fiel, M. Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension is a poorly defined clinical condition of unknown etiology. Patients present with signs and symptoms of portal hypertension without evidence of cirrhosis. The disease course appears to be indolent and benign with an overall better outcome than cirrhosis, as long as the complications of portal hypertension are properly managed. This condition has been recognized in different parts of the world in diverse ethnic groups with variable risk factors, resulting in numerous terminologies and lack of standardized diagnostic criteria. Therefore, although the diagnosis of idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension requires clinical exclusion of other conditions that can cause portal hypertension and histopathologic confirmation, this entity is under-recognized clinically as well as pathologically. Recent studies have demonstrated that variable histopathologic entities with different terms likely represent a histologic spectrum of a single entity of which obliterative portal venopathy might be an underlying pathogenesis. This perception calls for standardization of the nomenclature and formulation of widely accepted diagnostic criteria, which will facilitate easier recognition of this disorder and will highlight awareness of this entity. PMID:26563701

  9. Intracranial pressure monitoring and outcomes after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Peter L.; Skoretz, Terry G.; Doig, Gordon; Girotti, Murray J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled intracranial hypertension after traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes significantly to the death rate and to poor functional outcome. There is no evidence that intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring alters the outcome of TBI. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that insertion of ICP monitors in patients who have TBI is not associated with a decrease in the death rate. Design Study of case records. Methods The data files from the Ontario Trauma Registry from 1989 to 1995 were examined. Included were all cases with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 12 from the 14 trauma centres in Ontario. Cases identifying a Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale score in the head region (MAIS head) greater than 3 were selected for further analysis. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate the relationship between ICP and death. Results Of 9001 registered cases of TBI, an MAIS head greater than 3 was recorded in 5507. Of these patients, 541 (66.8% male, mean age 34.1 years) had an ICP monitor inserted. Their average ISS was 33.4 and 71.7% survived. There was wide variation among the institutions in the rate of insertion of ICP monitors in these patients (ranging from 0.4% to over 20%). Univariate logistic regression indicated that increased MAIS head, ISS, penetrating trauma and the insertion of an ICP monitor were each associated with an increased death rate. However, multivariate analyses controlling for MAIS head, ISS and injury mechanism indicated that ICP monitoring was associated with significantly improved survival (p < 0.015). Conclusions ICP monitor insertion rates vary widely in Ontario’s trauma hospitals. The insertion of an ICP monitor is associated with a statistically significant decrease in death rate among patients with severe TBI. This finding strongly supports the need for a prospective randomized trial of management protocols, including ICP monitoring, in patients with severe TBI. PMID:11129833

  10. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  11. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Acute Liver Failure: Institutional Case Series.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick R; Mallory, Grant W; Atkinson, John L D; Wijdicks, Eelco F; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-08-01

    in the IP group was 38.5 % (5/13) with nine liver transplantations; three of the transplanted patients died, including one of the fatal hemorrhages due to monitor placement. Intracranial hypertension is common in patients with ALF with severe hepatic encephalopathy. Monitored patients in both groups experienced elevations of ICP in the setting of intermittent coagulopathy. Severity of coagulopathy did not influence hemorrhage rate. Yet, hemorrhages related to IP monitoring can be catastrophic and may add to the overall mortality. PMID:26966022

  12. [Puncture aspiration and local fibrinolysis in the surgery of primary non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhages].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Burov, S A; Dash'ian, V G; Galankina, I E

    2008-01-01

    A possibility of evacuation of primary non-traumatic intracranial hematomas with less traumatic effect using puncture aspiration and local fibrinolysis has been studied in 73 patients aged 23-69 years. It has been shown that this method allows an effective (up to 95% of initial volume) evacuation of hypertensive hematomas in most patients. The evacuation of hemorrhage is accompanied by the significant regress of movement disorders already in the early post-operative period that promotes shortening of treatment time in patients with hemorrhage stroke. The positive changes of neurological status are supported by the morphological data on the induction of reparative processes in the perifocal brain tissue against the background of focal fibrinolysis. The reduction of post-operative fatal cases (from 35 to 23%) allows a recommendation of the method described in surgery of hypertensive hemorrhages. PMID:19008848

  13. Endovascular management of six simultaneous intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas in a single patient

    PubMed Central

    Gist, Taylor L; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Krishna, Chandan; Roman, Gustavo C; Cech, David A; Diaz, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with a history of traumatic brain injury 4 years previously presented with progressive cognitive decline and gait abnormality. MRI revealed diffusion restriction in the bilateral centrum semiovale and multiple serpiginous flow voids. Cerebral angiogram revealed a total of six intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas with separate fistulas of the right and left sphenoid bones, left clival plexus, right transverse sinus, right sigmoid sinus, and superior sagittal sinus. A diffuse pseudophlebitic pattern of venous drainage indicating severe venous hypertension was also observed. The patient underwent a series of endovascular treatments over the next 10 months to achieve resolution of all arteriovenous shunting. Repeat MRI showed resolution of the diffusion restriction and marked reduction in T2 vascular flow voids. The patient's clinical status improved significantly over the course of treatment, paralleling the improvement in venous hypertension. PMID:23475992

  14. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  15. Hyperprolactinemia due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Nuño, Miriam; Rozen, Todd D; Maya, M Marcel; Mamelak, Adam N; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien S

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an increasingly recognized cause of headaches. Pituitary enlargement and brain sagging are common findings on MRI in patients with this disorder. The authors therefore investigated pituitary function in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. METHODS Pituitary hormones were measured in a group of 42 consecutive patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. For patients with hyperprolactinemia, prolactin levels also were measured following treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed prior to and following treatment. RESULTS The study group consisted of 27 women and 15 men with a mean age at onset of symptoms of 52.2 ± 10.7 years (mean ± SD; range 17-72 years). Hyperprolactinemia was detected in 10 patients (24%), ranging from 16 ng/ml to 96.6 ng/ml in men (normal range 3-14.7 ng/ml) and from 31.3 ng/ml to 102.5 ng/ml in women (normal range 3.8-23.2 ng/ml). In a multivariate analysis, only brain sagging on MRI was associated with hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging was present in 60% of patients with hyperprolactinemia and in 19% of patients with normal prolactin levels (p = 0.02). Following successful treatment of the spontaneous intracranial hypotension, hyperprolactinemia resolved, along with normalization of brain MRI findings in all 10 patients. CONCLUSIONS Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a previously undescribed cause of hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging causing distortion of the pituitary stalk (stalk effect) may be responsible for the hyperprolactinemia. PMID:25380110

  16. Elevated intracranial pressure causes optic nerve and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Derek M; Wu, Samuel M; Frankfort, Benjamin J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel experimental system for the modulation and measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP), and to use this system to assess the impact of elevated ICP on the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in CD1 mice. This system involved surgical implantation of an infusion cannula and a radiowave based pressure monitoring probe through the skull and into the subarachnoid space. The infusion cannula was used to increase ICP, which was measured by the probe and transmitted to a nearby receiver. The system provided robust and consistent ICP waveforms, was well tolerated, and was stable over time. ICP was elevated to approximately 30 mmHg for one week, after which we assessed changes in optic nerve structure with transmission electron microscopy in cross section and RGC numbers with antibody staining in retinal flat mounts. ICP elevation resulted in optic nerve axonal loss and disorganization, as well as RGC soma loss. We conclude that the controlled manipulation of ICP in active, awake mice is possible, despite their small size. Furthermore, ICP elevation results in visual system phenotypes of optic nerve and RGC degeneration, suggesting that this model can be used to study the impact of ICP on the visual system. Potentially, this model can also be used to study the relationship between ICP and IOP, as well diseases impacted by ICP variation such as glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the spaceflight-related visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. PMID:25912998

  17. Elevated intracranial pressure causes optic nerve and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Derek M.; Wu, Samuel M.; Frankfort, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel experimental system for the modulation and measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP), and to use this system to assess the impact of elevated ICP on the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in CD1 mice. This system involved surgical implantation of an infusion cannula and a radiowave based pressure monitoring probe through the skull and into the subarachnoid space. The infusion cannula was used to increase ICP, which was measured by the probe and transmitted to a nearby receiver. The system provided robust and consistent ICP waveforms, was well tolerated, and was stable over time. ICP was elevated to approximately 30 mmHg for one week, after which we assessed changes in optic nerve structure with transmission electron microscopy in cross section and RGC numbers with antibody staining in retinal flat mounts. ICP elevation resulted in optic nerve axonal loss and disorganization, as well as RGC soma loss. We conclude that the controlled manipulation of ICP in active, awake mice is possible, despite their small size. Furthermore, ICP elevation results in visual system phenotypes of optic nerve and RGC degeneration, suggesting that this model can be used to study the impact of ICP on the visual system. Potentially, this model can also be used to study the relationship between ICP and IOP, as well diseases impacted by ICP variation such as glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the spaceflight-related visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. PMID:25912998

  18. The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure Syndrome in Long Duration NASA Astronauts: An Integrated Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, C. A.; Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M. J.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is currently NASA's number one human space flight risk. The syndrome, which is related to microgravity exposure, manifests with changes in visual acuity (hyperopic shifts, scotomas), changes in eye structure (optic disc edema, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, globe flattening, and distended optic nerve sheaths). In some cases, elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure has been documented postflight reflecting increased intracranial pressure (ICP). While the eye appears to be the main affected end organ of this syndrome, the ocular affects are thought to be related to the effect of cephalad fluid shift on the vascular system and the central nervous system. The leading hypotheses for the development of VIIP involve microgravity induced head-ward fluid shifts along with a loss of gravity-assisted drainage of venous blood from the brain, both leading to cephalic congestion and increased ICP. Although not all crewmembers have manifested clinical signs or symptoms of the VIIP syndrome, it is assumed that all astronauts exposed to microgravity have some degree of ICP elevation in-flight. Prolonged elevations of ICP can cause long-term reduced visual acuity and loss of peripheral visual fields, and has been reported to cause mild cognitive impairment in the analog terrestrial population of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH). These potentially irreversible health consequences underscore the importance of identifying the factors that lead to this syndrome and mitigating them.

  19. Children With Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhen; Li, Yongxin; Zhu, Fengjun; Zang, Dongdong; Zhao, Cailei; Li, Cong; Tong, Dan; Zhang, Heye; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We performed a dynamic study of arachnoid cysts (ACs) using magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) and proposed a classification of ACs. Twenty-three suitable patients in our hospital entered into this study according to our inclusion criteria. MRC images were collected in all the subjects at 1 and 24 hours after the administration of intrathecal gadolinium-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We allocate the enrolled patients into 2 groups, MRC group and surgery group. The MRC results were considered before treatment in 1 group (MRC group, 13 patients), whereas another group was surgically treated without considering the MRC results (surgery group, 10 patients). We calculated the enhanced area of cyst using modified MacDonald Criteria from the images and measured the surrounding subarachnoid area as the reference. We found that it was practically useful to quantify 3 types of ACs, complete communicating, incomplete communicating, and noncommunicating, according to MRC results in this study. All the subjects in both groups are closely observed before the treatment and the follow-up using the MRI examination. In the surgery group, 5 patients were found that the area of cysts shrank in the follow-up stage. However, there was no significant difference in the percentage shrinkage area between the 2 groups. We concluded that MRC with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent is of significant clinical value for the diagnosis and treatment of children with intracranial ACs. This classification based on dynamic MRC is useful for making surgical recommendations. PMID:26554773

  20. [Suppurative intracranial infections in Africa].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Okome-Kouakou, M; Alliez, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review recent African literature on suppurative intracranial infection and its implications for neurosurgery. In order of decreasing frequency the main lesions are brain abscess, subdural empyema, and epidural abscess. Despite progress in diagnostic imaging and availability of antibiotic therapy, these lesions still cause disturbingly high morbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa where diagnosis is often delayed. The male-to-female ratio was 3.6:1 and 70 to 80% of patients were under the age of 20 years. Spread from the paranasal sinus or ear was the most common mechanism of infection. Hematogenous processes accounted for 22% of cases and the origin was undetermined in 11% to 26% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus and enteric gram-negative bacilli were the most common bacteria identified but cultures were reported as sterile in 30% to 50% of cases. While ultrasonography can be useful in newborns with an open fontanelle, arteriography is often the only feasible procedure for diagnosis in Black Africa. The diagnostic modality of choice is computed tomography which allows precise mapping prior to neurosurgery. Introduction of computed tomography in some African cities has led to a decrease in mortality ranging from 4.7% to 43%. The most effective treatment is a combination of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and surgical decompression of expanding lesions. The main procedures are aspiration through burr holes and craniotomy. Use of this combined strategy requires close cooperation between the neurosurgeon, infectious disease specialist, and microbiologist. Therapeutic indications are discussed within the context of Black Africa. PMID:9304016

  1. Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eric H; Larson, Jeffrey A; Andriole, Gerald L

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) commonly affect older men. Age-related changes associated with metabolic disturbances, changes in hormone balance, and chronic inflammation may cause BPH development. The diagnosis of BPH hinges on a thorough medical history and focused physical examination, with attention to other conditions that may be causing LUTS. Digital rectal examination and urinalysis should be performed. Other testing may be considered depending on presentation of symptoms, including prostate-specific antigen, serum creatinine, urine cytology, imaging, cystourethroscopy, post-void residual, and pressure-flow studies. Many medical and surgical treatment options exist. Surgery should be reserved for patients who either have failed medical management or have complications from BPH, such as recurrent urinary tract infections, refractory urinary retention, bladder stones, or renal insufficiency as a result of obstructive uropathy. PMID:26331999

  2. Monitoring intracranial pressure based on F-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ting; Tong, Xinglin; Chen, Guangxi

    2013-09-01

    Intracranial pressure is an important monitoring indicator of neurosurgery. In this paper we adopt all-fiber FP fiber optic sensor, using a minimally invasive operation to realize real-time dynamic monitoring intracranial pressure of the hemorrhage rats, and observe their intracranial pressure regularity of dynamic changes. Preliminary results verify the effectiveness of applications and feasibility, providing some basis for human brain minimally invasive intracranial pressure measurement.

  3. Hypertension and aging.

    PubMed

    Buford, Thomas W

    2016-03-01

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent condition with numerous health risks, and the incidence of hypertension is greatest among older adults. Traditional discussions of hypertension have largely focused on the risks for cardiovascular disease and associated events. However, there are a number of collateral effects, including risks for dementia, physical disability, and falls/fractures which are increasingly garnering attention in the hypertension literature. Several key mechanisms - including inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction - are common to biologic aging and hypertension development and appear to have key mechanistic roles in the development of the cardiovascular and collateral risks of late-life hypertension. The objective of the present review is to highlight the multi-dimensional risks of hypertension among older adults and discuss potential strategies for treatment and future areas of research for improving overall care for older adults with hypertension. PMID:26835847

  4. Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension Overview What is cirrhosis? In people who have ... lead to coma and death. What is portal hypertension? Normally, blood is carried to the liver by ...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  8. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  9. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome treated with fludrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Marwan; El Khatib, Mohammad; Yamout, Bassem; Hujeily, Elissar; Ayoub, Sophie; Ayoub, Chakib; Skaf, Ghassan

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare syndrome characterized by orthostatic headache not associated with trauma or dural puncture. In most cases, it is caused by a spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage as demonstrated by neuroradiological studies. The standard of care consists of conservative treatment including bed rest, hydration, and administration of caffeine or glucocorticoids. When such conservative therapy fails, an epidural blood patch is recommended. In this report, we describe the treatment of 2 patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who failed conservative treatment and went on to have complete and sustained resolution of their symptoms after the administration of oral fludrocortisone. PMID:25612272

  10. Simulation of the human intracranial arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Leopold; Anor, Tomer; Cheever, Elizabeth; Madsen, Joseph R; Karniadakis, George Em

    2009-06-13

    High-resolution unsteady three-dimensional flow simulations in large intracranial arterial networks of a healthy subject and a patient with hydrocephalus have been performed. The large size of the computational domains requires the use of thousands of computer processors and solution of the flow equations with approximately one billion degrees of freedom. We have developed and implemented a two-level domain decomposition method, and a new type of outflow boundary condition to control flow rates at tens of terminal vessels of the arterial network. In this paper, we demonstrate the flow patterns in the normal and abnormal intracranial arterial networks using patient-specific data. PMID:19414460

  11. The long-term side effects of radiation therapy for benign brain tumors in adults

    SciTech Connect

    al-Mefty, O.; Kersh, J.E.; Routh, A.; Smith, R.R. )

    1990-10-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral part in managing intracranial tumors. While the risk:benefit ratio is considered acceptable for treating malignant tumors, risks of long-term complications of radiotherapy need thorough assessment in adults treated for benign tumors. Many previously reported delayed complications of radiotherapy can be attributed to inappropriate treatment or to the sensitivity of a developing child's brain to radiation. Medical records, radiological studies, autopsy findings, and follow-up information were reviewed for 58 adult patients (31 men and 27 women) treated between 1958 and 1987 with radiotherapy for benign intracranial tumors. Patient ages at the time of irradiation ranged from 21 to 87 years (mean 47.7 years). The pathology included 46 pituitary adenomas, five meningiomas, four glomus jugulare tumors, two pineal area tumors, and one craniopharyngioma. Average radiation dosage was 4984 cGy (range 3100 to 7012 cGy), given in an average of 27.2 fractions (range 15 to 45 fractions), over a period averaging 46.6 days. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 31 years (mean 8.1 years). Findings related to tumor recurrence or surgery were excluded. Twenty-two patients had complications considered to be delayed side effects of radiotherapy. Two patients had visual deterioration developing 3 and 6 years after treatment; six had pituitary dysfunction; and 17 had varying degrees of parenchymal changes of the brain, occurring mostly in the temporal lobes and relating to the frequent presentation of pituitary tumors. One clival tumor with the radiographic appearance of a meningioma, developed 30 years post-irradiation for acromegaly. This study unveils considerable delayed sequelae of radiotherapy in a series of adult patients receiving what is considered safe treatment for benign brain tumors. 163 refs.

  12. Depression in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V; Parikh, G J; Srinivasan, V

    1983-10-01

    168 patients attending hypertension clinic were randomly selected for the study. They were thoroughly investigated using E.C.G., X-ray chest, Urine analysis, Blood sugar, Blood urea, Serum cholesterol, Serum K, Serum Na, Scrum creatinine and Uric acid level. Detailed psychiatric case history and mental examination was carried out. Beck Rating Scale was used to measure the depression. 25% of hypertensive subjects exhibited depressive features and their mean score in Beck Rating scale is 21.76. The mean score of non-depressives is 4.46. All patients were receiving methyl dopa.25 mg. twice or thrice daily with thiazide diuretic. No significant difference in the incidence of depression with the duration of medication was observed.The hypertension was classified into mild, moderate and severe depending on the diastolic pressure. Depression was more frequent in severe hypertensives but not to the statistically significant level.Further hypertensives were classified into:1. Hypertension without organ involvement2. Hypertension with LVH only3. Hypertension with additional organ involvement4. Malignant hypertensionDepression was significantly more frequent in hypertensives with complications and also hypertensives in whom the B.P. remained uncontrolled. As all the patients were on the same drug, the drug effect is common to all; hence, the higher incidence of depression in hypertensives with complications is due to the limitation and distress caused by the illness. PMID:21847301

  13. Computed tomographic patterns of intracranial infarcts in Ghanaians.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, M O; Nyame, P K; Jumah, K B; Wiredu, E K

    2002-01-01

    Computed tomography has given a boost to intracranial imaging in general, and the diagnosis of the subtypes of Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA) in particular. In this study of 1,172 cases of CVA examined by Computed Tomography (CT), 552 (47.10%) showed features of cerebral infarction. There was a male prevalence in the study and the mean age was 59.8 years. As in all infarcts the diagnostic appearance was a wedge shaped hypodensity within the brain parenchyma. This was most often found in the parietal lobe (73.6%) and was always without a mass effect. Even though solitary infarcts were frequent, multiple lesions were reported in 9.3% of cases and these group of respondents presented mostly with seizures. Diabetes mellitus was an important predisposing factor and was found in 163% of cases, while hypertension was found in only 9.1% of cases studied. Other CT findings were cerebral and cerebrellar atrophy. Calcification of the falx and the basal ganglia were also noted. PMID:12403033

  14. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  15. Benign hereditary chorea: an update.

    PubMed

    Inzelberg, Rivka; Weinberger, Moran; Gak, Eva

    2011-06-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC, MIM 118700) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder manifesting with chorea in conjunction with hypothyroidism and respiratory problems, a triad also named "brain-lung-thyroid syndrome". BHC is characterized by childhood onset with minimal or no progression into adult life and normal cognitive function. The genetic basis of BHC has been partially resolved, when mutations in the TTF1 gene on chromosome 14q13 encoding the thyroid transcription factor-1 have been identified in a number of BHC patients, suggesting that aberration of TTF1 transcriptional function or haploinsufficiency is associated with this disorder. TTF1 (also known as TITF1, TEBP or NKX2-1), belonging to the NKX2 homeodomain transcription factor family, has been implicated in several important molecular pathways essential for brain, thyroid and lung morphogenesis. Clinical evaluation of TTF1 gene mutations carrier patients exposed the involvement of each of the triad's components characterized by heterogeneity between index cases and even within families. This review highlights the current updates on expanded clinical aspects of BHC, imaging and treatment experience, its genetic markers, proposed molecular mechanisms, animal models and link to cancer. PMID:21292530

  16. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-12-15

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  17. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Benign Meningioma: Long-Term Outcome in 318 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Henzel, Martin; Surber, Gunar; Hamm, Klaus; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the long-term outcome of stereotactic-based radiation therapy in a large cohort of patients with benign intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2010, 318 patients with histologically confirmed (44.7%; previous surgery) or imaging-defined (55.3%) benign meningiomas were treated with either fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (79.6%), hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (15.4%), or stereotactic radiosurgery (5.0%), depending on tumor size and location. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), prognostic factors, and toxicity were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 50 months (range, 12-167 months). Local control, OS, and CSS at 5 years were 92.9%, 88.7%, and 97.2%, and at 10 years they were 87.5%, 74.1%, and 97.2%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, tumor location (P=.029) and age >66 years (P=.031) were predictors of LC and OS, respectively. Worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms immediately after radiation therapy occurred in up to 2%. Clinically significant acute toxicity (grade 3°) occurred in 3%. Only grade 1-2 late toxicity was observed in 12%, whereas no new neurologic deficits or treatment-related mortality were encountered. Conclusions: Patients with benign meningiomas predominantly treated with standard fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with narrow margins enjoy excellent LC and CSS, with minimal long-term morbidity.

  18. [Intracranial pressure monitoring in severe traumatic brain injury: A different perspective of the BestTrip trial].

    PubMed

    Murillo-Cabezas, F; Godoy, D A

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines a series of questions and reflections upon the recent publication of Chesnut et al., who compared 2 approaches to the treatment of intracranial hypertension (ICH) in severe head injuries: one with and the other without intracranial pressure monitoring (ICP). The authors concluded that no improved outcome was observed in the treatment group guided by ICP monitoring. The main concerns relate to the degree of training of the physicians involved in the monitoring and management of ICH in the ICP group, as well as to the possible inter-observer variability in interpreting the CT scans, the capacity of clinical signs to guide the treatment of ICH, and the suitability of randomization. The analysis of this trial should not be taken to suggest the futility of ICP monitoring but rather the need to correctly use the information afforded by ICP monitoring, with emphasis on the importance of the definition of alternative methods for non-invasive monitoring. PMID:24674667

  19. Endoscopic management of benign tracheobronchial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Ding, Xin; Wei, Dong; Cheng, Peng; Su, Xiaomei; Liu, Huanyi; Zhang, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Even though benign tracheobronchial tumors are quite rare, they still can induce airway obstruction, result in suffocation, and need emergent management to remove the obstructing lesions and make the respiratory tracts unobstructed. Although the preferred therapy is surgery, it is still difficult to deal with the tumors in some cases, and the complications of surgery are common. Therefore, bronchoscopic managements, such as Nd: YAG laser, electrocautery, APC and Cryotherapy, are very important to treat benign tracheobronchial tumors and can cure most of them. The efficacy of therapeutic endoscopy for the treatment of patients with benign airways obstruction has been established. However, in order to maximally eradicate the benign tumors with minimal damage to patients, the success of bronchoscopic managements for the treatment strongly depends on the diligent identification of the various factors, including the location, size, shape of tumor, and the age, status, cardio respiratory function of patients, and full comprehension of the limits and potential of each particular technique. Because the advantages and disadvantages of above mentioned interventional methods, single method can not solve all clinical issues. Therefore, in order to remove benign tracheobronchial tumors completely, and reduce the incidence of recurrence as far as possible, many doctors combine several methods of them to treat complicated benign tracheobronchial tumors. This article reviews the core principles and techniques available to the bronchoscope managing benign tracheobronchial tumors. PMID:22263100

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Environmentally Benign Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a growing interest in replacing current non-biodegradable and toxic nanosystems with environmentally benign biopolymer based ones to minimize post-utilization hazards due to uncontrolled accumulation of nanoparticles in the environment. Lignin based nanoparticles (...

  1. Benign idiopathic partial epilepsy and brain lesion.

    PubMed

    Stephani, U; Doose, H

    1999-03-01

    A 14-year-old girl had severe head trauma from a dog bite at the age of 9 days. This resulted in extensive brain damage, tetraplegia, mental retardation, and epilepsy. The seizures were of rolandic type, and the EEG showed multifocal sharp waves. The course was benign. The initial diagnosis of a pure symptomatic epilepsy was revised after demonstrating typical benign focal sharp waves in the EEG of the healthy sister. Thus a phenocopy of a benign partial epilepsy by the brain lesion could be excluded with sufficient certainty. This observation allows the conclusion that the genetic disposition underlying the sharp-wave trait characteristic of benign partial epilepsies can be involved also in the pathogenesis of seemingly pure symptomatic epilepsies. EEG studies on siblings of such patients are needed to exclude possible phenocopies. PMID:10080522

  2. ENVIRONMENTALLY-BENIGN MULTIPHASE CATALYSIS. (R826034)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental concerns stemming from the use of conventional solvents and from hazardous waste generation have propelled research efforts aimed at developing benign chemical processing techniques that either eliminate or significantly mitigate pollution at the source. This pap...

  3. A rabbit model of human familial, nonsyndromic unicoronal suture synostosis. II. Intracranial contents, intracranial volume, and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Siegel, M I; Burrows, A M; Smith, T D; Losken, H W; Dechant, J; Cooper, G; Fellows-Mayle, W; Kapucu, M R; Kapucu, L O

    1998-06-01

    This two-part study reviews data from a recently developed colony of New Zealand white rabbits with familial, nonsyndromic unilateral coronal suture synostosis, and this second part presents neuropathological findings and age-related changes in intracranial volume (ICV) and intracranial pressure (ICP) in 106 normal rabbits and 56 craniosynostotic rabbits from this colony. Brain morphology and anteroposterior length were described in 44 rabbit fetuses and perinates (27 normal; 17 synostosed). Middle meningeal artery patterns were qualitatively assessed from 2-D PCC MRI VENC scans and endocranial tracings from 15, 126-day-old rabbits (8 normal, 7 rabbits with unicoronal synostosis). Brain metabolism was evaluated by assessing 18F-FDG uptake with high-resolution PET scanning in 7, 25-day-old rabbits (3 normal, 4 with unicoronal or bicoronal synostosis). Intracranial contents and ICV were assessed using 3-D CT scanning of the skulls of 30 rabbits (20 normal,10 with unicoronal synostosis) at 42 and 126 days of age. Serial ICP data were collected from 66 rabbits (49 normal; 17 with unicoronal synostosis) at 25 and 42 days of age. ICP was assessed in the epidural space using a Codman NeuroMonitor microsensor transducer. Results revealed that cerebral cortex morphology was similar between normal and synostosed fetuses around the time of synostosis. Significantly (P<0.05) decreased A-P cerebral hemisphere growth rates and asymmetrical cortical remodeling were noted with increasing age in synostotic rabbits. In addition, rabbits with unicoronal suture synostosis exhibited asymmetrical middle meningeal artery patterns, decreased and asymmetrical brain metabolism, a "beaten-copper" intracranial appearance, significantly (P<0.05) decreased ICV, and significantly (P<0.01) elevated ICP compared with normal control rabbits. The advantages and disadvantages of these rabbits as a model for human familial, nonsyndromic unicoronal suture synostosis are discussed, especially in light

  4. Valproate Induced Hypertensive Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Sivananthan, Mauran

    2016-01-01

    Valproate is a medication used in the treatment of seizures, bipolar disorder, migraines, and behavioral problems. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with hypertensive urgency after initiation of valproate. Primary treatment of his hypertension was ineffective. Blood pressure stabilization was achieved following discontinuation of valproate. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of developing hypertensive urgency with administration of valproate. PMID:27403366

  5. Intracranial solitary fibrous tumors: A report of two cases and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZI-YAN; QIU, KAI; MA, YI-HUI; WANG, XIAO-TAO; BAO, JIAN-JI; ZHANG, ZHI-FENG; LIU, XIAN-ZHI

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are uncommon, with the pleura as a site of predilection. Central nervous system SFTs, particularly intracranial SFTs, are extremely rare. The lesions are generally benign and localized, and surgery is the main therapeutic solution. The current study reports the cases of a patient who presented with right haunch pain, right leg weakness and paresthesias for several months, and a patient with a history of unexpected loss of consciousness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of lesions, with a spindle cell morphology evident on pathological examination. The immunohistochemical examination demonstrated a strong immunoreaction for cluster of differentiation 34, which supported the diagnosis of an SFT. Following a near-total resection, the patients had a good neural prognosis. The present study also provides a literature review, discussing the imageological and pathological characteristics of SFT, and the diagnostic methods that aid in distinguishing the entity from other spindle-cell central nervous system tumors. PMID:26893690

  6. Intracranial extension of Schneiderian inverted papilloma: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pitak-Arnnop, Poramate; Bertolini, Julia; Dhanuthai, Kittipong; Hendricks, Jörg; Hemprich, Alexander; Pausch, Niels Christian

    2012-01-01

    Inverted papilloma is an uncommon primary nasal tumor. Despite its benign nature, this tumor represents three typical characteristics: a high propensity of recurrence, local aggressiveness and association with malignancy. Inverted papilloma can reduce the patient’s quality of life due to compromised nasal function, extension to the orbit and brain. The authors reported the unusual case of a 72-year-old male patient with inverted papilloma, which fatally extended to the intracranial temporal fossa after multiple recurrences. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the twelfth case in the literature of inverted papilla extending into the temporal fossa. The current and pertinent literature in English, French and German was reviewed, and an algorithm for managing inverted papilloma was also proposed. PMID:22737105

  7. Adult Intracranial Gliofibroma : A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho; Se, Young-Bem; Park, Sung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Gliofibroma is an extremely rare biphasic tumor with an astrocytic and benign mesenchymal component, which commonly occurs within the first two decades of life. The exact biological behavior of the tumor is not fully understood. Therefore, it is not listed as a distinct entity in the current World Health Organization classification of central nervous system tumors. Here, we describe a rare case of gliofibroma, which was located on the medial temporal lobe in a 61-year-old woman. Preoperatively, we misdiagnosed it as a meningioma because it was a well-demarcated and well-enhanced extra-axial mass with calcification and bony destruction. On the histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, the tumor consisted of a mixture of glial tissue and mesenchymal tissue and it was finally diagnosed as a gliofibroma. To our knowledge, this case of intracranial gliofibroma is in the oldest patient ever reported. PMID:27226865

  8. Pediatric endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bhavani, Nisha

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine causes of hypertension are rare in children and screening for endocrine hypertension in children should be carried out only after ruling out renal and renovascular causes. Excess levels and/or action of mineralocorticoids associated with low renin levels lead to childhood hypertension and this can be caused by various conditions which are discussed in detail in the article. Childhood pheochromocytomas are being increasingly diagnosed because of the improved application of genetic testing for familial syndromes associated with pheochromocytomas. Adolescents with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) can also have hypertension associated with their obese phenotype. PMID:22145140

  9. Hypertensive emergencies in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vadhera, Rakesh B; Simon, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy complicate 7% to 10% of pregnancies and are among the major causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Recently American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Taskforce on Hypertension during Pregnancy modified the diagnosis and management of hypertension in pregnancy, recommending prompt diagnosis, admission, close monitoring, and treatment. They strive to decrease maternal mortality and systemic complications. Labetalol, hydralazine, or nifedipine are considered first-line treatment, and either can be used to stabilize the patient with similar outcomes. Definite treatment is delivery of the fetus and should be considered based on the etiology of the hypertensive crisis and gestational age. PMID:25314092

  10. Intracranial causes of ophthalmoplegia: the visual reflex pathways.

    PubMed

    Stalcup, Seth T; Tuan, August S; Hesselink, John R

    2013-01-01

    The gathering of visual information is a complex process that relies on concerted movements of the eyes, and cranial nerves II-VIII are at least partially involved in the visual system. The cranial nerves do not function in isolation, however, and there are multiple higher-order cortical centers that have input into the cranial nerves to coordinate eye movement. Among the functions of the cortical reflex pathways are (a) controlling vertical and horizontal gaze in response to vestibular input to keep the eyes focused on an object as the head moves through space, and (b) controlling rapid, coordinated eye movement to a new visual target (saccades). There are also reflex pathways connecting the cranial nerves involved in vision that produce consensual blinking of the eyes in response to corneal stimulation of one eye and consensual pupillary constriction in response to light input on one pupil. A variety of intracranial pathologic conditions, including benign and malignant neoplasms, infection, trauma, autoimmune diseases, vascular anomalies, degenerative diseases, and inherited-congenital disorders, can disrupt the cranial nerves and visual reflex pathways. This disruption can manifest in myriad ways-for example, as extraocular muscle paresis, afferent pupillary defect, oculosympathetic paresis (Horner syndrome), internuclear ophthalmoplegia, dorsal midbrain (Parinaud) syndrome, or loss of the corneal reflex. Knowledge of the function and anatomy of the cranial nerves and visual reflex pathways, coupled with selection of the proper magnetic resonance pulse sequence, will allow the radiologist to order appropriate imaging of the involved cranial nerve or visual reflex pathway based on the patient's symptoms and thereby play an essential role in establishing the diagnosis and planning appropriate therapy. PMID:24025940

  11. Method for noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2000-01-01

    An ultrasonic-based method for continuous, noninvasive intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement and monitoring is described. The stress level in the skull bone is affected by pressure. This also changes the interfacial conditions between the dura matter and the skull bone. Standing waves may be set up in the skull bone and the layers in contact with the bone. At specific frequencies, there are resonance peaks in the response of the skull which can be readily detected by sweeping the excitation frequency on an excitation transducer in contact with a subject's head, while monitoring the standing wave characteristics from the signal received on a second, receiving transducer similarly in contact with the subject's head. At a chosen frequency, the phase difference between the excitation signal and the received signal can be determined. This difference can be related to the intracranial pressure and changes therein.

  12. Intracranial Artery Calcification and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao Hong; Wang, Li Juan; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial arterial calcification (IAC) is an easily identifiable entity on plain head computed tomography scans. Recent studies have found high prevalence rates for IAC worldwide, and this may be associated with ischemic stroke and cognitive decline. Aging, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic kidney disease have been found to be associated with IAC. The severity of IAC can be assessed using different visual grading scales or various quantitative methods (by measuring volume or intensity). An objective method for assessing IAC using consistent criteria is urgently required to facilitate comparisons between multiple studies involving diverse populations. There is accumulating evidence from clinical studies that IAC could be utilized as an indicator of intracranial atherosclerosis. However, the pathophysiology underlying the potential correlation between IAC and ischemic stroke—through direct arterial stenosis or plaque stability—remains to be determined. More well-designed clinical studies are needed to explore the predictive values of IAC in vascular events and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27165425

  13. [Therapeutic activity of gemcitabine in intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Stukov, A N; Filatova, L V; Latipova, D Kh; Bespalov, V G; Belyaeva, O A; Kireeva, G S; Vasilieva, I N; Alexandrov, V A; Maidin, M A; Semenov, A L; Vershinina, S F; Markochev, A B; Abduloeva, N Kh; Chubenko, V A; Semiglazova, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is known to exert a therapeutic effect on brain tumors despite the limited permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In our experimental research single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine 25 mg/kg provided increase in median survival of mice with intracranially transplanted Ehrlich carcinoma by 41-89% (p < 0.001). In this experimental model i.p. administration of gemcitabine (permeability of the BBB of less than 10%), carmustine (good permeability of the BBB), cyclophosphamide (poor permeability of the BBB) and cisplatin (doesn't penetrate through the BBB) increased median survival of mice by 88% (p < 0.001), 59% (p = 0.001), 35% (p = 0.005) and 18% (p = 0.302) respectively. Considering strong correlation between antitumor activity of the drugs (carmustine, cyclophosphamide and cisplatin) and their permeability of the BBB, efficacy of gemcitabine in intracranial tumors could be due to its wide range of therapeutic doses. PMID:26087611

  14. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  15. Ruptured, Intracranial Dermoid Cyst - A Visual Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Fabian; Andresen, Reimer

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are a very rare entity of intracranial tumours. The traumatic or non-traumatic rupture of the cyst wall is a serious complication that can be treated surgically or conservatively depending on the clinical symptoms. However, more common entities have to be considered as a differential diagnosis. We report on a female patient who was admitted with complaints of significant, prolonged headache and diffuse pain. Analysis of her blood and cerebrospinal fluid indicated no clear pathology. A CT examination of the head revealed a ruptured dermoid cyst adjacent to the left sphenoidal bone. An additional MRI was conducted to confirm the CT findings and rule out an intracranial ischemia or vasospasms. A conservative therapy was scheduled and the patient recovered well. Using current imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to identify a ruptured dermoid cyst by its pathognomonic signal behavior and rule out potentially life threatening complications. PMID:27190918

  16. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  17. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sumeet R; Gupta, Anju; Gupta, Vivek; Singhi, Pratibha D

    2016-08-01

    Neurological findings in HIV are common and include cognitive impairment, microcephaly, nonspecific white matter lesions and seizures. Cerebral vasculopathy and stroke are uncommon and may be due to primary HIV vasculopathy or opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis and cryptococcal meningitis. The authors describe a 7-y-old boy who presented with severe headache and was detected to have aneurysmal bleed due to intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27072660

  18. Filum ependymoma mimicking spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Akopov, Sergey E

    2005-05-01

    A 34-year-old man with a 2-week history of orthostatic headaches and a "dry tap" at lumbar puncture was found to have a lumbar intradural mass on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. A myxopapillary ependymoma was resected and the patient's headache completely resolved. The combination of spontaneous orthostatic headaches and a "dry tap" at the time of lumbar puncture does not always indicate the presence of a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension. PMID:15953283

  19. A novel guide catheter enabling intracranial placement.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael C; Sherma, Arun K; Surdell, Daniel; Shaibani, Ali; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-11-15

    We describe use of a novel guide, catheter with a soft and pliable, 6-cm or 12-cm distal segment that enables distal, including intracranial, placement--the Neuron guide catheter (Penumbra, San Leandro, CA)--in the treatment of 11 cases with a range of neuroendovascular lesions. We were able to advance the Neuron guide catheter to the intended level in each case and suffered no complications related to catheter spasm, dissection, thrombosis or thromboembolism. PMID:19670314

  20. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    PubMed Central

    John, Santosh G.; Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Lacasse, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS). Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser's syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms. PMID:24765434

  1. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  2. Endoscopic management of hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Mukerji, Gaurav; Shenoy, Ravikiran; Basoor, Abhijeet; Jain, Gaurav; Nelson, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Background Intracranial haemorrhage accounts for 30–60 % of all stroke admissions into a hospital, with hypertension being the main risk factor. Presence of intraventricular haematoma is considered a poor prognostic factor due to the resultant obstruction to CSF and the mass effect following the presence of blood resulting in raised intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. We report the results following endoscopic decompression of obstructive hydrocephalus and evacuation of haematoma in patients with hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage. Methods During a two year period, 25 patients diagnosed as having an intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to hypertension were included in this study. All patients underwent endoscopic evacuation of the haematoma under general anaesthesia. Post operative evaluation was done by CT scan and Glasgow outcome scale. Results Of the 25 patients, thalamic haemorrhage was observed in 12 (48%) patients, while, 11 (44%) had a putaminal haematoma. Nine (36%) patients had a GCS of 8 or less pre-operatively. Resolution of hydrocephalus following endoscopic evacuation was observed in 24 (96%) patients. No complications directly related to the surgical technique were encountered in our study. At six months follow-up, a mortality rate of 6.3% and 55.5% was observed in patients with a pre-operative GCS of ≥ 9 and ≤ 8 respectively. Thirteen of the 16 (81.3%) patients with a pre-operative GCS ≥ 9 had good recovery. Conclusion Endoscopic technique offers encouraging results in relieving hydrocephalus in hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage. Final outcome is better in patient with a pre-operative GCS of >9. Future improvements in instrumentation and surgical techniques, with careful case selection may help improve outcome in these patients. PMID:17204141

  3. Intracranial hemorrhage in cancer patients treated with anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Matthew J; Uhlmann, Erik J; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Both venous thromboembolism and intracranial metastases are common complications in the setting of primary brain tumors and metastatic malignancies. Anticoagulation is indicated in the presence of cancer-associated thrombosis in order to limit the risk of pulmonary embolism; however, there is reluctance to initiate anticoagulation in the setting of intracranial metastatic disease due to potential for intracranial hemorrhage. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutic anticoagulation can be safely administered in the setting of metastatic brain tumors. This review examines the current understanding of the pathophysiology of intracranial hemorrhage in malignancy, describes the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of brain tumors with therapeutic anticoagulation, and outlines management strategies relevant to the treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of anticoagulation. PMID:27067980

  4. Intracranial bacterial infections of oral origin.

    PubMed

    Moazzam, Alan A; Rajagopal, Sowmya M; Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Zada, Gabriel; Habibian, Mina

    2015-05-01

    Brain abscesses are rare but potentially deadly complications of odontogenic infections. This phenomenon has been described mainly in the form of case reports, as large-scale studies are difficult to perform. We compiled a total of 60 previously published cases of such a complication to investigate the predisposing factors, microbiology, and clinical outcomes of intracranial abscesses of odontogenic origin. A systematic review of the literature using the PubMed database was performed. Men accounted for 82.1% of cases, and the mean age was 42.1 years. Caries with periapical involvement and periodontitis were the two most common intra-oral sources, and wisdom tooth extraction was the most common preceding dental procedure. In 56.4% of cases, there were obvious signs of dental disease prior to development of intracranial infection. Commonly implicated microorganisms included Streptococcus viridans (especially the anginosus group), Actinomyces, Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens. There was an 8.3% mortality rate. Intracranial abscesses can form anywhere within the brain, and appear unrelated to the side of dental involvement. This suggests that hematogenous spread is the most likely route of dissemination. PMID:25800939

  5. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo; Grabowski, Mathew M; Juthani, Rupa; Sharma, Mayur; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Chao, Samuel; Suh, John; Mohammadi, Alireza; Barnett, Gene H

    2016-09-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become a treatment option for intracranial hemangioblastomas, especially in patients with poor clinical status and also high-risk surgical candidates. The objective of this study was to analyze clinical outcome and tumor control rates. Retrospective chart review revealed 12 patients with a total of 20 intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with GKRS from May 1998 until December 2014. Kaplan-Meier plots were used to calculate the actuarial local tumor control rates and rate of recurrence following GKRS. Univariate analysis, including log rank test and Wilcoxon test were used on the Kaplan-Meier plots to evaluate the predictors of tumor progression. Two-tailed p value of <0.05 was considered as significant. Median follow-up was 64months (2-184). Median tumor volume pre-GKRS was 946mm(3) (79-15970), while median tumor volume post-GKRS was 356mm(3) (30-5404). Complications were seen in two patients. Tumor control rates were 100% at 1year, 90% at 3years, and 85% at 5years, using the Kaplan-Meier method. There were no statistically significant univariate predictors of progression identified, although there was a trend towards successful tumor control in solid tumors (p=0.07). GKRS is an effective and safe option for treating intracranial hemangioblastoma with favorable tumor control rates. PMID:27422585

  6. Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    IZUMI, Takashi; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; MIYACHI, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Of the patients enrolled in the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET), a surveillance study in Japanese, 1133 patients who underwent intracranial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA)/stenting for intracranial stenosis during the period from 2005 to 2009 were investigated. A technical success was achieved in 98.3% of the patients, and 70.5% and 7.5% had a residual stenosis of < 30% and ≥ 50%, respectively. The incidence of ischemic complications and hemorrhagic complications was as low as 7.7% and 2.5%, respectively, but tended to increase in patients who underwent stenting. While a significant correlation with ischemic complications was observed in previously untreated patients and patients who underwent stenting followed by post-dilatation, a significant correlation with hemorrhagic complications was observed in patients who received emergency treatment and those treated between 24 hours and 14 days of the onset. Flexible intracranial stents are expected to contribute to improvement in the treatment outcome. PMID:24390191

  7. Detection of increased intracranial pressure by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Stephanie; Chin, Eric J; Heiner, Jason D

    2012-01-01

    Increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) may damage the brain by compression of its structures or restriction of its blood flow, and medical providers my encounter elevated ICP in conventional and non-conventional medical settings. Early identification of elevated ICP is critical to ensuring timely and appropriate management. However, few diagnostic methods are available for detecting increased ICP in an acutely ill patient, which can be performed quickly and noninvasively at the bedside. The optic nerve sheath is a continuation of the dura mater of the central nervous system and can be viewed by ocular ultrasound. Pressure changes within the intracranial cavity affect the diameter of the optic nerve sheath. Data acquired from multiple clinical settings suggest that millimetric increases in the optic nerve sheath diameter detected via ocular ultrasound correlate with increasing levels of ICP. In this review, we discuss the use of ocular ultrasound to evaluate for the presence of elevated ICP via assessment of optic nerve sheath diameter, and describe critical aspects of this valuable diagnostic procedure. Ultrasound is increasingly becoming a medical fixture in the modern battlefield where other diagnostic modalities can be unavailable or impractical to employ. As Special Forces and other austere medical providers become increasingly familiar with ultrasound, ocular ultrasound for the assessment of increased intracranial pressure may help optimize their ability to provide the most effective medical management for their patients. PMID:23032316

  8. Update on the natural history of intracranial atherosclerotic disease: A critical review

    PubMed Central

    Komotar, Ricardo J; Kellner, Christopher P; Raper, Daniel M; Strozyk, Dorothea; Higashida, Randall T; Meyers, Philip M

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) contributes to a significant number of ischemic strokes. There is debate in the recent literature concerning the impact of the location of stenosis in ICAD on outcome. Some reports have suggested that disease processes and outcomes vary by vessel location, potentially altering the natural history and indications for intervention. Here we have performed a comprehensive, critical review of the natural history of ICAD by vessel in an attempt to assess the differences in disease specific to each of the vascular territories. Our assessment concludes that only minor differences exist between patients with different vessels affected in vessel-specific ICAD. We have found that middle cerebral artery disease confers a lower mortality than vessel-specific ICAD in other intracranial vessels, asymptomatic disease follows a more benign course than symptomatic disease, and that plaque progression or the detection of microemboli on transcranial Doppler may predict poor outcome. Given the expanding indications for treatment of ICAD and rapidly developing endovascular techniques to confront this disease, a thorough understanding of the natural history of ICAD aids the interventional neuroradiologist in determining when to treat and how to predict outcome in this patient population. PMID:21161031

  9. Role of dynamic CT perfusion study in evaluating various intracranial space-occupying lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Jayakumar, Peruvumba N; Shivashankar, Ravishankar

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Differentiating intracranial mass lesions on CT scan is challenging. The purpose of our study was to determine the perfusion parameters in various intracranial space-occupying lesions (ICSOL), differentiate benign and malignant lesions, and differentiate between grades of gliomas. Materials and Methods: We performed CT perfusion (CTP) in 64 patients, with age ranging from 17 to 68 years, having space-occupying lesions in brain and calculated relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV). Results: We found significantly lower perfusion in low-grade gliomas as compared to high-grade tumors, lymphoma, and metastases. Similarly in infective lesions, TWT and abscesses showed significantly lower perfusion compared to TOT. In ring enhancing lesions, capsule of TWT showed significantly lower perfusion as compared to abscesses, TOT, and metastases. Conclusion: Thus, in conclusion, infective lesions can be differentiated from tumors like lymphomas, high-grade gliomas, or metastases based on perfusion parameters. The cut off value of rCBV 1.64 can be used to differentiate between low grade and high grade gliomas. However, depending only on perfusion parameters, differentiation between the tumors like lymphomas, high-grade gliomas, and metastases may not be possible. PMID:25969639

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  11. Non-invasive characterization of intracranial tumors by magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Guo, J.; Papazoglou, S.; Scholand-Engler, H.; Erdmann, C.; Melchert, U.; Bonsanto, M.; Braun, J.; Petersen, D.; Sack, I.; Wuerfel, J.

    2013-08-01

    Presurgical, non-invasive methods of differentiating brain tumors have remained unsatisfactory even for specialized academic hospitals. Despite major advances in clinical and neuroradiological diagnostic techniques, the majority of neurooncology patients still need to undergo a brain biopsy for diagnosis. Recent single cell experiments suggested that biomechanical cell properties might be very sensitive in detecting cellular malignancy. Accordingly, we investigated magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) as an investigative tool for the clinical routine diagnostic work-up of intracranial neoplasm. In order to obtain sufficient spatial resolution for the biomechanical characterization of intracranial tumors, we modified a recently introduced least-squares solution of the stationary wave equation, facilitating stable solutions of the magnitude |G*| and the phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus G*. MRE was added to a routine diagnostic or presurgical neuroradiological magnetic resonance imaging work-up in 16 prospective patients and it was well tolerated in all cases. Our preliminary tumor MRE data revealed alterations in viscoelastic constants, e.g. a loss of stiffness in malignancies compared to healthy reference tissue, or benign variants. Based on larger studies on selected tumor entities to establish threshold and reference values for future diagnostic purposes, MRE may thus provide a predictive marker for tumor malignancy and thereby contribute to an early non-invasive clinical assessment of suspicious cerebral lesions.

  12. Hypertension in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Alys; Holdsworth, D A; D'Arcy, J; Bailey, K; Casadei, B

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension and hypertension-related diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A diagnosis of hypertension can have serious occupational implications for military personnel. This article examines the diagnosis and management of hypertension in military personnel, in the context of current international standards. We consider the consequences of hypertension in the military environment and potential military-specific issues relating to hypertension. PMID:26253125

  13. Coexistence of intracranial germ cell tumor and craniopharyngioma in an adolescent: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Tolia, Maria; Kostakis, Ioannis D; Pistamaltzian, Nikolaos; Tryfonopoulos, Dimitrios; Lypas, Georgios; Koumakis, Georgios; Barbounis, Vasileios; Goutas, Nikolaos; Efremidis, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We present the case of a patient treated for intracranial germ cell tumor in which elements of craniopharyngioma were found in the residual tumor mass. Findings: A 17 year old patient presented with a history of secondary amenorrhea. She deteriorated with headache and left eyelid drop, paresis of the abducent nerve and convergent strabismus (Parinaud syndrome). β-HCG was 722mIU/ml and pregnancy was excluded. AFP was 6322 ng/ml. Brain CT scan showed a large endosellar tumor to the hypersellar region. There was left papillary atrophy. MRI confirmed a tumor to dorsum sellae. Primary germ cell intracranial tumor was diagnosed. Severe clinically evident pituitary failure developed with signs of increased intracranial pressure and brain edema as well as diabetes insipidus, while AFP increased to 15786,3ng/ml. Urgent treatment with combination chemotherapy including cisplatin etoposide and bleomycin (ΡEB) was administered for 4 courses. As a result her clinical condition improved and tumor markers dropped but nevertheless did not become normal. In addition CT scans revealed a remaining endocranial mass and therefore the patient was subjected to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stemcell rescue which resulted in complete clinical and biochemical remission. Due to the persisting mass in the area, it was delivered radiotherapy. Conclusions: The above case is extremely rare in worldwide literature. Dysgerminoma may coexist with craniopharyngioma which in fact may be part of a germ cell tumor in the context of dysembryogenesis and benign “teratoma”. PMID:23573353

  14. [Intracranial volume reserve assessment based on ICP pulse wave analysis].

    PubMed

    Berdyga, J; Czernicki, Z; Jurkiewicz, J

    1994-01-01

    ICP waves were analysed in the situation of expanding intracranial mass. The aim of the study was to determine how big the intracranial added volume has to be in order to produce significant changes of harmonic disturbances index (HFC) of ICP pulse waves. The diagnostic value of HFC and other parameters was compared. The following other parameters were studied: intracranial pressure (ICP), CSF outflow resistance (R), volume pressure response (VPR) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). It was found that ICP wave analysis very clearly reflects the intracranial volume-pressure relation changes. PMID:8028705

  15. A segmentation algorithm of intracranial hemorrhage CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianzhi

    2011-10-01

    To develop a computer aided detection (CAD) system that improves diagnostic accuracy of intracranial hemorrhage on cerebral CT. A method for CT image segmentation of brain is proposed, with which, several regions that are suspicious of hemorrhage can be segmented rapidly and effectively. Extracting intracranial area algorithm is introduced firstly to extract intracranial area. Secondly, FCM is employed twice, we named it with TFCM. FCM is first employed to identify areas of intracranial hemorrhage. Finally, FCM is employed to segment the lesions. Experimental results on real medical images demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness.

  16. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  17. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  18. Hypertension and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Paglieri, Cristina; Bisbocci, Daniela; Caserta, Mimma; Rabbia, Franco; Bertello, Chiara; Canadè, Antonella; Veglio, Franco

    2008-11-01

    Arterial hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, and dementia are related pathologies. This paper has reviewed comparatively the incidence of arterial hypertension and adult-onset dementia disorders. Hypertension is associated with cerebrovascular disease, which is in turn associated with dementia. It is the most important modifiable risk factor for stroke, which is a recognized cause of vascular dementia. In terms of pathophysiology of hypertensive brain damage, several hypotheses were developed, such as that vascular alterations induced by hypertension can induce lacunar or cortical infarcts and leucoaraiosis, that hypertension is responsible for cerebrovascular disease and acts into the contest of a pre-existing subclinic Alzheimer's disease (AD), that hypertension determines neurobiologic alterations (such as beta-amyloid accumulation) resulting in neuropathologic damage, and that aging and cerebrovascular risk factors act together to cause cerebral capillary degeneration, mitochondrial disruption, reduced glucose oxidation, and reduced ATP synthesis. The consequence of these alterations are neuronal death and dementia. Macroscopic results of these mechanisms are the so-called white matter lesions (WML), the significance of which is analyzed. Increasing clinical evidence suggests a close relationship between the reduction of elevated blood pressure and countering of both vascular dementia and AD. Antihypertensive treatment probably influences cognitive performances and prevents cognitive function alterations and the development of dementia. It is therefore important to evaluate as soon as possible cognitive functions of hypertensive patients. PMID:19021021

  19. Genome Screen to Detect Linkage to Intracranial Aneurysm Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Foroud, Tatiana; Sauerbeck, Laura; Brown, Robert; Anderson, Craig; Woo, Daniel; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Deka, Ranjan; Hornung, Richard; Meissner, Irene; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Rouleau, Guy; Sander Connolly, E.; Lai, Dongbing; Koller, Daniel L.; Huston, John; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Evidence supports a substantial genetic contribution to the risk of intracranial aneurysm (IA). The purpose of this study was to identify chromosomal regions likely to harbor genes that contribute to the risk of IA. Methods Multiplex families having at least 2 individuals with “definite” or “probable” IA were ascertained through an international consortium. First-degree relatives of individuals with IA who were at increased risk of an IA because of a history of hypertension or present smoking were offered cerebral magnetic resonance angiography. A genome screen was completed using the Illumina 6K SNP system, and the resulting data from 192 families, containing 1155 genotyped individuals, were analyzed. Narrow and broad disease definitions were used when testing for linkage using multipoint model-independent methods. Ordered subset analysis was performed to test for a gene×smoking (pack-years) interaction. Results The greatest evidence of linkage was found on chromosomes 4 (LOD=2.5; 156 cM), 7 (LOD=1.7; 183 cM), 8 (LOD=1.9; 70 cM), and 12 (LOD=1.6; 102 cM) using the broad disease definition. Using the average pack-years for the affected individuals in each family, the genes on chromosomes 4 (LOD=3.5; P=0.03), 7 (LOD=4.1; P=0.01) and 12 (LOD=3.6; P=0.02) all appear to be modulated by the degree of smoking in the affected members of the family. On chromosome 8, inclusion of smoking as a covariate did not significantly strengthen the linkage evidence, suggesting no interaction between the loci in this region and smoking. Conclusions We have detected possible evidence of linkage to 4 chromosomal regions. There is potential evidence for a gene×smoking interaction with 3 of the loci. PMID:18323491

  20. Hypertension in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lionakis, Nikolaos; Mendrinos, Dimitrios; Sanidas, Elias; Favatas, Georgios; Georgopoulou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The elderly are the most rapidly growing population group in the world. Data collected over a 30-year period have demonstrated the increasing prevalence of hypertension with age. The risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, congestive heart disease, chronic kidney insufficiency and dementia is also increased in this subgroup of hypertensives. Hypertension in the elderly patients represents a management dilemma to cardiovascular specialists and other practioners. During the last years and before the findings of the Systolic Hypertension in Europe Trial were published, the general medical opinion considered not to decrease blood pressure values similarly to other younger patients, in order to avoid possible ischemic events and poor oxygenation of the organs (brain, heart, kidney). The aim of this review article is to highlight the importance of treating hypertension in aged population in order to improve their quality of life and lower the incidence of the cardiovascular complications. PMID:22655162

  1. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  2. Benign Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Human Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexei; Downey, Robert J.; Healey, John; Moreira, Andre L.; Lou, Emil; Leung, Roland; Edgar, Mark; Singer, Samuel; LaQuaglia, Michael; Maki, Robert G.; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that at least some sarcomas arise through aberrant differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), but MSCs have never been isolated directly from human sarcoma specimens. Experimental Design We examined human sarcoma cell lines and primary adherent cultures derived from human sarcoma surgical samples for features of MSCs. We further characterized primary cultures as either benign or malignant by the presence of tumor-defining genetic lesions and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. Results We show that a dedifferentiated liposarcoma cell line DDLS8817 demonstrates fat, bone and cartilage trilineage differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Primary sarcoma cultures have the morphology, surface immunophenotype and differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Surprisingly, many of these cultures are benign as they do not form tumors in mice and lack sarcoma-defining genetic lesions. Consistent with the recently proposed pericyte origin of MSCs in normal human tissues, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs express markers of pericytes and cooperate with endothelial cells in tube formation assays. In human sarcoma specimens, a subset of CD146-positive microvascular pericytes express CD105, an MSC marker, while malignant cells largely do not. In an in vitro co-culture model, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs as well as normal human pericytes markedly stimulate the growth of sarcoma cell lines. Conclusions Sarcoma-derived benign MSCs/pericytes represent a previously undescribed stromal cell type in sarcoma which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:21138865

  3. Benign metastasizing leiomyoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Benign leiomyomas of the uterus are uncommonly found in association with benign smooth muscle tumors beyond the confines of the uterus. Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is a rare disease in which the lung is described to be the most afflicted extrauterine organ. We present a brief review of the literature, along with case reports for four patients who were followed up after resection of a pulmonary lesion or after pathological confirmation by biopsy. The clinical course of BML varies from chronic asymptomatic appearance to rapid progression, leading to respiratory failure and death. Our BML patients did not complain of pulmonary symptoms, such as cough, dyspnea, or chest tightness. Pathology revealed benign leiomyomas with no atypia and mitotic activity <5 per 10 high-power field. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for actin and desmin. A standard treatment for BML has not yet been established. Because of the hormone-sensitive characteristics of BML, treatments are based on hormonal manipulation along with either surgical or medical oophorectomy. Benign metastasizing leiomyoma can be observed in postmenopausal women. We observed four patients who did not receive adjuvant hormonal therapy because they were postmenopausal or perimenopausal. All patients are still healthy and show no evidence of recurrence or progression of the disease. PMID:24134076

  4. Insufficient platelet inhibition and thromboembolic complications in patients with intracranial aneurysms after stent placement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongchao; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Yuhua

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Insufficient platelet inhibition has been associated with an increased incidence of thromboembolic complications in cardiology patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Data regarding the relationship between insufficient platelet inhibition and thromboembolic complications in patients undergoing neurovascular procedures remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of insufficient platelet inhibition and thromboembolic complications in patients with intracranial aneurysm undergoing stent treatment. METHODS The authors prospectively recruited patients with intracranial aneurysms undergoing stent treatment and maintained the data in a database. MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences was performed within 24 hours of stent insertion to identify acute ischemic lesions. The authors used thromboelastography to assess the degree of platelet inhibition in response to clopidogrel and aspirin. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify potential risk factors of thromboembolic complications. RESULTS One hundred sixty-eight patients with 193 aneurysms were enrolled in this study. Ninety-one of 168 (54.2%) patients with acute cerebral ischemic lesions were identified by diffusion-weighted MRI. In 9 (5.4%) patients with ischemic lesions, transient ischemic attack or stroke was found at discharge, and these complications were found in 11 (6.5%) patients during the follow-up period. The incidence of periprocedural thromboembolic complications increased with resistance to antiplatelet agents, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, complete occlusion, and aneurysm of the anterior circulation. The multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the anterior circulation and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) inhibition percentage were independent risk factors of perioperative thromboembolic complications. The maximum amplitude and ADP inhibition percentage were independent risk factors for thromboembolic

  5. Malignancy and the benign lymphoepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    Batsakis, J G; Bernacki, E G; Rice, D H; Stebler, M E

    1975-02-01

    The benign lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands is now considered the histological hallmark of a variety of clinical and pathological disorders affecting salivary tissues. Malignancy arising in the lesion is uncommon, but may take origin in either the epithelial or lymphoreticular components. Lymphomas and pseudolymphomas associated with salivary gland lymphoepithelial lesions have been predominately extra-salivary and strongly correlated with Sjögren's syndrome. Epithelial malignancy has not been associated with autoimmunity and with few exceptions has been of the anaplastic type. This report presents two patients with intra-salivary lymphomas arising in a benign lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands and a patient with anaplastic carcinoma arising in the epithelial islands of the lesion. The fourth patient manifested pseudolymphomatous lymphoreticular hyperplasia in lung and submandibular gland and illustrates the possible multiple organ involvement that may occur in patients with benign lymphoepithelial lesion, even without clinical evidence of concommitant autoimmune disorders. PMID:1172885

  6. Hypertension in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Yeoh, Peng Nam; Wai, Victor Nyunt; Win, Ni Ni; Kuan, Lai Pei; Aung, Kyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine trends in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension in Malaysia and to assess the relationship between socioeconomic determinants and prevalence of hypertension in Malaysia. The distribution of hypertension in Malaysia was assessed based on available data in 3 National Health and Morbidity Surveys (NHMSs) and 1 large scale non-NHMS during the period of 1996 to 2011. Summary statistics was used to characterize the included surveys. Differences in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension between any 2 surveys were expressed as ratios. To assess the independent associations between the predictors and the outcome variables, regression analyses were employed with prevalence of hypertension as an outcome variable. Overall, there was a rising trend in the prevalence of hypertension in adults ≥30 years: 32.9% (30%–35.8%) in 1996, 42.6% (37.5%–43.5%) in 2006, and 43.5% (40.4%–46.6%) in 2011. There were significant increase of 32% from 1996 to 2011 (P < 0.001) and of 29% from 1996 to 2006 (P < 0.05), but only a small change of 1% from 2006 to 2011 (P = 0.6). For population ≥18 years, only a 1% increase in prevalence of hypertension occurred from the 2006 NHMS (32.2%) to the 2011 NHMS (32.7%) (P = 0.25). A relative increase of 13% occurred in those with primary education (P < 0.001) and a 15% increase was seen in those with secondary education (P < 0.001). The rate of increase in the prevalence of hypertension in the population with income level RM 3000–3999 was the highest (18%) during this period. In general, the older age group had higher prevalence of hypertension in the 2006 and 2011 NHMSs. The prevalence peaked at 74.1% among population aged 65 to 69 years in the 2011 NHMS. Both the proportion of awareness and the control of hypertension in Malaysia improved from 1996 to 2006. A change in the control of hypertension was 13% higher in women than in men. The findings suggest that

  7. The Unusual but Benign in Pediatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shandling, Barry

    1985-01-01

    The problem of what is normal and what is not is closely related to whether or not, if something is indeed abnormal, it matters. Anticipating the outcome will affect the management in infants and children of such relatively benign conditions as hydroceles, umbilical hernias, diseases of the male and female breasts, lymphadenopathy and the intact prepuce. Unnecessary investigations such as barium studies which do not affect management are inadvisable. Congenital torticollis and undescended testis, seemingly benign, must be appropriately treated, however, in order to avoid lifelong sequelae. PMID:21274156

  8. Osteoid osteoma and benign osteoblastoma in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Black, J A; Levick, R K; Sharrard, W J

    1979-01-01

    Three cases of osteoid osteoma and one of benign osteoblastoma in children are described. The main complaint was severe pain which was worse at night; it was relieved by aspirin or other analgesics. The diagnosis was made on clinical and radiological grounds and was confirmed on histological examination of the central nidus removed at operation. The pain was relieved in the patients with osteoid osteoma, and it was very much less after operative removal of the benign osteoblastoma. Both conditions are probably variations of the same disease process, depending on the anatomical site and the type of bone affected. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:475430

  9. Radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Stacul, F; Zecchin, M; Dobrinja, C; Zanconati, F; Fabris, B

    2016-09-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are an extremely common occurrence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining ground as an effective technique for their treatment, in case they become symptomatic. Here we review what are the current indications to RFA, its outcomes in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and cost, and also how it compares to the other conventional and experimental treatment modalities for benign thyroid nodules. Moreover, we will also address the issue of treating with this technique patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), as it is a rather frequent occurrence that has never been addressed in detail in the literature. PMID:27098804

  10. Benign Cystic Mesothelioma Misdiagnosed as Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun Deok; Kim, Suk Bae

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic mesothelioma (BCM) is a rare benign disease that forms multicystic masses in the abdomen, pelvis, and retroperitoneum. It occurs predominantly in young to middle-aged women. The majority of cases were associated with a history of abdominal or pelvic operation, a history of endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease. We present a unique case of BCM which is different to the previous cases. The patient was a 52-year-old man showing features of peritoneal carcinomatosis accompanied by ascites on abdominal computed tomography scans. We herein report a case of BCM misdiagnosed with peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  11. Clinical, lifestyle, socioeconomic determinants and rate of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis in stroke free Pakistanis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease (ICAD) is the most frequent etiology of stroke with high prevalence among Asians. Despite this, early determinants of ICAD have not been described from this region. Methods The study is an analytical prospective cross-sectional study of 200 adults from Radiology Departments of two diagnostic centers in Karachi. Eligible participants confirmed the absence of stroke symptoms via the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke Free Status (QVSFS) and underwent an interview covering medical, socio demographic, lifestyle and anthropometric evaluation using locally validated and standardized definitions. Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) were centrally reviewed to detect ICAD using the criterion used in the Warfarin–Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease study. The risk factors associated with asymptomatic ICAD are reported along with prevalence ratios. Results Of the 200 participants, ICAD was found in 34.5% (n = 69) of the participants. Mean age was 37.1 (S.D 15.1) years with 62% younger than 45 years. Self-reported hypertension was found in 26.5% subjects, diabetes in 9%, dyslipidemia in 5% and depression in 60%. Smokeless tobacco (Adjusted PR 3.27 (1.07-6.05)), Western diet, high socioeconomic status (Adjusted PR 2.26 (1.99-5.62)) and dyslipidemia (Adjusted PR 1.88 (1.25-2.21)) had significant associations with ICAD after multivariable analysis. Age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, depression and physical activity did not have a significant association. Conclusion ICAD was found on MRI in one in three asymptomatic Pakistanis and was associated with modifiable risks. Initiatives targeting primary prevention may be able to decrease the burden of disease caused by stroke due to ICAD. Study Registration Number NCT02072876 2/25/2014 PMID:25124284

  12. The current status of 5-ALA fluorescence-guided resection of intracranial meningiomas-a critical review.

    PubMed

    Motekallemi, Arash; Jeltema, Hanne-Rinck; Metzemaekers, Jan D M; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Crane, Lucy M A; Groen, Rob J M

    2015-10-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary tumors affecting the central nervous system. Surgical treatment can be curative in case of complete resection. 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) has been established as an intraoperative tool in malignant glioma surgery. A number of studies have tried to outline the merits of 5-ALA for the resection of intracranial meningiomas. In the present paper, we review the existing literature about the application of 5-ALA as an intraoperative tool for the resection of intracranial meningiomas. PubMed was used as the database for search tasks. We included articles published in English without limitations regarding publication date. Tumor fluorescence can occur in benign meningiomas (WHO grade I) as well as in WHO grade II and WHO grade III meningiomas. Most of the reviewed studies report fluorescence of the main tumor mass with high sensitivity and specificity. However, different parts of the same tumor can present with a different fluorescent pattern (heterogenic fluorescence). Quantitative probe fluorescence can be superior, especially in meningiomas with difficult anatomical accessibility. However, only one study was able to consistently correlate resected tissue with histopathological results and nonspecific fluorescence of healthy brain tissue remains a confounder. The use of 5-ALA as a tool to guide resection of intracranial meningiomas remains experimental, especially in cases with tumor recurrence. The principle of intraoperative fluorescence as a real-time method to achieve complete resection is appealing, but the usefulness of 5-ALA is questionable. 5-ALA in intracranial meningioma surgery should only be used in a protocolled prospective and long-term study. PMID:25736455

  13. Resistant hypertension - an update.

    PubMed

    Pasha, K; Towhiduzzaman, M; Manwar, A; Jahan, M U

    2015-04-01

    Patients with hypertension are increasing in Bangladesh. Among these patients a growing number of patients are having resistant hypertension faced by both primary care physicians and specialists. There is no data regarding prevalence of resistant hypertension in Bangladesh, but clinical trials abroad suggests that it is not rare, involving perhaps 20% to 30% of study participants. Cardiovascular risk is undoubtedly increased in such patients and the condition is often complicated by multiple other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, sleep apnea, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Resistant hypertension is almost always multifactorial in etiology. Successful treatment requires identification and reversal of lifestyle factors contributing to treatment resistance; diagnosis and appropriate treatment of secondary causes of hypertension; and use of effective multi drug regimens. Studies of resistant hypertension are limited by the high cardiovascular risk of patients within this subgroup, which generally precludes safe withdrawal of medications; presence of multiple disease processes and their associated medical therapies, which confound interpretation of study results. Therefore we should concentrate on expanding our knowledge of the causes of resistant hypertension which will allow for more effective prevention and/or treatment which is essential to improve long-term clinical management of this condition. PMID:26007281

  14. Platelet interaction within giant intracranial aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; King, M.E.; Peerless, S.J.; Vezina, W.C.; Brown, G.W.; Chamberlain, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Turbulence within intracranial aneurysms may result in tearing of the aneurysmal wall, exposing the subendothelial matrix to circulating platelets. In this study, platelet interaction in giant intracranial aneurysms was evaluated by a dual-isotope technique employing In-labeled platelets and Tc-labeled red blood cells. The use of two isotopes allows the subtraction of the blood pool and the calculation of the ratio indium deposited:indium blood pool (In(D)/In(BP)). A ratio greater than zero indicates platelet deposition within aneurysm. Thirteen patients were evaluated in this way, with platelet deposition demonstrated in six. In these six patients, the ratio In(D)/In(BP) was found to be significantly elevated, with a mean value of 0.96 +/- 0.65. Three of these six patients has symptoms of recurrent transient neurological deficits; one of these three suffered a complete stroke following documentation of platelet deposition. In this case, the aneurysm was obtained at surgery and was found to contain intraluminal platelet aggregation when viewed by scanning electron microscopy. In the remaining seven patients, the ratio IN(D)/In(BP) was found not to be significantly elevated (mean -0.03 and/- 0.06), indicating the absence of active platelet deposition. Two of these patients had prior symptoms of cerebral ischemia; one of these was found to have an ulcer in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery which was probably responsible for thromboembolic events to the hemisphere. The authors conclude that platelet aggregation occurs more frequently than previously recognized in giant intracranial aneurysms, and their data substantiate the hypothesis that platelet metabolic products or thrombi originating from a large aneurysm may embolize to distal cerebral vessels.

  15. Intracranial subdural hygroma after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William L; Lee, Michael; MacIntosh, Robert Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Various intra- and postoperative complications have been well-documented after Le Fort I osteotomies; however, an intracranial subdural hygroma has not yet been reported in oral and maxillofacial studies. We report a unique case of an intracranial subdural hygroma requiring neurosurgical intervention after Le Fort I advancement. PMID:25631863

  16. A Practical Approach to the Diagnosis of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Steenerson, Kristen; Halker, Rashmi

    2015-08-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension can be difficult to diagnose as there are a number of tests available and knowing how to appropriately choose amongst them is not always easy. In this article, we will review the available diagnostic options and provide a practical approach to the workup of a patient with suspected intracranial hypotension. PMID:26077206

  17. Update in Hypertension Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Leonard A

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of early mortality in the world, and reduction of blood pressure can help to reduce that burden. There is an enormous and ever-expanding body of literature on hypertension, with a 2016 Medline search for hypertension retrieving more than 113,000 publications. Recent guidelines from major societies have been published, and often present conflicting recommendations based on the same data. Using a question-and-answer format, this article reviews some of the recent developments and opinions on management of blood pressure and provides practical suggestions for management in the clinical arena. PMID:27235610

  18. Perioperative hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Varon, Joseph; Marik, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Perioperative hypertension is commonly encountered in patients that undergo surgery. While attempts have been made to standardize the method to characterize the intraoperative hemodynamics, these methods still vary widely. In addition, there is a lack of consensus concerning treatment thresholds and appropriate therapeutic targets, making absolute recommendations about treatment difficult. Nevertheless, perioperative hypertension requires careful management. When treatment is necessary, therapy should be individualized for the patient. This paper reviews the pharmacologic agents and strategies commonly used in the management of perioperative hypertension. PMID:18827911

  19. Lung Disease and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Airflow limitation is a predictor of future risks of hypertension and cardiovascular events. COPD is now understood as a systemic inflammatory disease, with the focus on inflammation of the lungs. An association between inflammation and sympathetic overactivity has also been reported. In this article, we review the association between chronic lung disease and the risks of hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic approach to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in patients with lung diseases. PMID:26587450

  20. Hypertension in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Sachtleben, Thomas; Fields, Karl B

    2003-04-01

    Athletes with hypertension are frequently encountered in clinical settings and during preparticipation examinations. This common condition merits special attention in athletes, as they have particular physiologic and sport-specific demands. Awareness of the pressor response to both isometric and isotonic exercise is valuable in managing hypertensive athletes. Recommendations regarding physical activity in hypertensive patients and clearance for sports participation among competitive athletes are reviewed. Nonpharmacologic measures and the use of customary antihypertensives in athletes is essential. However, knowledge of side-effect profiles and possible negative effects on exercise tolerance guide appropriate medication choices. PMID:12831663

  1. [Intracranial tumors and epileptic seizures: treatment principles].

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2016-04-27

    Epileptic seizures represent a relatively frequent issue in patients with intracranial neoplasms, and very frequently imply the start of an antiepileptic treatment as secondary prophylaxis. Even if the current level of evidence is relatively low, compounds with a limited risk of pharmacokinetic interactions are clearly preferred. Levetiracetam is probably the most prescribed agent in this setting, while pregabalin, valproate, lacosamide and lamotrigine are valuable alternatives. The treatment choice has to consider the different profiles of side effects and should be tailored to each patient. In this setting, a multidisciplinary approach including general practicioner, oncologist and neurologist is strongly advocated. PMID:27281943

  2. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Bivek; Tamrakar, Karuna; Wu, Yuan-Kui

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region. PMID:22438693

  3. Hypothalamic signaling mechanisms in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Casey Y; Wainford, Richard D

    2015-05-01

    The etiology of hypertension, a critical public health issue affecting one in three US adults, involves the integration of the actions of multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system. Increased activation of the central nervous system, driving enhanced sympathetic outflow and increased blood pressure, has emerged as a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The hypothalamus is a key brain site acting to integrate central and peripheral inputs to ultimately impact blood pressure in multiple disease states that evoke hypertension. This review highlights recent advances that have identified novel signal transduction mechanisms within multiple hypothalamic nuclei (e.g., paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus) acting to drive the pathophysiology of hypertension in neurogenic hypertension, angiotensin II hypertension, salt-sensitive hypertension, chronic intermittent hypoxia, and obesity-induced hypertension. Increased understanding of hypothalamic activity in hypertension has the potential to identify novel targets for future therapeutic interventions designed to treat hypertension. PMID:25860531

  4. Whole-body mathematical model for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Penar, Paul L. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor); Tranmer, Bruce I. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A whole-body mathematical model (10) for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics. In one embodiment, model (10) includes 17 interacting compartments, of which nine lie entirely outside of intracranial vault (14). Compartments (F) and (T) are defined to distinguish ventricular from extraventricular CSF. The vasculature of the intracranial system within cranial vault (14) is also subdivided into five compartments (A, C, P, V, and S, respectively) representing the intracranial arteries, capillaries, choroid plexus, veins, and venous sinus. The body's extracranial systemic vasculature is divided into six compartments (I, J, O, Z, D, and X, respectively) representing the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the central body and the lower body. Compartments (G) and (B) include tissue and the associated interstitial fluid in the intracranial and lower regions. Compartment (Y) is a composite involving the tissues, organs, and pulmonary circulation of the central body and compartment (M) represents the external environment.

  5. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    2002-11-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  6. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  7. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: from Bench to Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Ju

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease, especially in old men, and often results in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This chronic disease has important care implications and financial risks to the health care system. LUTS are caused not only by mechanical prostatic obstruction but also by the dynamic component of obstruction. The exact etiology of BPH and its consequences, benign prostatic enlargement and benign prostatic obstruction, are not identified. Various theories concerning the causes of benign prostate enlargement and LUTS, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, growth factors, androgen receptor, epithelial-stromal interaction, and lifestyle, are discussed. Incomplete overlap of prostatic enlargement with symptoms and obstruction encourages focus on symptoms rather than prostate enlargement and the shifting from surgery to medicine as the treatment of BPH. Several alpha antagonists, including alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin, have shown excellent efficacy without severe adverse effects. In addition, new alpha antagonists, silodosin and naftopidil, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors are emerging as BPH treatments. In surgical treatment, laser surgery such as photoselective vaporization of the prostate and holmium laser prostatectomy have been introduced to reduce complications and are used as alternatives to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and open prostatectomy. The status of TURP as the gold standard treatment of BPH is still evolving. We review several preclinical and clinical studies about the etiology of BPH and treatment options. PMID:22468207

  8. Unusual Benign Tumors of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Adrada, Beatriz E; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Carkaci, Selin; Posleman-Monetto, Flavia E; Ewere, Adesuwa; Whitman, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging characteristics of a variety of benign breast tumors that may be encountered in daily practice, in order to formulate an appropriate differential diagnosis and to establish concordance between the imaging and the pathologic findings, and to assist the clinician with appropriate management. PMID:26085959

  9. Secondary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Puar, Troy Hai Kiat; Mok, Yingjuan; Debajyoti, Roy; Khoo, Joan; How, Choon How; Ng, Alvin Kok Heong

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of adult patients (~10%). In young patients, renal causes (glomerulonephritis) and coarctation of the aorta should be considered. In older patients, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnoea and renal artery stenosis are more prevalent than previously thought. Primary aldosteronism can be screened by taking morning aldosterone and renin levels, and should be considered in patients with severe, resistant or hypokalaemia-associated hypertension. Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea should be sought. Worsening of renal function after starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests the possibility of renal artery stenosis. Recognition, diagnosis and treatment of secondary causes of hypertension lead to good clinical outcomes and the possible reversal of end-organ damage, in addition to blood pressure control. As most patients with hypertension are managed at the primary care level, it is important for primary care physicians to recognise these conditions and refer patients appropriately. PMID:27211205

  10. Hypertensive heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure: pathophysiology and diagnosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Victor RG. Arterial hypertension. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  11. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure to live. Without it, blood can't flow through our bodies and carry oxygen to our vital organs. But when blood pressure gets too high — a condition called hypertension — it can lead to ...

  12. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  13. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  14. Increased Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment Associated with Long-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2011-01-01

    Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has made it a high priority to understand this syndrome and provide mitigation techniques to protect crewmembers from visual impairment. While there are many possible factors that could contribute to intracranial hypertension associated with spaceflight, the relative contribution of these, as well as the processes by which eye damage occurs as a result of intracranial hypertension, are not fully understood. The observed pathophysiological phenomena are extremely complex and it is likely that multiple factors contribute to their incidence, rather than one simple mechanism. This paper will define and examine the findings in detail, and expound upon the potential contributing factors and their relative contribution to this syndrome.

  15. Cost of hypertension treatment.

    PubMed

    Odell, T W; Gregory, M C

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted of the cost of hypertension care at one internal medicine clinic, looking at the cost of office visits, laboratory tests, and medications. Cost of hypertension care was $947 the first year of treatment, $575 the second year, and $420 per year thereafter. Drug costs were the major determinant of cost of care, comprising 80% of the total cost of treatment after the first year of therapy. PMID:8770721

  16. Hypertensive emergencies of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, James M; Wilson, Karen L

    2013-03-01

    Hypertension is commonly encountered in pregnancy and has both maternal and fetal effects. Acute hypertensive crisis most commonly occurs in severe preeclampsia and is associated with maternal stroke, cardiopulmonary decompensation, fetal decompensation due to decreased uterine perfusion, abruption, and stillbirth. Immediate stabilization of the mother including the use of intervenous antihypertensives is required and often delivery is indicated. With appropriate management, maternal and fetal outcomes can be excellent. PMID:23466139

  17. Carcinoembryonic antigen in patients with intracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Tanaka, R

    1980-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tumor cyst fluid obtained from patients with a variety of intracranial tumors was determined by radioimmunoassay Slightly elevated levels of plasma CEA, ranging from 2.6 to 3.8 ng/ml, were noted in six (4%) of 161 patients with primary brain tumors: in three gliomas, two pineal tumors, and one acoustic neurinoma, respectively. On the other hand, 17 (37%) of 46 patients with metastatic brain tumors showed a definite elevation, and most of them had values higher than 5.0 ng/ml. Of 37 patients with primary brain tumors, only one with a pineal germinoma showed a significant elevation of CEA in CSF, whereas eight (44%) of 18 patients with metastatic brain tumors showed high values of CEA in CSF. All six patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis showed elevated CEA in CSF. Levels of CEA in tumor cyst fluid were determined in 17 patients with intracranial tumors, including 12 gliomas, two craniopharyngiomas, two metastatic tumors, and one meningioma; elevation of CEA in tumor fluid was noted in two craniopharyngiomas and one metastatic tumor. Sequential determination of CEA of plasma or CSF revealed that the CEA levels were well correlated with the activity of brain tumors. Consequently, the determination of CEA in plasma or CSF is valuable for the differential diagnosis between primary and metastatic brain tumors and for the management of CEA-producing tumors. PMID:7420150

  18. Neuroblastoma with intracranial involvement: an ENSG Study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, P J; Eden, T

    1992-01-01

    We report the experience of the European Neuroblastoma Study Group (ENSG) with central nervous system (CNS) involvement of neuroblastoma. Among this series of intensively treated patients, CNS neuroblastoma was diagnosed by computerised tomography (CT) scanning, rather than by autopsy. Cranial disease occurred in 5% of ENSG patients. Of 11 patients with intracranial disease, 4 had disease in the posterior fossa, a site rarely reported previously. Furthermore, 5 cases had CNS metastases at a time when there was no detectable disease elsewhere, rather than as part of extensive relapse. The pattern of disease we observed, at least for those with parenchymal disease, is in keeping with arterial spread. Although CT scanning is the optimal modality for identifying CNS disease, 2 cases had normal head CT scans prior to the onset of CNS disease. As most patients had symptoms of raised intracranial pressure (RICP) at the time the CNS disease was diagnosed, there does not seem to be any indication for routine CT scanning of the head at diagnosis, but this should be performed as soon as any symptoms or signs appear. With patients living longer with their disease, vigilance must be maintained during follow-up. PMID:1734220

  19. Multiple intracranial abscesses: Heralding asymptomatic venosus ASD.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Praveen K; Marzook, Rehab Ali; Sulaibeekh, Leena

    2013-10-01

    A case of multiple intracranial abscesses in an immune-competent young girl is reported. She had chicken pox. Two weeks later, she presented with multiple intracranial abscesses. No significant cardiac abnormality was detected on transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). The condition was treated medically. However, one of the abscesses adjacent to the CSF pathways enlarged on treatment and caused obstructive hydrocephalus that required stereotactic aspiration. Gram stain showed gram positive cocci in chain. Pus was sterile on culture. She was treated with broad spectrum IV antibiotics based on Gram staining report for 6 weeks followed by another 8 weeks of oral antibiotics. She made good recovery and had been leading a normal life. The abscess capsules took 30 months to resolve completely on MRI. A repeat TTE done in the follow up showed enlarged right heart chambers with a suggestion of a venosus ASD. A trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) confirmed the presence of sinus venosus ASD from the SVC side with mainly left to right shunt. There was also partial anomalous drainage of the pulmonary veins. The patient underwent correction of the defect and has been doing well. PMID:24551007

  20. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  1. A Histoenzymatic Study of Human Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Henry F.

    1972-01-01

    A light microscopy study on the localization of enzyme activity within atherosclerotic human intracranial arteries was performed on autopsy material obtained within 4 hours of death. The data suggests that the atherosclerotic process first goes through a proliferative phase and then a degenerative phase culminating in the formation of a plaque. In the proliferative phase, smooth muscle cell proliferation has formed a thickened intima. Tetrazolium reductase, adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and adenosine monophosphatase (AMPase) activities are present in these cells, while all dehydrogenases and acid phosphatase activities were weak or not present. As the degenerative phase commences, an area of necrosis, lipid and macrophage accumulation is formed on the lumen side of the elastica. This area increases in size until a plaque is formed. Unsaturated polar and nonpolar lipid, cholesterol, α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, and AMPase activities are associated with these areas and in foam cells, which are often found in the thickened intima of the proliferative phase. Tetrazolium reductase and ATPase activities decrease in the thickened intima as the area of necrosis increases in size, while dehydrogenase activity, except that for α-glycerophosphate, remains low or not present. Patterns of enzyme alterations for various stages of the disease process in intracranial arteries, the aorta and coronary arteries suggest a similar, if not identical, progression of the atherosclerotic process, irrespective of known differences in the prevalence of atherosclerosis. ImagesFig 2Fig 3Fig 5Fig 1Fig 4 PMID:4260721

  2. Intracranial cholesterol granuloma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Emanuele; Abbiati, Gianluca; Cantile, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    A case of intracranial cholesterol granuloma is described in a 4-year-old neutered European male cat presented with a 5-month history of progressive weakness, ataxia and depression. On clinical evaluation, haematological and biochemical profiles revealed only mild hypercholesterolemia and magnetic resonance imaging showed a large space-occupying extra-axial mass in the area of the falx, not homogeneous after contrast enhancement. At post-mortem examination, an orange-yellowish mass of 22 mm in diameter extended from the right frontal lobe to the temporo-parietal region, causing atrophy of the prosencephalic region of the brain. The site of origin of the mass was within the subarachnoid space of the supracallosum sulcus of the right cerebral hemisphere. Histological examination of the lesion revealed abundant deposits of cholesterol clefts, surrounded by clusters of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Neither inflammatory lesions, nor cholesterol deposits were detected in other areas of the brain and in other organs. On the basis of the histological examination, a diagnosis of intracranial cholesterol granuloma was made. PMID:20543528

  3. The spectrum of intracranial aneurysms in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, I; Lasjaunias, P; Coates, R

    1995-03-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are rare in children, accounting for merely 0.5-4.6% of all aneurysms. Several characteristics distinguish them from aneurysms in adults: male predominance; higher incidence of unusual location, such as peripheral or posterior circulation; and a greater number of large and giant aneurysms. These unique features can be attributed to the higher incidence of traumatic, infectious, developmental, and congenital lesions. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is not the exclusive mode of presentation; neuro-compressive signs and symptoms are also frequently seen. The treatment of intracranial aneurysms in pediatrics is dictated by their unusual pathology and liability to rehemorrhage. Although direct clipping has been the standard surgical technique, certain obsolete or innovative procedures should also be considered, such as entrapment, proximal occlusion, and endovascular embolisation, or even, in some cases, the non-invasive treatment of "watch and wait" for a spontaneous thrombosis. Six representative cases from King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre are reviewed. They reflect the diversity of the problem and the multi-disciplinary approach to the treatment. PMID:7627578

  4. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies. PMID:27082149

  5. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Perquin, D A; Kloet, A; Tans, J T; Witte, G N; Dörr, P J

    1999-03-01

    Three women, aged 27, 32 and 30 years, respectively, suffered from headache, nausea and neurological abnormalities and were found to have an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). One of them after diagnosis had two pregnancies, both ended by caesarean section with good results. Another woman was 32 weeks pregnant when the AVM manifested itself with a haemorrhage; she recovered well and was delivered by caesarean section. After the AVM proved radiologically to have been obliterated, she delivered after her subsequent pregnancy by the vaginal route with vacuum extraction. The third woman was 15 weeks pregnant when major abnormalities developed. There was a large intracerebral haematoma with break-through to the ventricular system; this patient died. Intracranial haemorrhage during pregnancy is rate. It can result in maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. It appears that pregnancy does not increase the rate of first cerebral haemorrhage from an AVM. The management of AVM rupture during pregnancy should be based primarily on neurosurgical rather than on obstetric considerations. Close collaboration with a team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists is mandatory. PMID:10321255

  6. Primary intracranial neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome: A rare and complicated case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAILONG; ZHANG, MINGSHAN; WANG, XUAN; QU, YANMING; ZHANG, HONGWEI; YU, CHUNJIANG

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome are frequent in adult patients. However, primary intracranial NETs, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH, high serum ACTH level and treated with anterior skull base reconstruction, are rare and complicated. We herein present a case of a primary intracranial NET immunonegative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. A 40-year-old woman presented with intermittent rhinorrhea, rapid weight gain, polydipsia, polyuria, hypertension, dimness, bilateral exophthalmus, diminution of vision in the left eye and pigmentation of the skin of the face and trunk. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a sizeable enhancing tumor in the anterior cranial fossa, which infiltrated the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses bilaterally, the left maxillary sinus and the nasal cavity. Abdominal CT scans revealed bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. The biochemical findings included hypokalemia and high glucose, cortisol, plasma ACTH, 24-h urinary free cortisol and testosterone levels. The neoplasm was exposed through a right frontal craniotomy, while anterior skull base reconstruction was performed during surgery. The intracranial surgery achieved gross removal of the tumor; however, part of the tumor remained in the nasal cavity. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low-grade small-cell NET, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH. A postoperative abdominal CT scan demonstrated bilateral regression of the adrenal gland hyperplasia and the serum ACTH level returned to normal after 16 days. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of primary intracranial NETs, immunohistochemically negative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. PMID:27330775

  7. Resistant hypertension and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-04-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient's history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of "non-dipper" hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  8. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  9. [BENIGN TUMORS OF MEDIASTINUM: CLINIC, DIAGNOSIS, SURGICAL TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Kalabukha, I A; Mayetniy, E M

    2015-12-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 18 patients in a thoracic surgery clinic for benign tumors of mediastinum are presented. The symptoms of benign tumors, efficacy of application of welding technologies in operative intervention were analyzed. PMID:27025028

  10. Isolated benign primary cutaneous plasmacytosis in a child.

    PubMed

    On, Hye Rang; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, You Chan; Kim, Soo-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Isolated benign primary cutaneous plasmacytosis in a child is a very rare and benign disease. Herein we present a case of this condition occurring in a child who showed good response to topical corticosteroid. PMID:25424220

  11. A novel benign solution for collagen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, Olivier

    Collagen is the main protein constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues in the body (skin, cartilage, blood vessels...). It exists many types of collagen, this work studies only fibrillar collagen (e.g. collagen type I contained in the skin) that exhibits a triple helical structure composed of 3 alpha-helical collagen chains. This particular and defined hierarchical structure is essential to the biological and mechanical properties of the collagen. Processing collagen into scaffolds to mimic the ECM is crucial for successful tissue engineering. Recently collagen was processed into fibrous and porous scaffold using electrospinning process. However the solvent (HFIP) used for electrospinning is extremely toxic for the user and expensive. This work shows that HFIP can be replaced by a benign mixture composed of water, salt and alcohol. Yet only three alcohols (methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol) enable the dissolution of large quantity of collagen in the benign mixture, with a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, and conserve the collagen hierarchical structure at least as well as the HFIP. Collagen can be electrospun from the benign mixture into sub-micron fibers with concentrations as low as 6 wt-% for a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, with at least 10wt-% of salt, and any of the three alcohols. Specific conditions yield nano size fibers. After processing from HFIP or a benign mixture, collagen is water soluble and needs to be chemically crosslink for tissue engineering application. Post-crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) results in the loss of the scaffold fibrous aspect and porosity, hence it is useless for tissue engineering. Such issue could be prevented by incorporating the crosslinker into the mixture prior to electrospinning. When EDC is used alone, collagen forms a gel in the mixture within minutes, preventing electrospinning. The addition of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in excess to EDC

  12. Postural Effects on Intracranial Pressure as Assessed Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Hargens, Alan R.; Ballard, R. E.; Shuer, L. M.; Cantrell, J. H.; Yost, W. T.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of whole body tilting on intracranial compliance and pressure in six healthy volunteers by using a noninvasive ultrasonic device. Subjects were randomly tilted up or down sequentially at 60 degree, 30 degree head-up, supine, and 15 degree head-down position for one minute at each angle. We measured arterial blood pressure with a finger pressure cuff and changes in intracranial distance with an ultrasonic device. The device measures skull movement on the order of micro-meter. Our ultrasound technique demonstrates that skull movement is highly correlated (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.77) with intracranial pressure variations due to cerebral arterial pulsation. The amplitudes of arterial pressure (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.99 and those of intracranial distance changes (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.87) associated with one cardiac cycle were inversely correlated with the angle of tilt. The ratio of pulsation amplitudes for intracranial distance over arterial pressure also showed a significant increase as the angle of tilt was lowered (p=0.003). Thus, postural changes alter intracranial compliance in healthy volunteers and intracranial volume-buffering capacity is reduced in head-down position.

  13. Seven patients diagnosed as intracranial hemorrhage combined with intracranial tumor: case description and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chun; Tang, Shuang; Jiang, Yongming; Xiong, Xuehua; Zhou, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, 7 patients with brain hemorrhage combined with intracranial tumor were investigated for about 3 years. Furthermore, the previous reports related with such cases were also reviewed. In all of these patients, hemorrhage was a main characteristic of the diagnosed neoplasm. The clinical data were identified by computed tomography (CT) scanning in the present study. CT scanning results demonstrated that there was a neoplastic core with high or low density and multifocal clots generally at the borders of the tumors. Increase of tumor tissues with intravenous injection of approximate 70% hypaque was analyzed in all the 7 patients with brain hemorrhage. The parts that were increased showed peripheral distributions corresponding to the hemorrhage sites. In conclusion, the intracranial brain hemorrhage related with the several types of tumors, including hemangiopericytoma, metastatic carcinomas, oligodendroglioma, and glioblastoma multiforme, which may be helpful to these patients. PMID:26770623

  14. [Hypertensive crisis in kidney patients].

    PubMed

    Scrivano, Jacopo; Giuliani, Anna; Pettorini, Laura; Punzo, Giorgio; Mene', Paolo; Pirozzi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The classification and management of hypertensive crisis have been recently reviewed in the context of both European and American guidelines. The key points for proper blood pressure control in severe arterial hypertension are: 1 - Distinction between urgent intervention and emergencies 2 - Choice of the best drug(s) 3 - Choice of the correct route of administration. In patients with renal disease, beside the common causes of hypertension/ hypertensive crises, kidney-specific causes should be taken into account such as renal parenchymal hypertension, renovascular hypertension, sclerodermic crises, and preeclampsia. PMID:22028263

  15. CT Perfusion Dynamics of Intracranial Tuberculomas

    PubMed Central

    N., Jayakumar Peruvumba; Shivashankar, Ravishankar

    2015-01-01

    Aims To study perfusion characteristics of intracranial tuberculomas and analyze changes with anti tubercular treatment. Materials and Methods Nineteen patients of histologically proven intracranial tuberculomas were included in the study of which 9 were not on antitubercular treatment and ten were on antitubercular treatment (6 patients on treatment for less than 2 months and 4 were more than 6 months). All patients underwent CT perfusion (CTP) and CTP parameters like rCBV and rCBF were obtained from entire lesion, center and capsule of lesions and compared. Results CTP parameters like rCBF and rCBV were significantly low in all the three ROIs in the group not on treatment compared to that of on treatment ; rCBF and rCBV of entire lesion (p=0.018 and p=0.005 respectively), capsule (p=0.045 and p=0.010 respectively) and center of the lesion (p=0.020 and p=0.009) respectively). Tuberculomas on antitubercular treatment of more than six months showed reduced rCBF and rCBV in entire lesion (p=0.01 & p=0.01 respectively), capsule (p=0.04 & p=0.03 respectively) and center (p=0.08 & p=0.05 respectively) compared to those on treatment for less than two months. Similarly tuberculomas on treatment for six months did not show significant difference in rCBF and rCBV compared to tuberculomas who were not on treatment. Tuberculomas on treatment for less than two months showed statistically increased rCBF and rCBV in entire lesion (p=0.01 & p=0.04 respectively), capsule (p=0.03 & p=0.01 respectively) and center (p= 0.03 &=0.01) compared to those not on treatment. Conclusion Intracranial tuberculomas not on treatment and those on treatment for around six months show low perfusion and tuberculomas on treatment for less than two months show high perfusion. These findings suggest that serial perfusion profiles of tuberculomas on treatment could possibly be seen as surrogate markers of response to treatment. PMID:26155528

  16. The case for angioplasty in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Marks, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is likely the most common cause of stroke worldwide and remains highly morbid even with highly monitored medical therapy. Recent results of the SAMMPRIS trial, which randomized patients to stenting plus aggressive medical management versus aggressive medical management alone have shown that additional treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic lesions with the Wingspan stent is inferior to aggressive medical management alone. In light of these results, there has been renewed interest in angioplasty alone to treat symptomatic ICAD. This article will briefly review the natural history of ICAD and discuss the possible future for endovascular treatment of ICAD with primary intracranial angioplasty in appropriately selected patients. PMID:24782816

  17. The Case for Angioplasty in Patients with Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Ryan A.; Marks, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is likely the most common cause of stroke worldwide and remains highly morbid even with highly monitored medical therapy. Recent results of the SAMMPRIS trial, which randomized patients to stenting plus aggressive medical management versus aggressive medical management alone have shown that additional treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic lesions with the Wingspan stent is inferior to aggressive medical management alone. In light of these results, there has been renewed interest in angioplasty alone to treat symptomatic ICAD. This article will briefly review the natural history of ICAD and discuss the possible future for endovascular treatment of ICAD with primary intracranial angioplasty in appropriately selected patients. PMID:24782816

  18. Intravenous digital subtraction angiography in the investigation of intracranial disease

    SciTech Connect

    DeFilipp, G.J.; Pinto, R.S.; Lin, J.P.; Kricheff, I.I.

    1983-07-01

    Eighty-six patients who presented with a variety of intracranial lesions were examined with intravenous digital subtraction angiogrphy (IV-DSA). A grading system was used to evaluate the ability IV-DSA to answer specific diagnostic questions regarding intracranial tumors, vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage, lesions of the sella, dural sinus occlusion, and post-therapeutic embolization. Eighty-four percent of the examinations provided clinically useful information. In 15% of the cases limited but useful information was obtained; only 1% of the examinations provided no useful information. We conclude that IV-DSA can routinely provide useful information in the evaluation of the variety of intracranial lesions described above.

  19. [Surgery of benign vocal fold lesions].

    PubMed

    Olthoff, A

    2016-09-01

    Surgical treatment of benign vocal fold lesions can be indicated for clinical or functional reasons. The principles of phonosurgery have to be maintained in either case. The appropriate phonosurgical technique depends on the type of vocal fold lesion. Depending on the findings, phonosurgery aims to maintain or improve voice quality. The evaluation of clinical and functional results includes indirect laryngoscopy, videostroboscopy, and voice analysis. PMID:27552826

  20. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  1. Large Penile Mass With Unusual Benign Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nate; Voznesensky, Maria; VerLee, Graham

    2015-09-01

    Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is an extremely rare condition presenting as a lesion on the glans penis in older men. Physical exam without biopsy cannot differentiate malignant from nonmalignant growth. We report a case of large penile mass in an elderly male with a history of lichen sclerosis, highly suspicious for malignancy. Subsequent surgical removal and biopsy demonstrated pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, an unusual benign histopathologic diagnosis with unclear prognosis. We review the literature and discuss options for treatment and surveillance. PMID:26793536

  2. Benign Diseases and Neoplasms of the Penis.

    PubMed

    Wasco, Matthew J; Shah, Rajal B

    2009-03-01

    This article provides comprehensive review of benign diseases and neoplastic conditions of the penis. It describes and provides representative images of clinical, key pathologic features and ancillary techniques to aid in differential diagnoses. It examines these diseases from the epidemiologic standpoint, looks at environmental and genetic factors, and outlines the new histologic entities for penile neoplasms with distinct outcomes and clinical behavior that have been proposed in recent years. PMID:26838101

  3. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: A clinical review.

    PubMed

    Skinder, Danielle; Zacharia, Ilana; Studin, Jillian; Covino, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an increasingly common diagnosis seen in men over age 50 years. Primary care providers must be aware of patient presentation, diagnostic tests, appropriate lifestyle modifications, treatment options, and potential complications in order to properly manage and educate patients with BPH. If left untreated, BPH can significantly decrease a man's quality of life; however, many pharmacologic and surgical treatments are available to control the symptoms. PMID:27367595

  4. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  5. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor. PMID:20616180

  6. [Increased intracranial pressure and brain edema].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W; Erbguth, F

    2013-03-01

    In primary and secondary brain diseases, increasing volumes of the three compartments of brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, or blood lead to a critical increase in intracranial pressure (ICP). A rising ICP is associated with typical clinical symptoms; however, during analgosedation it can only be detected by invasive ICP monitoring. Other neuromonitoring procedures are not as effective as ICP monitoring; they reflect the ICP changes and their complications by other metabolic and oxygenation parameters. The most relevant parameter for brain perfusion is cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is calculated as the difference between the middle arterial pressure (MAP) and the ICP. A mixed body of evidence exists for the different ICP-reducing treatment measures, such as hyperventilation, hyperosmolar substances, hypothermia, glucocorticosteroids, CSF drainage, and decompressive surgery. PMID:23503630

  7. [Increased intracranial pressure and brain edema].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W; Erbguth, F

    2013-09-01

    In primary and secondary brain diseases, increasing volumes of the three compartments of brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, or blood lead to a critical increase in intracranial pressure (ICP). A rising ICP is associated with typical clinical symptoms; however, during analgosedation it can only be detected by invasive ICP monitoring. Other neuromonitoring procedures are not as effective as ICP monitoring; they reflect the ICP changes and their complications by other metabolic and oxygenation parameters. The most relevant parameter for brain perfusion is cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is calculated as the difference between the middle arterial pressure (MAP) and the ICP. A mixed body of evidence exists for the different ICP-reducing treatment measures, such as hyperventilation, hyperosmolar substances, hypothermia, glucocorticosteroids, CSF drainage, and decompressive surgery. PMID:24061872

  8. Recurrent spontaneous intracranial hypotension in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Emer; Monaghan, Thomas S; Alexander, Michael; Hennessy, Michal J

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon condition characterised by postural headache secondary to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Here we present a case of recurrence of SIH in early pregnancy in a 26-year-old woman. She first presented at the age of 21 years at 15 weeks' gestation with a history of headache, nausea, vomiting, neck stiffness and photophobia. Findings from a MRI brain scan led to a diagnosis of SIH. She was treated with autologous epidural blood patching and remained asymptomatic until her second pregnancy 5 years later, when she re-presented at 16 weeks' gestation with similar symptoms. She was again diagnosed with SIH and required a repeat treatment of autologous epidural blood patching. She subsequently remained symptom free and delivered a healthy boy at term. PMID:22791729

  9. Multiple Intracranial Arteriovenous Fistulas in Cowden Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prats-Sánchez, Luis A; Hervás-García, Jose V; Becerra, Juan L; Lozano, Manuel; Castaño, Carlos; Munuera, Josep; Escudero, Domingo; García-Esperón, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Cowden syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease. It is characterized by multiple noncancerous tumorlike growths called hamartomas, which typically are found in the skin, oral mucosa, thyroid, breast, and gastrointestinal tract. It carries with it a potential risk of malignant transformation, especially of the breast and thyroid. In 80% of the cases, the human tumor suppressor gene, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), is mutated in the germ line. We report a patient with Cowden syndrome who presented with generalized seizure and left anterior temporal hemorrhage and a nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage due to multiple intracranial arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). We discuss previous reports about vascular malformations in patients with Cowden syndrome and PTEN mutations. Importantly, we hypothesize that the production of multiple AVFs in our patient was associated with PTEN mutation. PMID:27105569

  10. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  11. Intracranial meningioma: an exercise in differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, J G; Kothe, A C

    1990-04-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with a unilateral visual disturbance including reduced visual acuity and decreased sensitivity of the temporal visual field. He was initially diagnosed as having optic neuritis. Four months later the condition not only remained unresolved, but showed signs of progression. This presentation was atypical for optic neuritis and further detailed investigation was warranted. The patient's symptoms, along with multi-channel topographic visual evoked potentials and quantitative visual field analysis, were more indicative of a diagnosis of a space occupying lesion. A CT scan confirmed the presence of an intracranial tumour which was surgically excised. Pre- and post-operative visual function are described. The case report highlights the difficulty of differential diagnosis of optic neuritis and the clinical value of the appropriate and judicious use of multi-channel evoked potentials. PMID:2371068

  12. Intracranial meningeal chondrosarcoma--probable mesenchymal type.

    PubMed

    Rodda, R A; Franklin, C I

    1984-08-01

    A 12 year old girl with episodes of left hemiparesis for 9 months was found to have a large, partly calcified brain tumour which at craniotomy presented on the parasagittal and medial surfaces of the right frontal lobe. No dural or falx attachment could be found and naked eye removal of the tumour was achieved. At a second craniotomy 10 weeks later there was recurrent tumour attached to the falx and involving the sagittal sinus. She died 5 months later. Pathologically, almost all this malignant intracranial neoplasm comprised differentiated cartilaginous tumour. Although only a very small amount of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue was found in the surgical material available for histological study, it is suggested the tumour can be regarded as a predominantly mature mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the meninges. PMID:6593035

  13. Converging Intracranial Markers of Conscious Access

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Raphaël; Dehaene, Stanislas; Adam, Claude; Clémenceau, Stéphane; Hasboun, Dominique; Baulac, Michel; Cohen, Laurent; Naccache, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    We compared conscious and nonconscious processing of briefly flashed words using a visual masking procedure while recording intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) in ten patients. Nonconscious processing of masked words was observed in multiple cortical areas, mostly within an early time window (<300 ms), accompanied by induced gamma-band activity, but without coherent long-distance neural activity, suggesting a quickly dissipating feedforward wave. In contrast, conscious processing of unmasked words was characterized by the convergence of four distinct neurophysiological markers: sustained voltage changes, particularly in prefrontal cortex, large increases in spectral power in the gamma band, increases in long-distance phase synchrony in the beta range, and increases in long-range Granger causality. We argue that all of those measures provide distinct windows into the same distributed state of conscious processing. These results have a direct impact on current theoretical discussions concerning the neural correlates of conscious access. PMID:19296722

  14. Intracranial fungal aneurysm caused by Candida endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Wakabayashi, K; Yamazaki, K; Miyakawa, T; Arai, H

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 67-year-old man who died 4 days after suffering a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Autopsy revealed a fresh subarachnoid hemorrhage and a ruptured fungal aneurysm near the trifurcation of the right middle cerebral artery. In comparison with 21 previously reported cases in which the fungal aneurysms were proved to be intracranial, the present case had several characteristic features: the causative fungus of the aneurysm was Candida (only one such case has been reported previously). The aneurysm was caused by direct Candida invasion of the arterial wall from the Candida embolus (previously reported aneurysms have been caused by direct invasion of the arterial wall during fungal meningitis). The source of the Candida was endocarditis (the main sources of fungus in previously reported cases have been sinusitis, dental extraction wounds, and some forms of surgery). We describe the features of this rare autopsy case of a ruptured fungal aneurysm caused by Candida originating from endocarditis and review the literature. PMID:9707334

  15. Computed tomography in intracranial supratentorial osteochondroma

    SciTech Connect

    Matz, S.; Israeli, Y.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.

    1981-02-01

    A case of a huge intracranial frontoparietal osteochondroma in a 20-year-old man is reported. The presenting symptoms were headache, vomiting, and blurred vision. Apart from papilledema, no other abnormal neurological signs were present. A specific preoperative diagnosis could not be reached from the information provided by plain skull films, angiography, and radionuclide scan. The findings on computed tomography were those of a high density mass interspersed with small foci of lower densities, producing a honeycomb appearance, and surrounded by deposits of nodular calcification. The postcontrast scan showed a moderate degree of enhancement with preservation of the precontrast honeycomb pattern. These particular features may enable a correct preoperative histological diagnosis to be offered with a high degree of probability.

  16. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  17. Intracranial venous thrombosis complicating oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Dindar, F.; Platts, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Four days after the onset of a severe headache a 22-year-old woman who had been taking oral contraceptives for less than three weeks had a convulsion, followed by right hemiparesis. Other focal neurologic signs and evidence of raised intracranial pressure appeared, and she became comatose on the seventh day. A left craniotomy revealed extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. She died the next day. On postmortem examination extensive thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus and draining cerebral veins, and multiple areas of cerebral hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction were seen. Some of the superficial cerebral veins showed focal necrosis of their walls, and the lateral lacunae of the superior sagittal sinus contained proliferating endothelial cells. The adrenal veins were also thrombosed. The significance of these findings is discussed. The literature on cerebrovascular complications of oral contraception, particularly cerebral venous thrombosis, is reviewed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4413961

  18. Environmentally benign silicon solar cell manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Gee, J.M.; Menna, P.; Strebkov, D.S.; Pinov, A.; Zadde, V.

    1998-09-01

    The manufacturing of silicon devices--from polysilicon production, crystal growth, ingot slicing, wafer cleaning, device processing, to encapsulation--requires many steps that are energy intensive and use large amounts of water and toxic chemicals. In the past two years, the silicon integrated-circuit (IC) industry has initiated several programs to promote environmentally benign manufacturing, i.e., manufacturing practices that recover, recycle, and reuse materials resources with a minimal consumption of energy. Crystalline-silicon solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which accounted for 87% of the worldwide module shipments in 1997, are large-area devices with many manufacturing steps similar to those used in the IC industry. Obviously, there are significant opportunities for the PV industry to implement more environmentally benign manufacturing approaches. Such approaches often have the potential for significant cost reduction by reducing energy use and/or the purchase volume of new chemicals and by cutting the amount of used chemicals that must be discarded. This paper will review recent accomplishments of the IC industry initiatives and discuss new processes for environmentally benign silicon solar-cell manufacturing.

  19. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  20. Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D; Conner, Andrew K; Bonney, Phillip A; Archer, Jacob B; Christensen, Blake; Smith, Jacqueline; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keyhole craniotomies are increasingly being used for lesions of the skull base. Here we review our recent experience with these approaches for resection of intracranial meningiomas. Methods: Clinical and operative data were gathered on all patients treated with keyhole approaches by the senior author from January 2012 to June 2013. Thirty-one meningiomas were resected in 27 patients, including 9 supratentorial, 5 anterior fossa, 7 middle fossa, 6 posterior fossa, and 4 complex skull base tumors. Twenty-nine tumors were WHO Grade I, and 2 were Grade II.  Results: The mean operative time was 8 hours, 22 minutes (range, 2:55-16:14) for skull-base tumors, and 4 hours, 27 minutes (range, 1:45-7:13) for supratentorial tumors. Simpson Resection grades were as follows: Grade I = 8, II = 8, III = 1, IV = 15, V = 0. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (range, 1-20 days). In the 9 patients presenting with some degree of visual loss, 7 saw improvement or complete resolution. In the 6 patients presenting with cranial nerve palsies, 4 experienced improvement or resolution of the deficit postoperatively. Four patients experienced new neurologic deficits, all of which were improved or resolved at the time of the last follow-up. Technical aspects and surgical nuances of these approaches for management of intracranial meningiomas are discussed.  Conclusions: With careful preoperative evaluation, keyhole approaches can be utilized singly or in combination to manage meningiomas in a wide variety of locations with satisfactory results. PMID:27284496

  1. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P.; Snell, Jamaal T.; Lieber, Bryan A.; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P.; Sutin, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  2. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P; Snell, Jamaal T; Wilson, Taylor A; Lieber, Bryan A; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P; Sutin, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  3. Stress and hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacchi, P.

    1990-01-01

    In susceptible persons emotional stress results in immediate sympathetic stimulation, with a vasomotor response that results in a high-output state and elevated blood pressure; the vasopressor response seems to be transient. There seems to be no longitudinal epidemiologic validation of the attractive hypothesis that transiently elevated blood pressures are the prelude to fixed hypertension, however. The acquisition of hypertension by populations abandoning their traditional mode of living has been attributed to the sociocultural stress inherent in westernization, but these studies usually have not taken into account concomitants of this type of acculturation, such as dietary changes and increased body weight. The inverse relationship of blood pressure levels to education could explain the development of hypertension when aspiration to upward mobility is thwarted. The severity of perceived occupational stress relates inversely to blood pressure, suggesting that familiarity with a job renders the demands made by the work environment more predictable and less threatening in terms of vasopressor response. PMID:2219875

  4. Hypertension and cerebrovascular damage.

    PubMed

    Veglio, Franco; Paglieri, Cristina; Rabbia, Franco; Bisbocci, Daniela; Bergui, Mauro; Cerrato, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable factor for cerebrovascular disease. Stroke and dementia are growing health problems that have considerable social and economical consequences. Hypertension causes brain lesions by several mechanisms predisposing to lacunar infarctions, leucoaraiosis, and white matter changes as well as to intracerebral haemorrhages. These parenchymal damages determine evident or silent neurological alterations that often precede the onset of cognitive decline. It is important to recognize cerebrovascular disease and, above all, to correlate typical lesions to hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy has shown clinical benefits in primary and secondary prevention of stroke. These drugs represent important instruments against cerebrovascular disease but their effects on cognition are still matter of debate. Cerebral parenchymal and functional damages have to be considered together to make medical intervention more incisive. PMID:19100549

  5. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the

  6. A rare case report of Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor of the pancreas with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Asha; Sanniyasi, Saravanan; George, Dilip Joseph; Narayanan, Cunnigaiper Dhanasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor of the pancreas (SPT) is a rare pancreatic tumor and represents 1–3% of all pancreatic tumors. It usually presents in young females with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and abdominal fullness. The first case report was documented in 1959 and since then multiple case reports have been documented on the various surgical approaches for SPT. However, there are not many reported cases where surgery has been performed on SPT with portal hypertension. Presentation of case In our case report, a 19 year old girl presented with a mass in the left side of the abdomen with associated dragging pain. Ultrasound Abdomen and CT (computed tomography) confirmed an SPT with portal hypertension, with the lesion involving the body and tail of pancreas. Discussion Although few reports are available on SPT with portal hypertension, ours is the first report on a benign SPT with sinistral portal hypertension treated with a distal pancreatectomy. The presence of portal hypertension made the excision of the tumor and delineation of the vessels very difficult. However, when great care is taken while handling the dilated vessels, dissection can be completed with minimal blood loss. Conclusion Meticulous surgical technique along with accurate identification of vasculature will aid in the resection. Although some SPTs behave aggressively, most of them are benign and patients with SPT have an excellent prognosis. PMID:27046101

  7. Headache attributed to intracranial pressure alterations: applicability of the International Classification of Headache Disorders ICHD-3 beta version versus ICHD-2.

    PubMed

    Curone, M; Peccarisi, C; Bussone, G

    2015-05-01

    The association between headache and changes in intracranial pressure is strong in clinical practice. Syndromes associated with abnormalities of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure include spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). In 2013, the Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (IHS) published the third International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta version). The aim of this study was to investigate applicability of the new ICHD-3 versus ICHD-2 criteria in a clinical sample of patients with intracranial pressure (ICP) alterations. Patients admitted at our Headache Center for headache evaluation in whom a diagnosis of ICP alterations was performed were reviewed. 71 consecutive patients were studied. 40 patients (Group A) were diagnosed as IIH, 22 (Group B) as SIH, 7 (Group C) and 2 (Group D), respectively, as symptomatic intracranial hypertension and symptomatic intracranial hypotension. Main headache features were: in Group A, daily or nearly-daily headache (100 %) with diffuse/non-pulsating pain (73 %), aggravated by coughing/straining (54 %) and migrainous-associated symptoms (43 %). In Group B, an orthostatic headache (100 %) with nausea (29 %), vomiting (24 %), hearing disturbance (33 %), neck pain (48 %), hypacusia (24 %), photophobia (22 %) was reported. In Group C, a diffuse non-pulsating headache was present in 95 % with vomiting (25 %), sixth nerve palsy (14 %) and tinnitus (29 %). In Group D, an orthostatic headache with neck stiffness was reported by 100 %. Regarding applicability of ICHD-2 criteria in Group A, 73 % of the patients fitted criterion A; 100 %, criterion B; 100 %, criterion C; and 75 %, criterion D; while applying ICHD-3 beta version criteria, 100 % fitted criterion A; 97.5 %, criterion B; 100 %, criterion C; and 100 %, criterion D. In Group B, application of ICHD-2 showed 91 % patients fitting criterion A; 100 %, criterion B; 100

  8. Perspectives on research in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K

    2009-01-01

    This is a review of my published research on hypertension over 45 years on the three main racial groups residing in KwaZulu-Natal and its main city Durban. These three groups are blacks - mainly Zulu, whites and Indians. The research focused mainly on epidemiology, determinants of the aetiology of hypertension, clinical features, varying responses to hypotensive agents among the racial groups, complications that result from hypertension and the control of hypertension. PMID:19287815

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  10. Raised intracranial pressure following abdominal closure in a polytrauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Liza; Wilson, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Lesson We report a polytrauma case requiring simultaneous neurosurgery and laparotomy. Upon abdominal closure, raised intracranial pressure occurred. This illustrates the important physiological interplay between body compartments in critical care patients. PMID:25852954

  11. A case of direct intracranial extension of tuberculous otitis media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Kee; Park, Shi-Nae; Park, Kyung-Ho; Yeo, Sang Won

    2014-02-01

    We describe a very rare case of tuberculous otitis media (TOM) with direct intracranial extension. The patient was a 55-year-old man who presented to our ENT clinic for evaluation of severe headaches and right-sided otorrhea. A biopsy of granulation tissue obtained from the right external auditory canal demonstrated chronic inflammation that was suggestive of mycobacterial infection. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain indicated intracranial extension of TOM through a destroyed tegmen mastoideum. After 2 months of antituberculous medication, the headaches and otorrhea were controlled, and the swelling in the external ear canal subsided greatly. Rarely does TOM spread intracranially. In most such cases, intracranial extension of tuberculosis occurs as the result of hematogenous or lymphogenous spread. In rare cases, direct spread through destroyed bone can occur, as it did in our patient. PMID:24526478

  12. The Management of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Gary C.; Stein, Fernando

    1983-01-01

    Ten children with acute increased intracranial pressure, documented by the Cheek screw technique, were treated for Reye's syndrome, other toxic/metabolic encephalopathies, encephalitis, and traumatic encephalopathies. The rationale for the use of hyperventilation, head position, maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure, hyperosmolar agents, steroids, adequate fluid balance, and barbiturates in the therapy of these patients is described. An analysis of these cases reveals that early monitoring of intracranial pressure, maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure, and aggressive treatment of increased intracranial pressure may reduce the mortality of patients with increased intracranial pressure. Of all patients studied, those who survived demonstrated some neurological deficit as determined by clinical examination or neuropsychological testing. PMID:6655720

  13. WEB in Partially Thrombosed Intracranial Aneurysms: A Word of Caution.

    PubMed

    Anil, G; Goddard, A J P; Ross, S M; Deniz, K; Patankar, T

    2016-05-01

    Despite the proved safety and efficacy of Woven EndoBridge (WEB) flow disruption in conventional intracranial saccular aneurysms, the literature on its use in partially thrombosed intracranial aneurysms is scarce. We report a series of 4 patients in whom partially thrombosed intracranial aneurysms were treated with the WEB. The 2 patients who received additional intraluminal treatment with conventional stents made a good clinical recovery. Meanwhile, those patients who were treated with the WEB alone had fatal rupture of the aneurysm at short- to medium-term follow-up. This small, select case series demonstrates that WEB placement with adjunctive stent placement may be an effective treatment in the management of partially thrombosed intracranial aneurysms, which merits further validation. However, exclusive intrasaccular flow disruption may have an adverse influence on the natural history of this disease. PMID:26585255

  14. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly -- not a benign condition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geraldine A; Stub, Dion; Ling, Han

    2012-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly seen arrhythmia and its prevalence increases with age. In the general population, rates of 1-2% are reported but in older patients, the rates increase to over 10% (in those aged 85years or older). Many older patients present to the emergency department (ED) with complaints that could be caused or associated with AF including valvular heart disease, hypertension, heart failure, an underlying infection (urinary or chest) and thyroid disorder. The most devastating complication of AF is stroke and early detection of AF and initiation of treatment (specifically the use of anti-coagulant medication) can significantly reduce the risk. AF is associated with high healthcare costs and has significant impacts on disability and quality of life especially if a stroke occurs. This review aims to describe the aetiology and treatment options for patients with newly diagnosed and previously diagnosed AF with an emphasis on how ED staff can manage older patients with AF and ensure optimal care is given. The treatment of AF has three main considerations (i) appropriateness for thromboembolic prophylaxis, (ii) rate control (including anti-arrhythmics, cardiac glycosides, B blockers and calcium channel blockers) and (iii) rhythm control with traditional cardioversion (either electrically or pharmacologically) or utilising interventional means to maintain sinus rhythm with cardiac surgery and more recently radio-frequency ablation. As anti-coagulation is widely implemented, the risks and benefits associated with warfarin and the newer agents will be described. Given that more than half of those with AF are over 75years and 30% of AF is diagnosed incidentally, there is an imperative for prompt diagnosis to reduce the risk of debilitating complications especially stroke. AF should not be viewed as yet another concomitant "benign" condition. Emergency staff are well placed to detect AF and ensure appropriate treatment is commenced to reduce the

  15. Association between pregnancy-related hypertension and severity of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moreira, L B; Gus, M; Nunes, G; Gonçalves, C B C; Martins, J; Wiehe, M; Fuchs, F D

    2009-06-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is an emerging sex-specific risk factor for cardiovascular disease and may lead to more severe hypertension after pregnancy. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of pregnancy-related hypertension among patients referred to a hypertension clinic and its association with the severity of hypertension and evidence of end-organ damage. In this cross-sectional study, women with hypertension were submitted to a systematic clinical evaluation. The occurrence of pregnancy-related hypertension was investigated by questionnaire. The association between pregnancy-related hypertension and severity of hypertension (stage 2 according to Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VII)) and end-organ damage was assessed in a logistic regression model. The mean age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index (BMI) of the 768 women examined were 51.6+/-12.7 years, 158.2+/-26.6 mm Hg, 93.8+/-14.3 mm Hg and 29.4+/-5.6 kg/m(2), respectively. The proportion of women with pregnancy-related hypertension was 32.9%. It was significantly associated with hypertension at stage 2 (OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.14-2.24; P=0.01) after controlling for confounders. The occurrence of a pregnancy-related hypertension was not associated with evidence of optic fundi abnormalities, left ventricular hypertrophy or abnormalities in kidney function. In conclusion, pregnancy-related hypertension is frequent in women referred to a hypertension clinic, and is associated with severe hypertension but not with evidence of end-organ damage. PMID:19020534

  16. Assessing intracranial vascular compliance using dynamic arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lirong; Liu, Collin Y; Smith, Robert X; Jog, Mayank; Langham, Michael; Krasileva, Kate; Chen, Yufen; Ringman, John M; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular compliance (VC) is an important marker for a number of cardiovascular diseases and dementia, which is typically assessed in the central and peripheral arteries indirectly by quantifying pulse wave velocity (PWV), and/or pulse pressure waveform. To date, very few methods are available for the quantification of intracranial VC. In the present study, a novel MRI technique for in-vivo assessment of intracranial VC was introduced, where dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans were synchronized with the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. VC is defined as the ratio of change in arterial cerebral blood volume (ΔCBV) and change in arterial pressure (ΔBP). Intracranial VC was assessed in different vascular components using the proposed dynamic ASL method. Our results show that VC mainly occurs in large arteries, and gradually decreases in small arteries and arterioles. The comparison of intracranial VC between young and elderly subjects shows that aging is accompanied by a reduction of intracranial VC, in good agreement with the literature. Furthermore, a positive association between intracranial VC and cerebral perfusion measured using pseudo-continuous ASL with 3D GRASE MRI was observed independent of aging effects, suggesting loss of VC is associated with a decline in perfusion. Finally, a significant positive correlation between intracranial and central (aortic arch) VC was observed using an ungated phase-contrast 1D projection PWV technique. The proposed dynamic ASL method offers a promising approach for assessing intracranial VC in a range of cardiovascular diseases and dementia. PMID:26364865

  17. Imaging Modalities Relevant to Intracranial Pressure Assessment in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Kramer, Larry A.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Fogarty, Jennifer; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives of this slide presentation are: 1: To review the morphological changes in orbit structures caused by elevated Intracranial Pressure (ICP), and their imaging representation. 2: To learn about the similarities and differences between MRI and sonographic imaging of the eye and orbit. 3: To learn about the role of MRI and sonography in the noninvasive assessment of intracranial pressure in aerospace medicine, and the added benefits from their combined interpretation.

  18. Computerised tomographic detection of intracranial complications of paranasal sinus infections.

    PubMed

    Ogunseyinde, A O; Obajimi, M O; Agunloye, A M

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-four patients were referred for CT examination of the paranasal sinuses within a five year period. Only 11 (11.7%) of them had intracranial complications. These include cerebral, subdural and epidural abscesses, frontal bone osteomyelitis. The maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses were mostly involved and can be implicated as the sinogenic causes of intracranial infections. Sphenoidal sinus was not involved in any of the patients. PMID:15730085

  19. Pulmonary hypertension caused by pulmonary venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) on the pulmonary circulation is extraordinarily variable, ranging from no impact on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) to a marked increase. The reasons for this are unknown. Both acutely reversible pulmonary vasoconstriction and pathological remodeling (especially medial hypertrophy and intimal hyperplasia) account for increased PVR when present. The mechanisms involved in vasoconstriction and remodeling are not clearly defined, but increased wall stress, especially in small pulmonary arteries, presumably plays an important role. Myogenic contraction may account for increased vascular tone and also indirectly stimulate remodeling of the vessel wall. Increased wall stress may also directly cause smooth muscle growth, migration, and intimal hyperplasia. Even long-standing and severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) usually abates with elimination of PVH, but PVH-PH is an important clinical problem, especially because PVH due to left ventricular noncompliance lacks definitive therapy. The role of targeted PH therapy in patients with PVH-PH is unclear at this time. Most prospective studies indicate that these medications are not helpful or worse, but there is ample reason to think that a subset of patients with PVH-PH may benefit from phosphodiesterase inhibitors or other agents. A different approach to evaluating possible pharmacologic therapy for PVH-PH may be required to better define its possible utility. PMID:25610595

  20. [Hypertensive emergency and urgence].

    PubMed

    Gegenhuber, Alfons; Lenz, Kurt

    2003-12-01

    DEFINITION, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, THERAPY: The hypertensive crisis is characterized by a massive, acute rise in blood pressure. Patients with underlying hypertensive disease usually have an increase in systolic blood pressure values > 220 mmHg and diastolic values > 120 mmHg. The severity of the condition, however, is not determined by the absolute blood pressure level but by the magnitude of the acute increase in blood pressure. Thus, in the presence of primarily normotensive baseline values (such as those in eclampsia), even a systolic blood pressure > 170 mmHg may lead to a life-threatening condition. The most important causes are non-compliance (reduction or interruption of therapy), inadequate therapy, endocrine disease, renal (vessel) disease, pregnancy and intoxication (drugs). The management of this condition greatly depends on whether the patient has a hypertensive crisis with organ manifestation (hypertensive emergency) or a crisis without organ manifestation (hypertensive urgency). By documenting the medical history, the medical status and by simple diagnostic procedures, the differential diagnosis can be established at the emergency site within a very short period of time. In the absence of organ manifestations (hypertensive urgency) the patient may have non-specific symptoms such as palpitations, headache, malaise and a general feeling of illness in addition to the increase in blood pressure. In a hypertensive urgency the patient's blood pressure should not be reduced within a few minutes but within a period of 24 to 48 hours. Such adjustment can be achieved on an out-patient basis, however, only if the patient can be followed up adequately for early detection of a renewed attack. In the absence of follow-up facilities, the patient's blood pressure should be reduced over a period of 4 to 6 hours, if necessary in an out-patient emergency service. While intravenous medication is given preference when a rapid effect is desired, oral medication may be used for

  1. Traumatic Intracranial Aneurysm Formation following Closed Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miley, Jefferson T; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2008-01-01

    Background: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare conditions that can be a result of non-penetrating head trauma. We report the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: All diagnostic cerebral angiograms performed in patients with traumatic brain injury at a level I trauma center from January 2006 to July 2007 were reviewed. Results: Diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed in 74 patients with the diagnosis of closed head injury. A total of 4 traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms were found in 4 patients, two in the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, one in the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and one in the paraophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. One patient had follow up imaging on which there was no change in the size and morphology of the aneurysm. Conclusion: Intracranial aneurysms can develop in patients with closed head injury presumably related to shear or rotational injury. It is unclear whether these aneurysms should be classified as traumatic intracranial aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms, but the pathological findings frequently reveal disruption of the three vascular layers fulfilling the definition of pseudoaneurysm. For these reason we favor the name of post-traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms. PMID:22518228

  2. Gender Differences in Hypertension and Hypertension Awareness Among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    EVERETT, BETHANY; ZAJACOVA, ANNA

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that men have higher levels of hypertension and lower levels of hypertension awareness than women, but it remains unclear if these differences emerge among young adults. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), this study examines gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among U.S. young adults, with special focus on factors that may contribute to observed disparities (N = 14,497). Our results show that the gender disparities in hypertension status were already evident among men and women in their twenties: women were far less likely to be hypertensive compared to men (12% vs. 27%). The results also reveal very low levels of hypertension awareness among young women (32% of hypertensive women were aware of their status) and even lower levels among men (25%). Finally, this study identifies key factors that contribute to these observed gender disparities. In particular, health care use, while not related to the actual hypertension status, fully explains the gender differences in hypertension awareness. The findings thus suggest that regular medical visits are critical for improving hypertension awareness among young adults and reducing gender disparities in cardiovascular health. PMID:25879259

  3. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  4. Hypertension in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aglony, Marlene; Acevedo, Monica; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2009-12-01

    In adults, hypertension has long been perceived as a public health problem. By contrast, its impact in childhood is far less appreciated. In fact, quite often, high blood pressure in children is not even diagnosed. Blood pressure is a vital sign that is routinely obtained during a physical examination of adults, but only very seldom in children. The diagnosis of hypertension in children is complicated because 'normal' blood pressure values vary with age, sex and height. As a consequence, almost 75% of the cases of arterial hypertension and 90% of the cases of prehypertension in children and adolescents are currently undiagnosed. Furthermore, adolescence hypertension is increasing in prevalence as the prevalence of pediatric obesity has increased. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a useful method for risk evaluation in adolescents. In addition to being viewed as an important cardiovascular risk factor in adolescents, elevated blood pressure should prompt a thorough search for other modifiable risk factors that, if treated, might reduce teenagers' risk of developing cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Thus, assessing blood pressure values in children represents one of the most important measurable markers of cardiovascular risk later in life and a major step in preventive medicine. PMID:19954321

  5. Carvedilol in hypertension treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stafylas, Panagiotis C; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2008-01-01

    Although β-blockers have been previously shown to effectively reduce blood pressure (BP) and have been used for hypertension treatment for over 40 years, their effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients remains controversial and its use in uncomplicated hypertension is currently under debate. However, data on the above field derive mainly from studies which were conducted with older agents, such as atenolol and metoprolol, while considerable pharamacokinetic and pharmacodynamic heterogeneity is present within the class of β-blockers. Carvedilol, a vasodilating non-cardioselective β-blocker, is a compound that seems to give the opportunity to the clinician to use a cardioprotective agent without the concerning hemodynamic and metabolic actions of traditional β-blocker therapy. In contrast with conventional β-blockers, carvedilol maintains cardiac output, has a less extended effect on heart rate and reduces BP by decreasing vascular resistance. Further, several studies has shown that carvedilol has a beneficial or at least neutral effect on metabolic parameters, such as glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and lipid metabolism, suggesting that they could be used in subjects with the metabolic syndrome or diabetes without negative consequences. This article summarizes the distinct pharmacologic, hemodynamic, and metabolic properties of carvedilol in relation to conventional β-blockers, attempting to examine the potential use of this agent for hypertension treatment. PMID:18629377

  6. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  7. Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rogerio; Jardim, Carlos; Humbert, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension, is a rare disease (incidence and prevalence rates of approximately one and six cases per million inhabitants, respectively) with different clinical phenotypes. A group of diverse conditions manifest pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and share similar pathological and/or clinical findings with IPAH. By definition, IPAH is diagnosed only after alternative diagnoses have been ruled out. Extensive investigation is needed to determine if PAH is associated with thyroid diseases, infectious diseases, autoimmune conditions, exposure to certain drugs (particularly anorexigens), certain genetic mutations, and so on. The presence of genetic abnormalities and risk factors (such as specific drug exposures) reinforces the "multiple hit" concept for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Fortunately, within the past two decades, therapeutic options have become available for IPAH, resulting in improved survival and clinical outcomes. At least seven different compounds have been registered for PAH treatment. However, even with aggressive PAH-specific therapy, mortality rates remain high (∼40% at 5 years). Given the high mortality rates, the use of combinations of agents that work by different pathways has been advocated (either as "add-on" therapy or initial "up front" therapy). Further, new therapeutic agents and treatment strategies are on the near horizon, aiming to further improve survival from the remarkable progress already seen. PMID:24037625

  8. Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper arm. Then they listen to your blood flow with a stethoscope. High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your ... is not a good idea if you have high blood pressure during pregnancy. Your body needs salt to keep up the flow of fluid in your body, so you need ...

  9. Influence of the benign enlargement of the subarachnoid space on the bridging veins strain during a shaking event: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Roth, Sébastien; Ludes, Bertrand; Willinger, Rémy

    2008-07-01

    There is controversy regarding the influence of the benign enlargement of the subarachnoid space on intracranial injuries in the field of the shaken baby syndrome. In the literature, several terminologies exists to define this entity illustrating the lack of unicity on this theme, and often what is "benign" enlargement is mistaken with an old subdural bleeding or with abnormal enlargement due to brain pathology. This certainly led to mistaken conclusions. To investigate the influence of the benign enlargement of the subarachnoid space on child head injury and especially its influence on the bridging veins, we used a finite element model of a 6-month-old child head on which the size of the subarachnoid space was modified. Regarding the bridging veins strain, which is at the origin of the subdural bleeding when shaking an infant, our results show that the enlargement of the subarachnoid space has a damping effect which reduces the relative brain/skull displacement. Our numerical simulations suggest that the benign enlargement of the subarachnoid space may not be considered as a risk factor for subdural bleeding. PMID:18493785

  10. Hypertension, a health economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Alcocer, Luis; Cueto, Liliana

    2008-06-01

    The economic aspects of hypertension are critical to modern medicine. The medical, economic, and human costs of untreated and inadequately controlled hypertension are enormous. Hypertension is distributed unequally and with iniquity in different countries and regions of the world. Treatment of hypertension requires an investment over many years to prolong disease-free quality years of life. The high prevalence and high cost of the disease impacts on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of countries and regions. The criteria used for inclusion in clinical guidelines for hypertension impact on the cost and cost/utility of diagnosis or treatment. PMID:19124418

  11. Cognitive function in hypertensive children.

    PubMed

    Lande, Marc B; Kupferman, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Young hypertensive adults demonstrate decreased performance on neurocognitive testing compared with that of normotensive controls. There is emerging, preliminary evidence that children with hypertension also manifest cognitive differences when compared to normotensive controls. These preliminary studies consist mostly of database and single-center studies that focus primarily on differences in neurocognitive test performance and differences in cerebrovascular reactivity between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Lessons from the literature on cognition in adult hypertensives and experience from the preliminary studies in children informed the design of a current, multicenter, ongoing study of cognition in children with primary hypertension. PMID:25432900

  12. OTC tamsulosin for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    Earlier this year, tamsulosin, an alpha blocker previously only available on prescription, became available for sale by pharmacists as a treatment for functional symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in men aged 45-75 years (Flomax Relief MR - Boehringer Ingelheim). A television advert for the over-the-counter (OTC) product claims that it is a "simple and effective" treatment that can relieve symptoms within 1 week, allowing the user to "take control of your annoying pee problems".¹ Here we review the evidence on tamsulosin and assess whether its availability as an OTC product confers worthwhile advantages. PMID:20926447

  13. Thallium-201 uptake in a benign thymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Campeau, R.J.; Ey, E.H.; Varma, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    A 68-year-old woman was admitted with atypical angina. A chest radiograph showed an anterior mediastinal mass that was confirmed on CT. The mass was relatively avascular and separate from the heart and great vessels. She underwent stress thallium testing that demonstrated no exercise-induced ischemia; however, an abnormal focus of thallium activity was present in the anterior mediastinum on stress and redistribution images. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated a normal left ventriculogram, coronary arteries and thoracic aorta. Subsequent surgery and pathologic examination revealed the mass to be a benign thymoma arising in the right lobe of the thymus gland.

  14. Models for studying benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mahapokai, W; Van Sluijs, F J; Schalken, J A

    2000-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases affecting aging man. Attempts have been made to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis and, to that end, experimental models have been developed. To date, in vitro and in vivo models have been used, depending on the concept of the study. Spontaneous animal models are limited to the chimpanzee and the dog. Ethical and financial factors restrict the applicability of these models. The hormonal-induced canine BPH model is a good alternative that closely resembles human BPH in many aspects. The experimental models currently used for studying BPH are reviewed. Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2000) 3, 28-33 PMID:12497158

  15. Benign schwannoma of the maxillary antrum

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Oshin; Desai, Dinkar; Bhandarkar, Gowri P.; Paul, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Schwannoma also known commonly as neurilemmoma and schwann cell tumor is a benign nerve sheath tumor. About 1/3rd cases of schwannoma arise from the head and neck region but rarely from the nasal and paranasal sinuses. The recurrence rate in these cases has reported to be very rare. We report a rare case of schwannoma in a 60-year-old woman arising from the maxillary sinus further eroding the orbital floor and nasal bone. We have also described the clinical presentation, radiological, histological findings, and management of the case. PMID:27095911

  16. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  17. The effect of intraocular and intracranial pressure on retinal structure and function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Da; He, Zheng; Vingrys, Algis J; Bui, Bang V; Nguyen, Christine T O

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that the optic nerve head of the eye is sensitive not only to changes in intraocular pressure (IOP), but also to intracranial pressure (ICP). This study examines changes to optic nerve and retinal structure in a rat model in response to a range of IOP and ICP levels using optical coherence tomography. Furthermore, we examine the functional sequelae of these structural changes by quantifying the effect of pressure changes on the electroretinogram. IOP elevation (10–90 mmHg) induces progressive deformation of the optic nerve head and retinal surface (P < 0.05), compression of the retina (P < 0.05) and bipolar cell (b-wave), and retinal ganglion cell (scotopic threshold response) dysfunction (P < 0.05). Simultaneously altering ICP (−5 to 30 mmHg) modifies these IOP-induced responses, with lower ICP (−5 mmHg) exacerbating and higher ICP (15–30 mmHg) ameliorating structural and functional deficits. Thus, the balance between IOP and ICP (optic nerve pressure gradient, ONPG = IOP − ICP) plays an important role in optic nerve integrity. Structural and functional parameters exhibit a two-phase relationship to ONPG, with structural changes being more sensitive to ONPG modification (threshold = −0.6 to 11.3 mmHg) compared with functional changes (threshold = 49.7–54.6 mmHg). These findings have implications for diseases including glaucoma, intracranial hypertension, and long-term exposure to microgravity. PMID:26290528

  18. Benefits of Surgical Treatment for Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, E-Wook; Jung, Jin-Young; Hong, Chang-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Objective Due to longer life spans, patients newly diagnosed with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are increasing in number. This study aimed to evaluate how management of UIAs in patients age 65 years and older affects the clinical outcomes and post-procedural morbidity rates in these patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 109 patients harboring 136 aneurysms across 12 years, between 1997 and 2009, at our institute. We obtained the following data from all patients : age, sex, location and size of the aneurysm(s), presence of symptoms, risk factors for stroke, treatment modality, and postoperative 1-year morbidity and mortality. We classified these patients into three groups : Group A (surgical clipping), Group B (coil embolization), and Group C (observation only). Results Among the 109 patients, 56 (51.4%) underwent clipping treatment, 25 (23%) patients were treated with coiling, and 28 observation only. The overall morbidity and mortality rates were 2.46% and 0%, respectively. The morbidity rate was 1.78% for clipping and 4% for coiling. Factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and family history of stroke were correlated with unfavorable outcomes. Two in the observation group refused follow-up and died of intracranial ruptured aneurysms. The observation group had a 7% mortality rate. Conclusion Our results show acceptable favorable outcome of treatment-related morbidity comparing with the natural history of unruptured cerebral aneurysm. Surgical clipping did not lead to inferior outcomes in our study, although coil embolization is generally more popular for treating elderly patients. In the treatment of patients more than 65 years old, age is not the limiting factor. PMID:21494358

  19. Optical coherence tomography of the optic nerve head detects acute changes in intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Anand, Aashish; Pass, Anastas; Urfy, Mian Z; Tang, Rosa; Cajavilca, Christian; Calvillo, Eusebia; Suarez, Jose I; Venkatasubba Rao, Chethan P; Bershad, Eric M

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to determine if there are measurable objective changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) immediately after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage in a prospective case-series of five patients undergoing a clinically indicated lumbar puncture (LP) for diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. A Cirrus high-definition optical coherence tomography machine (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA) was used to acquire images in the lateral decubitus position. Optic disc cube and high-definition line raster scans centered on the ONH were obtained immediately before and after draining CSF, while the patient maintained the lateral decubitus position. Measured parameters included retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, peripapillary retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch's membrane (RPE/BM) angulation, transverse neural canal diameter (NCD) and the highest vertical point of the internal limiting membrane from the transverse diameter (papillary height). The mean (±standard deviation) opening and closing CSF pressures were 34.3±11.8 and 11.6±3.3cmH2O, respectively. Mean RNFL thickness (pre LP: 196±105μm; post LP: 164±77μm, p=0.1) and transverse NCD (pre LP: 1985±559μm; post LP: 1590±228μm, p=2.0) decreased in all subjects, but with non-significant trends. The RPE/BM angle (mean change: 5.8±2.0degrees, p=0.003) decreased in all subjects. A decrease in papillary height was seen in three of five subjects (mean: pre LP: 976±275μm; post LP: 938±300μm, p=0.9). Our results show a measurable, objective change in the ONH after acute lowering of the lumbar CSF pressure, suggesting a direct link between the lumbar subarachnoid space and ONH regions, and its potential as a non-invasive method for monitoring intracranial pressures. PMID:26898579

  20. A Prospective Study of Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenosis in Neurologically Normal Volunteers in a Japanese Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Ryukichi; Nakagawa, Tomonori; Takayoshi, Hiroyuki; Onoda, Keiichi; Oguro, Hiroaki; Nagai, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of major intracranial arteries is a leading cause of ischemic stroke in Asia. However, the long-term prognosis of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) in healthy volunteers has not been fully examined. Here, we conducted a longitudinal study to examine the prognosis of healthy volunteers with asymptomatic ICAS and to determine the risk factors for ICAS, including asymptomatic brain parenchymal lesions. We studied 2,807 healthy Japanese volunteers with no history of stroke (mean age, 62.0 years). They were followed for a mean interval of 64.5 months. The degree of ICAS and the presence of asymptomatic brain lesions were assessed by using magnetic resonance imaging. Asymptomatic ICAS was detected in 166 volunteers (5.9%) at the initial examination. Moderate and mild stenoses were observed in 1.5 and 4.4% of patients, respectively. Significant risk factors for ICAS were older age and a history of hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. During follow-up, ischemic stroke developed in 32 volunteers. Seven strokes occurred in the ICAS group, whose stroke incidence rate was higher than that in the non-ICAS group (0.78 vs. 0.18% per year). According to a Cox regression analysis, asymptomatic ICAS was an independent risk factor for future ischemic stroke after adjustment for age. Furthermore, after asymptomatic brain lesions were taken into account, ICAS was still a significant risk factor for stroke onset. In conclusion, even mild to moderate asymptomatic ICAS was a significant risk factor for future stroke, independent of asymptomatic brain lesions, in a healthy Japanese population. Mild to moderate ICAS might be a therapeutic target for stroke prevention. PMID:27047445

  1. Are deep eutectic solvents benign or toxic?

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Hayyan, Adeeb; Al-Saadi, Mohammed A; AlNashef, Inas M; Mirghani, Mohamed E S; Saheed, Olorunnisola Kola

    2013-02-01

    In continuation of investigation for environmentally benign protocol for new solvents termed deep eutectic solvents (DESs), it is herein reported results concerning the toxicity and cytotoxicity of choline chloride (ChCl) based DESs with four hydrogen bond donors including glycerine, ethylene glycol, triethylene glycol and urea. The toxicity was investigated using two Gram positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, and two Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The cytotoxicity effect was tested using the Artemia salina leach. It was found that there was no toxic effect for the tested DESs on all of the studied bacteria confirming their benign effects on these bacteria. Nevertheless, it was found that the cytotoxicity of DESs was much higher than their individual components (e.g. glycerine, ChCl) indicating that their toxicological behavior is different. For our best knowledge this is the first time that toxicity and cytotoxicity of DESs were studied. The toxicity and cytotoxicity of DESs varied depending on the structure of components. Careful usage of the terms non-toxicity and biodegradability must be considered. More investigation on this matter is required. PMID:23200570

  2. Breast-feeding and benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Londero, A P; Bertozzi, S; Driul, L; Marchesoni, D; Petri, R

    2012-01-01

    Benign breast disease (BBD) is very common among women in their fertile age, but its correlation with breast reproductive function remains unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the relation between BBD and breast-feeding. We collected data on 105 women with BBD and 98 controls, focusing on their reproductive history and breast-feeding. We analysed data by R (version 2.12.1) considering p < 0.05 as significant. The results showed that fibroadenoma represented the most frequent BBD (55%), followed by fibrocystic changes (19%), intraductal papilloma (6%) and inflammatory breast disorders (5%). The mean age was 31.5 years (± 6.1), BMI 21.2 kg/m² (± 3.4) and age at menarche 13.0 years (± 1.5). Duration of breast-feeding was not significantly different between controls and BBD types (p = NS). Selecting women with fibroadenoma breast-feeding duration directly correlated with the number of benign lesions (p < 0.05), which remains significant also by multivariate analysis. It was concluded that there seemed to be no difference in breast-feeding among BBDs types, but lactation may influence the number of fibroadenomas. Moreover, prospective studies would better define the correlation between lactation and BBDs. PMID:22185539

  3. Histiocytic sarcoma that mimics benign histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boisseau-Garsaud, A M; Vergier, B; Beylot-Barry, M; Nastasel-Menini, F; Dubus, P; de Mascarel, A; Eghbali, H; Beylot, C

    1996-06-01

    A 28-year-old man presented with a histiocytic sarcoma of a very uncommon origin, as it had developed for several years like a benign cutaneous histiocytosis resembling generalized eruptive histiocytoma before becoming acute, with nodal and massive pulmonary involvement. Despite various chemotherapies, the patient died within 8 months. Skin biopsies showed histiocytic proliferation in the dermis and node biopsies showed histiocytic proliferation with a sinusoidal pattern. Immunohistochemical analysis, performed on paraffin-embedded sections, demonstrated strong labeling of tumoral cells for CD68 and moderate labeling for CD3 and CD4. CD30 labeling was negative. S-100 protein was positive on a Langerhans' cell reactive subpopulation. Electron microscopy confirmed the histiocytic nature of malignant cells and showed cytoplasmic inclusions such as regularly laminated bodies, dense bodies and pleomorphic inclusions. No Birbeck granules were seen. A gene rearrangement study of T-cell receptor gamma and immunoglobulin heavy chain genes showed a germline configuration. Histiocytic sarcoma is an extremely rare true histiocytic malignancy, the existence of which has been recently debated since it has often been mistaken in the past for large cell lymphomas. Such a deceptive onset as benign cutaneous histiocytosis has not been described in the literature to our knowledge. PMID:8793665

  4. Intracranial nonthermal irreversible electroporation: in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Neal, Robert E; Ellis, Thomas L; Olson, John D; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia; Robertson, John; Davalos, Rafael V

    2010-07-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer. It is unique because of its nonthermal mechanism of tumor ablation. Intracranial NTIRE procedures involve placing electrodes into the targeted area of the brain and delivering a series of short but intense electric pulses. The electric pulses induce irreversible structural changes in cell membranes, leading to cell death. We correlated NTIRE lesion volumes in normal brain tissue with electric field distributions from comprehensive numerical models. The electrical conductivity of brain tissue was extrapolated from the measured in vivo data and the numerical models. Using this, we present results on the electric field threshold necessary to induce NTIRE lesions (495-510 V/cm) in canine brain tissue using 90 50-mus pulses at 4 Hz. Furthermore, this preliminary study provides some of the necessary numerical tools for using NTIRE as a brain cancer treatment. We also computed the electrical conductivity of brain tissue from the in vivo data (0.12-0.30 S/m) and provide guidelines for treatment planning and execution. Knowledge of the dynamic electrical conductivity of the tissue and electric field that correlates to lesion volume is crucial to ensure predictable complete NTIRE treatment while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:20668843

  5. Non-invasive assessment of intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Robba, C; Bacigaluppi, S; Cardim, D; Donnelly, J; Bertuccio, A; Czosnyka, M

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is invaluable in the management of neurosurgical and neurological critically ill patients. Invasive measurement of ventricular or parenchymal pressure is considered the gold standard for accurate measurement of ICP but is not always possible due to certain risks. Therefore, the availability of accurate methods to non-invasively estimate ICP has the potential to improve the management of these vulnerable patients. This review provides a comparative description of different methods for non-invasive ICP measurement. Current methods are based on changes associated with increased ICP, both morphological (assessed with magnetic resonance, computed tomography, ultrasound, and fundoscopy) and physiological (assessed with transcranial and ophthalmic Doppler, tympanometry, near-infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalography, visual-evoked potentials, and otoacoustic emissions assessment). At present, none of the non-invasive techniques alone seem suitable as a substitute for invasive monitoring. However, following the present analysis and considerations upon each technique, we propose a possible flowchart based on the combination of non-invasive techniques including those characterizing morphologic changes (e.g., repetitive US measurements of ONSD) and those characterizing physiological changes (e.g., continuous TCD). Such an integrated approach, which still needs to be validated in clinical practice, could aid in deciding whether to place an invasive monitor, or how to titrate therapy when invasive ICP measurement is contraindicated or unavailable. PMID:26515159

  6. Long-term intracranial pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    de Jong, D A; Maas, A I; den Ouden, A H; de Lange, S A

    Continuous or intermittent measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is important in patients at risk for raised ICP. Indications exist for short- and long-term measurements. The various methods used for short-term monitoring are discussed with their relative advantages and disadvantages. For long-term measurements of ICP use of a completely implantable telemetric epidural pressure transducer is indicated. No such device is commercially available. We have developed an inexpensive passive telemetric transducer for this purpose. Results obtained up till now have demonstrated its reliability for measurements of two to three months duration. The life span of the device is limited by degrading of the epoxy utilized for sealing of the titanium pressure sensing part to the radiolucent ceramic cap of the transducer, causing leakage of water into the transducer and false low measurements. Because of these problems new hermetic sealing techniques were tested. Both active metal brazing and glass bonding yielded good results and hermetic sealing could be obtained. The metal to ceramic bonding presented is generally applicable within the design of implants. Besides the technical progress reported, the experience with clinical use in 12 patients is presented. PMID:6674738

  7. Hemorheology in complicated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cicco, G; Vicenti, P; Stingi, G D; Tarallo; Pirrelli, A

    1999-01-01

    During essential and secondary arterial hypertension it is possible to observe changes in microcirculation perfusion associated with a reduction in tissue oxygenation due in part to hemorheological changes such as an increase in blood viscosity or the formation of the red blood cell "rouleaux" which favour an increase in peripheral resistance and can cause or worsen arterial hypertension. We studied 21 healthy subjects (11 male and 10 female aged 42 +/- 4) and 26 hypertensive subjects (14 male and 12 female aged 49 +/- 3). The patients were non smokers and non suffering from respiratory or haemathological pathologies. They were not undergoing antihypertensive or vasodilatory pharmaceutical treatment. The patients suffered from mild hypertension (II WHO) with Peripheral Occlusive Arterial Disease (POAD II "a" acc. to Leriche-Fontaine class.). The patients showed an increase in cholesterolaemia (6.42 +/- 0.81 mmol/l) and trygliceridaemia (2.73 +/- 0.09 mmol/l) at an average level. The patients were studied in standard conditions with a constant temperature of 22 degrees C. We measured SBP, DBP, MBP, and the HR. We also measured the elongation index (EI) (with shear stress range 0.30 to 30 pascals) using LORCA, acc. to Hardeman method (1994), in order to study the erythrocyte deformability and aggregation kinetics in dynamic condition. To evaluate deformability in static conditions we calculated the Erythrocyte Morphologic Index (EMI), acc. to Forconi method, via the bowl/discocyte ratio (for 100 red blood cells fixed in glutaraldehyde at 0.3% and observed with an optical microscope under immersion in glycerol). Peripheral oxygenation was taken transcutaneously (TcpO2). To establish the level of vascular disease we used the Regional Perfusion Index (RPI = TcpO2 foot/TcpO2 subclavean) and doppler guided Winsor Index (WI). The Student "t" test and linear regression were used for the statistical analysis. Our data confirm a reduction in peripheral tissue oxygenation in

  8. Rigorous anaesthesia management protocol for patients with intracranial arterial stenosis: a prospective controlled-cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Laiwalla, Azim N; Ooi, Yinn Cher; Van De Wiele, Barbara; Ziv, Keren; Brown, Adam; Liou, Raymond; Saver, Jeffrey L; Gonzalez, Nestor R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reducing variability is integral in quality management. As part of the ongoing Encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis Revascularisation for Symptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis (ERSIAS) trial, we developed a strict anaesthesia protocol to minimise fluctuations in patient parameters affecting cerebral perfusion. We hypothesise that this protocol reduces the intraoperative variability of targeted monitored parameters compared to standard management. Design Prospective cohort study of patients undergoing encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis surgery versus standard neurovascular interventions. Patients with ERSIAS had strict perioperative management that included normocapnia and intentional hypertension. Control patients received regular anaesthetic standard of care. Minute-by-minute intraoperative vitals were electronically collected. Heterogeneity of variance tests were used to compare variance across groups. Mixed-model regression analysis was performed to establish the effects of treatment group on the monitored parameters. Setting Tertiary care centre. Participants 24 participants: 12 cases (53.8 years±16.7 years; 10 females) and 12 controls (51.3 years±15.2 years; 10 females). Adults aged 30–80 years, with transient ischaemic attack or non-disabling stroke (modified Rankin Scale <3) attributed to 70–99% intracranial stenosis of the carotid or middle cerebral artery, were considered for enrolment. Controls were matched according to age, gender and history of neurovascular intervention. Main outcome measures Variability of heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure and end tidal CO2 (ETCO2) throughout surgical duration. Results There were significant reductions in the intraoperative MAP SD (4.26 vs 10.23 mm Hg; p=0.007) and ETCO2 SD (0.94 vs 1.26 mm Hg; p=0.05) between the ERSIAS and control groups. Median MAP and ETCO2 in the ERSIAS group were higher (98 mm Hg, IQR 23 vs 75 mm Hg, IQR 15; p<0

  9. A Consensus-Based Interpretation of the Benchmark Evidence from South American Trials: Treatment of Intracranial Pressure Trial.

    PubMed

    Chesnut, Randall M; Bleck, Thomas P; Citerio, Giuseppe; Classen, Jan; Cooper, D James; Coplin, William M; Diringer, Michael N; Grände, Per-Olof; Hemphill, J Claude; Hutchinson, Peter J; Le Roux, Peter; Mayer, Stephan A; Menon, David K; Myburgh, John A; Okonkwo, David O; Robertson, Claudia S; Sahuquillo, Juan; Stocchetti, Nino; Sung, Gene; Temkin, Nancy; Vespa, Paul M; Videtta, Walter; Yonas, Howard

    2015-11-15

    Widely-varying published and presented analyses of the Benchmark Evidence From South American Trials: Treatment of Intracranial Pressure (BEST TRIP) randomized controlled trial of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring have suggested denying trial generalizability, questioning the need for ICP monitoring in severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI), re-assessing current clinical approaches to monitored ICP, and initiating a general ICP-monitoring moratorium. In response to this dissonance, 23 clinically-active, international opinion leaders in acute-care sTBI management met to draft a consensus statement to interpret this study. A Delphi method-based approach employed iterative pre-meeting polling to codify the group's general opinions, followed by an in-person meeting wherein individual statements were refined. Statements required an agreement threshold of more than 70% by blinded voting for approval. Seven precisely-worded statements resulted, with agreement levels of 83% to 100%. These statements, which should be read in toto to properly reflect the group's consensus positions, conclude that the BEST TRIP trial: 1) studied protocols, not ICP-monitoring per se; 2) applies only to those protocols and specific study groups and should not be generalized to other treatment approaches or patient groups; 3) strongly calls for further research on ICP interpretation and use; 4) should be applied cautiously to regions with much different treatment milieu; 5) did not investigate the utility of treating monitored ICP in the specific patient group with established intracranial hypertension; 6) should not change the practice of those currently monitoring ICP; and 7) provided a protocol, used in non-monitored study patients, that should be considered when treating without ICP monitoring. Consideration of these statements can clarify study interpretation. PMID:26061135

  10. Hypertension: the missing WNKs.

    PubMed

    Dbouk, Hashem A; Huang, Chou-Long; Cobb, Melanie H

    2016-07-01

    The With no Lysine [K] (WNK) family of enzymes are central in the regulation of blood pressure. WNKs have been implicated in hereditary hypertension disorders, mainly through control of the activity and levels of ion cotransporters and channels. Actions of WNKs in the kidney have been heavily investigated, and recent studies have provided insight into not only the regulation of these enzymes but also how mutations in WNKs and their interacting partners contribute to hypertensive disorders. Defining the roles of WNKs in the cardiovascular system will provide clues about additional mechanisms by which WNKs can regulate blood pressure. This review summarizes recent developments in the regulation of the WNK signaling cascade and its role in regulation of blood pressure. PMID:27009339

  11. Hypertension in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, W.F.; Zijlstra, F.

    2005-01-01

    Decisions about the management of hypertensive patients should not be based on the level of blood pressure alone, but also on the presence of other risk factors, target organ damage and cardiovascular and renal disease. The results of echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography aids in the stratification of absolute cardiovascular risk as recently advocated by the guidelines of the European Society of Hypertension 2003. Therefore, the detection of target organ damage by ultrasound techniques allows an accurate identification of high-risk patients. Cardiovascular risk stratification only based on a simple routine work-up can often underestimate overall risk, thus leading to a potentially inadequate therapeutic management especially of low-medium risk patients. PMID:25696486

  12. [Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Middeke, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In pregnancy, both mother and fetus benefit from blood pressure in normal ranges. There is discrepancy in the normenclature and thresholds for classification of hypertension in pregnancy and for initiation of antihypertensive treatment in different international guidelines. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure values that are associated with normal outcome are notably lower than any recommended treatment threshold in pregnancy. Tight blood pressure control under 85 mmHg diastolic is save and significantly prevents severe maternal hypertension as could be demonstrated in CHIPS. Close blood pressure monitoring comprising modern methods and devices including telemonitoring allows early recognition of risk developments and optimal guidance of antihypertensive therapy starting early in pregnancy. Only a few pharmacological substances are suitable for antihypertensive treatment in pregnancy. PMID:27598915

  13. An update on hypertensive emergencies and urgencies.

    PubMed

    Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Salvetti, Massimo; Amadoro, Valentina; di Somma, Salvatore; Perlini, Stefano; Semplicini, Andrea; Borghi, Claudio; Volpe, Massimo; Saba, Pier Sergio; Cameli, Matteo; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Maiello, Maria; Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Novo, Salvatore; Palmiero, Pasquale; Scicchitano, Pietro; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Pedrinelli, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Severe acute arterial hypertension is usually defined as 'hypertensive crisis', although 'hypertensive emergencies' or 'hypertensive urgencies', as suggested by the Joint National Committee and the European Society of Hypertension, have completely different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.The prevalence and demographics of hypertensive emergencies and urgencies have changed over the last four decades, but hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are still associated with significant morbidity and mortality.Different scientific societies have repeatedly produced up-to-date guidelines; however, the treatment of hypertensive emergencies and urgencies is still inappropriate, with potential clinical implications.This review focuses on hypertensive emergencies and urgencies management and treatment, as suggested by recent data. PMID:25575271

  14. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  15. Drug Treatment of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    Hypertension is an important contributor to cardiovascular disease, which accounts for about half of all deaths in Western societies. Proper control of elevated blood pressure is therefore important. Support has grown for an approach to care in which antihypertensive drug therapy is individually tailored for each patient. Management strategy based on this approach is discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of the various antihypertensive agents are reviewed. PMID:21229011

  16. Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oudiz, Ronald J

    2016-08-01

    The classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an attempt to define subtypes of PH based on clinical presentation, underlying physiology, and treatment implications. Five groups of PH have been defined, and the classification scheme has been refined over the years to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of PH. Understanding the classification of PH is paramount before embarking on a work-up of patients with PH or suspected PH because treatment and outcome can vary greatly. PMID:27443133

  17. Genetic factors involves in intracranial aneurysms – actualities

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, D; Munteanu, V; Coman, T; Ciurea, AV

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a common vascular disorder, which frequently leads to fatal vascular rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although various acquired risk factors associated with IAs have been identified, heritable conditions are associated with IAs formation but these syndromes account for less than 1% of all IAs in the population. Cerebral aneurysm disease is related to hemodynamic and genetic factors, associated with structural weakness in the arterial wall, which was acquired by a specific, often unknown, event. Possibly, the trigger moment of aneurysm formation may depend on the dynamic arterial growth, which is closely related to aging/ atherosclerosis. Genetic factors are known to have an important role in IA pathogenesis. Literature data provide complementary evidence that the variants on chromosomes 8q and 9p are associated with IA and that the risk of IA in patients with these variants is greatly increased with cigarette smoking. Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5-10% of the population). In comparison with sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located in the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid, FIA = familial Intracranial Aneurysm, GWAS = genome-wide association studies, IL-6 = interleukin-6, ISUIA = International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms, IA = Intracranial aneurysm, mRNA = Messager ribonucleic acid, SNPs = single-nucleotide polymorphisms, SMCs = smooth muscle cells, sIAs = sporadic IAs, SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage, TNF-α = tumor necrosis factor-alpha, COL4A1 = type IV collagen alpha-1 PMID:26351537

  18. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  19. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  20. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liu; Yan, Yao; Jiahao, Ma; Yanhang, Zhang; Qian, Wang; Zhaohua, Zhang; Tianling, Ren

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 μm2. It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm2. In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm2. Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10-2 mV/kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61025021, 61434001), and the ‘Thousands Talents’ Program for Pioneer Researchers and Its Innovation Team, China.

  1. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension manifesting as a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery. PMID:25969682

  2. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Manifesting as a Unilateral Subdural Hematoma with a Marked Midline Shift

    PubMed Central

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery. PMID:25969682

  3. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed. PMID:27429002

  4. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed. PMID:27429002

  5. Portal hypertensive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mekaroonkamol, Parit; Cohen, Robert; Chawla, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) is a condition that describes the pathologic changes and mucosal abnormalities observed in the small intestine of patients with portal hypertension. This entity is being increasingly recognized and better understood over the past decade due to increased accessibility of the small intestine made possible by the introduction of video capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy. Though challenged by its diverse endoscopic appearance, multiple scoring systems have been proposed to classify the endoscopic presentation and grade its severity. Endoscopic findings can be broadly categorized into vascular and non-vascular lesions with many subtypes of both categories. Clinical manifestations of PHE can range from asymptomatic incidental findings to fatal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Classic endoscopic findings in the setting of portal hypertension may lead to a prompt diagnosis. Occasionally histopathology and cross sectional imaging like computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful in establishing a diagnosis. Management of overt bleeding requires multidisciplinary approach involving hepatologists, endoscopists, surgeons, and interventional radiologists. Adequate resuscitation, reduction of portal pressure, and endoscopic therapeutic intervention remain the main principles of the initial treatment. This article reviews the existing evidence on PHE with emphasis on its classification, diagnosis, clinical manifestations, endoscopic appearance, pathological findings, and clinical management. A new schematic management of ectopic variceal bleed is also proposed. PMID:25729469

  6. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  7. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Coope, J

    1987-08-01

    Hypertension is a common finding in patients aged over 60 years, but the following questions need answering. How dangerous is it? Will lowering the blood pressure reduce the attendant risks? What is the 'cost' of such treatment in terms of side effects, drug-induced disease and health service finance? Two recently completed trials throw light on these problems: EWPHE (European Working Party on Hypertension in the Elderly), a European study based on hospital-clinic attenders, using a diuretic backed up with methyldopa; and HEP (randomized trial of treatment of Hypertension in Elderly Patients in Primary Care), based on general-practice screening in England and Wales using atenolol and bendrofluazide. The results of these trials were compared and the findings were broadly similar in the two studies. Some of the differences may be due to the different selection of patients. It is concluded that elderly patients with sustained blood pressures greater or equal to 170/90 mmHg would benefit from treatment by substantial reduction of stroke. Diuretics or beta-blockers, alone or together, are acceptable treatments in elderly subjects. PMID:3312529

  8. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2015-12-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  9. Management of hypertension emergencies.

    PubMed

    Elliott, William J

    2003-12-01

    Although they have become less common, hypertensive emergencies occur with an incidence of approximately 1 to 2/100,000 people per year. Our knowledge about this problem, its pathophysiology, risk factors, and appropriate treatment options has expanded during the past decade. A hypertensive emergency can be declared when an elevated blood pressure is associated with acute target-organ damage. Rapid evaluation and treatment (typically with an intravenously administered agent) should be instituted, usually in an intensive care unit setting, and the patient should be observed carefully during acute blood-pressure lowering. When properly treated, the prognosis for these patients is not nearly as dismal as it was more than 60 years ago, and the initial level of function of target organs (brain, heart, kidneys) is more indicative of an emergency than the actual level of blood pressure. Therapeutic options include the time-tested sodium nitroprusside (which has toxic metabolic products and is contraindicated in pregnancy, tobacco amblyopia, and Leber's optic atrophy); fenoldopam mesylate; and nicardipine. When properly treated, "malignant hypertension" need be considered malignant no longer. PMID:14594569

  10. Managing hypertension by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Camps, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Some polyphenols, obtained from plants of broad use, induce a favorable endothelial response in hypertension and beneficial effects in the management of other metabolic cardiovascular risks. Previous studies in our laboratories using the calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa as a source of polyphenols show that significant effects on hypertension are noticeable in humans only when provided in high amounts. Available data are suggestive in animal models and ex vivo experiments, but data in humans are difficult to acquire. Additionally, and despite the low bioavailability of polyphenols, intervention studies provide evidence for the protective effects of secondary plant metabolites. Assumptions on public health benefits are limited by the lack of scientific knowledge, robust data derived from large randomized clinical trials, and an accurate assessment of the bioactive components provided by common foodstuff. Because it is likely that clinical effects are the result of multiple interactions among different polyphenols rather than the isolated action of unique compounds, to provide polyphenol-rich botanical extracts as dietary supplements is a suggestive option. Unfortunately, the lack of patent perspectives for the pharmaceutical industries and the high cost of production and release for alimentary industries will hamper the performance of the necessary clinical trials. Here we briefly discuss whether and how such limitations may complicate the extensive use of plant-derived products in the management of hypertension and which steps are the necessary to deal with the predictable complexity in a possible clinical practice. PMID:25714729

  11. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Robles, Nicolas R; Macias, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Data collected over a 30-year period have demonstrated the increasing prevalence of hypertension with age. Aging is an inevitable part of life and brings along two inconvenient events: physiologic decline and disease state. High blood pressure (HBP) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. It is a significant and often asymptomatic chronic disease, which requires optimal control and persistent adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risks of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal disease. Hypertension in the elderly patients represents a management dilemma to geriatric and cardiovascular specialists and other practitioners. Furthermore, with the wide adoption of multiple drug strategies targeting subgroups of hypertensive patients with specific risk conditions to lower blood pressure (BP), difficult questions arise about how aggressive treatment of elderly patients should be. The purpose of the following chapter article is to review the pathophysiology of aging as well as the epidemiology and the clinical assessment of high blood pressure (HBP) in older people. PMID:25761101

  12. Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) and adjuvant fractionated radiotherapeutic multimodal therapy for intracranial malignant glioma in a canine patient.

    PubMed

    Garcia, P A; Pancotto, T; Rossmeisl, J H; Henao-Guerrero, N; Gustafson, N R; Daniel, G B; Robertson, J L; Ellis, T L; Davalos, R V

    2011-02-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) has shown promise as an ablative therapy for a variety of soft-tissue neoplasms. Here we describe the therapeutic planning aspects and first clinical application of N-TIRE for the treatment of an inoperable, spontaneous malignant intracranial glioma in a canine patient. The N-TIRE ablation was performed safely, effectively reduced the tumor volume and associated intracranial hypertension, and provided sufficient improvement in neurological function of the patient to safely undergo adjunctive fractionated radiotherapy (RT) according to current standards of care. Complete remission was achieved based on serial magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the brain, although progressive radiation encephalopathy resulted in the death of the dog 149 days after N-TIRE therapy. The length of survival of this patient was comparable to dogs with intracranial tumors treated via standard excisional surgery and adjunctive fractionated external beam RT. Our results illustrate the potential benefits of N-TIRE for in vivo ablation of undesirable brain tissue, especially when traditional methods of cytoreductive surgery are not possible or ideal, and highlight the potential radiosensitizing effects of N-TIRE on the brain. PMID:21214290

  13. Non-Thermal Irreversible Electroporation (N-TIRE) and Adjuvant Fractionated Radiotherapeutic Multimodal Therapy for Intracranial Malignant Glioma in a Canine Patient

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, P. A.; Pancotto, T.; Rossmeisl, J. H.; Henao-Guerrero, N.; Gustafson, N. R.; Daniel, G. B.; Robertson, J. L.; Ellis, T. L.; Davalos, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) has shown promise as an ablative therapy for a variety of soft-tissue neoplasms. Here we describe the therapeutic planning aspects and first clinical application of N-TIRE for the treatment of an inoperable, spontaneous malignant intracranial glioma in a canine patient. The N-TIRE ablation was performed safely, effectively reduced the tumor volume and associated intracranial hypertension, and provided sufficient improvement in neurological function of the patient to safely undergo adjunctive fractionated radiotherapy (RT) according to current standards of care. Complete remission was achieved based on serial magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the brain, although progressive radiation encephalopathy resulted in the death of the dog 149 days after N-TIRE therapy. The length of survival of this patient was comparable to dogs with intracranial tumors treated via standard excisional surgery and adjunctive fractionated external beam RT. Our results illustrate the potential benefits of N-TIRE for in vivo ablation of undesirable brain tissue, especially when traditional methods of cytoreductive surgery are not possible or ideal, and highlight the potential radiosensitizing effects of N-TIRE on the brain. PMID:21214290

  14. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are a common indication for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Endoscopic management has evolved over the last 2 decades as the current standard of care. The most common etiologies of strictures encountered are following surgery and those related to chronic pancreatitis. High-quality cross-sectional imaging provides a road map for endoscopic management. Currently, sequential placement of multiple plastic biliary stents represents the preferred approach. There is an increasing role for the treatment of these strictures using covered metal stents, but due to conflicting reports of efficacies as well as cost and complications, this approach should only be entertained following careful consideration. Optimal management of strictures is best achieved using a team approach with the surgeon and interventional radiologist playing an important role. PMID:25613176

  15. Clinical Evaluation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    McVary, Kevin T

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common neoplastic condition afflicting men and constitutes a major factor impacting male health. Clinical evaluation to assess the presence and degree of voiding dysfunction and/or the role of BPH in its presence has an increasingly broad spectrum of treatment goals. The goals of the evaluation of such men are to identify the patient’s voiding or, more appropriately, urinary tract problems, both symptomatic and physiologic; to establish the etiologic role of BPH in these problems; to evaluate the necessity for and probability of success and risks of various therapeutic approaches; and to present the results of these assessments to the patient so he can make an informed decision about management recommendations and available alternatives. PMID:16985961

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    McVary, Kevin T

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common neoplastic condition afflicting men and constitutes a major factor impacting male health. Clinical evaluation to assess the presence and degree of voiding dysfunction and/or the role of BPH in its presence has an increasingly broad spectrum of treatment goals. The goals of the evaluation of such men are to identify the patient’s voiding or, more appropriately, urinary tract problems, both symptomatic and physiologic; to establish the etiologic role of BPH in these problems; to evaluate the necessity for and probability of success and risks of various therapeutic approaches; and to present the results of these assessments to the patient so he can make an informed decision about management recommendations and available alternatives. PMID:16985968

  17. Benign Vascular Malformation at the Ischial Tuberosity.

    PubMed

    Said, Rami; Bevelaqua, Anna-Christina

    2016-07-01

    A 31-year-old female student was referred to physical therapy with a chief complaint of proximal, posterior left thigh pain that began insidiously 12 months prior, and progressively worsened while training for a half-marathon. A mobile, soft mass was identified just inferior to the ischial tuberosity that was tender and painful to palpation, recreating the patient's chief complaint. Radiographic findings were negative for a suspected avulsion fracture at the ischial tuberosity. Therefore, the physician performed musculoskeletal ultrasonography, which revealed a superficial hypoechoic mass with vascular flow. Magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent biopsy led to the diagnosis of a benign vascular malformation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):607. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0410. PMID:27363574

  18. [Benign thyroid nodules: diagnostic and therapeutic approach].

    PubMed

    Durante, Cosimo; Cava, Francesco; Paciaroni, Alessandra; Filetti, Sebastiano

    2008-05-01

    In the last years an increase in thyroid nodules detection has been reported from several epidemiological studies. This trend is largely due to the routine use of diagnostic sonography procedures in clinical practice. Thyroid nodules, both palpable or not palpable, rarely turn out to be malignant. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAc) plays a central role in establishing the nature of the nodule. Excluded the presence of malignant lesions, which are generally treated with surgery, physicians are faced with a variety of therapeutic options, and choosing the optimal approach can be a difficult task. These include a periodic follow-up alone without treatment, the iodine supplementation, the thyroid-hormone suppressive therapy, the radioiodine administration, the percutaneous ethanol injections, and the new technique of laser photocoagulation. In all cases, decisions on the management of benign thyroid nodules should always be based on clinical target and a careful analysis of benefits and risks to the patient. PMID:18581970

  19. Palladium-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Acylation.

    PubMed

    Suchand, Basuli; Satyanarayana, Gedu

    2016-08-01

    Recent trends in research have gained an orientation toward developing efficient strategies using innocuous reagents. The earlier reported transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylations involved either toxic carbon monoxide (CO) gas as carbonylating agent or functional-group-assisted ortho sp(2) C-H activation (i.e., ortho acylation) or carbonylation by activation of the carbonyl group (i.e., via the formation of enamines). Contradicting these methods, here we describe an environmentally benign process, [Pd]-catalyzed direct carbonylation starting from simple and commercially available iodo arenes and aldehydes, for the synthesis of a wide variety of ketones. Moreover, this method comprises direct coupling of iodoarenes with aldehydes without activation of the carbonyl and also without directing group assistance. Significantly, the strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis n-butylphthalide and pitofenone. PMID:27377566

  20. Benign Duodenocolic Fistula: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Soheili, Marzieh; Honarmand, Shirin; Soleimani, Heshmatollah; Elyasi, Anvar

    2015-08-01

    Benign duodenocolic fistula (DCF), known as a fistula between the duodenum and colon with or without cecum of nonmalignant origin, is an unusual complication of different gastrointestinal diseases. The present paper records a case in which the patient presented with chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss as well as having a history of gastric ulcer. Most frequently the condition presents with signs of malabsorption such as weight loss and diarrhea, but other symptoms include nausea, vomiting (sometimes with fecal), and abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal inflammatory conditions are the usual causes. The most common ones are perforated duodenal ulcer and Crohn's disease. Barium enemas are usually diagnostic. Treatment consists of excising the fistula and repairing the duodenal and colonic defects. Closure of the fistula provides quick relief. PMID:26545997