Science.gov

Sample records for benign intracranial hypertension

  1. CSF imaging in benign intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    James, A. Everette; Harbert, J. C.; Hoffer, P. B.; DeLand, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The cisternographic images in 10 patients with benign intracranial hypertension were reviewed. Nine were normal. Transfer of labelled tracer from the subarachnoid space was measured in five patients and was found to be abnormal in only two. The relation of these findings to the proposed pathophysiological alterations is discussed. Images

  2. Clarithromycin Culprit of Benign Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Habib Rehman; Mason, Colin; Mulcahy, Riona

    2015-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension is characterized with increase in CSF opening pressure with no specific etiology. It is predominantly found in women of child bearing age and particularly in individuals with obesity. Visual disturbances or loss and associated headaches are common and can lead to blindness if left untreated. Diagnosis can be achieved once other causes of visual loss, headaches and high opening pressures are excluded. Management consists of serial optic disc assessments although no specific treatment is available despite recent trials using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Diet modification and weight management can help in therapy. PMID:26713029

  3. [Neuroophthalmological aspects of benign intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Eliseeva, N M; Serova, N K; Gasparian, S S; Shifrin, M A

    2008-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BICH) is characterized by elevated spinal fluid pressure in the absence of space-occupying lesion in the skull, dilated cerebral ventricles, significant neurological disorders, and altered spinal fluid composition. Forty-nine patients with a female predominance were examined. Their age ranged from 4 to 52 years (median 39 years). The most common predictors of BICH were overweight, endocrine disorders, and cerebral sinus thrombosis. Ophthalmoscopically, the patients were found to have early, moderate, and significant papilledema, and secondary optic atrophy. Examination of visual functions revealed these or those disturbances of visual acuity and/or field of vision in 43 of the 49 patients. The incidence and degree of visual disturbances depended on the stage of papilledema. Timely diagnosis and treatment in patients with BICH allows the development of visual disturbances to be prevented in them. PMID:18589651

  4. Benign Intracranial Hypertension: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Gary Y.; Million, Stephanie K.

    2012-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) (also known as pseudotumor cerebri and empty sella syndrome) remains a diagnostic challenge to most physicians. The modified Dandy criteria consist of, the classic findings of headache, pulsatile tinnitus, papilledema, and elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, however, these are rarely collectively present in any one patient. Furthermore, these findings can wax and wane over time. Due to the nature of this disease, both signs and symptoms may be intermittent, making definitive diagnosis difficult. Newer imaging studies, particularly the magnetic resonance venogram (MRV) along with a constellation of correlative findings and associated diseases have given new impetus in the diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of this disease. This has led the authors to offer modifications to the classic Dandy criteria. This report presents three representative cases of BIH highlighting many of the newer advances in both diagnosis and treatment of this perplexing disorder. PMID:22928139

  5. Risperidone Induced Benign Intracranial Hypertension Leading to Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Sushil Thomas; Kattula, Dheeraj; Mannam, Pavithra; Iyyadurai, Ramya

    2016-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) is a rare but potentially serious condition causing visual loss. Occasionally, medication use has been associated with the occurrence of BIH. We report the case of a 40-year-old obese lady being treated with risperidone for schizophrenia who presented with features of BIH. We report this case, occurring for the 1st time in India, to emphasize that a commonly used atypical antipsychotic drug can rarely cause BIH leading to visual loss. PMID:27335522

  6. Hypervitaminosis A causing benign intracranial hypertension. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhettay, E M; Bakst, C M

    1988-12-01

    Hypervitaminosis A is a well-recognized clinical entity, but the toxic manifestations develop so insidiously and involve so many systems that diagnosis can easily be missed or delayed. A patient with juvenile chronic arthritis developed benign intracranial hypertension and other manifestations of excessive vitamin A intake and made a complete recovery after it was withdrawn. Vitamin A is a non-prescription drug and any history of its ingestion must be obtained during evaluation of papilloedema. A plea is made for the public to be repeatedly reminded that no proposed remedy is safe or effective until it is demonstrated to be so. PMID:3194809

  7. Lumbar subcutaneous shunt: a novel technique for therapeutic decision making in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and benign intracranial hypertension (BIH).

    PubMed

    Ushewokunze, S; Haja Mydin, H N; Prasad, R; Mendelow, A D

    2008-10-01

    Selecting patients who will benefit from a permanent CSF diversion procedure in benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) or communicating hydrocephalus due to normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) has inherent problems. The percutaneous introduction of a lumbar subcutaneous shunt (LSS) under local anaesthesia facilitates both a prolonged CSF drainage under aseptic conditions and also elicits an adequate clinical response. We describe the technique of a lumbar subcutaneous shunt and our experience with its use in patients with BIH and NPH. Postprocedure changes in the patients' clinical status were noted. Patients with a transient clinical improvement underwent a subsequent definitive CSF diversion; those with a sustained clinical improvement or no change in symptoms had no further procedure. PMID:19016120

  8. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  9. Intracranial Hypertension in Children without Papilledema.

    PubMed

    Chelse, Ana B; Epstein, Leon G

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital studied the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children followed in a multispecialty pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic. PMID:26933598

  10. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects. PMID:27523417

  11. Intracranial hypertension: classification and patterns of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (ICH) was systematized in four categories according to its aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms: parenchymatous ICH with an intrinsic cerebral cause; vascular ICH, which has its aetiology in disorders of cerebral blood circulation; ICH caused by disorders of cerebro–spinal fluid dynamics and idiopathic ICH. The increase of intracranial pressure is the first to happen and then intracranial hypertension develops from this initial effect becoming symptomatic; it then acquires its individuality, surpassing the initial disease. The intracranial hypertension syndrome corresponds to the stage at which the increased intracranial pressure can be compensated and the acute form of intracranial hypertension is equivalent to a decompensated ICH syndrome. The decompensation of intracranial hypertension is a condition of instability and appears when the normal intrinsic ratio of intracranial pressure – time fluctuation is changed. The essential conditions for decompensation of intracranial hypertension are: the speed of intracranial pressure increase over normal values, the highest value of abnormal intracranial pressure and the duration of high ICP values. Medical objectives are preventing ICP from exceeding 20 mm Hg and maintaining a normal cerebral blood flow. The emergency therapy is the same for the acute form but each of the four forms of ICH has a specific therapy, according to the pathogenic mechanism and if possible to aetiology. PMID:20108456

  12. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zaitun; Fenton, Eoin; Sattar, Muhammad Taufiq

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation. PMID:23239783

  13. Perspective: Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Provide an update on various features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Design Perspective. Methods Selected articles on the epidemiology, clinical and imaging features, natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed and interpreted in the context of the authors’ clinical and research experience. Results Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is primarily a disease of obese women of childbearing age, but it can affect patients of any weight, sex, and age. Although a relatively rare disorder, idiopathic intracranial hypertension’s associated costs in the U.S. entail hundreds of millions of dollars. Even following treatment, headaches are frequently persistent and may require the continued involvement of a neurologist. Quality of life reductions and depression are common among idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients. However, visual dysfunction, especially visual field abnormalities, represents the major morbidity of this disorder, and serial automated perimetry remains the primary mode of patient monitoring. Patients who are men, black, very obese, or anemic are at higher risk of visual loss. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding idiopathic intracranial hypertension’s pathophysiology. Treatment studies show that lumbar puncture is a valuable treatment (in addition to its crucial diagnostic role) and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, CSF diversion procedures, and cerebral venous stenting. Conclusions Many questions remain unanswered about idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Ongoing studies, especially an ongoing NIH-funded clinical trial of acetazolamide, should provide more insight into this important, yet poorly understood syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. PMID:21696699

  14. Intracranial Hypertension Without Papilledema in Children.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Aronowitz, Catherine; Roach, E Steve

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children. Charts of patients evaluated in a pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic at our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they had presence or absence of optic nerve edema at the time of presentation. Age, body mass index, and opening cerebrospinal fluid pressures were considered continuous variables and compared by Wilcoxon rank sum test because of non-normality. A P-value of 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 228 charts were reviewed; 152 patients met the criteria for intracranial hypertension, and 27 patients (17.8%) met the criteria of headache without optic nerve edema. There was no clinically significant difference in age, body mass index, opening pressure, and modified opening pressure between the 2 groups. PMID:26012507

  15. An Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thurtell, Matthew J.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of unknown etiology often encountered in neurologic practice. It produces non-localizing symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure and, when left untreated, can result in severe irreversible visual loss. It most commonly occurs in obese women of childbearing age, but it can also occur in children, men, non-obese adults, and older adults. While it is frequently associated with obesity, it can be associated with other conditions, such as obstructive sleep apnea and transverse cerebral venous sinus stenoses. Recent identification of subgroups at high risk for irreversible visual loss, including black patients, men, and patients with fulminant forms of IIH, help guide the optimal management and follow-up. Ongoing studies of venous anatomy and physiology in IIH patients, as well as a recently begun randomized clinical treatment trial, should provide more insights into this common yet poorly understood syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. PMID:20944524

  16. [Primary "pseudotumor cerebri" syndrome or idiopathic intracranial hypertension: clinical features and treatment].

    PubMed

    Timmermans, G; Scholtes, F; Andris, C; Martin, D

    2015-10-01

    "Pseudotumor cerebri" generally refers to a syndrome associating signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension, increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and normal CSF composition, without any identifiable intracranial abnormality, particularly by neuroimaging studies. Although the "idiopathic" variant of the syndrome is most common, there are secondary forms where a cause can be found. The term "benign intracranial hypertension" should be abandoned, since permanent visual impairment can complicate the condition. This disaster can be avoided by early recognition and medical or surgical treatment of the disease. This article discusses the terminology, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the syndrome. PMID:26727837

  17. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://www.ihrfoundation.org/hypertension/info/C172 Surgery Optic Nerve Fenestration When sight is at risk and drug therapy has been unsuccessful, an optic nerve fenestration (also called an optic nerve sheath ...

  18. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting as postpartum headache.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mariam; Salahuddin, Ayesha; Mathew, Namitha R; Nandhagopal, Ramachandiran

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum headache is described as headache and neck or shoulder pain during the first 6 weeks after delivery. Common causes of headache in the puerperium are migraine headache and tension headache; other causes include pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, post-dural puncture headache, cortical vein thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome, brain tumor, cerebral ischemia, meningitis, and so forth. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare cause of postpartum headache. It is usually associated with papilledema, headache, and elevated intracranial pressure without any focal neurologic abnormality in an otherwise healthy person. It is more commonly seen in obese women of reproductive age group, but rare during pregnancy and postpartum. We present a case of IIH who presented to us 18 days after cesarean section with severe headache and was successfully managed. PMID:26818168

  19. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  20. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Kieburtz, Karl D.; Corbett, James J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Friedman, Deborah I.; Katz, David M.; Keltner, John L.; Schron, Eleanor B.; McDermott, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, there are no large prospective cohorts of untreated patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) to characterize the disease. OBJECTIVE To report the baseline clinical and laboratory features of patients enrolled in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We collected data at baseline from questionnaires, examinations, automated perimetry, and fundus photography grading. Patients (n = 165) were enrolled from March 17, 2010, to November 27, 2012, at 38 academic and private practice sites in North America. All participants met the modified Dandy criteria for IIH and had a perimetric mean deviation between −2 dB and −7 dB. All but 4 participants were women. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Baseline and laboratory characteristics. RESULTS The mean (SD) age of our patients was 29.0 (7.4) years and 4 (2.4%) were men. The average (SD) body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was 39.9 (8.3). Headache was the most common symptom (84%). Transient visual obscurations occurred in 68% of patients, back pain in 53%, and pulse synchronous tinnitus in 52%. Only 32% reported visual loss. The average (SD) perimetric mean deviation in the worst eye was −3.5 (1.1) dB, (range, −2.0 to −6.4 dB) and in the best eye was −2.3 (1.1) dB (range, −5.2 to 0.8 dB). A partial arcuate visual field defect with an enlarged blind spot was the most common perimetric finding. Visual acuity was 85 letters or better (20/20) in 71% of the worst eyes and 77% of the best eyes. Quality of life measures, including the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 and the Short Form–36 physical and mental health summary scales, were lower compared with population norms. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial represents the largest prospectively analyzed cohort of untreated patients with IIH. Our data show

  1. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, P I; D'Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option. PMID:26752823

  2. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, PI; D’Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option. PMID:26752823

  3. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect. PMID:27283387

  4. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Intracranial Hypertension and Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Cadena, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Sustained intracranial hypertension and acute brain herniation are “brain codes,” signifying catastrophic neurological events that require immediate recognition and treatment to prevent irreversible injury and death. As in cardiac arrest, a brain code mandates the organized implementation of a stepwise management algorithm. The goal of this emergency neurological life support protocol is to implement an evidence-based, standardized approach to the evaluation and management of patients with intracranial hypertension and/or herniation. PMID:26438459

  5. Spontaneous intracranial hypo and hypertensions: an imaging review.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, Viratsinh; Hingwala, Divyata Rajendra; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure changes can manifest as either intracranial hypertension or hypotension. The idiopathic forms are largely under or misdiagnosed. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension occurs due to reduced CSF pressure usually as a result of a spontaneous dural tear. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a syndrome of elevated intracranial tension without hydrocephalus or mass lesions and with normal CSF composition. Neuroimaging plays an important role in excluding secondary causes of raised intracranial tension. As the clinical presentation is varied, imaging may also help the clinician in arriving at the diagnosis of IIH with the help of a few specific signs. In this review, we attempt to compile the salient magnetic resonance imaging findings in these two conditions. Careful observation of these findings may help in early accurate diagnosis and to provide appropriate early treatment. PMID:21891924

  6. The laboratory profile in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Lea; Zohar, Efrat; Glovinsky, Yoseph; Huna-Baron, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    While overweight and female gender play an undisputable role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), the contribution of other factors is still unclear. We have evaluated the laboratory findings of patients with IIH in an attempt to find the influence of abnormalities on the disease course. Included were 82 females after menarche and males older than 18 years who were followed up for at least 1 year. A wide range of laboratory parameters were examined at the time of presentation. The most frequent abnormal laboratory findings were elevated C reactive protein (CRP) (51 %), thrombophilia (31 %), increased plasma cortisol levels (29 %) and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (20 %). Patients with elevated CRP and patients with thrombophilia had an unfavorable visual outcome. Increased cortisol levels and abnormal calcium correlated with a higher rate of recurrence. The visual outcome of patients with elevated LDH was better than those with normal LDH. It seems that certain metabolic, inflammatory and coagulation abnormalities may influence the course of IIH. If confirmed in further studies, these findings could contribute to elucidation of the etiology and prognosis of IIH. PMID:25596710

  7. Risk of intracranial hypertension with intrauterine levonorgestrel

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao; Gustafson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to quantify the risk of intracranial hypertension (ICH) with the intrauterine levonorgestrel (IUL) device Mirena®. Methods: We used the United States Food and Drug Administration’s Adverse Events Reporting System (FAERS) database to quantify a reporting odds ratio (ROR) for ICH and Mirena®. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study using the IMS LifeLink® database, comparing the risk of two oral contraceptives ethinyl estradiol (EE) with Mirena®. A Bayesian sensitivity analysis was performed to account for the effect of body mass index (BMI). Results: The reported odds ratios (ORs) for ICH and papilledema with Mirena® were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–2.25) and 1.50 (95% CI 1.10–2.05), respectively. In the cohort study, the OR for ICH and EE-norgestimate and EE-norethindrone compared with Mirena® were 1.29 (95% CI 0.83–2.00) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04–2.29), respectively. The presence of a strong confounder BMI did not affect the estimated OR (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 0.73–2.41 for EE-norgestimate; OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0.01–1.27 for EE-norethindrone). Conclusion: We found a higher than expected number of reports of ICH with Mirena® in the FAERS database. We also found a similar risk of ICH with Mirena® compared with the oral contraceptive EE-norgestimate. The higher risk of ICH with EE-norethindrone, another oral contraceptive should be further investigated. PMID:26240745

  8. Intradiploic epidermoid cyst with intracranial hypertension syndrome: Report of two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Holguin, J.C.; Medélez-Borbonio, R.; Quintero-Lopez, E.; García-González, U.; Gómez-Amador, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intradiploic epidermoid intracranial cysts (IEIC) derive from ectodermal cells and are covered with stratified squamous epithelium. They are extremely rare, and most common locations are in the occipital, frontal and parietal bones. They have a very slow growth and can be asymptomatic until becoming evident by the deformation produced. The treatment is based on the removal of the lesion, and subsequent histopathological confirmation. Presentation of case Two cases are reported, with intracranial hypertension syndrome, which is very uncommon because of the slow growth of this type of pathology; however, decompensations occurring in the space-occupying lesions at intracranial level explain this type of clinical presentation. Discussion The most common presentation of intracranial intradiploic epidermoid cysts (IEIC) is asymptomatically, which is made evident by the prominence at the level of the soft tissues and then presenting less frequently local pain and cephalea; rarely the size of the lesion can cause focal neurological signs. Conclusion These benign lesions, although they are of low incidence, are seen very rarely in intradiploic locations and above all, of significant size, may produce significant mass effect in patients, which was initially tolerated because of its slow growth, however, they may become decompensate and cause intracranial hypertension syndrome. PMID:26433925

  9. Complete ophthalmoplegia: A rare presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Irfan Yousuf; Verma, Sawan; Wani, Mushtaq; Asimi, Ravouf; Sheikh, Saleem; Wani, Maqbool; Sheikh, Nawaz; Shah, Irfan; Mushtaq, Mudasir

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder defined by clinical criteria that include signs and symptoms isolated to those produced by increased intracranial pressure (ICP; e. g., headache, papilledema, and vision loss), elevated ICP with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and no other cause of intracranial hypertension evident on neuroimaging or other evaluations. The most common signs in IIH are papilledema, visual field loss, and unilateral or bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a case of IIH presenting as headache with vision loss, papilledema, complete ophthalmoplegia with proptosis in one eye, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in the other eye. Patient was managed with acetazolamide, topiramate, and diuretics. Symptoms remained static and she was planned for urgent CSF diversion procedure. PMID:26713027

  10. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension: mechanisms, management, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus, and back and neck pain, but the clinical presentation is highly variable. Although few studies have been done to support evidence-based management, several recent advances have the potential to enhance understanding of the causes of the disease and to guide treatment decisions. Investigators of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) reported beneficial effects of acetazolamide in patients with mild visual loss. Studies have also established weight loss as an effective disease-modifying treatment, and further clinical trials to investigate new treatments are underway. The incidence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is expected to increase as rates of obesity increase; efforts to reduce diagnostic delays and identify new, effective approaches to treatment will be key to meeting the needs of a growing number of patients. PMID:26700907

  11. An uncommon case of pediatric neurobrucellosis associated with intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sinopidis, Xenophon; Kaleyias, Joseph; Mitropoulou, Konstantina; Triga, Maria; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Mantagos, Stefanos

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old boy who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension, headache, diplopia, papilledema, and a normal brain MRI. Brucella melitensis in the cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed with PCR assay. We believe that neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when headaches persist following brucellosis. In addition, we suggest that when cerebrospinal fluid culture is negative, PCR may prove to be an optimal alternative tool for an immediate and accurate diagnosis. PMID:22900217

  12. An Uncommon Case of Pediatric Neurobrucellosis Associated with Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sinopidis, Xenophon; Kaleyias, Joseph; Mitropoulou, Konstantina; Triga, Maria; Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Mantagos, Stefanos

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old boy who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension, headache, diplopia, papilledema, and a normal brain MRI. Brucella melitensis in the cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed with PCR assay. We believe that neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when headaches persist following brucellosis. In addition, we suggest that when cerebrospinal fluid culture is negative, PCR may prove to be an optimal alternative tool for an immediate and accurate diagnosis. PMID:22900217

  13. Finite Element Model for Hydrocephalus and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Hakseung; Park, Dae-Hyeon; Lee, Hack-Jin; Czosnyka, Zofia; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are neuropathies associated with disturbed cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Several finite element (FE) brain models were suggested to simulate the pathological changes in hydrocephalus, but with overly simplified assumptions regarding the properties of the brain parenchyma. This study proposes a two-dimensional FE brain model, capable of simulating both hydrocephalus and IIH by incorporating poro-hyperelasticity of the brain and detailed structural information (i.e., sulci). PMID:27165898

  14. Primary Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Mario A.; Bialer, Omer Y.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is increasingly recognized as a cause of spontaneous cerebrospinal (CSF) leak in the ENT and neurosurgical literature. The diagnosis of IIH in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks is classically made a few weeks after surgical repair of the CSF leak when symptoms and signs of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) appear. Methods Case reports and literature review. Two young obese women developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea related to an empty sella in one, and a cribriform plate encephalocele in the other. Both patients underwent surgical repair of the CSF leak. A few weeks later, they developed chronic headaches and bilateral papilledema. Lumbar punctures showed elevated CSF-opening pressures with normal CSF contents, with temporary improvement of headaches. A man with a three-year history of untreated IIH developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea. He experienced improvement of his headaches and papilledema after a CSF shunting procedure, and the rhinorrhea resolved after endoscopic repair of the leak. Results These cases and the literature review confirm a definite association between IIH and spontaneous CSF leak based on: 1) similar demographics; 2) increased ICP in some patients with spontaneous CSF leak after leak repair; 3) higher rate of leak recurrence in patients with raised ICP; 4) patients with intracranial hypertension secondary to tumors may develop CSF leak, confirming that raised ICP from other causes than IIH can cause CSF leak. Conclusions CSF leak may occasionally keep IIH patients symptom-free; however, classic symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension may develop after the CSF leak is repaired, exposing these patients to a high risk of recurrence of the leak unless an ICP-lowering intervention is performed. PMID:24042170

  15. MS-31INTRACRANIAL MENINGIOMAS COMPLICATED BY HYPERTENSION: FOUR CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Haining; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jiang; Zhao, Jun; Huo, Junli; Zhang, Xiang; Fei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology and mechanism of both meningioma and hypertension are still not fully understood, and their diagnosis and treatment still need to be improved. The phenomenon that some meningiomas can directly lead hypertension was never reported previously. Here we reported four consecutive cases with hypertension secondary to intracranial meningiomas. CASE PRESENTATION: Case 1 was a 62-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.6 cm × 1.5 cm) at left frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 10 years; Case 2 was a 50-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 1.5 cm × 1.2 cm × 1.1 cm) at right parietal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 4 years; Case 3 was a 42-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.7 cm × 2.6 cm × 2.3 cm) in trigonum of left lateral ventricle and with a medical history of hypertension for 3 months; Case 4 was a 56-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.8 cm × 1.5 cm) at bilateral falx of frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 8 years. All the four cases were treated in our hospital from April to June in 2013. After surgical resection of the tumors, blood pressure of all the patients returned to normal level in a short term, and it remained stable for 10 to 12 months of postoperative follow-up period. CONCLUSION: These four cases may present a new clinical syndrome and provide important clinical insights, and also should attract the attention of clinicians, i.e. in patients with hypertension, coexisting intracranial meningiomas should be suspected, and appropriate diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment should be provided; for patients with hypertension secondary to meningiomas, their hypertension can be cured after surgical removal of the tumors.

  16. Update on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bidot, Samuel; Bruce, Beau B

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare disorder occurring more frequently in obese women of childbearing age, resulting in increased intracranial pressure (ICP) from an unknown cause. Recent advances in epidemiology, imaging, and treatment have provided a better understanding of IIH in recent years, with better identification of visual risk factors and atypical forms of IIH, including fulminant IIH and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and a randomized clinical trial providing the rationale for the use of acetazolamide. In addition, a revised version of the modified Dandy criteria for the diagnosis of IIH was suggested in 2013, with better definition of IIH in adults and children; however, controversy regarding nomenclature has precluded its acceptance among IIH experts. Finally, questions regarding the best surgical strategy, the indications for venous sinus stenting, and the diagnostic role of the radiologic findings commonly seen in IIH have remained unanswered. PMID:26444398

  17. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taddeo, Terrance A.

    2010-01-01

    During recent long duration missions to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers have reported changes in visual acuity or visual field defects. Exams in the postflight period revealed changes to the visual system and elevated intracranial pressures. As a result, NASA Space Medicine has added a number of tests to be performed in the preflight, inflight and postflight periods for ISS and shuttle missions with the goal of determining the processes at work and any potential mitigation strategies. This discussion will acquaint you with the changes that NASA has made to its medical requirements in order to address the microgravity induced intracranial hypertension and associated visual changes. Key personnel have been assembled to provide you information on this topic. Educational Objectives: Provide an overview of the current Medical Operations requirements and the mitigation steps taken to operationally address the issue.

  18. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Cato, Liam D; Miah, Mohammed A L; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Jensen, Rigmor H; Gonzalez, Ana M; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH. PMID:27186074

  19. Update on the pathophysiology and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Biousse, Valérie; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a disease of unknown etiology typically affecting young, obese women, producing a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without identifiable cause. Despite a large number of hypotheses and publications over the past decade, the etiology is still unknown. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding IIH’s pathophysiology. There continues to be no evidence-based consensus or formal guidelines regarding management and treatment of the disease. Treatment studies show that the diagnostic lumbar puncture is a valuable intervention beyond its diagnostic importance, and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, cerebrospinal fluid shunting procedures, and cerebral transverse venous sinus stenting. PMID:22423118

  20. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: ongoing clinical challenges and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Julayanont, Parunyou; Karukote, Amputch; Ruthirago, Doungporn; Panikkath, Deepa; Panikkath, Ragesh

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is an uncommon disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure without radiological or laboratory evidence of intracranial pathology except empty sella turcica, optic nerve sheath with filled out cerebrospinal fluid spaces, and smooth-walled nonflow-related venous sinus stenosis or collapse. This condition typically affects obese women. The incidence of IIH is increasing with the rising prevalence of obesity. Persistent headache is the most common symptom. Visual impairment is a serious complication that may not be recognized by the patients. This paper reviews clinical manifestations, diagnostic challenges, and current treatments of IIH in adults. Various imaging modalities have been studied on their validity for detection of IIH and papilledema. This review also includes new studies on medical, surgical, and interventional management of this condition. Acetazolamide and topiramate are the only two medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials about their efficacy in treatment of IIH. In patients who have severe visual impairment or progressive visual deterioration despite medical management, surgical or interventional treatment may be considered. The efficacy and complications of cerebrospinal fluid diversion, optic nerve sheath fenestration, and endovascular venous stenting reported in the last 3 decades have been summarized in this review. Finally, the prospective aspects of biomarkers and treatments are proposed for future research. PMID:26929666

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: ongoing clinical challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Julayanont, Parunyou; Karukote, Amputch; Ruthirago, Doungporn; Panikkath, Deepa; Panikkath, Ragesh

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is an uncommon disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure without radiological or laboratory evidence of intracranial pathology except empty sella turcica, optic nerve sheath with filled out cerebrospinal fluid spaces, and smooth-walled nonflow-related venous sinus stenosis or collapse. This condition typically affects obese women. The incidence of IIH is increasing with the rising prevalence of obesity. Persistent headache is the most common symptom. Visual impairment is a serious complication that may not be recognized by the patients. This paper reviews clinical manifestations, diagnostic challenges, and current treatments of IIH in adults. Various imaging modalities have been studied on their validity for detection of IIH and papilledema. This review also includes new studies on medical, surgical, and interventional management of this condition. Acetazolamide and topiramate are the only two medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials about their efficacy in treatment of IIH. In patients who have severe visual impairment or progressive visual deterioration despite medical management, surgical or interventional treatment may be considered. The efficacy and complications of cerebrospinal fluid diversion, optic nerve sheath fenestration, and endovascular venous stenting reported in the last 3 decades have been summarized in this review. Finally, the prospective aspects of biomarkers and treatments are proposed for future research. PMID:26929666

  2. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in the Middle East: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Almarzouqi, Sumayya J.; Morgan, Michael L.; Lee, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial pressure without any identifiable etiology. It is defined by elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) with normal neuroimaging and normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contents. IIH typically affects young obese women and produces symptoms and signs related to high ICP. Headache and blurred vision are the most common symptoms, and papilledema is the major clinical sign. In this review we examine the epidemiology and demographic features of IIH in Middle Eastern countries and compare and contrast them with the published IIH literature from Western countries. The incidence of IIH in several Middle East countries has been estimated at 2.02–2.2/100,000 in the general population, which is higher than the Western rate. Obesity is a major risk factor globally and it is associated with an increased risk of severe vision loss due to IIH. There has been an increase in obesity prevalence in the Middle East countries mainly affecting the Gulf Council Countries (GCC), which parallels increased industrial development. This rise may be contributing to the increasing incidence of IIH in these countries. Other risk factors may also be contributing to IIH in Middle East countries and the differences and similarities to Western IIH merit further study. PMID:25859136

  3. Quality of life in idiopathic intracranial hypertension at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Galetta, Kristin M.; Balcer, Laura J.; Wall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study purpose was to examine vision-specific and overall health-related quality of life (QOL) at baseline in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial patients who were newly diagnosed and had mild visual loss. We also sought to determine the associations between vision-specific QOL scores and visual symptoms, visual function, pain, headache-related disability, and obesity. Methods: We assessed QOL using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 (NEI-VFQ-25), and 10-Item NEI-VFQ-25 Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement. We compared these results with those of previously reported idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) QOL studies. We assessed relationships between QOL and other clinical characteristics. Results: Among 165 participants with IIH (161 women and 4 men with a mean age ± SD of 29.2 ± 7.5 years), vision-specific QOL scores were reduced compared with published values for disease-free controls. Scores of participants were comparable to published results for patients with multiple sclerosis and a history of optic neuritis. A multiple linear regression model for the NEI-VFQ-25 composite score found that perimetric mean deviation in the best eye, visual acuity in the worst eye, visual symptoms, and pain symptoms (headache, neck pain), but not obesity, were independently associated with QOL. Conclusions: IIH affects QOL at time of diagnosis even in patients with mild visual impairment. Vision-specific QOL in patients with newly diagnosed IIH may be as decreased as that for patients with other neuro-ophthalmic disorders. IIH treatment should target visual loss and other symptoms of increased intracranial pressure associated with reduced QOL. Reduced QOL does not simply reflect obesity, an underlying IIH risk factor. PMID:25995055

  4. Intracranial benign fibrous histiocytoma mimicking parasagittal meningioma: report of two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baoshi; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanwei; You, Gan; Wang, Jiangfei; Wang, Junmei; Jiang, Zhongli; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Primary benign fibrous histiocytoma involving the central nervous system is an exceedingly rare tumor with most cases originating from the dura or parenchymal tissue. Diagnosis of primary benign fibrous histiocytoma is difficult due to its confusing histopathological characteristics. Two cases of primary intracranial benign fibrous histiocytoma mimicking parasagittal meningioma are presented in this report. Both tumors were gross totally resected and the patients showed no evidence of recurrence at follow-up of 12 months. The clinical features and prognosis of this rare tumor that were reported previously in the literature were also reviewed. Histopathological examination coupled with immunohistochemical staining is proved to be the convincing diagnostic method for the primary benign fibrous histiocytoma. Surgical resection is the recommendation for the therapy of the tumor. PMID:26617915

  5. Progressive intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion in a fatal case of cerebral aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report a case of cerebral aspergilloma in a 25-year-old immunoincompetent man admitted to a general intensive care unit. Monitoring of intracranial pressure was instigated and revealed hour-long epochs of severe intracranial hypertension, despite a normal opening pressure, with decreases in cerebral perfusion pressure. We documented that this was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion by transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The present case illustrates that severe intracranial hypertension may evolve despite a normal opening pressure; it furthermore shows that continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure may be used to predict changes in cerebral haemodynamics in critically ill patients with neuroinfection. PMID:24907204

  6. Tonsillar Herniation After Lumbar Puncture in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Borire, Adeniyi A; Hughes, Andrew R; Lueck, Christian J

    2015-09-01

    A 30-year-old woman with coexisting renal tubular acidosis and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), treated with acetazolamide, experienced coning (cerebellar tonsillar herniation) after a lumbar puncture (LP). Brain magnetic resonance imaging at initial diagnosis of IIH showed minor tonsillar descent and computed tomographic venography revealed hypoplasia of the left transverse sinus. The patient previously had three uneventful LPs, all of which showed high opening pressures and normal cerebrospinal fluid composition. In retrospect, it was noted that her serum bicarbonate had fallen to 9 mmol/L (normal: 22-28 mm/L) 1 week before the LP. We hypothesize that the combination of cerebral edema (due to worsening metabolic acidosis), poor venous drainage, and preexisting minor tonsillar descent contributed to her post-LP coning. PMID:25786203

  7. Evolving evidence in adult idiopathic intracranial hypertension: pathophysiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Susan P; Ali, Fizzah; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Botfield, Hannah; Friedman, Deborah I; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare but important disease associated with significant morbidity. There is an expected rise in prevalence in line with the escalating global burden of obesity. Modern revisions in the terminology and diagnostic criteria for IIH help guide clinicians in investigations and researchers in standardising recruitment criteria for clinical trials. The pathophysiology of IIH is incompletely characterised; suggested underpinning mechanisms include the role of cerebrospinal fluid regulation as well as metabolic and endocrinological perspectives. Recent treatment trials are providing insights into the management but debate still surrounds key areas in treatment. This review will provide an up-to-date discussion on the potential pathogenic mechanisms and management of IIH. PMID:26888960

  8. [Intracranial hypertension in severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Blanc, P L; Bedock, B; Jay, S; Martin, A; Marc, J M

    1994-11-19

    We observed two cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma and shock. In one case, coma was present at admission and in the second occurred within 15 hours. In both cases, intracranial hypertension was confirmed with an extradural captor. These findings are in agreement with observations of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Clinical data suggest that brain oedema may occur after a latency period but that clinical expression is much more rare, perhaps favoured by treatment (excessive rehydratation, alkalinization, too sharp drop in blood glucose level). In our cases, despite major fluid infusion, shock persisted requiring norepinephrine. This shock could have been the expression of the severe ketoacidosis or have resulted from an underlying infection. In case of sudden onset coma, a regularly encountered manifestation of brain oedema, respiratory assistance and mannitol infusion must be instituted rapidly. With this type of management, it should be possible to improve the severe prognosis of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:7899292

  9. Intracranial hypertension: A rare presentation of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Praveen; Nair, Anishkumar; Cherian, Ajith; Sibi, N. S.; Kumar, Ashwini

    2010-01-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with bilateral papilledema, growth retardation and absent secondary sexual characters. He had a past history of fever, headache and fatigue of 6 months duration. The diagnosis of intracranial hypertension (IH) was confirmed by an increased intracranial pressure and normal neuroimaging studies of the brain, except for partial empty sella, prominent perioptic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and buckling of optic nerves. Evaluation showed erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 150 mm/hr, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti dsDNA and anti ribosomal P protein. Renal biopsy revealed diffuse segmental proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) class IV S (A) confirming the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Treatment of LN with intravenous pulse methyl prednisolone and cyclophosphamide was effective in normalizing the CSF pressure, resulting in express and dramatic resolution of symptomatology. In a case of IH, SLE must be considered. IH, growth retardation and absence of sexual characters may be presenting manifestations of a chronic systemic inflammatory disease like SLE. These manifestations may act as a pointer to associated advanced grades of LN, which can be totally asymptomatic and missed without a renal biopsy. PMID:21559160

  10. Intracranial idiopathic hypertension: 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, D; Curone, M; Erbetta, A; Farago', G; Bianchi-Marzoli, S; Ciasca, P; Bussone, G; Chiapparini, L

    2014-05-01

    Standard guidelines for ongoing management, as well as definitive data about the long-term course of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are not available. The aim of this study was to compare several clinical and instrumental variables as assessed at the time of diagnosis and then after 1 year in a sample of IIH patients. A total of 21 patients were studied. Our results confirmed that headache and TVO are the most frequent symptoms in IIH patients, and that overweight is a very common feature. A trend towards a favorable outcome in patients followed for 1 year and treated by usual medical therapy was found: intracranial pressure was lower at follow-up; improvement of headache and transient visual obscurations, as well as of papilledema, was reported in most patients. On the other hand, neuroradiological findings (such as empty sella, perioptic subarachnoid space distension, narrowing of the transverse sinuses) were substantially stable at follow. These findings may be relevant for future research as far as understanding the role of different clinical and instrumental findings as diagnostic items as well as predictors of outcome in IIH. PMID:24867861

  11. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Polk, J. D.; Tarver, W.; Gibson, C. R.; Sargsyan, A.; Taddeo, T.; Alexander, D.; Otto, C.

    2010-01-01

    What is the risk? Given that astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic astronauts have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts have some degree of increased intracranial pressure (ICP; intracranial hypertension), and that those susceptible (via eye architecture, anatomy, narrow optic disc) have a high likelihood of developing papilledema (optic disc edema, globe flattening), choroidal folds, and/or hyperopic shifts and that the degree of edema may determine long-term or permanent vision impairment or loss. Back to back panels on this topic have been developed to address this emerging risk. The first panel will focus on the 6 clinical cases with emphasis on ophthalmic findings and imaging techniques used pre-, in-, and post-flight. The second panel will discuss the operational mitigation and medical requirements, the potential role of CO2 on ISS, and the research approach being developed. In total these back to back panels will explore what is known about this risk, what has been done immediately to address it, and how an integrated research model is being developed.

  12. Probable Levofloxacin-associated Secondary Intracranial Hypertension in a Child With Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Louvina E; Schaaf, H Simon; Solomons, Regan; Willemse, Marianne; Mohamed, Nabil; Baboolal, Sandika O; Hesseling, Anneke C; van Toorn, Ronald; Garcia-Prats, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Fluoroquinolones are a key component of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment. We describe the first reported case of probable levofloxacin-associated intracranial hypertension in a 6-year-old girl with pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The case highlights the potential risk of secondary intracranial hypertension in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients who require prolonged fluoroquinolone therapy and the need for ophthalmologic screening in children with suggestive signs and symptoms. PMID:26974890

  13. Pseudotumor cerebri: What We Have Learned from the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Rachel V; Johnson, Meredith A J; Krohel, Gregory B; Johnson, Lenworth N

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is an unexplained increase in intracranial pressure associated with permanent severe visual loss in 25% of cases and debilitating headaches. The condition is often associated with obesity. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, a large, randomized, collaborative clinical trial, evaluated the efficacy of acetazolamide with weight loss versus placebo with weight loss in participants. Herein, we describe the major components of the clinical trial and discuss its shortcomings. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-05.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27128512

  14. Intracranial Hypertension in Children: Etiologies, Clinical Features, and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Masri, Amira; Jaafar, Amani; Noman, Rasha; Gharaibeh, Almutez; Ababneh, Osama H

    2015-10-01

    This retrospective study aimed to describe the clinical presentations, possible causes, and outcomes of children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension who presented to the authors' clinic. The mean age at onset of symptoms in the authors' cohort of 19 children was 6 years (range: 7 months to 12 years). Most patients (90%) were under 11 years old and (84.2%) symptomatic. The probable cause was identified in 7/19 (37.0%) patients. The most common cause was vitamin D deficiency (26.3%). Other associated probably coincidental comorbidities included sinusitis (5/19, 26.3%), hypophosphatasia (1/19), Pyle disease (1/19), and measles vaccine (1/19). Apart from 2 patients who required lumboperitoneal shunt, the cerebrospinal fluid pressure returned to normal in all patients within a period of 6 weeks to 1 year (average, 5 months). Of those who followed up with the authors' ophthalmologist, 30.7% developed optic atrophy or pallor; 75% of these patients had previous ocular comorbidities. PMID:25762586

  15. The Pupillary Light Reflex in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason C.; Moss, Heather E.; McAnany, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) on rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflexes (PLRs). Methods Pupillary light reflexes elicited by full-field, brief-flash stimuli were recorded in 13 IIH patients and 13 normal controls. Subjects were dark-adapted for 10 minutes and the PLR was recorded in response to short-wavelength flashes (0.001 cd/m2: rod condition; 450 cd/m2: melanopsin condition). Subjects were then exposed to a rod-suppressing field and 10 cd/m2 long-wavelength flashes were presented (cone condition). Pupillary light reflexes were quantified as the maximum transient constriction (rod and cone conditions) and the post-illumination pupil constriction (melanopsin condition), relative to the baseline pupil size. Diagnostic power was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results The IIH patients had significantly smaller PLRs under the melanopsin (P < 0.001) and rod (P = 0.04) paradigms; a trend for reduced cone-mediated PLRs was also found (P = 0.08). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated areas under the curves (AUC) of 0.83 (melanopsin-meditated; P = 0.001), 0.71 (rod-mediated; P = 0.07), and 0.77 (cone-mediated; P = 0.02). The AUC (0.90, P < 0.001), sensitivity (85%), and specificity (85%) were high for ROC analysis performed on the mean of the rod, cone, and melanopsin PLRs. Conclusions Pupillary light reflex reductions in IIH patients indicate compromised RGC function. PLR measurement, particularly under rod- and melanopsin-mediated conditions, may be a useful adjunct to standard clinical measures of visual function in IIH. PMID:26746015

  16. The Photopic Negative Response in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.; Park, Jason C.; McAnany, J. Jason

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the photopic negative response (PhNR) as an index of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Methods. Amplitude and implicit time of the PhNR, as elicited by full-field, brief-luminance flashes, was measured in IIH (n = 10) and visually normal control (n = 15) subjects. Visual function was assessed in IIH subjects using standard automated perimetry mean deviation (SAP-MD) scores. Optic nerve structure was evaluated using the Frisén papilledema grading scale (FPG). Macula ganglion cell complex volume (GCCV) was extracted from optical coherence tomography images to assess RGC loss. Results. Median PhNR amplitude was significantly lower in IIH subjects compared with control subjects (P = 0.015, Mann-Whitney Rank Sum [MW]), but implicit time was similar (P = 0.54, MW). In IIH subjects, PhNR amplitude and SAP-MD were correlated (Pearson's r = 0.78, P = 0.008). Ganglion cell complex volume was correlated with both SAP-MD (r = 0.72, P = 0.019) and PhNR amplitude (r = 0.77, P = 0.009). Multivariate linear regression models demonstrated that the correlation between GCCV and PhNR amplitude was improved by accounting for FPG in the model (r = 0.94, P < 0.0001), but the correlation between GCCV and SAP-MD was not (r = 0.74, P = 0.009). Conclusions. Photopic negative response amplitude, which can be decreased in IIH subjects, correlates well with a clinical measure of visual function (SAP-MD). In multivariate models, it correlated with both an imaging measure of chronic ganglion cell injury (GCCV) and a clinical measure of acute optic nerve head pathology (FPG). Further studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of PhNR as a marker for diagnosis and monitoring of IIH. PMID:26047172

  17. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, polycystic-ovary syndrome, and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Aregawi, Dawit; Goldenberg, Naila; Golnik, Karl C; Sieve, Luann; Wang, Ping

    2005-02-01

    We studied thrombophilia, hypofibrinolysis, and polycystic-ovary syndrome (PCOS) in 65 women consecutively referred because of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) as a means of better understanding the origin of IIH, with the ultimate goal of developing novel medical therapies for IIH. Our hypothesis: IIH results in part from inadequate drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resulting from thrombotic obstruction to CSF resorption-outflow, favored by thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. We conducted the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and assessed serologic coagulation measures in 65 women (64 of them white) with IIH, PCR in 102 healthy white female controls (72 children, 30 age-matched adults), and serologic measures in the 30 adults. Of the 65 patients, 37 (57%) were found to have PCOS; 16 (43%) were obese (BMI > or = 30 to < 40), and 19 (51%) were extremely obese (BMI > or = 40). Of the 65 women with IIH, 25 (38%) were homozygous for the thrombophilic C677T MTHFR mutation, compared with 14% of controls (14/102) ( P = .0002). Thrombophilic high concentrations of factor VIII (>150%) were present in 9 of 65 (14%) IIH cases, compared with 0 of 30 controls (0%) (Fisher's p [p f ] = .053). An increased concentration of lipoprotein A (> or = 35 mg/dL), associated with hypofibrinolysis, was present in 19 of 65 IIH cases (29%), compared with 3 of 30 controls (10%) (p f = .039). IIH occurred in 18 of 65 IIH patients taking estrogen-progestin contraceptives (28%), in 6 patients taking hormone-replacement therapy (9%), and in 5 pregnant subjects (8%). We speculate that PCOS, associated with obesity and extreme obesity, is a treatable promoter of IIH. We also speculate that if thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis and subsequent thrombosis are associated with reduced CSF resorption in the arachnoid villi of the brain, thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis-often exacerbated by thrombophilic exogenous estrogens, pregnancy, or the paradoxical hyperestrogenemia of PCOS-are treatable

  18. [Advances in application of non-invasive ophthalmologic technologies in idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Xie, Lindan; Zhang, Xuxiang

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a common neuro-ophthalmologic disorder which leads to significant visual impairment. Clinically, visual manifestation secondary to increased intracranial hypertension generally shows papilledema and the progressive visual impairment subsequently. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion. The methods include lumber puncture (LP), laboratory tests and imaging examination. However, those methods do limit in evaluation and follow-up in IIH. Currently, with the development of diagnostic technology in ophthalmology, Optical Coherence Tomography and B-scan ultrasound have been employed to estimate intracranial hypertension not only in early diagnosis, but also in long-term follow-up examination. The goal of this review is to sumarize the value of various ophthalmologic methods in evaluation and management of IIH. PMID:26696582

  19. Visual Outcome and Recurrence Rate in Children With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Sarit; Shahar, Eli; Schif, Aharon; Yehudian, Shawn

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the visual outcome and recurrence rate of idiopathic intracranial hypertension in children. The study included 68 patients who were diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension according to the modified Dandy criteria. Permanent visual impairment was rare. Three percent remained with mild visual impairment, 4% with minimal visual field defects, and only 1 patient had severe visual impairment. However, 26% had either a prolonged course of disease or a recurring condition. Higher cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure was the only clinical predictor at presentation (P = .04). Recurrence rate was 18%, and in most cases, the second episode occurred during the first year after remission. There was no significant difference between the group of patients with only 1 episode and the group of patients with more than 1 episode. We suggest long-term follow-up after remission, for at least a year, for all children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. PMID:25713004

  20. A practical approach to, diagnosis, assessment and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Susan P; Markey, Keira A; Benzimra, James D; Jacks, Andrew; Matthews, Tim D; Burdon, Michael A; Sinclair, Alex J

    2014-01-01

    Adult patients who present with papilloedema and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure need urgent multidisciplinary assessment including neuroimaging, to exclude life-threatening causes. Where there is no apparent underlying cause for the raised intracranial pressure, patients are considered to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The incidence of IIH is increasing in line with the global epidemic of obesity. There are controversial issues in its diagnosis and management. This paper gives a practical approach to assessing patients with papilloedema, its investigation and the subsequent management of patients with IIH. PMID:24809339

  1. Over-the-counter self-medication leading to intracranial hypertension in a young lady.

    PubMed

    Ramana Reddy, A M; Prashanth, L K; Sharat Kumar, G G; Chandana, G; Jadav, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Intracranial hypertension (idiopathic-IIH and secondary) is a potentially treatable condition. Although various factors such as female gender and obesity, certain drugs have been implicated as risk factors for IIH, there remains a lack of clarity in the exact causal-effect relationship. In India, self-medication by obtaining drugs over the counter due to lack of adequate drug regulation and ignorance of the public is a very common practice with a potential for severe adverse effects. We present a case of a young lady who has developed intracranial hypertension possibly due to self-medication with steroids and cyproheptadine, obtained over the counter. PMID:25288841

  2. Bibrachial amyotrophy and ventral spinal cyst associated with myelomalacia and intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Child, N; McGuinness, B; Kilfoyle, D

    2014-03-01

    It has been recently recognised that patients with ventral intraspinal fluid collections secondary to cerebrospinal fluid leaks can present with bibrachial amyotrophy or mimic Hirayama disease. Here we present two further patients that expand the clinical spectrum of this disorder to include association with myelomalacia and intracranial hypertension. PMID:24100111

  3. Pediatric and adult vision restoration after optic nerve sheath decompression for idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Thomas A; Meeker, Austin R; Sismanis, Dimitrios N; Carruth, Bryant P

    2016-06-01

    To compare presentations of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and efficacy of optic nerve sheath decompression between adult and pediatric patients, a retrospective cohort study was completed All idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients undergoing optic nerve sheath decompression by one surgeon between 1991 and 2012 were included. Pre-operative and post-operative visual fields, visual acuity, color vision, and optic nerve appearance were compared between adult and pediatric (<18 years) populations. Outcome measures included percentage of patients with complications or requiring subsequent interventions. Thirty-one adults (46 eyes) and eleven pediatric patients (18 eyes) underwent optic nerve sheath decompression for vision loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Mean deviation on visual field, visual acuity, color vision, and optic nerve appearance significantly improved across all subjects. Pre-operative mean deviation was significantly worse in children compared to adults (p=0.043); there was no difference in mean deviation post-operatively (p=0.838). Significantly more pediatric eyes (6) presented with light perception only or no light perception than adult eyes (0) (p=0.001). Pre-operative color vision performance in children (19%) was significantly worse than in adults (46%) (p=0.026). Percentage of patients with complications or requiring subsequent interventions did not differ between groups. The consistent improvement after surgery and low rate of complications suggest optic nerve sheath decompression is safe and effective in managing vision loss due to adult and pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Given the advanced pre-operative visual deficits seen in children, one might consider a higher index of suspicion in diagnosing, and earlier surgical intervention in treating pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension. PMID:27163674

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Lumboperitoneal Shunt for Fulminant Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Chandra, Ronil V; Gutman, Matthew; Ligtermoet, Matthew; Seneviratne, Udaya; Kempster, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with severe visual loss from fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Her lumbar puncture opening pressure was 97 cm H2O. Soon after lumboperitoneal shunt surgery, she had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frontal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and neuroimaging findings consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We hypothesize that an abrupt drop in intracranial pressure after lumboperitoneal shunting led to maladjustment of cerebral vascular autoregulation, which caused SAH and PRES. PMID:26919070

  5. Endovascular Interventions for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and Venous Tinnitus: New Horizons.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ferdinand K; Abruzzo, Todd; Ansari, Sameer A

    2016-05-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus from intracranial venous abnormalities is an uncommon cause of pulse synchronous tinnitus. Endovascular therapies may have applications in many of these disease conditions. They have the advantage of being minimally invasive and may selectively eliminate the site of turbulence. Venous stenting has been used successfully to treat venous stenoses with low complication rates and high success rates in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension though randomized controlled data are lacking. Careful exclusion of other causes of tinnitus should be performed before consideration for surgical or endovascular treatment of presumed causative lesions of venous tinnitus. PMID:27154610

  6. [Characteristic neurological features, differential diagnostic criteria and medicinal treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Willenborg, K-D; Nacimiento, W

    2015-10-01

    Persistent headache and loss of visual acuity combined with papilledema are the predominant symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The clinical signs are not different from those seen in other diseases with elevated intracranial pressure. To differentiate primary and secondary forms of increased intracranial pressure neuroimaging procedures and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are absolutely essential according to national and international guidelines. Lumbar puncture reveals an elevated opening pressure in cases of IIH as the only pathological finding. Treatment options are serial lumbar punctures combined with body weight reduction as well as medication with carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as acetazolamide and topiramate or diuretic therapy with furosemide. In some patients surgical options, e.g. optic nerve sheath fenestration, CSF shunting procedures including ventriculoperitoneal and lumboperitoneal shunt systems and bariatric surgery also have to be considered. In recent years modern neuroradiological procedures have also been applied (e.g. venous stenting in cases of sinus obstruction) in some centers. PMID:26377103

  7. CO2 Effects in Space: Relationship to Intracranial Hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 on Earth and in space. The effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 are experienced in almost all bodily systems. In space some of the effects are heightened due to the fluid shifts to the thorax and head. This fluid shift results in increased intracranial pressure, congested cerebral circulation, increased Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) and Intravenous dilatation. The mechanism of the effect of CO2 on CBF is diagrammed, as is the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) production. A listing of Neuroendocrine targets is included.

  8. [Efficiency of high-volume hemofiltration in patients with severe sepsis and intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Musaeva, T S; Berdnikov, A P; Goncharenko, S I; Denisova, E A

    2014-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study in 68 patients (144 procedures) with severe sepsis and intracranial hypertension measured by the pressure in the central retinal vein. The patients underwent high-volume hemofiltration (HV-HF) for extrarenal indications. Increased pressure in the central retinal vein was accompanied by critical points of cerebral perfusion pressure and the growth of neurological deficit with inhibition level of consciousness to coma 1. In this case, IHV-HF may be associated with the formation of the critical points of cerebral perfihsion and severe disorders of microcirculation and the lack of resolution of tissue hypoperfusion. In case of intracranial hypertension IHV-HF is not effective in the category of patients where there is a combination ΔpCO2 > 5.9 mm Hg level and GCS <10 points. PMID:25831703

  9. REOPERATION FOR INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN TWIST1 CONFIRMED SAETHRE-CHOTZEN SYNDROME: A 15 YEAR REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Roger H; Ul-Haq, Ehtesham; Wilkie, Andrew OM; Jayamohan, Jayaratnam; Richards, Peter G; Johnson, David; Lester, Tracy; Wall, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Background Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) is a syndromic craniosynostosis defined by a genetic mutation affecting the TWIST1 gene on chromosome 7p21. SCS is typically associated with uni- or bi-coronal synostosis, eyelid ptosis, dysmorphic external ears and other variable facial and limb abnormalities. Surgical management of the craniosynostosis addresses the calvarial deformity and may relieve or reduce risk of intracranial hypertension. The aim of this study was to assess surgical intervention, with particular consideration of reoperation rate for intracranial hypertension, in SCS patients. Method A retrospective casenote analysis was performed on all patients with a confirmed TWIST1 gene abnormality, who attended the Oxford Craniofacial Unit over a 15-year period. Each patient’s mutation and clinical features were recorded. Surgical intervention and sequelae were examined in greater detail. Results Thirty-four patients with genetically confirmed SCS were identified. All had craniosynostosis (bicoronal 76%, unicoronal 18%, bicoronal and sagittal 6%), and the majority had eyelid ptosis, low frontal hairline and external ear anomalies. Thirty-one cases had received surgical intervention. Nine of 26 patients (35%) with minimum 12 month follow-up after primary intervention, and 8 of 19 patients (42%) with minimum 5 year follow-up, developed intracranial hypertension necessitating secondary calvarial surgery. Conclusions Despite standard surgical intervention, patients with SCS have a high rate (35 - 42%) of recurrent intracranial hypertension necessitating further surgical expansion. All patients with either bicoronal synostosis or unicoronal synostosis with syndromic features, should be screened for TWIST1 mutations as this confers a greater risk than non-syndromic synostosis of the same sutures. Regular follow-up of SCS patients throughout the childhood years is essential. PMID:19483581

  10. The diagnosis and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and the associated headache

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Yri, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a challenging disorder with a rapid increasing incidence due to a close relation to obesity. The onset of symptoms is often insidious and patients may see many different specialists before the IIH diagnosis is settled. A summary of diagnosis, symptoms, headache characteristics and course, as well as existing evidence of treatment strategies is presented and strategies for investigations and management are proposed. PMID:27366239

  11. Cortical astrogliosis and increased perivascular aquaporin-4 in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eide, Per Kristian; Eidsvaag, Vigdis Andersen; Nagelhus, Erlend A; Hansson, Hans-Arne

    2016-08-01

    The syndrome idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) includes symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and impaired vision, usually in overweight persons. The pathogenesis is unknown. In the present prospective observational study, we characterized the histopathological changes in biopsies from the frontal brain cortical parenchyma obtained from 18 IIH patients. Reference specimens were sampled from 13 patients who underwent brain surgery for epilepsy, tumors or acute vascular diseases. Overnight ICP monitoring revealed abnormal intracranial pressure wave amplitudes in 14/18 IIH patients, who underwent shunt surgery and all responded favorably. A remarkable histopathological observation in IIH patients was patchy astrogliosis defined as clusters of hypertrophic astrocytes enclosing a nest of nerve cells. Distinct astrocyte domains (i.e. no overlap between astrocyte processes) were lacking in most IIH biopsy specimens, in contrast to their prevalence in reference specimens. Evidence of astrogliosis in IIH was accompanied with significantly increased aquaporin-4 (AQP4) immunoreactivity over perivascular astrocytic endfeet, compared to the reference specimens, measured with densitometry. Scattered CD68 immunoreactive cells (activated microglia and macrophages) were recognized, indicative of some inflammation. No apoptotic cells were demonstrable. We conclude that the patchy astrogliosis is a major finding in patients with IIH. We propose that the astrogliosis impairs intracranial pressure-volume reserve capacity, i.e. intracranial compliance, and contributes to the IIH by restricting the outflow of fluid from the cranium. The increased perivascular AQP4 in IIH may represent a compensatory mechanism to enhance brain fluid drainage. PMID:27188961

  12. Space Flight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Ophthalmic Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Charles Robert; Mader, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although physiologic and pathologic changes associated with microgravity exposure have been studied extensively, the effect of this environment on the eye is largely unknown. Over the last several years, NASA s Space Medicine Division has documented astronauts presenting with varying degrees of disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, and hyperopic shifts after long-duration space flight. Methods: Before and after long-duration space flight, six astronauts underwent complete eye examinations to include cycloplegic and/or manifest refraction and fundus photography. Five of these astronauts had Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) performed following their missions. Results: Following exposure to space flight of approximately 6-months duration, six astronauts had neuro-ophthalmic findings. These consisted of disc edema in four astronauts, globe flattening in four astronauts, choroidal folds in four astronauts, cotton wool spots in three astronauts, nerve fiber layer thickening by OCT in five astronauts, and decreased near vision in five astronauts. Four of the astronauts with near vision complaints had a hyperopic shift equal to or greater than + 0.50D between pre- and post-mission spherical equivalent refraction in one or both eyes (range +0.50D to +1.50D). These same four had globe flattening by MRI. Conclusions: The findings we describe may have resulted from a rise in intracranial pressure caused by microgravity fluid shifts, and could represent parts of a spectrum of ocular and cerebral responses to extended microgravity.

  13. Cerebral blood flow autoregulation during intracranial hypertension in hypoxic lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.O.; Backofen, J.E.; Koehler, R.C.; Jones, M.D. Jr.; Traystman, R.J. )

    1987-12-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that hypoxic hypoxia interferes with cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation when intracranial pressure (ICP) is elevated in pentobarbital-anesthetized lambs (3 to 9 days old). Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was lowered stepwise from 73 to 23 mmHg in eight normoxic lambs and from 65 to 31 mmHg in eight other hypoxic lambs by ventricular infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid. In normoxic lambs, CBF measured by microspheres labeled with six different radioisotopes was not significantly changed over this range of CPP. In animals made hypoxic, base-line CBF was twice that of normoxic lambs. CBF was unchanged as CPP was reduced to 31 mmHg. Lower levels of CPP were not attained because a pressor response occurred with further elevations of ICP. No regional decrements in blood flow to cortical arterial watershed areas or to more caudal regions, such as cerebellum, brain stem, or thalamus, were detected with elevated ICP. Cerebral O{sub 2} uptake was similar in both groups and did not decrease when CPP was reduced. These results demonstrate that normoxic lambs have a considerable capacity for effective autoregulation of CBF when ICP is elevated. Moreover, cerebral vasodilation in response to a level of hypoxia approximating that normally seen prenatally does not abolish CBF autoregulation when ICP is elevated during the first postnatal week.

  14. Cisternostomy for Management of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury; Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh; Rezaee, Elahe; Hakiminejad, Hasanali; Tavakoli, Maryam; Sadeghpoor, Tayebe

    2016-01-01

    Main goal in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is control of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy is an accepted technique for control of refractory intracranial hypertension in patients with severe TBI. Because of high complication rate after decompressive craniectomy, new techniques such as basal cisternostomy have developed. We herein report a case of severe TBI in a 13-year-old boy treated by cisternostomy. The patient was admitted following a motor vehicle accident. Brain CT scan showed diffuse brain edema, left frontal contusion and posterior interhemispheric subdural hematoma. The patient underwent ICP monitoring. Subsequently, with 26 mmHg mean-value of ICP, he was treated surgically by cisternostomy technique. A progressive improvement of the neurological conditions in the following hours. After 5 days the boy was discharged and in the 3-months follow-up he was completely recovered. Cisternostomy could be an appropriate alternative to decompressive craniectomy for management of intracranial hypertension in patietns with sever TBI. PMID:27540551

  15. Cisternostomy for Management of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury; Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh; Rezaee, Elahe; Hakiminejad, Hasanali; Tavakoli, Maryam; Sadeghpoor, Tayebe

    2016-07-01

    Main goal in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is control of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy is an accepted technique for control of refractory intracranial hypertension in patients with severe TBI. Because of high complication rate after decompressive craniectomy, new techniques such as basal cisternostomy have developed. We herein report a case of severe TBI in a 13-year-old boy treated by cisternostomy. The patient was admitted following a motor vehicle accident. Brain CT scan showed diffuse brain edema, left frontal contusion and posterior interhemispheric subdural hematoma. The patient underwent ICP monitoring. Subsequently, with 26 mmHg mean-value of ICP, he was treated surgically by cisternostomy technique. A progressive improvement of the neurological conditions in the following hours. After 5 days the boy was discharged and in the 3-months follow-up he was completely recovered. Cisternostomy could be an appropriate alternative to decompressive craniectomy for management of intracranial hypertension in patietns with sever TBI. PMID:27540551

  16. [Progressive Intracranial Hypertension due to Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis Following Mild Head Trauma: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Suto, Yuta; Maruya, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mild head trauma without skull fracture or intracranial hematoma is exceptionally rare. We describe an unusual case of progressive intracranial hypertension due to superior sagittal sinus thrombosis following mild head trauma. A 17-year-old boy presented with nape pain a day after a head blow during a gymnastics competition (backward double somersault). On admission, he showed no neurological deficit. CT scans revealed no skull fractures, and there were no abnormalities in the brain parenchyma. However, his headache worsened day-by-day and he had begun to vomit. Lumbar puncture was performed on Day 6, and the opening pressure was 40 cm of water. After tapping 20 mL, he felt better and the headache diminished for a few hours. MR venography performed on Day 8 revealed severe flow disturbance in the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus with multiple venous collaterals. Because of the beneficial effects of lumbar puncture, we decided to manage his symptoms of intracranial hypertension conservatively with repeated lumbar puncture and administration of glycerol. After 7 days of conservative treatment, his symptoms resolved completely, and he was discharged from the hospital. Follow-up MR venography performed on Day 55 showed complete recanalization of the superior sagittal sinus. The exact mechanism of sinus thrombosis in this case is not clear, but we speculate that endothelial damage caused by shearing stress because of strong rotational acceleration or direct impact to the superior sagittal sinus wall may have initiated thrombus formation. PMID:26136327

  17. Modeling of the acute effects of primary hypertension and hypotension on the hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Coley, Stuart C; Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Frangi, Alejandro F; Marzo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamics is a risk factor in intracranial aneurysms (IA). Hypertension and pharmacologically induced hypotension are common in IA patients. This study investigates how hypertension and hypotension may influence aneurysmal hemodynamics. Images of 23 IAs at typical locations were used to build patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics models. The effects of hypotension and hypertension were simulated through boundary conditions by modulating the normotensive flow and pressure waveforms, in turn produced by a 1D systemic vascular model. Aneurysm location and flow pattern types were used to categorize the influence of hypotension and hypertension on relevant flow variables (velocity, pressure and wall shear stress). Results indicate that, compared to other locations, vertebrobasilar aneurysms (VBA) are more sensitive to flow changes. In VBAs, space-averaged velocity at peak systole increased by 30% in hypertension (16-21% in other locations). Flow in VBAs in hypotension decreased by 20% (10-13% in other locations). Momentum-driven hemodynamic types were also more affected by hypotension and hypertension, than shear-driven types. This study shows how patient-specific modeling can be effectively used to identify location-specific flow patterns in a clinically-relevant study, thus reinforcing the role played by modeling technologies in furthering our understanding of cardiovascular disease, and their potential in future healthcare. PMID:25118666

  18. The translaminar pressure gradient in sustained zero gravity, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, John P; Yu, Dao Yi; Morgan, William H

    2012-12-01

    Papilledema has long been associated with elevated intracranial pressure. Classically, tumors, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and obstructive hydrocephalus have led to an increase in intracranial pressure causing optic nerve head edema and observable optic nerve swelling. Recent reports describe astronauts returning from prolonged space flight on the International Space Station with papilledema (Mader et al., 2011) [1]. Papilledema has not been observed in shorter duration space flight. Other recent work has shown that the difference in intraocular pressure (IOP) and cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFp) may be very important in the pathogenesis of diseases of the optic nerve, especially glaucoma (Berdahl and Allingham, 2009; Berdahl, Allingham, et al., 2008; Berdahl et al., 2008; Ren et al., 2009; Ren et al., 2011) [2-6]. The difference in IOP and CSFp across the lamina cribrosa is known as the translaminar pressure difference (TLPD). We hypothesize that in zero gravity, CSF no longer pools in the caudal spinal column as it does in the upright position on earth. Instead, CSF diffuses throughout the subarachnoid space resulting in a moderate but persistently elevated cranial CSF pressure, including the region just posterior to the lamina cribrosa known as the optic nerve subarachnoid space (ONSAS). This small but chronically elevated CSFp could lead to papilledema when CSFp is greater than the IOP. If the TLPD is the cause of optic nerve head edema in astronauts subjected to prolonged zero gravity, raising IOP and/or orbital pressure may treat this condition and protect astronauts in future space travels from the effect of zero gravity on the optic nerve head. Additionally, the same TLPD concept may offer a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment options of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), glaucoma and other diseases of the optic nerve head. PMID:22981592

  19. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in a Prepubertal Pediatric Japanese Patient Complicated by Severe Papilledema

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Akiko; Ikesugi, Kengo; Kondo, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a rare case of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in a prepubertal pediatric patient. Case Report The patient was an 11-year-old Japanese boy. Initially, an ophthalmologist found severe papilledema, and the patient was diagnosed with IIH. He was unresponsive to conservative therapy, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted in the Neurosurgery Department because the visual impairment was severe. Twelve months after the shunt, the improvement in vision was limited due to optic disc atrophy. Conclusion Ophthalmologists need to be more aware of II, especially in cases with severe papilledema that can lead to permanent reduction of vision. PMID:27065853

  20. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marc E.; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G.; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  1. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  2. Severe visual loss associated with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zamecki, Katherine J; Frohman, Larry P; Turbin, Roger E

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in pregnancy is often responsive to conservative management and usually carries a favorable prognosis. Pregnant patients may be managed with dietary control, corticosteroid therapy, diuretics, and occasionally serial lumbar puncture. We report an unusual case of permanent visual loss due to IIH in pregnancy, requiring aggressive CSF diversion and bilateral optic nerve sheath fenestration after failure to improve with a brief course of medical management and a lumbar puncture. Despite resolution of the papilledema, the subject’s acuity improved only to 20/40 in the right eye and remained no light perception in the left eye. PMID:19668497

  3. Assessment and management of cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Vahid

    2013-10-01

    Acute liver failure is uncommon but not a rare complication of liver injury. It can happen after ingestion of acetaminophen and exposure to toxins and hepatitis viruses. The defining clinical symptoms are coagulopathy and encephalopathy occurring within days or weeks of the primary insult in patients without preexisting liver injury. Acute liver failure is often complicated by multiorgan failure and sepsis. The most life-threatening complications are sepsis, multiorgan failure, and brain edema. The clinical signs of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) are nonspecific except for neurologic deficits in impending brain stem herniation. Computed tomography of the brain is not sensitive enough in gauging intracranial hypertension or ruling out brain edema. Intracranial pressure monitoring, transcranial Doppler, and jugular venous oximetry provide valuable information for monitoring ICP and guiding therapeutic measures in patients with encephalopathy grade III or IV. Osmotic therapy using hypertonic saline and mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and propofol sedation are shown to improve ICPs and stabilize the patient for liver transplantation. In this article, diagnosis and management of hepatic encephalopathy and cerebral edema in patients with acute liver failure are reviewed. PMID:23683564

  4. Multiple hemorrhagic intraparenchymal tumors presenting with fatal intracranial hypertension: A rare manifestation of systemic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Tsukasa; Oya, Soichi; Mori, Harushi; Matsui, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epithelioid hemangioendotheliomas (EHE) is an extremely rare tumor that can arise not only intracranially but also systemically. Its radiological characteristics and the mechanism underlying the multiple organ involvement in EHE are poorly understood. Case Description: A 24-year-old woman with a 7-month history of coughing and blood-stained sputum complained of visual disturbance in the right eye that had persisted for 1-month. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed multiple intraparenchymal masses with low-intensity on MR susceptibility-weighted images with minimal enhancement with gadolinium. Systemic computed tomography revealed multiple nodules in both lungs and the liver. Because her neurological status rapidly deteriorated, brain biopsy of the right frontal mass was performed. The pathological diagnosis was EHE. Over the following 3 months, the patient gradually developed disturbance of consciousness. She died at 4 months after admission because of significant intracranial hypertension. Conclusion: Although intracranial EHEs are extremely rare, they should be included in the differential diagnoses of multiple small-sized masses with low-intensity on MR susceptibility-weighted images. We also emphasize that the systemic involvement of this tumor was more compatible with multicentric development than metastasis. PMID:26539307

  5. Venous sinus stenting is a valuable treatment for fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Rory Goodwin, C; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Radvany, Martin G; Gailloud, Philippe; Moghekar, Abhay; Subramanian, Prem S; Miller, Neil R; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Over the past 10 years, transverse sinus stenting has grown in popularity as a treatment for idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Although promising results have been demonstrated in several reported series, the vast majority of patients in these series have been treated on an elective basis rather than in the setting of fulminant disease with acute visual deterioration. We identified four patients who presented with severe acute vision loss between 2008 and 2012 who were treated with urgent transverse sinus stenting with temporary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion with lumbar puncture or lumbar drain as a bridge to therapy. All patients presented with headache, and this was stable or had improved at last follow-up. Three patients had improvement in some or all visual parameters following stenting, whereas one patient who presented with severe acute vision loss and optic disc pallor progressed to blindness despite successful stenting. We hypothesize that she presented too late in the course of the disease for improvement to occur. Although the management of fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension remains challenging, we believe that transverse sinus stenting, in conjunction with temporary CSF diversion, represents a viable treatment option in the acute and appropriate setting. PMID:25579238

  6. NASA's Spaceflight Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension Research Plan: An accelerated Research Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, Christian; Fogarty, J.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J.

    2010-01-01

    To date six long duration astronauts have experienced in flight visual changes and post flight signs of optic disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, hyperoptic shifts and or raised intracranial pressure. In some cases the changes were transient while in others they are persistent with varying degrees of visual impairment. Given that all astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts develop in-flight idiopathic intracranial hypertension to some degree. Those who are susceptible, have an increased likelihood of developing treatment resistant papilledema resulting in visual impairment and possible long-term vision loss. Such an acquired disability would have a profound mission impact and would be detrimental to the long term health of the astronaut. The visual impairment and increased intracranial pressure phenomenon appears to have multiple contributing factors. Consequently, the working "physiological fault bush" with elevated intracranial pressure at its center, is divided into ocular effects, and CNS and other effects. Some of these variables have been documented and or measured through operational data gathering, while others are unknown, undocumented and or hypothetical. Both the complexity of the problem and the urgency to find a solution require that a unique, non-traditional research model be employed such as the Accelerated Research Collaboration(TM) (ARC) model that has been pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. In the ARC model a single entity facilitates and manages all aspects of the basic, translational, and clinical research, providing expert oversight for both scientific and managerial efforts. The result is a comprehensive research plan executed by a multidisciplinary team and the elimination of stove-piped research. The ARC model emphasizes efficient and effective

  7. Lyme disease-related intracranial hypertension in children: clinical and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Obeid, Rawad; Zuccoli, Giulio; Cleves-Bayon, Catalina; Nowalk, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a tick-borne infection that is endemic to multiple areas of the United States. Patients with LD may present with sign and symptoms of intracranial hypertension (IH). The objective of this study is to evaluate the history, clinical findings, CSF analysis, and brain imaging results in pediatric patients with increased intracranial pressure secondary to LD. A retrospective database search was performed using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 9/10 codes to identify patients diagnosed with LD and IH between 2004 and 2014 at a tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging data for each patient were reviewed. Seven patients met inclusion criteria; mean age was 9.6 years (standard deviation 4.0 years); 4/7 patients were male. Average body mass index was 18.8 kg/m(2) (standard deviation 3.0 kg/m(2)). Fever was present in four patients. Four had a history of LD related erythema migrans. All had elevated CSF opening pressure with leukocytosis and lymphocytic predominance. MRI obtained in six patients showed contrast enhancement of various cranial nerves. Tentorial enhancement was noted in all patients. In addition, patients had widening of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve protrusion, and flattening of the posterior globe consistent with increased intracranial pressure. All patients had resolution of their symptoms after initiation of antibiotic therapy. In endemic areas, LD should be included in the differential of IH. MRI can help distinguish IH due to LD from its idiopathic form due to the presence of tentorial and cranial nerve enhancement in the former in addition to abnormal CSF showing leukocytosis with lymphocyte predominance. PMID:26739381

  8. [Treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension by endovascular improvement of venous drainage of the brain].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pérez, M; Henkes, H

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of any known causative factor. Most patients with IIH respond to weight reduction, repeated lumbar punctures and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as acetazolamide and topiramate to reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production. Despite a number of pathogenetic theories, the cause of IIH remains unknown. With the availability of magnetic resonance (MR) venography and cerebral angiography, venous disease is increasingly being discussed as the etiology of IIH, with a high proportion of patients presenting with nonthrombotic unilateral or bilateral dural venous sinus stenoses. Based on this observation, endovascular stenting of stenotic dural sinuses in patients with IIH has gained popularity. Whether dural venous sinus stenoses are the cause or the consequence of increased ICP is still under debate. In patients with failure of conservative treatment or non-compliance, a more aggressive treatment, such as CSF shunting or surgical optic nerve fenestration, should be performed. For approximately 13 years endovascular stenting of the stenotic sinuses has been used and discussed as an alternative and effective treatment of IIH. Since the first report in 2002, individual cases and case series have been published demonstrating that stents immediately lower the venous pressure gradient, which is associated with clinical improvement. This effect occurs within days or weeks and is permanent in many cases. PMID:26400795

  9. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekharan, Chandrasekharan; Renjith, Sanu Watson; Marzook, Ali; Parvathy, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of headache with episodes of transient blurring of vision, and intermittent fever for 4 weeks. On examination she was conscious and febrile, with multiple annular purpuric skin lesions present over the face and back. Neurological examination revealed a bilaterally extensor plantar response, with bilateral papilloedema. Lumbar puncture yielded clear spinal fluid with a very high opening pressure with a normal biochemistry and cytology. Neuroimaging showed evidence of raised intracranial tension. She was provisionally diagnosed to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and started on anticerebral oedema measures. Despite medication, she continued to be symptomatic. On the sixth day of admission, her antinuclear antibody and antidouble-stranded DNA registered positively in high titres. She was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with IIH and was started on corticosteroids, with dramatic recovery of her symptoms and clinical signs. Reports of SLE, the maiden presentation of which is IIH, are rare in the literature. PMID:23376664

  10. Intracranial hypertension as the primary symptom of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiali; Xu, Lingjia; Yin, Xinzhen; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intracranial hypertension (IH) is a neurological disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure. It is a poorly understood syndrome that most commonly manifests nonspecific symptoms such as stroke-like headache, vision changes, nausea, vomiting, and papilledema. IH has been reported in young cancer patients but never in association with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma. Methods: Here, we discuss the case of an 18-year-old girl with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma in which IH was the primary symptom accompanied by the even rarer symptom of cutaneous metastases. We also present a review of the relevant literature. The patient experienced frequent headaches, vomiting, and blurred vision but showed no abnormal findings on cranial imaging studies. Further examination showed multiple skin nodules on the abdomen. Then pathological and immunohistochemical examination of gastroscopic specimens and the biopsied subcutaneous nodules were done. Results: Pathological and immunohistochemical examination of gastroscopic specimens and the biopsied subcutaneous nodules confirmed gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma with skin metastases. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma primarily presenting IH and accompanied by subcutaneous metastases. This case emphasizes the importance of excluding malignancy from the differential diagnosis of IH. PMID:27583897

  11. Brain Slump Caused by Jugular Venous Stenoses Treated by Stenting: A Hypothesis to Link Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicholas; Trivedi, Rikin; Greenwood, Richard; Pickard, John

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension, of which brain slump is an extreme expression, is caused by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The reason the leak develops in the first place, however, is unknown, and some cases can be very difficult to manage. We describe a patient with severe symptoms of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and brain slump documented by magnetic resonance imaging whose clinical syndrome and structural brain anomaly resolved completely after treatment directed exclusively at improving cranial venous outflow. Diagnostics included computed tomography (CT) venography, catheter venography, and jugular venoplasty. CT venography showed narrowing of both internal jugular veins below the skull base. Catheter venography confirmed that these were associated with pressure gradients. Jugular venoplasty performed on two separate occasions as a clinical test gave temporary respite. Lasting remission (2 years of follow-up) was achieved by stenting the dominant internal jugular vein. These findings and this outcome suggest a mechanism for the development of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that would link it to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and have cranial venous outflow obstruction as the underlying cause. PMID:26251803

  12. Brain Slump Caused by Jugular Venous Stenoses Treated by Stenting: A Hypothesis to Link Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Nicholas; Trivedi, Rikin; Greenwood, Richard; Pickard, John

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension, of which brain slump is an extreme expression, is caused by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The reason the leak develops in the first place, however, is unknown, and some cases can be very difficult to manage. We describe a patient with severe symptoms of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and brain slump documented by magnetic resonance imaging whose clinical syndrome and structural brain anomaly resolved completely after treatment directed exclusively at improving cranial venous outflow. Diagnostics included computed tomography (CT) venography, catheter venography, and jugular venoplasty. CT venography showed narrowing of both internal jugular veins below the skull base. Catheter venography confirmed that these were associated with pressure gradients. Jugular venoplasty performed on two separate occasions as a clinical test gave temporary respite. Lasting remission (2 years of follow-up) was achieved by stenting the dominant internal jugular vein. These findings and this outcome suggest a mechanism for the development of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that would link it to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and have cranial venous outflow obstruction as the underlying cause. PMID:26251803

  13. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

    PubMed Central

    Wibroe, Elisabeth A.; Yri, Hanne M.; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Wibroe, Morten A.; Hamann, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP) of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with IIH. Methods We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred on suspicion of IIH from 2011–2013. Subjects included as patients fulfilled Friedman and Jacobson’s diagnostic criteria for IIH. Individuals in whom intracranial hypertension was refuted were included as controls. Lumbar puncture with ICP measurement was performed at inclusion and repeated for patients after three months of treatment. Osmolality was measured with a Vapor Pressure Osmometer. Results We collected 90 CSF samples from 38 newly diagnosed patients and 28 controls. At baseline 27 IIH-samples and at 3 months follow-up 35 IIH-samples were collected from patients. We found no significant differences in osmolality between 1) patients at baseline and controls (p = 0. 86), 2) patients at baseline and after 3 months treatment (p = 0.97), and 3) patients with normalized pressure after 3 months and their baseline values (p = 0.79). Osmolality in individuals with normal ICP from 6–25 cmH2O (n = 41) did not differ significantly from patients with moderately elevated ICP from 26–45 cmH2O (n = 21) (p = 0.86) and patients with high ICP from 46–70 cmH2O (n = 4) (p = 0.32), respectively. There was no correlation between osmolality and ICP, BMI, age and body height, respectively. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg (± 1 SE, 95% confidence interval 267–272) for both patients and controls. Conclusions CSF osmolality was normal in patients with IIH, and there was no relation to treatment, ICP, BMI, age and body height. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg and constitutes a reference for future studies. Changes in CSF osmolality are not responsible for development of IIH. Other underlying pathophysiological mechanisms must be searched. PMID:26808050

  14. A decreased metabolic clearance rate of aldosterone in benign essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nowaczynski, W.; Kuchel, O.; Genest, J.

    1971-01-01

    Aldosterone secretion rate, metabolic clearance rate, and/or plasma concentration were determined in 16 patients with benign, uncomplicated essential hypertension and compared with those of control subjects. The mean metabolic clearance rate of aldosterone in 10 patients was significantly (P < 0.001) lower (mean 867 liters of plasma/day per m2 ±270 SD) than in a group of 7 healthy subjects (mean 1480 liters/day per m2 ±265 SD). Secretion rates in 13 patients (including the 10 already mentioned) tended to be low (83 ±43 vs. 109 ±54 μg/day) and plasma concentrations tended to be high (13.6 ±4.6 vs. 7.5 ±4.8 ng/100 ml), but neither of these differences was statistically significant. The lower metabolic clearance rate could account for elevated plasma concentrations of aldosterone even when the secretion rate is normal or low. Measurement of secretion rate or urinary excretion only is therefore insufficient to establish the presence and/or mode of evolution of hyperaldosteronism. Failure of the aldosterone secretion to adapt fully to a decreased aldosterone metabolic clearance rate (MCR) could explain the state of relative hyperaldosteronism in patients with benign essential hypertension, even when the secretion rate and the urinary excretion rate are in the normal range. PMID:5116208

  15. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for benign intracranial tumours of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Neda; Seely, Anna; Paul, Eldho; Dally, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We present our experience with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) using 15 fractions to treat benign conditions of the cavernous sinus (CS) and emphasise the outcome in terms of cranial nerve (CN) function and toxicity for long term safety and efficacy. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 112 patients with benign tumours of the CS treated with HSRT between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2009. While all tumours involved the CS, a separate analysis was undertaken for meningiomas and pituitary adenomas. The median follow-up was 77 months (range: 2.3-177). Fifty-seven patients (51%) had a diagnosis of meningioma and 55 (49%) had pituitary adenomas. Prior to HSRT, 82 patients (73%) underwent microsurgery. The median tumour volume was 6.6 cm(3) for meningiomas and 3.4 cm(3) for pituitary adenomas (interquartile range: 2.8-7.9), and the mean prescribed dose was 38 Gy (range: 37.5-40.0) to the tumour margin, delivered in 15 fractions. After HSRT, 57% of all preexisting cranial neuropathies either resolved or improved and 38% remained stable, whereas 5% deteriorated. The diagnosis of meningioma was the only variable associated with recovery of cranial neuropathy (p<0.001). Permanent CN complications occurred in three patients (3%). The 5 and 10 year actuarial freedom from progression for patients with meningiomas was 98% and 93%, respectively, and for patients with pituitary adenomas this was 96% and 96%, respectively. We demonstrate low rates of CN morbidity after HSRT and the possibility of resolution or improvement in CN function for common histologies involving the CS. PMID:26113003

  16. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Sinus Stenosis in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Complications, Neurological Outcomes, and Radiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Wang, Tony; Ding, Dale; Durst, Christopher R.; Crowley, R. Webster; Chalouhi, Nohra; Hasan, David M.; Dumont, Aaron S.; Jabbour, Pascal; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may result in a chronic debilitating disease. Dural venous sinus stenosis with a physiologic venous pressure gradient has been identified as a potential etiology in a number of IIH patients. Intracranial venous stenting has emerged as a potential treatment alternative. Methods. A systematic review was carried out to identify studies employing venous stenting for IIH. Results. From 2002 to 2014, 17 studies comprising 185 patients who underwent 221 stenting procedures were reported. Mean prestent pressure gradient was 20.1 mmHg (95% CI 19.4–20.7 mmHg) with a mean poststent gradient of 4.4 mmHg (95% CI 3.5–5.2 mmHg). Complications occurred in 10 patients (5.4%; 95% CI 4.7–5.4%) but were major in only 3 (1.6%). At a mean clinical follow-up of 22 months, clinical improvement was noted in 130 of 166 patients with headaches (78.3%; 95% CI 75.8–80.8%), 84 of 89 patients with papilledema (94.4%; 95% CI 92.1–96.6%), and 64 of 74 patients with visual symptoms (86.5%; 95% CI 83.0–89.9%). In-stent stenosis was noted in six patients (3.4%; 95% CI 2.5–4.3%) and stent-adjacent stenosis occurred in 19 patients (11.4%; 95% CI 10.4–12.4), resulting in restenting in 10 patients. Conclusion. In IIH patients with venous sinus stenosis and a physiologic pressure gradient, venous stenting appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option. Further studies are necessary to determine the long-term outcomes and the optimal management of medically refractory IIH. PMID:26146651

  17. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid: an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2016-05-01

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors that may play a protective role in glaucoma. β-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to increase by chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in animals with experimentally induced ocular hypertension and to cause retinal ganglion cell death, pointing to similarities in molecular cell death mechanisms between glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have reported that intracranial pressure is higher in patients with ocular hypertension compared with controls, giving rise to the idea that elevated intracranial pressure may provide a protective effect for the optic nerve by decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. The speculation that the higher intracranial pressure reported in ocular hypertension patients may protect against glaucoma mainly through a lower trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference remains at least questionable. Here, we present an alternative viewpoint, according to which the protective effect of higher intracranial pressure could be due, at least in part, to a pressure-independent mechanism, namely faster cerebrospinal fluid production leading to increased cerebrospinal fluid turnover with enhanced removal of potentially neurotoxic waste products that accumulate in the optic nerve. This suggests a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, may be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including β-amyloid. If confirmed, then strategies to improve cerebrospinal fluid flow are reasonable and could provide a new therapeutic approach for stopping the neurotoxic β-amyloid pathway in glaucoma. PMID:26691953

  18. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma: Long-term experience and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie . E-mail: stefanie_milker-zabel@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Zabel, Angelika; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To analyze our long-term experience and prognostic factors after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma. Methods and materials: Between January 1985 and December 2001, 317 patients with a median age of 55.7 years were treated with FSRT for intracranial meningioma. The tumor distribution was World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 1 in 48.3%, WHO Grade 2 in 8.2%, and unknown in 43.5%. Of the 317 patients, 97 underwent RT as their primary treatment, 79 underwent postoperative RT (subtotal resection in 38 and biopsy only in 41), and 141 were treated for recurrent disease. The median target volume was 33.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 1.0-412.6 cm{sup 3}). The median total dose was 57.6 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction five times weekly. Results: The median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 1.2-14.3 years). The overall local tumor control rate was 93.1% (295 of 317). Of the 317 patients, 72 had a partial response on CT/MRI and 223 (70.4%) remained stable. At a median of 4.5 years after FSRT, 22 patients (6.9%) had local tumor progression on MRI. Local tumor failure was significantly greater in patients with WHO Grade 2 meningioma (p < 0.002) than in patients with WHO Grade 1 or unknown histologic features. Patients treated for recurrent meningioma showed a trend toward decreased progression-free survival compared with patients treated with primary therapy, after biopsy, or after subtotal resection (p < 0.06). Patients with a tumor volume >60 cm{sup 3} had a recurrence rate of 15.5% vs. 4.3% for those with a tumor volume of {<=}60 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001). In 42.9% of the patients, preexisting neurologic deficits improved. Worsening of preexisting neurologic symptoms occurred in 8.2%. Eight patients developed new clinical symptoms, such as reduced vision, trigeminal neuralgia, and intermittent tinnitus located at the side of the irradiated meningioma after FSRT. Conclusion: These data have demonstrated that FSRT is an

  19. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF. PMID:26928128

  20. Refractory nausea and vomiting in the setting of well-controlled idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Dennis L; Rosenbaum, Rachel A; Diaz, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 27-year-old woman with a history of recurrent nausea and vomiting in the setting of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) was admitted for control of unremitting nausea and vomiting. Initial antiemetic therapy included optimisation of IIH therapy by titrating acetazolamide, in addition to using ondansetron and metoclopramide as needed, with minimal relief. She was ultimately treated with palonosetron with complete resolution of her acute nausea. Nausea, often treated with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, approved for perioperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea, are used off-label to treat nausea and vomiting outside of those settings. The efficacy of different regimens has been compared in the literature and continues to remain controversial. When choosing from different 5-HT3 antagonists there are other considerations, in addition to efficacy to consider: dosing schedule, half-life, time of onset, duration and cost-to-benefit ratio, and although one 5-HT3 antagonist may not have been effective, another one may be. In our case palonosetron, with a significantly longer half-life than other 5-HT3 antagonists, was effective in resolving nausea when compared with the more commonly used ondansetron. PMID:24895391

  1. Baseline Visual Field Findings in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT)

    PubMed Central

    Keltner, John L.; Johnson, Chris A.; Cello, Kimberly E.; Wall, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize visual field (VF) loss at the baseline visit and to evaluate VF quality control (QC) procedures in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT). Methods. The Visual Field Reading Center (VFRC) evaluated 660 baseline VFs (1320 hemifields) from 165 enrolled patients. Three readers independently classified each superior and inferior hemifield and identified any abnormalities. A subset (20%) of the hemifields was reread to evaluate within- and between-reader agreements. The QC system addressed test parameters, patient data, and shipment errors. Results. The majority (60%) of the baseline hemifields consisted of localized nerve fiber bundle-type VF loss. Approximately one-third (31.5%) of all the classifications consisted of partial arcuate defects combined with an enlarged blind spot, making this the most common type of hemifield classification. Inferior hemifield loss was greater than superior loss for both study and nonstudy eyes. Reader agreements were >90% for both inferior and superior hemifields for two out of three readers. Test–retest reliability agreement for individual readers was 95% for both hemifields. There were few QC errors with only 5.48 error points per 100-point VF. Conclusions. The most common type of IIHTT baseline hemifield abnormality was a localized nerve fiber bundle-like defect. Localized inferior hemifield loss was more common than superior hemifield loss. Quality control and within- and between-reader agreement were excellent for the IIHTT (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639). PMID:24781936

  2. Controversies: Optic nerve sheath fenestration versus shunt placement for the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Spitze, Arielle; Lam, Peter; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) has been increasing in prevalence in the past decade, following the obesity epidemic. When medical treatment fails, surgical treatment options must be considered. However, controversy remains as to which surgical procedure is the preferred surgical option – optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting – for the long-term treatment of this syndrome. Purpose: To provide a clinical update of the pros and cons of ONSF versus shunt placement for the treatment of IIH. Design: This was a retrospective review of the current literature in the English language indexed in PubMed. Methods: The authors conducted a PubMed search using the following terms: Idiopathic IIH, pseudotumor cerebri, ONSF, CSF shunts, vetriculo-peritoneal shunting, and lumbo-peritoneal shunting. The authors included pertinent and significant original articles, review articles, and case reports, which revealed the new aspects and updates in these topics. Results: The treatment of IIH remains controversial and lacks randomized controlled clinical trial data. Treatment of IIH rests with the determination of the severity of IIH-related visual loss and headache. Conclusion: The decision for ONSF versus shunting is somewhat institution and surgeon dependent. ONSF is preferred for patients with visual symptoms whereas shunting is reserved for patients with headache. There are positive and negative aspects of both procedures, and a prospective, randomized, controlled trial is needed (currently underway). This article will hopefully be helpful in allowing the reader to make a more informed decision until that time. PMID:25449938

  3. Visual Field Outcomes for the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT)

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael; Johnson, Chris A.; Cello, Kimberly E.; Zamba, K. D.; McDermott, Michael P.; Keltner, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) showed that acetazolamide provided a modest, significant improvement in mean deviation (MD). Here, we further analyze visual field changes over the 6-month study period. Methods Of 165 subjects with mild visual loss in the IIHTT, 125 had perimetry at baseline and 6 months. We evaluated pointwise linear regression of visual sensitivity versus time to classify test locations in the worst MD (study) eye as improving or not; pointwise changes from baseline to month 6 in decibels; and clinical consensus of change from baseline to 6 months. Results The average study eye had 36 of 52 test locations with improving sensitivity over 6 months using pointwise linear regression, but differences between the acetazolamide and placebo groups were not significant. Pointwise results mostly improved in both treatment groups with the magnitude of the mean change within groups greatest and statistically significant around the blind spot and the nasal area, especially in the acetazolamide group. The consensus classification of visual field change from baseline to 6 months in the study eye yielded percentages (acetazolamide, placebo) of 7.2% and 17.5% worse, 35.1% and 31.7% with no change, and 56.1% and 50.8% improved; group differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions In the IIHTT, compared to the placebo group, the acetazolamide group had a significant pointwise improvement in visual field function, particularly in the nasal and pericecal areas; the latter is likely due to reduction in blind spot size related to improvement in papilledema. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:26934136

  4. Photographic Reading Center of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT): Methods and Baseline Results

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, William S.; Wall, Michael; McDermott, Michael P.; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Feldon, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the methods used by the Photographic Reading Center (PRC) of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) and to report baseline assessments of papilledema severity in participants. Methods. Stereoscopic digital images centered on the optic disc and the macula were collected using certified personnel and photographic equipment. Certification of the camera system included standardization and calibration using a model eye. Lay readers assessed disc photos of all eyes using the Frisén grade and performed quantitative measurements of papilledema. Frisén grades by PRC were compared with site investigator clinical grades. Spearman rank correlations were used to quantify associations among disc features and selected clinical variables. Results. Frisén grades according to the PRC and site investigator's grades, matched exactly in 48% of the study eyes and 42% of the fellow eyes and within one grade in 94% of the study eyes and 92% of the fellow eyes. Frisén grade was strongly correlated (r > 0.65, P < 0.0001) with quantitative measures of disc area. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure was weakly associated with Frisén grade and disc area determinations (r ≤ 0.31). Neither Frisén grade nor any fundus feature was associated with perimetric mean deviation. Conclusions. In a prospective clinical trial, lay readers agreed reasonably well with physicians in assessing Frisén grade. Standardization of camera systems enhanced consistency of photographic quality across study sites. Images were affected more by sensors with poor dynamic range than by poor resolution. Frisén grade is highly correlated with quantitative assessment of disc area. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:26024112

  5. Increased Risk of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients With Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Te; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Huang, Wei-Chun; Liou, Wen-Shiung; Tang, Pei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) may be a major predictor of pregnancy-associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). However, the relationship between PIH and long-term ICH risk is unknown. The objective of the study was to determine the association between PIH and ICH and to identify the predictive risk factors. Patients with newly diagnosed PIH were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. PIH patients were divided into gestational hypertension (GH) and preeclampsia groups. The 2 groups were separately compared with matched cohorts of patients without PIH based on age and date of delivery. The occurrence of ICH was evaluated in both cohorts. The overall observational period was from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2013. Among the 23.3 million individuals registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database, 28,346 PIH patients, including 7390 with GH and 20,956 with preeclampsia, were identified. The incidences of ICH were increased in both groups (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 3.72 in the GH group, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.63–3.81, P < 0.0001 and IRR = 8.21 in the preeclampsia group, 95% CI 8.12–8.31, P < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, according to the results of stratification of follow-up years, both groups were associated with a highest risk of ICH at 1 to 5 years of follow-up (IRR = 11.99, 95% CI 11.16–12.88, P < 0.0001 and IRR = 21.83, 95% CI 21.24–22.44, P < 0.0001, respectively). After adjusting for age, parity, severity of PIH, number of PIH occurrences, gestational age, and comorbidities in the multivariate survival analysis using Cox regression model, age ≥30 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, 95% CI 1.27–3.10, P = 0.0026), patients with preeclampsia (HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.22–3.90, P = 0.0089), multiple PIH occurrences (HR 4.08, 95% CI 1.85–9.01, P = 0.0005), hypertension (HR 4.51, 95% CI 1.89–10.74, P = 0.0007), and obesity (HR 7.21, 95

  6. Impact of CO2 on Intracranial Hypertension in Spaceflight. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk [Part 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Polk, James D.; Tarver, William J.; Gibson, Charles R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Taddeo, Terrance A.; Alexander, David J.; Otto, Christian A.

    2010-01-01

    A. CO2 - Acute: Given the history of uneven removal of CO2 from spacecraft areas, there is a history of acute illness that impacts short-term health and performance. 1) Acute CO2 symptoms occur in space flight due to a combination of CO2 scrubbing limitations, microgravity-related lack of convection, and possibly interaction with microgravity-related physiological changes. 2) Reported symptoms mainly include headaches, malaise, and lethargy. Symptoms are treatable with analgesics, rest, temporarily increasing scrubbing capability, and breathing oxygen. This does not treat the underlying pathology. 3)ld prevent occurrence of symptoms. B. CO2 - Chronic: Given prolonged exposure to elevated CO2 levels, there is a history that the long-term health of the crew is impacted. 1) Chronic CO2 exposures occur in space flight due to a combination of CO2 scrubbing limitations and microgravity-related lack of convection, with possible contribution from microgravity-related physiological changes. 2) Since acute symptoms are experienced at levels significantly lower than expected, there are unidentified long-term effects from prolonged exposure to elevated CO2 levels on orbit. There have been long term effects seen terrestrially and research needed to further elucidate long term effects on orbit. 3) Recommended disposition: Research required to further elucidate long term effects. In particular, elucidation of the role of elevated CO2 on various levels of CO2 vasodilatation of intracranial blood vessels and its potential contribution to elevation of intracranial pressure.

  7. Effect of Acetazolamide on Visual Function in Patients With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and Mild Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Acetazolamide is commonly used to treat idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), but there is insufficient information to establish an evidence base for its use. OBJECTIVE To determine whether acetazolamide is beneficial in improving vision when added to a low-sodium weight reduction diet in patients with IIH and mild visual loss. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study of acetazolamide in 165 participants with IIH and mild visual loss who received a low-sodium weight-reduction diet. Participants were enrolled at 38 academic and private practice sites in North America from March 2010 to November 2012 and followed up for 6 months (last visit in June 2013). All participants met the modified Dandy criteria for IIH and had a perimetric mean deviation (PMD) between −2 dB and −7 dB. The mean age was 29 years and all but 4 participants were women. INTERVENTIONS Low-sodium weight-reduction diet plus the maximally tolerated dosage or acetazolamide (up to 4 g/d) or matching placebo for 6 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The planned primary outcome variable was the change in PMD from baseline to month 6 in the most affected eye, as measured by Humphrey Field Analyzer. Perimetric mean deviation is a measure of global visual field loss (mean deviation from age-corrected normal values), with a range of 2 to −32 dB; larger negative values indicate greater vision loss. Secondary outcome variables included changes in papilledema grade, quality of life (Visual Function Questionnaire 25 [VFQ-25] and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey), headache disability, and weight at month 6. RESULTS The mean improvement in PMD was greater with acetazolamide (1.43 dB, from −3.53 dB at baseline to −2.10 dB at month 6; n = 86) than with placebo (0.71 dB, from −3.53 dB to −2.82 dB;n = 79); the difference was 0.71 dB (95% CI, 0 to 1.43 dB; P= .050). Mean improvements in papilledema grade (acetazolamide: −1

  8. Microgravity environment and compensatory: Decompensatory phases for intracranial hypertension form new perspectives to explain mechanism underlying communicating hydrocephalus and its related disorders.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zamzuri; Mustapha, Muzaimi; Abdullah, Jafri M

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis underlying communicating hydrocephalus has been centered on impaired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow secondary to abnormal CSF pulsation and venous hypertension. Hydrodynamic theory of hydrocephalus fares better than traditional theory in explaining the possible mechanisms underlying communicating hydrocephalus. Nonetheless, hydrodynamic theory alone could not fully explain some conditions that have ventriculomegaly but without hydrocephalus. By revisiting brain buoyancy from a fresher perspective, called microgravity environment of the brain, introducing wider concepts of anatomical and physiological compensatory-decompensatory phases for a persistent raise in intracranial pressure, and along with combining these two concepts with the previously well-accepted concepts of Monro-Kellie doctrine, intracranial hypertension, cerebral blood flow, cerebral perfusion pressure, brain compliance and elasticity, cerebral autoregulation, blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers, venous and cardiopulmonary hypertension, Windkessel phenomenon, and cerebral pulsation, we provide plausible explanations to the pathogenesis for communicating hydrocephalus and its related disorders. PMID:24891884

  9. Microgravity environment and compensatory: Decompensatory phases for intracranial hypertension form new perspectives to explain mechanism underlying communicating hydrocephalus and its related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Mustapha, Muzaimi; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis underlying communicating hydrocephalus has been centered on impaired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow secondary to abnormal CSF pulsation and venous hypertension. Hydrodynamic theory of hydrocephalus fares better than traditional theory in explaining the possible mechanisms underlying communicating hydrocephalus. Nonetheless, hydrodynamic theory alone could not fully explain some conditions that have ventriculomegaly but without hydrocephalus. By revisiting brain buoyancy from a fresher perspective, called microgravity environment of the brain, introducing wider concepts of anatomical and physiological compensatory–decompensatory phases for a persistent raise in intracranial pressure, and along with combining these two concepts with the previously well-accepted concepts of Monro–Kellie doctrine, intracranial hypertension, cerebral blood flow, cerebral perfusion pressure, brain compliance and elasticity, cerebral autoregulation, blood–brain and blood–CSF barriers, venous and cardiopulmonary hypertension, Windkessel phenomenon, and cerebral pulsation, we provide plausible explanations to the pathogenesis for communicating hydrocephalus and its related disorders. PMID:24891884

  10. Clinical significance of dynamic monitoring by transcranial doppler ultrasound and intracranial pressure monitor after surgery of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zaiming; Chen, Qianxue; Tian, Daofeng; Wang, Long; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Shenqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surgical method of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HIH) and how to control the postoperative blood pressure. 96 HIH patients were performed the craniotomic hematoma dissection (CHD) and the hematoma-cavity drilling drainage (HCDD), respectively. Meanwhile, the intracranial pressure and mean arterial pressure of each patient were continuously monitored for 7 days, the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 7th and 14th-day average flow velocities and pulsatility indexes of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries were monitored. CHD exhibited the significant difference in the long-term quality of life (ADL classification 6 months later) of patients with hematoma >50 ml than HCDD; furthermore, the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 7th and 14th-day TCD parameter analysis revealed that CHD exhibited better results in relieving the intracranial pressure and improving the cerebral blood flow than HCDD, and the postoperative ICP and MAP monitoring towards all patients could effectively control the blood pressure and prevent the further bleeding. The patients with hematoma >50 ml should choose CHD, and all HIH patients should be routinely performed the ICP and MAP monitoring. PMID:26379963

  11. Managing hypertension: drugs, life-style manipulation or benign neglect? Medical, ethical and economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simpson, F O

    1990-10-01

    Antihypertensive drugs have been of major benefit to people with moderate or severe hypertension and have contributed enormously to fundamental physiological knowledge. Antihypertensive therapy in milder hypertension reduces the incidence of stroke by 40% or more, may reduce myocardial infarction and prevents progression to more severe hypertension or heart failure but is being criticised as not cost-effective. Much of this criticism is based on deductions from inappropriate data. Nevertheless, it is likely that money is in some cases being wasted on the treatment of people who were not truly hypertensive in the first place. It is also likely that drug dosage is often unnecessarily high. Clearly it is vital that treatment is delivered as economically as possible. A reduction in the prevalence of hypertension would be the best way to reduce costs. Obesity and a high alcohol intake are associated with a higher blood pressure at any age. A high salt intake throughout life appears to be associated with a rise in blood pressure in the second half of life and may well be the main factor in hypertension. A radical rethinking of the method of pricing of medical care should be considered, so as to provide incentives to people to adopt life-style measures that lead to avoidance of hypertension (and other cardiovascular risk factors) or, in established hypertension, to a reduction in the need for medication. PMID:2126730

  12. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24-3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309-3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  13. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24–3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309–3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  14. Decompressive craniectomy in the treatment of post-traumatic intracranial hypertension in children: our philosophy and indications.

    PubMed

    Beuriat, P A; Javouhey, E; Szathmari, A; Courtil-Tesseydre, S; Desgranges, F P; Grassiot, B; Hequet, O; Mottolese, C

    2015-12-01

    Decompressive craniotomy (DC) in children is a life-saving procedure for the treatment of refractory intracranial hypertension related to traumatic, ischemic and infectious lesions. Different surgical procedures have been proposed including uni or bilateral hemicraniectomy, bi-frontal, bi-temporal, or bi-parietal craniotomies. DC can avoid the cascade of events related to tissue hypoxia, brain perfusion reduction, hypotension and the evolution of brain edema that can be responsible for brain herniation. The monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is very important to take a decision as well as the value of Trans cranial Doppler (TCD). Repeated TCD in the intensive care unit give important information about the decrease of the cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and facilitates the decision making. The important question is about how long time we have to wait before to perform the DC. Three conditions can be distinguished: 1) ICP stable and TCD with good parameters: the decision can be postponed; 2) ICP>20 mmHg with good TCD and without clinical signs of deterioration: the decision can be postponed; 3) ICP>20 mmHg with altered CPP and degraded TCD value and clinical signs of brain herniation: the surgical procedure is indicated. The decision of a ventricular drainage can also be discussed but in cases of slit ventricles it is preferable to realize a DC to avoid the problems of multiple taps without finding the ventricular system. In some very specific situations, DC has to be contraindicated. The first one is a prolonged cardiopulmonary arrest with a no-flow longer than 15 minutes and irreversible lesions on the TCD or on the CT-scan. The second most common situation is a patient with GCS of 3 on admission associated with bilaterally fixed dilated pupils. In this case TCD is very useful to document the decrease or the absence of diastolic flux that indicates a very poor cerebral perfusion. In case of severe polytraumatism with multiorgan failure, especially in very

  15. Anatomical Variations of the Transverse-Sigmoid Sinus Junction: Implications for Endovascular Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael W; Bartels, Harrison G; Rodriguez, Analiz; Johnson, James E; Janjua, Rashid M

    2016-08-01

    Venous sinus pathology can result in multiple pathological diseases, including idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). There remains a paucity of information on anatomical luminal variations of the major venous sinuses which may contribute to the etiology of certain disease states. Thirty-six transverse and sigmoid sinuses were removed following dissection of 19 unfixed cadaveric heads. Sinuses were opened longitudinally to study luminal variations. A semiquantitative classification system was developed to assess septations and blind pouches. Seventy-nine percent of cadavers had a luminal anatomical variation. Forty-four percent and 42% of sinuses dissected had occurrence of a septations or blind pouches, respectively. Thirty percent of septations and 25% of pouches were classified as large. Incidence of anatomical variations was not statistically significant between cadaver gender or sinus laterality. Luminal variations are present in the transverse and sigmoid sinuses at rates higher than expected. This study is the first to report the presence of blind pouches in the luminal wall of transverse and sigmoid sinuses. These variations can have clinical importance to the endovascular surgeon and may also contribute to the pathophysiological etiology of venous sinus diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1037-1042, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27161529

  16. Diet-induced antisecretory factor prevents intracranial hypertension in a dosage-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ewa; Al-Olama, Mohamed; Hansson, Hans-Arne; Lange, Stefan; Jennische, Eva

    2013-06-28

    Intake of specially processed cereal (SPC) stimulates endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) activity, and SPC intake has proven to be beneficial for a number of clinical conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the dosage relationship between SPC intake and plasma AF activity and to further correlate achieved AF levels to a biological effect. SPC was fed to rats in concentrations of 5, 10 or 15% for 2 weeks. A further group was fed 5% SPC for 4 weeks. AF activity and the complement factors C3c and factor H were analysed in plasma after the feeding period. Groups of rats fed the various SPC concentrations were subjected to a standardised freezing brain injury, known to induce increases in intracranial pressure (ICP). The AF activity in plasma increased after intake of SPC, in a dosage- and time-dependent manner. The complement factors C3c and factor H increased in a time-dependent manner. Measurements of ICP in animals fed with SPC prior to the brain injury showed that the ICP was significantly lower, compared with that of injured rats fed with a standard feed, and that the change was dose and time dependent. AF activity increases, in a dosage- and time-dependent manner, after intake of SPC. The inverse relationship between ICP after a head injury and the percentage of SPC in the feed indicate that the protective effect is, to a large extent, due to AF. PMID:23153478

  17. Intracranial Hypertension in a Patient with a Chiari Malformation Accompanied by Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-01-01

    The Chiari malformation is an infrequently detected congenital anomaly characterized by the downward displacement of the cerebellum with a tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum that may be accompanied by either syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. Surgery, such as foramen magnum decompression, is indicated for a symptomatic Chiari malformation, although an incidental lesion may be followed-up without further treatment. Infrequently, increased intracranial pressure emerges due to hyperthyroidism. A nineteen-year-old girl visited our outpatient clinic presented with a headache, nausea and vomiting. A brain and spinal magnetic resonance image study (MRI) indicated that the patient had a Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. An enlarged thyroid gland was detected on a physical examination, and serum markers indicated Graves' disease. The patient started anti-hyperthyroid medical treatment. Subsequently, the headache disappeared after the medical treatment of hyperthyroidism without surgical intervention for the Chiari malformation. A symptomatic Chiari malformation is indicated for surgery, but a surgeon should investigate other potential causes of the symptoms of the Chiari malformation to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26512271

  18. Mechanism of delayed intracranial hypertension after cerebroventricular infusions in conscious rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, B. A.; Holt, M. R.; Starcevic, V. P.; Keil, L. C.; Severs, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Prior studies showed that cerebroventricular infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 8 microliter/min for 10 min, followed by a 10 min rest and a 24 h infusion of 0.5 microliters/min, raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFp) of conscious, unrestrained rats after about 2 h. Here, we report that the 10 min infusion alone evoked a delayed, prolonged rise in CSFp. Pressure during the infusion itself rose and recovered quickly, as is usually reported. Pressure/volume tests, used to calculate resistance to outflow (Ro) and compliance (C), revealed that infusions increased Ro and decreased C, after a delay (P less than 0.05). The rise in CSFp after infusion was blocked by pretreatment with acetazolamide + ouabain (P less than 0.05), but the delayed changes in Ro and C were unaffected. We suggest that the 10 min infusion of a sterile, balanced salt solution has a primary effect that increases Ro; as CSF synthesis continues, C is exhausted and the delayed rise in CSFp ensues. This non-traumatic method of raising CSFp may be a useful method to study intracranial fluid dynamics.

  19. Intracranial Hypertension in a Patient with a Chiari Malformation Accompanied by Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-09-01

    The Chiari malformation is an infrequently detected congenital anomaly characterized by the downward displacement of the cerebellum with a tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum that may be accompanied by either syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. Surgery, such as foramen magnum decompression, is indicated for a symptomatic Chiari malformation, although an incidental lesion may be followed-up without further treatment. Infrequently, increased intracranial pressure emerges due to hyperthyroidism. A nineteen-year-old girl visited our outpatient clinic presented with a headache, nausea and vomiting. A brain and spinal magnetic resonance image study (MRI) indicated that the patient had a Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. An enlarged thyroid gland was detected on a physical examination, and serum markers indicated Graves' disease. The patient started anti-hyperthyroid medical treatment. Subsequently, the headache disappeared after the medical treatment of hyperthyroidism without surgical intervention for the Chiari malformation. A symptomatic Chiari malformation is indicated for surgery, but a surgeon should investigate other potential causes of the symptoms of the Chiari malformation to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26512271

  20. Over-drainage and persistent shunt-dependency in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension treated with shunts and bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Jonathan; Constantini, Shlomi; Kesler, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may lead to visual impairment. Shunt surgery is indicated for refractory IIH-related symptoms that persist despite medical treatment, or those presenting with significant visual decline. Obesity is a risk factor for IIH; a reduction in weight has been shown to improve papilledema. Bariatric surgery (BS) has been suggested for treating IIH associated with morbid obesity. In this study, we describe a high rate of over-drainage (OD) seen in patients following shunts and BS. Methods: The study cohort includes 13 patients with IIH that underwent shunt surgery for treatment of the IIH-related symptoms. Six patients underwent BS in addition to the shunt surgery (but not concomitantly). Seven patients had only shunt surgeries with no BS. Data were collected retrospectively. Results: BS effectively led to weight reduction (body mass index decreasing from 43 ± 4 to 28 ± 5). Patients undergoing BS had 1–6 (2.5 ± 1.9) shunt revisions for OD following BS, as opposed to 0–3 (1.4 ± 1.1) revisions prior to BS over similar time spans (statistically insignificant difference), and 0–6 (1.6 ± 2.5) revisions among the non-BS patients over a longer time span (statistically insignificant difference). Two patients in the BS group underwent shunt externalization and closure; however, they proved to be shunt-dependent. Conclusions: Patients with IIH that undergo shunt surgery and BS (not concomitantly) may suffer from OD symptoms, necessitating multiple shunt revisions, and valve upgrades. Despite BS being a valid primary treatment for some patients with IIH, among shunted patients, BS may not lead to resolution of IIH-related symptoms and patients may remain shunt-dependent. PMID:26713173

  1. Causes and Prognosis of Visual Acuity Loss at the Time of Initial Presentation in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, John J.; Thurtell, Matthew J.; Longmuir, Reid A.; Garvin, Mona K.; Wang, Jui-Kai; Wall, Michael; Kardon, Randy H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the etiology and prognosis of visual acuity loss in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at presentation and to provide objective measures to predict visual outcome. Methods. A retrospective review of 660 patients with IIH (2009–2013) identified 31 patients (4.7%) with 48 eyes having best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/25 or worse on initial presentation. Fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the optic disc and macula, and perimetry were used to determine the causes and prognosis of vision loss. Segmentation of the macula OCT was performed using the Iowa Reference Algorithm to determine the retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer complex (GCL-IPL) thickness. Results. Outer retinal changes alone caused decreased BCVA at initial presentation in 22 eyes (46%): subretinal fluid in 16, chorioretinal folds in 5, and peripapillary choroidal neovascularization in 1. The vision loss was reversible except for some eyes with chorioretinal folds. Optic neuropathy alone caused decreased BCVA in 10 eyes (21%) and coexisting outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy caused decreased BCVA in 16 eyes (33%). A GCL-IPL thickness less than or equal to 70 μm at initial presentation or progressive thinning of greater than or equal to 10 μm within 2 to 3 weeks compared with baseline correlated with poor visual outcome. Conclusions. Visual acuity loss in IIH can be caused by both outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy. Vision loss from outer retinal changes is mostly reversible. The outcome of patients with coexisting outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy or optic neuropathy alone depends on the degree of optic neuropathy, which can be predicted by the GCL-IPL thickness. PMID:26070058

  2. Baseline OCT Measurements in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, Part I: Quality Control, Comparisons, and Variability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to investigate papilledema in single-site, mostly retrospective studies. We investigated whether spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), which provides thickness and volume measurements of the optic nerve head and retina, could reliably demonstrate structural changes due to papilledema in a prospective multisite clinical trial setting. Methods. At entry, 126 subjects in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) with mild visual field loss had optic disc and macular scans, using the Cirrus SD-OCT. Images were analyzed by using the proprietary commercial and custom 3D-segmentation algorithms to calculate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), total retinal thickness (TRT), optic nerve head volume (ONHV), and retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness. We evaluated variability, with interocular comparison and correlation between results for both methods. Results. The average RNFL thickness > 95% of normal controls in 90% of eyes and the RNFL, TRT, ONH height, and ONHV showed strong (r > 0.8) correlations for interocular comparisons. Variability for repeated testing of OCT parameters was low for both methods and intraclass correlations > 0.9 except for the proprietary GCL thickness. The proprietary algorithm–derived RNFL, TRT, and GCL thickness measurements had failure rates of 10%, 16%, and 20% for all eyes respectively, which were uncommon with 3D-segmentation–derived measurements. Only 7% of eyes had GCL thinning that was less than fifth percentile of normal age-matched control eyes by both methods. Conclusions. Spectral-domain OCT provides reliable continuous variables and quantified assessment of structural alterations due to papilledema. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:25370510

  3. Baseline OCT Measurements in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, Part II: Correlations and Relationship to Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The accepted method to evaluate and monitor papilledema, Frisén grading, uses an ordinal approach based on descriptive features. Part I showed that spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in a clinical trial setting provides reliable measurement of the effects of papilledema on the optic nerve head (ONH) and peripapillary retina, particularly if a 3-D segmentation method is used for analysis.1 We evaluated how OCT parameters are interrelated and how they correlate with vision and other clinical features in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) patients. Methods. A total of 126 subjects in the IIH Treatment Trial (IIHTT) OCT substudy had Cirrus SD-OCT optic disc and macula scans analyzed by using a 3-D segmentation algorithm to derive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, total retinal thickness (TRT), retinal ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCL+IPL) thickness, and ONH volume. The SD-OCT parameter values were correlated with high- and low-contrast acuity, perimetric mean deviation, Frisén grading, and IIH features. Results. At study entry, the average RNFL thickness, TRT, and ONH volume showed significant strong correlations (r ≥ 0.90) with each other. The same OCT parameters showed a strong (r > 0.76) correlation with Frisén grade and a mild (r > 0.24), but significant, correlation with lumbar puncture opening pressure. For all eyes at baseline, neither visual acuity (high or low contrast) nor mean deviation correlated with any OCT measure of swelling or GCL+IPL thickness. Conclusions. In newly diagnosed IIH, OCT demonstrated alterations of the peripapillary retina and ONH correlate with Frisén grading of papilledema. At presentation, OCT measures of papilledema, in patients with newly diagnosed IIH and mild vision loss, do not correlate with clinical features or visual dysfunction. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:25370513

  4. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Registry (GRDR) IHRF Scientific Advisor Awarded NSBRI/NASA Grant to Study Non-Invasive Pressure Monitoring CNN: ... For Future Deep Space Missions IHRF Part Of NASA Research Team On Microgravity-Induced IH Is Vision ...

  5. Primary Intracranial Leptomeningeal Melanomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Lee, Chae-Heuck; Joo, Mee

    2015-01-01

    Primary intracranial malignant melanoma is a very rare and highly aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. A 66-year-old female patient presented a headache that had been slowly progressing for several months. A large benign pigmented skin lesion was found on her back. A brain MRI showed multiple linear signal changes with branching pattern and strong enhancement in the temporal lobe. The cytological and immunohiostochemical cerebrospinal fluid examination confirmed malignant melanoma. A biopsy confirmed that the pigmented skin lesion on the back and the conjunctiva were benign nevi. We report a case of primary intracranial malignant melanoma and review relevant literatures. PMID:26819692

  6. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination. PMID:22696735

  7. Effect of hypertension on bacteria composition of prostate biopsy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer in PSA grey-zone

    PubMed Central

    NI, XIAOFENG; MENG, HONGZHOU; ZHOU, FENG; YU, HAINING; XIANG, JIANJIAN; SHEN, SHENGRONG

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic prostate cancer (PC) is difficult to diagnose by prostate biopsy, even in patients with markedly elevated PSA levels. Therefore, we aimed to identify a new, better technique to detect PC in a more consistent manner. A variety of steps were employed to validate this proposed method, including DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and DGGE band sequencing. Four transperineal prostate biopsy specimens were obtained from male patients. The patients were under the age of 65 and PSA levels were 4–10 ng/ml. We also investigated the bacteria composition of transperineal prostate biopsy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and PC by PCR-DGGE profiling. Sequences from selected bands 2 and 4 both matched with Sphingomonas, which is present in lower amounts in PC without hypertension as compared to PC with hypertension, while there were no particular differences in the BPH group. Specific bacteria from the prostate biopsy tissues provide further confidence in PC diagnosis based on a PCR approach as a diagnostic tool, while hypertension was found to be a disturbing factor that can affect the diagnosis of BPH and PC in grey-zone. PMID:27284421

  8. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oparil, S; Calhoun, D A

    1989-03-01

    An estimated 58 million Americans are at increased risk of morbidity and premature death due to high blood pressure (BP) and require some type of therapy or systematic monitoring. This article focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of hypertension, new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of secondary hypertension, and current views of the most appropriate nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy for essential hypertension. In view of the extremely high prevalence of the disorder, emphasis is placed on efficient and cost-effective strategies for diagnosing and managing the hypertensive patient. Recent evidence indicates that nonpharmacologic therapy, including dietary potassium and calcium supplements, reduction of salt intake, weight loss for the obese patient, regular exercise, a diet high in fiber and low in cholesterol and saturated fats, smoking cessation, and moderation of alcohol consumption produces significant sustained reductions in BP while reducing overall cardiovascular risk. Accordingly, nonpharmacologic antihypertensive therapy should be included in the treatment of all hypertensive patients. In persons with mild hypertension, nonpharmacologic approaches may adequately reduce BP, thereby avoiding the expense and potential side effects of drug therapy. In patients with more severe hypertension, nonpharmacologic therapy, used in conjunction with pharmacologic therapy, can reduce the dosage of antihypertensive medications necessary for BP control. Patients treated with nonpharmacologic therapy only should be followed closely, and if BP control is not satisfactory, drug therapy should be added. The large number of drugs available for use in hypertension treatment, coupled with our rapidly expanding knowledge of the pathophysiology of hypertension and of the adverse effects of these drugs in individual patient groups, make it possible to individualize antihypertensive treatment. When used as monotherapy, most agents

  9. Efficacy of Low Dose Barbiturate Coma Therapy for the Patients with Intractable Intracranial Hypertension Using the Bispectral™ Index Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    An, Hung-Shik; Kang, Jeong-Han; Kim, Moon-Kyu; Oh, Sae-Moon; Park, Se-Hyuck

    2010-01-01

    Objective Barbiturate coma therapy (BCT) is a useful method to control increased intracranial pressure (IICP) patients. However, the complications such as hypotension and hypokalemia have caused conditions that stopped BCT early. The complications of low dose BCT with Bispectral™ index (BIS) monitoring and those of high dose BCT without BIS monitoring have been compared to evaluate the efficacy of low dose BCT with BIS monitoring. Methods We analyzed 39 patients with high dose BCT group (21 patients) and low dose BCT group (18 patients). Because BIS value of 40-60 is general anesthesia score, we have adjusted the target dose of thiopental to maintain the BIS score of 40-60. Therefore, dose of thiopental was kept 1.3 to 2.6 mg/kg/hour during low dose BCT. However, high dose BCT consisted of 5 mg/kg/hour without BIS monitoing. Results The protocol of BCT was successful in 72.2% and 38.1% of low dose and high dose BCT groups, respectively. The complications such as QT prolongation, hypotension and cardiac arrest have caused conditions that stopped BCT early. Hypokalemia showed the highest incidence rate in complications of both BCT. The descent in potassium level were 0.63 ± 0.26 in low dose group, and 1.31 ± 0.48 in high dose group. The treatment durations were 4.89 ± 1.68 days and 3.38 ± 1.24 days in low dose BCT and high dose BCT, respectively. Conclusion It was proved that low dose BCT showed less severe complications than high dose BCT. Low dose BCT with BIS monitoring provided enough duration of BCT possible to control ICP. PMID:20461164

  10. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Neil R; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Caulfield, Mark

    2015-08-22

    Raised blood pressure is the biggest single contributor to the global burden of disease and to global mortality. The numbers of people affected and the prevalence of high blood pressure worldwide are expected to increase over the next decade. Preventive strategies are therefore urgently needed, especially in less developed countries, and management of hypertension must be optimised. Genetic advances in some rare causes of hypertension have been made lately, but the aggregate effect on blood pressure of all the genetic loci identified to date is small. Hence, intervention on key environmental determinants and effective implementation of trial-based therapies are needed. Three-drug combinations can control hypertension in about 90% of patients but only if resources allow identification of patients and drug delivery is affordable. Furthermore, assessment of optimal drug therapy for each ethnic group is needed. PMID:25832858

  11. Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Richard L.; Sullivan, Humbert G.; Miller, J. Douglas

    1978-01-01

    Digital computer simulation is utilized to test hypotheses regarding poorly understood mechanisms of intracranial pressure change. The simulation produces graphic output similar to records from polygraph recorders used in patient monitoring and in animal experimentation. The structure of the model is discussed. The mathematic model perfected by the comparison between simulation and experiment will constitute a formulation of medical information applicable to automated clinical monitoring and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  12. The effects of lumboperitoneal and ventriculoperitoneal shunts on the cranial and spinal cerebrospinal fluid volume in a patient with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nikić, Ines; Radoš, Milan; Frobe, Ana; Vukić, Miroslav; Orešković, Darko; Klarica, Marijan

    2016-01-01

    Lumboperitoneal (LP) and ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts are a frequent treatment modality for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Although these shunts have been used for a long time, it is still not clear how they change the total craniospinal CSF volume and what portions of cranial and spinal CSF are affected. This report for the first time presents the results of a volumetric analysis of the total cranial and spinal CSF space in a patient with IIH. We performed an automated segmentation of the cranial and a manual segmentation of the spinal CSF space first with an LP shunt installed and again after the LP shunt was replaced by a VP shunt. When the LP shunt was in place, the total CSF volume was smaller than when the VP shunt was in place (222.4 cm3 vs 279.2 cm3). The difference was almost completely the result of the spinal CSF volume reduction (49.3 cm3 and 104.9 cm3 for LP and VP, respectively), while the cranial CSF volume was not considerably altered (173.2 cm3 and 174.2 cm3 for LP and VP, respectively). This report indicates that LP and VP shunts in IIH do not considerably change the cranial CSF volume, while the reduction of CSF volume after LP shunt placement affects almost exclusively the spinal part of the CSF system. Our results suggest that an analysis of both the cranial and the spinal part of the CSF space is necessary for therapeutic procedures planning and for an early recognition of numerous side effects that often arise after shunts placement in IIH patients. PMID:27374831

  13. [Intracranial pressure changes during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertention].

    PubMed

    Rylova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    Xenon assures rapid awakening and stable hemodynamics, it also has some neuroprotective effect. This is the reason why it may become an anesthetic of choice in neurosurgery. Still there is little and controversial data on its impact upon ICP. This is the first study of xenon effect upon intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. We report a slight increase in intracranial and a slight decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure during xenon anesthesia and show that cerebrovascular reactivity is preserved. Thus we conclude that xenon anesthesia is safe for neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. PMID:21957614

  14. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Tejpal

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.

  15. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... together in a delicate balance. A pressure and volume relationship exists between CSF, the brain and the ... approximately 0.3 cc per minute. (The total volume of CSF in the skull at any given ...

  16. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  17. [Hypertensive emergencies and urgencies].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara

    2005-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common medical problems affecting approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. Severe hypertension that is a potentially life-threatening condition refers to a hypertensive crisis. Severe hypertension is further classified into hypertensive emergencies or hypertensive urgencies. Hypertensive emergency refers to a severe hypertension that is associated with new or progressive end-organ damage. In these clinical situations, blood pressure should be reduced immediately to prevent or minimize organ dysfunction. Hypertensive urgency refers to severe hypertension without evidence of new or worsening end-organ injury. Blood pressure can be lowered less rapidly in this condition. In this review article it is discussed about clinical assessment of patients under these conditions, evaluating neurological, cardiovascular, renal end-organ damage; how much blood pressure should be lowered, which medication should be used to lower blood pressure, treating hypertensive emergencies and urgencies; and management of specific conditions (acute intracranial events, acute left ventricular dysfunction etc). PMID:15998994

  18. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies. PMID:27443382

  19. Intracranial aneurysms: analysis of results of microneurosurgery.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C B; Loach, A B; O'laoire, S A

    1976-01-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms has a poor prognosis. Operative management of intracranial aneurysms was once considered ineffective. The first 100 cases treated by micorsurgery were analysed to see whether mortality and morbidity were reduced. Modern surgical techniques halved the total mortality but the morbidity was unaltered. Results can be improved by delaying surgery seven days and by treating any hypertension before surgery. PMID:963461

  20. Intracranial germinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Manoj P.; Doughty, Kyle E.; Armstrong, Danielle; Melguizo-Gavilanes, Isaac; Cheek, Brennen S.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Pineal region tumors make up less than 1% of all intracranial neoplasms, with the majority being of germ cell origin. We describe the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of a patient presenting with neurological deficits who was found to have a germinoma of the pineal gland. PMID:25552796

  1. Presence of Essential Hypertension or Diabetes Mellitus Is a Predictor of Intracranial Bleeding in Elderly Patients: A Study of 108 Patients with Isolated Thrombocytopenia from a Single Reference Center

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rajan; Pati, Hara Prasad; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Monga, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Thrombocytopenia poses a significant problem in the elderly. Not only are there varied causes, but it is also associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We carried out a study to learn the causes of isolated thrombocytopenia in elderly patients and to correlate the severity of thrombocytopenia and bleeding manifestations with various etiologic factors and comorbidities. Materials and Methods: A total of 108 patients above 50 years of age presenting with isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet counts of <100x109/L with normal hemoglobin and total leukocyte counts) were enrolled in the study. Detailed history and clinical examinations were carried out for each patient. Complete blood counts were analyzed by automated cell counter. Peripheral smears were examined in all cases. HbsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV testing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was done in all patients. Wherever clinically indicated, bone marrow aspiration biopsy and cytogenetic studies were done. Results: Out of 108 patients, 102 (94.4%) presented with bleeding tendencies. Twenty-nine (26.8%) presented with serious (World Health Organization grade 3/4) bleedings. Major findings were immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 79 (73.1%), myelodysplastic syndrome in 7 (6.5%), drug-induced thrombocytopenia in 7 (6.5%), and connective tissue disorder in 4 (3.7%) cases. Ten patients presented with intracranial bleedings. Upon logistic regression analysis, comorbidities in the form of essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with occurrence of intracranial bleeding. There was no correlation of serious bleedings with platelet counts. Conclusion: Isolated thrombocytopenia in the elderly is associated with significant morbidity. Diligent clinical and laboratory evaluation is required to elucidate the cause of thrombocytopenia in the elderly. Comorbidities in this population are associated with serious bleedings and not low platelet counts as is commonly thought

  2. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    , resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the mortality rate can be 40% to 50%, with severe morbidity of 10% to 20%. The reported overall risk of rupture is 1.9% per year and is higher for women, cigarette smokers, and cocaine users, and in aneurysms that are symptomatic, greater than 10 mm in diameter, or located in the posterior circulation. If left untreated, there is a considerable risk of repeat hemorrhage in a ruptured aneurysm that results in increased mortality. In Ontario, intracranial aneurysms occur in about 1% to 4% of the population, and the annual incidence of SAH is about 10 cases per 100,000 people. In 2004-2005, about 660 intracranial aneurysm repairs were performed in Ontario. Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms Treatment of an unruptured aneurysm attempts to prevent the aneurysm from rupturing. The treatment of a ruptured intracranial aneurysm aims to prevent further hemorrhage. There are 3 approaches to treating an intracranial aneurysm. Small, asymptomatic aneurysms less than 10 mm in diameter may be monitored without any intervention other than treatment for underlying risk factors such as hypertension. Open surgical clipping, involves craniotomy, brain retraction, and placement of a silver clip across the neck of the aneurysm while a patient is under general anesthesia. This procedure is associated with surgical risks and neurological deficits. Endovascular coil embolization, introduced in the 1990s, is the health technology under review. Literature Review Methods The Medical Advisory Secretariat searched the International Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) Database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant systematic reviews. OVID Medline, Medline In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, and Embase were searched for English-language journal articles that reported primary data on the effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of treatments for intracranial aneurysms, obtained in a clinical setting or analyses of primary

  3. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  4. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  5. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  6. Incidence and risk factors for post-traumatic hydrocephalus following decompressive craniectomy for intractable intracranial hypertension and evacuation of mass lesions.

    PubMed

    Honeybul, Stephen; Ho, Kwok M

    2012-07-01

    There continues to be a considerable interest in decompressive craniectomy in the management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Though technically straightforward, the procedure is not without significant complications. In this study we assessed the incidence and risk factors for the development of subdural hygroma and hydrocephalus after decompressive craniectomy. A total of 195 patients who had had a decompressive craniectomy for severe TBI between 2004 and 2010 at the two major trauma centers in Western Australia were considered. Of the 166 patients who survived after the acute hospital stay, 93 (56%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 48,63%) developed subdural hygroma; 45 patients (48%) had unilateral and 48 patients (52%) had bilateral subdural hygromas. Of the 159 patients who survived more than 6 months after surgery, 72 (45%; 95% CI 38,53%) developed radiological evidence of ventriculomegaly, and 26 of these 72 patients (36%; 95% CI 26,48%) developed clinical evidence of hydrocephalus and required a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. Maximum intracranial pressure prior to decompression (p=0.005), subdural hygroma (p=0.012), and a lower admission Glasgow Coma Scale score (p=0.009), were significant risk factors for hydrocephalus after decompressive craniectomy. Hydrocephalus requiring a VP shunt was associated with a higher risk of unfavorable neurological outcomes at 18 months (odds ratio 7.46; 95%CI 1.17,47.4; p=0.033), after adjusting for other factors. Our results showed a clear association between injury severity, subdural hygroma, and hydrocephalus, suggesting that damage to the cerebrospinal fluid drainage pathways contributes to the primary brain injury rather than the margin of the craniectomy as the factor responsible for these complications. PMID:22583391

  7. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  8. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Increased intracranial pressure is a rise in the pressure inside the skull that can result from or cause brain injury. ... Increased intracranial pressure can be due to a rise in pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid. This is ...

  9. Intracranial Vascular Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Mechanical retrievers/aspiration systems: used to remove clots ... passageway between an artery and a vein. intracranial aneurysms, a ballooning out of the wall of an ...

  10. Clinical comparison of tympanic membrane displacement with invasive intracranial pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Shimbles, S; Dodd, C; Banister, K; Mendelow, A D; Chambers, I R

    2005-12-01

    A non-invasive method of assessing intracranial pressure (ICP) would be of benefit to patients with abnormal cerebral pathology that could give rise to changes in ICP. In particular, it would assist the regular monitoring of hydrocephalus patients. This study evaluated a technique using tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) measurements, which has been reported to provide a reliable, non-invasive measure of ICP. A group of 135 hydrocephalus patients was studied, as well as 13 patients with benign intracranial hypertension and a control group of 77 volunteers. TMD measurements were carried out using the Marchbanks measurement system analyser and compared between the groups. In 36 patients, invasive measurements of ICP carried out at the same time were compared with the TMD values. A highly significant relationship was found between TMD and ICP but intersubject variability was high and the predictive value of the technique low. Taking the normal range of ICP to be 10-15 mmHg, the predictive limits of the regression are an order of magnitude wider than this and therefore Vm cannot be used as a surrogate for ICP. In conclusion, TMD measurements do not provide a reliable non-invasive measure of ICP in patients with shunted hydrocephalus. PMID:16311455

  11. Pseudotumor cerebri

    MedlinePlus

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension; Benign intracranial hypertension ... Ferri FF. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:640-641. Pless ML. Pseudotumor cerebri. In: Kliegman ...

  12. High Agatston Calcium Score of Intracranial Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effect of intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) calcification on cognitive impairment is uncertain. Our objective was to investigate whether intracranial ICA calcification is a significant cognitive predictor for cognitive impairment. Global cognition and degrees of intracranial ICA calcification of 579 subjects were assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Agatston calcium scoring method, respectively. Other risk factors for cognitive impairment, including age, education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and body mass index, were documented and analyzed for their associations with cognitive function. In univariate analyses, older age, lower education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and higher intracranial ICA Agatston scores were significantly associated with cognitive impairment. In ordinal logistic regression, only age and total intracranial ICA Agatston score were significant risk factors for cognitive impairment. After adjustment for the other documented risk factors, subjects were 7% (95% CI: 5–10; P < 0.001) and 6% (95% CI: 0–13; P = 0.04) more likely to have lower cognitive category with every year increment of age and every 100-point increment of the total intracranial ICA Agatston score respectively. These results suggest an important role of the intracranial ICA calcification on cognitive impairment. PMID:26426620

  13. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: J Kevin ...

  14. Intracranial ROSAI-DORFMAN Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahzoni, Parvin; Zavareh, Mohsen Hani Tabaei; Bagheri, Marzie; Hani, Neda; Moqtader, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a benign lymphohistiocytosis that often involve lymph nodes and present as massive lymphadenopathy with sinus histiocytosis. The disease is rarely associated with intracranial involvement. Herein, we report a 33-years-old man with recent onset of unconsciousness. According to his past medical history, he was suffering from frontal headache, ataxia and dizziness with no sensory or motor defect since August 2010. At initial work up, MRI showed infiltrating mass in the left parietal region. Microscopically, the mass consisted of infiltration of abundant lymphoplasma cells, neutrophils and some histiocytes scattered in fibrotic background. Emperipolesis (lymphocytophagocytosis) of histiocytic cells made the diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease should be added in the list of differential diagnosis for a dural mass mimicking meningioma or cerebral mass mimicking glioma, therefore, immunohistochemical staining for EMA, S100 and CD1a should be performed to rule out the differential diagnosis. PMID:23267385

  15. Isolated Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taufiq, Md.; Khair, Abul; Begum, Ferdousy; Akhter, Shabnam; Shamim Farooq, Md.; Kamal, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a benign histiocytic proliferative disorder of unknown etiology. This rare condition commonly causes massive cervical lymphadenopathy. Intracranial RDD without any nodal involvement is extremely rare. Case Report. A young Bangladeshi male complained of bilateral complete blindness with left sided deafness for about three years. There was no lymphadenopathy. MRI and CT scan of brain suggested an inflammatory/neoplastic (?meningioma) lesion located at left parasellar region which extended frontally to encircle both optic nerves and also to left prepontine area. Histopathologically the lesion was diagnosed as RDD. The patient was treated with steroid and significant clinical improvement observed. Conclusion. The prognosis of intracranial RDD is not poor. It can be treated with surgery with or without corticosteroids, chemotherapy, and so forth. But as the condition is extremely rare and often misdiagnosed, the clinician, radiologist, and histopathologist should have a suspicion in their mind about the possibility of RDD. PMID:26949555

  16. Orbital and Intracranial Effects of Microgravity: 3T MRI Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, L. A.; Sargsyan, A.; Hasan, K. M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Goals and Objectives of this presentation are: 1. To briefly describe a newly discovered clinical entity related to space flight. 2. To describe normal anatomy and pathologic changes of the optic nerve, posterior globe, optic nerve sheath and pituitary gland related to exposure to microgravity. 3. To correlate imaging findings with known signs of intracranial hypertension.

  17. Current Status of the Application of Intracranial Venous Sinus Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Yuan, Yongjie; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The intracranial venous sinus is an important component of vascular disease. Many diseases involve the venous sinus and are accompanied by venous sinus stenosis (VSS), which leads to increased venous pressure and high intracranial pressure. Recent research has focused on stenting as a treatment for VSS related to these diseases. However, a systematic understanding of venous sinus stenting (VS-Stenting) is lacking. Herein, the literature on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), venous pulsatile tinnitus, sinus thrombosis, high draining venous pressure in dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and tumor-caused VSS was reviewed and analyzed to summarize experiences with VS-Stenting as a treatment. The literature review showed that satisfactory therapeutic effects can be achieved through stent angioplasty. Thus, the present study suggests that selective stent release in the venous sinus can effectively treat these diseases and provide new possibilities for treating intracranial vascular disease. PMID:26516306

  18. Elevated Intracranial Pressure Diagnosis with Emergency Department Bedside Ocular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Amin, D.; McCormick, T.; Mailhot, T.

    2015-01-01

    Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter can aid in the diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure in the emergency department. This case report describes a 21-year-old female presenting with 4 months of mild headache and 2 weeks of recurrent, transient binocular vision loss. Though limited by patient discomfort, fundoscopic examination suggested the presence of blurred optic disc margins. Bedside ocular ultrasound (BOUS) revealed wide optic nerve sheath diameters and bulging optic discs bilaterally. Lumbar puncture demonstrated a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure of 54 cm H2O supporting the suspected diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Accurate fundoscopy can be vital to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected elevated intracranial pressure, but it is often technically difficult or poorly tolerated by the photophobic patient. BOUS is a quick and easily learned tool to supplement the emergency physician's fundoscopic examination and help identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure. PMID:26587297

  19. Elevated Intracranial Pressure Diagnosis with Emergency Department Bedside Ocular Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Amin, D; McCormick, T; Mailhot, T

    2015-01-01

    Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter can aid in the diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure in the emergency department. This case report describes a 21-year-old female presenting with 4 months of mild headache and 2 weeks of recurrent, transient binocular vision loss. Though limited by patient discomfort, fundoscopic examination suggested the presence of blurred optic disc margins. Bedside ocular ultrasound (BOUS) revealed wide optic nerve sheath diameters and bulging optic discs bilaterally. Lumbar puncture demonstrated a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure of 54 cm H2O supporting the suspected diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Accurate fundoscopy can be vital to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected elevated intracranial pressure, but it is often technically difficult or poorly tolerated by the photophobic patient. BOUS is a quick and easily learned tool to supplement the emergency physician's fundoscopic examination and help identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure. PMID:26587297

  20. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  1. Mesothelioma - benign-fibrous

    MedlinePlus

    Mesothelioma - benign; Mesothelioma - fibrous; Pleural fibroma; Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura ... other reasons. Other tests that may show benign mesothelioma include: CT scan of the chest Open lung ...

  2. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  3. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  4. The effect of right internal jugular vein cannulation on intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Woda, R P; Miner, M E; McCandless, C; McSweeney, T D

    1996-10-01

    Access to the central venous circulation is often necessary in patients who have elevated intracranial pressure. It has been suggested that a disadvantage of the internal jugular vein approach to the central circulation may be an elevated intracranial pressure. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the effect of right internal jugular vein cannulation on intracranial pressure in patients who are at risk of intracerebral hypertension. Eleven adult patients studied in the intensive care unit were evaluated. The population included those patients who were admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit requiring intracranial pressure monitoring and central venous access. With the intracranial pressure monitor in place, patients were put in supine and 30 degrees head-up positions while intracranial pressure was recorded. The Queckenstedt maneuver was performed on all patients. A central venous line was then placed in the right internal jugular vein, and intracranial pressure was recorded. The Queckenstedt maneuver was again performed in the study population, and intracranial pressure measurements were recorded for the right, left, and bilateral compression of the internal jugular vein. The results of the intracranial pressure measurements before and after placement of the central venous line were statistically analyzed using single-factor analysis of variance over time. The mean Glasgow coma and Apache II scores for the study groups were 8 +/- 4 and 15 +/- 6, respectively. There were no significant differences in heart rate; cerebral perfusion pressure; or systolic, mean, or diastolic pressures throughout the study period. There was no statistical difference found between the intracranial pressures at any time point throughout the study. Furthermore, no difference was found in percentage change from baseline intracranial pressure data throughout the study period. Our results suggest that cannulation of the right internal jugular vein is a safe

  5. Management of raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, J D; Czosnyka, M

    1993-01-01

    This review has been written at an unfortunate time. Novel questions are being asked of the old therapies and there is an abundance of new strategies both to lower ICP and protect the brain against cerebral ischaemia. In the United Kingdom, the problem is to ensure that appropriate patients continue to be referred to centres where clinical trials of high quality can be undertaken. One of the success stories of the past decade has been the decline in the number of road accidents as a result of seat belt legislation, improvements in car design and the drink/driving laws. Hence, fortunately there are fewer patients with head injuries to treat and it is even more important that patients are appropriately referred if studies to assess efficacy of the new strategies are not to be thwarted. The nihilistic concept that intensive investigation with ICP monitoring for patients with diffuse head injury or brain swelling following evacuation of a haematoma or a contusion has no proven beneficial effect on outcome, requires revision. A cocktail of therapies may be required that can be created only when patients are monitored in sufficient detail to reveal the mechanisms underlying their individual ICP problem. Ethical problems may arise over how aggressively therapy for intracranial hypertension should be pursued and for how long. There has always been the concern that cranial decompression or prolonged barbiturate coma may preserve patients but with unacceptably severe disability. Some patients may be salvaged from herniating with massive cerebral infarction with the use of osmotherapy but is the outcome acceptable? Similar considerations apply to some children with metabolic encephalopathies. Where such considerations have been scrutinised in patients with severe head injury, the whole spectrum of outcomes appears to be shifted so that the number of severe disabilities and persistent vegetative states are not increased. However, it is important to be sensitive to such issues

  6. Intracranial pressure monitoring for traumatic brain injury: available evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Stocchetti, N; Longhi, L; Zanier, E R

    2008-05-01

    Following traumatic brain injury, uncontrollable intracranial hypertension remains the most frequent cause of death. Despite general agreement on the deleterious effects of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), however, the evidence supporting the use of ICP monitoring has recently been questioned. The aim of this review was to evaluate the pros and cons of ICP monitoring and to discuss the hypothetical desirability and feasibility of a trial testing the benefits of ICP monitoring. PMID:18414362

  7. Hypothermia for Increased Intracranial Pressure: Is It Dead?

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos; Robertson, Claudia S

    2016-09-01

    Mild to moderate therapeutic hypothermia (HT) has been used to alleviate intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Its main contribution is thought to be via reduction in cerebral metabolic requirement leading both to favorable oxygen/metabolic delivery-demand ratios as well as a reduction of cerebral blood volume resulting in decreased ICP. Nevertheless, HT is a clinically complex, labor-intensive procedure with numerous potential adverse effects. Furthermore, randomized controlled trials suggest either no effect or harm. These facts challenge the role of HT in TBI. We address this challenge by posing three questions that relate to the overarching value of controlling ICP, the effectiveness of HT in reducing ICP, and the benefit-risk ratio of the intervention. We conclude that HT should not be used as an "early" intervention unless as a part of a clinical trial, although it may still have a role in patients with refractory intracranial hypertension. PMID:27443645

  8. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  9. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  10. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect.

  11. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Hepatitis C Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD NOTE: This is ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension Portal hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure in ...

  12. [Secondary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is a common disease and a crucial predisposing factor of cardiovascular diseases. Approximately 10% of hypertensive patients are secondary hypertension, a pathogenetic factor of which can be identified. Secondary hypertension consists of endocrine, renal, and other diseases. Primary aldosteronism, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism result in endocrine hypertension. Renal parenchymal hypertension and renovascular hypertension result in renal hypertension. Other diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are also very prevalent in secondary hypertension. It is very crucial to find and treat secondary hypertension at earlier stages since most secondary hypertension is curable or can be dramatically improved by specific treatment. One should keep in mind that screening of secondary hypertension should be done at least once in a daily clinical practice. PMID:26619670

  13. Exophytic benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Blaschko, Sarah D; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2011-08-01

    A 60-year-old man had incidental finding of a multilobular 8 × 7 × 7-cm mass identified posterior to the urinary bladder in continuity with the prostate. The man's prostate-specific antigen was 1.87, and he denied any lower urinary tract symptoms. A transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy demonstrated benign prostatic tissue. A computed tomography-guided needle aspiration demonstrated a benign epithelium-lined cyst, likely prostatic in origin. Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a proliferation of prostatic epithelial and stromal cells. Although prostatic hyperplasia is usually restricted to the prostate gland, hyperplastic nodules occasionally protrude outside the prostate and rarely form exophytic pelvic masses. PMID:20869104

  14. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  15. The Benign Hamburger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peaslee, Graham; Lantz, Juliette M.; Walczak, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a case study of food poisoning from hamburgers at the fictitious Jill-at-the-Grill to teach the nuclear science behind food irradiation. Includes case teaching notes on the benign hamburger. (ASK)

  16. Benign positional vertigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical practice guideline: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2008;139(5 Suppl 4):S47-S81. ... BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015: ...

  17. Intracranial extra-axial hemangioma in a newborn: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dalsin, Marcos; Silva, Rafael Sodré; Galdino Chaves, Jennyfer Paula; Oliveira, Francine Hehn; Martins Antunes, Ápio Cláudio; Vedolin, Leonardo Modesti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors, and the intracranial counterpart was described in very few cases. Case Description: A newborn presented with an intracranial tumor associated with an arachnoid cyst, diagnosed by antenatal ultrasound at 37 weeks of gestation. Surgery was indicated due to increased head circumference and bulging fontanelle, and a complete resection of an extra-axial red–brown tumor was performed at the 3rd week of life. Microscopy revealed a hemangioma. Conclusion: Hemangioma is a rare differential diagnosis that must be considered in extra-axial intracranial tumors affecting infants and neonates. The radiological features are not helpful in differentiating from other tumors, and surgery is indicated when the diagnosis is uncertain or whenever there are signs of increased intracranial pressure. PMID:27274403

  18. Fluctuating nature of an orbital venous-lymphatic anomaly in association with intracranial vascular malformations: a classical presentation.

    PubMed

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Wyse, Emily; Merbs, Shannath L; Pearl, Monica Smith

    2015-01-01

    Venous-lymphatic anomalies (VLA) are rare and benign congenital lesions of the lymphatic system, composed of endothelial-lined lymphatic cysts. They are most frequently located in the region of the head and neck, and represent 4% of all orbital masses. In those patients with extensive orbital VLAs, a strong association with intracranial vascular anomalies has been reported. Factors known to suddenly increase the size of these lesions include upper respiratory tract infections or intralesional haemorrhage; however, complete spontaneous regression is rare. We report on the classic presentation of a patient with a fluctuating right orbital VLA in association with an intracranial cavernous malformation and intracranial developmental venous anomaly. PMID:26438679

  19. Iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension after gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Albert; Creedon, Kerry; Sahjpaul, Ramesh

    2014-09-01

    Perineural cysts are common lesions of the sacral spine. They have rarely been reported in a presacral location, leading to their misdiagnosis as a gynecological lesion. The authors report the second such case, in a patient undergoing fenestration of what was presumed to be a benign pelvic cyst, and the resultant high-flow CSF leak that occurred. They describe the clinical presentation and manifestations of intracranial hypotension, as well as the pertinent investigations. They also review the literature for the best management options for this condition. Although they are uncommon, large perineural cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis when examining patients with a pelvic lesion. Appropriate imaging investigations should be performed to rule out a perineural cyst. The CSF leak that occurs from iatrogenic cyst fenestration may not respond to traditional first-line treatments for intracranial hypotension and may require early surgical intervention. The authors would recommend neurosurgical involvement prior to definitive treatment. PMID:24905389

  20. Intracranial haemorrhage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fairhall, Jacob M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a rare, yet potentially devastating event in pregnancy. There is a risk of maternal mortality or morbidity and a significant risk to the unborn child. The risk of haemorrhage increases during the third trimester and is greatest during parturition and the puerperium. ICH can be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid or intraparenchymal. Causes of bleeding include trauma, arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, preeclampsia/eclampsia and venous thrombosis. Urgent neurosurgical conditions generally outweigh obstetric considerations in management decisions, although anaesthetic and surgical modifications can be made to minimize adverse effects to the fetus.

  1. Increased Intracranial Pressure in a Boy with Gorham-Stout Disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manisha K; Mittelstaedt, Brent R; Valentin, Frank E; Thomas, Linda P; Carlson, Christian L; Faux, Brian M; Hsieh, David T

    2016-01-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD), also known as vanishing bone disease, is a rare disorder, which most commonly presents in children and young adults and is characterized by an excessive proliferation of lymphangiomatous tissue within the bones. This lymphangiomatous proliferation often affects the cranium and, due to the proximate location to the dura surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, can result in CSF leaks manifesting as intracranial hypotension with clinical symptoms to include orthostatic headache, nausea, and vertigo. We present the case of a boy with GSD and a known history of migraine headaches who presented with persistent headaches due to increased intracranial pressure. Although migraine had initially been suspected, he was eventually diagnosed with intracranial hypertension after developing ophthalmoplegia and papilledema. We describe the first known instance of successful medical treatment of increased intracranial pressure in a patient with GSD. PMID:27194986

  2. Increased Intracranial Pressure in a Boy with Gorham-Stout Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manisha K.; Mittelstaedt, Brent R.; Valentin, Frank E.; Thomas, Linda P.; Carlson, Christian L.; Faux, Brian M.; Hsieh, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD), also known as vanishing bone disease, is a rare disorder, which most commonly presents in children and young adults and is characterized by an excessive proliferation of lymphangiomatous tissue within the bones. This lymphangiomatous proliferation often affects the cranium and, due to the proximate location to the dura surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, can result in CSF leaks manifesting as intracranial hypotension with clinical symptoms to include orthostatic headache, nausea, and vertigo. We present the case of a boy with GSD and a known history of migraine headaches who presented with persistent headaches due to increased intracranial pressure. Although migraine had initially been suspected, he was eventually diagnosed with intracranial hypertension after developing ophthalmoplegia and papilledema. We describe the first known instance of successful medical treatment of increased intracranial pressure in a patient with GSD. PMID:27194986

  3. Benign Essential Blepharospasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Benign Essential Blepharospasm Research Foundation 637 North 7th Street Suite 102 P.O. ... 832-0788 Fax: 409-832-0890 Dystonia Medical Research Foundation 1 East Wacker Drive Suite 2810 Chicago, IL ...

  4. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Gilday, D L; Ash, J M

    1976-01-01

    There is little information in the literature concerning the role of bone scanning in benign bone neoplasms except for sporadic reports. Since the advent of 99mTc-polyphosphate, bone imaging has proven feasible and useful in locating the cause of bone pain, such as in osteoid osteomas, which are not always radiologically apparent, and in evaluating whether or not a radiologic lesion is indeed benign and solitary. Blood-pool images are particularly important in neoplastic disease, since the absence of hyperemia in the immediate postinjection period favors the diagnosis of a benign neoplasm, as does low-grade uptake on the delayed study. The scan, including pinhole magnification images, is especially valuable in diagnosing lesions in the spine and pelvis, which are poorly seen radiologically. We have studied various types of benign bone tumors, including simple and aneurysmal bone cysts, fibrous cortical defects, and nonossifying fibromas, all of which had minimal or no increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical, unless traumatized. Although osteochondromas and enchondromas showed varied accumulation of activity, the scan was useful in differentiating these from sarcomatous lesions. All osteoid osteomas demonstrated marked activity, and could be accurately located preoperatively, as could the extent of fibrous dysplasia. The bone scan in the reticuloses also showed abnormal accumulation of activity, and aided in arriving at the prognosis and treatment of histiocytic bone lesions. PMID:1082170

  5. Hypertension - overview

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    If left untreated, hypertension can lead to the thickening of arterial walls causing its lumen, or blood passage way, to narrow in diameter. ... the narrowed arterial openings. In addition, people with hypertension may be more susceptible to stroke.

  6. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Renal hypertension; Hypertension - renovascular; Renal artery occlusion; Stenosis - renal artery; Renal artery stenosis ... Renal artery stenosis is a narrowing or blockage of the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys. The most ...

  7. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Renal hypertension; Hypertension - renovascular; Renal artery occlusion; Stenosis - renal artery; Renal artery stenosis ... blood pressure to rise. Risk factors for atherosclerosis: High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes High cholesterol Heavy alcohol use Cocaine ...

  8. Monitoring of intracranial pressure in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume-pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  9. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume–pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  10. Ectopic intracranial germinoma.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Samantha; Wu, Xiao; Kalra, Vivek B; Huttner, Anita J; Malhotra, Ajay

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial ectopic germinomas are often associated with synchronous midline disease. Germinomas involving the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare. The reported imaging appearance is not as varied as one might expect and a review of the literature reveals a few common imaging features amongst most ectopic lesions, including cyst formation. We report a 24-year-old man with panhypopituitarism. Neuroimaging revealed three enhancing lesions involving the pituitary infundibulum, the pineal region, and a parenchymal lesion involving the genu of the corpus callosum. The described ectopic mass, a parenchymal lesion, was associated with small peripheral cysts. Stereotactic biopsy and histopathological evaluation revealed this mass to be a germinoma. Following chemotherapy and radiation therapy, there was near-total resolution of the intracranial disease. Preoperative imaging plays an important role, not only in delineating the extent of disease, but also in assisting in generating an appropriate differential diagnosis. Germinomas in the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare but should be considered in the differential of any young patient with a characteristic cystic and solid intra-axial mass. PMID:27050919

  11. [Childhood hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takemura, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    For accurate diagnosis of childhood hypertension, selection of appropriate manchette size according to the child age and the circumstantial size of upper limb is essentially important. In addition, except for the emergency case of hypertension, repeated measurement of blood pressure would be desirable in several weeks interval. Recently, childhood hypertension might be closely related to the abnormality of maternal gestational period caused by the strict diet and the maternal smoking. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease(DOHaD) theory is now highlighted in the pathogenesis of adulthood hypertension. To prevent hypertension of small-for-date baby in later phase of life, maternal education for child nursing should be conducted. In children, secondary hypertension caused by renal, endocrinologic, or malignant disease is predominant rather than idiopathic hypertension. PMID:26619664

  12. Benign familial hyperphosphatasemia

    SciTech Connect

    Siraganian, P.A.; Mulvihill, J.J.; Mulivor, R.A.; Miller, R.W. )

    1989-03-03

    Elevated alkaline phosphatase activity in serum suggests bone or liver disease or a neoplasm but can also indicate pregnancy or another benign condition. A family with benign hyperphosphatasemia was studied to elucidate the genetics and enzyme defect. Serum total alkaline phosphatase activity was greater than the population mean in all six family members, and more than 7 SDs above the mean in two of four offspring. Monoclonal antibodies to three alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, intestinal, placental, and tissue nonspecific demonstrated markedly increased intestinal alkaline phosphatase levels in all family members and significantly elevated liver/bone/kidney activity in the two offspring. Guanidine hydrochloride denaturation of the liver/bone/kidney component showed high alkaline phosphatase activity from liver in both siblings and from bone in one. The mode of inheritance in this family is obscure, but a complex regulation of the products of two different alkaline phosphatase genes seems likely. Steps toward diagnosis are suggested. Early recognition of this benign biochemical abnormality should help to avoid unnecessary diagnostic tests.

  13. Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Janus, Agnieszka; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a severe medical condition which is estimated to appear in 9-18% of hypertensive patients. Due to higher cardiovascular risk, this disorder requires special diagnosis and treatment. The heterogeneous etiology, risk factors and comorbidities of resistant hypertension stand in need of sophisticated evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and select the best therapeutic options, which should consider lifestyle modifications as well as pharmacological and interventional treatment. After having excluded pseudohypertension, inappropriate blood pressure measurement and control as well as the white coat effect, suspicion of resistant hypertension requires an analysis of drugs which the hypertensive patient is treated with. According to one definition - ineffective treatment with 3 or more antihypertensive drugs including diuretics makes it possible to diagnose resistant hypertension. A multidrug therapy including angiotensin - converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to be effective in resistant hypertension treatment. Nevertheless, optional, innovative therapies, e.g. a renal denervation or baroreflex activation, may create a novel pathway of blood pressure lowering procedures. The right diagnosis of this disease needs to eliminate the secondary causes of resistant hypertension e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, atherosclerosis and renal or hormonal disorders. This paper briefly summarizes the identification of the causes of resistant hypertension and therapeutic strategies, which may contribute to the proper diagnosis and an improvement of the long term management of resistant hypertension. PMID:26935512

  14. Analysis of risk factors for perifocal oedema after endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial arterial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lukic, Snezana; Jankovic, Slobodan; Popovic, Katarina Surlan; Bankovic, Dragic; Popovic, Peter; Mijailovic, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Background Endovascular embolization is a treatment of choice for the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, but sometimes is complicated with perianeurysmal oedema. The aim of our study was to establish incidence and outcomes of perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and to reveal possible risk factors for development of this potentially serious complication. Methods In total 119 adult patients with endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysm (performed at Department for Interventional Neuroradiology, Clinical Center, Kragujevac, Serbia) were included in our study. The embolizations were made by electrolite-detachable platinum coils: pure platinum, hydrophilic and combination of platinum and hydrophilic coils. Primary outcome variable was perianeurysmal oedema visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 7, 30 and 90 days after the embolization. Results The perianurysmal oedema appeared in 47.6% of patients treated with hydrophilic coils, in 21.6% of patients treated with platinum coils, and in 53.8% of those treated with mixed type of the coils. The multivariate logistic regression showed that variables associated with occurrence of perianeurysmal oedema are volume of the aneurysm, hypertension, diabetes and smoking habit. Hypertension is the most important independent predictor of the perianeurysmal oedema, followed by smoking and diabetes. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that older patients with larger unruptured intracranial aneurysms, who suffer from diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and have the smoking habit, are under much higher risk of having perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling. PMID:26834520

  15. Malignant hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009:chap 89. Read More Acute kidney failure Alertness - decreased Angina Heart attack Preeclampsia Pulmonary edema Renovascular hypertension Seizures Stroke Update ...

  16. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  17. Trends in cognitive dysfunction following surgery for intracranial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, Manju; Gupta, Sandhya; Mohanty, Manju; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to prospectively assess the cognitive function of patients with intracranial tumors. Methods: The cognitive status of patients with intracranial tumors were prospectively studied before surgery, and later at 1 and 6 months following surgery, on purposive sampling, using validated post graduate institute (PGI) battery for brain dysfunction (score 0–30) with a higher dysfunction rating score indicating poor cognitive status. Results: Out of 23 patients enrolled, 20 could complete the study. They had substantial cognitive dysfunction before surgery (score 17.1 ± 9.4). Though there was no significant improvement (16.9 ± 9.0) at 1 month, the score improved significantly (10.3 ± 9.2) at 6 months following surgery (P = 0.008). The improvement was relatively subdued in intra-axial, malignant, and radiated tumors. Overall, there was a significant improvement in mental balance (P = 0.048), verbal retention of dissimilar pairs (P = 0.01), and recognition (P = 0.01), while dysfunction persisted in the domains of memory, verbal retention to similar pairs, and visual retention. Conclusion: Patients with intracranial tumors have substantial cognitive dysfunction, which tend to show significant improvement beyond 6 months following surgery, especially among tumors, which were extra-axial, benign, and nonirradiated. PMID:27114854

  18. Benign Metastasizing Leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Moss, Joel

    2016-09-01

    Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is a rare and poorly characterized disease affecting primarily premenopausal women. Asymptomatic patients are often diagnosed incidentally by radiographs or other lung-imaging procedures performed for other indications, and the diagnosis is eventually confirmed by biopsy. Patients with BML are usually treated pharmacologically with antiestrogen therapies or surgically with oophorectomy or hysterectomy. Antiestrogen therapy is typically efficacious and, in general, most patients have a favorable prognosis. Asymptomatic patients with a confirmed diagnosis of BML, may be followed conservatively without treatment. PMID:27514603

  19. Intracranial complications following mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Eyal, Ana; Kronenberg, Jona

    2004-01-01

    Mastoidectomy is a common surgical procedure in otology. However, postoperative complications of various degrees of severity may occur. We present 4 children who underwent mastoidectomy for middle ear and mastoid disease and developed postoperative intracranial complications. One child was operated on for brain abscess 1 week after the initial mastoidectomy. Another child appeared with seizures 5 days after the initial mastoidectomy and a subdural empyema was drained during revision surgery. Large bone defects with exposed middle cranial fossa dura were found at revision surgery in both cases and Proteus vulgaris and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the mastoid and abscess cavities in these children. A small epidural collection was diagnosed in the third patient 2 days after initial mastoid surgery and was managed with intravenous antibiotics only. The other child was found to have sigmoid sinus thrombosis the day after mastoidectomy that was performed for nonresponsive acute mastoiditis. This child received both intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulants. Timely revision surgery, combinations of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins with vancomycin or metronidazole and the addition of anticoagulants in cases of sinus thrombosis can lead to full recovery. PMID:15689642

  20. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  1. Benign follicular tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Oscar; Cardoso, José Carlos; Reis, José Pedro; Ramos, Leonor; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Inês; Baptista, António Poiares

    2015-01-01

    Benign follicular tumors comprise a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a common histogenesis and display morphological features resembling one or several portions of the normal hair follicle, or recapitulate part of its embryological development. Most cases present it as clinically nondescript single lesions and essentially of dermatological relevance. Occasionally, however, these lesions be multiple and represent a cutaneous marker of complex syndromes associated with an increased risk of visceral neoplasms. In this article, the authors present the microscopic structure of the normal hair follicle as a basis to understand the type and level of differentiation of the various follicular tumors. The main clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of benign follicular tumors are then discussed, including dilated pore of Winer, pilar sheath acanthoma, trichoadenoma, trichilemmoma, infundibuloma, proliferating trichilemmal cyst/tumor, trichoblastoma and its variants, pilomatricoma, trichodiscoma/fibrofolliculoma, neurofollicular hamartoma and trichofolliculoma. In addition, the main syndromes presenting with multiple follicular tumors are also discussed, namely Cowden, Birt-Hogg-Dubé, Rombo and Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndromes, as well as multiple tumors of follicular infundibulum (infundibulomatosis) and multiple trichoepitheliomas. Although the diagnosis of follicular tumors relies on histological examination, we highlight the importance of their knowledge for the clinician, especially when in presence of patients with multiple lesions that may be the cutaneous marker of a cancer-prone syndrome. The dermatologist is therefore in a privileged position to recognize these lesions, which is extremely important to provide further propedeutic, appropriate referral and genetic counseling for these patients. PMID:26734858

  2. Management of Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hoak, David A; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is a common cause of stroke worldwide, causing approximately 10 % of strokes in the USA and up to 50 % in Asian populations. Recurrent stroke risks are particularly high in those with a stenosis of 70 % or more and a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke. Warfarin has been associated with higher major hemorrhage rates and no reduction of recurrent stroke compared to aspirin in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. After early trials showed the feasibility of stenting, two randomized trials compared stenting plus medical management to medical management alone in symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Stenting was linked with increased risk and showed no benefit in any subpopulation of patients. Aggressive medical management in the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial was associated with half the risk of stroke compared to that in similar patients in a previous symptomatic intracranial stenosis trial after adjustment of confounding characteristics. Aggressive medical management comprises risk factor control, including a target systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, a low density lipoprotein <70 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1C <7.0 %, and lifestyle management that incorporates exercise, smoking cessation and weight management, and the use of antithrombotics. PMID:27443379

  3. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  4. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation. PMID:18769797

  5. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  6. Treatment of intracranial foreign body.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Dursun, Recep; Kiymaz, Nejmi

    2014-07-01

    Craniospinal penetrating foreign body (FB) injuries are interesting, but rarely observed, cases. They are important in terms of the complications that they may cause. The etiologies of craniospinal penetrating injuries and intracranial FB are also different. Though a sewing needle is more rarely seen in an intracranial FB, it may occur as atttempted infanticide or as a result of an accident especially in early childhood before the closure of fontanels. We detected an intracranial sewing needle in the head radiograph of a case admitted to the emergency department for another reason. We present this case since this is a rare injury and the etiologies of craniospinal penetrating foreign body have different characteristics. PMID:25255596

  7. Intravenous labetolol in treating hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion for procedural sedation.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Moni, Amarnath; Mathews, Lailu; Balaji, Sudarshan

    2016-03-01

    Dexmedetomidine is widely used for procedural sedation because of its unique combination of sedation, analgesia, and anxiolysis with minimal respiratory depression. Transient hypertension has been reported during the use of dexmedetomidine which is usually benign and is taken over by the hypotensive response on continuing the infusion. We report a case of hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion used for procedural sedation, necessitating discontinuation of the infusion and treatment of hypertension. The dilemmas involved in treating hypertension caused by dexmedetomidine are discussed. PMID:26897444

  8. Hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, E B; Escalante, C

    1989-07-01

    Hypertensive crisis is an acute emergency requiring aggressive management. Its incidence has decreased in recent years but still is prevalent in the medical community. From review of past and present treatment regimens, the following recommendations can be considered. (1) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated CHF, sodium nitroprusside is still an excellent agent. It has a rapid onset of action and blood pressure can be easily titrated. Nitroglycerin is also another agent that can be used in this situation. (2) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated aortic dissection, trimethophan camsylate is the preferred agent. An alternative choice is the combination of nitroprusside and labetalol. (3) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated myocardial ischemia, an excellent choice is nitroglycerin. Labetalol also should be considered in this situation. (4) In the treatment of hypertension during pregnancy, hydralazine is still a good choice. Labetalol has also been shown to be efficacious. (5) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated cerebral ischemia, the following drugs should be considered: nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, and labetalol. The most important attribute of these agents is that they are nonsedating and rapid in onset. (6) In the treatment of postoperative hypertension the choices best suited are labetalol, enalapril, nitroprusside, and nitroglycerin. These agents are rapid in onset and all can be administered intravenously. PMID:2670090

  9. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  10. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  11. [Dynamics of intracranial pressure in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A S; Burov, S A; Petrikov, S S; Asratian, S A; Gorshkov, K M; Krylov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the value of ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy. 12 patients with massive ischemic stroke were performed ICP monitoring after decompressive craniotomy. We identified 3 types of ICP dynamics: a) normal ICP, which no need to treat; b) ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more in postoperative period, which can be treated by nonsurgical therapy; c) refractory to therapy ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more with development of intracranial hypertension. We consider that ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy can be useful for optimization of the therapy and correction of intracranial hypertension. PMID:24341041

  12. Transethmoidal encephalocele after reduction of high intracranial pressure in aqueductal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Guive; Alavi, Ehsan; Jalessi, Maryam; Haddadian, Karim; Faramarzi, Faezeh

    2014-01-01

    Acquired non-traumatic transethmoidal encephaloceles are very infrequent lesions that are generally caused by a tumor or hydrocephalus. As far as we know, there is no reported case of encephalocele after CSF diversion in the literature. We present a 25-year-old woman with hydrocephalus due to aquiductal stenosis who was treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Nine months later, she had developed rhinorrhea and on imaging she had a transethmoidal encephalocele. She underwent endonasal endoscopic repair of the defect and removal of herniated parenchyma. CSF diversion to parasellar cisterns is not a known iatrogenic cause of basal encephalocele and is not noted elsewhere as a complication of third ventriculostomy. However, as third ventriculostomy is performed usually for intracranial hypertension treatment and intracranial hypertension itself is a known but rare cause of lacunar skull defect and encephalocele, this co-incidence may occur. PMID:24535796

  13. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  15. [Benign endobronchial tumors].

    PubMed

    Nikhtianov, Kh

    1980-01-01

    Endobronchial localizations of benign neoplasms are met with in 24.5 per cent of the cases. Right lung localizations are more frequent. More than half of them are broadly based (57.5 per cent). In most of the cases it is a matter of nonepithelial tumours of which a greater intensity is displayed by hamartomas /7/, vascular /4/ and neurogenic /3/ neoformations. The size of endobronchial tumours varies from 1 to 10 cm. Cases measuring 1-3 cm are the most numerous. Those of the "iceberg" type appear to be larger. The size per se has a relative importance for the clinical picture. Endobronchial tumours exhibit a clear cut clinical picture, and run a clinical course in three stages, determined by the degree of bronchial obturation and longstanding of the condition. The most common symptoms are coughing /80.7 per cent/, expectoration /50.0 per cent/, rales /57.6 per cent/, dullness /38.4 per cent/ and lacking respiration /38.4 per cent/. The nosological entity by itself is less conclusive for the clinical course. The X-ray data have orientation and by no means decisive significance for the diagnosis. The "crab pincers" sign in the bronchial lumen during bronchography has a definite importance. Bronchoscopy in conjunction with biopsy is a dependable method of preoperative diagnosing. It contributes greatly to the nosological diagnosis. Even nowadays, the diagnosis of endobronchial tumours is difficult. A rather exact diagnosis can be made intraoperatively, whereas the most accurate diagnosis is established only after histological study. The treatment of endobronchial benign neoplasms is operative. The number of medium /lobectomies/ and extensive /pulmonectomies/ pulmonary resections is considerable. In case of early diagnosis and intervention, sparing resection is the naturally indicated size of operation - mainly resection and plasty of the bronchi without lobectomy. The advantages of circular resection are substantial. Reconstructive operations of "clarinet" and

  16. [Hypertensive retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Genevois, Olivier; Paques, Michel

    2010-01-20

    Acute hypertensive retinopathy should be distinguished from retinal arteriolosclerosis. The presence of microvascular abnormalities in the ocular fundus increases the risk of heart and/or brain attack. At the clinical level, the current classification of chronic hypertensive retinopathy is based on the long-term risk of stroke. In research, a great number of studies are focused on the predictive value of retinal vascular diameters related to the general micro- and macrovascular disease. PMID:20222306

  17. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  18. Intracranial haemorrhage and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Cheah, I G; Kasim, M S; Shafie, H M; Khoo, T H

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in child abuse cases in developed countries. However, similar data are not available in most developing countries. This study therefore aimed to determine the incidence of intracranial haemorrhage amongst all cases of child physical abuse, the nature of the injuries incurred, and the morbidity and mortality resulting therefrom. Among 369 cases of physical abuse seen over a 4-year period, 41 (11.4%) had intracranial haemorrhage, of whom 37 (90%) were 2 years old or less. A history of trauma was present in only eight (20%), of which only two were compatible with the injuries incurred. Subdural haemorrhages accounted for 80% of the cases, with skull fractures present in only nine cases. Fifty-four per cent of the 37 children aged 2 years of age or less had no external signs of trauma, but 11 of them had retinal haemorrhages. This is in contrast to the children older than 2 years of age who all had external signs of trauma. The overall prognosis was dismal with an early mortality of almost 30% (13 cases) and at least seven cases with severe neurological sequelae. These findings are comparable with studies from developed countries which have established that non-accidental injury must be considered as a cause of intracranial haemorrhage in any young child, despite the absence of external signs of trauma. PMID:7880096

  19. Intracranial Schwannoma in a Cow

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, S. A.; Kasari, T. R.; Parent, J. M.; Naylor, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A nine year old Hereford crossbred cow with a history of progressive neurological signs was referred to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon. A large intracranial mass, histologically identified as a schwannoma, was found to be compressing the left brain stem and appeared to have arisen from the left fifth cranial nerve. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17422375

  20. Systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elliott, William J

    2007-04-01

    Hypertension is a growing public health problem worldwide. Only 37% of American hypertensives currently have their blood pressures controlled. Hypertension is traditionally diagnosed in the medical office, but both home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can help. Lifestyle modifications are recommended for everyone who has higher than "normal" blood pressure (<120/80 mm Hg). Voluminous clinical trial data support beginning drug therapy with low-dose chlorthalidone, unless the patient has a specific indication for a different drug. Additional drugs (typically in the sequence, angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker, calcium antagonist, beta-blocker, alpha-blocker, aldosterone antagonist, direct vasodilator, and centrally acting alpha(2)-agonist) can be added to achieve the blood pressure goal (usually <140/90 mm Hg, but <130/80 mm Hg for diabetics and those with chronic kidney disease). Special circumstances exist for treatment of hypertension in pregnancy, in childhood, in the elderly, and in both extremes of blood pressure (pre-hypertension or hypertensive emergencies). PMID:17398315

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  2. Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Bilal; Forde, James C; Thomas, Dominique Dana Marie; Laor, Leanna; Hossack, Tania; Woo, Henry H; Te, Alexis E; Kaplan, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which causes lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), is a common diagnosis among the ageing male population with increasing prevalence. Many risks factors, both modifiable and non-modifiable, can increase the risk of development and progression of BPH and LUTS. The symptoms can be obstructive (resulting in urinary hesitancy, weak stream, straining or prolonged voiding) or irritative (resulting in increased urinary frequency and urgency, nocturia, urge incontinence and reduced voiding volumes), or can affect the patient after micturition (for example, postvoid dribble or incomplete emptying). BPH occurs when both stromal and epithelial cells of the prostate in the transitional zone proliferate by processes that are thought to be influenced by inflammation and sex hormones, causing prostate enlargement. Patients with LUTS undergo several key diagnostic investigations before being diagnosed with BPH. Treatment options for men with BPH start at watchful waiting and progress through medical to surgical interventions. For the majority of patients, the starting point on the treatment pathway will be dictated by their symptoms and degree of bother. PMID:27147135

  3. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  4. Baritosis: a benign pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Doig, A T

    1976-01-01

    Baritosis is one of the benign pneumoconioses in which inhaled particulate matter lies in the lungs for years without producing symptoms, abnormal physical signs, incapacity for work, interference with lung function, or liability to develop pulmonary or bronchial infections or other thoracic disease. Owing to the high radio-opacity of barium, the discrete shadows in the chest radiograph are extremely dense. Even in the most well-marked cases with extreme profusion of the opacities, massive shadows do not occur. When exposure to barium dust ceases the opacities begin slowly to disappear. Nine cases of baritosis occurring in a small factory in which barytes was crushed, graded, and milled are described. Two of the cases occurred after only 18 and 21 month's exposure, and 9 of the 10 men employed for more than one and a half years had baritosis. Five of the affected men examined at intervals since their exposure to barytes ceased in 1964 showed marked clearing of their radiological abnormalities. Images PMID:1257935

  5. Hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C

    1995-11-01

    Hypertensive emergencies are uncommon and physiologically diverse. Consequently, it is difficult for most physicians to develop a familiarity with all the different hypertensive crises and with all drugs available for treating them (Table 4). Clinicians should not agonize over which is the perfect therapeutic agent for a particular emergency, but instead, they should focus on scrupulous monitoring and familiarize themselves with a few agents that will serve in most situations. Generally, these agents will be sodium nitroprusside and nitroglycerin. Vigilant neurologic monitoring is mandatory in all hypertensive emergencies. The early symptoms and signs of cerebral hypoperfusion can be vague and subtle, but if recognized, serious complications of therapy can be avoided. Remember, the patient may still be hypertensive. Avoid acute (during the first hour) reductions in MAP of more than 20% whenever possible; subsequent reductions should be gradual. In patients known to have markedly elevated ICP and who need acute reductions in their BP, serious consideration should be given to direct monitoring of the ICP so that CPP can be maintained within safe limits. In general, oral agents should not be used for the treatment of hypertensive emergencies. Intravenous Labetalol and intravenous nicardipine are not suitable for general use in hypertensive emergencies. In special situations (e.g., perioperative hypertension and subarachnoid hemorrhage), however, they may be employed. Their role may expand with further study. Trimethaphan may be superior to nitroprusside for hypertension complicated by elevated ICP or cerebral dysfunction. Realistically, most physicians will continue to use nitroprusside. Intense neurologic monitoring is more important than the specific agent used. Nitroglycerin is the agent of choice for acute ischemic heart disease complicated by severe hypertension; if it fails, use nitroprusside. For aortic dissection, the combination of nitroprusside and IV

  6. Hypertensive urgency: an important aetiology of rebound hypertension.

    PubMed

    Malaty, John; Malaty, Irene A

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year-old African-American man with a history of hypertension, end-stage kidney disease (on haemodialysis) and previous cocaine misuse presented to the emergency room with a sudden onset of severe headache and diaphoresis without other neurological or cardiovascular signs/symptoms. He checked his blood pressure at home and found it to be 230/130. It did not improve despite taking two serial doses of oral clonidine 0.3 mg. Evaluation with head CT and lumbar puncture demonstrated no acute intracranial process, such as subarachnoid haemorrhage. These symptoms started after he took Libido-Max, an over-the-counter supplement for erectile dysfunction. This supplement includes yohimbine, an α-2 antagonist, which counteracts the effects of oral clonidine, one of his routine antihypertensive medications. This led to rebound hypertension and made his hypertensive urgency resistant to oral clonidine. He was successfully treated with intravenous labetalol and his symptoms quickly resolved after lowering of his blood pressure. PMID:25336552

  7. Petrous apex cephalocoele: contribution of coexisting intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Duran, S; Hatipoglu, H G; Cılız, D S; Elverici, E; Sakman, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to show the MRI findings of petrous apex cephalocoele (PAC) and the other intracranial pathologies that coexist with PAC, and to discuss the contribution of the co-existing pathologies to aetiopathogenesis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of our imaging archive for the period from January 2012 to October 2013 revealed 13 patients with PAC (12 females and 1 male; age range, 26–69 years). 11 patients underwent MRI examination of the cranium, and 2 patients underwent MRI examination of the sellar region. We evaluated the lesions for content, signal intensity, enhancement, relation to petrous apex and Meckel's cave. Images were also evaluated for coexisting pathologies. Results: The presenting symptoms included headache, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and trigeminal neuropathy. All patients had PAC. All lesions were located posterolateral to the Meckel's cave and were isointense with CSF signal on all pulse sequences. All lesions were continuous with Meckel's cave. Coexisting pathologies included intracranial aneurysmal dilatation, empty sella, mass in hypophysis, arachnoid cyst, inferior herniation of parahippocampal gyrus and optic nerve sheath CSF distension. Conclusion: Coexistence with other intracranial pathologies supports the possibility of CSF imbalance and/or intracranial hypertension in the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. Advances in knowledge: This study examined the contribution of the co-existing intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. PMID:25651410

  8. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  9. [Portopulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Halank, M; Miehlke, S; Kolditz, M; Hoeffken, G

    2005-07-01

    Patients with portal hypertension may develop pulmonary complications such as hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) or portopulmonary hypertension (PPHT). PPHT is defined as elevated pulmonary pressure, elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and portal hypertension in the absence of other known causes pulmonary hypertension. Various factors such as hyperdynamic circulation, volume overload, and circulating vasoactive mediators are suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of PPHT. The prognosis of patients with severe PPHT is significantly reduced due to the risk of right heart failure. In patients with moderate to severe PPHT liver transplantation is associated with a significantly increased mortality. The chief symptom of PPHT may be dyspnoe in the presence of typical histomorphological alterations comparable with idiopathic pulmonary hypertension. Continuous intravenous application of prostacyclin is currently regarded as the treatment of choice for patients with severe PPHT. Inhaled prostacyclin or its analogue iloprost or oral treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan may be promising alternatives which should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:16001350

  10. Diagnosing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Padwal, Raj; Cloutier, Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To highlight the 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension. Quality of evidence A systematic search was performed current to August 2014 by a Cochrane Collaboration librarian using the MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The search results were critically appraised by the CHEP subcommittee on blood pressure (BP) measurement and diagnosis, and evidence-based recommendations were presented to the CHEP Central Review Committee for independent review and grading. Finally, the findings and recommendations were presented to the Recommendations Task Force for discussion, debate, approval, and voting. The main recommendations are based on level II evidence. Main message Based on the most recent evidence, CHEP has made 4 recommendations in 2 broad categories for 2015 to improve BP measurement and the way hypertension is diagnosed. A strong recommendation is made to use electronic BP measurement in the office setting to replace auscultatory BP measurement. For patients with elevated office readings, CHEP is recommending early use of out-of-office BP measurement, preferably ambulatory BP measurement, in order to identify early in the process those patients with white-coat hypertension. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostic accuracy are critical to optimizing hypertension management in Canada. The annual updates provided by CHEP ensure that practitioners have up-to-date evidence-based information to inform practice. PMID:26564654

  11. Intracranial nonvestibular neurinomas: Young neurosurgeons’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Forhad Hossain; Haque, Mohammod R.; Kawsar, Khandkar A.; Sarker, Mainul H.; Hasan, Mahmudul; Goel, Atul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Neurinoma arising from other than nonvestibular cranial nerves is less prevalent. Here we present our experiences regarding the clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, and the outcome of nonvestibular cranial nerve neurinomas. Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2011, the recorded documents of operated nonvestibular intracranial neurinomas were retrospectively studied for clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, complications, follow-up, and outcomes. Results: The average follow-up was 24.5 months. Total number of cases was 30, with age ranging from 9 to 60 years. Sixteen cases were males and 14 were females. Nonvestibular cranial nerve schwannomas most commonly originated from trigeminal nerve followed by glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve. There were three abducent nerve schwannomas that are very rare. There was no trochlear nerve schwannoma. Two glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve schwannomas extended into the neck through jugular foramen and one extended into the upper cervical spinal canal. Involved nerve dysfunction was a common clinical feature except in trigeminal neurinomas where facial pain was a common feature. Aiming for no new neurodeficit, total resection of the tumor was done in 24 cases, and near-total resection or gross total resection or subtotal resection was done in 6 cases. Preoperative symptoms improved or disappeared in 25 cases. New persistent deficit occurred in 3 cases. Two patients died postoperatively. There was no recurrence of tumor till the last follow-up. Conclusion: Nonvestibular schwannomas are far less common, but curable benign lesions. Surgical approach to the skull base and craniovertebral junction is a often complex and lengthy procedure associated with chances of significant morbidity. But early diagnosis, proper investigations, and evaluation, along with appropriate decision making and surgical planning with microsurgical techniques are the

  12. Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo Yuan; Zong, Miao; Zong, Wen Jing; Sun, Yan Hui; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Hong Bo

    2016-10-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare histioproliferative disorder that only occasionally involves the central nervous system. We present the diagnosis and treatment of five patients with intracranial RDD. The patients were preoperatively misdiagnosed as meningioma or eosinophilic granuloma. All five patients were treated by total or subtotal surgical resection and none of them experienced recurrence. Histopathological examination showed a characteristic emperipolesis, the lymphocytes were engulfed in the S-100 protein and CD68 positive histiocytes, with negative expression of CD1a. Preoperative diagnosis of intracranial RDD is still challenging because the lesion is usually a dural-based lesion that mimics a meningioma. Surgical resection is an effective treatment and radiotherapy, steroid and chemotherapy has not demonstrated reliable therapeutic efficiency. PMID:27561856

  13. Clinical Analysis of Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Joo; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Sung; Lee, Youn-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracranial hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are rare tumors with aggressive behavior, including local recurrence and distant metastasis. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of grossly total resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for these tumors. Methods A total of 13 patients treated for intracranial HPC from January 1995 through May 2013 were included in this retrospective study. We analyzed the clinical presentations, radiologic appearances, treatment results, and follow-up outcomes, as well as reviewed other studies. Results The ages of the patients at the time of diagnosis ranged from 26 to 73 years (mean : 48 years). The majority of the patients were male (92.3%), and the majority of the tumors were located in the parasagittal and falx. The ratio of intracranial HPCs to meningiomas was 13 : 598 in same period, or 2.2%. Seven patients (53.8%) had anaplastic HPCs. Nine patients (69.2%) underwent gross total tumor resection in the first operation without mortality. Eleven patients (84.6%) underwent postoperative adjuvant RT. Follow-up period ranged from 13 to 185 months (mean : 54.3 months). The local recurrence rate was 46.2% (6/13), and there were no distant metastases. The 10-year survival rate after initial surgery was 83.9%. The initial mean Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) was 70.8 and the final mean KPS was 64.6. Conclusion Gross total tumor resection upon initial surgery is very important. We believe that adjuvant RT is helpful even with maximal tumor resection. Molecular biologic analyses and chemotherapy studies are required to achieve better outcomes in recurrent intracranial HPCs. PMID:24294454

  14. Intracranial ependymoma: factors affecting outcome.

    PubMed

    Massimino, Maura; Buttarelli, Francesca R; Antonelli, Manila; Gandola, Lorenza; Modena, Piergiorgio; Giangaspero, Felice

    2009-03-01

    Ependymomas account for 2-9% of all neuroepithelial tumors, amounting to 6-12% of all intracranial tumors in children and up to 30% of those in children younger than 3 years. Recent findings provide evidence that intracranial and spinal ependymomas share similar molecular profiles with the radial glia of their corresponding locations. The management of intracranial ependymoma is still not optimal. The 5-year progression-free survival for children with ependymoma ranges between 30 and 50% with a worse prognosis for patients with residual disease after surgery. The prognostic relevance of most factors are still being debated. Recent studies, in which the current WHO classification criteria were applied, reported the relationship between histological grade and outcome. Biomolecular studies have identified that gain of 1q25 and EGFR overexpression correlate to poor prognosis, whereas low expression of nucleolin correlated with a favorable outcome. Ependymomas have been considered a 'surgical disease', where completeness of excision can be reached in approximately half of the cases. At present the standard treatment is radiation therapy for all patients after gross-total or near-total resection. For high-risk patients, with residual tumor, an interesting, although experimental, approach could be chemotherapy followed by secondary surgery and postoperative conformal irradiation. PMID:19284379

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anticoagulants (blood-thinning medicine) Calcium channel blockers Diuretics (water pills) Digoxin Your doctor will decide what type of medicine is right for you. In some cases, people who have pulmonary hypertension need surgical treatment. Surgical treatment options include a lung transplant and ...

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood ... heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and ... of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  17. Portopulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong; Han, Guohong; Fan, Daiming

    2016-07-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) refers to the condition that pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occur in the stetting of portal hypertension. The development of PoPH is thought to be independent of the severity of portal hypertension or the etiology or severity of liver disease. PoPH results from excessive vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling, and proliferative and thrombotic events within the pulmonary circulation that lead to progressive right ventricular failure and ultimately to death. Untreated PoPH is associated with a poor prognosis. As PoPH is frequently asymptomatic or symptoms are generally non-specific, patients should be actively screened for the presence of PoPH. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography is a useful non-invasive screening tool, but a definitive diagnosis requires invasive hemodynamic confirmation by right heart catheterization. Despite a dearth of randomized, prospective data, an ever-expanding clinical experience shows that patients with PoPH benefit from therapy with PAH-specific medications including with endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and/or prostanoids. Due to high perioperative mortality, transplantation should be avoided in those patients who have severe PoPH that is refractory to medical therapy. PMID:27002212

  18. Hypertensive leucocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rajkumari, Rolinda; Laishram, Deben; Thiyam, Joshna; Javan, Ng

    2013-04-01

    There are studies showing association of high WBC count with the higher incidence of hypertension though a few are done in the Indian population. The present study was conducted with the view to find any significant increase in total leucocyte count and differential leucocyte count in hypertensive patient Twenty-seven hypertensives with 12 males and 15 females and 27 age and sex matched control subjects (normotensive) were studied. Hypertension was defined when the systolic BP > or = 140 mmHg or diastolic BP > or = 90 mmHg or history of taking antihypertensive medicine. Three blood pressure recordings at an interval of 2 minutes were taken after the patient was made to sit for 30 minutes with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer in the left arm. The disappearance of sound was used for diastolic blood pressure. Blood was drawn into EDTA containing vials. Two separate counts were performed: First for total leucocyte count (TLC) and second for determination of percentage of polymorphonuclear cells. For the TLC, 0.5 part of blood mixed with 10 part of Turk's fluid followed by counting of leucocyte in a counting chamber under light microscope. The percentage of polymorphonuclear leucocyte was performed on a slide after making the slide and staining it with Leishman's stain. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was performed using Wintrobe's methods. The first 1 hour reading on the Wintrobe's tube was taken for analysis. The total leucocyte count (TLC) for the study group as compared to the controls were 7413.70 +/- 735.45 cells/cmm and 5236.30 +/- 528.77 cells/ cmm which was statistically significant. The mean percentage neutrophils were 62.04 +/- 4.99 for study group and 53.00 +/- 3.44 for the controls; the mean percentage lymphocytes for the study group and the controls were 34.37 +/- 4.55 and 39.11 +/- 4.40 respectively. Both the mean percentage neutrophils and lymphocytes showed significant differences. The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) also showed

  19. Young Women with a Long Past of Resistant Hypertension Cured after Surgery of Severe Bilateral Ostial Renal Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Simonnet, Blandine; Deharo, Pierre; Rouabah, Karim; Silhol, François; Soler, Raphael; Bartoli, Jean Michel; Lévrier, Olivier; Bartoli, Michel Alain; Magnan, Pierre Edouard; Sarlon-Bartoli, Gabrielle

    2016-07-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is an underdiagnosed disease which can affect young people and with poor prognosis such as dissection or aneurysm rupture if unknown. This case illustrates a multi-vessel FMD with symptomatic severe bilateral ostial renal artery stenosis and intracranial aneurysms. One of the original features is a very late delay to diagnosis with 23 years between onset of hypertension and renal stenosis diagnosis, particularly due to lower quality of initial CT scan with milder and uncommon abnormalities. The experiment neuroradiologist had suspected the diagnosis of renal FMD because she developed intracranial aneurysms and he confirmed this diagnosis with an artery renal contrast injection during an intracranial angiogram Because of very tight and short stenosis, surgery was chosen for treatment and permitted the cure of hypertension, with normal home blood pressure after 6 months. Several particularities of FMD were presented in this case: important delay diagnosis due to rare lesion and lower sensitivity of CT in this form, the possibility to perform an angiography in high suspicion of FMD, poor prognosis risk with intracranial aneurisms and premature birth child, and the choice for surgery with cure of hypertension. We thought that hypertension etiologic evaluation must be repeated in case of resistant hypertension in young patients, particularly when they developed intracranial aneurysms. PMID:27174348

  20. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept. PMID:21862201

  1. Neisseria sicca meningitis following intracranial hemorrhage and ventriculostomy tube placement.

    PubMed

    Carter, J Elliot; Mizell, Kelly N; Evans, Tara N

    2007-12-01

    A normal component of the flora of the oropharynx, Neisseria sicca was first isolated in 1906 and has since been reported as a rare cause of various human infections including endocarditis, pneumonia, sinusitis, sepsis, and urethritis. We report the case of a 44-year-old African-American female with a history of hypertension who presented with complaints of right frontal headache, nausea, photophobia, and vomiting. A computed tomography scan of the patient's brain showed a large subarachnoid hemorrhage, and an arteriogram confirmed a large posterior communicating artery aneurysm. A ventriculostomy tube was placed, and the patient subsequently developed an elevated temperature and elevated white blood cell count. Cerebrospinal fluid studies showed elevated protein and glucose levels and cultures positive for N. sicca. This is only the seventh reported case of culture-proven meningitis related to N. sicca, and the first reported case associated with intracranial hemorrhage and ventriculostomy tube placement. PMID:17904282

  2. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  3. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  4. The rare benign liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Skalicky, T; Treska, V; Liska, V; Sutnar, A; Molacek, J; Mirka, H; Ferda, J; Ohlidalova, K

    2007-01-01

    As opposed to malignant secondary tumors, metastases of the colorectal carcinoma are benign tumors of the liver that are quite rare in the Czech Republic. From the 55 patients operated on since 2000 at our department for benign liver tumors, the most frequent are haemangiomas, focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and hepatocelular adenoma. Only 7.3% of them form a different histological type of a tumor than this most frequently occurring trio of tumors. The authors describe three cases of rather rare liver tumors with benign behavior that have the potential of becoming malignant. It concerns mucin producing biliary tumors, which correspond to the pancreatic intraductal papillary mucin tumor, hepatic cystadenoma with ovarian stroma and a liver hamartoma in an adult patient (Ref 13). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:17694811

  5. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    Salako, Babatunde L.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Cooper, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH), isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH), and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH). Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5%) and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7%) were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2%) was higher among males (P = 0.048). Female subjects were more obese (P < 0.0001) and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations. PMID:25389499

  6. Intracranial volume in craniosynostotic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Burrows, A M; Wigginton, W; Singhal, V K; Losken, H W; Smith, T D; Dechant, J; Towbin, A; Cooper, G M; Towbin, R; Siegel, M I

    1998-05-01

    Although craniosynostosis alters brain growth direction resulting in compensatory changes in the neurocranium, it has been suggested that such compensations occur with little reduction in intracranial volume (ICV). This hypothesis was tested in a rabbit model with nonsyndromic, familial coronal suture synostosis. Cross-sectional three-dimensional computed tomographic head scans were obtained from 79 rabbits (25 normal, 28 with delayed-onset synostosis, and 26 with early-onset synostosis) at 25, 42, and 126 days of age. Intracranial contents were reconstructed and indirect ICV was calculated. Results revealed that by 25 days of age the intracranial contents from early-onset synostosed rabbit skulls showed rostral (anterior) constrictions and a "beaten copper" morphology in the parietal and temporal regions compared with the other two groups. These deformities increased in severity with age. Quantitatively, ICV was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 7% in rabbits with early-onset synostosis compared with both control rabbits and rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis at 25 days of age. By 126 days of age, ICV in rabbits with synostosis was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by 11% in early-onset synostosis and by 8% in delayed-onset synostosis compared with normal rabbits. Results suggest that in rabbits with uncorrected craniosynostosis, compensatory changes in the neurocranium were not adequate to allow normal expansion of the neurocapsular matrix. Further research is needed to determine if ICV reduction is correlated with cerebral atrophy or cerebral spinal fluid (i.e., ventricular or subarachnoid) space compression in this model. PMID:9693554

  7. Transnasal, intracranial penetrating injury treated endoscopically.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Erdem Atalay; Okan, Cinemre; Pelin, Kesapli

    2006-04-01

    Intracranial penetrating injury through the nose is uncommon. We present the case of a four-year-old girl who sustained a transnasal, intracranial penetrating injury with a sharp wooden object. We performed endoscopic removal of the foreign body and repair of the associated cerebrospinal fluid fistula. PMID:16623978

  8. Megadolicho vascular malformation of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1981-01-01

    A patient is presented suffering a hemiparesis. Megadolicho-vascular malformation of the intracranial part of the internal carotid arteries and some of its branches and of the basilar artery was suggested by CT and confirmed by angiography. The value of CT compared with angiography in relation to intracranial megadolicho vascular malformations is discussed. PMID:6273040

  9. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  10. Pathogenesis of benign adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel

    2010-12-01

    Most adrenocortical tumors (ACT) are benign unilateral adrenocortical adenomas, often discovered incidentally. Exceptionally, ACT are bilateral. However bilateral ACT have been very helpful to progress in the pathophysiology of ACT. Although most ACT are of sporadic origin, they may also be part of syndromic and/or hereditary disorders. The identification of the genetics of familial diseases associated with benign ACT has been helpful to define somatic alterations in sporadic ACT: for example, identification of PRKAR1A mutations in Carney complex or alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Coli. Components of the cAMP signaling pathway-for example, adrenocorticotropic-hormone receptors and other membrane receptors, Gs protein, phosphodiesterases and protein kinase A-can be altered to various degrees in benign cortisol-secreting ACT. These progress have been important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of benign ACT, but already have profound implications for clinical management, for example in unraveling the genetic origin of disease in some patients with ACT. They also have therapeutic consequences, and should help to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:21115158