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Sample records for benthic nepheloid layer

  1. Response of the benthic nepheloid layer to near-inertial internal waves in southern Lake Michigan

    E-print Network

    Response of the benthic nepheloid layer to near-inertial internal waves in southern Lake Michigan-inertial internal waves are correlated with variations in the thickness and in the vertical distribution of suspended sediment in the benthic nepheloid layer. Although a direct causal link between internal wave

  2. Suspended sediment transport in the benthic nepheloid layer in southeastern Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, N.; Lesht, B.M.

    1995-02-01

    Time series observations of water temperature, water transparency, and current velocity were made at four stations located on the lake slope of southeastern Lake Michigan. The observations show that during stratified conditions the benthic nepheloid layer is probably not maintained by the local resuspension of bottom sediment. A more likely source is sediment resuspended further inshore and then transported across the shelf and slope during downwelling events. Internal wave action may be an important source of energy for this transport. Although sediment trap studies suggest that resuspension does occur, it is more likely that increased fluxes observed near the bottom are due to the vertical redistribution of material already in suspension. A benthic nepheloid layer also exists at times during the unstratified period, when occassionally enough energy reaches the bottom to directly resuspend bottom material at the sites.

  3. Benthic nepheloid layers in the Gulf of Maine and Alexandrium cyst inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilskaln, C. H.; Hayashi, K.; Keafer, B. A.; Anderson, D. M.; McGillicuddy, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    Cysts residing in benthic nepheloid layers (BNLs) documented in the Gulf of Maine have been proposed as a possible source of inoculum for annual blooms of a toxic dinoflagellate in the region. Herein we present a spatially extensive data set of the distribution and thickness of benthic nepheloid layers in the Gulf of Maine and the abundance and inventories of suspended Alexandrium fundyense cysts within these near-bottom layers. BNLs are pervasive throughout the gulf and adjacent Bay of Fundy with maximum layer thicknesses of 50-60 m observed. Mean BNL thickness is 30 m in the eastern gulf and Bay of Fundy, and 20 m in the western gulf. Cyst densities in the near-bottom particle resuspension layers varied by three orders of magnitude across the gulf with maxima of 105 cysts m-3. An important interconnection of elevated BNL cyst densities is observed between the Bay of Fundy, the Maine Coastal Current and the south-central region of the gulf. BNL cyst inventories estimated for the eastern and western gulf are each on the order of 1015 cysts, whereas the BNL inventory in the Bay of Fundy is on the order of 1016. Although BNL cyst inventories in the eastern and western gulf are 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the abundance of cysts in the upper 1 cm of sediment in those regions, BNL and sediment-bound cyst inventories are comparable in the Bay of Fundy. The existence of widespread BNLs containing substantial cyst inventories indicates that these near-bottom layers represent an important source of germinating A. fundyense cysts in the region.

  4. Benthic nepheloid layers in the Gulf of Maine and Alexandrium cyst inventories.

    PubMed

    Pilskaln, C H; Hayashi, K; Keafer, B A; Anderson, D M; McGillicuddy, D J

    2014-05-01

    Cysts residing in benthic nepheloid layers (BNLs) documented in the Gulf of Maine have been proposed as a possible source of inoculum for annual blooms of a toxic dinoflagellate in the region. Herein we present a spatially extensive data set of the distribution and thickness of benthic nepheloid layers in the Gulf of Maine and the abundance and inventories of suspended Alexandrium fundyense cysts within these near-bottom layers. BNLs are pervasive throughout the gulf and adjacent Bay of Fundy with maximum layer thicknesses of 50-60 m observed. Mean BNL thickness is 30 m in the eastern gulf and Bay of Fundy, and 20 m in the western gulf. Cyst densities in the near-bottom particle resuspension layers varied by three orders of magnitude across the gulf with maxima of 10(5) cysts m(-3). An important interconnection of elevated BNL cyst densities is observed between the Bay of Fundy, the Maine Coastal Current and the south-central region of the gulf. BNL cyst inventories estimated for the eastern and western gulf are each on the order of 10(15) cysts, whereas the BNL inventory in the Bay of Fundy is on the order of 10(16) . Although BNL cyst inventories in the eastern and western gulf are 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the abundance of cysts in the upper 1 cm of sediment in those regions, BNL and sediment-bound cyst inventories are comparable in the Bay of Fundy. The existence of widespread BNLs containing substantial cyst inventories indicates that these near-bottom layers represent an important source of germinating A. fundyense cysts in the region. PMID:25419055

  5. Benthic nepheloid layers in the Gulf of Maine and Alexandrium cyst inventories

    PubMed Central

    Pilskaln, C.H.; Hayashi, K.; Keafer, B.A.; Anderson, D.M.; McGillicuddy, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cysts residing in benthic nepheloid layers (BNLs) documented in the Gulf of Maine have been proposed as a possible source of inoculum for annual blooms of a toxic dinoflagellate in the region. Herein we present a spatially extensive data set of the distribution and thickness of benthic nepheloid layers in the Gulf of Maine and the abundance and inventories of suspended Alexandrium fundyense cysts within these near-bottom layers. BNLs are pervasive throughout the gulf and adjacent Bay of Fundy with maximum layer thicknesses of 50–60 m observed. Mean BNL thickness is 30 m in the eastern gulf and Bay of Fundy, and 20 m in the western gulf. Cyst densities in the near-bottom particle resuspension layers varied by three orders of magnitude across the gulf with maxima of 105 cysts m?3. An important interconnection of elevated BNL cyst densities is observed between the Bay of Fundy, the Maine Coastal Current and the south-central region of the gulf. BNL cyst inventories estimated for the eastern and western gulf are each on the order of 1015 cysts, whereas the BNL inventory in the Bay of Fundy is on the order of 1016 . Although BNL cyst inventories in the eastern and western gulf are 1–2 orders of magnitude smaller than the abundance of cysts in the upper 1 cm of sediment in those regions, BNL and sediment-bound cyst inventories are comparable in the Bay of Fundy. The existence of widespread BNLs containing substantial cyst inventories indicates that these near-bottom layers represent an important source of germinating A. fundyense cysts in the region. PMID:25419055

  6. Sedimentary sources of old high molecular weight dissolved organic carbon from the ocean margin benthic nepheloid layer

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, L. Santschi, P.H.

    2000-02-01

    Average {sup 14}C ages of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean are 3--6,000 years, and are influenced by old DOC from continental margins. However, sources of DOC from terrestrial, autochthonous, and sedimentary organic carbon seem to be too young to be responsible for the old DOC observed in the ocean. Since colloidal organic carbon (COC, i.e., high molecular weight DOC), which is chemically very similar to that of bulk DOC, can be effectively isolated from seawater using cross-flow ultrafiltration, it can hold clues to sources and pathways of DOC turnover in the ocean. Radiocarbon measurements on COC in the water column and benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) from two continental margin areas (the Middle Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico) and controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to study sources of old DOC in the ocean margin areas. Vertical distributions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON), and DOC in the water column and bottom waters near the sediment-water interface all demonstrate a well developed benthic nepheloid layer in both ocean margin areas. COC from the BNL was much older than COC from the overlying water column. These results, together with strong concentration gradients of SPM, POC, PON, and DOC, suggest a sedimentary source for organic carbon species and possibly for old COC as well in BNL waters. This is confirmed by the results from controlled laboratory experiments. The heterogeneity of {Delta}{sup 14}C signatures in bulk SOC thus points to a preferential release of old organic components from sediment resuspension, which can be the transport mechanism of the old benthic COC observed in ocean margin areas. Old COC from continental margin nepheloid layers may thus be a potential source of old DOC to the deep ocean.

  7. Aerobic methanotrophs drive the formation of a seasonal anoxic benthic nepheloid layer in monomictic Lake Lugano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blees, Jan; Niemann, Helge; Wenk, Christine B.; Zopfi, Jacob; Schubert, Carsten J.; Jenzer, Joël S.; Veronesi, Mauro L.; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2014-05-01

    In the southern basin of Lake Lugano, thermal stratification of the water column during summer and autumn leads to a lack of exchange between surface and deep water masses, and consequently to seasonal bottom water anoxia, associated with high methane concentrations. With the onset of bottom water anoxia, a dense layer of high particulate matter concentration - a so-called benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) - develops in the bottom waters. A sharp redox gradient marks the upper boundary of the BNL. At its maximum, the BNL extends 15 - 30 m from the sediment into the water column. We investigated the identity of the BNL and key environmental factors controlling its formation in the framework of a seasonal study. Compound specific C-isotope measurements and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH) of suspended particulate organic matter, radioactive tracer based measurements of methane oxidation, as well as investigation of geochemical water column parameters were performed in spring and autumn. Our analyses revealed that the microbial biomass within the BNL is dominated by methanotrophic bacteria. Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) was restricted to a narrow zone at the top of the BNL, reaching maximum rates of up to 1.8 ?M/day. The rates of MOx activity effectively consumed most (>99%) of the uprising methane, leading to the formation of a sharp CH4 concentration gradient and a strongly suppressed kinetic isotope effect (? = -2.8o). CH4 oxidation was limited by the diffusive supply of O2 from the upper hypolimnion, implying that methanotrophy is the primary driver of the seasonal expansion of the anoxic bottom water volume, and explaining the vertical migration of the BNL in response to its own O2 consumption. The bulk organic matter extracted from the BNL was strongly depleted in 13C (?13C < -60o), providing evidence for the incorporation of CH4-derived carbon into the biomass, suggesting that the BNL was composed of MOx-communities. This was further evidenced by four dominant fatty acid biomarkers (C16:1?5, C16:1?6, C16:1?7, and C16:1?8), which were strongly C-isotopically depleted, with ?13C values between -62o (?6) and -80o (?7). The fingerprint of isotopically depleted FAs indicates a dominance of Type I MOx bacteria in the BNL, which we could confirm with FISH using specific probes. Isotope mixing considerations suggest that 77 - 96 % of fatty acid carbon in the BNL is CH4-derived. FISH revealed that up to 30% of microbial cells in the BNL are methanotrophic. The cell size of methanotrophs was significantly larger than of other microbial cells, and an independent approach to quantify the contribution of methanotroph-carbon to the BNL biomass, based on methanotrophic cell size, confirmed our C-isotope-based estimate.

  8. Mass-physical properties of surficial sediments on the Rhoˆne continental margin: implications for the nepheloid benthic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefiere, Bernard

    1990-09-01

    Mass-physical properties of the surficial (upper 5 m) sediments on the Gulf of Lions continental margin were analysed, from more than 100 short (1 m) and longer (5 m) cores obtained during several cruises. Data include water content, unit weight, Atterberg limits (liquid limit, plastic limit, plasticity index), shear strength and compression index, and are used to determine: first, the mass property distribution, according to the main parameters influencing mass-physical properties; the relationships between these properties and the nepheloid layer on the shelf. The shoreline (lagoons) and inner shelf are characterized by low density and shear strength and high water content deposits, due to electrochemical flocculation of the sediment. The outer shelf is blanketed by higher density and shear strength and lower water content deposits generated by normal settling of suspended particles. On the inner shelf, during river peak discharges, a short-term thin bottom layer of "yogurt-like" [ FASS (1985) Geomarine Letters, 4, 147-152; FASS (1986) Continental Shelf Research, 6, 189-208] fluid-mud (unit weight lower than 1.3 mg m -3) is supplied, by a bottom nepheloid layer. During stormy periods, this "yogurt-like" layer (about 10 cm thick) partly disappears by resuspension of suspended particulate matter; this is advected, in the bottom nepheloid layer, over the shelf and the canyons within the upper slope.

  9. Ciliated protists from the nepheloid layer and water column of sites affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Joseph A.; McCurry, Chelsea; Tominack, Sarah; Romero, Isabel C.; Hollander, David; Jeffrey, Wade H.; Snyder, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    Benthic marine protists have been well documented from shallow marine benthic habitats but remain understudied in deeper habitats on continental shelves and slopes, particularly in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico (NEGOM). This region was affected by a deep water oil well failure (BP-Deepwater Horizon, 2010). The combination of a lack of information on deep sea microbenthic communities and the potential for benthic microbial petroleum mineralization prompted this investigation. Water column and nepheloid layer samples were obtained via Niskin bottles and a multicorer respectively at stations across the NEGOM to: (1) determine whether nepheloid and water column communities are distinct and (2) assess benthic species richness relative to sediment PAH contamination. Phylum specific 18S rRNA gene amplification was used to construct clone libraries of ciliate assemblages. BLAST searches in the NCBI database indicated that a majority (~75%) of the clone sequences corresponded (94-100% similarity) with listed, yet unclassified sequences. Several putative species were common at most site locations and depths. Many known benthic ciliates, such as Uronychia transfuga, Uronychia setigera, and Spirotrachelostyla tani, were common in the nepheloid layer samples and not recovered in water column samples. Ciliated protist species richness increased with PAH levels found in surface sediments, suggesting a positive microbial response to petroleum enrichment of the benthos. The presence of previously unknown microbenthic communites in the nephaloid layer over oceanic clay-silt muds alters our view of microbial processes in the deep sea and merits investigation of the microbial processes and rates of microbial mineralization and biomass production important to global biogeochemistry.

  10. Nepheloid layers and internal waves over continental shelves and slopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and laboratory results indicate that bottom velocities within shoaling internal gravity waves intensify upslope approximately inversely proportional to the water depth. The elevated velocities (and bottom stresses) caused by shoaling and, possibly, breaking internal waves might explain the generation and maintenance of near-bottom nepheloid zones and attached turbid plumes that have been observed over certain continental shelves and slopes. This process is proposed as an explanation of zones of relatively low transmissibility that emanate from the upper continental slope near Newport submarine canyon off southern California. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  11. The importance of subsurface nepheloid layers in transport and delivery of sediments to the eastern Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzoni, Laura; Thunell, Robert C.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Hollander, David; Martinez, Nahysa; Tappa, Eric; Varela, Ramón; Astor, Yrene; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

    2009-12-01

    Optical transmissometer measurements were coupled with particulate organic matter (POM) observations to understand suspended sediment composition and distribution in the eastern Cariaco Basin during the rainy seasons of September 2003 and 2006. Our results suggest that nepheloid layers originating at the mouth of small mountainous rivers discharging into the eastern Basin are a major delivery mechanism of terrigenous sediments to the Basin interior. Intermediate nepheloid layers (INL) were observed near the shelf break (˜100 m) and appear to effectively transport terrigenous material laterally from the shelf to deep waters, thereby providing a plausible supply mechanism of the terrestrial material observed in sediment traps. These findings highlight the importance of small, local rivers in the Cariaco Basin as sources of terrestrial material. In contrast, these nepheloid layers contained only limited POM. When this information is combined with published sediment trap POM data, it suggests that nepheloid layers may not be a primary mechanism for delivering terrigenous POM to the deeper waters of the basin during the rainy season. Rather, BNL may redistribute marine-derived POM from shallow waters to the Basin's interior by providing ballast materials, particularly during episodic events driven by wind and precipitation. Though we have determined that nepheloid layers play an important role in the seaward transport of particulate material in the Cariaco Basin, their composition and temporal variability have not been fully characterized. This is critical to understand lateral particle transport, since nepheloid layers constitute a significant source of sediment to the deep Cariaco Basin.

  12. Suspended particulate loads and transports in the nepheloid layer of the abyssal Atlantic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biscaye, P.E.; Eittreim, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Vertical profiles of light scattering from over 1000 L-DGO nephelometer stations in the Atlantic Ocean have been used to calculate mass concentrations of suspended particles based on a calibration from the western North American Basin. From these data are plotted the distributions of particulate concentrations at clear water and in the more turbid near-bottom water. Clear water is the broad minimum in concentration and light scattering that occurs at varying mid-depths in the water column. Concentrations at clear water are as much as one-to-two orders of magnitude lower than those in surface water but still reflect a similar geographic distribution: relatively higher concentrations at ocean margins, especially underneath upwelling areas, and the lowest concentrations underneath central gyre areas. These distributions within the clear water reflect surface-water biogenic productivity, lateral injection of particles from shelf areas and surface circulation patterns and require that the combination of downward vertical and horizontal transport processes of particles retain this pattern throughout the upper water column. Below clear water, the distribution of standing crops of suspended particulate concentrations in the lower water column are presented. The integration of mass of all particles per unit area (gross particulate standing crop) reflects a relative distribution similar to that at the surface and at clear water levels, superimposed on which is the strong imprint of boundary currents along the western margins of the Atlantic. Reducing the gross particulate standing crop by the integral of the concentration of clear water yields a net particulate standing crop. The distribution of this reflects primarily the interaction of circulating abyssal waters with the ocean bottom, i.e. a strong nepheloid layer which is coincident with western boundary currents and which diminishes in intensity equatorward. The resuspended particulate loads in the nepheloid layer of the basins west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, resulting from interaction of abyssal currents with the bottom, range from ??? 2 ?? 106 tons in the equatorial Guyana Basin to ??? 50 ?? 106 tons in the North American Basin. The total resuspended particulate load in the western basins (111 ?? 106 tons) is almost an order of magnitude greater than that in the basins east of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (13 ?? 106 tons). The net northward flux of resuspended particles carried in the AABW drops from ??? 8 ?? 106 tons/year between the southern and northern ends of the Brazil Basin and remains ??? 1 ?? 106 tons/year across the Guyana Basin. ?? 1977.

  13. Acquiring Peak Samples from Phytoplankton Thin Layers and Intermediate Nepheloid Layers by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle with Adaptive Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; McEwen, R.; Ryan, J. P.; Bellingham, J. G.; Harvey, J.; Vrijenhoek, R.

    2010-12-01

    Phytoplankton thin layers (PTLs) affect many fundamental aspects of coastal ocean ecology including primary productivity, development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and the survival and growth of zooplankton and fish larvae. Intermediate nepheloid layers (INLs) that contain suspended particulate matter transported from the bottom boundary layer of continental shelves and slopes also affect biogeochemistry and ecology of ocean margins. To better understand the impacts of these types of layers, we have developed an adaptive sampling method for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to detect a layer (adjusting detection parameters in situ), acquire water samples from peaks in the layer, and acquire control samples outside the layer. We have used the method in a number of field experiments with the AUV Dorado, which is equipped with ten water samplers (called "gulpers"). In real time, the algorithm tracks background levels of fluorescence and optical backscatter and the peaks' baseline to ensure that detection is tuned to the ambient conditions. The algorithm cross-checks fluorescence and backscatter signals to differentiate PTLs from INLs. To capture peak water samples with minimal delay, the algorithm exploits the AUV's sawtooth (i.e., yo-yo) trajectory: the vehicle crosses the detected layer twice in one yo-yo cycle. At the first crossing, it detects the layer's peak and saves its signal height. Sampling is triggered at the second crossing when the signal reaches the saved peak height plus meeting additional timing and depth conditions. The algorithm is also capable of triggering gulpers to acquire control samples outside the layer for comparison with ambient water. The sequence of peak and control samples can be set based on need. In recent AUV Dorado missions, the algorithm triggered the gulpers to acquire peak and control samples from INLs and PTLs in Monterey Bay. Zooplankton analysis of some peak samples showed very high concentrations of mussel and barnacle larvae in addition to a variety of copepod signals.

  14. Thick bottom nepheloid layers in the western Mediterranean generated by deep dense shelf water cascading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, Pere; Madron, Xavier Durrieu de; Salat, Jordi; Schroeder, Katrin; Martín, Jacobo; Karageorgis, Aristomenis P.; Palanques, Albert; Roullier, François; Lopez-Jurado, José Luis; Emelianov, Mikhail; Moutin, Thierry; Houpert, Loïc

    2013-04-01

    The analysis of a compilation of deep CTD casts conducted in the western Mediterranean from 1998 to 2011 has documented the role that dense water formation, and particularly deep dense shelf water cascading off the Gulf of Lions, plays in transporting suspended particulate matter from the coastal regions down to the basin. Deep CTD casts reveal that after the 1999 and 2005-2006 deep cascading events the Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW) was characterized by the presence of a thick bottom nepheloid layer (BNL) that corresponded in thickness with a thermohaline anomaly generated by the mixture of dense waters formed by deep convection in the open sea and by deep cascading. This BNL can be hundreds of meters thick and in the central part of the basin usually exhibits suspended sediment concentrations of <0.1 mg/l above background levels, reaching higher concentrations close to the continental rise, with near-bottom peaks >1 mg/l. After winter 1999 the BNL spread from the Gulf of Lions and the Catalan margin over the northwestern Mediterranean basin, reaching west of the Balearic Islands and the Ligurian Sea, while after winters 2005-2006 the BNL covered the entire western Mediterranean basin. Thickness and concentration of the BNL tend to diminish with time but this trend is highly dependent on the volume of dense water generated, both by convection and cascading. After winter 1999 the BNL signal vanished in one year, but after winters 2005-2006 it lasted for longer and the turbidity signal can still be distinguished at present (2011). Particle size distribution in the BNL reveals the presence of large aggregates up to 1 mm in size formed by a mixture of single particles with the same bimodal grain size distribution as the surface sediments found in the northwestern Mediterranean slope and basin. Results presented in this paper highlight the fact that the WMDW can be periodically affected by the arrival of new dense waters loaded with suspended particles mainly introduced by resuspension processes during major cascading events, being a key process that could ultimately affect deep-sea biogeochemical cycles in the western Mediterranean.

  15. Aggregation processes in the benthic boundary layer at the Celtic Sea continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, L. A.; McCave, I. N.

    2000-08-01

    Small particle scavenging rates in the benthic boundary layer (BBL) are calculated for the interaction between measured large particles and single particles at five stations (204, 667, 1445, 2285, 3660 m) at the Celtic Sea continental margin. In summer particle scavenging of small particles ?10 ?m at the study site takes place under typical flow conditions of u ?>0.2 cm s -1. Scavenging of 10 ?m particles can take place only at high particle concentrations, which result from sediment erosion. It is expected that the BBL aggregates found in the Celtic Sea at the mid- and lower-slope areas originate in sediment resuspension events. During these times of enhanced flow conditions, aggregates are formed and compacted by shear, which accounts for the fact that they do not disaggregate when they enter the viscous sublayer. Total clearance of bottom nepheloid layers occurs only during times of transport of large aggregates >1000 ?m after the arrival of phytodetrital aggregates on the sea floor with number concentrations >200 dm -3 and flow conditions with u ?>1 cm s -1.

  16. Benthic boundary layer processes in the Lower Florida Keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, D.L.; Richardson, M.D.; Holmes, C.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue of Geo-Marine Letters, "Benthic Boundary Layer Processes in the Lower Florida Keys," includes 12 papers that present preliminary results from the Key West Campaign. The Dry Tortugas and Marquesas Keys test sites were selected by a group of 115 scientists and technicians to study benthic boundary layer processes in a carbonate environment controlled by bioturbation and biogeochemical processes. Major activities included remote sediment classification; high-frequency acoustic scattering experiments; sediment sampling for radiological, geotechnical, biological, biogeochemical, physical, and geoacoustic studies; and hydrodynamic studies using an instrumented tetrapod. All these data are being used to improve our understanding of the effects of environmental processes on sediment structure and behavior.

  17. Distinct Benthic Community Trends Driven by Particle Transport and Deposition in Mid-Atlantic Bight Canyons, NW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demopoulos, A. W.; Robertson, C. M.; Bourque, J. R.; Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.; Ross, S.; Brooke, S.; Davies, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) is a well-studied region of the U.S. East coast continental margin, rich in submarine canyons. Baltimore and Norfolk canyons were studied during the multidisciplinary Atlantic Deepwater Canyons project through funding from BOEM, NOAA, and USGS. Sediment and water column properties were assessed in the context of canyon physical dynamics and ecosystem ecology. Sediment samples were collected by NIOZ box corer in 2012 and 2013 along canyon axes and comparative adjacent slopes at standardized depths. Sediments were analyzed for grain size, organic content, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, chlorophyll a, and benthic infauna. Water column properties were sampled using CTD transects, and benthic landers and moorings positioned along canyon axes. Significant differences in sediment transport regimes were found for each canyon where observed nepheloid layers corresponded to shifts in infaunal community structure. Significant community shifts were observed in stations at depths > 900m in Baltimore Canyon, coinciding with higher organic matter concentrations at depths below the nepheloid layer. In contrast, adjacent slope communities exhibited a more uniform infaunal assemblage where distinct zonation patterns by depth were observed. Preliminary data for Norfolk Canyon suggest very different sediment deposition rates in the canyon and also show clear differences between canyon and slope benthic communities. Geological processes and canyon topography coupled with organic inputs and disturbance events are clear factors in determining benthic infaunal diversity and standing stock dynamics in and around these canyons.

  18. On the links between a river’s hyperpycnal plume and marine benthic nepheloid layer in the wake of a typhoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ray T.; Liu, James T.; Su, Chih-Chieh; Kao, Shuh-Ji; Chen, Shih-Nan; Kuo, Fang-Hsu; Huang, Jeff C.

    2014-09-01

    In 2010 two moorings each configured with a CTD and an ADCP, one with an additional non-sequential sediment trap (NSST), were deployed in the head region of the Gaoping Submarine Canyon 3 days after the typhoon-induced peaks of the runoff and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) of the Gaoping River in southern Taiwan. Our data show a demarcation between tidal and hyperpycnal regimes in the temperature, salinity, and flow fields. The latter existed in the first 5 days out of the 18-day deployment, as defined by higher water density due to high SSC. Several lines of evidence indicate the presence of the tail end of a hyperpycnal turbidity current (HTC), including the retention of warm water near the canyon floor, high SSC, down-canyon directed residual flow and its vertical structure, and high terrestrial fraction (larger than 70%) of the organic particles carried by the flow. The decreasing mass flux during the deployment is also an indication of a waning HTC. Our findings also show that the vertical flow structure and the direction of the gravity-driven down-canyon HTC were retarded by the instantaneous up-canyon-directed tidal oscillations in the submarine canyon.

  19. The benthic boundary layer under fully-nonlinear internal solitary waves of depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuncheng; Redekopp, Larry

    2010-11-01

    Long internal waves are common features on the continental shelf and in lakes, but their dissipation via benthic boundary layer drag is largely unknown, particularly when the wave amplitudes are large and boundary layer corrections based on linear theory are clearly invalid. In general, the wave-induced boundary layer experiences a continuous favorable-to-adverse variation of the pressure gradient, undergoes transition, may reach a strongly turbulent state, and frequently separates near the point of maximum adverse pressure gradient in the lee of the wave. In this study a model for fully-nonlinear solitary waves of depression in a two-layer stratification is employed as the inviscid base state, and a RANS solver with k-? turbulence model is used to compute the stationary boundary layer under the wave. Local friction coefficients and eddy viscosities are computed in the footprint of the wave. Locations of boundary layer separation are computed as well as the integrated frictional drag over the region of attached boundary layer flow. Boundary layer characteristics are presented for a range of environmental conditions, Reynolds numbers, and surface roughness in an attempt to provide a quantitative measure of the frictional drag of long internal waves in realistic, shallow environs.

  20. ANALYTICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF THE BENTHIC BOUNDARY LAYER AND THEIR APPLICABILITY TO NEAR-BOTTOM TRANSPORT IN LAKE ERIE

    EPA Science Inventory

    With there being few if any well organized field experiments in Lake Erie on benthic boundary layer (BBL) physics to review, this paper summarizes theoretical and experimental observations from the ocean, estuary, and continental shelf research, contrasts the Lake Erie setting wi...

  1. An instrument system for monitoring and sampling suspended sediment in the benthic boundary layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sternberg, R.W.; Johnson, R.V., II; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    An instrument system has been constructed that can monitor and sample suspended sediment distributions in the benthic boundary layer. It consists of miniature nephelometers and suspended sediment samplers placed within one meter of the seabed. The system is capable of continuously monitoring suspended sediment profiles at eight levels between 14 and 100 cm above the seabed and collecting suspended sediment samples at four levels (20, 50, 70 and 100 cm) at three times during a deployment period. The suspended sediment system is designed to fit onto the instrumented tripod GEOPROBE which contains four electromagnetic current meters, pressure sensor, bottom stereo camera, two temperature sensors, transmissometer, and a Savonius rotor current meter. Sensor operation, data recording, and sediment sampling events are synchronized. Thus detailed measurements of the near-bottom flow conditions are made concurrently with suspended sediment measurements. The combined system has been used in sediment transporting environments within San Francisco Bay, California, and Puget Sound, Washington. ?? 1986.

  2. Responses of benthic macroinvertebrates to thin-layer disposal of dredged material in Mississippi Sound, USA.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Dara H; Clarke, Douglas G; Rees, Susan I

    2007-01-01

    Benthic community responses to thin-layer disposal of dredged material were assessed at three sites in Mississippi Sound, USA. Community composition differed between disposal and reference sites (ANOSIM) for each disposal event. Oweniid sand worms, Amphinomid fire worms, and brittle stars (Ophiuriodea) contributed the most to community distinctions between disposal and reference sites (SIMPER), with higher abundances at the disposal sites. Total infaunal abundance was similar to pre-disposal and reference conditions within 3-10 months of thin-layer disposal. Distinctions in community composition between disposal and reference sites (nMDS) persisted throughout the 16-month study period, but were less pronounced at the site where sediment composition was unchanged by disposal. Size distributions of some taxa (e.g., gastropod and hemichordate) suggest adults recolonized the newly deposited sediments either through vertical migration or lateral immigration from adjacent areas. Thin-layer disposal offers a viable alternative to conventional open-water disposal practices and warrants further exploration for other areas with deeper bathymetries and different hydrodynamic regimes. PMID:17052734

  3. Dynamics of the benthic boundary layer and seafloor contributions to oxygen depletion on the Oregon inner shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann-Grosvenor, Kristina; Reimers, Clare E.; Sanders, Rhea D.

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of in situ O2 consumption and production within permeable sediments, such as those found over the Oregon-Washington inner shelf, has traditionally been done using methods that isolate the sediments from the dynamic influences of currents and wave motions. Modified from atmospheric research, the non-invasive eddy correlation technique can be used to characterize benthic boundary layer dynamics and measure O2 flux across the sediment-water interface without excluding the natural hydrodynamic flow. In 2009, eddy correlation measurements were made in 5 discrete months with varying conditions at a 30 m site off Yaquina Head, Newport, OR. The O2 flux was found to be primarily into the bed (-18±3 mmol m-2 d-1; mean±SE, n=137 15-min bursts) but was sensitive to non-steady state changes in O2 concentrations caused by the differential advection of water masses with variable mean O2 concentrations. Important contributions to O2 eddy fluxes at surface wave frequencies were seen in eddy correlation cospectra and these are interpreted as being indicative of consumption enhanced by advective transport of O2 into the bed. The sediments were deposits of fine sand with permeabilities of 1.3-4.7×10-11 m2 and wave-generated ripples. Sediment pigment and organic carbon concentrations were low (chlorophyll-?: 0.02-0.45 ?g g-1, phaeophytin-?: 0.38-1.38 ?g g-1 and organic carbon: 0.05-0.39% dry wt in discrete depth intervals from cores collected between March and October), but it was evident that during the summer fresh pigments were trapped in the sand and rapidly mixed over the uppermost 0-13 cm. From these results it is inferred that physical forcing associated largely with waves and currents may accentuate the role of sediment-covered inner shelf habitats as a regional O2 sink compared to the middle shelf. In effect, the action of waves and currents in the benthic boundary layer enables aerobic respiration that counterbalances the oxygenation of the water column by primary production and mixing in the surface layer.

  4. Two-dimensional distribution of living benthic foraminifera in anoxic sediment layers of an estuarine mudflat (Loire estuary, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault de Chanvalon, A.; Metzger, E.; Mouret, A.; Cesbron, F.; Knoery, J.; Rozuel, E.; Launeau, P.; Nardelli, M. P.; Jorissen, F. J.; Geslin, E.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new rapid and accurate protocol to simultaneously sample benthic living foraminifera in two dimensions in a centimetre-scale vertical grid and dissolved iron and phosphorus in two dimensions at high resolution (200 ?m). Such an approach appears crucial for the study of foraminiferal ecology in highly dynamic and heterogeneous sedimentary systems, where dissolved iron shows a strong variability at the centimetre scale. On the studied intertidal mudflat of the Loire estuary, foraminiferal faunas are dominated by Ammonia tepida, which accounts for 92 % of the living (CellTracker Green(CTG)-labelled) assemblage. The vertical distribution shows a maximum density in the oxygenated 0-0.4 cm surface layer. A sharp decrease is observed in the next 2 cm, followed by a second, well-defined maximum in the suboxic sediment layer (3-8 cm depth). The presented method yields new information concerning the 2-D distribution of living A. tepida in suboxic layers. First, the identification of recent burrows by visual observation of the sediment cross section and the burrowing activity as deduced from the dissolved iron spatial distribution show no direct relation to the distribution of A. tepida at the centimetre scale. This lack of relation appears contradictory to previous studies (Aller and Aller, 1986; Berkeley et al., 2007). Next, the heterogeneity of A. tepida in the 3-8 cm depth layer was quantified by means of Moran's index to identify the scale of parameters controlling the A. tepida distribution. The results reveal horizontal patches with a characteristic length of 1-2 cm. These patches correspond to areas enriched in dissolved iron likely generated by anaerobic degradation of labile organic matter. These results suggest that the routine application of our new sampling strategy could yield important new insights about foraminiferal life strategies, improving our understanding of the role of these organisms in coastal marine ecosystems.

  5. The Role of the Benthic Boundary Layer in Frontal Stability and Cross-shelf Exchange: An Idealized Model of the East Coast of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deringer, S. A.; Mahadevan, A.; Hales, B.; Archer, D. E.

    2006-12-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, high-resolution model with idealized bathymetry to simulate the shelf and shelf-break front circulations of an archetypical passive margin off the eastern coast of the United States. Studies have suggested that a convergence occurs at the foot of the front, in the benthic boundary layer, driving upwelling of nutrient- and CO2-rich water at the frontal boundary (Chapman and Lentz, 1994; Houghton, 1997). Our goal is to understand the relationship between the benthic boundary layer, stratification, and the cross-shelf exchange of carbon dioxide and nutrients. We find that the horizontal density gradient and stratification interact and control the benthic boundary layer velocity magnitudes and directions. We assess the effect of physical factors such as stratification, horizontal density gradient, and wind direction on the supply of nutrients to the surface waters and exchange with the open ocean. Chapman, D.C. and Lentz, S.J., 1994, Jour. Phys. Oceanogr., vol. 24, pp. 1464-1479. Houghton, R.W., 1997, Geophys. Res. Let., vol. 24, no. 16, pp. 2035-2038.

  6. Leaf litter recycling in benthic and hyporheic layers in agricultural streams with different types of land use.

    PubMed

    Piscart, Christophe; Navel, Simon; Maazouzi, Chafik; Montuelle, Bernard; Cornut, Julien; Mermillod-Blondin, Florian; des Chatelliers, Michel Creuze; Simon, Laurent; Marmonier, Pierre

    2011-09-15

    Changes in land use and intensification of agricultural pressure have greatly accelerated the alteration of the landscape in most developed countries. These changes may greatly disturb the adjacent ecosystems, particularly streams, where the effects of pollution are amplified. In this study, we used the leaf litter breakdown rate to assess the functional integrity of stream ecosystems and river sediments along a gradient of either traditional extensive farming or a gradient of vineyard area. In the benthic layer, the total litter breakdown process integrates the temporal variability of the anthropogenic disturbances and is strongly influenced by land use changes in the catchment even though a low concentration of toxics was measured during the study period. This study also confirmed the essential role played by amphipods in the litter breakdown process. In contrast, microbial processes may have integrated the variations in available nutrients and dissolved oxygen concentrations, but failed to respond to the disturbances induced by vineyard production (the increase in pesticides and metal concentrations) during the study period. The response of microbes may not be sensitive enough for assessing the global effect of seasonal agricultural practices. Finally, the leaf litter breakdown measured in the hyporheic zone seemed mainly driven by microbial activities and was hence more affected by vertical exchanges with surface water than by land use practices. However, the breakdown rate of leaf litter in the hyporheic zone may constitute a relevant way to evaluate the impact on river functioning of any human activities that induce massive soil erosion and sediment clogging. PMID:21794895

  7. Benthic foraminifera from Capbreton Canyon revisited; faunal evolution after repetitive sediment disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolliet, T.; Jorissen, F. J.; Schmidt, S.; Howa, H.

    2014-06-01

    At a 650 m deep site in the axis of Capbreton Canyon an 18-cm-thick turbidite was deposited in December 1999. During subsequent campaigns, an almost monospecific fauna of the benthic foraminifer Technitella melo, considered as a pioneer species, was found in May 2000. In 2001 this fauna had disappeared and was replaced by an exceptionally rich fauna strongly dominated by the opportunistic species Bolivina subaenariensis. We present sedimentological, radionuclide and foraminiferal data of new cores, sampled in 2005 and 2011, taken with the aim to study the further evolution of the benthic ecosystem. Cores sampled in 2005 show that in the canyon axis a new, ca. 5 cm thick, turbidite has been deposited. The live benthic foraminiferal faunas were much poorer than in 2001, but still had a high dominance and low diversity, although less extreme than in 2001. We conclude that in the canyon axis, benthic foraminiferal faunas remain in an early stage of ecosystem colonization. It appears that the very thick 1999 turbidite marks an exceptional event. The uncommonly rich faunas observed in 2001 could be a response to the concentration of organic-rich material in the fine-grained top of this deposit. In 2011, cores were sampled at a slightly different site, on the lower canyon flank. The sedimentary sequence here is marked by the absence of coarse turbidite layers, although some levels show slightly increased grain size, and lower 210Pbxs activities, indicative of an admixture with advected older sediments. Live foraminiferal faunas are much more equilibrated, as shown by their higher diversity, lower dominance, and deeper penetration into the sediment. All these characteristics are indicative of a much more stable ecosystem. Dead faunas are present throughout the core, indicating that the levels with slightly elevated grain size are not typical turbidites resulting from hyperpycnal currents (which are characterized by levels barren of foraminifera) but denote other, more long-term sedimentary processes leading to the advection of older material, such as bottom nepheloid layers, or repetitive fine-grained turbidite deposits due to small-scale slumping. The comparison of live and dead fauna shows that at both sites, the foraminiferal turnover rates are fairly low. At the lower canyon flank site sampled in 2011, the foraminiferal faunas are renewed every 1.5-2 years. Such a fairly long foraminiferal lifespan corresponds to earlier estimates, but is surprisingly high for the opportunistic taxa that dominate the faunal assemblages in these unstable and food-enriched submarine canyon settings.

  8. Two-dimensional distribution of living benthic foraminifera in anoxic sediment layers of an estuarine mudflat (Loire Estuary, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault de Chanvalon, A.; Metzger, E.; Mouret, A.; Cesbron, F.; Knoery, J.; Rozuel, E.; Launeau, P.; Nardelli, M. P.; Jorissen, F. J.; Geslin, E.

    2015-07-01

    We present a new rapid and accurate protocol to simultaneously sample benthic living foraminifera in two dimensions in a centimeter scale vertical grid and dissolved iron in high resolution (200 ?m). Such an approach appears crucial to study foraminiferal ecology in heterogeneous environments. The foraminiferal faunas of the main intertidal mudflat of the Loire estuary are dominated by Ammonia tepida, which accounts for 92 % of the living assemblage (CTG-labeled). Its vertical distribution shows a first density maximum at the surface, a sharp decrease in the next two centimeter followed by a well defined second maximum between 3 and 8 cm depth. The heterogeneity of A. tepida in this 3-8 cm depth layer was calculated by the Moran's Index and reveals lateral patches with a characteristic length of 1 to 2 cm. We investigate mechanisms potentially responsible for this distribution by observation of burrow structures and two-dimensional high-resolution imaging of dissolved iron. The surface maximum corresponded to the area of maximum oxygen availability. Observable burrows have no clear relation with the distribution of A. tepida but were closely related to dissolved iron distribution. Consequently, no evident relation between A. tepida and dissolved iron was observed. Nevertheless, two one cm-wide structures, enriched in dissolved iron produced by anaerobic degradation of labile organic matter, corresponded to increased A. tepida densities. This observation suggests that within strongly oxygen-depleted sediments, A. tepida could still be favoured by labile organic carbon. The main characteristics of the vertical distribution of A. tepida are interpreted in the present study as a combination of passive downward transport by biomixing into deeper suboxic (without both oxygen and sulfide) sediment layers and a subsequent mobility driven by a sensitivity to geochemical gradients. We hypothesize that the survival of A. tepida in oxygen depleted environments is explained its ability to lower its metabolism between periods of oxygen renewal by bioirrigation.

  9. Shining Light on Benthic Macroalgae: Mechanisms of Complementarity in Layered Macroalgal Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Leigh W.; Hawes, Ian; Schiel, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophs underpin most ecosystem processes, but to do this they need sufficient light. This critical resource, however, is compromised along many marine shores by increased loads of sediments and nutrients from degraded inland habitats. Increased attenuation of total irradiance within coastal water columns due to turbidity is known to reduce species' depth limits and affect the taxonomic structure and architecture of algal-dominated assemblages, but virtually no attention has been paid to the potential for changes in spectral quality of light energy to impact production dynamics. Pioneering studies over 70 years ago showed how different pigmentation of red, green and brown algae affected absorption spectra, action spectra, and photosynthetic efficiency across the PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) spectrum. Little of this, however, has found its way into ecological syntheses of the impacts of optically active contaminants on coastal macroalgal communities. Here we test the ability of macroalgal assemblages composed of multiple functional groups (including representatives from the chlorophyta, rhodophyta and phaeophyta) to use the total light resource, including different light wavelengths and examine the effects of suspended sediments on the penetration and spectral quality of light in coastal waters. We show that assemblages composed of multiple functional groups are better able to use light throughout the PAR spectrum. Macroalgal assemblages with four sub-canopy species were between 50–75% more productive than assemblages with only one or two sub-canopy species. Furthermore, attenuation of the PAR spectrum showed both a loss of quanta and a shift in spectral distribution with depth across coastal waters of different clarity, with consequences to productivity dynamics of diverse layered assemblages. The processes of light complementarity may help provide a mechanistic understanding of how altered turbidity affects macroalgal assemblages in coastal waters, which are increasingly threatened by diminishing light quantity and altered spectral distributions through sedimentation and eutrophication. PMID:25438045

  10. Shining light on benthic macroalgae: mechanisms of complementarity in layered macroalgal assemblages.

    PubMed

    Tait, Leigh W; Hawes, Ian; Schiel, David R

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophs underpin most ecosystem processes, but to do this they need sufficient light. This critical resource, however, is compromised along many marine shores by increased loads of sediments and nutrients from degraded inland habitats. Increased attenuation of total irradiance within coastal water columns due to turbidity is known to reduce species' depth limits and affect the taxonomic structure and architecture of algal-dominated assemblages, but virtually no attention has been paid to the potential for changes in spectral quality of light energy to impact production dynamics. Pioneering studies over 70 years ago showed how different pigmentation of red, green and brown algae affected absorption spectra, action spectra, and photosynthetic efficiency across the PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) spectrum. Little of this, however, has found its way into ecological syntheses of the impacts of optically active contaminants on coastal macroalgal communities. Here we test the ability of macroalgal assemblages composed of multiple functional groups (including representatives from the chlorophyta, rhodophyta and phaeophyta) to use the total light resource, including different light wavelengths and examine the effects of suspended sediments on the penetration and spectral quality of light in coastal waters. We show that assemblages composed of multiple functional groups are better able to use light throughout the PAR spectrum. Macroalgal assemblages with four sub-canopy species were between 50-75% more productive than assemblages with only one or two sub-canopy species. Furthermore, attenuation of the PAR spectrum showed both a loss of quanta and a shift in spectral distribution with depth across coastal waters of different clarity, with consequences to productivity dynamics of diverse layered assemblages. The processes of light complementarity may help provide a mechanistic understanding of how altered turbidity affects macroalgal assemblages in coastal waters, which are increasingly threatened by diminishing light quantity and altered spectral distributions through sedimentation and eutrophication. PMID:25438045

  11. Diapycnal nutrient fluxes across the benthic boundary layers at the continental slopes off Peru and Mauritania based on 224Ra/223Ra-ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, P.; Scholten, J. C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Miquel, J. C.; Gasser, B.; Liebetrau, V.; Sommer, S.; Dengler, M.; Bryant, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    Marine sediments may act as sources and/or sinks of nutrients in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) where solute fluxes between sediments and the above water column are believed to be an important component for the bioproductivity in the mixed layer. However, solute fluxes between sediments and the water column above are difficult to obtain. We determined the diapycnal nutrient fluxes across the benthic boundary layer at the OMZs off Peru and Mauritania using nutrient concentration profiles and vertical diffusion coefficients derived from 224Ra/223Ra isotope ratios. The radium isotopes 223Ra (half-life: 11.4 days) and 224Ra (half-life: 3.66 days) are produced in sediments by radioactive decay of 227Th and 228Th ,respectively: Diffusion of radium out of the sediments results in gradients of 224Ra/223Ra above the sediments; and these gradients may be used to estimate vertical diffusion coefficients. We determined 224Ra/223Ra along two transects at the continental slopes off Peru (12° S) and off Mauritania (18° N) in water depths between 65m - 1000mand 53m - 1100m, respectively. For the 223Ra/224Ra sampling we used acrylic fibers/cartridges coated with MnO2. The Mn-fibers were attached to benthic landers (moored for ~ 24 hours at the sea floor) and the Mn-cartridges were placed in series on several in-situ filtration pumps (Challenger Oceanic and McLane pumps). 223Ra and 224Ra were measured on-board using a delayed coincidence counting system (RaDeCC). In our presentation we will present the 224Ra/223Ra distribution along these transects investigated and we will compare the diapycnal radium-derived nutrient fluxes with those determined using benthic chambers and microstructure measurements.

  12. Research papers Sediment resuspension and nepheloid layers induced by long internal

    E-print Network

    particulate organic matter and other biologically sensitive compounds such as iron, nutrients, or contaminants, 2006). Internal solitary waves have emerged in recent studies as poten- tially effective agents

  13. Seasonal variation in concentration, size, and settling velocity of muddy marine flocs in the benthic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fettweis, Michael; Baeye, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) concentration profiles of the lowest 2 m of the water column and particle size distribution at 2 m above the bed were measured in a coastal turbidity maximum area (southern North Sea) during more than 700 days between 2006 and 2013. The long-term data series of SPM concentration, floc size, and settling velocity have been ensemble averaged according to tidal range, alongshore residual flow direction, and season, in order to investigate the seasonal SPM dynamics and its relation with physical and biological processes. The data show that the SPM is more concentrated in the near-bed layer in summer, whereas in winter, the SPM is better mixed throughout the water column. The decrease of the SPM concentration in the water column during summer is compensated by a higher near-bed concentration indicating that a significant part of the SPM remains in the area during summer rather than being advected out of it. The opposite seasonality between near-bed layer and water column has to our knowledge not yet been presented in literature. Physical effects such as wave heights, wind climate, or storms have a weak correlation with the observed seasonality. The argument to favor microbial activity as main driver of the seasonality lies in the observed variations in floc size and settling velocity. On average, the flocs are larger and thus settling velocities higher in summer than winter.

  14. Trophic interactions in the benthic boundary layer of the Beaufort Sea shelf, Arctic Ocean: Combining bulk stable isotope and fatty acid signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Tara L.; Deibel, Don; Parrish, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The food web structure and diets of 26 taxa of benthic boundary layer (BBL) zooplankton on the Beaufort Sea shelf were studied using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and fatty acids. Mean ?15N values ranged from 7.3‰ for the amphipod Melita formosa to 14.9‰ for an unidentified polychaete, suggesting that taxa sampled came from three trophic levels. For 8 taxa, the lightest carbon signature occurred near the mouth of the Mackenzie River. Stable isotope ratios helped clarify the origin of signature fatty acids. Levels of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were negatively correlated with ?15N, with the exception of 22:6?3, which was positively correlated with ?15N, suggesting that this essential PUFA was retained through the food web. Discriminant analysis proved to be a powerful tool, predicting taxa from fatty acid profiles with 99% accuracy, and revealing strong phylogenetic trends in fatty acid profiles. The amphipod Arrhis phyllonyx had higher levels of ?6 PUFA, especially 20:4?6 with several possible sources, than other peracarid crustaceans. The holothurian had high levels of odd numbered and branched chain fatty acids, indicative of bacterial consumption, while fatty acids of phytoplankton origin were important discriminants for Calanus hyperboreus and the chaetognaths Eukrohnia hamata and Parasagitta elegans. This relationship indicates that the conventional phytoplankton-copepod-chaetognath food web found in the water column also exists in the BBL. This observation, as well as generally low ?15N and high levels of certain PUFA in samples with lower ?15N, strongly suggests that BBL zooplankton on the Beaufort Sea shelf have access to fresh material of phytoplankton origin either by feeding on sedimenting matter or by active migration to surface waters.

  15. Coastal Benthic Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the species diversity of benthic communities in U.S. estuarine waters during the period 1997–2000. Benthic organisms — animals that inhabit the bottom substrate of a water body — play an important role in maintaining sediment and water qual...

  16. Benthic foraminiferal thanatocoenoses from the Cap-Ferret Canyon area (NE Atlantic): A complex interplay between hydro-sedimentary and biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duros, P.; Jorissen, F. J.; Cesbron, F.; Zaragosi, S.; Schmidt, S.; Metzger, E.; Fontanier, C.

    2014-06-01

    Benthic foraminiferal thanatocoenoses from the Cap-Ferret Canyon area were studied in the >150-?m fraction of 4-5 cm deep sediment levels, at 13 stations. The shallowest station (151 m depth) is located at the shelf break, close to the canyon head. All other stations are located along two bathymetric transects: seven stations along the canyon axis between 300 and 3000 m depth, and five stations from 300 m to 2000 m depth along the southern flank of the canyon. The comparison between the live (Rose-Bengal-stained) and dead assemblages shows that biological (i.e. population dynamic) and taphonomic processes (i.e. test destruction, transport) generate important discrepancies between live and dead assemblages. An important question is, to what degree post-mortem transport and redeposition of foraminiferal tests contribute to the difference between living and dead assemblages? The composition of the thanatocoenoses (<1% of neritic species) indicates that there is no substantial transport of shells >150 ?m from the inner continental shelf to the Cap-Ferret Canyon axis. However, transport of tests from outer shelf or upper canyon axis towards deeper sites occurs, as indicated by an increase of diversity indices of the dead fauna along the canyon axis. Moreover, some species (e.g., Cassidulina carinata) are observed in the living fauna restricted to the shallow sites, but occur in important amounts in the dead fauna at deeper stations, suggesting that these taxa have been transported from upper canyon stations toward deeper sites. Since Cap-Ferret Canyon is inactive in terms of massive sediment transport (i.e. gravity events), downslope transport of foraminiferal tests probably takes place in nepheloid layers. Downslope transports of foraminiferal tests may create important biases for the utilisation of paleoceanographic proxies using the assemblage characteristics and/or the geochemical composition of selected species. However, the study of dead assemblages along a canyon axis can give important clues about the sedimentary dynamics, especially an idea of the quantity of reworked foraminifera transported through the canyon axis. Along the adjacent flank, such evidence of downslope transport was not observed. Despite taphonomic (test destruction) and biological processes (population dynamics), the live fauna closely resembles the distribution and the composition of the dead assemblage. Therefore, ecological information obtained from the fossil flank samples can be more reliably used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions.

  17. Annual growth layers as proxies of past growth conditions for benthic microbial mats in a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Hawes, Ian

    2009-02-01

    Perennial microbial mats can be the dominant autotrophic community in Antarctic lakes. Their seasonal growth results in clearly discernible annual growth layering. We examined features of live microbial mats from a range of depths in Lake Hoare, Antarctica, that are likely to be preserved in these layers to determine their potential as proxies of past growth performance. Cyanobacteria dominated the mat for all but the deepest depth sampled. Changes in areal concentrations of phycobilin pigments, organic matter and extracellular polysaccharide and in species composition did not correspond to changes in various water column properties, but showed a linear relationship with irradiance. Carbonate accumulation in the mats correlated with biomass markers and may be inferred as an index of mat performance. We examined the carbonate content of annual layers laid down from 1958-1959 to 1994-1995 in sediment cores from 12 m depth. The carbonate content in the layer showed a significant correlation with the mean summer air temperature. These data suggest a link between air temperature and microbial mat growth performance, and suggest that it is mediated via irradiance. Laminated microbial mats in Antarctic lakes have the potential to act as fine-resolution records of environmental conditions in the recent past, although interpretation is complex. PMID:19120468

  18. Benthic Macroinvertebrates in Wadeable Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the presence and distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates in wadeable streams nationwide as surveyed from 2000 to 2004. Benthic macroinvertebrates are particularly sensitive to disturbances in stream chemistry and physical habitat, making their prese...

  19. Dynamics of the bathyal Benthic Boundary Layer in the northwestern Mediterranean: depth and temporal variations in macrofaunal megafaunal communities and their possible connections within deep-sea trophic webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, Joan E.

    1998-01-01

    The distribution patterns of benthopelagic fauna and the macrofauna-megafauna trophic relationships in the Benthic Boundary Layer (BBL) were studied. The study is based on data collected during 6 sampling cruises off the Catalan coast (western Mediterranean) during 1991-1995 at depths ranging from 389-1355 m. Crustaceans were the dominant benthopelagic macrofauna in the BBL level closest to the sea bed (~0-1.5 m above bottom) on the Catalan Sea slope. Copepods and peracarid crustaceans (mysids, amphipods, isopods, and cumaceans) were dominant, whereas euphausiids and natantian decapods, some taxa of gelatinous plankton (siphonophores, medusae, and chaetognaths), and benthopelagic fishes were also well represented groups. Seasonal changes in megafaunal decapod crustaceans abundance seem to be linked to changes in the density and the biological cycle of BBL macrofauna, which constitute an important part of the available food exploited by megafauna. Both the advective and the vertical flow of organic matter in the north-western Mediterranean should simultaneously influence peaks of available food (BBL macrofauna) for bathyal-megafaunal decapods. Recruitment of macrofaunal (suprabenthos and infauna) species at the level of canyons and neighbouring slope zones mainly occurred between late autumn-late winter and would probably be mainly induced by an advective component. However, the macrofaunal sizes consumed by megafaunal decapods are found more abundantly represented in spring and summer populations. In parallel, the vertical fluxes seem to determine maxima in the abundance of planktonic organisms (especially copepods) which also occur in late spring-summer. Size, natatory capability, and energetic value are important factors in the selection of food-resources by megafaunal decapods, which would have a greater availability of food in late spring-summer. This would explain both the seasonal maxima of decapod abundance in summer, and maxima in the catches of some commercial species (i.e. the shrimp Aristeus antennatus) in spring-summer.

  20. PII S0016-7037(99)00335-X Sedimentary sources of old high molecular weight dissolved organic carbon from the ocean

    E-print Network

    Guo, Laodong

    are 3­6,000 years, and are influenced by old DOC from continental margins. However, sources of DOC from of the old benthic COC observed in ocean margin areas. Old COC from continental margin nepheloid layers may DOC (Benner et al., 1992; Aluwihare et al., 1997; McCarthy et al., 1997). Continental margin areas

  1. Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. J.; Jeong, T. S.; Youn, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature-dependent photoresponse characteristics of MnAl2S4 layers have been investigated, for the first time, by use of photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy. Three peaks were observed at all temperatures. The electronic origin of these peaks was associated with band-to-band transitions from the valence-band states ?4( z), ?5( x), and ?5( y) to the conduction-band state ?1( s). On the basis of the relationship between PC-peak energy and temperature, the optical band gap could be well expressed by the expression E g( T) = E g(0) - 2.80 × 10-4 T 2/(287 + T), where E g(0) was estimated to be 3.7920 eV, 3.7955 eV, and 3.8354 eV for the valence-band states ?4( z), ?5( x), and ?5( y), respectively. Results from PC spectroscopy revealed the crystal-field and spin-orbit splitting were 3.5 meV and 39.9 meV. The gradual decrease of PC intensity with decreasing temperature can be explained on the basis of trapping centers associated with native defects in the MnAl2S4 layers. Plots of log J ph, the PC current density, against 1/ T, revealed a dominant trap level in the high-temperature region. By comparing PC and the Hall effect results, we confirmed that this trap level is a shallow donor 18.9 meV below the conduction band.

  2. Woody Vegetation Removal Stimulates Riparian and Benthic

    E-print Network

    Dodds, Walter

    by climate change, elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, increased nitrogen (N) depositionWoody Vegetation Removal Stimulates Riparian and Benthic Denitrification in Tallgrass Prairie and subsequent woody plant removal on riparian and benthic denitrification. Denitrification rates in riparian

  3. Identification of the Photosynthetic Pigments of the Tropical Benthic Dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus

    E-print Network

    Identification of the Photosynthetic Pigments of the Tropical Benthic Dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus. toxicus strains as well as ABSTRACT-Photosynthetic pigments of the Floridn isolate ofGambierdiscus toxicus isolates. The pigments were separated using thin-layer chromatography (FLC). Tentative pigment

  4. Benthic phosphorus regeneration in the Potomac River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, E.

    1982-01-01

    The flux of dissolved reactive phosphate from Potomac riverine and estuarine sediments is controlled by processes occurring at the water-sediment interface and within surficial sediment. In situ benthic fluxes (0.1 to 2.0 mmoles m-2 day-1) are generally five to ten times higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (0.020 to 0.30 mmoles m-2 day-1). The discrepancy between the two flux estimates is greatest in the transition zone (river mile 50 to 70) and is attributd to macrofaunal irrigation. Both in situ and diffusive fluxes of dissolved reactive phosphate from Potomac tidal river sediments are low while those from anoxic lower estuarine sediments are high. The net accumulation rate of phosphorus in benthic sediment exhibits an inverse pattern. Thus a large fraction of phosphorus is retained by Potomac tidal river sediments, which contain a surficial oxidized layer and oligochaete worms tolerant of low oxygen conditions, and a large fraction of phosphorus is released from anoxic lower estuary sediments. Tidal river sediment pore waters are in equilibrium with amorphous Fe (OH)3 while lower estuary pore waters are significantly undersaturated with respect to this phase. Benthic regeneration of dissolved reactive phosphorus is sufficient to supply all the phosphorus requirements for net primary production in the lower tidal river and transition-zone waters of the Potomac River Estuary. Benthic regeneration supplies approximately 25% as much phosphorus as inputs from sewage treatment plants and 10% of all phosphorus inputs to the tidal Potomac River. When all available point source phosphorus data are put into a steady-state conservation of mass model and reasonable coefficients for uptake of dissolved phosphorus, remineralization of particulate phosphorus, and sedimentation of particulate phosphorus are used in the model, a reasonably accurate simulation of dissolved and particulate phosphorus in the water column is obtained for the summer of 1980. ?? 1982 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  5. EPA'S BENTHIC HABITAT DATA FOR YAQUINA ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists at EPA's National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Western Ecology Division (WED) have been studying seafloor (benthic) habitats in Yaquina estuary for several years. Those studies were conducted as parts of several research projects, including: e...

  6. REMOTE SENSING OF BENTHIC HABITATS IN SOUTHWESTERN

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING OF BENTHIC HABITATS IN SOUTHWESTERN PUERTO RICO Fernando Gilbes Santaella ­ Dep. of Geology Roy Armstrong ­ Dep. of Marine Sciences University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez fernando of subsurface aquatic remote sensing algorithms LEGACY: Utilize scientific publications and web

  7. BENTHIC MACROFAUNAL ALIENS IN WILLAPA BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic macrofaunal samples were collected at random stations in Willapa Bay, WA, in four habitats [eelgrass (Zostera marina), Atlantic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis), ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis)] in 1996 and in seven habitats (Z...

  8. Using Regional Distribution of Estuarine and Coastal Benthic Invertebrates to Calibrate Benthic Indices of Ecological Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biogeography of marine benthic macroinvertebrates of the U.S. Atlantic coast from Delaware Bay north to Passamaquoddy Bay, Maine, was studied to define physical-chemical factors affecting broad taxa distributions and provide information needed to calibrate benthic indices of ...

  9. CODIS Fraser River Benthic Invertebrates Table of Contents

    E-print Network

    ;______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ CODIS Fraser River Benthic Invertebrates Table of Contents Page Table of Contents i List of Figures iii ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ CODIS Fraser River Benthic Invertebrates Appendix III: Data Appraisal 3.1 Protocol Document 65 Appendix ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ CODIS Fraser River Benthic Invertebrates List of Figures Page Figure 1. The Fraser River basin and sub

  10. CHECKLIST AND BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE MARINE BENTHIC ALGAE

    E-print Network

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    CHECKLIST AND BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE MARINE BENTHIC ALGAE FROM ISLANDS AND ATOLLS WITHIN YAP STATE October 2002 #12;Checklist and Bibliography of the Marine Benthic Algae from Islands and Atolls within Yap) recorded 85 species of marine benthic algae from Ifalik (Ifaluk) Atoll. Trono (1968, 1969, 1971) published

  11. Estimates the Effects of Benthic Fluxes on the Water Quality of the Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Huh, I. A.; Park, S.; Choi, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoirs located in highly populated and industrialized regions receive discharges of nutrients and pollutants from the watershed that have great potential to impair water quality and threaten aquatic life. The Euiam reservoir is a multiple-purpose water body used for tourism, fishery, and water supply and has been reported as eutrophic since 1990s. The external nutrients loading is considered to be the main cause of eutrophication of water bodies, and control strategies therefore focus on its reduction. However, algae blooms often continue even after external nutrients loading has been controlled, being benthic nutrient loading the main source of nutrients in the water column. Attempts to quantify benthic nutrients fluxes and their role as a source of nutrients to the water column have produced ambiguous results. Benthic flux is dependent on the upward flow of pore water caused by hydrostatic pressure, molecular diffusion, and mixing of sediment and water. In addition, it is controlled by dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, pH values and temperature in the overlying water. Therefore, linking a benthic flux to a water quality model should give us more insight on the effects of benthic fluxes to better quantify nutrient concentration within an entire reservoir system where physical, chemical, biological properties are variable. To represent temporal and spatial variations in the nutrient concentrations of the reservoir, a three-dimensional time variable model, Generalized Longitudinal-Lateral-Vertical Hydrodynamic and Transport (GLLVHT) was selected. The GLLVHT model is imbedded within the Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surface waters (GEMSS). The computational grid of the three-dimensional model was developed using the GIS. The horizontal grid is composed of 580 active cells at the surface layer with spacing varies from 54.2 m to 69.8 m. There are 15 vertical layers with uniform thickness of 1.9 m resolution. To calibrate the model, model prediction for nutrient concentration was compared with field collected data. The model results showed a good agreement with field measurements. From the model results, the followings are determined and discussed: (1) the role of benthic fluxes on the water quality of the reservoir (2) the extent of benthic fluxes to which the water quality exceeds the criteria.

  12. Long term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöger, Julia; Eder, Wolfgang; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Antonino, Briguglio; Carles, Ferrandes-Cañadell; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Benthic Foraminifera are used in a variety of applications employing numerous different methods, i.e. ecological monitoring, studying the effects of ocean acidification, reconstructing palaeo-bathymetry or investigating palaeo-salinity and palaeo-temperature to name only a few. To refine our understanding of ecological influences on larger benthic foraminiferal biology and to review inferences from field observations, culture experiments have become an indispensable tool. While culture experiments on smaller benthic foraminifera have become increasingly frequent in the past century, reports of the cultivation of symbiont bearing larger Foraminifera are rare. Generally, cultivation experiments can be divided into two groups: Culturing of populations and cultivation of single specimens allowing individual investigation. The latter differ form the former by several restrictions resulting from the need to limit individual motility without abridging microenvironmental conditions in the Foraminiferans artificial habitat, necessary to enable the individual to development as unfettered as possible. In this study we present first experiences and preliminary results of the long-term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera conducted at the 'Tropical Biosphere Research Station Sesoko Island, University of the Ryukyus', Japan, trying to reproduce natural conditions as closely as possible. Individuals of three species of larger benthic Foraminifera (Heterostegina depressa, Palaeonummulites venosus and Operculina complanata) have been cultured since April 2014. At the time of the general assembly the cultivation experiments will have been going on for more than one year, with the aim to investigate growth rates, longevities and reproduction strategies for comparison with results statistically inferred from application of the of the 'natural laboratory' method. The most important factor influencing foraminiferal health and development was found to be light intensity and light spectrum. The light intensities reaching the Foraminifera in cultivation however largely depend on the substrate provided (e.g. sand and silt where individuals dig close to the surface or coral rubble used as shelter by the Foraminiferans and as an easy way of retaining the organisms within a designated container by the investigator).

  13. The role of benthic foraminifera in the benthic nitrogen cycle of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glock, N.; Schönfeld, J.; Eisenhauer, A.; Hensen, C.; Mallon, J.; Sommer, S.

    2013-07-01

    The discovery that foraminifera are able to use nitrate instead of oxygen as an electron acceptor for respiration has challenged our understanding of nitrogen cycling in the ocean. It was thought before that only prokaryotes and some fungi are able to denitrify. Rate estimates of foraminiferal denitrification have been very sparse and limited to specific regions in the oceans, not comparing stations along a transect of a certain region. Here, we present estimates of benthic foraminiferal denitrification rates from six stations at intermediate water depths in and below the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Foraminiferal denitrification rates were calculated from abundance and assemblage composition of the total living fauna in both surface and subsurface sediments, as well as from individual species specific denitrification rates. A comparison with total benthic denitrification rates as inferred by biogeochemical models revealed that benthic foraminifera probably account for the total denitrification in shelf sediments between 80 and 250 m water depth. The estimations also imply that foraminifera are still important denitrifiers in the centre of the OMZ around 320 m (29-50% of the benthic denitrification), but play only a minor role at the lower OMZ boundary and below the OMZ between 465 and 700 m (2-6% of total benthic denitrification). Furthermore, foraminiferal denitrification has been compared to the total benthic nitrate loss measured during benthic chamber experiments. The estimated foraminiferal denitrification rates contribute 2 to 46% to the total nitrate loss across a depth transect from 80 to 700 m, respectively. Flux rate estimates range from 0.01 to 1.3 mmol m-2 d-1. Furthermore we show that the amount of nitrate stored in living benthic foraminifera (3 to 3955 ?mol L-1) can be higher by three orders of magnitude as compared to the ambient pore waters in near-surface sediments sustaining an important nitrate reservoir in Peruvian OMZ sediments. The substantial contribution of foraminiferal nitrate respiration to total benthic nitrate loss at the Peruvian margin, which is one of the main nitrate sink regions in the world ocean, underpins the importance of the previously underestimated role of benthic foraminifera in global biogeochemical cycles.

  14. State of the benthic ecosystem on western Black Sea shelf in spring 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.; Aleynik, D.; Eulenburg, A.; Kusch, St.; Mee, L. D.; Minicheva, G.; Stevens, T. F.; Teaca, A.; Shapiro, G. I.; Soloviev, D.

    2009-04-01

    Since the changes in the economies in the Black Sea countries in the 1990's, the momentarily associated decrease in anthropogenic pressures has put the ecosystem of Black Sea western shelf on a trajectory to recovery. However, the suspected non-linearity of recovery and the ecological instability of the benthic shelf ecosystem in particular became evident in the field surveys supported by the BSERP in 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006, e.g. in the spread of opportunistic species taking new niches and the re-occurrence of large-scale bottom water hypoxia like in 2001. The temporal dynamics of the recovery (as well as of the decline) may also be tied to climatic effects. The Black Sea is known to respond to north Atlantic oscillation (NAO) forcing and decadal climate changes. The target of the 363th cruise of R/V Poseidon in March 2008 has been to map the current state of the benthic ecosystem in a quasi-winter situation. We assessed: a) the current state of the benthic ecosystem on the north-western shelf; to what degree it recovered during the past decade from its collapse in the 1980's. In this respect, we investigated the role of the seabed as storage media of nutrients from past eutrophication, and the role of the sediments as internal source of nutrients to the pelagic system. We focused on zoo- and phytobenthos distribution, the interaction of benthic biota with the sediment, accumulation of nutrients in the sediment, and the flux of nutrients from the sediments to the water. b) The benthic-pelagic coupling, i.e. how the nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and silica for algal growth are transported from the seafloor to the sea surface and thus fuel biologic productivity. c) The exchange of water between the shelf and the open Black Sea, and hence the transport of nutrients, i.e. the fertilization of the open Black Sea with nutrients from the shelf. Here, we are presenting results from the spring 2008 survey and compare them to findings from a summer survey in 2006: thermal heating and freshwater input created a double front structure on the western shelf, and intrusion of the Cold Intermediate Layer (CIL) into shelf waters was observed. Surface distribution of dissolved nutrients reflects clear signals of silica and total dissolved nitrogen input from the Danube River. Phosphate appears to have a different source, e.g. benthic and/or from the CIL. The benthic ecosystem remains fragile; diversity indices reflect small recovery, quantities in biomass of both zoo- and phytobenthos indicate ongoing perturbations in nearshore areas. A full recovery of historical beds of Phyllophora is not evident, coverage both in winter and summer is less than 10%, and its role as habitat could be compromised by overgrowth of filamentous algae. The benthic system with an epibenthic community in balance releases less nutrients than a disturbed system without benthic life. Nutrients release from the sediment is lower in winter than in summer. The oxygen penetration depth in the sediment triggers denitrification. A spectacular population development of opportunistic species both in zoo- and phytobenthos was observed. The question remains whether or not those opportunistic species can ensure ecosystem functionality and stability. Our findings will help to identify locations crucial for the functioning for the benthic shelf ecosystem, to define "Good Environmental Status" and help to provide recommendations for Marine protected areas on the western Black Sea shelf. It is hoped that the data will make an important contribution to the information base underpinning the new European Marine Strategy Directive and the Bucharest Convention for the Protection of the Black Sea.

  15. Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages and Environmental Correlates in Springs of the Ridge and Valley Province

    EPA Science Inventory

    Springs are unique features in the landscape that provide important habitat for benthic invertebrates, yet there are few studies characterizing the distribution of benthic macro invertebrates in springs. Benthic macroinvertebrate and water quality data were collected at 35 spring...

  16. Generalized analytical model for benthic water flux forced by surface gravity waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, J.N.; Mehta, A.J.; Dean, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    A generalized analytical model for benthic water flux forced by linear surface gravity waves over a series of layered hydrogeologic units is developed by adapting a previous solution for a hydrogeologic unit with an infinite thickness (Case I) to a unit with a finite thickness (Case II) and to a dual-unit system (Case III). The model compares favorably with laboratory observations. The amplitude of wave-forced benthic water flux is shown to be directly proportional to the amplitude of the wave, the permeability of the hydrogeologic unit, and the wave number and inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity of water. A dimensionless amplitude parameter is introduced and shown to reach a maximum where the product of water depth and the wave number is 1.2. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is a benthic water discharge flux to a marine water body. The Case I model estimates an 11.5-cm/d SGD forced by a wave with a 1 s period and 5-cm amplitude in water that is 0.5-m deep. As this wave propagates into a region with a 0.3-m-thick hydrogeologic unit, with a no-flow bottom boundary, the Case II model estimates a 9.7-cm/d wave-forced SGD. As this wave propagates into a region with a 0.2-m-thick hydrogeologic unit over an infinitely thick, more permeable unit, the Case III quasi-confined model estimates a 15.7-cm/d wave-forced SGD. The quasi-confined model has benthic constituent flux implications in coral reef, karst, and clastic regions. Waves may undermine tracer and seepage meter estimates of SGD at some locations. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. A MORE COST-EFFECTIVE EMAP BENTHIC MACROFAUNAL SAMPLING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic macrofaunal sampling protocols in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) are to collect 30 to 50 random benthic macrofauna [defined as animals retained on a 0.5 mm (East and Gulf Coasts, USA) or a 1.0 mm mesh siev...

  18. BENTHIC NUTRIENT FLUX IN A SMALL ESTUARY IN NORTHWESTERNFLORIDA (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic Nutrient Flux in a Small Estuary in Northwestern Florida(USA).Gulf and Caribbean Research 18, 15-25, 2006.

    Benthic nutrient fluxes of ammonium (NH4+), nitrite/nitrate (NO2-+NO3-), phosphate (PO4-), and dissolved silica (DSi) were measured in Escambia Bay, an estuar...

  19. LATITUDINAL GRADIENTS IN BENTHIC COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN WESTERN ATLANTIC ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The community structure of benthic macroinvertebrates from estuaries along the Atlantic coast of North America from Cape Cod, MA, to Biscayne Bay, FL, were compared. Benthic data were collected over a 5 year period (1990 to 1995) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Envi...

  20. Benthic effects on the polarization of light in shallow waters

    E-print Network

    Cummings, Molly E.

    Benthic effects on the polarization of light in shallow waters Alexander A. Gilerson,1, * Jan 194876); published 13 December 2013 Measurements of the upwelling polarized radiance in relatively shallow waters of varying depths and benthic conditions are compared to simulations, revealing

  1. CHECKLIST AND BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE MARINE BENTHIC ALGAE

    E-print Network

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    benthic algae from the atolls within the Republic of the Marshall Islands (Figure 1) is based Atoll algae (Tsuda,1987) and subsequent phycological studies conducted within the Marshall Islands references reveal that marine benthic algae have been reported from 17 of the 28 atolls (i.e., low coral

  2. INDEX OF ESTUARINE BENTHIC INTEGRITY FOR GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A benthic index for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries has been developed and successfully validated by the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) in the Louisianian Province. The benthic index is a useful indicator of estuarine condition that provi...

  3. SEASONAL CHANGES OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN SOUTHWESTERN BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-print Network

    SEASONAL CHANGES OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES IN SOUTHWESTERN BRITISH COLUMBIA Prepared composition between both different classes of streams and seasons in southwestern British Columbia. Insect regime. Seasonal change of the benthic invertebrate community was small relative to the spatial change, i

  4. New Benthic ?18o Stacks and Age Models for the Last Glacial Cycle (0-150 kyr ago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, L. E.; Stern, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    The ?18O of formainiferal calcite is a common paleoceanographic proxy, which measures ice volume and deep water temperature change. Foraminiferal ?18O is also often used to create marine sediment core age models by aligning down-core variations in ?18O to a global stack, or average. However, the most commonly used stack, known as "LR04," has an outdated age model, assumes global benthic ?18O synchrony, and is biased to the Atlantic [Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005]. Here we present six regional benthic ?18O stacks of the last glacial cycle (0-150 kyr) that are combined to form a volume-weighted global stack with data from 263 sites. We develop new benthic ?18O age models using regional radiocarbon dates from 0-40 ka and correlations to the GICC05 layer-counted Greenland age model from 40-56 ka [Svensson et al., 2008] and U-Th-dated Chinese speleothems from 56-150 kyr [Wang et al., 2001; Cheng et al., 2009; Barker et al, 2011]. Additional features of the new stacks are diachronous benthic ?18O changes during the last two glacial terminations and explicit age uncertainty estimates throughout. Our new global stack indicates that some portions of the LR04 stack are up to 4 kyr too young. We estimate corrections to the LR04 age model throughout the Pleistocene that imply faster climate responses to orbital forcing than previously estimated.

  5. Diel Variability in Seawater pH Relates to Calcification and Benthic Community Structure on Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Martz, Todd R.; Brainard, Russell E.

    2012-01-01

    Community structure and assembly are determined in part by environmental heterogeneity. While reef-building corals respond negatively to warming (i.e. bleaching events) and ocean acidification (OA), the extent of present-day natural variability in pH on shallow reefs and ecological consequences for benthic assemblages is unknown. We documented high resolution temporal patterns in temperature and pH from three reefs in the central Pacific and examined how these data relate to community development and net accretion rates of early successional benthic organisms. These reefs experienced substantial diel fluctuations in temperature (0.78°C) and pH (>0.2) similar to the magnitude of ‘warming’ and ‘acidification’ expected over the next century. Where daily pH within the benthic boundary layer failed to exceed pelagic climatological seasonal lows, net accretion was slower and fleshy, non-calcifying benthic organisms dominated space. Thus, key aspects of coral reef ecosystem structure and function are presently related to natural diurnal variability in pH. PMID:22952785

  6. 3.6 BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE by Trefor B. Reynoldson

    E-print Network

    109 3.6 BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE 3.6 by Trefor B. Reynoldson National Water Department of Fisheries and Oceans Winnipeg, Manitoba BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE Benthic numerous sites. #12;110 3.6 BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE The concept of a reference condition

  7. Assessment of Arctic community wastewater impacts on marine benthic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Krumhansl, Kira A; Krkosek, Wendy H; Greenwood, Mark; Ragush, Colin; Schmidt, Jordan; Grant, Jon; Barrell, Jeff; Lu, Lin; Lam, Buuan; Gagnon, Graham A; Jamieson, Rob C

    2015-01-20

    This study sought to understand the performance of arctic treatment systems and the impact of wastewater effluent on benthic invertebrate communities in arctic receiving water habitats. Effluent quality and benthic impacts were monitored in the receiving water of five communities across Nunavut that differed in the type and level of treatment achieved by wastewater infrastructure, the volume of effluent and receiving water mixing environment. We detected minimal impacts to benthic communities (<225 m linear distance from the effluent source) in four out of the five communities (Grise Fiord, Kugaaruk, Pond Inlet, and Pangnirtung), where the population was <2000 people. In these small communities impacts were characterized by increases or decreases in species richness, diversity, evenness, and density, and some differences in benthic species composition. This was in contrast to benthic sediments in Iqaluit (population 6699), which were devoid of benthic fauna up to 580 m from the effluent source in response to sediment anoxia. Variation in benthic community response between sampling locations was attributed primarily to differences in effluent volume, with effluent quality and receiving water hydrodynamics playing secondary roles. The results of this study will help to inform the development of northern specific treatment performance standards which will aid in prioritizing community wastewater system upgrades in arctic communities. PMID:25514191

  8. Interpreting benthic oxygen levels in mudrocks: a new approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wignall, P.B.; Myers, K.J.

    1988-05-01

    Quantified paleoecology and gamma-ray spectrometry have been applied in the analysis of the Kimmeridge Clay, a highly organic-rich British Jurassic mudrock. Decreasing benthic oxygen trends are reflected in decreasing species richness and dominance-diversity values. Similarly, the degree of fragmentation of the benthos reflects the benthic energy levels and covaries with benthic oxygen. The calculation of authigenic uranium values from data gathered by gamma-ray spectrometry shows enrichment in more oxygen-deficient environments. The good correlation between the independently derived paleoecological and authigenic U data indicates the importance of these techniques in environmental analysis of marine petroleum source rocks.

  9. The Benthic Terrain Modeler (BTM) is an ArcGIS-based tool that can be used by coastal and marine resource managers to examine the deepwater benthic

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    DATA Benthic Terrain Classification Wizard The Benthic Terrain Classification Wizard is provided and an interactive help window. BTM Tools More advanced BTM users can choose to skip the wizard and use the tools

  10. Introduction Antarctic benthic communities have been described as one

    E-print Network

    Paiva, Paulo Cesar de

    irradiance, together with the input of coastal runoff by the melt of coastal ice and snow (carrying organic primary production of: 1) benthic microalgae (Gilbert 1991), 2) macroalgae with the input of its debris

  11. WASP7 BENTHIC ALGAE - MODEL THEORY AND USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard WASP7 eutrophication module includes nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, dissolved oxygen-organic matter interactions, and phytoplankton kinetics. In many shallow streams and rivers, however, the attached algae (benthic algae, or periphyton, attached to submerged substr...

  12. DECLINE IN LAKE ONTARIO POPULATIONS OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of benthic macroinvertebrates conducted in Lake Ontario during 1994 and 1997 revealed declines in populations of three major groups of organisms: oligochaetes, sphariids, and Diporeia spp. (Amphipoda), with the most drastic reductions occurring in the latter. Based on phy...

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Alteration of benthic communities associated with copper

    E-print Network

    Levin, Lisa

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Alteration of benthic communities associated with copper contamination linked; copper contamination; diversity; macrofauna; marina; recreational boats; San Diego Bay sediment.1111/maec.12054 Abstract Although copper (Cu) is an essential element for life, leaching from boat paint can

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Benthic sediment influence on dissolved phosphorus

    E-print Network

    Lottig, Noah R.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Benthic sediment influence on dissolved phosphorus concentrations in a headwater with inorganic sedi- ment particles through sorption reactions in streams. Collectively, this phosphorus (P determining ambi- ent stream P concentrations. Keywords Phosphorus retention Á Sediments Á Equilibrium

  15. Benthic perspective on Earth's oldest evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis

    E-print Network

    Konhauser, Kurt

    Benthic perspective on Earth's oldest evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis Stefan V. Lalondea,1. We calculate that oxygenic photosynthesis in these milli- meter-thick ecosystems provides sufficient photosynthesis | Great Oxidation Event | oxidative weathering | Precambrian Aremarkably coherent ensemble

  16. SAMPLING LARGE RIVERS FOR ALGAE, BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES AND FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple projects are currently underway to increase our understanding of the effects of different sampling methods and designs used for the biological assessment and monitoring of large (boatable) rivers. Studies include methods used to assess fish, benthic macroinvertebrates, ...

  17. BENTHIC MACROFAUNA-HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS IN WILLAPA BAY, WASHINGTON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuary-wide benthic macrofauna-habitat associations in Willapa Bay, Washington, United States, were determined for 4 habitats (eelgrass [Zostera marina], Atlantic cordgrass [Spartina alterniflora], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californiensis]) in 1...

  18. BENTHIC MACROFAUNA-HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN WILLAPA BAY, WA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic macrofauna-habitat relationships were determined estuary-wide in Willapa Bay, WA for four intertidal habitats ((1) eelgrass, Zostera marina, (2) Atlantic cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora, (3) ghost shrimp, Neotrypaea californiensis, (4) mud shrimp, Upogebia pugettensis) i...

  19. Magnesium content of calcite in carapaces of benthic armine Ostracoda

    E-print Network

    Cadot, H. M.; Kaesler, R. L.

    1977-07-22

    PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS July 22, 1977 Paper 87 MAGNESIUM CONTENT OF CALCITE IN CARAPACES OF BENTHIC MARINE OSTRACODA 1 H. MEADE CADOT, JR.,2 and ROGER L. KAESLER3 2 Antioch College—New England and The Harris Center for Conservation Education, Hancock, New... Hampshire; 'The University of Kansas, Lawrence ABSTRACT Statistically significant differences in mean magnesium content of calcite in carapaces of benthic marine Ostracoda were found to occur among four superfamily groups and among regions of the carapace...

  20. Biomixing generated by benthic filter feeders: a diffusion model for near-bottom phytoplankton depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsena, Poul S.; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    1997-05-01

    Transient concentration distributions of flagellate cells ( Rhodomonas sp.) previously measured by Riisgård and co-workers in laboratory experiments have been examined to develop a diffusion model for the process of phytoplankton depletion in stagnant seawater above populations of benthic filter feeders, the polychaete Nereis diversicolor and the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, respectively. The model is based on sinks located at inhalant openings and Fick's law with an effective diffusivity that decreases with distance above the bottom due to the biomixing generated by exhalant and inhalant feeding currents. For N. diversicolor, having inhalant and exhalant openings flush with the sediment surface and a moderate exhalant jet velocity of ˜0.01 m s -1, concentration boundary layer growth is retarded and limited by the low values of diffusivity prevailing at heights greater >˜0.05 m above the bottom. For C. intestinalis, having inhalant and exhalant openings situated ˜0.05-0.1 m above the bottom and a higher and inclined exhalant jet velocity of ˜0.1-0.2 m s -1, the concentration distributions show a nearly uniform depletion over a layer reaching a thickness of 0.2-0.3 m above the bottom due to high biomixing in this layer. Numerical predictions of concentration distributions reproduce essential features of experiments, and suggest near-bottom values of effective diffusivity of 0.3 x 10 -6 and 150 x 10 -6 m 2 s -1, for N. diversicolor and C. intestinalis, respectively. It is suggested that the latter value is so large that the induced mixing should be accounted for in modelling benthic concentration boundary layers under flow conditions.

  1. Parameterisation of clastic sediments including benthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobertz, B.; Harff, J.; Bohling, B.

    2009-02-01

    The sediment transport processes in the south-western Baltic Sea are predicted by means of a numerical model in the project DYNAS. There are two sediment parameters that influence the results of modelling remarkably: critical shear stress velocity and bottom roughness. This paper presents the way how to parameterise these factors and extrapolate them into the investigation area. The critical shear stress velocity is parameterised basing on grain size data, combining approximations after Hjulström [Hjulström, F., 1935: Studies in the morphological activity of rivers as illustrated by the river Fyris. Geological Institution of University of Uppsala: Bulletin (25): 221-528.], Shields [Shields, A., 1936: Anwendung der Ähnlichkeits-Mechanik und der Turbulenzforschung auf die Geschiebebewegung. Mitteilungen der Preussischen Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau und Schiffahrt (26): 26 pp.] and Bohling [Bohling, B., 2003: Untersuchungen zur Mobilität natürlicher und anthropogener Sedimente in der Mecklenburger Bucht. unpublished doctoral thesis, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald/Germany, 156 pp.]. The roughness length, in the case of absence of macro zoo-benthos and their structures, is parameterised basing on grain size too employing Soulsby [Soulsby, R.L., 1997: Dynamics of Marine Sands: a Manual for Practical Applications. London, Thomas Telford Publications. 249 pp.], Nielsen [Nielsen, P., 1983: Analytical determination of nearshore wave height variation due to refraction shoaling and friction. Coastal Engineering 7, 233-251.] and Yalin [Yalin, M.S., 1977: Mechanics of Sediment Transport. Pergamon Press, New York. 298 pp.]. No equivalent simple parameterisations for biologically caused bed roughness exist. Here, findings of Friedrichs [Friedrichs, M., 2004: Flow-induced effects of macro zoo-benthic structures on the near-bed sediment transport. Dissertation, Universität Rostock, 80 S.] and estimations by the DYNAS biologists group were combined in order to derive roughness lengths from abundance measurements of four previously selected key species which represent the originators of the dominating benthic structures at the sea floor in the south-western Baltic Sea. Critical shear stress velocity and bed roughness are known at few sample sites only. They were extrapolated into the larger investigation area using a proxy-target concept. The mean near bottom milieu (bathymetry, median grain size, salinity, oxygen) which was derived using results from numerical modelling serves as the proxy. Since the milieu parameters are measured at the sampling sites for which the target parameters have been determined, a combined hierarchical and supervised classification was employed to transfer the local knowledge into the unknown investigation area.

  2. Miocene benthic foraminiferal isotope records: A synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savin, S.M.; Douglas, R.G.; Keller, G.; Killingley, J.S.; Shaughnessy, L.; Sommer, M.A.; Vincent, E.; Woodruff, F.

    1981-01-01

    18O 16O and 13C 12C ratios of Miocene benthic foraminifera from a number of Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean DSDP sites (71, 77B, 206, 208, 238, 279, 289, 296, 329, 357 and 366A) have been compiled. These provide a rather detailed history of Miocene deep water especially in the Pacific Ocean. Bottom-water temperatures rose during the early Miocene and then declined rapidly during the middle Miocene. This decline was accompanied by an increase in Antarctic glaciation. Late Miocene bottom temperatures and Antarctic ice volumes are inferred to be similar to today's, but exhibited some fluctuation. The early Miocene ocean was less thermally stratified at intermediate and abyssal depths while the late Miocene deep ocean had a thermal structure generally similar to the modern ocean. Foraminiferal carbon isotope ratios at most of the sites varied quasi-sympathetically throughout the Miocene. These variations must reflect comparable variations in the mean 13C 12C of marine HCO3-. However, the causes of such variations are not yet clear. ?? 1981.

  3. Spatial and temporal distributions of benthic green macroalgae in Yaquina bay, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal estuaries of Oregon, USA, typically support relatively large accumulations of benthic green macroalgae (BGM) during the summer/early fall growing season. This raises questions regarding possible (positive and negative) effects on eelgrass and benthic epifauna and infauna...

  4. Application of multiple index development approaches to benthic invertebrate data from the Virginian Biogeographic Province

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic invertebrate indices have commonly been utilized to assess benthic invertebrate communities. These indices have been constructed using different techniques, but have shown different levels of application success. For example, the EMAP Virginian Province Index did not pe...

  5. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABLES AND BENTHIC DIATOM ASSEMBLAGES IN CALIFORNIA CENTRAL VALLEY STREAMS (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams and rivers in the California Central Valley Ecoregion have been substantially modified by human activities. This study examines distributional patterns of benthic diatom assemblages in relation to environmental characteristics in streams and rivers of this region. Benthic...

  6. Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages in the Near Coastal Zone of Lake Erie

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages have been used as indicators of ecological condition because their responses integrate localized environmental conditions of the sediments and overlying water. Assemblages of benthic invertebrates in the near coastal region are of particular...

  7. Spatial Patterns of Subtidal Benthic Invertebrates and Environmental Factors in the Nearshore Gulf of Maine

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spatial patterns of subtidal benthic invertebrates and physical-chemical variables in the nearshore Gulf of Maine (Acadian Biogeographic Province) were studied to provide information needed to calibrate benthic indices of environmental condition, determine physical-chemical f...

  8. Ecology and role of benthic copepods in northern lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvala, J.

    1998-06-01

    Freshwater benthic Harpacticoida consist of species capable of swimming, but mostly burrowing in organic sediments, and small, vermiform species that are poor swimmers and live in interstitial systems. Freshwater benthic Cyclopoida are either agile epibenthic and often relatively large herbivores, carnivores and omnivores, or small infaunal omnivores. Harpacticoids seem to have few, mainly invertebrate, predators, and consequently low mortality and long life span. These are evolutionarily linked to slow growth and low production to biomass ratio (typically 1-7 a -1). Cyclopoids are characterized by more rapid growth and higher production to biomass ratio (typically 3-13 a -1). Due to their active mode of life, they are preyed upon by fish and other predators, which results in high mortality and a short adult life span. Harpacticoid numbers and biomass may reach 250,000 ind/m 2 and 120 mgC/m 2. True benthic cyclopoids are usually much less abundant (up to 20,000 ind/m 2 and 9 mgC/m 2). Thus, although the quantitative importance of freshwater meiofauna as a whole may often be comparable to that of macrofauna, the few biomass and production data on benthic copepods suggest that at least harpacticoids have a minor role in the benthic food web of northern lakes.

  9. Naturally Ocurring Polyphosphate-accumulating Bacteria in Benthic Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, N. A.; Saia, S. M.; Walter, M. T.; Carrick, H. J.; Buda, A. R.; Regan, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), known to store excess phosphorus (P) as polyphosphate (poly-P), influence P transport in the environment. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater has long served as a basis to study bacterial PAOs, yet little research has genetically identified similar organisms in natural settings. Aerobic/anaerobic cycles, used to select for PAOs in EBPR, can result from changing environmental conditions such as night/day cycles for benthic biofilms. Benthic biofilms from eight Pennsylvanian streams were studied for naturally-occurring bacterial PAOs similar to those typically found in EBPR systems. PAOs were confirmed in the benthic biofilms by a characteristic yellow fluorescent emission from DAPI staining. Cells containing yellow fluorescence were separated from the rest of the sample using a flow cytometer, resulting in a physically enriched culture of PAOs from the benthic biofilms. Amplicon-based metagenomic sequencing will reveal the phylogeny of bacteria responsible for poly-P accumulation in these benthic biofilms. Sequencing data will be used to develop fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) probes, and hybridizations will be performed on DAPI-stained cells to confirm poly-P accumulation by targeted phylotypes. Identifying PAOs in natural settings is a critical step towards studying environments that support high concentrations of PAOs, serving as significant factors in the P cycle. PAOs can then be connected to P transport models to help understand and mitigate P pollution in agricultural watersheds.

  10. Status of Lake Superior Benthic Macroinvertebrates, 1994-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharold, J.; Lozano, S. J.; Corry, T. D.

    2005-05-01

    Recently documented changes to benthic communities in the lower Great Lakes have created concerns about the status of benthic macroinvertebrates in Lake Superior. This lakewide study was conducted to ascertain their status in U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Superior. Benthic macroinvertebrates were collected from 27 sites representing the U.S. nearshore waters (20 to 110 m) of Lake Superior in 1994, 2000, and 2003. No significant differences in total benthic macroinvertebrate abundance, or abundances of oligochaetes, clams or chironomids were detected between years. Abundance of the amphipod Diporeia spp. was lower in 2000 than in 1994 and 2003. The oligochaete trophic index, a measure of relative abundance of species tolerant of varying degrees of organic enrichment, did not differ between years. Diporeia exhibited a bimodal depth distribution, with peaks in abundance at depths of 30 to 40 and 60 to 70 m. Oligochaetes were most abundant at 50 to 60 m depth, clams between 30 and 70 m, and chironomids at less than 30 m, with a secondary peak at 50 to 60 m. The spatial and temporal variability observed in Lake Superior benthic macroinvertebrate communities has implications for sampling design for environmental assessment. This abstract does not necessarily reflect USEPA policy.

  11. SURVEY OF THE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE FAUNA OF THE EASTERN BERING SEA

    E-print Network

    401 SURVEY OF THE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE FAUNA OF THE EASTERN BERING SEA SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORTMMERfiiAL Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director SURVEYOR THE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE FAUNA OF THE EASTERN BERING SEA;#12;SURVEY OF THE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE FAUNA OF THE EASTERN BERING SEA by Patsy A. McLaughlin Fishery

  12. COMPARISON OF TWO INDICES OF BENTHIC COMMUNITY CONDITION IN CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chesapeake Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity (B-IBI) and the EMAP-VP Benthic Index were applied to samples from 239 sites in Chesapeake Bay. The B-IBI weights several community measures equally and uses a simple scoring system while the EMAP-VP Benthic Index uses discriminant...

  13. APPLICATION OF TWO INDICES OF BENTHIC COMMUNITY CONDITION IN CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chesapeake Bay Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity (B-161) and the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's Virginian Province Benthic Index (EMAP-VP BI) were applied to 294 sampling events in Chesapeake Bay and the results were compared. These benthic indices are inte...

  14. Impact of Benthic Algae on Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in a Temperate, Coastal Lagoon

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Deborah

    Impact of Benthic Algae on Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in a Temperate, Coastal Lagoon Anna Christina ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ #12;ii Abstract Coastal lagoons are a common land-margin feature world-wide. The shallow nature of lagoons leads to substantial benthic-pelagic coupling and dominance by benthic autotrophs. Increased

  15. REFINEMENT, VALIDATION, AND APPLICATION OF A BENTHIC CONDITION INDEX FOR NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    By applying discriminant analysis to benthic macroinvertebrate data to produce a benthic index, we have developed an indicator of benthic condition for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries. The data used were collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmen...

  16. InteractionsBetweenBenthicPredatorsandZooplanktonicPreyare Affected by Turbulent Waves

    E-print Network

    Koehl, Mimi

    and variable environments. In the ocean, bottom-dwelling (benthic) or- ganisms are subjected to water currents, waves, and turbulent eddies. For benthic predators that feed on small animals carried in the water on zooplankton by benthic animals depend on the feeding mode of the predator. Introduction Predators seek food

  17. Early Cretaceous benthic associations (foraminifera and calcareous algae) of a shallow tropical-water platform

    E-print Network

    Husinec, Antun

    Early Cretaceous benthic associations (foraminifera and calcareous algae) of a shallow tropical of benthic foraminifera and calcareous algae in order to establish a precise, combined benthic biozonation species of calcareous algae, distributed among 11 genera, were recovered from the Lower Cretaceous shallow

  18. Clinch River remedial investigation task 9 -- benthic macroinvertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, E.M. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of Task 9 of the TVA/Department of Energy (DOE) Interagency Agreement supporting DOE`s Clinch River Remedial Investigation. Species lists and densities (numbers/m{sup 2}) of benthic macroinvertebrates sampled at 16 sites in the Clinch River and Poplar Creek embayments of upper Watts Bar Reservoir near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in March, 1994, are presented and briefly discussed. Data are also analyzed to assess and compare quality of benthic communities at each site, according to methods developed for TVA`s Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring Program. Results of this study will be incorporated with other program tasks in a comprehensive report prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1995, which will, in part, assess the effect of sediment contaminants on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in Watts Bar Reservoir.

  19. Benthic plastic debris in marine and fresh water environments.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Patricia L

    2015-08-01

    This review provides a discussion of the published literature concerning benthic plastic debris in ocean, sea, lake, estuary and river bottoms throughout the world. Although numerous investigations of shoreline, surface and near-surface plastic debris provide important information on plastic types, distribution, accumulation, and degradation, studies of submerged plastic debris have been sporadic in the past and have become more prominent only recently. The distribution of benthic debris is controlled mainly by combinations of urban proximity and its association with fishing-related activities, geomorphology, hydrological conditions, and river input. High density plastics, biofouled products, polymers with mineral fillers or adsorbed minerals, and plastic-metal composites all have the potential to sink. Once deposited on the bottoms of water basins and channels, plastics are shielded from UV light, thus slowing the degradation process significantly. Investigations of the interactions between benthic plastic debris and bottom-dwelling organisms will help shed light on the potential dangers of submerged plastic litter. PMID:26129903

  20. The PROWQM physical biological model with benthic pelagic coupling applied to the northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Young; Tett, Paul; Jones, Ken; Jones, Sarah; Luyten, Patrick; Smith, Claire; Wild-Allen, Karen

    2002-12-01

    PROWQM, a 1-D depth resolving model which couples physical and microbiological processes in the water column with sedimentation/resuspension and benthic mineralisation processes, has been used to simulate seasonal changes of chlorophyll, nutrients and oxygen at the PROVESS north site (59°20'N 1°00'E) in the North Sea. PROWQM is derived from the 3-D model COHERENS, and improves COHEREN's benthic and pelagic biology. The physical sub-model of PROWQM implicitly solves turbulence closure equations forced by climatological, or realistic high-frequency, meteorological and tidal data. The pelagic biological sub-model 2MPPD includes a 'diatomy' microplankton (mp1) and a 'flagellatey' (or microbial loop) microplankton (mp2), the cycling of silicon and nitrogen, slow-sinking detritus, and fast-sinking phytodetritus. Phytodetritus is formed by shear-driven aggregation of particulate material, using a simple algorithm for bulk processes that is derived by considering the interactions of single cells. The microplankton compartments include heterotrophic bacteria and protozoa as well as phytoplankton, and most microplankton rates are specified with the aid of a 'heterotroph fraction' parameter, which was 0.125 for mp1 and 0.6 for mp2. The microbiological system is closed by mesozooplankton grazing pressures imposed as time varying series determined from observed zooplankton abundance. The benthic boundary sub-model includes a superficial fluff layer and a nutrient element reservoir in the consolidated sediment. Particulate material in the fluff layer can be resuspended (in response to bed stress by near-bed flows), mineralised or carried by bioturbation into the underlying, consolidated, sediment, where it is mineralised and its nutrients returned to the water-column at rates mainly dependent on (implicit) macrobenthic pumping. Benthic denitrification can occur when mineralisation rates exceed oxygen supply. Verification of the PROWQM numerical implementation used test cases and checks for nutrient element conservation. Simulations with realistic forcing, for a range of parameter values, were compared with historic observations in the NOWESP data set and during FLEX76, and with those made during the PROVESS cruises in autumn 1998. PROWQM provided a good simulation of the seasonal succession from a diatom-dominated spring bloom to summer dominance by small flagellates. The simulations included sedimentation of organic matter from the spring bloom, and qualitatively realistic behaviour of the fluff layer, but decay rates were too slow and there was almost no denitrification. The simulated surface mixed layer was too shallow during the summer. Simulated annual net microplankton primary production was in between 59 and 91 g C m -2 y -1. A large proportion of mineralisation, 28-47% of nitrogen and 40-67% of silicon mineralisation, took place as a result of the decay of sinking and resuspended detritus whilst in the water column. PROWQM is discussed in relation to other models that have been used to simulate this part of the North Sea, in particular the simpler ECOHAM1 and the more complex ERSEM, and in relation to PROWQM's evolution from COHERENS.

  1. Responses of benthic foraminifera to the 2011 oil spill in the Bohai Sea, PR China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yan Li; Li, Tie Gang; Bi, Hongsheng; Cui, Wen Lin; Song, Wen Peng; Li, Ji Ye; Li, Cheng Chun

    2015-07-15

    The 2011 oil spill in the Bohai Sea was the largest spill event in China. Nine sediment cores were taken near the spill site and environmental factors including Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAHs), oils, sulfides, organic carbon were measured 6 months later. Benthic foraminifera were separated into >150 ?m (large) and 63-150 ?m (small) size fractions for 2-cm depth interval of each sediment core. Statistical analyses suggested that the species composition of living foraminifera was impacted by oils, PAHs and sulfides. Large foraminifera were more sensitive to the oils than the small. Abnormal specimens were positively correlated with oils or PAHs. Small forms, however, tended to have high reproduction and mortality. Pollution-resistant and opportunistic taxa were identified to calculate a Foraminiferal Index of Environmental Impacts (FIEI). The FIEI increased from low to high oil-polluted station and from deep layer to surface sediment reflects the impact of oil pollution in this area. PMID:26002093

  2. Benthic photosynthesis and oxygen consumption in permeable carbonate sediments at Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Mohammed; Wild, Christian; Franke, Ulrich; Huettel, Markus

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate benthic photosynthesis and oxygen demand in permeable carbonate sands and the impact of benthic boundary layer flow on sedimentary oxygen consumption, in situ and laboratory chamber experiments were carried out at Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Total photosynthesis, net primary production and respiration were estimated to be 162.9±43.4, 98.0±40.7, and 64.9±15.0 mmol C m -2 d -1, respectively. DIN and DIP fluxes for these sands reached 0.34 and 0.06 mmol m -2 d -1, respectively. Advective pore water exchange had a strong impact on oxygen consumption in the permeable sands. Consumption rates in the chamber with larger pressure gradient (20 rpm, 1.2 Pa between centre and rim) simulating a friction velocity of 0.6 cm s -1 were approximately two-fold higher than in the chambers with slow stirring (10 rpm, 0.2 Pa between centre and rim, friction velocity of 0.3 cm s -1). In the laboratory chamber experiments with stagnant water column, oxygen consumption was eight times lower than in the chamber with fast stirring. Laboratory chamber experiments with Br - tracer revealed solute exchange rates of 2.6, 2.2, 0.7 ml cm -2 d -1 at stirring rates of 20, 10, and 0 rpm, respectively. In a laboratory experiment investigating the effect of sediment permeability on oxygen and DIC fluxes, a three-fold higher permeability resulted in two- to three-fold higher oxygen consumption and DIC release rates. These experiments demonstrate the importance of boundary flow induced flushing of the upper layer of permeable carbonate sediment on oxygen uptake in the coral sands. The high filtration and oxidation rates in the sub-tropical permeable carbonate sediments and the subsequent release of nutrients and DIC reveal the importance of these sands for the recycling of matter in this oligotrophic environment.

  3. Synthesis of benthic flux components in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    The primary objective of this work is to synthesize components of benthic flux in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Specifically, the component of benthic discharge flux forced by the terrestrial hydraulic gradient is 0.8 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux associated with the groundwater tidal prism are both 2.1 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity wave setup are both 6.3 m3 d-1; the component of benthic discharge flux that transports radium-228 is 350 m3 d-1; and components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity waves propagating over a porous medium are both 1400 m3 d-1. (All models are normalized per meter shoreline.) Benthic flux is a function of components forced by individual mechanisms and nonlinear interactions that exist between components. Constructive and destructive interference may enhance or diminish the contribution of benthic flux components. It may not be possible to model benthic flux by summing component magnitudes. Geochemical tracer techniques may not accurately model benthic discharge flux or submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). A conceptual model provides a framework on which to quantitatively characterize benthic discharge flux and SGD with a multifaceted approach.

  4. Page 1 of 30 Fundamentals of Benthic Microbial Fuel Cells

    E-print Network

    Girguis, Peter R.

    Page 1 of 30 17 Fundamentals of Benthic Microbial Fuel Cells: Theory, Development and Application a watershed for fuel cell research, in particular for microbial fuel cells (see for example: Larminie & Dicks; Schröder, 2007; Logan, 2008). While the majority of microbial fuel cell (MFC) research has focused

  5. Development and Verification of a Benthic/Pelagic Food Web

    E-print Network

    Gobas, Frank

    that estimates chemical concentrations in phytoplankton, zooplankton, filter-feeding and detritovorous benthic, persistence), biological processes (e.g., food web structure, assimilation efficiencies), and system processes and relationships de- scribing ingestion rates and gill ventilation rates in fish and invertebrates. The model

  6. Topographic complexity and roughness of a tropical benthic seascape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawada, David G.; Piniak, Gregory A.; Hearn, Clifford J.

    2010-07-01

    Topographic complexity is a fundamental structural property of benthic marine ecosystems that exists across all scales and affects a multitude of processes. Coral reefs are a prime example, for which this complexity has been found to impact water flow, species diversity, nutrient uptake, and wave-energy dissipation, among other properties. Despite its importance, only limited assessments are available regarding the distribution or range of topographic complexity within or between benthic communities. Here, we show substantial variability in topographic complexity over the entire inner-shelf seascape of a tropical island. Roughness, estimated in terms of fractal dimension, served as a proxy for topographic complexity, and was computed for linear transects (DT), as well as the benthic surface (DS). Spatial variability in both DT and DS was correlated with the known distribution of benthic cover types in the seascape. Transect roughness values ranged from 1.0 to 1.7, with features along the shelf edge being markedly anisotropic with an along-shore bias, whereas regions with high scleractinian coral cover were nearly isotropic and exhibited minimal directional bias. Surface-roughness values ranged from 2.0 in predominantly hardbottom areas with low coral cover to 2.5 in areas with high coral cover. Quantifying roughness across the substrates and biological communities for an entire seascape provides a synoptic view of its spatial variability at scales appropriate for numerous research efforts, including ecosystem studies, parameterizing hydrodynamic models, and designing monitoring programs.

  7. Growth form defines physiological photoprotective capacity in intertidal benthic diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Alexandre; Méléder, Vona; Blommaert, Lander; Lepetit, Bernard; Gaudin, Pierre; Vyverman, Wim; Sabbe, Koen; Dupuy, Christine; Lavaud, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In intertidal marine sediments, characterized by rapidly fluctuating and often extreme light conditions, primary production is frequently dominated by diatoms. We performed a comparative analysis of photophysiological traits in 15 marine benthic diatom species belonging to the four major morphological growth forms (epipelon (EPL), motile epipsammon (EPM-M) and non-motile epipsammon (EPM-NM) and tychoplankton (TYCHO)) found in these sediments. Our analyses revealed a clear relationship between growth form and photoprotective capacity, and identified fast regulatory physiological photoprotective traits (that is, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and the xanthophyll cycle (XC)) as key traits defining the functional light response of these diatoms. EPM-NM and motile EPL showed the highest and lowest NPQ, respectively, with EPM-M showing intermediate values. Like EPL, TYCHO had low NPQ, irrespective of whether they were grown in benthic or planktonic conditions, reflecting an adaptation to a low light environment. Our results thus provide the first experimental evidence for the existence of a trade-off between behavioural (motility) and physiological photoprotective mechanisms (NPQ and the XC) in the four major intertidal benthic diatoms growth forms using unialgal cultures. Remarkably, although motility is restricted to the raphid pennate diatom clade, raphid pennate species, which have adopted a non-motile epipsammic or a tychoplanktonic life style, display the physiological photoprotective response typical of these growth forms. This observation underscores the importance of growth form and not phylogenetic relatedness as the prime determinant shaping the physiological photoprotective capacity of benthic diatoms. PMID:25003964

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF BENTHIC ALGAL COMMUNITIES IN THE UPPER GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The upper Great Lakes contain a diverse array of benthic algal communities. Characteristic communities occupy substrates from the supralittoral to depths in excess of 30 m. Diatoms are the dominant taxonomic group present in terms of numbers, and usually in terms of biomass, exce...

  9. Growth form defines physiological photoprotective capacity in intertidal benthic diatoms.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Alexandre; Méléder, Vona; Blommaert, Lander; Lepetit, Bernard; Gaudin, Pierre; Vyverman, Wim; Sabbe, Koen; Dupuy, Christine; Lavaud, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In intertidal marine sediments, characterized by rapidly fluctuating and often extreme light conditions, primary production is frequently dominated by diatoms. We performed a comparative analysis of photophysiological traits in 15 marine benthic diatom species belonging to the four major morphological growth forms (epipelon (EPL), motile epipsammon (EPM-M) and non-motile epipsammon (EPM-NM) and tychoplankton (TYCHO)) found in these sediments. Our analyses revealed a clear relationship between growth form and photoprotective capacity, and identified fast regulatory physiological photoprotective traits (that is, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and the xanthophyll cycle (XC)) as key traits defining the functional light response of these diatoms. EPM-NM and motile EPL showed the highest and lowest NPQ, respectively, with EPM-M showing intermediate values. Like EPL, TYCHO had low NPQ, irrespective of whether they were grown in benthic or planktonic conditions, reflecting an adaptation to a low light environment. Our results thus provide the first experimental evidence for the existence of a trade-off between behavioural (motility) and physiological photoprotective mechanisms (NPQ and the XC) in the four major intertidal benthic diatoms growth forms using unialgal cultures. Remarkably, although motility is restricted to the raphid pennate diatom clade, raphid pennate species, which have adopted a non-motile epipsammic or a tychoplanktonic life style, display the physiological photoprotective response typical of these growth forms. This observation underscores the importance of growth form and not phylogenetic relatedness as the prime determinant shaping the physiological photoprotective capacity of benthic diatoms. PMID:25003964

  10. MAPPING BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN SOUTHWESTERN PUERTO RICO USING IKONOS

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    MAPPING BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN SOUTHWESTERN PUERTO RICO USING IKONOS Zayas-Santiago,Carmen C.1 and 2Department of Geology, University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez Abstract The Center for Subsurface. The University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (UPRM) is an important partner of CenSSIS with a multidisciplinary

  11. Surviving mass extinction by bridging the benthic/planktic divide

    E-print Network

    Surviving mass extinction by bridging the benthic/planktic divide Kate F. Darlinga,1 , Ellen, this evolutionary expansion occurred in the Early­Middle Jurassic, and all living and extinct planktic foraminifera- nization of the extinction-susceptible pelagic domain from the benthos. We argue that the existence

  12. PHOTOINDUCED TOXICITY OF FLUORANTHENE TO SEVEN MARINE BENTHIC CRUSTACEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven marine benthic crustaceans were exposed in 4 d water-only toxicity tests to five concentrations of fluoranthene.After exposures, mortality (LC50) and the ability to bury in clean sediment (EC50) were determined. Survivors were then exposed to UV radiation for 1 h. The diffe...

  13. Abstract--Multibeam sonar mapping techniques provide detailed benthic

    E-print Network

    521 Abstract--Multibeam sonar mapping techniques provide detailed benthic habitat information. Habitat was mapped by using multibeam sonar survey techniques and categorized by using rugosity reported because of the additional amount of habitat sur- veyed in this study. The use of multibeam sonar

  14. Relating Remotely Sensed Optical Variability to Marine Benthic Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Herkül, Kristjan; Kotta, Jonne; Kutser, Tiit; Vahtmäe, Ele

    2013-01-01

    Biodiversity is important in maintaining ecosystem viability, and the availability of adequate biodiversity data is a prerequisite for the sustainable management of natural resources. As such, there is a clear need to map biodiversity at high spatial resolutions across large areas. Airborne and spaceborne optical remote sensing is a potential tool to provide such biodiversity data. The spectral variation hypothesis (SVH) predicts a positive correlation between spectral variability (SV) of a remotely sensed image and biodiversity. The SVH has only been tested on a few terrestrial plant communities. Our study is the first attempt to apply the SVH in the marine environment using hyperspectral imagery recorded by Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). All coverage-based diversity measures of benthic macrophytes and invertebrates showed low but statistically significant positive correlations with SV whereas the relationship between biomass-based diversity measures and SV were weak or lacking. The observed relationships did not vary with spatial scale. SV had the highest independent effect among predictor variables in the statistical models of coverage-derived total benthic species richness and Shannon index. Thus, the relevance of SVH in marine benthic habitats was proved and this forms a prerequisite for the future use of SV in benthic biodiversity assessments. PMID:23405180

  15. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 103 Benthic Macrofauna of the

    E-print Network

    NOAA Technical Report NMFS 103 Benthic Macrofauna of the New York Bight, 1979-89 Robert N. Reid, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry. The NOAA Technical Report NMFS series of restricted scope; papers on applied fishery problems; technical reports of general interest intended to aid

  16. EFFECTS OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS ON MARINE BENTHIC BIOTA AND COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the effects of contaminants on benthic organisms lags well behind that for water column species because of the way in which sediments mediate bioavailability and because test protocols using infaunal organism are still in the developmental stage. lthough quan...

  17. Recent declines in benthic macroinvertebrate densities in Lake Ontario1

    E-print Network

    sediments at depths of 12­88 m may have a detrimental impact on the benthic food web. Résumé : Des are usually found in waters less than 90 m deep and account for 5­15% of the total ben- thic population- mer thermocline in waters 30­60 m deep. In the Great Lakes, Diporeia is found in greatest numbers

  18. BENTHIC MACROFAUNA AND HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN TILLAMOOK BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tillamook Bay is subject to natural and man-made stressors, such as increased nutrients and sediments, which can alter its habitats and, thereby, impact its productivity and ecological resources. The benthic macrofauna are small, sediment-dwelling invertebrates which have strong...

  19. BENTHIC MACROFAUNA-HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN TWO PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat-based ecological risk assessments rely, in part, on estimates of the ecological value of the habitats at risk. As part of a larger programmatic effort to estimate estuarine habitat values, we determined benthic macrofauna-habitat relationships for 8 intertidal habitats i...

  20. A review of benthic faunal surveys in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, Frederic H.

    1973-01-01

    During the past 60 years, considerable effort has been expended in studies of the relations of the biotic community and physicochemical characteristics of San Francisco Bay water. In very recent years these studies have emphasized the relations between the 'state of health' of bottom-living invertebrates (the benthos) and the levels of pollutants in the bay. Benthic organisms, generally sessile, are unable to escape deleterious environmental changes, and they reflect these changes in alterations of normal species composition of assemblages and species abundance. Data that expands understanding of these relations in urbanized areas such as San Francisco Bay are critical. Because of the implications of such data in control of water quality, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook a review of the results and major conclusions of San Francisco Bay benthic surveys. The size and species composition of faunal assemblages are largely controlled by the salinity of the water, the texture of the bottom sediments, and locally by wastes discharged into the bay. Efforts to describe the structure and function of benthic communities of the bay and to quantify the effects of waste discharge on them have been hampered by inconsistent and often faulty sampling methodology and species identification. Studies made show a lack of information on the normal life processes of the organisms concerned. The diversity index (a mathematical expression of the number of kinds of organisms present at a location), commonly used to describe the 'health' of the benthic community, has been employed without regard for the need for standardizing methodology and species identifications or for understanding natural biological processes that affect such mathematical indices. There are few reliable quantitative data on the distribution of benthic organisms in San Francisco Bay with which future assessments of the 'health' of the benthic community might be compared. Methods for study of the benthos must be standardized, identifications of species verified by trained taxonomists, and new field and laboratory studies undertaken before we can expect to obtain an accurate description of the benthic fauna and its relations with the environment.

  1. Benthic Nitrogen Loss in the Arabian Sea Off Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Sokoll, Sarah; Holtappels, Moritz; Lam, Phyllis; Collins, Gavin; Schlüter, Michael; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2012-01-01

    A pronounced deficit of nitrogen (N) in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea suggests the occurrence of heavy N-loss that is commonly attributed to pelagic processes. However, the OMZ water is in direct contact with sediments on three sides of the basin. Contribution from benthic N-loss to the total N-loss in the Arabian Sea remains largely unassessed. In October 2007, we sampled the water column and surface sediments along a transect cross-cutting the Arabian Sea OMZ at the Pakistan continental margin, covering a range of station depths from 360 to 1430?m. Benthic denitrification and anammox rates were determined by using 15N-stable isotope pairing experiments. Intact core incubations showed declining rates of total benthic N-loss with water depth from 0.55 to 0.18?mmol?N?m?2?day?1. While denitrification rates measured in slurry incubations decreased from 2.73 to 1.46?mmol?N?m?2?day?1 with water depth, anammox rates increased from 0.21 to 0.89?mmol?N?m?2?day?1. Hence, the contribution from anammox to total benthic N-loss increased from 7% at 360?m to 40% at 1430?m. This trend is further supported by the quantification of cd1-containing nitrite reductase (nirS), the biomarker functional gene encoding for cytochrome cd1-Nir of microorganisms involved in both N-loss processes. Anammox-like nirS genes within the sediments increased in proportion to total nirS gene copies with water depth. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses of NirS revealed different communities of both denitrifying and anammox bacteria between shallow and deep stations. Together, rate measurement and nirS analyses showed that anammox, determined for the first time in the Arabian Sea sediments, is an important benthic N-loss process at the continental margin off Pakistan, especially in the sediments at deeper water depths. Extrapolation from the measured benthic N-loss to all shelf sediments within the basin suggests that benthic N-loss may be responsible for about half of the overall N-loss in the Arabian Sea. PMID:23226143

  2. Orbital forcing of deep-sea benthic species diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Raymo, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    Explanations for the temporal and spatial patterns of species biodiversity focus on stability-time, disturbance-mosaic (biogenic microhabitat heterogeneity) and competition-predation (biotic interactions) hypotheses. The stability-time hypothesis holds that high species diversity in the deep sea and in the tropics reflects long-term climatic stability. But the influence of climate change on deep-sea diversity has not been studied and recent evidence suggests that deep-sea environments undergo changes in climatically driven temperature and flux of nutrients and organic-carbon during glacial-interglacial cycles. Here we show that Pliocene (2.85-2.40 Myr) deep-sea North Atlantic benthic ostracod (Crustacea) species diversity is related to solar insolation changes caused by 41,000-yr cycles of Earth's obliquity (tilt). Temporal changes in diversity, as measured by the Shannon- Weiner index, H(S), correlate with independent climate indicators of benthic foraminiferal oxygen-isotope ratios (mainly ice volume) and ostracod Mg:Ca ratios (bottomwater temperature). During glacial periods, H(S) = 0.2-0.6, whereas during interglacials, H(S) = 1.2-1.6, which is three to four times as high. The control of deep-sea benthic diversity by cyclic climate change at timescales of 103-104 yr does not support the stability-time hypothesis because it shows that the deep sea is a temporally dynamic environment. Diversity oscillations reflect large-scale response of the benthic community to climatically driven changes in either thermohaline circulation, bottom temperature (or temperature-related factors) and food, and a coupling of benthic diversity to surface productivity.

  3. Phototoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles to a freshwater benthic amphipod: are benthic systems at risk?

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated phototoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to a freshwater benthic amphipod (Hyalella azteca) using 48-h and 96-h bioassays. Thorough monitoring of particle interactions with exposure media (Lake Superior water, LSW) and the surface of organisms was p...

  4. Floating mucus aggregates derived from benthic microorganisms on rocky intertidal reefs: Potential as food sources for benthic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2011-09-01

    Mucus films, flocs or foams consisting of fine sand, algae and detritus frequently occur in the surface waters of rocky intertidal reef flats during incoming tide. These masses are referred to as mucus aggregates. We examined the developmental process of mucus aggregates and their abundance, distribution, migration and trophic composition. The trophic composition of mucus aggregates was then compared to those of sediments to evaluate their potential nutritional value for benthic animals. The organic matter content, chlorophyll a concentration, microalgal density and bacteria-derived fatty acid contents of mucus aggregates were higher than those observed in sediment, suggesting that mucus aggregates contain not only high levels of organic matter but also dense concentrations of microalgae and bacteria; therefore, mucus aggregates may serve as a qualitatively more energetic food source for benthic fauna compared to sediments. Benthic diatoms were the most abundant organisms in mucus aggregates. Large numbers of diatoms were trapped in fine mineral particles and mucilage-like strings, suggesting that a portion of the mucus is secreted by these benthic microalgae. Mucus aggregate accounted for only 0.01-3.9% of the daily feeding requirements of the dominant detritivore, Ophiocoma scolopendrina (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) over the entire sampling area. In contrast, for the species population on the back reef, where mucus aggregates ultimately accumulate, mucus aggregates provided from 0.4 to 113.3% of food for this species. These results suggest that mucus aggregate availability varies spatiotemporally and that they do not always provide adequate food sources for O. scolopendrina populations.

  5. Effects of short-term environmental disturbances on living benthic foraminifera during the Pacific oyster summer mortality in the Marennes-Oléron Bay (France).

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Vincent M P; Debenay, Jean-Pierre; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; Radford-Knoery, Joël; Soletchnik, Patrick

    2007-09-01

    Sediment cores were collected from April to August 2004 on tidal mudflats of the macrotidal Marennes-Oléron Bay (SW France), famous for the cultivation of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas). The response of living (stained) benthic foraminifera to short-term biogeochemical disturbances in the sediment and overlying water, which may be involved in oyster summer mortality, was monitored. Short-term hypoxia occurred in early June, in conjunction with a sudden rise in temperature. In mid-June, the ammonia content of sediment porewater increased, leading to potentially maximal flux towards overlying waters. Foraminiferal assemblages, particularly in the topmost layer, were altered. Ammonia tepida was the most tolerant to temperature increase and hypoxic conditions whereas Brizalina variabilis and Haynesina germanica were sensitive to organic degradation and hypoxia. Cribroelphidium gunteri was the most opportunistic during recolonisation. Benthic foraminifera showed that short-term biochemical changes in the sediment are toxic and may be involved in the summer mortality of Pacific oysters. PMID:17418889

  6. Partitioning of Total Dissolved Salts, Boron and Selenium in Pariette Wetland Water, Sediments and Benthic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Jones, C. P.; Vasudeva, P.; Powelson, D.; Grossl, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Pariette Wetlands located in the Uinta Basin, UT, were developed by the BLM in part to mitigate salinity associated with irrigation drainage and runoff from flowing to the Green River, a tributary of the Colorado River. The wetlands are fed by runoff from upstream agricultural irrigation, and natural subsurface and overland flow through the Uintah formation, which is seleniferous, and saline. Concentrations of Total Dissolved Salts (TDS), boron (B) and selenium (Se) in the wetlands exceed the total maximum daily loads developed to meet the US EPA's water quality planning and management regulations (40CFR 130). This is of concern because the wetlands are home to populations of migratory birds, waterfowl, raptors, and numerous small mammals. A mass balance of the Se concentrations of water flowing into and out of the wetlands indicates that 80% of the Se is stored or lost within the system. Additional data suggest that the majority of the Se is associated with the sediments. Little information is available regarding the TDS and B. Therefore we will determine the whether B and other salts are accumulating in the wetland systems, and if so where. We sampled water, sediment, benthic organisms, and wetland plants, in 4 of the 23 ponds from the flood control inlet to water flowing out to the Green River. Sediments were collected at 3 depths (0-2 cm, 2-7 cm, and 7+ cm) at 3-4 locations within each pond including the inlet, outlet and at least one site near a major wetland plant community. Benthic organisms were sampled from the 0-2 cm and 2-7 cm sediment layers. Sediment and organism samples were digested with HNO3 and HClO4 prior to analysis of total Se by HGAAS. Hot water extractable B and DPTA extractable B were analyzed by ICP-AES. TDS was estimated from EC in the sediment and organisms extracts and direct analysis in the water. Preliminary results found that Se in the sediments decreases with depth. Se concentrations in the benthic organisms is approximately 4 times higher than in the associated sediments. Data from this study will contribute to a water quality risk assessment to the wetland fish and birds.

  7. The role of sediments on the Bering Sea shelf N cycle: Insights from measurements of benthic denitrification and benthic DIN fluxes

    E-print Network

    The role of sediments on the Bering Sea shelf N cycle: Insights from measurements of benthic denitrification and benthic DIN fluxes Rachel E.A. Horaka, , Heather Whitneya , David H. Shullb , Calvin W. Mordyc 14 March 2013 Keywords: Denitrification Bering Sea shelf Sediments Nitrification N* nitrogen cycle

  8. Global warming and mass mortalities of benthic invertebrates in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Rivetti, Irene; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Lionello, Piero; Zambianchi, Enrico; Boero, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    Satellite data show a steady increase, in the last decades, of the surface temperature (upper few millimetres of the water surface) of the Mediterranean Sea. Reports of mass mortalities of benthic marine invertebrates increased in the same period. Some local studies interpreted the two phenomena in a cause-effect fashion. However, a basin-wide picture of temperature changes combined with a systematic assessment on invertebrate mass mortalities was still lacking. Both the thermal structure of the water column in the Mediterranean Sea over the period 1945-2011 and all documented invertebrate mass mortality events in the basin are analysed to ascertain if: 1- documented mass mortalities occurred under conditions of positive temperature trends at basin scale, and 2- atypical thermal conditions were registered at the smaller spatial and temporal scale of mass mortality events. The thermal structure of the shallow water column over the last 67 years was reconstructed using data from three public sources: MEDAR-MEDATLAS, World Ocean Database, MFS-VOS programme. A review of the mass mortality events of benthic invertebrates at Mediterranean scale was also carried out. The analysis of in situ temperature profiles shows that the Mediterranean Sea changed in a non-homogeneous fashion. The frequency of mass mortalities is increasing. The areas subjected to these events correspond to positive thermal anomalies. Statistically significant temperature trends in the upper layers of the Mediterranean Sea show an increase of up to 0.07°C/yr for a large fraction of the basin. Mass mortalities are consistent with both the temperature increase at basin scale and the thermal changes at local scale, up to 5.2°C. Our research supports the existence of a causal link between positive thermal anomalies and observed invertebrate mass mortalities in the Mediterranean Sea, invoking focused mitigation initiatives in sensitive areas. PMID:25535973

  9. Spectral reflectance of carbonate sediments and application to remote sensing classification of benthic habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louchard, Eric Michael

    Remote sensing is a valuable tool in marine research that has advanced to the point that images from shallow waters can be used to identify different seafloor types and create maps of benthic habitats. A major goal of this dissertation is to examine differences in spectral reflectance and create new methods of analyzing shallow water remote sensing data to identify different seafloor types quickly and accurately. Carbonate sediments were used as a model system as they presented a relatively uniform, smooth surface for measurement and are a major bottom type in tropical coral reef systems. Experimental results found that sediment reflectance varied in shape and magnitude depending on pigment content, but only varied in magnitude with variations in grain size and shape. Derivative analysis of the reflectance spectra identified wavelength regions that correlate to chlorophyll a and chlorophyllide a as well as accessory pigments, indicating differences in microbial community structure. Derivative peak height also correlated to pigment content in the sediments. In remote sensing data, chlorophyll a, chlorophyllide a, and some xanthophylls were identified in derivative spectra and could be quantified from second derivative peak height. Most accessory pigments were attenuated by the water column, however, and could not be used to quantify pigments in sediments from remote sensing images. Radiative transfer modeling of remote sensing reflectance showed that there was sufficient spectral variation to separate major sediment types, such as ooid shoals and sediment with microbial layers, from different densities of seagrass and pavement bottom communities. Both supervised classification with a spectral library and unsupervised classification with principal component analysis were used to create maps of seafloor type. The results of the experiments were promising; classified seafloor types correlated with ground truth observations taken from underwater video and were comparable to existing maps of seafloor type. Creation of accurate seafloor type maps is an important step in constructing maps of benthic habitats.

  10. Global Warming and Mass Mortalities of Benthic Invertebrates in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Rivetti, Irene; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Lionello, Piero; Zambianchi, Enrico; Boero, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    Satellite data show a steady increase, in the last decades, of the surface temperature (upper few millimetres of the water surface) of the Mediterranean Sea. Reports of mass mortalities of benthic marine invertebrates increased in the same period. Some local studies interpreted the two phenomena in a cause-effect fashion. However, a basin-wide picture of temperature changes combined with a systematic assessment on invertebrate mass mortalities was still lacking. Both the thermal structure of the water column in the Mediterranean Sea over the period 1945–2011 and all documented invertebrate mass mortality events in the basin are analysed to ascertain if: 1- documented mass mortalities occurred under conditions of positive temperature trends at basin scale, and 2- atypical thermal conditions were registered at the smaller spatial and temporal scale of mass mortality events. The thermal structure of the shallow water column over the last 67 years was reconstructed using data from three public sources: MEDAR-MEDATLAS, World Ocean Database, MFS-VOS programme. A review of the mass mortality events of benthic invertebrates at Mediterranean scale was also carried out. The analysis of in situ temperature profiles shows that the Mediterranean Sea changed in a non-homogeneous fashion. The frequency of mass mortalities is increasing. The areas subjected to these events correspond to positive thermal anomalies. Statistically significant temperature trends in the upper layers of the Mediterranean Sea show an increase of up to 0.07°C/yr for a large fraction of the basin. Mass mortalities are consistent with both the temperature increase at basin scale and the thermal changes at local scale, up to 5.2°C. Our research supports the existence of a causal link between positive thermal anomalies and observed invertebrate mass mortalities in the Mediterranean Sea, invoking focused mitigation initiatives in sensitive areas. PMID:25535973

  11. Age and correlation of California Paleogene benthic foraminiferal stages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, Richard Z.

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of age determinations and correlations derived from calcareous plankton with those derived from benthic foraminifers in a number of sections in California show significant overlap in time of the Ynezian through the Ulatisian Stages. Thus interbasin time correlations deduced from these stage assignments must be treated with caution. Calcareous plankton occasionally associated with benthic foraminifers diagnostic of the Narizian through the Zemorrian Stages indicate that the Narizian-Refugian boundary is within the upper Eocene of international usage and that the Refugian is entirely upper Eocene. Overlap of the Narizian and the Refugian appears to be minimal. The Zemorrian correlates, mostly, with the Oligocene, although the upper limit of the Zemorrian might be in the lower Miocene.

  12. An assessment of seabird influence on Arctic coastal benthic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmudczy?ska-Skarbek, Katarzyna; Balazy, Piotr; Kuklinski, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    It is well recognized that seabirds, particularly those nesting in coastal colonies, can provide significant nutrient enrichment to Arctic terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about the fate of bird-derived nutrients that return to the marine environment and potentially concentrate below the colonies. To attempt to assess the influence of this potential nutrient enrichment of the coastal benthic community, samples of macroalgae, sea urchins (mainly algivores), and hermit crabs (scavengers) were collected at two Arctic localities (Spitsbergen), (1) below a mixed colony of guillemots and kittiwakes, and (2) in an adjacent geomorphologically similar location not influenced by the seabird colony. A much higher nitrogen stable isotope ratio (?15N) and total nitrogen content were found in terrestrial plants sampled below the colony than away from it. In benthic macroalgae, however, there were no ?15N differences. This might result from the timing of an intensive growth period in macroalgae in late winter/early spring, when there is little or no runoff from the land, and/or ornithogenic nutrients being directly incorporated by phytoplankton. Sea urchins showed higher ?15N and total N in the control site comparing to the colony-influenced area, suggesting differential food sources in their diet and a role of scavenging/carnivory on higher trophic levels there. Opportunistically feeding hermit crabs showed ?15N and total N enrichment below the seabird colony, suggesting dependence on detritus derived from food chains originating from pelagic producers. Our results indicate that seabirds in the Arctic may fertilize coastal benthic communities through pelagic-benthic coupling, while having no direct impact on bottom primary production.

  13. Mobile fishing gear reduces benthic megafaunal production on Georges Bank

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hermsen, J.M.; Collie, J.S.; Valentine, P.C.

    2003-01-01

    This study addresses the effect of mobile fishing gear disturbance on benthic megafaunal production on the gravel pavement of northern Georges Bank. From 1994 to 2000, we sampled benthic megafauna with a 1 m Naturalists' dredge at shallow (47 to 62 m) and deep (80 to 90 m) sites. The cessation of fishing in large areas of Georges Bank in January 1995 allowed us to monitor changes in production at a previously disturbed site. Production at a shallow disturbed site varied little over the sampling period (32 to 57 kcal m-2 yr-1) and was markedly lower than production at the nearby recovering site, where production increased from 17 kcal m-2yr -1 in 1994 before the closure to 215 kcal m-2 yr -1 in 2000. Atlantic sea scallops Placopecten magellanicus and green sea urchins Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis dominated production at the recovering site. The community production:biomass ratio decreased over time at the recovering site as the sea scallop population matured. At the deep sites, production remained significantly higher at undisturbed sites (174 to 256 kcal m-2 yr-1) than at disturbed sites (30 to 52 kcal m -2 yr-1). The soft-bodied tube-building polychaete Thelepus cincinnatus dominated production at the undisturbed site, while hard-shelled bivalve molluscs Astarte spp. and P. magellanicus were prevalent at the disturbed site. Mobile fishing gear disturbance has a conspicuous effect on benthic megafaunal production in this hard-bottom habitat. Cessation of mobile fishing has resulted in a marked increase in benthic megafaunal production. These findings should help fishery managers to gauge the costs and benefits of management tools such as area closures and low-impact fishing gears.

  14. Impact of benthic disturbance on megafauna in Central Indian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Nimi; Sharma, Rahul; Nagender Nath, B.

    Deep-sea photographs and video data were studied to evaluate the effects of benthic disturbance on megafaunal distribution in the Central Indian Basin. Xenophyophores (41%) and holothurians (30%) are the most abundant taxa, followed by other groups in the area before the disturbance. An overall reduction (32%) in the total megafaunal population after disturbance is direct evidence of the impact on benthic environment. Different groups such as xenophyophores, sea anemones, shrimps, starfish, brittle stars, holothurians and fish show different degrees of reduction (21-48%) in their numbers, depending upon their ability to withstand increased turbidity and sedimentation rates due to disturbance. Faunal groups such as protobranch molluscs, polychaete worms, seafans and squids, observed before the disturbance, were not seen after disturbance, whereas populations of some taxa increased after the disturbance. Increased numbers of mobile taxa could be due to increased levels of organic carbon due to resedimentation, whereas increase in sessile taxa may partly reflect the difficulty in distinguishing live from dead specimens. The impact on faunal assemblages is more severe in the disturbed area than the undisturbed area. Our results indicate that monitoring of megafauna can be used effectively to evaluate the potential impacts of large-scale mining or other disturbance on the seafloor, and may therefore help in developing measures for conservation of the benthic environment.

  15. Traditional Ecological Knowledge and the mapping of benthic marine habitats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, João Batista; Martins, Agnaldo Silva; Pinheiro, Hudson Tercio; Secchin, Nelio Augusto; Leão de Moura, Rodrigo; Bastos, Alex Cardoso

    2013-01-30

    Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) is the empirically accumulated knowledge of local communities whose livelihoods depend directly on natural resources. TEK has a considerable potential as a reliable, rapid and low cost information source. However, its use for decision making in environmental management is frequently challenged due to the lack of scientific validation and the multiple and poorly understood biases deriving from measurement and analytical errors, as well as from political, cultural and religious sources. During the planning stage of a Marine Protected Area (MPA) in Southeastern Brazil we assessed fisherfolk TEK regarding seabed features, comparing it with results from a conventional oceanographic assessment. TEK was acquired and synthesized during a survey involving 19 fishing villages and a consensus analysis that minimized variation among individual fisherfolks and communities. The oceanographic survey included high resolution benthic habitat mapping tools such as sidescan sonar and ground-truthing with SCUBA near the interfaces of benthic features identified by fisherfolk. Nearly 3000 km(2) of seafloor were mapped by local fisherfolk as "gravel", "sand", "mud" and "reef structures", while side-scan sonar surveys covered approximately 360 km with an average 400 m swath. Analyses of overlap and proximity showed that TEK is relatively cost-effective and accurate for large-scale benthic surveys, especially as a starting point for planning oceanographic surveys. Moreover, including TEK in the planning stage of MPAs may increase communities' participation and understanding of the costs and benefits of the new access and fishing effort regulations. PMID:23262411

  16. Sequential decision plans, benthic macroinvertebrates, and biological monitoring programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, John K.; Resh, Vincent H.

    1989-07-01

    A common obstacle to the inclusion of benthic macroinvertebrates in water quality monitoring programs is that numerous sample units must be examined in order to distinguish between impacted and unimpacted conditions, which can add significantly to the total cost of a monitoring program. Sequential decision plans can be used to reduce this cost because the number of sample units needed to classify a site as impacted or unimpacted is reduced by an average of 50%. A plan is created using definitions of unimpacted and impacted conditions, a description of the mathematical distribution of the data, and definitions of acceptable risks of type I and II errors. The applicability of using sequential decision plans and benthic macroinvertebrates in water quality monitoring programs is illustrated with several examples (e.g., identifying moderate and extreme changes in species richness in response to acid mine drainage; assessing the impact of a crude oil contamination on the density of two benthic populations; monitoring the effect of geothermal effluents on species diversity). These examples use data conforming to the negative binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions and define impact as changes in population density, species richness, or species diversity based on empirical data or the economic feasibility of the sequential decision plan. All mathematical formulae and intermediate values are provided for the step-by-step calculation of each sequential decision plan.

  17. Zebra mussel effects on benthic invertebrates: physical or biotic?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Botts, P. Silver; Patterson, Benjamin A.; Schloesser, Don W.

    1996-01-01

    In soft sediments, Dreissena spp. create firm substrate in the form of aggregates of living mussels (druses) that roll free on the sediments. Druses provide physical structure which increases habitat heterogeneity, and the mussels increase benthic organic matter through the production of pseudofeces and feces. Descriptive and experimental studies were used to determine: 1) whether the density of benthic invertebrates in soft sediments increased in the presence of druses, and 2) whether the invertebrate assemblage responded to the physical structure provided by a druse or to some biotic effect associated with the presence of living mussels. In core samples collected biweekly during summer in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania, amphipods, chironomids, oligochaetes, turbellarians, and hydrozoans were significantly more abundant in sand with druses than in bare sand. When mesh bags containing either a living druse, non-living druse, or no druse were incubated in the bay for 33 d, we found that chironomids were significantly more abundant in treatments with living druses than with non-living druses, and in treatments with non-living druses than with no druse; turbellarians, amphipods, and hydrozoans were significantly more abundant in treatments with living or non-living druses than with no druse; oligochaetes showed no significant differences among treatments. This study demonstrates that most taxa of benthic invertebrates in soft substrate respond specifically to the physical structure associated with aggregates of mussel shells, but further study is needed to examine chironomid responses to some biotic effect dependent on the presence of living mussels.

  18. Modern benthic foraminifer distribution in the Amerasian Basin, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ishman, S.E.; Foley, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 38 box cores were collected from the Amerasian Basin, Arctic Ocean during the U.S. Geological Survey 1992 (PI92-AR) and 1993 (PI93-AR) Arctic Cruises aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker Polar Star. In addition, the cruises collected geophysical data, piston cores and hydrographic data to address the geologic and oceanographic history of the western Arctic Ocean. This paper reports the results of the quantitative analyses of benthic foraminifer distribution data of the total (live + dead) assemblages derived from 22 box core-top samples. The results show that a distinct depth distribution of three dominant benthic foraminifer assemblages, the Textularia spp. - Spiroplectammina biformis, Cassidulina teretis and Oridorsalis tener - Eponides tumidulus Biofacies are strongly controlled by the dominant water masses within the Canada Basin: the Arctic Surface Water, Arctic Intermediate Water and Canada Basin Deep Water. The faunal distributions and their oceanographic associations in the Canada Basin are consistent with observations of benthic foraminifer distributions from other regions within the Arctic Ocean.

  19. USGS-NPS Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) workshop report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moses, Christopher S.; Nayagandhi, Amar; Brock, John; Beavers, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program recently allocated funds to initiate a benthic mapping program in ocean and Great Lakes parks in alignment with the NPS Ocean Park Stewardship 2007-2008 Action Plan. Seventy-four (ocean and Great Lakes) parks, spanning more than 5,000 miles of coastline, many affected by increasing coastal storms and other natural and anthropogenic processes, make the development of a Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) timely. The resulting maps and associated reports will be provided to NPS managers in a consistent servicewide format to help park managers protect and manage the 3 million acres of submerged National Park System natural and cultural resources. Of the 74 ocean and Great Lakes park units, the 40 parks with submerged acreage will be the focus in the early years of the SBMP. The NPS and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop (June 3-5, 2008) in Lakewood, CO. The assembly of experts from the NPS and other Federal and non-Federal agencies clarified the needs and goals of the NPS SBMP and was one of the key first steps in designing the benthic mapping program. The central needs for individual parks, park networks, and regions identified by workshop participants were maps including bathymetry, bottom type, geology, and biology. This workshop, although not an exhaustive survey of data-acquisition technologies, highlighted the more promising technologies being used, existing sources of data, and the need for partnerships to leverage resources. Workshop products include recommended classification schemes and management approaches for consistent application and products similar to other long-term NPS benthic mapping efforts. As part of the SBMP, recommendations from this workshop, including application of an improved version of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), will be tested in several pilot parks. In 2008, in conjunction with the findings of this workshop, the NPS funded benthic mapping projects in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Golden Gate National Recreational Area, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Virgin Islands National Park, and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument.

  20. A Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program for National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moses, Christopher S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Beavers, Rebecca; Brock, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring Program directed the initiation of a benthic habitat mapping program in ocean and coastal parks in alignment with the NPS Ocean Park Stewardship 2007-2008 Action Plan. With 74 ocean and Great Lakes parks stretching over more than 5,000 miles of coastline across 26 States and territories, this Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) is essential. This program will deliver benthic habitat maps and their associated inventory reports to NPS managers in a consistent, servicewide format to support informed management and protection of 3 million acres of submerged National Park System natural and cultural resources. The NPS and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop June 3-5, 2008, in Lakewood, Colo., to discuss the goals and develop the design of the NPS SBMP with an assembly of experts (Moses and others, 2010) who identified park needs and suggested best practices for inventory and mapping of bathymetry, benthic cover, geology, geomorphology, and some water-column properties. The recommended SBMP protocols include servicewide standards (such as gap analysis, minimum accuracy, final products) as well as standards that can be adapted to fit network and park unit needs (for example, minimum mapping unit, mapping priorities). SBMP Mapping Process. The SBMP calls for a multi-step mapping process for each park, beginning with a gap assessment and data mining to determine data resources and needs. An interagency announcement of intent to acquire new data will provide opportunities to leverage partnerships. Prior to new data acquisition, all involved parties should be included in a scoping meeting held at network scale. Data collection will be followed by processing and interpretation, and finally expert review and publication. After publication, all digital materials will be archived in a common format. SBMP Classification Scheme. The SBMP will map using the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) that is being modified to include all NPS needs, such as lacustrine ecosystems and submerged cultural resources. CMECS Version III (Madden and others, 2010) includes components for water column, biotic cover, surface geology, sub-benthic, and geoform. SBMP Data Archiving. The SBMP calls for the storage of all raw data and final products in common-use data formats. The concept of 'collect once, use often' is essential to efficient use of mapping resources. Data should also be shared with other agencies and the public through various digital clearing houses, such as Geospatial One-Stop (http://gos2.geodata.gov/wps/portal/gos). To be most useful for managing submerged resources, the SBMP advocates the inventory and mapping of the five components of marine ecosystems: surface geology, biotic cover, geoform, sub-benthic, and water column. A complete benthic inventory of a park would include maps of bathymetry and the five components of CMECS. The completion of mapping for any set of components, such as bathymetry and surface geology, or a particular theme (for example, submerged aquatic vegetation) should also include a printed report.

  1. Variability of South Atlantic Central Water in the last century based on stable isotopes and benthic foraminifera of southeast Brazilian continental shelf.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, C. F.; De Faria, G. R.; Albuquerque, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    In order to better understand the changes in productivity and water masses that permeate the bottom of the continental shelf of southeast Brazilian margin influenced by upwelling, three box-cores were collected in a bathymetric transect. Cores were analyzed for assemblage composition of benthic foraminifera and isotopes. 55 samples were analyzed and 227 benthic foraminifera were identified, but only 18 of them showed relative frequencies that contributed to the understanding of both oceanographic dynamics and productivity conditions of the area. There was dominance of Globocassidulina subglobosa, which is considered an indicator of areas with pulses of phytodetritus. Statistical analysis separated samples into different groups according to their location, indicating environmental factors on the continental shelf. Innershore core showed the highest flux of benthic foraminifera and the offshore one showed the major diversity and variation of foraminifera assemblages over time. Mid shelf cores showed little variation of the assemblages and indicate a stable environment. The ?13C values of Uvigerina peregrina indicated more degraded organic matter in the center of the shelf. The mean composition of Cibicides spp. ?13C is, on average, 0.25 ‰ depleted related to the values of ?13CDIC. Such values associated with high frequency of phytodetritus species indicated the formation of a phytodetritus layer at the bottom of the continental shelf of Cabo Frio. The paleotemperature calculated from oxygen isotopes pointed the permanence of SACW at the shelf bottom over the last few centuries.

  2. A decline in benthic foraminifera following the deepwater horizon event in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schwing, Patrick T; Romero, Isabel C; Brooks, Gregg R; Hastings, David W; Larson, Rebekka A; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    Sediment cores were collected from three sites (1000-1200 m water depth) in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico from December 2010 to June 2011 to assess changes in benthic foraminiferal density related to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) event (April-July 2010, 1500 m water depth). Short-lived radioisotope geochronologies (²¹?Pb, ²³?Th), organic geochemical assessments, and redox metal concentrations were determined to relate changes in sediment accumulation rate, contamination, and redox conditions with benthic foraminiferal density. Cores collected in December 2010 indicated a decline in density (80-93%). This decline was characterized by a decrease in benthic foraminiferal density and benthic foraminiferal accumulation rate (BFAR) in the surface 10 mm relative to the down-core mean in all benthic foraminifera, including the dominant genera (Bulimina spp., Uvigerina spp., and Cibicidoides spp.). Cores collected in February 2011 documented a site-specific response. There was evidence of a recovery in the benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR at the site closest to the wellhead (45 NM, NE). However, the site farther afield (60 NM, NE) recorded a continued decline in benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR down to near-zero values. This decline in benthic foraminiferal density occurred simultaneously with abrupt increases in sedimentary accumulation rates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations, and changes in redox conditions. Persistent reducing conditions (as many as 10 months after the event) in the surface of these core records were a possible cause of the decline. Another possible cause was the increase (2-3 times background) in PAH's, which are known to cause benthic foraminifera mortality and inhibit reproduction. Records of benthic foraminiferal density coupled with short-lived radionuclide geochronology and organic geochemistry were effective in quantifying the benthic response and will continue to be a valuable tool in determining the long-term effects of the DWH event on a larger spatial scale. PMID:25785988

  3. A Decline in Benthic Foraminifera following the Deepwater Horizon Event in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Schwing, Patrick T.; Romero, Isabel C.; Brooks, Gregg R.; Hastings, David W.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Hollander, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment cores were collected from three sites (1000–1200 m water depth) in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico from December 2010 to June 2011 to assess changes in benthic foraminiferal density related to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) event (April-July 2010, 1500 m water depth). Short-lived radioisotope geochronologies (210Pb, 234Th), organic geochemical assessments, and redox metal concentrations were determined to relate changes in sediment accumulation rate, contamination, and redox conditions with benthic foraminiferal density. Cores collected in December 2010 indicated a decline in density (80–93%). This decline was characterized by a decrease in benthic foraminiferal density and benthic foraminiferal accumulation rate (BFAR) in the surface 10 mm relative to the down-core mean in all benthic foraminifera, including the dominant genera (Bulimina spp., Uvigerina spp., and Cibicidoides spp.). Cores collected in February 2011 documented a site-specific response. There was evidence of a recovery in the benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR at the site closest to the wellhead (45 NM, NE). However, the site farther afield (60 NM, NE) recorded a continued decline in benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR down to near-zero values. This decline in benthic foraminiferal density occurred simultaneously with abrupt increases in sedimentary accumulation rates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations, and changes in redox conditions. Persistent reducing conditions (as many as 10 months after the event) in the surface of these core records were a possible cause of the decline. Another possible cause was the increase (2–3 times background) in PAH’s, which are known to cause benthic foraminifera mortality and inhibit reproduction. Records of benthic foraminiferal density coupled with short-lived radionuclide geochronology and organic geochemistry were effective in quantifying the benthic response and will continue to be a valuable tool in determining the long-term effects of the DWH event on a larger spatial scale. PMID:25785988

  4. Application of Multiple Index Development Approaches to Benthic Invertebrate Data from the Virginian Biogeographic Province (SETAC NA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic invertebrate indices have commonly been utilized to assess benthic invertebrate communities. These indices have been constructed using different techniques, but have shown different levels of application success. For example, the EMAP Virginian Province Index did not pe...

  5. Comparison of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages associated with salt marshes in low and high salinity areas of Galveston Bay 

    E-print Network

    Pool, Suzan Samantha

    1999-01-01

    Two study areas in Galveston Bay, Texas were chosen to assess the species composition and abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates in salt marshes that are utilized by juvenile brown shrimp. The objectives of the study were to compare the benthic...

  6. Ecological periodic tables for benthic macrofaunal usage of estuarine habitats : Insights from a case study in Tillamook bay, Oregon, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study validates the ecological relevance of estuarine habitat types to the benthic macrofaunal community and, together with previous similar studies, suggests they can serve as elements in ecological periodic tables of benthic macrofaunal usage in the bioregion. We compared...

  7. Turbulence and nutrient interactions that control benthic algal production in an engineered cultivation raceway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow turbulence can be a controlling factor to the growth of benthic algae, but few studies have quantified this relationship in engineered cultivation systems. Experiments were performed to understand the limiting role of turbulence to algal productivity in an algal turf scrubber for benthic algal...

  8. Fish and Benthic Invertebrates: Community Concordance and Community-Environment Relationships

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Don

    Fish and Benthic Invertebrates: Community Concordance and Community-Environment Relationships, Canada Jackson, D.A., and H.H. Harvey. 1993. Fish and benthic invertebrates: community concordance in small, shallow lakes than in larger lakes. The invertebrate community was not correlated with lake

  9. Development of a National-Scale Indicator of Benthic Condition for the National Coastal Condition Assessment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has evaluated the application of a national-scale indicator of estuarine benthic condition for the National Coastal Condition Assessment (NCCA). Historically, in the National Coastal Condition Reports (NCCR I-IV), estuarine benthic condition was assessed by applying m...

  10. WALRUS, ODOBENUS ROSMARUS, FEEDING IN THE BERING SEA: A BENTHIC PERSPECTIVE

    E-print Network

    WALRUS, ODOBENUS ROSMARUS, FEEDING IN THE BERING SEA: A BENTHIC PERSPECTIVE JOHN S. OLIVER,' PETER N. SLATTERY,1 EDMUND F. O'CONNOR,1 AND LLOYD F. LOWRy2 ABSTRACT Walrus, Odobenus rosmarus, feed with scuba Documentation of this benthic feeding record suggested that walrus com- monly search for visually

  11. FUSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL AND BATHYMETRY DATA FOR IMPROVED BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    FUSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL AND BATHYMETRY DATA FOR IMPROVED BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING Maria C. Torres habitat mapping. Several algorithms have been described in the literature to remove the effects this information for improved retrieval of the water properties and benthic habitat composition. We present results

  12. DEVELOPING AND INDEX OF BENTHIC CONDITION FOR THE ACADIAN BIOGEOGRAPHIC PROVINCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Assessment has sampled benthic assemblages each summer since 2000 in coastal areas of the U.S. Acadian Biogeographic Province (tip of Cape Cod to Canadian border). We are developing a multimetric index to be used as an indicator of benthic condition. During...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDEX OF BENTHIC CONDITION FOR COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MAINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Assessment has sampled benthic assemblages each summer since 2000 in coastal areas of the U.S. Gulf of Maine. We are developing a multimetric index to be used as an indicator of benthic condition for both spatial comparisons of condition along the coast and f...

  14. ALIENS IN PARADISE: A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE MANGROVE BENTHIC COMMUNITY COMPOSITION,

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    ttlf 75 ALIENS IN PARADISE: A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE MANGROVE BENTHIC project would not have been accomplished without the mangrove-loving volunteers who assisted me: Duyen Ngo Mangrove benthic community ecology and food-web structures in introduced and native mangroves were examined

  15. MIDDLE REACH OF THE SNAKE RIVER: WATER QUALITY AND BENTHIC BIOMONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined spatial and temporal trends in water quality, sestonic and benthic algal concentrations, and benthic macroinvertebrate taxa richness, population density, and biomass at nine stations along the Middle Snake River from Pillar Falls to Upper Salmon Falls Dam. Pri...

  16. Benthic invertebrate community structure is influenced by forest succession after clearcut logging in southeastern Alaska

    E-print Network

    Wipfli, Mark S.

    ). The effects of clearcutting on benthic macroinver- tebrates have been investigated before and after harvestBenthic invertebrate community structure is influenced by forest succession after clearcut logging macroinvertebrate, functional feeding group, headwater stream, timber harvest Abstract To assess the effects

  17. High-resolution bottom albedo images and benthic habitat classification to develop

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    High-resolution bottom albedo images and benthic habitat classification to develop baseline-based and natural factors. However, little is known about benthic habitats and water properties. http://gers.uprm.edu/images Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) · December 2005 · 224 Bands (370-2500 nm) · Hyperspectral · Visible

  18. IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL SCALING FACTORS TO BENTHIC MARINE INVERTEBRATE RECOLONIZATION OF LABORATORY MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five laboratory studies of benthic macroinvertebrate recolonization were conducted for 6-wk periods to evaluate the effects of physical factors (i.e., microcosm size, seawater flow rates and sediment depth) on benthic community structure. esign variables included4 open-faced acry...

  19. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science (1985) 21,357-364 Estimation of Benthic Respiration

    E-print Network

    1985-01-01

    Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science (1985) 21,357-364 Estimation of Benthic Respiration Parameters emphasized the importance of benthic respiration and nutrient regeneration to the understanding respiration of the accumulated organic detritus on the bottom in combination with the onsetof increasedwater

  20. OLIGOCENE BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA FROM THE FUENTE CALDERA SECTION (SPAIN, WESTERN TETHYS): TAXONOMY AND

    E-print Network

    OLIGOCENE BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA FROM THE FUENTE CALDERA SECTION (SPAIN, WESTERN TETHYS): TAXONOMY. The study of benthic foraminif- era from the upper bathyal Fuente Caldera section in southern Spain may help from Fuente Caldera consist of hemi- pelagic marls intercalated with turbiditic sandstones. Based

  1. Paleoecology of benthic metazoans in the Early Cambrian Maotianshan Shale biota and the Middle Cambrian Burgess

    E-print Network

    Dornbos, Stephen Q.

    Paleoecology of benthic metazoans in the Early Cambrian Maotianshan Shale biota and the Middle-existed with benthic metazoans adapted to more typical Phanerozoic-style soft substrates. Paleoecological examination of the paleoecological analysis indicate that the Maotianshan Shale and Burgess Shale biotas contain mobile and sessile

  2. ALLOMETRIC LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATIONSHIPS FOR BENTHIC PREY OF AQUATIC WILDLIFE IN COASTAL MARINE HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed models to estimate the soft tissue content of benthic marine invertebrates that are prey for aquatic wildlife. Allometric regression models of tissue wet weight with shell length for 10 species of benthic invertebrates had r2 values ranging from 0.29 for hermit crabs...

  3. Functional Morphology of the Pectoral Fins in Bamboo Sharks, Chiloscyllium plagiosum: Benthic vs. Pelagic

    E-print Network

    Lauder, George V.

    cruising, generalized continental swimming, slow demersal (epibenthic) locomotion, benthic station if pectoral fin function during both benthic station-holding and pelagic swimming differs from fin function sharks, C. plagiosum, during four behaviors: holding station on the substrate, steady horizontal swimming

  4. The Power of Computer-aided Tomography to Investigate Marine Benthic Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilization of Computer-aided-Tomography (CT) technology is a powerful tool to investigate benthic communities in aquatic systems. In this presentation, we will attempt to summarize our 15 years of experience in developing specific CT methods and applications to marine benthic co...

  5. Deep Sea Benthic Foraminifera: Love Cold, Fear Warm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.

    2007-12-01

    The fossil record provides understanding of possible linkages between long-term environmental changes and evolution of assemblages and morphological species of deep-sea benthic foraminifera, of which the phylogeny is still little known. Deep-sea benthic foraminifera have long morphological species lives and do not commonly suffer massive extinctions: they live in the largest habitat on earth, species have large geographic ranges or are cosmopolitan, and they use motile propagules to rapidly re-populate regions where populations have been destroyed. Extinction occurs only when rapid and severe environmental change affects such a large part of the deep ocean that no refugia exist, even for common species. Deep-sea benthic foraminifera reacted to global cooling (in the earliest Oligocene, middle Miocene and middle Pleistocene) not by extinction, but by a gradual turnover of species. The most extensive turnover occurred in the late Eocene through earliest Oligocene, when some presently important ecological niches were first filled. In contrast, deep-sea benthic foraminifera suffered severe extinction (30-50% of species, including common, cosmopolitan, long-lived species) during the rapid global warming of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a time of high CO2 levels and potential ocean acidification. The extinction was followed by slow recovery of faunas, but diversity never returned to pre-extinction levels. The PETM and later, less severe short-term periods of global warming (hyperthermals ETM1 and ETM2) were characterized by low diversity faunas dominated by small, thin-walled individuals. No significant net extinction occurred during the later hyperthermals. Such faunas might reflect dissolution, low oxygen conditions, or blooming of opportunistic species after environmental disturbance. Most commonly cited causes of the PETM extinction are: 1. low oxygen concentrations, 2. acidification of the oceans, 3. increase or decrease in oceanic productivity and/or transfer of food to the sea floor, and 4. increasing temperatures. All 4 factors may have contributed to the extinction, but the first three factors varied regionally and by depth, whereas only the temperature increase affected the deep-sea environment globally. High temperatures not only increase overall metabolic rates, but also affect which species of prokaryotes are most active and which labile compounds they generate, thus the compounds and the amount of labile organic matter available for foraminiferal feeding. At sites along a depth transect at Walvis Ridge (SE Atlantic) species that earlier had been abundant in neritic waters ( Tappanina selmensis) increased strongly in abundance. Some surviving deep-sea species underwent diversification and morphological evolution; during and just after the PETM and two other hyperthermal events the deep-sea genus Abyssamina became more abundant (most pronounced at the deeper sites), while evolving into several morphological species. During the warmer intervals its aperture became more irregular in shape, with an extremely asymmetrical shape at the deepest site during ETM1. The aperture in benthic foraminifera directs the streaming of pseudopods, thus the way of food intake, suggesting that the nature of benthic feeding changed during the warm periods. During the early Eocene (a period characterized by hyperthermals), faunas maintained larger differences in assemblage composition between ocean basins than before the extinction. It remains a question whether this faunal heterogeneity reflects the mode of deep-ocean circulation/ventilation during the warmest period of the Cenozoic.

  6. Fine-Scale Distribution and Spatial Variability of Benthic Invertebrate Larvae in an Open Coastal Embayment in

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Fine-Scale Distribution and Spatial Variability of Benthic Invertebrate Larvae in an Open Coastal- scale (0.5 km) of variability in the horizontal distributions of benthic invertebrate larvae and related (2014) Fine-Scale Distribution and Spatial Variability of Benthic Invertebrate Larvae in an Open Coastal

  7. Carbon and oxygen isotope geochemistry of live (stained) benthic foraminifera from the Aleutian Margin and the Southern Australian Margin

    E-print Network

    Levin, Lisa

    Carbon and oxygen isotope geochemistry of live (stained) benthic foraminifera from the Aleutian October 2008 Accepted 4 November 2008 Keywords: stable isotopes benthic foraminifera 13C 18O deep sea-water geochemistry and stable isotopic values of the tests of living (stained) calcareous benthic foraminifera from

  8. Northern Florida reef tract benthic metabolism scaled by remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, J.C.; Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.; Kuffner, I.B.; Wright, C.W.; Hatcher, B.G.

    2006-01-01

    Holistic rates of excess organic carbon production (E) and calcification for a 0.5 km2 segment of the backreef platform of the northern Florida reef tract (NFRT) were estimated by combining biotope mapping using remote sensing with community metabolic rates determined with a benthic incubation system. The use of ASTER multispectral satellite imaging for the spatial scaling of benthic metabolic processes resulted in errors in E and net calcification (G) of 48 and 431% respectively, relative to estimates obtained using AISA hyperspectral airborne scanning. At 19 and 125%, the E and G errors relative to the AISA-based estimates were less pronounced for an analysis that used IKONOS multispectral satellite imagery to spatially extrapolate the chamber process measurements. Our scaling analysis indicates that the holistic calcification rate of the backreef platform of the northern Florida reef tract is negligible at 0.07 g CaCO3 m-2 d-1. All of the mapped biotopes in this reef zone are net heterotrophic, resulting in an estimated holistic excess production rate of -0.56 g C m-2 d-1, and an overall gross primary production to respiration ratio of 0.85. Based on our finding of ubiquitous heterotrophy, we infer that the backreef platform of the NFRT is a sink for external inputs of suspended particulate organic matter. Further, our results suggest that the inward advection of inorganic nutrients is not a dominant forcing mechanism for benthic biogeochemical function in the NFRT. We suggest that the degradation of the northern Florida reef tract may parallel the community phase shifts documented within other reef systems polluted by organic detritus.

  9. Antarctic sea ice losses drive gains in benthic carbon drawdown.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D K A

    2015-09-21

    Climate forcing of sea-ice losses from the Arctic and West Antarctic are blueing the poles. These losses are accelerating, reducing Earth's albedo and increasing heat absorption. Subarctic forest (area expansion and increased growth) and ice-shelf losses (resulting in new phytoplankton blooms which are eaten by benthos) are the only significant described negative feedbacks acting to counteract the effects of increasing CO2 on a warming planet, together accounting for uptake of ?10(7) tonnes of carbon per year. Most sea-ice loss to date has occurred over polar continental shelves, which are richly, but patchily, colonised by benthic animals. Most polar benthos feeds on microscopic algae (phytoplankton), which has shown increased blooms coincident with sea-ice losses. Here, growth responses of Antarctic shelf benthos to sea-ice losses and phytoplankton increases were investigated. Analysis of two decades of benthic collections showed strong increases in annual production of shelf seabed carbon in West Antarctic bryozoans. These were calculated to have nearly doubled to >2x10(5) tonnes of carbon per year since the 1980s. Annual production of bryozoans is median within wider Antarctic benthos, so upscaling to include other benthos (combined study species typically constitute ?3% benthic biomass) suggests an increased drawdown of ?2.9x10(6) tonnes of carbon per year. This drawdown could become sequestration because polar continental shelves are typically deeper than most modern iceberg scouring, bacterial breakdown rates are slow, and benthos is easily buried. To date, most sea-ice losses have been Arctic, so, if hyperboreal benthos shows a similar increase in drawdown, polar continental shelves would represent Earth's largest negative feedback to climate change. PMID:26394097

  10. Benthic phosphorus cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, U.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Löscher, C. R.; Noffke, A.; Wallmann, K.; Hensen, C.

    2015-10-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) that impinge on continental margins favor the release of phosphorus (P) from the sediments to the water column, enhancing primary productivity and the maintenance or expansion of low-oxygen waters. A comprehensive field program in the Peruvian OMZ was undertaken to identify the sources of benthic P, including the analysis of particles from the water column, surface sediments and pore fluids as well as in situ benthic flux measurements. A major fraction of solid phase P was bound as particulate inorganic P (PIP) both in the water column and in sediments. Sedimentary PIP increased with depth in the sediment at the expense of particulate organic P (POP). The ratio of particulate organic carbon (POC) to POP exceeded the Redfield Ratio both in the water column (202 ± 29) and in surface sediments (303 ± 77). However, the POC to total particulate P (TPP = POP + PIP) ratio was close to Redfield in the water column (103 ± 9) and in sediment samples (102 ± 15) taken from the core of the OMZ. This observation suggests that the burial efficiencies of POC and TPP are similar under the low oxygen conditions prevailing in the Peruvian OMZ. Benthic fluxes of dissolved P were extremely high (up to 1.04 ± 0.31 mmol m-2 d-1) and exceeded the fluxes resulting from the degradation of particulate organic matter raining to the seabed. Most of the excess P may have been released by bacterial mats that had stored P during previous periods when bottom waters were less reducing. At one station located at the lower rim of the OMZ, dissolved P was taken up by the sediments indicating recent phosphorite formation.

  11. Disturbance, colonization and development of Antarctic benthic communities.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A; Conlan, Kathleen E

    2007-01-29

    A decade has yielded much progress in understanding polar disturbance and community recovery-mainly through quantifying ice scour rates, other disturbance levels, larval abundance and diversity, colonization rates and response of benthos to predicted climate change. The continental shelf around Antarctica is clearly subject to massive disturbance, but remarkably across so many scales. In summer, millions of icebergs from sizes smaller than cars to larger than countries ground out and gouge the sea floor and crush the benthic communities there, while the highest wind speeds create the highest waves to pound the coast. In winter, the calm associated with the sea surface freezing creates the clearest marine water in the world. But in winter, an ice foot encases coastal life and anchor ice rips benthos from the sea floor. Over tens and hundreds of thousands of years, glaciations have done the same on continental scales-ice sheets have bulldozed the seabed and the zoobenthos to edge of shelves. We detail and rank modern disturbance levels (from most to least): ice; asteroid impacts; sediment instability; wind/wave action; pollution; UV irradiation; volcanism; trawling; non-indigenous species; freshwater inundation; and temperature stress. Benthic organisms have had to recolonize local scourings and continental shelves repeatedly, yet a decade of studies have demonstrated that they have (compared with lower latitudes) slow tempos of reproduction, colonization and growth. Despite massive disturbance levels and slow recolonization potential, the Antarctic shelf has a much richer fauna than would be expected for its area. Now, West Antarctica is among the fastest warming regions and its organisms face new rapid changes. In the next century, temperature stress and non-indigenous species will drastically rise to become dominant disturbances to the Antarctic life. Here, we describe the potential for benthic organisms to respond to disturbance, focusing particularly on what we know now that we did not a decade ago. PMID:17405206

  12. Deep-Sea Benthic Footprint of the Deepwater Horizon Blowout

    PubMed Central

    Montagna, Paul A.; Baguley, Jeffrey G.; Cooksey, Cynthia; Hartwell, Ian; Hyde, Larry J.; Hyland, Jeffrey L.; Kalke, Richard D.; Kracker, Laura M.; Reuscher, Michael; Rhodes, Adelaide C. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident in the northern Gulf of Mexico occurred on April 20, 2010 at a water depth of 1525 meters, and a deep-sea plume was detected within one month. Oil contacted and persisted in parts of the bottom of the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. As part of the response to the accident, monitoring cruises were deployed in fall 2010 to measure potential impacts on the two main soft-bottom benthic invertebrate groups: macrofauna and meiofauna. Sediment was collected using a multicorer so that samples for chemical, physical and biological analyses could be taken simultaneously and analyzed using multivariate methods. The footprint of the oil spill was identified by creating a new variable with principal components analysis where the first factor was indicative of the oil spill impacts and this new variable mapped in a geographic information system to identify the area of the oil spill footprint. The most severe relative reduction of faunal abundance and diversity extended to 3 km from the wellhead in all directions covering an area about 24 km2. Moderate impacts were observed up to 17 km towards the southwest and 8.5 km towards the northeast of the wellhead, covering an area 148 km2. Benthic effects were correlated to total petroleum hydrocarbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and barium concentrations, and distance to the wellhead; but not distance to hydrocarbon seeps. Thus, benthic effects are more likely due to the oil spill, and not natural hydrocarbon seepage. Recovery rates in the deep sea are likely to be slow, on the order of decades or longer. PMID:23950956

  13. Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in remediated wetlands around Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Christopher A; Lim, Richard P; Tremblay, Louis A; Warne, Michael St J; Ying, Guang-Guo; Laginestra, Edwina; Chapman, John C

    2010-11-01

    To investigate potential high organisational level impacts of persistent organic pollution in the wetlands in the Sydney Olympic Park (SOP) remediated site, the benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages of seven wetlands within SOP and two off-site reference wetlands were examined. Sediment cores were collected, stained and preserved from each study site and the macroinvertebrates identified to the appropriate taxonomic level (Class, Order, Family, Subfamily). Data were analysed for taxon richness and macroinvertebrate abundance and multivariate techniques were used to identify chemical/physical characteristics of the sediment, which were important influences on the differences in the assemblage between study sites. Macroinvertebrate abundance was highly variable between study sites and taxon richness was low across all sites. Oligochaetes, nematodes, ostracods and chironomids were the most common taxa found and were the most important in influencing differences between the macroinvertebrate assemblages among the study sites. Sediment grain size and chemical characteristics of the sediments (?PAH, ?PCB, TCDDeq and heavy metal concentrations) were important in separating the study sites based on taxon richness and abundance. Canonical correspondence analysis separated the macroinvertebrate assemblages at newly two created wetlands from those at other study sites including the urban reference sites. Increased sediment POP contamination (particularly as measured TCDDeq and ?DDT concentrations) is a likely contributor in excluding pollution sensitive taxa and, therefore, alterations to benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Further, the influence of TOC suggests the significance of catchment inputs in contributing to changes in macroinvertebrate assemblage. The SOP remediation led to the establishment of wetlands with benthic communities representative of those expected in urban wetlands. PMID:20857194

  14. Deep-sea benthic footprint of the deepwater horizon blowout.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Paul A; Baguley, Jeffrey G; Cooksey, Cynthia; Hartwell, Ian; Hyde, Larry J; Hyland, Jeffrey L; Kalke, Richard D; Kracker, Laura M; Reuscher, Michael; Rhodes, Adelaide C E

    2013-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident in the northern Gulf of Mexico occurred on April 20, 2010 at a water depth of 1525 meters, and a deep-sea plume was detected within one month. Oil contacted and persisted in parts of the bottom of the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. As part of the response to the accident, monitoring cruises were deployed in fall 2010 to measure potential impacts on the two main soft-bottom benthic invertebrate groups: macrofauna and meiofauna. Sediment was collected using a multicorer so that samples for chemical, physical and biological analyses could be taken simultaneously and analyzed using multivariate methods. The footprint of the oil spill was identified by creating a new variable with principal components analysis where the first factor was indicative of the oil spill impacts and this new variable mapped in a geographic information system to identify the area of the oil spill footprint. The most severe relative reduction of faunal abundance and diversity extended to 3 km from the wellhead in all directions covering an area about 24 km(2). Moderate impacts were observed up to 17 km towards the southwest and 8.5 km towards the northeast of the wellhead, covering an area 148 km(2). Benthic effects were correlated to total petroleum hydrocarbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and barium concentrations, and distance to the wellhead; but not distance to hydrocarbon seeps. Thus, benthic effects are more likely due to the oil spill, and not natural hydrocarbon seepage. Recovery rates in the deep sea are likely to be slow, on the order of decades or longer. PMID:23950956

  15. Benthic Foraminifer Nd Isotopes and Radiocarbon: a Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivner, A. E.; Skinner, L. C.

    2008-12-01

    The combined analysis of neodymium (Nd) isotopes and radiocarbon (14C) in sedimentary benthic foraminifera has the potential to remedy a major issue involved in the interpretation of 14C data. The problem is that changes in deep-water sourcing, deep-water source signature and deep-water renewal rates may all affect 14C concentration, complicating the interpretation of deep-water 14C reconstructions. To overcome this, the application of a circulation tracer is required. Traditional proxies such as ?13C, Cd/Ca, and deep-water temperature either do not behave as conservative tracers or only indirectly represent water mass mixing, and so are of limited use1. The application of a more recently developed proxy for water mass sourcing, circulation and mixing, Nd isotopes, might offer a solution to this problem. A recent pioneering study2 has demonstrated that sedimentary benthic foraminifera might be a suitable archive of past deep-water Nd isotope composition at high resolution, potentially more robust than acidic-reductive sediment leach data. This study seeks to utilise this promising new tracer by applying it to an investigation of deglacial ventilation changes in the North Atlantic. Initial data presented here for core-top benthic foraminifera from the Labrador Sea, Iberian Margin and Pacific illustrate nearly the complete dynamic range of Nd isotope compositions present in the modern ocean, in general agreement with existing seawater Nd isotope data. Preliminary down-core Nd isotope data from the Iberian Margin place initial constraints on the contribution of deep-water sourcing to observed changes in deep-water 14C ventilation across the last deglaciation. 1 - E. Boyle, Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 20, 245-287 (1992) 2 - V. Klevenz et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 265, 571-587 (2008)

  16. Disturbance, colonization and development of Antarctic benthic communities

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, David K.A; Conlan, Kathleen E

    2006-01-01

    A decade has yielded much progress in understanding polar disturbance and community recovery—mainly through quantifying ice scour rates, other disturbance levels, larval abundance and diversity, colonization rates and response of benthos to predicted climate change. The continental shelf around Antarctica is clearly subject to massive disturbance, but remarkably across so many scales. In summer, millions of icebergs from sizes smaller than cars to larger than countries ground out and gouge the sea floor and crush the benthic communities there, while the highest wind speeds create the highest waves to pound the coast. In winter, the calm associated with the sea surface freezing creates the clearest marine water in the world. But in winter, an ice foot encases coastal life and anchor ice rips benthos from the sea floor. Over tens and hundreds of thousands of years, glaciations have done the same on continental scales—ice sheets have bulldozed the seabed and the zoobenthos to edge of shelves. We detail and rank modern disturbance levels (from most to least): ice; asteroid impacts; sediment instability; wind/wave action; pollution; UV irradiation; volcanism; trawling; non-indigenous species; freshwater inundation; and temperature stress. Benthic organisms have had to recolonize local scourings and continental shelves repeatedly, yet a decade of studies have demonstrated that they have (compared with lower latitudes) slow tempos of reproduction, colonization and growth. Despite massive disturbance levels and slow recolonization potential, the Antarctic shelf has a much richer fauna than would be expected for its area. Now, West Antarctica is among the fastest warming regions and its organisms face new rapid changes. In the next century, temperature stress and non-indigenous species will drastically rise to become dominant disturbances to the Antarctic life. Here, we describe the potential for benthic organisms to respond to disturbance, focusing particularly on what we know now that we did not a decade ago. PMID:17405206

  17. One Step forward: Benthic Pelagic Coupling and Indicators for Environmental Status

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Papageorgiou, Nafsika; Arvanitidis, Christos; Assimakopoulou, Georgia; Pagou, Kalliopi; Papadopoulou, Konstantia N.; Pavlidou, Alexandra; Pitta, Paraskevi; Reizopoulou, Sofia; Simboura, Nomiki; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    A large data set from the Eastern Mediterranean was analyzed to explore the relationship between seawater column variables and benthic community status. Our results showed a strong quantitative link between the seawater column variables (Chlorophyll a and Eutrophication Index) and various indicators describing benthic diversity and community composition. The percentage of benthic opportunistic species increased significantly in the stations with high trophic status of the seawater column and so did the strength of the coupling between values of seawater column and benthic indicators. The Eutrophication Index threshold level of 0.85, separating the “Bad and Poor” from “Moderate to High” conditions could serve as an acceptable critical value above which there is a readily observable change in benthic community composition. PMID:26496714

  18. Effects of thermal effluents on communities of benthic marine macroalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Devinny; J.S.

    1980-11-01

    Surveys of marine benthic macro-algae were made at two study areas receiving thermal effluents from power plants. A third, at an area where a natural thermal gradient exists, was investigated for comparison. Ordination analysis of the algal communities indicated changes in species composition of about 10% for each degree of temperature change up to 3/sup 0/C. Temperatures 7/sup 0/C above ambient altered the algal community by eliminating the large phaeophytes. Temperatures 10/sup 0/C above ambient left only a species-poor community of ephemeral populations.

  19. Intertidal benthic resources of the Copper River Delta, Alaska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Sean P.; Bishop, Mary Anne; Grabowski, Jonathan H.; Peterson, Charles H.

    2002-02-01

    The Copper River Delta, Alaska is the largest contiguous coastal wetland system along the West Coast of North America. Vast expanses of tidal mud flats formed by sediments carried by the suspended load of the Copper River serve as a connection between the Gulf of Alaska and the extensive network of wetlands, rivers and sloughs of the delta system. In addition to providing habitat for resident fish, shrimp and crabs, these tidal flats serve as critical feeding grounds for up to 5 million migratory shorebirds as well as an entry and exit corridor for three species of commercially fished salmonids. Here we report the first description of the benthic community of these intertidal flats. Between April and September 2000, we conducted three samplings on the Copper River Delta in which we quantified benthic macro-invertebrates inhabiting silt-clay sediments, the dominant substrate in the system, over a range of tidal inundation. Specifically, sampling was performed in two areas on the delta: near the outflows of the Eyak River and Pete Dahl Slough. Pore-water salinity of surficial sediment ranged from 4 psu during peak summer flow of the Copper River to 14 psu in April prior to increased riverine input. Sediment temperatures corresponded to ambient air temperatures with lowest temperatures during the April-September observation period recorded in April (4°C) and warmest in August (16°C). The benthic community of the delta's tidal flats was characterised by low species diversity and was dominated by the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica, which reached densities greater than 4000 m -2. Age-length relationship of M. balthica indicated slow growth and longevity of up to 8 years. Polychaete densities, primarily the phyllodocid Eteone longa, were low throughout the study period, reaching a maximum of only 700 m -2 in August. Amphipod densities, primarily the corophid amphipod Corophium salmonis, were high (up to 7000 m -2) only during the August sampling. Spatial patterns of benthic invertebrate abundance were best explained by differences in tidal inundation with longer inundation corresponding to greater invertebrate densities. Temporal changes in abundance of polychaetes, amphipods, and M. balthica recruits corresponded to increases in sediment temperatures. Natural or human-induced changes to M. balthica populations could impact the food web of the delta, which could cascade to larger geographic impacts because of the importance of the delta to migratory species.

  20. Using benthic macroinvertebrate and fish communities as bioindicators of the Tanshui River basin around the greater Taipei area - multivariate analysis of spatial variation related to levels of water pollution.

    PubMed

    Young, Shuh-Sen; Yang, Hsi-Nan; Huang, Da-Ji; Liu, Su-Miao; Huang, Yueh-Han; Chiang, Chung-Ting; Liu, Jin-Wei

    2014-07-01

    After decades of strict pollution control and municipal sewage treatment, the water quality of the Tanshui River increased significantly after pollution mitigation as indicated by the River Pollution Index (RPI). The pollution level of the estuarine region decreased from severe pollution to mostly moderately impaired. The most polluted waters are presently restricted to a flow track length between 15-35 km relative to the river mouth. From July 2011 to September 2012, four surveys of fish and benthic macroinvertebrates were conducted at 45 sampling sites around the Tanshui River basin. The pollution level of all the study area indicated by the RPI could also be explained by the Family Biotic Index (FBI) and Biotic Index (BI) from the benthic macroinvertebrate community, and the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) of the fish community. The result of canonical correlation analysis between aquatic environmental factors and community structure indicated that the community structure was closely related to the level of water pollution. Fish species richness in the estuarine area has increased significantly in recent years. Some catadromous fish and crustaceans could cross the moderate polluted water into the upstream freshwater, and have re-colonized their populations. The benthic macroinvertebrate community relying on the benthic substrate of the estuarine region is still very poor, and the water layer was still moderately polluted. PMID:25026081

  1. Using Benthic Macroinvertebrate and Fish Communities as Bioindicators of the Tanshui River Basin Around the Greater Taipei Area — Multivariate Analysis of Spatial Variation Related to Levels of Water Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Young, Shuh-Sen; Yang, Hsi-Nan; Huang, Da-Ji; Liu, Su-Miao; Huang, Yueh-Han; Chiang, Chung-Ting; Liu, Jin-Wei

    2014-01-01

    After decades of strict pollution control and municipal sewage treatment, the water quality of the Tanshui River increased significantly after pollution mitigation as indicated by the River Pollution Index (RPI). The pollution level of the estuarine region decreased from severe pollution to mostly moderately impaired. The most polluted waters are presently restricted to a flow track length between 15–35 km relative to the river mouth. From July 2011 to September 2012, four surveys of fish and benthic macroinvertebrates were conducted at 45 sampling sites around the Tanshui River basin. The pollution level of all the study area indicated by the RPI could also be explained by the Family Biotic Index (FBI) and Biotic Index (BI) from the benthic macroinvertebrate community, and the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) of the fish community. The result of canonical correlation analysis between aquatic environmental factors and community structure indicated that the community structure was closely related to the level of water pollution. Fish species richness in the estuarine area has increased significantly in recent years. Some catadromous fish and crustaceans could cross the moderate polluted water into the upstream freshwater, and have re-colonized their populations. The benthic macroinvertebrate community relying on the benthic substrate of the estuarine region is still very poor, and the water layer was still moderately polluted. PMID:25026081

  2. Deep-Sea Research II 49 (2002) 14111421 Bay of Bengal nutrient-rich benthic layer

    E-print Network

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    2002-01-01

    - centration at the sediment­water interface. Total CO2 and alkalinity also increase as the bottom and carbon is likely to be due to decomposition of marine plankton deposited on the Ganges fan. While similar

  3. The mismatch between bioaccumulation in field and laboratory environments: Interpreting the differences for metals in benthic bivalves.

    PubMed

    Belzunce-Segarra, Maria J; Simpson, Stuart L; Amato, Elvio D; Spadaro, David A; Hamilton, Ian L; Jarolimek, Chad V; Jolley, Dianne F

    2015-09-01

    Laboratory-based bioaccumulation and toxicity bioassays are frequently used to predict the ecological risk of contaminated sediments in the field. This study investigates the bioassay conditions most relevant to achieving environmentally relevant field exposures. An identical series of metal-contaminated marine sediments were deployed in the field and laboratory over 31 days. Changes in metal concentrations and partitioning in both sediments and waters were used to interpret differences in metal exposure and bioaccumulation to the benthic bivalve Tellina deltoidalis. Loss of resuspended sediments and deposition of suspended particulate matter from the overlying water resulted in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn (major contaminants) becoming lower in the 1-cm surface layer of field-deployed sediments. Lower exchange rates of overlying waters in the laboratory resulted in higher dissolved metal exposures. The prediction of metal bioaccumulation by the bivalves in field and laboratory was improved by considering the metal partitioning within the surface sediments. PMID:25912886

  4. Compound-Specific Amino Acid Isotopic Analysis of Benthic Food Webs in the Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Cooper, L. W.; Biasatti, D. M.; Grebmeier, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Chukchi Sea is known for locally high standing stocks of benthic macrofauna and strong coupling between pelagic-benthic components of the ecosystem. However, benthic food structure is not fully understood, due to varied sources of particulate organic matter (POM) and the high diversity of benthic invertebrates. We provide the first demonstration of the application of compound-specific amino acid isotope analysis to study the dietary sources and trophic structure for this Arctic marginal sea. About 20 stations in Chukchi Sea were sampled during cruises in August of 2012 and 2013. At each station, phytoplankton, POM and benthic fauna were collected, processed and analyzed using GC-C-IRMS (gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry). Among benthic fauna, dominant species included the following taxonomic groups: Ophiuroidea, Amphipoda, Polychaeta, Gastropoda, Bivalvia, and Cnidaria. The benthic fauna showed similar patterns of individual amino acid ?13C, with glycine the most enriched in 13C and leucine the most depleted in 13C. Specific amino acids including phenylalanine showed spatial variability in ?13C and ?15N values within the sampled area, indicating contributions of different dietary sources including phytoplankton, sea ice algae, benthic algae and terrestrial organic materials. ?15N values of individual amino acids such as the difference between glutamic acid and phenylalanine, i.e. ?15Nglu-phe (?15Nglu - ?15Nphe), were also used to identify trophic levels of benthic invertebrates relative to estimates available from bulk ?15N values. These data will ultimately be used to evaluate the spatial variability of organic carbon sources and trophic level interactions of dominant benthic species in the Chukchi Sea.

  5. Benthic foraminifera at the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section): variability in climate and productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2015-09-01

    The Forada section (northeastern Italy) provides a continuous, expanded deep-sea record of the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) in the central-western Tethys. We combine a new, high resolution, benthic foraminiferal assemblage record with published calcareous plankton, mineralogical and biomarker data to document climatic and environmental changes across the PETM, highlighting the benthic foraminiferal extinction event (BEE). The onset of the PETM, occurring ~ 30 kyr after a precursor event, is marked by a thin, black, barren clay layer, possibly representing a brief pulse of anoxia and carbonate dissolution. The BEE occurred within the 10 cm interval including this layer. During the first 3.5 kyr of the PETM several agglutinated recolonizing taxa show rapid species turnover, indicating a highly unstable, CaCO3-corrosive environment. Calcareous taxa reappeared after this interval, and the next ~ 9 kyr were characterized by rapid alternation of peaks in abundance of various calcareous and agglutinant recolonizers. These observations suggest that synergistic stressors including deep water CaCO3-corrosiveness, low oxygenation, and high environmental instability caused the extinction. Combined faunal and biomarker data (BIT index, higher plant n-alkane average chain length) and the high abundance of the mineral chlorite suggest that erosion and weathering increased strongly at the onset of the PETM, due to an overall wet climate with invigorated hydrological cycle, which led to storm flood-events carrying massive sediment discharge into the Belluno Basin. This interval was followed by the core of the PETM, characterized by four precessionally paced cycles in CaCO3%, hematite%, ?13C, abundant occurrence of opportunistic benthic foraminiferal taxa, as well as calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminiferal taxa typical of high productivity environments, radiolarians, and lower ?Dn-alkanes. We interpret these cycles as reflecting alternation between an overall arid climate, characterized by strong winds and intense upwelling, with an overall humid climate, with abundant rains and high sediment delivery (including refractory organic carbon) from land. Precessionally paced marl-limestone couplets occur throughout the recovery interval of the CIE and up to ten meters above it, suggesting that these wet-dry cycles persisted, though at declining intensity, after the peak PETM. Enhanced climate extremes at mid-latitudes might have been a direct response to the massive CO2 input in the ocean atmosphere system at the Paleocene-Eocene transition, and may have had a primary role in restoring the Earth system to steady state.

  6. Measuring coral reef community metabolism using new benthic chamber technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate measurement of coral reef community metabolism is a necessity for process monitoring and in situ experimentation on coral reef health. Traditional methodologies used for these measurements are effective but limited by location and scale constraints. We present field trial results for a new benthic chamber system called the Submersible Habitat for Analyzing Reef Quality (SHARQ). This large, portable incubation system enables in situ measurement and experimentation on community- scale metabolism. Rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification were measured using the SHARQ for a variety of coral reef substrate types on the reef flat of South Molokai, Hawaii, and in Biscayne National Park, Florida. Values for daily gross production, 24-h respiration, and net calcification ranged from 0.26 to 6.45 g O2 m-2 day-1, 1.96 to 8.10 g O2 m-2 24 h-1, and 0.02 to 2.0 g CaCO3 m -2 day-1, respectively, for all substrate types. Field trials indicate that the SHARQ incubation chamber is an effective tool for in situ isolation of a water mass over a variety of benthic substrate types for process monitoring, experimentation, and other applications.

  7. Predicting the Presence of Large Fish through Benthic Geomorphic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, F.; Sautter, L.; Levine, N. S.; Kracker, L.

    2013-12-01

    Marine Protected Areas are critical in sustaining the resilience of fish populations to commercial fishing operations. Using acoustic data to survey these areas promises efficiency, accuracy, and minimal environmental impact. In July, 2013, the NOAA Ship Pisces collected bathymetric, backscatter and water column data for 10 proposed MPA sites along the U.S. Southeast Atlantic continental shelf. A total of 205 km2 of seafloor were mapped between Mayport, FL and Wilmington, NC, using the SIMRAD ME70 and EK60 echosounder systems. These data were processed in Caris HIPS, QPS FMGT, MATLAB and ArcGIS. The backscatter and bathymetry reveal various benthic geomorphic features, including flat sand, rippled sand, and rugose hard bottom. Water column data directly above highly rugose hardbottom contains the greatest counts for large fish populations. Using spatial statistics, such as a geographically weighted regression model, we aim to identify features of the benthic profile, including rugosity, curvature and slope, that can predict the presence of large fish. The success of this approach will greatly expedite fishery surveys, minimize operational cost and aid in making timely management decisions.

  8. Benthic marine fauna structured by hydrodynamic processes and food availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Rutger

    Benthic macrofauna was investigated, mainly in clayey silt sediments, on the west and east slopes (65-90 m depth) and at the bottom (?100 m depth) of a trench in the Skagerrak, western Sweden. The western slope is an underwater delta front area with, at least intermittently, strong bottom currents transporting suspended organic and inorganic particles. In the deeper parts, currents slow down and accumulation is extremely high (mean ?90 mm·y -1). The benthic community on the western slope was dominated by the passive suspension-feeding brittle star Amphiura filiformis. Its numbers and biomass were much larger than recorded in the Skagerrak and the North Sea. Total community abundance and number of species were significantly larger on the western slope than on the eastern. In the deep part of the trench significantly higher abundance and number of species were recorded than on the slopes. Dominant in the deep were the small polychaetes, Heteromastus filiformis and Paramphinome jeffreysi, both assumed to be sub-surface deposit feeders. Faunal distribution and richness are discussed in relation to food availability through advective near-bottom processes on the western slope, and in relation to accumulation at the bottom of the trench. The extreme densities and biomasses recorded on the western slope suggest that these communities were limited by space rather than by food. In contrast, similar communities characterized by A. filiformis in the Skagerrak and the North Sea have significantly lower abundance and biomass, and are therefore thought to be food limited.

  9. An apparatus for preparing benthic samples aboard ship

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, Phillip N.; Girard, Thomas L.; Stapanian, Martin A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a safe and effective apparatus for washing and reducing the volume of benthic samples collected by grab samplers aboard ship. The sample is transferred directly from the dredge to the apparatus and then washed with water pumped through pipes in the apparatus and from onboard hoses. Wastewater and materials smaller than 0.541 mm in diameter are washed overboard. Larger materials, including benthic organisms, collect on an upper 0.64-cm screen and on a lower 30-mm-mesh stainless steel bolt cloth. A collection jar is screwed into the bottom of the apparatus. Therefore, transfer of sample material from the apparatus to the jar is quick and easy. This apparatus has several advantages for use aboard ship over others described in the literature, especially in rough seas, in cold weather, and at night. The apparatus provides a safe and convenient platform for washing and reducing samples, and samples can be prepared while the vessel is traveling at full speed.

  10. A deep-sea sediment transport storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Thomas F.; Williams, A. J.; Newell, A. R. M.

    1988-02-01

    Photographs taken of the sea bottom since the 1960s suggest that sediments at great depth may be actively resuspended and redistributed1. Further, it has been suspected that active resus-pension/transport may be required to maintain elevated concentrations of particles in deep-sea nepheloid layers. But currents with sufficient energy to erode the bottom, and to maintain the particles in suspension, have not been observed concurrently with large concentrations of particles in the deep nepheloid layer2-4. The high-energy benthic boundary-layer experiment (HEBBLE) was designed to test the hypothesis that bed modifications can result from local erosion and deposition as modelled by simple one-dimensional local forcing mechanics5. We observed several 'storms' of high kinetic energy and near-bed flow associated with large concentrations of suspended sediment during the year-long deployments of moored instruments at the HEBBLE study site. These observations, at 4,880 m off the Nova Scotian Rise in the north-west Atlantic, indicate that large episodic events may suspend bottom sediments in areas well removed from coastal and shelf sources.

  11. Spallanzani Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    31 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a layered, light-toned mesa among other layered materials exposed in a mound that covers much of the floor of Spallanzani Crater.

    Location near: 58.3oS, 273.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  12. Stable-isotope analysis of a deep-sea benthic-fish assemblage: evidence of an enriched benthic food web.

    PubMed

    Boyle, M D; Ebert, D A; Cailliet, G M

    2012-04-01

    In this study, fishes and invertebrates collected from the continental slope (1000 m) of the eastern North Pacific Ocean were analysed using stable-isotope analysis (SIA). Resulting trophic positions (T(P) ) were compared to known diets and habitats from the literature. Dual isotope plots indicated that most species groups (invertebrates and fishes) sorted as expected along the carbon and nitrogen axes, with less intraspecific variability than interspecific variability. Results also indicated an isotopically distinct benthic and pelagic food web, as the benthic food web was more enriched in both nitrogen and carbon isotopes. Trophic positions from SIA supported this finding, resulting in the assignment of fishes to different trophic positions from those expected based on published dietary information. These differences can be explained largely by the habitat of the prey and the percentage of the diet that was scavenged. A mixing model estimated dietary contributions of prey similar to those of the known diet of Bathyraja trachura from stomach-content analysis (SCA). Linear regressions indicated that trophic positions calculated from SIA and SCA, when plotted against B. trachura total length for 32 individuals, exhibited similar variation and patterns. Only the T(P) from SCA yielded significant results (stomach content: P < 0·05, stable isotope: P > 0·05). PMID:22497394

  13. Water conditions and geochemistry in northern Adriatic anoxia-prone areas and response of benthic faunas to oxygen deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuschin, Martin; Riedel, Bettina; Stachowitsch, Michael; Cermelj, Branko

    2010-05-01

    One predicted effect of global climate change, specifically global warming, is the increase in the temperatures and stratification of shallow coastal and estuarine systems. This, coupled with ongoing anthropogenic eutrophication, will exacerbate hypoxia and benthic mortalities, significantly damaging these critical marine ecosystems. These phenomena are particularly severe on sublitoral soft-bottoms such as the poorly sorted silty sands at the study site in the northern Adriatic Sea. We deployed a specially developed underwater chamber to artificially induce anoxia in situ. Our Experimental Anoxia Generating Unit (EAGU) is a large plexiglass chamber that combines a digital camera with oxygen/hydrogen sulphide/pH sensors along with flashes and battery packs. The unit can be deployed for up to five days to autonomously generate oxygen crises and quantify both physico-chemical parameters and benthic responses. The system is initially positioned in an "open" configuration (open-sided aluminium frame) over the benthic fauna ("control" experiment). After 24 h the EAGU is switched to its "closed" configuration (plexiglass enclosure) and repositioned over the same assemblage. In this contribution, we focus on the natural oxygen content, temperature and pH of bottom waters during summer, the course of oxygen decrease during our experiments and the onset of H2S development. Oxygen content of the bottom water, a few centimetres above the sediment-water interface, ranges from ~3.5-8 but is mostly between 4-6 ml l-1 during July to September of the study periods (2005 and 2006) and decreases to zero within ~1-3 days after initiation of our experiments. In parallel, H2S starts to develop at the onset of anoxia. Water temperatures at the bottom were stable during experiments and ranged from 18.5°C to 21.4°C, but pH decreased from 8.3 to 8.1 at the beginning to 7.9 to 7.7 at the end of the experiments. Sediment profiling indicates that the diffusive benthic boundary layer is approximately 2.5 mm thick and that oxygen values decrease from ~2 ml l-1 3.5 mm above the sediment water interface to virtually zero at the interface. PH-values in 2 mm depth decrease from 8.15 to 7.6 within the first 10 h of the experiment. This indicates that the most reactive organic matter is decomposing in the uppermost few mm of the sediment. These data can be related to behavioural responses and mortality sequences of benthic faunas, including echinoids, crustaceans, molluscs and anemones. Beginning hypoxia (?2.0 ml l-1 DO) elicited escape patterns such as increased horizontal and vertical locomotion of animals. Moderate hypoxia (?1.0 ml l-1 DO) triggered species-specific sublethal effects such as arm-tipping in ophiuroids or extension from the sediment in sea anemones. At severe hypoxia (?0.5 ml l-1 DO) infaunal organisms began to emerge and first mortalities occurred. Some crustaceans and echinoderms are among the first to die, but sea anemones and large gastropods can even survive the onset of hydrogen sulfide.

  14. Modelling Changes of the Paleogene Ca Budget Using Benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabich, S.; Gussone, N. C.; Vollmer, C.; Palike, H.; Rabe, K.; Teichert, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the earth's climate as well as the oceanic chemical and isotopic evolution in the past is one of the main aims in earth science. Ca as one of the major elements in the ocean is especially important. Its variation in concentration are controlled by different factors including the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere, continental weathering and Ca carbonate sedimentation. We used samples from IODP Exp. 320/321 to establish a ?44/40Ca paleo-seawater record between 45 and 25 Ma and model changes in the Ca budget through time. Our results show differences in the Eocene and Oligocene Ca isotope record of benthic foraminifers. The ?44/40Ca values during the Eocene are relatively constant with no significant fluctuations during phases of large short term CCD fluctuations[1]. The Oligocene is characterized by sediments with uniformly high carbonate content and increasing ?44/40Ca towards the late Oligocene. Past seawater ?44/40Ca values (Fig. 1) were calculated from the measured benthic foraminifer record applying the calibration for Gyroidinoides spp.[2]. The Ca budget during the Eocene is relatively constant and not affected by short term CCD fluctuations, indicating that they are too small to alter the isotopic Ca budget. The Oligocene, in contrast is characterized by a general increase in ?44/40Ca seawater values and a continuously deep CCD[1]. This is consistent with a massive long term (>1Ma) CaCO3 deposition and decreasing Ca concentration in the ocean water. To examine the preservation (dissolution and recrystallization) of the foraminifer test through time, we studied additionally the changes in the crystallographic orientations trough time by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis and Raman spectroscopy. As a final step we use our ?44/40Ca seawater record to run a combined Ca and C model showing the effect of Ca weathering input, carbonate remobilization and dolomitization on the Ca and carbonate system of seawater [1]. [1]Pälike H., Mitchell W. Lyle, Hiroshi Nishi, Isabella Raffi, Andy Ridgwell, Kusali Gamage, Adam Klaus et al. (2012): A Cenozoic record of the equatorial Pacific carbonate compensation depth. Nature 488, 609-614 [2]Gussone N. & Filipsson H.L. (2010): Calcium isotope ratios in calcitic tests of benthic Foraminifers. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 290, 108-117

  15. Turnover and paleoenvironmental changes across the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary at the Galanderud section (Northern Alborz, Iran) based on benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharianrostami, Masoud; Leckie, R. Mark; Font, Eric; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution quantitative study of benthic foraminifera across the expanded and continuous Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary at the Galanderud section in northern Iran provides an excellent record of the K/Pg event. The benthic foraminiferal assemblages, in contrast to the planktic foraminifers, did not suffer mass extinction at the K/Pg boundary. Uppermost Maastrichtian assemblages are well preserved and highly diverse. Only ~3% of the benthic species became extinct, including Bolivinoides draco, Eouvigerina subsculptura, Neoflabellina sp. and Praebulimina reussi. Other species are temporarily absent for a short interval after the K/Pg boundary. Benthic foraminifera indicate outer neritic-uppermost bathyal depths during the Plummerita hantkeninoides Zone until 70 cm below the K/Pg boundary. This interval contains abundant species of Bolivinoides draco, Gaudryina pyramidata, Cibicidoides hyphalus, P. reussi, and Sitella cushmani. The paleodepth decreased to outer neritic in the uppermost Maastrichtian based on the dominance of Stensioeina excolata, G. pyramidata, Cibicidoides pseudoacutus, and Coryphostoma incrassata forma gigantea. On the other hand, some species such as P. reussi and C. hyphalus, which are normally found at bathyal depths, decreased in their abundances. These data suggest a sea-level fall at the end of Maastrichtian. Additional evidence for sea-level fall is a decrease of planktic/benthic ratio from ~60% to ~40% in the uppermost Maastrichtian. The K/Pg clay layer is characterized by a high abundance of opportunistic species such as Cibicidoides spp., C. pseudoacutus, and Tappanina selemensis. The drastic change of benthic foraminiferal assemblages coincides with a sharp drop in magnetic susceptibility and %CaCO3, mass extinction of planktic foraminifera, a sharp enrichment in Ir, and a 2.25‰ negative excursion in ?13C at the K/Pg boundary, which is largely compatible with the catastrophic effects of an asteroid impact on Earth that briefly, but severely destabilized the oceanic phytoplankton food webs. Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM) curves treated by the cumulative log-Gaussian function shows that hematite (or goethite) and magnetite are the main magnetic minerals in the K/Pg clay layer, whereas large and small magnetite characterize the Maastrichtian and the Danian sediments, respectively. The dominance of hematite over magnetite at the K/Pg boundary explains the lack of the characteristic positive magnetic susceptibility peak observed in other sections suggesting higher oxidation state of the Galanderud depositional environment during the impact. The presence of three calcareous dinoflagellate chalk layers and large excursions in O- and C-isotopic compositions in basal Danian Zone P0 highlight the instability of the ecosystem immediately following the K/Pg boundary. In the Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina and Parasubbotina pseudobulloides Zones, there is an increase in both diversity and infaunal morphogroups, and a slight decrease of the epifaunal morphogroups; some deeper species increase in abundance including Gyroidinoides globosus and Marssonella oxycona. These changes might indicate a sea level rise and uppermost bathyal paleodepths in the early Danian, but it might also indicate improved conditions at the seafloor including greater flux of organic matter. These abrupt paleoenvironmental changes at the K/Pg boundary are correlated in age to the Chicxulub impact event and to the Deccan Phase 2; the contribution of each event is currently under study.

  16. Geologic characteristics of benthic habitats in Glacier Bay, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harney, Jodi N.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Etherington, Lisa L.; Dartnell, Pete; Golden, Nadine E.; Chezar, Hank

    2006-01-01

    In April 2004, more than 40 hours of georeferenced submarine digital video was collected in water depths of 15-370 m in Glacier Bay to (1) ground-truth existing geophysical data (bathymetry and acoustic reflectance), (2) examine and record geologic characteristics of the sea floor, and (3) investigate the relation between substrate types and benthic communities, and (4) construct predictive maps of seafloor geomorphology and habitat distribution. Common substrates observed include rock, boulders, cobbles, rippled sand, bioturbated mud, and extensive beds of living horse mussels and scallops. Four principal sea-floor geomorphic types are distinguished by using video observations. Their distribution in lower and central Glacier Bay is predicted using a supervised, hierarchical decision-tree statistical classification of geophysical data.

  17. Hexabromocyclododecane affects benthic-pelagic coupling in an experimental ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Clare; Näslund, Johan; Hansen, Joakim; Kozlowsky-Suzuki, Betina; Sundström, Bo; Gustafsson, Kerstin

    2015-11-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) is an additive brominated flame retardant and a recognized PBT chemical. However, little is known about its effects on coastal species, and even less on ecosystem effects. We investigated the dose-response effects of HBCDD over 8 months in 1000 L experimental mesocosms assembled from coastal Baltic Sea ecosystem components. HBCDD was added via spiked plankton material and a range of structural and functional endpoints were measured during the experiment. Increasing HBCDD concentration decreased the biomass of large Macoma balthica, resulting in a decreased recirculation of nutrients to the water. Changes in plankton communities were also observed, either due to direct toxic HBCDD effects or indirect via changes in benthic-pelagic coupling of nutrients. Such complex ecosystem responses can only be quantified and understood by using realistic experimental set-ups, and including knowledge of system-specific ecological interactions. This is the first study of HBCDD effects on ecosystem level. PMID:26219072

  18. Probabilistic sequence alignment of Late Pleistocene benthic ?18O data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, C.; Lin, L.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Stern, J.

    2013-12-01

    The stratigraphic alignment of ocean sediment cores plays a vital role in paleoceanographic research because it is used to develop mutually consistent age models for climate proxies measured in these cores. The most common proxy used for alignment is the The stratigraphic alignment of ocean sediment cores plays a vital role in paleoceanographic research because it is used to develop mutually consistent age models for climate proxies measured in these cores. The most common proxy used for alignment is the ?18O of calcite from benthic or planktonic foraminifera because a large fraction of ?18O variance derives from the global signal of ice volume. To date, alignment has been performed either by manual, qualitative comparison or by deterministic algorithms (Martinson, Pisias et al. Quat. Res. 27 1987; Lisiecki and Lisiecki Paleoceanography 17, 2002; Huybers and Wunsch, Paleoceanography 19, 2004). Here we present a probabilistic sequence alignment algorithm which provides 95% confidence bands for the alignment of pairs of benthic ?18O records. The probabilistic algorithm presented here is based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) (Levinson, Rabiner et al. Bell Systems Technical Journal, 62,1983) similar to those that have been used extensively to align DNA and protein sequences (Durbin, Eddy et al. Biological Sequence Analysis, Ch. 4, 1998). However, here the need to the alignment of sequences stems from expansion and/or contraction in the records due to changes in sedimentation rates rather than the insertion or deletion of residues. Transition probabilities that are used in this HMM to model changes in sedimentation rates are based on radiocarbon estimates of sedimentation rates. The probabilistic algorithm considers all possible alignments with these predefined sedimentation rates. Exact calculations are completed using dynamic programming recursions. The algorithm yields the probability distributions of the age at each point in the record, which are probabilistically inferred from the LR04 stack. The complication of the central (1-?)% intervals of these distributions yields the confidence bands. In an extension of this work we are rebuilding the stack using a profile HMM model (Durbin, Eddy et al, Ch. 5). We analyze the confidence bands produced for the alignments of 35 Late Pleistocene benthic ?18O records to the LR04 benthic ?18O stack. We find that the mean width of 95% confidence bands for core alignments varies between 3-23 kyr depending on the resolution and noisiness of the core's ?18O signal. Confidence bands within individual cores also vary greatly, ranging from ~0 to >40 kyr. These alignment confidence bands will allow researchers to examine the robustness of their conclusions with respect to alignment uncertainty at all points in the record. Additionally, they should aid in the identification of possible errors in inferred ages in the input record (e.g., due to core disturbances) because such errors are likely to be associated with large, local uncertainty.

  19. The Physics of Broadcast Spawning in Benthic Invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimaldi, John P.; Zimmer, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Most benthic invertebrates broadcast their gametes into the sea, whereupon successful fertilization relies on the complex interaction between the physics of the surrounding fluid flow and the biological properties and behavior of eggs and sperm. We present a holistic overview of the impact of instantaneous flow processes on fertilization across a range of scales. At large scales, transport and stirring by the flow control the distribution of gametes. Although mean dilution of gametes by turbulence is deleterious to fertilization, a variety of instantaneous flow phenomena can aggregate gametes before dilution occurs. We argue that these instantaneous flow processes are key to fertilization efficiency. At small scales, sperm motility and taxis enhance contact rates between sperm and chemoattractant-releasing eggs. We argue that sperm motility is a biological adaptation that replaces molecular diffusion in conventional mixing processes and enables gametes to bridge the gap that remains after aggregation by the flow.

  20. Benthic nutrient sources to hypereutrophic Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Topping, B.R.; Lynch, D.D.; Carter, J.L.; Essaid, H.I.

    2009-01-01

    Three collecting trips were coordinated in April, May, and August 2006 to sample the water column and benthos of hypereutrophic Upper Klamath Lake (OR, USA) through the annual cyanophyte bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. A porewater profiler was designed and fabricated to obtain the first high-resolution (centimeter-scale) estimates of the vertical, concentration gradients of macro- and micronutrients for diffusive-flux determinations. A consistently positive benthic flux for soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was observed with solute release from the sediment, ranging between 0.4 and 6.1 mg/m2/d. The mass flux over an approximate 200-km2 lake area was comparable in magnitude to riverine inputs. An additional concern, related to fish toxicity was identified when dissolved ammonium also displayed consistently positive benthic fluxes of 4 to 134 mg/m2/d, again, comparable to riverine inputs. Although phosphorus was a logical initial choice by water quality managers for the limiting nutrient when nitrogen-fixing cyanophytes dominate, initial trace-element results from the lake and major inflowing tributaries suggested that the role of iron limitation on primary productivity should be investigated. Dissolved iron became depleted in the lake water column during the course of the algal bloom, while dissolved ammonium and SRP increased. Elevated macroinvertebrate densities, at least of the order of 104 individuals/m2, suggested, that the diffusive-flux estimates may be significantly enhanced, by bioturbation. In addition, heat-flux modeling indicated that groundwater advection of nutrients could also significantly contribute to internal nutrient loading. Accurate environmental assessments of lentic systems and reasonable expectations for point-source management require quantitative consideration of internal solute sources ?? 2009 SETAC.

  1. Benthic foraminifera and environmental changes in Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, E.; Gapotchenko, T.; Varekamp, J.C.; Mecray, E.I.; Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    Benthic foraminiferal faunas in Long Island Sound (LIS) in the 1940s and 1960s were of low diversity, and dominated by species of the genus Elphidium, mainly Elphidium excavatum clavatum, with common Buccella frigida and Eggerella advena. The distribution of these species was dominantly correlated with depth, but it was not clear which depth-related environmental variable was most important. Differences between faunas collected in 1996 and 1997, and in the 1940s and 1960s include a strong decrease in relative abundance of Eggerella advena over all LIS, an increase in relative abundance of Ammonia beccarii in western LIS, and a decrease in species diversity. The decreased diversity suggests that environmental stress caused the faunal changes. Oxygen isotope data for E. excavatum clavatum indicate that a change in salinity is not a probable cause. Carbon isotope data suggest that the supply of organic matter to the benthos increased since the early 1960s, with a stronger increase in western LIS where algal blooms have occurred since the early 1970s, possibly as a result of nutrient input by waste water treatment plants. These blooms or the resulting episodes of anoxia/hypoxia may have played a role in the increased relative abundance of A. beccarii. There is no clear explanation for the decreased abundance of E. advena, but changes in the phytoplankton composition (thus food supply) are a possible cause. Benthic foraminiferal faunal and stable isotope data have excellent potential as indicators of physicochemical environmental changes and their effects on the biota in LIS.

  2. Benthic perspective on Earth's oldest evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Stefan V; Konhauser, Kurt O

    2015-01-27

    The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is currently viewed as a protracted process during which atmospheric oxygen increased above ?10(-5) times the present atmospheric level (PAL). This threshold represents an estimated upper limit for sulfur isotope mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF), an Archean signature of atmospheric anoxia that begins to disappear from the rock record at 2.45 Ga. However, an increasing number of papers have suggested that the timing for oxidative continental weathering, and by conventional thinking the onset of atmospheric oxygenation, was hundreds of million years earlier than previously thought despite the presence of S-MIF. We suggest that this apparent discrepancy can be resolved by the earliest oxidative-weathering reactions occurring in benthic and soil environments at profound redox disequilibrium with the atmosphere, such as biological soil crusts and freshwater microbial mats covering riverbed, lacustrine, and estuarine sediments. We calculate that oxygenic photosynthesis in these millimeter-thick ecosystems provides sufficient oxidizing equivalents to mobilize sulfate and redox-sensitive trace metals from land to the oceans while the atmosphere itself remained anoxic with its attendant S-MIF signature. As continental freeboard increased significantly between 3.0 and 2.5 Ga, the chemical and isotopic signatures of benthic oxidative weathering would have become more globally significant from a mass-balance perspective. These observations help reconcile evidence for pre-GOE oxidative weathering with the history of atmospheric chemistry, and support the plausible antiquity of a terrestrial biosphere populated by cyanobacteria well before the GOE. PMID:25583484

  3. Anthropogenic and natural disturbances to marine benthic communities in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, H.; Oliver, J.S.

    1995-05-01

    Sampling and field experiments were conducted from 1975 to 1990 to test how the structure of marine benthic communities around McMurdo Station, Antarctica varied with levels of anthropogenic contaminants in marine sediments. The structure of communities (e.g., infauna density, species composition, and life history characteristics) in contaminated and uncontaminated areas were compared with the structure of communities influenced by two large-scale natural disturbances, anchor ice formation and uplift or iceberg scour. Benthic communities changed radically along a steep spatial gradient of anthropogenic hydrocarbon, metal, and PCB contamination around McMurdo Station. The heavily contaminated end of the gradient, Winter Quarters Bay, was low in infaunal and epifaunal abundance and was dominated by a few opportunistic species of polychaete worms. The edge of the heavily contaminated bay, the transition area, contained several motile polychaete species with less opportunistic life histories. Uncontaminated sedimentary habitats harbored dense tube mats of infaunal animals numerically dominated by populations of polychaete worms, crustaceans, and a large suspension feeding bivalve. These species are generally large and relatively sessile, except for several crustacean species living among the tubes. Although the community patterns around anthropogenic and natural disturbances were similar, particularly motile and opportunistic species at heavily disturbed and marginal areas, the natural disturbances cover much greater areas of the sea floor about the entire Antarctic continent. On the other hand, recovery from chemical contamination is likely to take many more decades than recovery from natural disturbances as contaminant degradation is a slow process. 77 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Benthic macrofauna data for San Francisco Bay, California, September 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.; Thompson, J.K.; Harmon, J.G.; Yost, B.T.

    1995-01-01

    Benthic macrofauna were collected during September 1986 to evaluate locations for long-term monitoring stations as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Regional Effects Monitoring Program in San Francisco Bay, California. Three to ten replicate samples were collected with a modified Van Veen sampler (0.05 m2 area) at ten locations. One box core sample (0.06 m2 area) was collected at seven to the ten locations. Six of the box core samples were split into an upper 10 cm sample and a deeper sample before analysis. Macrofauna specimens were identified to the lowest possible taxon, usually genus and species, then counted. An average of 88 percent of the benthic macrofauna specimens were identified to the species level. The fraction identified varied among stations from 54 to 98 percent. Nematodes and oligochaetes accounted for most of the unidentified specimens. Relative to the total number of species identified in five replicates at each location, an average of 90 percent of the species were collected with three replicates. In general, species with high to moderate abundances were present in all replicates, and species collected only after three or more replicates averaged less than one specimen per replicate. Results from the box cores showed that the dominant species were most abundant in the upper 10 cm, the depth of sediment that can be adequately sampled with a modified Van Veen sampler. On the basis of the number of species and their abundances at each location, seven of the ten locations were selected for sampling in the regular program, which began in March 1987.

  5. PROCEDURES FOR DERIVING EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING BENCHMARKS (ESBS) FOR THE PROTECTION OF BENTHIC ORGANISM: PAH MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document describes procedures to derive concentrations of PAH mixtures in sediment which are protective of the presence of benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it accounts for t...

  6. Validation of soft bottom benthic habitats identified by single-beam acoustics.

    PubMed

    Freitas, R; Sampaio, L; Oliveira, J; Rodrigues, A M; Quintino, V

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic diversity charts were produced for a Portuguese soft bottom mid-shelf area, depth from 30 to 90 m, using a single-beam echo sounder coupled to the acoustic systems QTC VIEW Series IV and V. A similar acoustic pattern was identified by both systems, which, after ground-truth interpretation based in available sediment and biological data, established a preliminary spatial distribution model of the benthic habitats in this coastal area. However, some of the acoustic areas were interpreted using one or very few sediment and benthic samples. A specific validation survey was conducted a posteriori, in which the positioning of the sediment and benthic community sampling sites was based on the acoustic diversity previously identified. The results clearly confirm the benthic habitats distribution model suggested by the acoustic method, indicating a high potential for the use of such approach in the identification and mapping of large-scale soft bottom coastal shelf habitat diversity. PMID:16266728

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE INDEX FOR MEASURING THE CONDITION OF STREAMS AT A REGIONAL SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multimetric macroinvertebrate index of stream condition was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Highlands Region of the United States. Benthic macroinvertebrate samples were collected from 562 first through third order streams between 1993 and 1995. Macroinvertebrates were collect...

  8. Biogeographical Patterns of Marine Benthic Invertebrates Along the Atlantic Coast of the Northeastern USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aim Examine the biogeography of marine benthic invertebrates of the Atlantic coast of the northeastern USA, compare the results to historical biogeographic studies, define physical-chemical factors affecting species distributions, and provide biogeographic information needed to ...

  9. BIOGEOGRAPHY OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN ESTUARIES ALONG THE GULF OF MEXICO AND WESTERN ATLANTIC COASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The community composition of benthic macroinvertebrates from 870 estuarine sites was examined to determine boundaries of biogeographical provinces along the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic coasts of the United States. Our objective was to confirm or challenge established boun...

  10. Field Experiments on Responses of a Freshwater, Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community to Vertebrate Predators

    E-print Network

    Thorp, James H.; Bergey, E. A.

    1981-04-01

    We examined the seasonal importance of vertebrate predators in potentially regulating the abundance and diversity of the benthic macroinvertebrates in the littoral zone of a soft-bottom reservoir that receives thermal effluent from a nuclear...

  11. POTENTIAL USE OF BENTHIC ALGAE AS HYDROLOGIC INDICATORS FOR HEADWATER STREAMS: SOME DATA EXPLORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic algae were sampled to determine the utility of algal communities as indicators of hydrologic regime as part of a national survey involving habitat measurements and community assessments. Streams from four forests near Cincinnati were classified according to hydrologic pe...

  12. A cross-continental comparison of the effects of flow intermittence on benthic invertebrate assemblages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although temporary rivers are widespread freshwater systems, they have been poorly studied by ecologists and are largely ignored in water management plans, practices and policies. If the effects of dry events on benthic invertebrates have been reported individually from different...

  13. Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Steven P. Ferraro, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Newport, OR Background/Questions/Methods The chemical periodic table, the Linnaean system of classification, and the Her...

  14. EVALUATION OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE BIOMASS METHODOLOGY. PART 1. LABORATORY ANALYTICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of analytical methods employed for wet weight (live or preserved samples) of benthic marcoinvertebrates reveals that centrifugation at 140 x gravity for one minute yields constant biomass estimates. Duration of specimen exposure in ethanol, formalin, and formol (formal...

  15. Object-based benthic habitat mapping in the Florida Keys from hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Caiyun; Selch, Donna; Xie, Zhixiao; Roberts, Charles; Cooper, Hannah; Chen, Ge

    2013-12-01

    Accurate mapping of benthic habitats in the Florida Keys is essential in developing effective management strategies for this unique coastal ecosystem. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of hyperspectral imagery collected from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) for benthic habitat mapping in the Florida Keys. An overall accuracy of 84.3% and 86.7% was achieved respectively for a group-level (3-class) and code-level (12-class) classification by integrating object-based image analysis (OBIA), hyperspectral image processing methods, and machine learning algorithms. Accurate and informative object-based benthic habitat maps were produced. Three commonly used image correction procedures (atmospheric, sun-glint, and water-column corrections) were proved unnecessary for small area mapping in the Florida Keys. Inclusion of bathymetry data in the mapping procedure did not increase the classification accuracy. This study indicates that hyperspectral systems are promising in accurate benthic habitat mapping at a fine detail level.

  16. Relationship Between Nutrient Enrichment and Benthic Function: Local Effects and Spatial Patterns

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eutrophication-induced changes to benthic structure and function are problems of enormous ecological and economic significance. Understanding the relationships between nutrient enrichment and effects, modifying factors such as localized transport time, and symptoms of eutrophica...

  17. Effect of Organic Enrichment and Hypoxia on the Biodiversity of Benthic Communities in Narragansett Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excessive input of nitrogen to coastal waters leads to eutrophication and hypoxia that reduce biodiversity and impair key ecosystem services provided by benthic communities; for example, fish and shellfish production, bioturbation, nutrient cycling, and water filtration. Hypoxia ...

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METABOLISM AND BIOACCUMULATION OF BENZO[A]PYRENE IN BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential influence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolism on bioaccumulation is well accepted, but rarely has been examined in many species of benthic invertebrates that commonly are found in contaminated sediments, or used in bioaccumulation or toxicity tests. ...

  19. Seasonal variation of benthic macro invertebrates from Tons River of Garhwal Himalaya Uttarakhand.

    PubMed

    Negi, R K; Mamgain, Sheetal

    2013-11-15

    Present investigation was carried out to assess the seasonal variation of benthic macro-invertebrates from the Tons river, a tributary of Yamuna River in Garhwal Himalaya, Uttrakhand during December, 2007 to November, 2009. The seasonal benthic diversity was correlated with various physic-chemical parameters which documented that the macrobenthic diversity is mostly regulated by the dissolved oxygen in the water while temperature and free CO2 were found to be inversely correlated with the benthic fauna. Maximum diversity of benthos was reported at the upstream site ('H' 0.204) during the winter season while it was recorded minimum during the rainy season at all the sites. Maximum diversity is reported during the winter season at all the sites. The benthic fauna is represented by three phylum, 4 classes and 10 orders with Insecta emerging as the most dominant class. Maximum genera were reported from midstream site as it acts as ecotone between upstream and downstream. PMID:24511693

  20. Coral reef condition and benthic sedimentation threat in four regions of south Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scleractinian corals, gorgonian octocorals, sponges and fishes were assessed near the cities of LaParguera, Guánica, Guayanilla, and Jobos along the southern coast of Puerto Rico in November – December 2010. Survey sites were targeted near areas with varying benthic...

  1. Mud, Macrofauna and Microbes: An ode to benthic organism-abiotic interactions at varying scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic environments are dynamic habitats, subject to variable sources and rates of sediment delivery, reworking from the abiotic and biotic processes, and complex biogeochemistry. These activities do not occur in a vacuum, and interact synergistically to influence food webs, bi...

  2. RESPONSES OF ESTUARINE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES TO SEDIMENT BURIAL: THE IMPORTANCE OF MOBILITY AND ADAPTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine benthic organisms are frequently subjected to disturbance events caused by hydrodynamic processes that disrupt and move the sediment in which the animals reside, however the mechanisms by which physical disturbance processes affect infaunal and epifaunal populations and...

  3. Ecological periodic tables for benthic macrofaunal usage of estuarine habitats in the US Pacific Northwest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuary-wide benthic macrofauna?habitat associations were determined for 9 habitats (intertidal eelgrass [Zostera marina], dwarf eelgrass [Zostera japonica], oyster [Crassostrea gigas], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californiensis], shell, sand, mud,...

  4. BENTHIC MICROBIAL RESPIRATION IN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN, PIEDMONT, AND COASTAL PLAINS, STREAMS OF THE EASTERN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our study had two objectives. First, in order to quantify the potential underestimation of community respiration caused by the exclusion of anaerobic processes, we compared benthic microbial respiration measured as 02 consumption with estimated based on DHA. Second, our previous ...

  5. ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF INDIGENOUS, NONINDIGENOUS, AND CRYPTOGENIC BENTHIC MACROFAUNA IN WILLAPA BAY, WASHINGTON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic macrofaunal samples were collected in Willapa Bay, WA, in four habitats [eelgrass (Zostera marina), Atlantic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis), ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis)] in 1996 and in seven habitats (Zostera, Spartina, U...

  6. Layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and an overview of current areas of research interest.

  7. An oceanographic observation of the 2013 Mt.Etna pyroclastic fallout in the Ionian deep seafloor: multiparametric investigation through benthic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Bue, Nadia; Sgroi, Tiziana; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Marinaro, Giuditta; Embriaco, Davide; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Very large amounts of volcanic ash are released into the atmosphere during eruptive events. Taken over the atmospheric forcing tephra may be carried over great distances remaining in suspension for a long time. Nevertheless, the wind is not the only responsible for transport and dispersion of volcanic particles, but, especially in volcanic areas close to the coast, the ash fallout in marine areas plays an interesting role in the sedimentation processes affecting the benthic environments. During the Mt. Etna eruptive events of 2013, the volcanic ash fallout occurred in the Western Ionian Sea deep layers was recorded by an oceanographic sensor mounted on the cabled benthic node NEMO-SN1. The seafloor observatory was deployed in the framework of the European Research Infrastructure EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory) at a depth of 2100 m, about 25 km off-shore Eastern Sicily. The presence of a specific Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) able to monitor currents and direction of water particles in a depth range of about 30-50m above the seafloor, allowed to watch interesting episodes of suspended matter at the deep layers in correspondence with the pyroclastic activity which affected the ESE sector of the Etna volcano. The analysis of the acoustic backscattering signal of this sensor, combined with seismological and oceanographic data recorded by the benthic station, allowed to carry out a multidisciplinary study about the possible interaction between the Mt. Etna eruptive activity and the local oceanographic dynamic. This approach leads to consider that sedimentation processes of volcanic ash occurred, allowing to investigate on the very fast horizontal and vertical transport observed. Moreover, the surprising sedimentation rate recorded, probably results from intense aggregation and alteration processes affecting the ash particles in seawater. The importance of the presence of a multidisciplinary benthic observatory in sensible areas, such as the Western Ionian Sea, is confirmed by the possibility to record and monitor important processes otherwise unexplored, and also by the opportunity to carry out multidisciplinary studies indispensable to explain the observed processes.

  8. Examining the Evidence for the Influence of Carbonate Saturation State on Benthic Foraminiferal Mg/Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. A.; Lea, D. W.; McCorkle, D. C.

    2002-12-01

    Benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca paleothermometry is based on an empirical relationship between the Mg/Ca of benthic foraminifera recovered from core tops and in situ bottom water temperatures (Rosenthal, 1997; Martin et al, in press; Lear et al, in review). While there is a tight correlation between shell Mg/Ca and temperature over a broad range of temperatures (-1 to 20 degrees C), Mg/Ca variation over the small range of deep water temperatures reveals departures from the calibration curve at low temperatures. Lower Mg/Ca values are generally associated with the deepest sites from the Atlantic and Pacific, contributing to an apparently steeper Mg/Ca-T response for abyssal benthics. The steeper response of abyssal benthics may reflect an influence of decreasing carbonate saturation with depth. Saturation related effects have already been documented for Mg in planktonic foraminifera and for other metals (Cd, Ba, and Zn) in benthic foraminifera shells (see Marchitto and ref. therein). Although it is difficult to definitively separate the effects of various environmental parameters (including temperature, depth, and relative saturation states), which often change in unison, we can use the core top Mg/Ca data to estimate the potential influence of saturation state. An alternative calibration of the benthic Mg/Ca - T relationship can be derived from core top benthic foraminifera based only on sites bathed in waters above carbonate saturation that yields a slightly smaller change in Mg/Ca per degree C (~9.5% vs. 11%) but better explains benthic Mg/Ca from the coldest sites (-1degrees C). Using this alternative Mg/Ca -T relation and a subset of data from the Ceara Rise and Ontong Java Plateau, we can estimate a maximum Mg/Ca offset attributable to saturation state. By comparing core top and downcore data, we can also address possible differences in the primary Mg-T response and carbonate saturation related effects between different genera (Cibicidoides and Uvigerina).

  9. Salinity and temperature effects on photosynthesis and organic carbon release rates by selected benthic macroalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Yarish, C.; Heller, M.

    1983-09-01

    Estuarine benthic macroalgae are excellent producers of new carbonaceous material through their high rates of photosynthesis. Under some circumstances, this organic carbon is liberated into the aquatic environment in dissolved form while the plant is actively photosynthesizing. This project established a protocol for examining the effects of different combinations of salinity, temperature, and emergence/submergence regimes, determined the effects of antibiotics on the photosynthetic rate, and the extent to which these factors effect liberation of organics by selected estuarine benthic macroalgae.

  10. Trace metals, PCBs, and PAHs in benthic (epipelic) diatoms from intertidal sediments; a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Stronkhorst, J.; Misdorp, R. ); Vos, P.C. )

    1994-06-01

    Intertidal sediments in many estuaries around the world have a history of contamination resulting from long term discharges of industrial, agricultural and domestic waste effluents. These contaminated sediments are now regarded as a major source of toxicants for bottom-related organisms which, in turn, may pass on certain contaminants (e.g. methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)) to organisms higher in the foodchain. Many studies have been conducted on the contamination of benthic macrofauna, estuarine fish and birds, but to our knowledge no research has yet been carried out on benthic diatoms which form the lowest trophic level of an intertidal ecosystem. Research on the effects of micro-contaminants on primary producers in marine ecosystems is mainly performed with phytoplankton. In the estuaries of temperate regions, benthic diatoms make a significant contribution to primary production in the ecosystem and are predated especially by deposit feeding Polychaete and Mollusca. Knowledge of the level of contamination in benthic diatoms is of major importance to recognize possible effects on growth rate and species composition of the benthic diatom populations and to understand the accumulation of toxicants into the foodchain. For chemical analysis it is difficult to obtain [open quote]pure[close quote] samples of benthic diatoms because they form part of the sediment. A similar problem occurs with the sampling of phytoplankton in turbid estuarine waters. The aim of this pilot study was (a) to improve a trap technique to collect pure samples of benthic diatoms of at least 2 gram dry weight for analysis of trace metals, PCBs and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and (b) to compare the concentrations in benthic diatoms with levels in sediment and some bottom-related organisms. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Effect of seaweed proliferation on benthic habitat quality assessed by Sediment Profile Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bona, Francesca

    2006-10-01

    Changes in sediment quality, with special reference to benthic habitat conditions resulting from macroalgae overgrowth, were studied in the Venice Lagoon, Italy. Data were collected biweekly in spring and summer from 1993 to 1998 and from 2001 to 2002, as part of the macroalgae growth control strategies managed by the Venice Water Authority-Consorzio Venezia Nuova. Benthic habitat conditions were studied by means of Sediment Profile Imaging, which allowed the collection of several variables: aRPD (apparent redox potential discontinuity), prism penetration depth, presence of anoxia on the surface of the sediment, presence of reduced gas bubbles, stage of benthic colonization. All these variables led to the calculation of an environmental index (Organism-Sediment Index, OSI), which was then related to physical variables and macroalgae abundance. Until 1996, the overall benthic habitat of the Venice Lagoon showed almost stressed conditions; from 1997, the seaweed biomass rapidly declined and the OSI increased significantly. The OSI seemed to be affected by seaweed biomass, sediment compactness and water depth. Macroalgae biomass greater than 4.5 kg/m 2 led to the complete disappearance of stage III of benthic colonization; values as low as 0.70 kg m 2 already had a severe impact on recolonization. SPI attributes indicated the main mechanisms that could have contributed to the benthic quality: seaweed proliferation is often followed by rapid decay of macroalgae biomass, especially when present in large amounts. The decrease in seaweed biomass often results in oxygen depletion in the water column and thus in the sediment, preventing complete benthic colonization. This research confirms the importance of in situ rapid reconnaissance surveys to assess the impact of eutrophication on the benthic habitat.

  12. Spatial Variability of Benthic-Pelagic Coupling in an Estuary Ecosystem: Consequences for Microphytobenthos Resuspension Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Ubertini, Martin; Lefebvre, Sébastien; Gangnery, Aline; Grangeré, Karine; Le Gendre, Romain; Orvain, Francis

    2012-01-01

    The high degree of physical factors in intertidal estuarine ecosystem increases material processing between benthic and pelagic compartments. In these ecosystems, microphytobenthos resuspension is a major phenomenon since its contribution to higher trophic levels can be highly significant. Understanding the sediment and associated microphytobenthos resuspension and its fate in the water column is indispensable for measuring the food available to benthic and pelagic food webs. To identify and hierarchize the physical/biological factors potentially involved in MPB resuspension, the entire intertidal area and surrounding water column of an estuarine ecosystem, the Bay des Veys, was sampled during ebb tide. A wide range of physical parameters (hydrodynamic regime, grain size of the sediment, and suspended matter) and biological parameters (flora and fauna assemblages, chlorophyll) were analyzed to characterize benthic-pelagic coupling at the bay scale. Samples were collected in two contrasted periods, spring and late summer, to assess the impact of forcing variables on benthic-pelagic coupling. A mapping approach using kriging interpolation enabled us to overlay benthic and pelagic maps of physical and biological variables, for both hydrological conditions and trophic indicators. Pelagic Chl a concentration was the best predictor explaining the suspension-feeders spatial distribution. Our results also suggest a perennial spatio-temporal structure of both benthic and pelagic compartments in the ecosystem, at least when the system is not imposed to intense wind, with MPB distribution controlled by both grain size and bathymetry. The benthic component appeared to control the pelagic one via resuspension phenomena at the scale of the bay. Co-inertia analysis showed closer benthic-pelagic coupling between the variables in spring. The higher MPB biomass observed in summer suggests a higher contribution to filter-feeders diets, indicating a higher resuspension effect in summer than in spring, in turn suggesting an important role of macrofauna bioturbation and filter feeding (Cerastoderma edule). PMID:22952910

  13. Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stief, P.

    2013-07-01

    Invertebrate animals that live at the bottom of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., benthic macrofauna) are important mediators between nutrients in the water column and microbes in the benthos. The presence of benthic macrofauna stimulates microbial nutrient dynamics through different types of animal-microbe interactions, which potentially affect the trophic status of aquatic ecosystems. This review contrasts three types of animal-microbe interactions in the benthos of aquatic ecosystems: (i) ecosystem engineering, (ii) grazing, and (iii) symbiosis. Their specific contributions to the turnover of fixed nitrogen (mainly nitrate and ammonium) and the emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide are evaluated. Published data indicate that ecosystem engineering by sediment-burrowing macrofauna stimulates benthic nitrification and denitrification, which together allows fixed nitrogen removal. However, the release of ammonium from sediments often is enhanced even more than the sedimentary uptake of nitrate. Ecosystem engineering by reef-building macrofauna increases nitrogen retention and ammonium concentrations in shallow aquatic ecosystems, but allows organic nitrogen removal through harvesting. Grazing by macrofauna on benthic microbes apparently has small or neutral effects on nitrogen cycling. Animal-microbe symbioses provide abundant and distinct benthic compartments for a multitude of nitrogen-cycle pathways. Recent studies revealed that ecosystem engineering, grazing, and symbioses of benthic macrofauna significantly enhance nitrous oxide emission from shallow aquatic ecosystems. The beneficial effect of benthic macrofauna on fixed nitrogen removal through coupled nitrification-denitrification can thus be offset by the concurrent release of (i) ammonium that stimulates aquatic primary production and (ii) nitrous oxide that contributes to global warming. Overall, benthic macrofauna intensifies the coupling between benthos, pelagial, and atmosphere through enhanced turnover and transport of nitrogen.

  14. Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stief, P.

    2013-12-01

    Invertebrate animals that live at the bottom of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., benthic macrofauna) are important mediators between nutrients in the water column and microbes in the benthos. The presence of benthic macrofauna stimulates microbial nutrient dynamics through different types of animal-microbe interactions, which potentially affect the trophic status of aquatic ecosystems. This review contrasts three types of animal-microbe interactions in the benthos of aquatic ecosystems: (i) ecosystem engineering, (ii) grazing, and (iii) symbiosis. Their specific contributions to the turnover of fixed nitrogen (mainly nitrate and ammonium) and the emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide are evaluated. Published data indicate that ecosystem engineering by sediment-burrowing macrofauna stimulates benthic nitrification and denitrification, which together allows fixed nitrogen removal. However, the release of ammonium from sediments is enhanced more strongly than the sedimentary uptake of nitrate. Ecosystem engineering by reef-building macrofauna increases nitrogen retention and ammonium concentrations in shallow aquatic ecosystems, but allows organic nitrogen removal through harvesting. Grazing by macrofauna on benthic microbes apparently has small or neutral effects on nitrogen cycling. Animal-microbe symbioses provide abundant and distinct benthic compartments for a multitude of nitrogen-cycle pathways. Recent studies reveal that ecosystem engineering, grazing, and symbioses of benthic macrofauna significantly enhance nitrous oxide emission from shallow aquatic ecosystems. The beneficial effect of benthic macrofauna on fixed nitrogen removal through coupled nitrification-denitrification can thus be offset by the concurrent release of (i) ammonium that stimulates aquatic primary production and (ii) nitrous oxide that contributes to global warming. Overall, benthic macrofauna intensifies the coupling between benthos, pelagial, and atmosphere through enhanced turnover and transport of nitrogen.

  15. Concentrations of selected heavy metals in benthic diatoms and sediment in the Westerschelde Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, M.C.P.; Scheppingen, Y. van

    1996-12-31

    In recent years considerable data have been compiled on heavy metal levels in biota in marine and estuarine environments. With respect to the fauna, much information is available on accumulation and effects of heavy metals in birds, fish and benthic macrofauna. Accumulation of heavy metals in aquatic flora has been studied mostly in benthic macroalgae, in particular in relation to the use as a biological monitor. The response of planktonic algal species to heavy metals has been studied extensively in cultured populations. Also. heavy metal concentrations in natural plankton have been studied. As far as we know, very few data are available on the concentrations of heavy metals in the lowest benthic trophic level, the benthic microflora. It is a major food supply for numerous intertidal species, so it is obvious that microflora might play an important role in the accumulation of contaminants through coastal food chains. The aim of this research was to adjust a recently developed collection technique for benthic diatoms so that it is suitable for large-scale field studies. The method was then used to assess the concentration of the heavy metals Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in benthic diatoms and sediments along an estuarine gradient. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. An evaluation of benthic community measures using laboratory-derived sediment effect concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, F.J.; Canfield, T.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; Mount, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment effect concentrations (SECs) are contaminant sediment concentrations which are frequently associated with sediment toxicity. Recently, a number of different SECs have been calculated from laboratory toxicity tests with field collected sediments using Chironomus tentans, Chironomus riparius, and Hyalella azteca. Toxicity endpoints included (depending upon species) lethality, growth and sexual maturation. The authors selected the Effect Range Median (ERM) calculated for 28-d Hyalella azteca as an SEC for evaluating six different benthic community measures as indicators of contaminated sediment. The benthic measures included: taxa richness, chironomid genera richness, percent chironomid deformity, chironomid biotic index, ratio of chironomids/oligochaetes, and oligochaete biotic index. Benthic measures were obtained for 31 stations from the Great Lakes and 13 stations from Milltown Reservoir and Clark Fork River, MT. Each benthic measure was ranked from 1 to 100 and individual ranks and various combinations of ranks were plotted against the ratio of chemical concentration at the site/ERM calculated for that chemical (similar to a toxic unit approach) and the sum of the ERM ratios (sum of toxic units). Preliminary analysis indicates that, in general, benthic measures varied widely in relatively uncontaminated stations, confounding any underlying relationship that may have existed. The absence of chironomids, in areas with suitable habitat, seems to be indicative of grossly contaminated stations, but not an endpoint useful for discriminating stations with contaminant concentrations closer to the SEC. The usefulness of benthic measures as diagnostic tools for contaminated sediments and potential ways to improve these measures will be discussed.

  17. Associations between degraded benthic communities and contaminated sediments: Sabine Lake, Lake Pontchartrain, and Choctawhatchee Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, V.D.; Summers, J.K.; Macauley, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) in the Gulf of Mexico supplements its base sampling effort each year with localized, intensive spatial sampling in selected large estuarine systems. By selecting random locations within 70 km{sup 2} hexagonal areas, individual estuaries were sampled using EMAP methods but at four times the density as base sampling. In 1992, 19 sites were sampled in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. In 1 993, 18 sites were sampled in Sabine Lake, Texas and 12 sites were sampled in Choctawhatchee Bay, Florida. At all sites, sediment grabs were taken and analyzed for benthic species composition and abundance, for toxicity to Ampelisca, and for organic and inorganic sediment contaminants. An indicator of biotic integrity, the benthic index, was calculated to represent the status of benthic communities. A series of statistical techniques, such as stepwise regression analysis, were employed to determine whether the variation in the benthic index could be associated with variation in sediment contaminants, sediment toxicity, or levels of dissolved oxygen. Spatial distributions of these parameters were examined to determine the geographical co-occurrence of degraded benthic communities and environmental stressors. In Lake Pontchartrain, for example, 85% of the variation in the benthic index was associated with decreased levels of dissolved oxygen, and increased concentrations of PCBs, alkanes, copper, tin, and zinc in the sediments.

  18. Assessment of the direct effects of biogenic and petrogenic activated carbon on benthic organisms.

    PubMed

    Lillicrap, Adam; Schaanning, Morten; Macken, Ailbhe

    2015-03-17

    Activated carbon (AC) has long been associated with the capacity to effectively remove organic substances from aquatic and sediment matrices; however, its use in remediation purposes has drawn some concern due to possible impacts on benthic communities. Within the inner Oslofjord, the use of AC has been well documented for reducing the risks associated with dioxins or dioxin-like compounds from contaminated areas. However, benthic surveys performed on areas treated with AC have revealed that the abundance of organisms inhabiting these areas can be reduced significantly in the subsequent years following treatment. The reason for the reduction in the benthic communities is currently unknown, and therefore, an integrated approach to assess the effects of 2 different forms of AC (biogenic and petrogenic) on benthic organisms has been performed. A battery of 3 different benthic organisms with different feeding and life-cycle processes has been used encompassing sediment surface feeders, sediment ingestors, and sediment reworkers. Results of the tests indicated that although AC is not acutely toxic at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L, there may be physical effects of the substance on benthic dwelling organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations of AC at remediated sites. PMID:25723541

  19. Impact of crab bioturbation on benthic flux and nitrogen dynamics of Southwest Atlantic intertidal marshes and mudflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul, Eugenia; Bazterrica, María C.; Escapa, Mauricio; Grela, María A.; Iribarne, Oscar

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the SW Atlantic intertidal burrowing crab Neohelice (Chasmagnathus) granulata on benthic metabolism, benthic flux, and benthic N cycling processes was investigated through field experiments and in situ benthic chambers incubations. Our experimental results show that the presence and activity of N. granulata and its burrows may affect the direction and magnitude of nutrient benthic fluxes. Bioturbation enhanced ammonium efflux at mudflats, and influx at marshes. The flux of nitrate toward the sediment was stimulated by crabs at light and dark conditions in marshes, but only under light exposure in mudflats. Crab bioturbation stimulated benthic metabolism, N mineralization, nitrification and denitrification potentials in both sites. Crabs seem to have contrasting effects on dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) availability between marshes and mudflats, as reflected on benthic DIN flux. This different effect on DIN availability and also the possible different effects of crabs on N 2-fixers organisms could explain the opposite N 2 fixation pattern found for both habitats, since crabs promoted N 2 fixation in marshes, but diminished its rate in mudflats. Thus, the results obtained here through manipulative field experiments using benthic chambers suggest that macrofauna may influence the N benthic cycle and DIN fluxes in estuarine sediments. Besides, these macrofauna effects could be context-dependent, being many of them opposite between mudflats and marshes. We concluded that the above mentioned effects and the bioturbation-macrophytes interaction may be affecting the dissolved nutrient exportation from marshes to open waters.

  20. Double Layers in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Alton C. (editor); Moorehead, Tauna W. (editor)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: laboratory double layers; ion-acoustic double layers; pumping potential wells; ion phase-space vortices; weak double layers; electric fields and double layers in plasmas; auroral double layers; double layer formation in a plasma; beamed emission from gamma-ray burst source; double layers and extragalactic jets; and electric potential between plasma sheet clouds.

  1. Transport Layer Cornell University

    E-print Network

    Low, Steven H.

    directions for the future evolution of the transport layer and suggest some further reading in sections VITransport Layer Ao Tang Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 Lachlan L. H. Andrew California of the physical layer, the link layer, the network layer, the transport layer and the application layer1 . See

  2. Determining the relative sensitivity of benthic diatoms to atrazine using rapid toxicity testing: a novel method.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Kefford, Ben J

    2014-07-01

    Herbicides pose a potential threat to aquatic ecosystems, especially to phototrophic organisms such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms may be a valuable indicator of the toxic impacts of herbicides in aquatic systems. However, this requires information on the herbicide sensitivity of a wide range of freshwater benthic diatom taxa. Unfortunately this information is only available for a limited number of species as current methods of developing new algae toxicity tests on individual taxa are lengthy and costly. To address this issue, we developed a new rapid toxicity test method to test natural benthic communities, from which the relative herbicide sensitivity of many individual taxa can be derived. This involved the collection of natural benthic communities from rocks in situ, which were placed directly into laboratory toxicity tests. Sensitivity data for several diatom genera in a 48 hour exposure toxicity test were produced, without the need for cultures or multiple site visits. After exposure to the highest treatment of atrazine (500 ?g L(-1)) there were significant declines of healthy cells in the most sensitive genera: Gomphonema declined by 74%, Amphora by 62%, Cymbella by 54% and Ulnaria by 34% compared to control levels. In contrast, the genera, Eunotia, Achnanthidium and Navicula, had no statistically significant decline in cell health. This method can identify the diatom taxa most at risk of herbicide toxicity within the natural benthic diatom community. The rapid toxicity testing method presented is a simple and effective method to obtain sensitivity data for multiple taxa within a natural benthic diatom community in a relatively short period of time. PMID:24742551

  3. Spatial-temporal feeding dynamics of benthic communities in an estuary-marine gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Emily S.; Kasai, Akihide; Ueno, Masahiro; Ishihi, Yuka; Yokoyama, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yoh

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the fluctuations of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in benthic consumers and their potential food sources to determine the spatial and temporal variations in the utilization of available organic matter, indicating the origin and pathways of energy from Yura Estuary to Tango Sea, Japan. Field samplings were conducted from the upper estuary to offshore with sampling frequency of twice per season from April (spring) 2006 to February (winter) 2007. The ?13C signatures of the upper and lower estuary benthos showed depleted and in wide range (-28.9‰ to -13.5‰) compared to the enriched and within narrow range signatures of marine benthos (-20.6‰ to -14.0‰) in all seasons. On the contrary, the ?15N signatures of benthic communities showed decreasing trend seaward and summer values were different from the other seasons. Using the dual isotope and multisource mixing models, we estimated the relative contributions of potential food sources to the benthos diet. River POM played an important source of energy for the estuarine benthos, especially in winter when river discharge was high. Marine POM served as an important alternative food for the estuarine benthos from spring to autumn when seawater intruded the bottom estuary. Benthic microalgae were the major food source at the shallow coast throughout the year, while marine POM fueled the deep coast and offshore benthic food webs. Spatial and temporal feeding variations in estuarine benthic communities were driven by the hydrology of the estuary, whereas primary production and transport of food source dictated diet variations of marine benthic communities. The elucidation of the dynamic energy subsidy among aquatic systems highlights the importance of the land-sea transition zones that is crucial for benthic secondary productions.

  4. Benthic foraminifera at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary around the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alegret, Laia; Molina, Eustoquio; Thomas, Ellen

    2001-10-01

    Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary sections in northeastern Mexico contain marly formations separated by a controversial clastic unit. Benthic foraminifera in seven sections indicate middle and lower bathyal depths of deposition for the marls, with the exception of the upper bathyal northernmost section. Mixed neritic-bathyal faunas were present in the clastic unit, indicating redeposition in the deep basin by mass-wasting processes resulting from the K-T bolide impact in the Gulf of Mexico. Benthic foraminifera in the Mexican sections, and at other deep-sea locations, were not subject to major extinction at the time of impact, but there were temporary changes in assemblage composition. Benthic faunas indicate well- oxygenated bottom waters and mesotrophic conditions during the late Maastrichtian and increased food supply during the latest Maastrichtian. The food supply decreased drastically just after the K-T boundary, possibly because of the collapse of surface productivity. Cretaceous and early Paleogene benthic foraminifera, however, did not exhibit the benthic-pelagic coupling of present-day faunas, as documented by the lack of significant extinction at the K-T collapse of surface productivity. Much of the food supplied to the benthic faunas along this continental margin might have been refractory material transported from land or shallow coastal regions. The decrease in food supply at the K-T boundary might be associated with the processes of mass wasting, which removed surface, food-rich sediment. Benthic faunas show a staggered pattern of faunal recovery in the lowermost Paleogene, consistent with a staged recovery of the vertical organic flux but also with a gradual buildup of organic matter in the sediment.

  5. Long-term benthic infaunal monitoring at a deep-ocean dredged material disposal site off Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, James A.; Maciolek, Nancy J.; Ota, Allan Y.; Williams, Isabelle P.

    2009-09-01

    One hundred and thirty-five benthic infaunal samples were collected from the San Francisco Deep-Ocean Disposal Site (SF-DODS) over a 10-year period from January 1996 to September 2004. Each sample was 0.1 m 2, cut to a depth of 10 cm, and sieved through a 300-?m mesh. A total of 810 species of benthic invertebrates were identified; the majority of taxa (65.4%) new to science. The fauna represents a rich lower slope infaunal assemblage that rivals similarly studied locations in the western North Atlantic. No regional impact or degradation of benthic infauna due to dredged material disposal was detected. All reference stations and stations on the site boundary maintained high species richness and diversity during the monitoring period. Exceptions included an occasional sample with anomalously high numbers of one or two species that reduced the diversity and/or equitability. Within SF-DODS species richness and diversity were often reduced. Stations within the disposal site were recolonized by the same taxa that normally occurred in adjacent reference areas. Initial colonizers of fresh dredged material included spionid and paraonid polychaetes that were typical dominants at the site. At least one polychaete species, Ophelina sp. 1, sometimes colonized dredged materials containing coarse sand. One sample at Station 13, located in the middle of SF-DODS (September 2002), contained 57 species of benthic invertebrates, suggesting that colonization of fresh dredged material is rapid. It seems unlikely that larval dispersal and settlement account for this rapid recolonization; therefore it is postulated that adult organisms from adjacent areas move to the disturbed sites via boundary layer currents. The steep continental slope adjacent to SF-DODS is subject to turbidity flows and the resident fauna are likely pre-adapted to rapidly colonize disturbed sediments. Larval dispersal, especially by spionid polychaetes such as Prionospio delta, may also be important in colonizing newly deposited sediments. Subtle year-to-year shifts in faunal assemblages were evident at stations on the boundary of SF-DODS. At these stations species richness and diversity remained high, but numerically dominant taxa differed, possibly due to changes in sediment grain size associated with the dredged material. However, some year-to-year changes appeared to be regional in nature. Large epifaunal organisms such as the elasapoid holothurian Scotoplanes globosa appeared to be locally important in modifying surficial sediments: it moves through the sediment like a bulldozer, disturbing the surface and disrupting resident infauna as it ingests sediment. Other deposit-feeding holothurians such as Ypsilothuria bitentaculata were found throughout the study area including sediments with fresh dredged material. A long, narrow-bodied tube-like agglutinated foraminiferan of the genus Bathysiphon is commonly found in sediments containing dredged material. This foraminiferan is poorly understood, but may be opportunistic on soft dredged material.

  6. Effects of chemical disturbances on intertidal benthic assemblages.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Pinto, Mariana; Ignacio, Barbara Lage

    2015-02-15

    Contamination is a particular harmful type of chemical disturbance and predicting their effects on natural systems is very complex. Effects of disturbances vary in space and time and depend, among other things, on the type and age of organisms, the habitat being studied and the complex interactions occurring in the systems. Most impact analyses of contaminants are however still done with limited number of selected organisms under laboratory conditions. Manipulative experiments done in situ are important to measure ecologically relevant responses of contaminant effects on marine systems. Ecological approaches on contamination studies, accounting for interactions among species and the environment are essential to understand how such disturbances affect systems. We evaluated the effects of bleach and permethrin, two common and pervasive contaminants, on intertidal benthic assemblages in two different successional stages, mature and young. There were no impacts on the overall structure of assemblages, regardless of their age. The lack of effects on the structure of assemblages might be due to the intrinsic characteristic of the habitat studied, which provide few sinks for contaminants, as well as the inherent features of the organisms themselves. Bleach did cause, however, a decrease in the abundance of limpets, which can have further consequences to these systems. This study shows the importance of studies on chemical disturbances done under relevant natural scenarios and that efficient management policies of natural systems will only achieve successful responses with properly designed experiments under natural conditions. PMID:25460934

  7. Quantitative benthic habitat characterization at Heceta Bank, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmire, Curt E.; Wakefield, W. Waldo; Embley, Robert W.; Merle, Susan G.; Tissot, Brian N.; Puniwai, Noelani

    2004-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the shortcomings of regional trawl surveys for quantifying abundance of demersal fishes in rugged habitats. Many species show strong affinities to areas of high topographic relief and rugosity, therefore precluding sampling by bottom trawl gears. Consequently, advanced survey technologies such as submersibles and camera sleds have been utilized to survey demersal fishes in situ. One prerequisite in extrapolating densities of demersal fishes observed in situ is the mapping of benthic habitats beyond the observational extent of submersibles. Habitat characteristics observed from submersible and ROV dives in the late 1980s, 2000, and 2001 were used to establish habitat classes that have been statistically shown to correlate with demersal fish distributions. Those habitat characteristics were then extrapolated over the extent of a multibeam sonar survey conducted in 1998 using quantitative parameters derived from high-resolution bathymetric and acoustic backscatter data. The resultant map predicts the coverage of four lithologic habitat classes: mud (unconsolidated), sand (unconsolidated), boulder/cobble (high acoustic reflectivity), and rock outcrop (high vertical relief). Those four habitat classes will facilitate the extrapolation of fish densities to the larger spatial scales at which resident fish populations and physiographic provinces occur.

  8. Recent benthic ostracoda of Pahang River Delta, Pahang Darul Makmur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noraswana, N. F.; Ramlan, O.

    2014-09-01

    A study on the distribution of recent benthic Ostracoda in marine sediment was carried out around Pahang River Delta, Pahang Darul Makmur. A total of 24 surface sediments were taken from the sampling stations between latitude 3°20' and 3°39'N and longitude 103°26' and 103°35'E. From this study, 71 species of ostracods belonging to 17 families and 42 genera were identified. The abundant and dominant species is Pontocypris virdis with 326 specimens obtained. The dominant family is Trachyleberididae (16 species, 585 specimens). The distribution of ostracoda is from 13 to 637 specimens. The species diversity is from 6 to 29 species. The diversity index, H(s) is in the range of 1.71 to 3.08. There are five common species (Hemicytheridea cancellata, Parakrithella australis, Propontocypris rostrata, Loxoconcha paiki and Lankacythere coralloides) in the study area. A comparison showed that a total of 53 species identified had been previously recorded in Malacca Straits, South China Sea and Java Sea. Five species are newly recorded in Malaysians waters. The species are Papillatabairdia elongata. Mimicocythere pseudomelobesoides, Kotoracythere doratus, Xestoleberis maculanitida and Bosasella profunda.

  9. Sensitivity of Heterogeneous Marine Benthic Habitats to Subtle Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Rodil, Iván F.; Lohrer, Andrew M.; Thrush, Simon F.

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand the consequences of low level disturbances on the functioning of ecological communities because of the pervasiveness and frequency of this type of environmental change. In this study we investigated the response of a heterogeneous, subtidal, soft-sediment habitat to small experimental additions of organic matter and calcium carbonate to examine the sensitivity of benthic ecosystem functioning to changes in sediment characteristics that relate to the environmental threats of coastal eutrophication and ocean acidification. Our results documented significant changes between key biogeochemical and sedimentary variables such as gross primary production, ammonium uptake and dissolved reactive phosphorus flux following treatment additions. Moreover, the application of treatments affected relationships between macrofauna communities, sediment characteristics (e.g., chlorophyll a content) and biogeochemical processes (oxygen and nutrient fluxes). In this experiment organic matter and calcium carbonate showed persistent opposing effects on sedimentary processes, and we demonstrated that highly heterogeneous sediment habitats can be surprisingly sensitive to subtle perturbations. Our results have important biological implications in a world with relentless anthropogenic inputs of atmospheric CO2 and nutrients in coastal waters. PMID:24312332

  10. Optical Delineation of Benthic Habitat Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Moline, Mark A.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2007-06-01

    To improve understanding and characterization of coastal regions, there has been an increasing emphasis on autonomous systems that can sample the ocean on relevant scales. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) with active propulsion are especially well suited for studies of the coastal ocean because they are able to provide systematic and near-synoptic spatial observations. With this capability, science users are beginning to integrate sensor suits for a broad range of specific and often novel applications. Here, the relatively mature Remote Environmental Monitoring Units (REMUS) AUV system is configured with multi-spectral radiometers to delineate benthic habitat in Sequim Bay, WA. The vehicle was deployed in a grid pattern along 5 km of coastline in depths from 30 to less than 2 meters. Similar to satellite and/or aerial remote sensing, the bandwidth ratios from the downward looking radiance sensor and upward looking irradiance sensor were used to identify beds of eelgrass on sub-meter scales. Strong correlations were found between the optical reflectance signals and the geo-referenced in situ data collected with underwater video within the grid. Results demonstrate the ability of AUVs to map littoral habitats at high resolution and highlight the overall utility of the REMUS vehicle for nearshore oceanography.

  11. Seaweed-assisted, benthic gravel transport by tidal currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Shannon E.; Dashtgard, Shahin E.

    2012-07-01

    Traction transport of pebbles and cobbles occurs subtidally at current velocities below 0.5 m s- 1 when seaweed attached to clasts provides additional lift and drag to the clast. In the Juan de Fuca Strait, British Columbia, Canada, the seaweed Cymanthere triplicata commonly attaches to pebbles and provides sufficient additional surface area for tidal currents to drag the clast along the seafloor. Using in situ measurements of current velocities at 13 m water depth, the threshold for initiation of motion of a 30 mm pebble with attached seaweed is 0.3 m s- 1. This is approximately one order of magnitude less than the activation velocity for a 30 mm pebble without attached seaweed. In addition to kelp-rafted (floated) gravel, seaweed-assisted, benthic gravel transport is possible in marine settings where unidirectional currents (e.g., tidal currents, storm-induced bottom currents) are sufficient to transport pebbles alongshore, and into and across the offshore (below fairweather wave base). If preserved in the rock record, deposits of algal-enhanced gravel deposited via unidirectional, subtidal currents will likely appear as isolated gravel clasts encased in sandstone, reflecting the similar current velocities required to transport these two clast groups.

  12. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (?2,500-750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750?Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750?Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end. PMID:26739600

  13. Oil from the tropical marine benthic-diatom Navicula sp.

    PubMed

    Nurachman, Zeily; Brataningtyas, Dewi Susan; Hartati; Panggabean, Lily Maria Goretty

    2012-11-01

    The potential of the tropical marine benthic-diatom Navicula sp. for biodiesel feedstock was investigated. Growth profiles were analyzed by changing nutrient compositions in three different media (Walne, plain seawater, and modified seawater) and irradiance intensities. Navicula sp. cells showed significant growth in Walne and modified seawater medium but not in plain seawater medium. The microalgae grew well in a pH range of 7.8-8.4, and the cells were very sensitive to the intensity of direct sunlight exposure. The average cell concentration obtained from the cultures in plain seawater, Walne, and modified seawater media at the beginning of the stationary phase was 0.70, 2.17, and 2.54 g/L, respectively. Electron spray ionization-ion trap-mass spectrometry showed that the triacylglycerols of the algae oil were identified as POP (palmitic-oleic-palmitic), POO (palmitic-oleic-oleic), and OOLn (oleic-oleic-linoleic). The oil productivity of Navicula sp. cultivated in Walne and modified seawater media was 90 and 124 ?L L(-1) culture d(-1). The Navicula sp. biodiesel exhibited a kinematic viscosity of 1.299 mm(2)/s, density of 0.8347 g/mL, and internal energy of 0.90 kJ/mL. PMID:22926527

  14. The contents of labile sulfides in the bottom sediments of the central part of the Sea of Azov: Impact on benthic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Burkatskii, O. N.

    2007-10-01

    At 17 stations in the central part of the Sea of Azov, the contents of labile (acid-soluble) sulfides were determined in the upper layer (0-3 cm) of the bottom sediments. At 14 of these stations, the contents of sulfides in the oozy silts were over 300 mg S/dm3 of wet sediment; at seven of the stations, the contents of sulfide were as high as 420-720 mg S/dm3 of wet ooze, or 0.1-0.2% of dry weight. At the other three stations, where neutral matter such as shells and sand prevailed in the samples, the contents of sulfides varied from 80 to 110 mg S/dm3. At these stations, a high density and species diversity of the benthic fauna was retained. At other stations with labile sulfide contents over 200-300 mg S/dm3, the benthos biomass decreased by one or two orders of magnitude. At most of them, it was below 3 g/m2 and the small gastropod Hydrobia tolerant to sulfides dominated. The data obtained show that, in the central part of the Sea of Azov, reduced sediments with high contents of labile sulfides migrate towards the bottom surface, which conforms to the high intensity of the hydrogen sulfide formation process caused by the bacterial sulfate reduction. The study considers the environmental effects of the sulfide contamination of the upper layer of the bottom sediments in the Sea of Azov as a key factor causing the recurrent hypoxy in the near-bottom layers of the water, the suffocation occurrence, and the progressive depletion of the benthic and pelagic fauna.

  15. Dark layers of the late Quaternary Japan Sea: Marine records of the East Asian summer monsoon fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, K.; Usami, K.

    2009-12-01

    The late Quaternary sediments of the Japan Sea is characterized by the alternation of dark and light colored layers. Temporal occurrence of the dark layers has similar pattern with the Dansgaard-Oeschger cycle in the Greenland ice cores. It is considered that the dark layers were formed under the high primary productivity conditions related to enhanced inflow of nutrient-rich East China Sea surface water. We analyzed the sediment color with 0.2 mm intervals of a core collected from the central Japan Sea, and planktonic/benthic foraminiferal assemblages of another core from the southern Japan Sea. The results indicate the clear difference between the dark layers of MIS5 and of MIS 3-4. Higher productivity was expected for the former period but due to the relatively higher ventilation (lateral supply) of dissolved oxygen during the period, the dark layer formation occurred under the delicate balance between the oxygen consumption and supply. On the other hand, during MIS3-4, dark layer had sharp base and finely laminated, and low oxygen tolerant benthic foraminifera was dominant in the dark layer. This suggests that the dark layer formation was mainly controlled by not degradation at the sediment surface but the development of low-oxygen bottom water. The difference of the mechanism of dark layer formation was controlled by the global eustatic sea level changes and the East Asian summer monsoon fluctuation related to the mid-latitude insolation.

  16. Towards an integrated view of benthic and pelagic processes in the southern North Sea (German Bight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Neumann, Andreas; Naderipour, Celine

    2015-04-01

    The North Sea can be classified as a semi-enclosed shelf on the western-European continent. Atlantic influences are mainly through the Fair Isle current Channel in the North, and through the Strait of Dover in the South. An anti-clockwise circulation prevails, driven by mainly semi-diurnal tides and winds. The German Bight is located in the south-eastern part of the North Sea, and is strongly influenced by continental rivers. The outflow from the rivers Scheldt, Maas and Rhine is carried towards the German Bight with the residual currents. The German rivers Ems, Weser and Elbe directly debouche into the German Bight. On the shallow shelf, the water column is completely mixed by tidal forces and wind, largely preventing downward flux of particles and instead fostering temporary deposition and resuspension, which influences benthic mineralization. Hence, complex interactions between pelagic and benthic processes occur. Previous budget calculations indicate that the nutrient inventory has to be processed several times to support observed primary production, and, depending on water depth; only 10-20% remineralisation occurs in sediments of the German Bight whereas about 50% of organic matter is remineralised in the sediments of the shallow Wadden Sea. In this presentation, we use in-situ and ex-situ field data on pelagic and benthic oxygen respiration and benthic nutrient fluxes to assess the intense mineralization activity in the German Bight, the partitioning of benthic and pelagic processes and the factors influencing organic matter mineralization. Measurements of pelagic oxygen respiration based on Winkler titration, in-situ benthic oxygen uptake measurements based on flux-chamber landers and ex-situ incubations of intact sediment cores revealed that benthic remineralisation rates are about an order of magnitude smaller than pelagic rates, in agreement with previous budget estimates. Both benthic and pelagic oxygen respiration show a strong seasonality; with higher oxygen uptake rates in the warm, productive season. During the summer season, oxygen uptake is significantly higher on silty or muddy, organic-rich sediments than on fine sands or gravel. Epi- and infauna, however, increase the benthic oxygen uptake and nutrient fluxes apparently irrespective of the grain size of the underlying lithogenic sedimentary particles or the water depth. These first results originate from the projects "NOAH - North Sea: Observation and Assessment of Habitats" and "WiMo - Wissenschaftliche Monitoringkonzepte für die Deutsche Bucht / Scientific monitoring concepts for the German Bight".

  17. CENOZOIC RECORD OF ELONGATE, CYLINDRICAL, DEEP-SEA BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA IN THE INDIAN OCEAN (ODP SITES 722, 738, 744, 758, AND 763)

    E-print Network

    CENOZOIC RECORD OF ELONGATE, CYLINDRICAL, DEEP-SEA BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA IN THE INDIAN OCEAN (ODP A group of ,100 species of elongate, cylindrical deep-sea benthic foraminifera (families Stilostomellidae

  18. Subsurface unmixing for benthic habitat mapping using hyperspectral imagery and lidar-derived bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Madronero, Maria C.; Velez-Reyes, Miguel; Goodman, James A.

    2014-06-01

    Mapping of benthic habitats from hyperspectral imagery can be achieved by integrating bio-optical models with common techniques for hyperspectral image processing, such as spectral unmixing. Several algorithms have been described in the literature to compensate or remove the effects of the water column and extract information about the benthic habitat characteristics utilizing only measured hyperspectral imagery as input. More recently, the increasing availability of lidar-derived bathymetry information offers the possibility to incorporate this data into existing algorithms, thereby reducing the number of unknowns in the problem, for the improved retrieval of benthic habitat properties. This study demonstrates how bathymetry information improves the mapping of benthic habitats using two algorithms that combine bio-optical models with linear spectral unmixing. Hyperspectral data, both simulated and measured, in-situ spectral data, and lidar-derived bathymetry data are used for the analysis. The simulated data is used to study the capabilities of the selected algorithm to improve estimates of benthic habitat composition by combining bathymetry data with the hyperspectral imagery. Hyperspectral images captured over Emique in Puerto Rico using an AISA Eagle sensor is used to further test the algorithms using real data. Results from analyzing this imagery demonstrate increased agreement between algorithm output and existing habitat maps and ground truth when bathymetry data is used jointly with hyperspectral imagery.

  19. Benthic invertebrate population characteristics as affected by water quality in coal-bearing regions of Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradfield, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate and water quality data collected during previous U.S. Geological Survey studies to provide background hydrologic information on streams draining Tennessee coal reserves, were evaluated to identify possible relations between stream biota and water quality. Linear regressions produced low correlation coefficients relating the number of taxa/sample, total number of organisms/sample, sample diversity, and percentage composition of selected orders of invertebrates, with average water quality parameter values available at sampling stations (r is < 0.62 at p=0.05). Analyses of these data by linear regressions explained little of the variability in benthic invertebrate samples primarily because the distributions of benthic organisms along environmental gradients are nonlinear. Variability in substrate characteristics in the study area and seasonal insect emergence patterns also complicated interpretation of these data. However, analysis of variance tests did indicate significant trends towards reduced number of taxa, number of organisms, and sample diversity at stations with relatively poor water quality conditions. Decreasing percentage composition of Ephemeroptera was generally accompanied by an increase in percent Diptera at stations with higher water quality constituent concentrations and acidic pH ( > than 0.6 units). These trends indicate significant differences in benthic communities at sites with evidence of more severe land use impacts. Additional data on benthic invertebrates, water quality , and physical habitat conditions, along with analyses of data using multivariate statistical methods are needed to define ecological relations between specific groups of invertebrates and environmental conditions. (Author 's abstract)

  20. Decadal-scale effects of benthic habitat and marine reserve protection on Philippine goatfish (F: Mullidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Garry R.; Bergseth, Brock J.; Rizzari, Justin R.; Alcala, Angel C.

    2015-09-01

    Reef fish populations can be affected by both fishing and changes in benthic habitat. Yet, partitioning these effects is often difficult, usually requiring an appropriate sampling design and long-term monitoring. Here we quantify, over a 30-yr period, the effects of benthic habitat change and no-take marine reserve (NTMR) protection on the density and species richness of a lightly harvested benthic-feeding reef fish family, the Mullidae (goatfish), at four Philippine islands. Boosted regression trees demonstrated that goatfish density and species richness had strong negative associations with hard coral cover and strong positive associations with cover of dead substratum. No-take marine reserve protection had no effect on the density or species richness of goatfish over 19 and 30 yr at Sumilon and Apo islands, respectively. However, environmental disturbances (e.g., typhoons, coral bleaching) that reduced hard coral cover subsequently led to increases in goatfish numbers for periods ranging from 2 to 8 yr. After initial increases due to benthic disturbance, goatfish populations decreased during coral recovery, occurring on timescales of 10-20 yr. This long-term, "natural experiment" demonstrated that changes to benthic habitat (bottom-up control) had a far greater effect on Philippine goatfish populations than protection from fishing (a top-down effect) in NTMRs. Given the strong positive response of goatfish populations to loss of live hard coral cover, this group of fishes may be a valuable indicator species for habitat degradation on coral reefs.

  1. Spatial variation in organic matter utilization by benthic communities from Yura River-Estuary to offshore of Tango Sea, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Emily S.; Kasai, Akihide; Ueno, Masahiro; Won, Nam-il; Ishihi, Yuka; Yokoyama, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yoh

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of ? 13C and ? 15N of organic matter among benthic communities from the upper estuary of Yura River to offshore of Tango Sea, Japan, to determine spatial variation in utilization of organic matter by benthic communities. The ? 13C values of benthic animals ranged from -27 to -15‰ in the upper estuary, -21 to -15‰ in the lower estuary, -20 to -16‰ in the shallow coast (5-10 m depths), -18 to -16‰ in the deep coast (30-60 m depths) and -19 to -15‰ in offshore (100-150 m depths) stations. Adapting the dual isotope values to mixing models, we estimated the relative contributions of potential food sources to the benthos diet. Phytoplankton and macroalgae that intruded the estuary in summer were utilized as alternative food aside from the terrestrial-origin organic matter assimilated by the estuarine benthic consumers. Resuspended benthic microalgae were important source of energy in the shallow coastal stations, while abundant supply of phytodetritus fueled the deep coastal and offshore benthic food webs. Spatial difference in the diet of benthic communities depends largely on the shifts in the primary carbon source. Thus, benthic communities are important link of autochthonous/allochthonous production and secondary production in the continuous river-estuary-marine system.

  2. BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING AND BIO-OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION FOR LA PARGUERA MARINE RESERVE USING PASSIVE AND ACTIVE REMOTE SENSING

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING AND BIO-OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION FOR LA PARGUERA MARINE RESERVE USING, but also the communities that depend on these resources. Mapping marine habitats and associated species benthic habitat maps for La Parguera Reserve will be developed based on techniques that include supervised

  3. Marine Benthic Communities of Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds and What they're Good For

    EPA Science Inventory

    The benthic invertebrates of Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds include those adapted to near-shore habitats with variable temperature and salinity, mid-shelf species with narrower requirements, and boreal species that avoid elevated temperatures. Studies of benthic fauna in th...

  4. Development of a regional littoral benthic macroinvertebrate multi-metric index (MMI) for lakes from the National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the 2007 National Lakes Assessment (NLA) benthic macroinvertebrate samples were collected from the lake littoral zone. The purpose of the sampling was to assess the feasibility of a multi-metric index (MMI) to assess the condition of the littoral benthic macroinvertebrate...

  5. Deep-Sea Research II 47 (2000) 1}7 Benthic processes in the deep Arabian Sea

    E-print Network

    Levin, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research II 47 (2000) 1}7 Benthic processes in the deep Arabian Sea: introductionBX, UK 1. Introduction and historical context The Arabian Sea in the north-western Indian Ocean of the Arabian Sea, particularly its benthic biology, has developed rather intermittently because the region has

  6. CHANGES IN THE FRESHWATER BENTHIC COMMUNITY OF LAKE ONTARIO SINCE THE INVASION OF DREISSENA 1972-1997

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population changes of three major benthic taxa are discussed in relation to Dreissena spp. Lake Ontario was sampled pre-invasion (1972) and post-invasion (1994, 1997) for abundance of benthic organisms. In offshore sediments of Lake Ontario, neither species composition nor abunda...

  7. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages reveal the history of the Burdigalian Seaway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, W. E.; Grunert, P.; Harzhauser, M.

    2013-12-01

    The opening and closure of seaways have immanent paleoclimatic, paleoceanographic and paleobiogeographic consequences as they determine the exchange of water masses. During the Oligocene to Miocene severe alterations of marine gateway configuration shaped the evolution of the Mediterranean - Paratethys region. From early to middle Burdigalian (20.4-17.5 Myrs) the Burdigalian Seaway connected the western Mediterranean Sea with the Central Paratethys Sea via the North Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB). Its evolution resulted in profound paleoceanograpic and -geographic changes, and initiated a wave of faunal immigration from the Atlantic and Mediterranean into the Paratethys that had a severe impact on marine ecosystems. A detailed Early Miocene proxy record integrating seismic images, microfossil assemblages and geochemical analyses has been recently established for the Puchkirchen Basin (PB) as part of the NAFB. Herein, we exemplarily show the reconstruction of the dynamic early to middle Burdigalian paleoenvironment based on a quantitative evaluation of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from drill-sites and outcrops. Four major phases in PB development are distinguished, and new stratigraphic constraints allow discussing the results in the context of the evolution of the Burdigalian Seaway: 1. The global early Burdigalian sea-level rise initiated a marine transgression in the NAFB. In the PB, a long-lived basin-axial channel system was reactivated resulting in turbiditic and mass-flow deposition. The unstable upper bathyal environment is reflected in a low diverse autochthonous benthic foraminiferal fauna mainly composed of Bathysiphon filiformis. 2. The perpetuating transgression flooded large shelf areas and established the Burdigalian Seaway. The channel belt was cut off from its sediment sources and shut down. Subsequently, sedimentation was controlled by episodic turbidites from the southern basin margin, and large NE prograding delta fans. High sedimentation rates and strong terrestrial input led to the development of diverse foraminiferal faunas that are largely composed of agglutinated species. The encountered astrorhizids, ammodiscids and textualriids are adapted to high organic matter input and suboxic bottom-waters. Assemblages dominated by Bathysiphon filiformis occur in phases of turbidite deposition. 3. At ~19 Ma the Burdigalian Seaway became a vast shelf sea when increasing sedimentation rates led to the upfill of the PB. At the same time marine sedimentation reached its maximum extent in the NAFB. Characteristic hyaline shelf faunas composed of Lenticulina, Amphicoryna, Melonis, Cibcidoides and Ammonia developed along the inner-outer neritic shelf environments. 4. The beginning of a regression at ~18 Ma heralded the closure of the Burdigalian Seaway. Biofacies distribution shows a prograding tide-influenced shelf and widespread shallow water environments largely dominated by Ammonia, Elphidium and Cibicidoides developed. The closure of the Burdigalian Seaway initiated a major paleogeographic reorganization resulting in the final retreat of the Central Paratethys towards the east.

  8. Benthic substrate classification map: Gulf Islands National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, Dawn; Flocks, James; Twichell, Dave; Rose, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The 2005 hurricane season was devastating for the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Hurricane Katrina caused significant degradation of the barrier islands that compose the Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS). Because of the ability of coastal barrier islands to help mitigate hurricane damage to the mainland, restoring these habitats prior to the onset of future storms will help protect the islands themselves and the surrounding habitats. During Hurricane Katrina, coastal barrier islands reduced storm surge by approximately 10 percent and moderated wave heights (Wamsley and others, 2009). Islands protected the mainland by preventing ocean waves from maintaining their size as they approached the mainland. In addition to storm protection, it is advantageous to restore these islands to preserve the cultural heritage present there (for example, Fort Massachusetts) and because of the influence that these islands have on marine ecology. For example, these islands help maintain a salinity regime favorable to oysters in the Mississippi Sound and provide critical habitats for many migratory birds and endangered species such as sea turtles (Chelonia mydas, Caretta caretta, and Dermochelys coriacea), Gulf sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi), and piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2009a). As land manager for the GUIS, the National Park Service (NPS) has been working with the State of Mississippi and the Mobile District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide a set of recommendations to the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) that will guide restoration planning. The final set of recommendations includes directly renourishing both West Ship Island (to protect Fort Massachusetts) and East Ship Island (to restore the French Warehouse archaeological site); filling Camille Cut to recreate a continuous Ship Island; and restoring natural regional sediment transport processes by placing sand in the littoral zone just east of Petit Bois Island. Prevailing sediment transport processes will provide natural renourishment of the westward islands in the barrier system (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2009b). One difficulty in developing the final recommendations is that few data are available to incorporate into restoration plans related to bathymetry, sediment type, and biota. For example, the most recent bathymetry available dates to when East and West Ship Islands were a single continuous island (1917). As a result, the MsCIP program has encouraged post-hurricane bathymetric data collection for future reference. Furthermore, managing a complex environment such as this barrier island system for habitat conservation and best resource usage requires significant knowledge about those habitats and resources. To effectively address these issues, a complete and comprehensive understanding of the type, geographic extent, and condition of marine resources included within the GUIS is required. However, the data related to the GUIS marine resources are limited either spatially or temporally. Specifically, there is limited knowledge and information about the distribution of benthic habitats and the characteristics of the offshore region of the GUIS, even though these are the habitats that will be most affected by habitat restoration. The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive map of the benthic marine habitats within the GUIS to give park managers the ability to develop strategies for coastal and ocean-resource management and to aid decisionmakers in evaluating conservation priorities.

  9. Benthic foraminifera from polluted marine environment of Sulaibikhat Bay (Kuwait).

    PubMed

    Al-Zamel, A Z; Al-Sarawi, M A; Khader, S R; Al-Rifaiy, I A

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative analyses of recent benthic foraminiferal assemblages (living and dead) were carried out on the surface sediments of Sulaibikhat Bay. Marked contrast in foraminiferal assemblages between the shallow tidal mudflats and the deep tidal channel and their relation to the extent of pollution were observed. Cluster analysis of quantitative data on the distribution of foraminiferal tests revealed three assemblages that depend mainly on the intensity of pollution; (1) a highly polluted tidal flat assemblage, (2) normal (or less polluted) mud flat assemblage and, (3) tidal channel and subtidal assemblage. The highly polluted assemblage characterized by a drop in species densities (< 100 tests/20 cm(3) sediment) but with high average diversity (5.8 Yule-Simpson Index). The microfauna of the less polluted flat displays relatively lower diversity (4.6) but high density of tests (47.2% of the total picked tests). The most abundant species of this assemblage is Ammonia tepida, displays its maximum density in this assemblage. Ammonia tepida drops in density from 17.12% to 3.07% in the polluted assemblage. Tidal channel foraminiferal assemblages should normally display lower diversities than those of tidal flats, because tidal current in the channels tend to wash away most nutrient materials. However, this is not the case of the present study area which could be due to environmental setting of the Sulaibikhat Bay in which tidal currents bring in exceptionally high amounts of nutrients from Shatt Al-Arab Estuary and in which the tidal flats are strongly and adversely polluted. PMID:18389379

  10. Marine benthic ecological functioning over decreasing taxonomic richness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törnroos, Anna; Bonsdorff, Erik; Bremner, Julie; Blomqvist, Mats; Josefson, Alf B.; Garcia, Clement; Warzocha, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Alterations to ecosystem function due to reductions in species richness are predicted to increase as humans continue to affect the marine environment, especially in coastal areas, which serve as the interface between land and sea. The potential functional consequences due to reductions in species diversity have attracted considerable attention recently but little is known about the consequence of such loss in natural communities. We examined how the potential for function is affected by natural reductions in taxon richness using empirical (non-simulated) coastal marine benthic macrofaunal data from the Skagerrak-Baltic Sea region (N. Europe), where taxon richness decreases 25-fold, from 151 to 6 taxa. To estimate functional changes we defined multiple traits (10 traits and 51 categories) on which trait category richness, functional diversity (FD) and number of taxa per trait category were calculated. Our results show that decrease in taxon richness leads to an overall reduction in function but functional richness remains comparatively high even at the lowest level of taxon richness. Although the taxonomic reduction was sharp, up to 96% of total taxon richness, we identified both potential thresholds in functioning and subtler changes where function was maintained along the gradient. The functional changes were not only caused by reductions in taxa per trait category, some categories were maintained or even increased. Primarily, the reduction in species richness altered trait categories related to feeding, living and movement and thus potentially could have an effect on various ecosystem processes. This highlights the importance of recognising ecosystem multifunctionality, especially at low taxonomic richness. We also found that in this system rare species (singletons) did not stand for the functional complexities and changes. Our findings were consistent with theoretical and experimental predictions and suggest that a large proportion of the information about alterations of function is found in measures such as functional diversity and number of taxa per trait category.

  11. Biological vs. Physical Mixing Effects on Benthic Food Web Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Provoost, Pieter; Moens, Tom; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J.; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Biological particle mixing (bioturbation) and solute transfer (bio-irrigation) contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria) and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering) or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator) and Abra alba (bioturbator) compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The 13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1) microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2) microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3) control microcosms and (4) microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (??13C) of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom 13C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m?2), which included TO13C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food source for nematodes, the macrobenthic effect was more pronounced in niche establishment than the negative structuring effects such as competition. PMID:21455308

  12. Benthic invertebrate bioassays with toxic sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giesy, John P.; Rosiu, Cornell J.; Graney, Robert L.; Henry, Mary G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. The assays studied were: (a) Microtox(R), a 15-min assay of Photobacterium phosphoreum bioluminescence inhibition by pore water; (b) 48-h Daphnia magna lethality test in pore water; (c) 10-d subchronic assay of lethality to and reduction of weight gain by Chironomus tentans performed in either whole sediment or pore water; (d) 168-h acute lethality assay of Hexagenia limbata in either whole sediment or pore water. The three methods of diluting sediments were: (a) extracting pore water from the toxic location and dilution with pore water from the control station; (b) diluting whole sediment from the toxic location with control whole sediment from a reference location, then extracting pore water; and (c) diluting toxic, whole sediment with whole sediment from a reference location, then using the whole sediment in bioassays. Based on lethality, H. limbata was the most sensitive organism to the toxicity of Detroit River sediment. Lethality of D. magna was similar to that of H. limbata in whole sediment and can be used to predict effects of whole sediment toxicity to H. limbata. The concentration required to cause a 50% reduction in C. tentans growth (10-d EC50) was approximately that which caused 50% lethality of D. magna (48-h LC50) and was similar to the toxicity that restricts benthic invertebrate colonization of contaminated sediments. While the three dilution techniques gave similar results with some assays, they gave very different results in other assays. The dose-response relationships determined by the three dilution techniques would be expected to vary with sediment, toxicant and bioassay type, and the dose-response relationship derived from each technique needs to be interpreted accordingly.

  13. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.

    1997-09-01

    The authors objective was to characterize distributions of chloropigment fluorescence in relation to physical processes in the benthic boundary layer in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Ocean Margins Program`s (OMP) goal of quantifying carbon transport across the continental shelf. Their approach involved participation in the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) field experiment on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras by conducting multi-sensor fluorescence measurements of photosynthetic pigments. Specific tasks included (1) pre- and post-deployment calibration of multiple fluorescence sensors in conjunction with Woods Hole personnel; (2) collection and analysis of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and total particulate carbon in water column samples to aid in interpretation of the fluorescence time-series during the field experiment; (3) collaboration in the analysis and interpretation of 1994 and 1996 time-series data in support of efforts to quantify pigment and particulate organic carbon transport on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras. This third component included analysis of data obtained with a multi-sensor fiber-optic fluorometer in the benthic boundary layer of the inner shelf off Cape Hatteras during summer 1994.

  14. Evaluation of potential relationships between benthic community structure and toxic metals in Laizhou Bay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Song, Jinming; Li, Xuegang

    2014-10-15

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relationships between benthic community structure and toxic metals using bivariate/multivariate techniques at 17 sediment locations in Laizhou Bay, North China. Sediment chemical data were evaluated against geochemical background values and sediment quality guidelines, which identified Cu and As as contaminants of concern with a moderate potential for adverse effects. Benthic community data were subjected to non-metric multidimensional scaling, which generated four groups of stations. Spearman rank correlation was then employed to explore the relationships between the major axes of heavy metals and benthic community structure. However, weak and insignificant correlations were found between these axes, indicating that contaminants of concern may not be the primary explanatory factors. Polychaeta were abundant in southern Laizhou Bay, serving as a warning regarding the health status of the ecosystem. Integrated sediment quality assessment showed sediments from northern central locations were impaired, displaying less diverse benthos and higher metal contamination. PMID:25113101

  15. Effects of management legacies on stream fish and aquatic benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages.

    PubMed

    Quist, Michael C; Schultz, Randall D

    2014-09-01

    Fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages often provide insight on ecological conditions for guiding management actions. Unfortunately, land use and management legacies can constrain the structure of biotic communities such that they fail to reflect habitat quality. The purpose of this study was to describe patterns in fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage structure, and evaluate relationships between biota and habitat characteristics in the Chariton River system of south-central Iowa, a system likely influenced by various potential management legacies (e.g., dams, chemical removal of fishes). We sampled fishes, benthic macroinvertebrates, and physical habitat from a total of 38 stream reaches in the Chariton River watershed during 2002-2005. Fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were dominated by generalist species tolerant of poor habitat quality; assemblages failed to show any apparent patterns with regard to stream size or longitudinal location within the watershed. Metrics used to summarize fish assemblages and populations [e.g., presence-absence, relative abundance, Index of Biotic Integrity for fish (IBIF)] were not related to habitat characteristics, except that catch rates of piscivores were positively related to the depth and the amount of large wood. In contrast, family richness of benthic macroinvertebrates, richness of Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Plecoptera taxa, and IBI values for benthic macroinvertebrates (IBIBM) were positively correlated with the amount of overhanging vegetation and inversely related to the percentage of fine substrate. A long history of habitat alteration by row-crop agriculture and management legacies associated with reservoir construction has likely resulted in a fish assemblage dominated by tolerant species. Intolerant and sensitive fish species have not recolonized streams due to downstream movement barriers (i.e., dams). In contrast, aquatic insect assemblages reflected aquatic habitat, particularly the amount of overhanging vegetation and fine sediment. This research illustrates the importance of using multiple taxa for biological assessments and the need to consider management legacies when investigating responses to management and conservation actions. PMID:24981272

  16. Effects of Management Legacies on Stream Fish and Aquatic Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Michael C.; Schultz, Randall D.

    2014-09-01

    Fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages often provide insight on ecological conditions for guiding management actions. Unfortunately, land use and management legacies can constrain the structure of biotic communities such that they fail to reflect habitat quality. The purpose of this study was to describe patterns in fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage structure, and evaluate relationships between biota and habitat characteristics in the Chariton River system of south-central Iowa, a system likely influenced by various potential management legacies (e.g., dams, chemical removal of fishes). We sampled fishes, benthic macroinvertebrates, and physical habitat from a total of 38 stream reaches in the Chariton River watershed during 2002-2005. Fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were dominated by generalist species tolerant of poor habitat quality; assemblages failed to show any apparent patterns with regard to stream size or longitudinal location within the watershed. Metrics used to summarize fish assemblages and populations [e.g., presence-absence, relative abundance, Index of Biotic Integrity for fish (IBIF)] were not related to habitat characteristics, except that catch rates of piscivores were positively related to the depth and the amount of large wood. In contrast, family richness of benthic macroinvertebrates, richness of Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Plecoptera taxa, and IBI values for benthic macroinvertebrates (IBIBM) were positively correlated with the amount of overhanging vegetation and inversely related to the percentage of fine substrate. A long history of habitat alteration by row-crop agriculture and management legacies associated with reservoir construction has likely resulted in a fish assemblage dominated by tolerant species. Intolerant and sensitive fish species have not recolonized streams due to downstream movement barriers (i.e., dams). In contrast, aquatic insect assemblages reflected aquatic habitat, particularly the amount of overhanging vegetation and fine sediment. This research illustrates the importance of using multiple taxa for biological assessments and the need to consider management legacies when investigating responses to management and conservation actions.

  17. Benthic foraminifera as indicators of pollution in high latitude marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, N.; Junttila, J.; Husum, K.; Carroll, J.; Klitgaard-Kristensen, D.; Hald, M.

    2012-04-01

    An increasing number of studies demonstrate the potential of benthic foraminifera to characterize ecological status. However, the use of benthic foraminifera as bio-indicators has previously not been tested in high latitudes. This research contributes to the development of foraminifera as a bio-monitoring technique for the Arctic region, as industrial activities in this region will increase in the coming years. Surface sediments (0-1 cm) from sites close to gas fields in the SW Barents Sea were studied. In addition, to elucidate the range from less to very affected, surface sediments from the harbor of the town of Hammerfest (70° N) were studied. At least 300 living benthic foraminifera from the size fraction 100 µm-1 mm were counted and identified at species level. Pollution levels (heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants) and sediment properties (grainsize and TOC) were also analyzed. Pollution levels at the sea floor in the SW Barents Sea are of background to good level (level I-II) according to the definitions by the Water Framework Directorate (WFD). Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are influenced by natural environmental parameters such as water mass properties, water depth, nutrient availability, bottom current strength, and grain size. Surface sediments from the Hammerfest harbor are of moderate environmental status (WFD level II-III) based on heavy metal concentrations and of bad environmental status (WFD IV-V) based on persistent organic pollutant concentrations. Opportunistic benthic foraminifera are dominating the assemblages. The most polluted areas in the harbor are barren for foraminifera or have high amounts of deformed shells. In both environments the foraminiferal diversity of the samples, does not correspond to expected environmental status based on the pollution levels of the sediments. Environmental status classes, based on benthic foraminifera instead of macrofauna, would allow rapid analyses of the environmental impact of pollution.

  18. Benthic Community Responses during Different Construction Stage of Large Coastal Development (Saemangeum, Republic of Korea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; An, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Saemangeum reclamation project in South Korea represents one of the largest construction efforts in coastal environments and provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the benthic community responses in the large scale human disturbances. The changes of benthic ecosystems were monitored in the course of construction stage. Depending on the construction stage (Partial Closure (PC) stage: May 2004 ~Jan. 2006, Complete Closure (CC) stage: May 2006~Nov. 2006), Stable (S) stage: May 2007 ~ Aug. 2008), subtidal benthic ecosystems around Saemangeum were affected differently. In particular, the dramatic change of benthic community was observed in DI (Direct influence) area located inside the barrage. The benthic community change was temporal and minimum in the IDI (In-direct Influence) area located outside the barrage. During PC stage, the species number and density tended to increase in DI, but they rapidly decreased during CC stage. They increased again during S stage in DI but the most of the species were composed of opportunistic species indicating a deteriorated environment. In IDI, the species number and density also increased during PC stage and decreased during CC stage, but unlike DI, the increase of species number and density in S stage was not observed. In DI area, the benthic community structure had changed due to hypoxia, desalination and landization after CC stage, and the opportunistic species like Theora fragilis, Tharyx sp., Heteromastus filiformis had dominated after S-stage. In IDI area, however, abrupt environmental changes had not appeared and species number and density had been constant and species composition did not change even after the CC stage.

  19. Sediment transport in the Mississippi Canyon: the role of currents and storm events on optical variability 

    E-print Network

    Burden, Cheryl A

    1999-01-01

    . Large- and small-particle intermediate nepheloid layers were consistently present in the canyon axis and were not observed on the slope to either side of the canyon. The temporal variability in currents, temperature, and particulate matter was measured...

  20. 82nd Field Artillery in Box Canyon 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Two modes of sediment transport were found to exist in the Mississippi Canyon: the offshelf transport of material in intermediate nepheloid layers originating at depths of 50-175 m and the resuspension and transport of material within the canyon...

  1. Floral succession and isotopic diagenesis of the Anahuac Formation at Damon Mound, Texas 

    E-print Network

    De Freest, Eric Scott

    1993-01-01

    beginning with deep water substrata colonized by Porites douvillei shoaling upward into a massive reef boundstone. The column evidences numerous attempts at early colonization and emergence from a nepheloid layer. The succession of calcareous algae...

  2. Quantifying the Potential Influence of Carbonate Saturation State on Benthic Foraminiferal Mg/Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. A.; Lea, D. W.; McCorkle, D. C.

    2002-05-01

    Benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca paleothermometry is based on an empirical relationship between the Mg/Ca of benthic foraminifera recovered from core tops and in situ bottom water temperatures (Rosenthal, 1997; Martin et al, in press; Lear et al, in review). While there is a tight correlation between shell Mg/Ca and temperature over a broad range of temperatures (-1 to 20 degrees C), Mg/Ca variation over the small range of deep water temperatures reveals departures from the calibration curve at low temperatures. Lower Mg/Ca values are generally associated with the deepest sites from the Atlantic and Pacific, contributing to an apparently steeper Mg/Ca-T response for abyssal benthics. The steeper response of abyssal benthics may reflect an influence of decreasing carbonate saturation with depth. Dissolution or other saturation related effects have already been documented for Mg in planktonic foraminifera and for other metals (Cd, Ba, and Zn) in benthic foraminifera shells (see Marchitto and ref. therein). Although it is difficult to definitively separate the effects of various environmental parameters (including temperature, depth, and relative saturation states), which often change in unison, we can use to the core top Mg/Ca data to estimate the potential influence of saturation state. An alternative calibration of the benthic Mg/Ca - T relationship can be derived based on core top benthic foraminifera only from sites bathed in waters above carbonate saturation, which yields a slightly smaller change in Mg/Ca per degree C (~9.5% vs. 11%) but better explains benthic Mg/Ca from the coldest sites (-1oC). Using this alternative Mg/Ca -T relation and a subset of the data from the Ceara Rise and Ontong Java Plateau, we can estimate a maximum Mg/Ca offset attributable to saturation state. The uncertainty this implies for downcore reconstructions varies widely (exceeding 1.5oC), depending on the hydrographic setting and which proxy is used to estimate saturation state.

  3. The distribution and diversity of benthic macroinvertebrate fauna in Pondicherry mangroves, India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Species distribution, abundance and diversity of mangrove benthic macroinvertebrate fauna and the relationships to environmental conditions are important parts of understanding the structure and function of mangrove ecosystems. In this study seasonal variation in the distribution of macrobenthos and related environmental parameters were explored at four mangrove stations along the Pondicherry coast of India, from September 2008 to July 2010. Multivariate statistical analyses, including cluster analysis, principal component analysis and non-multidimensional scales plot were employed to help define trophic status, water quality and benthic characteristic at the four monitoring stations. Results Among the 528 samples collected over 168 ha of mangrove forest 76 species of benthic macroinvertebrate fauna were identified. Macrofauna were mainly composed of deposit feeders, dominated numerically by molluscs and crustaceans. Statistical analyses yielded the following descriptors of benthic macroinvertebrate fauna species distribution: densities between 140–1113 ind. m-2, dominance 0.17-0.50, diversity 1.80-2.83 bits ind-1, richness 0.47-0.74 and evenness 0.45-0.72, equitability 0.38-0.77, berger parker 0.31-0.77 and fisher alpha 2.46-5.70. Increases of species diversity and abundance were recorded during the post monsoon season at station 1 and the lowest diversity was recorded at station 2 during the monsoon season. The pollution indicator organisms Cassidula nucleus, Melampus ceylonicus, Sphaerassiminea minuta were found only at the two most polluted regions, i.e. stations 3 and 4. Benthic macroinvertebrate fauna abundances were inversely related to salinity at the four stations, Based on Bray-Curtis similarity through hierarchical clustering implemented in PAST, it was possible to define three distinct benthic assemblages at the stations. Conclusions From a different multivariate statistical analysis of the different environmental parameters regarding species diversity and abundance of benthic macroinvertebrate fauna, it was found that benthic communities are highly affected by all the environmental parameters governing the distribution and diversity variation of the macrofaunal community in Pondicherry mangroves. Salinity, dissolved oxygen levels, organic matter content, sulphide concentration were the most significant parameters. PMID:23937801

  4. Feasibility of combining two aquatic benthic macroinvertebrate community databases for water-quality assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenz, Bernard N.

    1997-01-01

    An important part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is the analysis of existing data in each of the NAWQA study areas. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) has an extensive aquatic benthic macroinvertebrate communities in streams (benthic invertebrates) database maintained by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. This database has data which date back to 1984 and includes data from streams within the Western Lake Michigan Drainages (WMIC) study area (fig. 1). This report looks at the feasibility of USGS scientists supplementing the data they collect with data from the WDNR database when assessing water quality in the study area.

  5. Nutrient Retention by Benthic Macrofaunal Biomass of Danish Estuaries: Importance of Nutrient Load and Residence Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josefson, A. B.; Rasmussen, B.

    2000-02-01

    The response of macrobenthic faunal abundance and biomass to nutrient load, and factors that may modify this response are examined by means of inter-estuary comparisons of 14 shallow Danish estuaries. Data for this analysis are the physicochemical and biological variables monitored by local authorities mainly during the period 1989-95. A clear positive effect of nutrient load is demonstrated on benthic biomass, over a wide range of total N-load as the model substance from 2-200 g m -2year -1. The relationship was curvilinear with a levelling off or even depression of biomass at high total N-load (above c. 35 g m -2year -1). A mixed chemostat model using total load and hydraulic residence time for estuaries was applied to estimate the load that could be realized into primary production, and consequently enter into benthic production. Two measures, the load corrected for winter export (the realized N-load) and the nutrient pool available for the spring bloom (SBNP) were calculated. The benthic metabolic demand inferred from biomass, assuming an annual P:B ratio of 1 (P, secondary production; B, benthic biomass), was approximately of the same magnitude as both total N-load and realized N-load. A positive correlation was still found between benthic biomass/production and the realized N-load, but the linearity of the regression between them was not improved compared to the corresponding relationship with total load. The best linearly proportional relationship was obtained with the spring bloom N-pool (SBNP) calculated from the chemostat model. Stoichiometry suggested, however, that the spring bloom is of little importance for supporting benthic standing stock in these well flushed estuaries. To explain the strong statistical relationship, despite poor causality, with SBNP, it is suggested that the algorithm behind SBNP reflects the ability of the estuary to retain nutrients in the water mass in the productive period, both as free molecules and included into biological particles. These findings strongly indicate that benthic standing stock system-wide is food limited and indicate the importance of interaction between loading and estuary residence time (flushing) for the outcome of eutrophication. The findings are in agreement with reports that high estuary flushing rate may modify effects of eutrophication, and they deviate from previous studies in shallow coastal areas reporting either no effect, or negative effects, of eutrophication on benthic biomass.

  6. Distribution and abundance of benthic organisms in the Sacramento River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferreira, Rodger F.; Green, D. Brady

    1977-01-01

    General comparisons were made between benthic organism samples collected in 1960-61 and 1972-73 from five sites in the Sacramento River between Red Bluff and Knights Landing, Calif. The composition of benthic organisms from both collection periods was similar. The 1972-73 data showed variable patterns in monthly changes at each site and downstream changes each month with number of organisms per square meter, number of taxa per square meter, and diversity index. Generally, the mean number of taxa per square meter and diversity index for all sampling periods were higher in the upper reach than the lower reach of the Sacramento River. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Benthic macrofauna and ancillary data for San Francisco Bay, California, March to November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.; Ota, A.Y.; Harmon, J.G.; Shay, J.M.; Adorado, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    Benthic macrofauna and ancillary data were collected during 1987 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Regional Effects Monitoring Program in San Francisco Bay, California. Data were collected during five cruises at 2-month intervals from March through November. Benthic macrofauna for identification of species and sediment for size analysis were sampled at eight stations. Ancillary data, which consisted of salinity, temperature, dissolved-oxygen concentrations, and suspended sediment, were collected at 12 stations. Salinity and temperature were measured at three stations that coincided with continuous water quality monitors. Abundances and geographical distributions of a newly introduced species of clam were measured. (USGS)

  8. An unusually large phytoplankton spring bloom drives rapid changes in benthic diversity and ecosystem function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingtian; Warwick, Richard M.; McNeill, Caroline L.; Widdicombe, Claire E.; Sheehan, Aaron; Widdicombe, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, the Western English Channel experienced an unusually large and long-lived phytoplankton spring bloom. When compared with data from the past 20 years, average phytoplankton biomass at Station L4 (part of the Western Channel Observatory) was approximately 3× greater and lasted 50% longer than any previous year. Regular (mostly weekly) box core samples were collected from this site before, during and after the bloom to determine its impact on macrofaunal abundance, diversity, biomass, community structure and function. The spring bloom of 2012 was shown to support a large and rapid response in the majority of benthic taxa and functional groups. However, key differences in the precise nature of this response, as well as in its timing, was observed between different macrofauna feeding groups. Deposit feeders responded almost instantly at the start of the bloom, primarily thorough an increase in abundance. Suspension feeders and opportunistic/predatory/carnivorous taxa responded slightly more slowly and primarily with an increase in biomass. At the end of the bloom a rapid decline in macrobenthic abundance, diversity and biomass closely followed the decline in phytoplankton biomass. With suspension feeders showing evidence of this decline a few weeks before deposit feeders, it was concluded that this collapse in benthic communities was driven primarily by food availability and competition. However, it is possible that environmental hypoxia and the presence of toxic benthic cyanobacteria could also have contributed to this decline. This study shows evidence for strong benthic-pelagic coupling at L4; a shallow (50 m), coastal, fine-sand habitat. It also demonstrates that in such habitats, it is not just planktonic organisms that demonstrate clear community phenology. Different functional groups within the benthic assemblage will respond to the spring bloom in specific manner, with implications for key ecosystem functions and processes, such as secondary production and bioturbation. Only by taking integrated benthic and pelagic observations over such fine temporal scales (weekly) was the current study able to identify the intimate structure of the benthic response. Similar studies from other habitats and under different bloom conditions are urgently needed to fully appreciate the strength of benthic-pelagic coupling in shallow coastal environments.

  9. Benthic infaunal community structuring in an acidified tropical estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that increasing ocean acidification (OA) should have strong direct and indirect influences on marine invertebrates. While most theory and application for OA is based on relatively physically-stable oceanic ecological systems, less is known about the effects of acidification on nearshore and estuarine systems. Here, we investigated the structuring of a benthic infaunal community in a tropical estuarine system, along a steep salinity and pH gradient, arising largely from acid-sulphate groundwater inflows (Sungai Brunei Estuary, Borneo, July 2011- June 2012). Results Preliminary data indicate that sediment pore-water salinity (range: 8.07 - 29.6 psu) declined towards the mainland in correspondence with the above-sediment estuarine water salinity (range: 3.58 – 31.2 psu), whereas the pore-water pH (range: 6.47- 7.72) was generally lower and less variable than the estuarine water pH (range: 5.78- 8.3), along the estuary. Of the thirty six species (taxa) recorded, the polychaetes Neanthes sp., Onuphis conchylega, Nereididae sp. and the amphipod Corophiidae sp., were numerically dominant. Calcified microcrustaceans (e.g., Cyclopoida sp. and Corophiidae sp.) were abundant at all stations and there was no clear distinction in distribution pattern along the estuarine between calcified and non-calcified groups. Species richness increased seawards, though abundance (density) showed no distinct directional trend. Diversity indices were generally positively correlated (Spearman’s rank correlation) with salinity and pH (p <0.05) and negatively with clay and organic matter, except for evenness values (p >0.05). Three faunistic assemblages were distinguished: (1) nereid-cyclopoid-sabellid, (2) corophiid-capitellid and (3) onuphid- nereid-capitellid. These respectively associated with lower salinity/pH and a muddy bottom, low salinity/pH and a sandy bottom, and high salinity/pH and a sandy bottom. However, CCA suggested that species distribution and community structuring is more strongly influenced by sediment particle characteristics than by the chemical properties of the water (pH and salinity). Conclusions Infaunal estuarine communities, which are typically adapted to survive relatively acidic conditions, may be less exposed, less sensitive, and less vulnerable than epibenthic or pelagic communities to further acidification of above-sediment waters. These data question the extent to which all marine infaunal communities, including oceanic communities, are likely to be affected by future global CO2-driven acidification. PMID:25396048

  10. Building biomedical materials layer-by-layer

    E-print Network

    Hammond, Paula T.

    In this materials perspective, the promise of water based layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly as a means of generating drug-releasing surfaces for biomedical applications, from small molecule therapeutics to biologic drugs and ...

  11. Structures of benthic prokaryotic communities and their hydrolytic enzyme activities resuspended from samples of intertidal mudflats: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Clarisse; Agogué, Hélène; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Guizien, Katell; Orvain, Francis; Dupuy, Christine

    2014-09-01

    Resuspended sediment can increase plankton biomass and the growth of bacteria, thus influencing the coastal planktonic microbial food web. But little is known about resuspension itself: is it a single massive change or a whole series of events and how does it affect the quantity and quality of resuspended prokaryotic cells? We simulated the sequential erosion of mud cores to better understand the fate and role of benthic prokaryotes resuspended in the water column. We analyzed the total, attached and free-living prokaryotic cells resuspended, their structure and the activities of their hydrolytic enzymes in terms of the biotic and abiotic factors that affect the composition of microphytobenthic biofilm. Free living prokaryotes were resuspended during the fluff layer erosion phase (for shear velocities below 5 cm · s- 1) regardless of the bed sediment composition. At the higher shear velocities, resuspended prokaryotes were attached to particulate matter. Free and attached cells are thus unevenly distributed, scattered throughout the organic matter (OM) in the uppermost mm of the sediment. Only 10-27% of the total cells initially resuspended were living and most of the Bacteria were Cyanobacteria and Gamma-proteobacteria; their numbers increased to over 30% in parallel with the hydrolytic enzyme activity at highest shear velocity. These conditions released prokaryotic cells having different functions that lie deep in the sediment; the most important of them are Archaea. Finally, composition of resuspended bacterial populations varied with resuspension intensity, and intense resuspension events boosted the microbial dynamics and enzyme activities in the bottom layers of sea water.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF SIEVE MESH SIZE SELECTIVITY ON BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE INDICES OF EUTROPHICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The selective retention of benthic invertebrates by sieves of various mesh sizes was demonstrated by Jonasson (1955, 1958) who reported that decreasing the mesh opening from 0.62 to 0.51 mm (effective decrease on one-third mesh opening area) resulted in samples with an average of...

  13. Recent benthic foraminifera from the Caribbean continental slope and shelf off west of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Flavia

    2015-07-01

    A quantitative benthic foraminiferal analysis was conducted on 30 sea-floor sediment samples distributed along the continental slope and shelf in Fuerte Area (Colombian Caribbean), between 39 and 2469 m water depth. The aims of the research were to provide data on the distribution of southwestern Caribbean Recent benthic foraminifera, to estimate changes in the foraminiferal distribution related to the bathymetry and the characteristics of the substrate, to define a data-bank on distribution of recent tropical benthic foraminifera from the southwestern Caribbean, to provide reference on foraminiferal distribution that can be used in bathymetric reconstructions of ancient environments. Three different assemblages corresponding to three different environments were identified by cluster analysis. Assemblage A, characterized by variable percentages of porcellaneous, hyaline and agglutinated benthic foraminifera indicative of shelf environments. Assemblage B, dominated by calcareous hyaline foraminifera mainly composed of infaunal foraminifera corresponding to upper bathyal, marine conditions. Assemblage C, composed by agglutinated and calcareous hyaline foraminifera characteristic of normal deep-water marine environments.

  14. DOWNSTREAM BENTHIC RESPONSES TO SMALL DAM REMOVAL IN A COLDWATER STREAM

    E-print Network

    Stanley, Emily

    DOWNSTREAM BENTHIC RESPONSES TO SMALL DAM REMOVAL IN A COLDWATER STREAM CAILIN H. ORR,* STEVE J Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA ABSTRACT Increased awareness of the negative effects of dams combined with an aging dam infrastructure has led to an increase in dam removals. However, ecological responses

  15. Development of bacteria and benthic total maximum daily loads: a case study, Linville Creek, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Benham, Brian L; Brannan, Kevin M; Yagow, Gene; Zeckoski, Rebecca W; Dillaha, Theo A; Mostaghimi, Saied; Wynn, Jeff W

    2005-01-01

    Two total maximum daily load (TMDL) studies were performed for Linville Creek in Rockingham County, Virginia, to address bacterial and benthic impairments. The TMDL program is an integrated watershed management approach required by the Clean Water Act. This paper describes the procedures used by the Center for TMDL and Watershed Studies at Virginia Tech to develop the Linville Creek TMDLs and discusses the key lessons learned from and the ramifications of the procedures used in these and other similar TMDL studies. The bacterial impairment TMDL was developed using the Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF). Fecal coliform loads were estimated through an intensive source characterization process. The benthic impairment TMDL was developed using the Generalized Watershed Loading Function (GWLF) model and the reference watershed approach. The bacterial TMDL allocation scenario requires a 100% reduction in cattle manure direct-deposits to the stream, a 96% reduction in nonpoint-source loadings to the land surface, and a 95% reduction in wildlife direct-deposits to the stream. Sediment was identified as the primary benthic stressor. The TMDL allocation scenario for the benthic impairment requires an overall reduction of 12.3% of the existing sediment loads. Despite the many drawbacks associated with using watershed-scale models like HSPF and GWLF to develop TMDLs, the detailed watershed and pollutant-source characterization required to use these and similar models creates information that stakeholders need to select appropriate corrective measures to address the cause of the water quality impairment when implementing the TMDL. PMID:16151238

  16. Proposed sediment quality criteria for the protection of benthic organisms: Dieldrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.J.; Berry, W.J.; Di Toro, D.M.; Paquin, P.; Davanzo, L.

    1991-11-01

    The criteria presented in the document are the EPA's best recommendation of the concentrations of a substance in sediment that will not unacceptably affect benthic organisms. These criteria are applicable to a variety of freshwater and marine sediments because they are based on the biologically available concentration of dieldrin in sediments.

  17. Vertical distribution of benthic infauna in continental slope sediments off Cape Lookout, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, James A.

    The vertical distribution of 30 species of benthic infauna from continental slope (583-3000 m) sediments off Cape Lookout, North Carolina was closely correlated with feeding types. Carnivores, omnivores, filter feeders, and surface deposit feeders were mostly concentrated in the upper 0-2 cm of the cores. The depth distribution of subsurface deposit feeders was more variable, even among related taxa.

  18. ESTABLISHING REFERENCE CONDITIONS FOR BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE MONITORING IN THE FRASER RIVER CATCHMENT,

    E-print Network

    ESTABLISHING REFERENCE CONDITIONS FOR BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE MONITORING IN THE FRASER RIVER CATCHMENT; (4) creating a family-level predictive model of invertebrate assemblage structure, and testing retained higher numbers of invertebrates than 400-µm-mesh nets, although the overall number of taxa

  19. Application of Multiple Index Development Approaches to Benthic Invertebrate Data from the Virginian Biogeographic Province, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work had indicated that the Virginian Province Index did not perform well in a smaller estuarine complex. While it was hoped that the existing Chesapeake Bay Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity, with its greater number of metrics and habitat separation would be more adapt...

  20. Status and Trends of Benthic Populations in a Coastal Drowned River Mouth Lake of Lake Michigan

    E-print Network

    Status and Trends of Benthic Populations in a Coastal Drowned River Mouth Lake of Lake Michigan evaluated relative to distance from the river mouth, water depth, grain size, and known areas of sediment of sites near the river mouth had the highest total density (9,375 m­2) and lowest diversity (Shannon

  1. The North Pacific giant octopus (Enter-octopus dofleini) is a benthic cephalo-

    E-print Network

    39 The North Pacific giant octopus (Enter- octopus dofleini) is a benthic cephalo- pod fished several attempts to develop a commercial fish- ery for the North Pacific giant octopus (hereafter referred and Game allows commercial harvest of octopus within state wa- ters only as incidental catch managed under

  2. COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE OF SIX DIFFERENT BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE SAMPLING METHODS FOR RIVERINE ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    At each of 60 sites, we collected benthic macroinvertebrates using six different protocols (including the EMAP methods for non-wadeable rivers) and physical habitat data using the USEPA-EMAP-SW protocols for non-wadeable rivers. We used PCA with physical habitat data and DCA wit...

  3. Structural responses of benthic macroinvertebrate communities from different stream orders to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Kiffney, P.M.; Clements, W.H. . Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology)

    1994-03-01

    It is well established that benthic invertebrate community structure and function shift in a predictable fashion along longitudinal stream gradients as a result of variation in environmental conditions. The authors research is concerned with experimentally testing whether this shift in community structure influences the response of benthic macroinvertebrates to heavy metals. Using artificial streams, they compared effects of Zn on natural assemblages of benthic macroinvertebrates communities collected from Little Beaver Creek (LBC; a third-order stream) and the Big South Fork of the Cache la Poudre, Colorado, catchment. Organisms collected from LBC and SFP were exposed to 0 or 130 [mu]g/L Zn in indoor experimental streams for 7 d. In general, similar taxa were found at both sites, but densities were generally higher at SFP than at LBC. They observed significant effects at the community and population level as a result of Zn, stream order, and the interaction between Zn and stream order. Specifically, mayflies from both sides were sensitive to Zn, but the magnitude of the response varied between sites. The results indicate that benthic macroinvertebrate communities from different stream order may vary in sensitivity to Zn.

  4. DEVELOPING AND APPLYING A BENTHIC INDEX OF ESTUARINE CONDITION FOR THE VIRGINIAN BIOGEOGRAPHIC PROVINCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A benthic index of estuarine condition was constructed for the Virginian Biogeographic Province (from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia) with data collected during summers of 1990 through 1993 by the US EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment...

  5. BIOGEOGRAPHY OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN ESTUARIES ALONG THE GULF OF MEXICO AND WESTERN ATLANTIC COASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The community composition of benthic macroinvertebrates from 870 estuarine sites was examimed in order to either confirm or challenge established boundaries of biogeographical provinces along the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic coasts of the United States. The objective was t...

  6. The Influence of Coral Reef Benthic Condition on Associated Fish Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Chong-Seng, Karen M.; Mannering, Thomas D.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Bellwood, David R.; Graham, Nicholas A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulative disturbances can erode a coral reef’s resilience, often leading to replacement of scleractinian corals by macroalgae or other non-coral organisms. These degraded reef systems have been mostly described based on changes in the composition of the reef benthos, and there is little understanding of how such changes are influenced by, and in turn influence, other components of the reef ecosystem. This study investigated the spatial variation in benthic communities on fringing reefs around the inner Seychelles islands. Specifically, relationships between benthic composition and the underlying substrata, as well as the associated fish assemblages were assessed. High variability in benthic composition was found among reefs, with a gradient from high coral cover (up to 58%) and high structural complexity to high macroalgae cover (up to 95%) and low structural complexity at the extremes. This gradient was associated with declining species richness of fishes, reduced diversity of fish functional groups, and lower abundance of corallivorous fishes. There were no reciprocal increases in herbivorous fish abundances, and relationships with other fish functional groups and total fish abundance were weak. Reefs grouping at the extremes of complex coral habitats or low-complexity macroalgal habitats displayed markedly different fish communities, with only two species of benthic invertebrate feeding fishes in greater abundance in the macroalgal habitat. These results have negative implications for the continuation of many coral reef ecosystem processes and services if more reefs shift to extreme degraded conditions dominated by macroalgae. PMID:22870294

  7. Research paper Benthic foraminifera across the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary in the

    E-print Network

    (ODP Site 690): Diversity, food and carbonate saturation Laia Alegret a, , Ellen Thomas b Keywords: Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary benthic foraminifera high southern latitudes export productivity the K/Pg boundary, indicating that food supply to the sea floor was affected to a lesser extent than

  8. Marine benthic habitat mapping of the West Arm, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodson, Timothy O.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Powell, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Seafloor geology and potential benthic habitats were mapped in West Arm, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska, using multibeam sonar, groundtruthed observations, and geological interpretations. The West Arm of Glacier Bay is a recently deglaciated fjord system under the influence of glacial and paraglacial marine processes. High glacially derived sediment and meltwater fluxes, slope instabilities, and variable bathymetry result in a highly dynamic estuarine environment and benthic ecosystem. We characterize the fjord seafloor and potential benthic habitats using the recently developed Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NatureServe. Due to the high flux of glacially sourced fines, mud is the dominant substrate within the West Arm. Water-column characteristics are addressed using a combination of CTD and circulation model results. We also present sediment accumulation data derived from differential bathymetry. These data show the West Arm is divided into two contrasting environments: a dynamic upper fjord and a relatively static lower fjord. The results of these analyses serve as a test of the CMECS classification scheme and as a baseline for ongoing and future mapping efforts and correlations between seafloor substrate, benthic habitats, and glacimarine processes.

  9. Benthic diatom composition in wet and dry isolated forested wetlands: implications for monitoring and assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of bioindicators for wetlands, especially ephemerally hydrated depressional and isolated wetlands, can be problematic because of seasonal changes in hydrology and target organism biology. To determine if benthic diatoms could be used as a year-round biological ind...

  10. Benthic diatom composition in isolated forested wetlands subject to drying: implications for monitoring and assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of bioindicators for wetlands, especially ephemerally hydrated depressional and isolated wetlands, can be problematic because of seasonal hydrology and target organism biology. To determine if benthic diatoms could be used as a year-round biological indicator of w...

  11. Benthic macroinvertebrate surveys in Chequamegon Bay in support of invasive species early detection research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the impetus and approach for MED invasive species early detection research generally and presents preliminary results concerning benthic composition and non-native species found in the 2013 Chequamegon Bay survey. The audience is a group of researchers...

  12. Mid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca

    E-print Network

    by rising sea level caused by the melting of alpine glaciers and small ice caps and portionsMid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca palaeotemperatures composition of seawater, and estimate continental ice volume and sea-level variability during the Mid

  13. Abundance variations of benthic foraminifera in Upper Oligocene and Miocene strata of south Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, L.L.; Sen Gupta, B.K.

    1986-09-01

    Abundance variations of benthic foraminifera in some upper Oligocene and Miocene strata of south Louisiana were studied to evaluate trends of species dominance, associations, and faunal diversity. Fifty-seven well-cutting samples were obtained from eleven wells in six parishes: Vermilion, St. Mary, St. Martin, Assumption, Terrebonne, and Lafourche. In addition, core samples were obtained from two wells in Terrebonne Parish.

  14. Benthic Megafaunal Community Structure and Biodiversity Along a Sea Ice Gradient

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    some of the fastest rates of regional warming in the world, resulting in the collapse of ice shelves, warming ocean temperatures, and increased melt and retreat of glaciers. Winter sea ice coverageBenthic Megafaunal Community Structure and Biodiversity Along a Sea Ice Gradient on the Western

  15. Application of a Eutrophic Condition Index to Benthic Macroalgal Accumulation in Pacific Northwest Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of benthic macroalgal accumulation in coastal estuaries of the Pacific Northwest, USA, were conducted over a 12-year period, including aerial mapping and ground surveys. The results were applied to an assessment framework for eutrophication developed by the European Unio...

  16. Benthic assemblage composition on subtidal reefs along a latitudinal gradient in Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smale, D. A.; Kendrick, G. A.; Waddington, K. I.; Van Niel, K. P.; Meeuwig, J. J.; Harvey, E. S.

    2010-01-01

    At regional scales, the distribution of species and the structure of assemblages vary with latitude within many marine and terrestrial systems. The oligotrophic coastal waters of Western Australia (WA) support highly speciose and endemic assemblages, yet spatial patterns in benthic structure are currently poorly known. We examined benthic assemblage composition along a latitudinal gradient of 28.5-33.5°S and a depth gradient of 14-62 m, on subtidal reefs in warm-temperate WA. We surveyed benthos using a remotely triggered digital stills camera. In total, we sampled macroalgae and sessile invertebrates at 201 sites spread across four locations. Percent cover of coarse taxonomic groups and dominant species was estimated from over 2000 photoquadrat samples. We recorded significant differences in benthic assemblage composition between locations, and along depth gradients within each location. However, the magnitude of change with depth was not consistent between locations, and shifts in assemblage composition along the depth gradients were not as pronounced as expected. The percent cover of all dominant benthic groupings differed between locations, and several key taxa, such as the kelp Scytothalia dorycarpa, brown foliose macroalgae, hard corals and sponges, changed predictably along the latitudinal gradient. Our study adopted a coarse taxonomic, but assemblage-wide, approach to describing macrobenthic assemblages, and clear differences between locations and depths were detected. The surveys have provided baseline data on broad scale ecosystem structure against which to detect future ecological change.

  17. Protein synthesis in a solitary benthic cephalopod, the Southern dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica)

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Protein synthesis in a solitary benthic cephalopod, the Southern dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica-history Protein synthesis Squid Tissue protein synthesis Rates of protein synthesis were measured in the whole-dose of 3 H phenylalanine for the measurement of protein synthesis with different size squid and to make

  18. Eutrophication and Hypoxia Degrade Ecosystem Functions and Services of Narragansett Bay Benthic Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excessive input of nitrogen to estuaries and coastal waters leads to eutrophication; the resulting organic matter over-enrichment of the sediments and seasonal hypoxia of the bottom water have well-known deleterious effects on benthic community biodiversity, abundance, and biomas...

  19. Influence of stability and fragmentation of a worm-reef on benthic macrofauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godet, Laurent; Fournier, Jérôme; Jaffré, Mikaël; Desroy, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    In coastal areas, reef-builder worms often are bio-engineers by structuring their physical and biological environment. Many studies showed that this engineering role is determined by the densities of the engineer species itself, the highest densities approximately corresponding to the most stable areas from a sedimentological point of view, and hosting the richest and the most diverse benthic fauna. Here, we tested the potential influence of the spatio-temporal dynamics and the spatial fragmentation of one of the largest European intertidal reefs generated by the marine worm Lanice conchilega (Pallas, 1766) (Annelida, Polychaeta) on the associated benthic macrofauna. We demonstrated that the worm densities do have a significant positive role on the abundance, biomass, species richness and species diversity of the benthic macrofauna and that the reef stability also significantly influences the biomass and species diversity. Moreover, the reef fragmentation has significant negative effects on the abundance, biomass and species richness. In addition to L. conchilega densities, the stability and the spatial fragmentation of the reef also significantly structure the associated benthic assemblages. This study demonstrates the interest of "benthoscape ecology" in understanding the role played by marine engineer species from a spatial point of view.

  20. High-throughput sequencing and morphology perform equally well for benthic monitoring of marine ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Lejzerowicz, Franck; Esling, Philippe; Pillet, Loïc; Wilding, Thomas A.; Black, Kenneth D.; Pawlowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Environmental diversity surveys are crucial for the bioassessment of anthropogenic impacts on marine ecosystems. Traditional benthic monitoring relying on morphotaxonomic inventories of macrofaunal communities is expensive, time-consuming and expertise-demanding. High-throughput sequencing of environmental DNA barcodes (metabarcoding) offers an alternative to describe biological communities. However, whether the metabarcoding approach meets the quality standards of benthic monitoring remains to be tested. Here, we compared morphological and eDNA/RNA-based inventories of metazoans from samples collected at 10 stations around a fish farm in Scotland, including near-cage and distant zones. For each of 5 replicate samples per station, we sequenced the V4 region of the 18S rRNA gene using the Illumina technology. After filtering, we obtained 841,766 metazoan sequences clustered in 163 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). We assigned the OTUs by combining local BLAST searches with phylogenetic analyses. We calculated two commonly used indices: the Infaunal Trophic Index and the AZTI Marine Biotic Index. We found that the molecular data faithfully reflect the morphology-based indices and provides an equivalent assessment of the impact associated with fish farms activities. We advocate that future benthic monitoring should integrate metabarcoding as a rapid and accurate tool for the evaluation of the quality of marine benthic ecosystems. PMID:26355099

  1. Intertidal Eelgrass Response to Benthic Macroalgal Accumulation in a Pacific Northwest Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    High accumulations of benthic macroalgae from excessive nutrient inputs to estuaries is commonly cited as a major cause of seagrass decline. Two measures of macroalgal abundance, biomass and percent cover, have been used in an assessment framework for estuarine condition propose...

  2. Calcareous benthic foraminiferal biofacies along a depth transect on the southwestern Marmara shelf (Turkey)

    E-print Network

    Kaminski, Michael A.

    , and there is less impact from shipping and other human activities compared to the east- ern part of the Sea (Ikis et (Turkey) Mark D. Phipps1 , Michael A. Kaminski2* , and Ali E. Aksu3 1 Laboratory of Recent and Fossil Bio. INTRODUCTION Species diversity and spatial distribution of benthic foram- iniferal assemblages are strongly

  3. Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats

    E-print Network

    Rundquist, Donald C.

    Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats. Rundquist, M. Lawson, and R. Perk (2007), Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef. For example, Myers et al. [1999] describe how optical spectra can be used to differ- entiate between pigmented

  4. Benthic macroinvertebrates in lake ecological assessment: A review of methods, intercalibration and practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Poikane, Sandra; Johnson, Richard K; Sandin, Leonard; Schartau, Ann Kristin; Solimini, Angelo G; Urbani?, Gorazd; Arba?iauskas, K?stutis; Aroviita, Jukka; Gabriels, Wim; Miler, Oliver; Pusch, Martin T; Timm, Henn; Böhmer, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Legislation in Europe has been adopted to determine and improve the ecological integrity of inland and coastal waters. Assessment is based on four biotic groups, including benthic macroinvertebrate communities. For lakes, benthic invertebrates have been recognized as one of the most difficult organism groups to use in ecological assessment, and hitherto their use in ecological assessment has been limited. In this study, we review and intercalibrate 13 benthic invertebrate-based tools across Europe. These assessment tools address different human impacts: acidification (3 methods), eutrophication (3 methods), morphological alterations (2 methods), and a combination of the last two (5 methods). For intercalibration, the methods were grouped into four intercalibration groups, according to the habitat sampled and putative pressure. Boundaries of the 'good ecological status' were compared and harmonized using direct or indirect comparison approaches. To enable indirect comparison of the methods, three common pressure indices and two common biological multimetric indices were developed for larger geographical areas. Additionally, we identified the best-performing methods based on their responsiveness to different human impacts. Based on these experiences, we provide practical recommendations for the development and harmonization of benthic invertebrate assessment methods in lakes and similar habitats. PMID:26580734

  5. BOTTOM TRAWLING IMPACTS ON DIVERSITY AND COMPOSITION OF HABITAT-FORMING BENTHIC

    E-print Network

    BOTTOM TRAWLING IMPACTS ON DIVERSITY AND COMPOSITION OF HABITAT-FORMING BENTHIC COMMUNITIES Management Project No.: 539 Title of Thesis: Bottom trawling impacts on diversity and composition of habitat impacts on vulnerable seafloor habitats are an important component of an ecosystem approach to fisheries

  6. CONTROLS ON BENTHIC BIODIVERSITY AND TROPHIC INTERACTIONS IN A TEMPERATE COASTAL LAGOON

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Deborah

    CONTROLS ON BENTHIC BIODIVERSITY AND TROPHIC INTERACTIONS IN A TEMPERATE COASTAL LAGOON Jennifer ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ #12;ii ABSTRACT Coastal lagoons are shallow land-margin ecosystems that are vulnerable to nutrient the lagoon and tidal- creek sites was species richness, where the tidal-creek supports high densities

  7. Benthic macrofaunal assemblages of the San Francisco Estuary and Delta, USA

    E-print Network

    Benthic macrofaunal assemblages of the San Francisco Estuary and Delta, USA Bruce Thompson & J distribution of macrobenthic assemblages in the San Francisco Estu- ary and Sacramento­San Joaquin River Delta) a tidal freshwater assemblage in the Delta. Most sites were classified within the same assemblage

  8. Chlorinated organic contaminants in benthic organisms of the lower Fraser River near Agassiz, British Columbia

    E-print Network

    1 Chlorinated organic contaminants in benthic organisms of the lower Fraser River near Agassiz published as a peer-reviewed article: Richardson, J.S. and C.D. Levings. 1996. Chlorinated organic Columbia in winter 1993 to assess concentrations of chlorinated organic contaminants. Concentrations

  9. IMPERVIOUS SURFACE AREA AND BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE RESPONSE AS INDEX OF IMPACT FROM URBANIZATION ON FRESHWATER WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of benthic macroinvertebrates to monitor water quality and ecological integrity is not as well established for wetlands as it is for rivers, streams and lakes where this form of biomonitoring is now a formalized procedure. he impact to wetlands from urbanization (as measu...

  10. Acoustic scattering by benthic and planktonic shelled animals Timothy K. Stanton and Dezhang Chu

    E-print Network

    Stanton, Tim

    Acoustic scattering by benthic and planktonic shelled animals Timothy K. Stanton and Dezhang Chu Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543 Robert L. Eastwood and Joseph D. Warren Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering

  11. Paleoecology of benthic foraminifera from the Miocene of the San Jacinto Basin, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, John Sebastian; Fiorini, Flavia; Andres Trejos, Raul; Vallejo, Diego Felipe; Pardo, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative benthic foraminifera analysis was conducted on 34 samples collected from a borehole core (393.72m deep) drilled by Colombian Hydrocarbon Agency (ANH) on 2009 in the San Jacinto basin (Northern Colombia). The aims of the research were to define a taxonomical data-bank of Miocene benthic foraminifera for this region, to use the benthic foraminifera assemblages to interpret the paleoenvironment and to identify paleoenvironmental changes. The bottom of the section was dated between lowest Burdigalian to middle Langhian (20.393-17.721 Ma) based on calcareous nannofossils bioevents: LO Helicosphaera ampliaperta, HCO Sphenolithus belemnos and LCO Sphenolithus heteromorphus. The benthic foraminifera fauna identified in the studied samples is composed for the majority of calcareous hyaline tests and is dominated by infaunal taxas. Species belonging to the genera Uvigerina and Lenticulina are commonly occurring in the studied section together with other species typical of outer-shelf upper-bathyal environment. Cibicidoides spp., abundant in the lower part of the section, abruptly decreases in abundance in the upper part. Species belonging to the opportunistic genera Bulimina and Bolivina are more abundant in the upper part of the section. Variability in the abundance of opportunistic species can be associated with tectonic disturbance on the Sinu-San Jacinto fold belt (NW of Colombia) as a result of collision of the Caribbean plate against NW of South America. The tectonics could lead a perturbation on deep ocean sedimentation and circulation.

  12. BENTHIC MACROALGAE, DISSOLVED SULFIDES, AND AMPHIPODS IN SURFICIAL SEDIMENTS OF YAQUINA BAY ESTUARY, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of benthic green macroalgae at two sites in Yaquina Bay Estuary, Oregon, in 1999 showed that percent cover and biomass values in June were much higher at one site, Idaho Point, than at the other site, Coquille Point. The frequency of detectable hydrogen sulfide odor late...

  13. Land use and the ecology of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages of high-altitude rainforest streams

    E-print Network

    Fussman, Gregor

    Land use and the ecology of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages of high-altitude rainforest conversion and degradation. In East Africa, the larger tracts of intact rainforest lie largely in protected and pristine forest created by the protection of the high-altitude rainforest in Bwindi Impenetrable National

  14. Benthic foraminiferal turnover across the Cretaceous/ Paleogene boundary at Agost (southeastern Spain)

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Ellen

    at the K/P boundary, where V5% of the species became extinct, and the species composition of the benthic) or there is an even mixture or epifaunal and infaunal morphogroups. Infaunal groups do not recover to pre-extinction. Introduction The Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/P) boundary, commonly called the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) 0377

  15. ESTIMATING DENSITIES OF ESTUARINE EELGRASS AND BENTHIC MACROALGAE VIA AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research was to distinguish meadows of native eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) from adjacent beds of benthic green macroalgae in the exposed intertidal zone of Pacific Northwest estuaries, using false-color near-infrared aerial photography. Aerial photographs of Yaq...

  16. Climate induced changes in benthic macrofauna--A non-linear model approach Karin Junker a,

    E-print Network

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Climate induced changes in benthic macrofauna--A non-linear model approach Karin Junker a, , Dusan macrofauna communities Climate indices Neural network Climate variability Time series forecasting Regime-nearest neighbours" (OPKNN) are applied to relate various climate indices to time series of biomass, abun- dance

  17. METABOLIC ENZYME ACTIVITIES OF BENTHIC ZOARCIDS OFF THE COAST OF CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    METABOLIC ENZYME ACTIVITIES OF BENTHIC ZOARCIDS OFF THE COAST OF CALIFORNIA A THESIS SUBMITTED, therefore, a great model for this research. The rates of four enzymes in twelve species of zoarcids were examined as a biochemical proxy for metabolic activity. Enzyme assays were performed on two anaerobic

  18. Effect of acidification on leaf litter decomposition in benthic and hyporheic zones of woodland streams.

    PubMed

    Cornut, Julien; Clivot, Hugues; Chauvet, Eric; Elger, Arnaud; Pagnout, Christophe; Guérold, François

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic acidification has deleterious effects on both structure and functioning of surface water ecosystems. This study examined how it may affect the leaf decomposition rate and the community structure and activity of decomposers in both benthic and hyporheic zones of five headwater streams along an acidification gradient from highly acidic (pH 4.6) to circumneutral (pH 7.4). Overall, responses to acidification in hyporheic zones were less pronounced, but followed the same pattern as in their benthic counterparts. Leaf decomposition was much faster in the circumneutral stream, both in the hyporheic and benthic zones (k = 0.0068 and 0.0534 d(-1), respectively), than in the most acidic one (k = 0.0016 and 0.0055 d(-1), respectively), and correlated well with the acidic gradient in both compartments. Interestingly, leaf litter decomposition was less affected by acidification in hyporheic compared to benthic compartments, likely due to the relatively low sensitivity of fungi, which were the main decomposers of buried coarse particulate organic matter. These results argue in favour of conserving hyporheic habitats in acidified streams as they can maintain matter and species fluxes that are essential to the ecosystem. PMID:23069077

  19. Calcium carbonate dissolution in deep sea sediments: reconciling microelectrode, pore water and benthic flux chamber results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Richard A.; Jahnke, Deborah B.

    2004-01-01

    We report the benthic fluxes of O 2, titration alkalinity (TA), Ca 2+, NO 3-, PO 43-, and Si(OH) 4 from in situ benthic flux chamber incubations on the Ceara Rise and Cape Verde Plateau and compare them to previously published results. We find within analytical uncertainty that the TA flux is twice the calcium flux, suggesting that dissolution/precipitation of CaCO 3 is the principal mechanism controlling benthic TA and Ca 2+ fluxes. At sites where the sediments contain significant (>35%) CaCO 3 and the overlying waters are supersaturated with respect to CaCO 3, the ratios of the total dissolution rate to the remineralization rate are significantly less than at all other study sites. We propose that these observations can be explained by precipitation of fresh CaCO 3 at the supersaturated sediment surface followed by redissolution deeper in the sediments because of metabolically-produced CO 2. A numerical simulation is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this explanation. In addition, surface exchange reactions in high-CaCO 3 sediments coupled with high rates of particle mixing may also impact rates of metabolic dissolution and depress chamber-derived estimates of carbonate alkalinity and calcium benthic fluxes. These results suggest that at supersaturated, high CaCO 3 locations, previous models of sediment diagenesis may have overestimated the impact of metabolic dissolution on the preservation of CaCO 3 deposited on the sea floor.

  20. BENTHIC PRODUCTION AS THE BASE FOR FOOD WEBS IN ALASKAN ARCTIC LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plankton are traditionally viewed as the basis for limnetic food webs, with zooplankton acting as an energy gateway between phytoplanktonic primary producers and fish. Often, benthic production is considered to be important primarily to the benthos and in shallow systems, such as...

  1. A Comparison of the Benthic Bacterial Communities Within and Surrounding Dreissena Clusters in Lakes

    E-print Network

    Sigler, Von

    - lected from locations in Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, and several inland lakes. Denaturing gradient gel function of the benthic bacterial community and may have yet unexplored ecosystem and food web consequences in response to Dreissena-related habitat alteration and grazing are potentially important in aquatic food webs

  2. Biostratigraphy and paleoecology of Naples Bluff coastal section determined from diatoms and benthic foraminifers

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, R.G.; Blake, G.H.

    1986-04-01

    An integrated biostratigraphic and paleoecologic study of the Naples Bluff coastal section used diatoms and benthic foraminifers. This section, composed of a thick sequence of Tertiary marine rocks, represents one of the most completely exposed Neogene sections along the central coast of California. The interval examined in this study is 1800 ft thick, and represents early to late Miocene rocks and the overlying early Pliocene sediments. This sequence contains well-preserved diatom floras and benthic foraminiferal faunas that enabled us to integrate diatom biochronology with the provincial benthic foraminifer stages and to construct a sediment accumulation curve. Although generally abundant in this section, the benthic faunas are dominated by an inner marginal bathyal assemblage. However, rare deeper water assemblages occur in some samples. Five faunal events are recognized that indicate response to paleo-oceanographic and tectonic influences. The diatom assemblages in this section are relatively abundant and range from the Actinocyclus ingens zone to the Thalassiosira oestrupii zone of J.A. Barron. The diversity and abundance of these assemblages made precise age control for this section possible. A major unconformity or severely compressed interval developed between 15 and 9 Ma.

  3. EFFECTS OF HURRICANE KATRINA ON BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES ALONG THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO COAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was initiated in fall 2005 to assess potential effects on benthic fauna and habitat quality in coastal waters of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama following Hurricane Katrina, which struck the coast of Louisiana, between New Orleans and Bioloxi, Mississippi on August 29...

  4. SUBMARINE CANYONS: HOTSPOTS OF DEEP-SEA BENTHIC ABUNDANCE AND BIODIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    SUBMARINE CANYONS: HOTSPOTS OF DEEP-SEA BENTHIC ABUNDANCE AND BIODIVERSITY A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED and photographic footage. The study of submarine canyons off the main and northwest Hawaiian islands was supported submersibles within the challenging environment of the submarine canyons and the captain and crew of the R/V Ka

  5. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SEAGRASSES, BENTHIC MACROALGAE AND NUTRIENTS IN A PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pacific Northwest estuaries are characterized by large tidal ranges (2-3 m) that routinely expose submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) such as seagrass and benthic macroalgae. The dominant native seagrass in PNW estuaries is the eelgrass Zostera marina. However, in recent decades...

  6. Development of Benthic Indicators for Nearshore Coastal Waters of New Jersey - A REMAP Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Coastal Assessment (NCA) is providing the first complete, consistent dataset on the condition of benthic communities in the nation's estuaries. Prior to NCA, New Jersey based its evaluation of the ecological condition of its coastal waters solely on dissolved oxyg...

  7. High-throughput sequencing and morphology perform equally well for benthic monitoring of marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Lejzerowicz, Franck; Esling, Philippe; Pillet, Loïc; Wilding, Thomas A; Black, Kenneth D; Pawlowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Environmental diversity surveys are crucial for the bioassessment of anthropogenic impacts on marine ecosystems. Traditional benthic monitoring relying on morphotaxonomic inventories of macrofaunal communities is expensive, time-consuming and expertise-demanding. High-throughput sequencing of environmental DNA barcodes (metabarcoding) offers an alternative to describe biological communities. However, whether the metabarcoding approach meets the quality standards of benthic monitoring remains to be tested. Here, we compared morphological and eDNA/RNA-based inventories of metazoans from samples collected at 10 stations around a fish farm in Scotland, including near-cage and distant zones. For each of 5 replicate samples per station, we sequenced the V4 region of the 18S rRNA gene using the Illumina technology. After filtering, we obtained 841,766 metazoan sequences clustered in 163 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). We assigned the OTUs by combining local BLAST searches with phylogenetic analyses. We calculated two commonly used indices: the Infaunal Trophic Index and the AZTI Marine Biotic Index. We found that the molecular data faithfully reflect the morphology-based indices and provides an equivalent assessment of the impact associated with fish farms activities. We advocate that future benthic monitoring should integrate metabarcoding as a rapid and accurate tool for the evaluation of the quality of marine benthic ecosystems. PMID:26355099

  8. Benthic biodiversity indices versus salinity gradient in the southern Baltic Sea

    E-print Network

    Zettler, Michael

    Benthic biodiversity indices versus salinity gradient in the southern Baltic Sea Michael L. Zettler *, Doris Schiedek, Bernd Bobertz Baltic Sea Research Institute, Seestr. 15, D-18119 Rostock, Germany Baltic Sea. The comparison of the three indices demonstrates that in the southern Baltic Sea

  9. BENTHIC AND WATER COLUMN PROCESSES IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, M.C., J.D. Hagy, J.G. Campbell and J.M. Caffrey. In press. Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Subtropical Estuary: Effects of Light on Oxygen Fluxes (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 ...

  10. Functional regionalization of the pectoral fin of the benthic longhorn sculpin during station holding and swimming

    E-print Network

    Lauder, George V.

    , Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA Keywords fish; sculpin; benthic; swimming; locomotion; three holding and swimming N. K. Taft1 , G. V. Lauder2 & P. G. A. Madden2 1 Graduate Program in Organismic to examine the motion of the pectoral fins during swimming and station holding on the bottom, the first

  11. Spatio-temporal community structure of peat bog benthic desmids on a microscale

    E-print Network

    Spatio-temporal community structure of peat bog benthic desmids on a microscale Jiri´ Neustupa- scale transects were delimited at 4 temperate lowland peat bog localities to investigate spatial bogs Á Spatial structure Introduction Microscale spatial variation has recently been recog- nised

  12. Food sources of benthic animals on intertidal and subtidal bottoms in inner Ariake Sound, southern Japan, determined by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hisashi; Sakami, Tomoko; Ishihi, Yuka

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the relative importance of possible food sources, including riverine particulate organic matter, reeds, benthic microalgae, seaweeds, cultured laver ( Porphyra) and coastal phytoplankton, for commercial bivalves and co-occurring benthic animals, 73 macrofaunal species were collected from intertidal and subtidal soft bottoms in the inner part of Ariake Sound, Kyushu, southern Japan, and their isotopic compositions were analyzed. The results revealed that (1) both intertidal and subtidal food webs were constituted of 3 trophic levels, (2) suspension-feeding bivalves utilize a mixture of benthic microalgae and coastal phytoplankton, and omnivores and carnivores incorporate benthic microalgae and phytoplankton through their intermediate prey, and (3) 3 bivalves ( Scapharca kagoshimensis, Modiolus metcalfei and Atrina lischkeana) inhabiting both intertidal and subtidal bottoms showed similar seasonal fluctuations, suggesting no difference in the diet composition among the species and between the 2 habitats. We conclude that a large biomass of benthic microalgae which was approximately equal to that of phytoplankton and the strong tidal currents that would resuspend benthic microalgae and transport them to subtidal bottom areas account for the benthic microalgal and phytoplankton based trophic structure in the inner part of Ariake Sound.

  13. Benthic resources assessment technique evaluation of potential dredged material disposal sites in Puget Sound. Pase 2 sites

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.G.; Kendall, D.

    1987-12-01

    The U.S. Army Engineer District, Seattle is currently involved in a decision-making process regarding the designation of open-water dredged-material disposal sites in Puget Sound and adjacent waters. In 1985 a joint effort was initiated to examine long-term requirements and strategies for open-water disposal of dredged materials. The quality of benthic habitats at proposed disposal sites was identified as a major topic of interest in the PSDDA study because of potential impacts to demersal fish feeding habitat. One aspect of benthic habitat quality is the relative amount of trophic support that a given benthic habitat provides demersal bottom-feeding fishes. Analytical procedures have been developed to estimate this aspect of benthic-habitat quality. These procedures are collectively called the Benthic Resources Assessment Technique, or BRAT. The BRAT analysis involves the collection of two data sets; one which describes benthic biomass in terms of size and vertical distribution in sediments at selected sites, and a second which describes the foraging depth and prey size exploitation pattern of demersal fishes at those sites. The BRAT then estimates that portion of the total benthic infaunal biomass that is both available and vulnerable to predation by target fishes.

  14. Comparison of Adjective vs. Benthic Sources of Nutrients to a Former Salt Pond under Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, B.; Kuwabara, J. S.; Garrett, K.; Takekawa, J.; Piotter, S.; Parchaso, F.

    2013-12-01

    With the implementation of the South Bay Restoration Program in 2008, water quality in the Alviso Salt Ponds, California, has been monitored to document the effects of changing hydrologic connections among the ponds and the adjacent pond, slough and estuary. In 2010 and 2012, pore-water profilers (U.S. Patent 8,051,727 B1) were deployed in Pond A3W, a former salt pond just north of Moffett Federal Airfield that mixes hydrologically through culverts and weirs with Guadalupe Slough and neighboring ponds, to assess the magnitude of diffusive benthic flux, generated primarily by remobilization of surface-reactive solutes in bed sediment accumulated over annual to decadal time scales. The study, focusing on macronutrient sources that may stimulate harmful algal blooms, revealed that orthophosphate, ammonia, and silica benthic flux were consistently positive (out of the sediment) in both 2010 and 2012, while nitrate and nitrite fluxes were negligible. Because tidal height can affect the size and direction of flow, a diurnal study of nutrient advective flux into and out of the pond was measured during neap and spring tides. These advective fluxes (kg/yr) were compared to benthic flux estimates for the pond extrapolated over the 2.27 (km2) pond surface. Benthic flux of inorganic nitrogen species, averaged over all sites and dates, was about 80,000 + 48,000 kilograms per year (kg/yr), well above the adjective flux range of -50 to 1,500 kg/yr. By contrast, the average benthic flux of orthophosphate was about 12,000 + 4,400 kg/yr, well below the advective flux range of 21,500 to 30,000 kg/yr. Benthic flux estimates determined by porewater gradients do not include enhancement processes such as bioturbation, bioirrigation, wind resuspension, and potential groundwater inflows. However, they provide a conservative measure and can be an effective management screening tool. These results indicate that benthic transport may be an important source of biologically reactive solutes for both nutrients and toxicants, an important consideration during restoration since there are trophic transfer implications.

  15. Benthic Food Webs of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas: Relative Importance of Ultimate Carbon Sources in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunton, K. H.; Schonberg, S. V.; Mctigue, N.; Bucolo, P. A.; Connelly, T. L.; McClelland, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in sea-ice cover, coastal erosion, and freshwater run-off have the potential to greatly influence carbon assimilation pathways and affect trophic structure in benthic communities across the western Arctic. In the Chukchi Sea, variations in the duration and timing of ice cover affect the delivery of ice algae to a relatively shallow (40-50 m) shelf benthos. Although ice algae are known as an important spring carbon subsidy for marine benthic fauna, ice algal contributions may also help initiate productivity of an active microphytobenthos. Recent studies provide clear evidence that the microphytobenthos are photosynthetically active, and have sufficient light and nutrients for in situ growth. The assimilation of benthic diatoms from both sources may explain the 13C enrichment observed in benthic primary consumers throughout the northern Chukchi. On the eastern Beaufort Sea coast, shallow (2-4 m) estuarine lagoon systems receive massive subsidies of terrestrial carbon that is assimilated by a benthic fauna of significant importance to upper trophic level species, but again, distinct 13C enrichment in benthic primary consumers suggests the existence of an uncharacterized food source. Since ice algae are absent, we believe the 13C enrichment in benthic fauna is caused by the assimilation of benthic microalgae, as reflected in seasonally high benthic chlorophyll in spring under replete light and nutrient conditions. Our observations suggest that changes in ice cover, on both temporal and spatial scales, are likely to have significant effects on the magnitude and timing of organic matter delivery to both shelf and nearshore systems, and that locally produced organic matter may become an increasingly important carbon subsidy that affects trophic assimilation and secondary ecosystem productivity.

  16. Effects of Benthic Flux on Dissolved-Mercury Distributions in Camp Far West Reservoir, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, J. S.; Alpers, C. N.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M.; Topping, B. R.; Carter, J. L.; Stewart, A. R.; Fend, S. V.; Parchaso, F.; Moon, G. E.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Agee, J. L.; Kieu, L. H.

    2003-12-01

    Benthic flux measurements of dissolved mercury species were made on sediment cores from Camp Far West Reservoir, a reservoir in which elevated mercury levels in sport fish had previously been documented. The reservoir is located downstream of historic hydraulic placer-gold mining and ore processing activities in the Bear River watershed of the northern Sierra Nevada. Field and laboratory studies were conducted in April and November of 2002 (one of the driest years on record for the area) to provide the first direct measurements of the benthic flux of dissolved mercury species between bottom sediment and the water column at three locations within the reservoir. Ancillary data, including nutrient and ligand fluxes, and benthic biological characterizations, were also gathered to provide a water-quality framework with which to interpret the mercury results. The following are the major observations made from interdependent physical, biological, and chemical data. Bottom water total mercury (HgT) concentrations ranged from 2.94 to 18.3 pM. Dissolved HgT benthic fluxes were generally higher in April than in November 2002 (based on site averages from replicate cores). HgT fluxes of 36.3 and -28.4 pmoles-m-2-h-1 were measured in cores from the deep site which was suboxic in November, contrasting with positive fluxes of 306 and 272 pmoles-m-2-h-1 at that site in April 2002 when the bottom water was oxic. All six measurements of HgT flux in April 2002 and five of six in November 2002 resulted in positive values (i.e., out of the sediment into the overlying water column). Consistent with benthic fluxes for HgT, dissolved MeHg fluxes were: (a) generally positive in April 2002, (b) negligible at all sites in November 2002, and (c) at least two orders of magnitude lower than total-mercury fluxes, roughly consistent with concentration differences between species. Observed concentration ranges for MeHg in bottom water ranged from less than the detection limit (0.20 pM) at the two shallower, up-gradient sites to 0.48 +/- 0.03 pM (n=3) at the deepest sampling site in November 2002. Dissolved MeHg concentrations in the bottom waters were significantly lower under the low-flow conditions of November 2002 relative to high flow in April 2002, but spatial trends were not temporally consistent. The reservoir was highly phosphate-limited with molar N:P ratios in water column samples ranging from 136 to >5,000 (compared to the Redfield N:P molar ratio of 16). Sulfide benthic fluxes were highest (1,180 +/- 50 nmoles-m-2-h-1) at the deepest site in November 2002 following at least 2 weeks of hypolimnetic anoxia (based on prior water-column monitoring), and lowest at the same site in April 2002 (290 +/- 30 nmoles-m-2-h-1) under oxic, high-flow conditions. Sparse benthic macroinvertebrate distributions, mirrored by low benthic-chlorophyll concentrations, were considered to be inconsequential factors mediating benthic flux. Despite their seasonal variability, the magnitude of benthic flux estimates for HgT were consistently comparable to or greater than riverine sources during a relatively dry year. Diffusive transport of dissolved, bioavailable mercury species between the reservoir bed and water column may therefore be an important process regulating the concentration of mercury species in the reservoir water column.

  17. Differential responses of benthic microbes and meiofauna to fish-farm disturbance in coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, T; Mirto, S; Mazzola, A; Danovaro, R

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial and meiofaunal abundance and biomass and their response to the disturbance induced by fish-farm biodeposition were investigated from March to October 1997 on a monthly basis at two stations of the Gaeta Gulf (Tyrrhenian Sea, Mediterranean Sea). The biopolymeric fraction of the organic matter was characterized by high concentrations which was similar at both fish-farming-impacted and control stations. Similarly, bacteria accounted for a small fraction of the biopolymeric organic carbon (< 1%), while the contribution due to auto-fluorescent cell biomass (i.e. prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells displaying auto-fluorescence) to the total biopolymeric carbon was quantitatively negligible (< 0.1%). Benthic bacteria appear to be sensitive to organic enrichment as their abundance increased significantly beneath the cage, whilst numbers of meiofauna was lower than in the control. Changes occurred also in terms of individual nematode biomass that increased as result of the biodeposition. A particularly useful tool appeared to be represented by the ratio of benthic auto-fluorescent cells to bacterial abundance, bacteria to meiofaunal biomass and auto-fluorescent cells to meiofauna biomass. All these parameters described well the impact due to biodeposition on the benthic environment as their ratios displayed significantly higher values in farm sediments, but recovered rapidly (15 days) to values observed in the control (i.e. undisturbed conditions) immediately after cage removal. Changes observed in the present study highlight that the increased organic loading determined a shift of the relative contribution of the different benthic components to the total biopolymeric carbon, so that in highly impacted systems total benthic biomass becomes increasingly dominated by microbial components. PMID:11291449

  18. Possible energetic linkage between primary production and deep-sea benthic archaea: insight from biogeochemical lipidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-04-01

    Marine archaea have been recognized as a cosmopolitan player for global carbon and nitrogen cycles in the water column and sub-seafloor environments. Recent molecular evidence based on lipids and DNA suggests that uncultured benthic archaea dominate biomass in marine sediment, implying past primary production is a crucial factor for their presently ongoing heterotrophy (e.g., 1-4). Focusing on benthic archaeal heterotrophic processes in deep-sea sediment, we preliminarily traced 13C-signature in archaeal lipids to determine de novo and salvage pathway by in situ 13C-experiment. On the basis of the differential 13C-uptake, we suggest that benthic archaea recycles sedimentary relic membrane lipids to minimize the energy expenditure during 405 days (5). The 16S rRNA and quantitative PCR analysis indicated a community shift in the composition of the benthic archaeal community (e.g., Marine Group I, Marine Benthic Group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group). In bacteria and eukarya, it is commonly recognized that free fatty acids are incorporated into cells and converted to acyl-CoA, which are eventually incorporated into membrane lipids as a salvage pathway (cf. 6). Considering the suggestion of salvage pathway in archaeal membrane synthesis (7,8), we discuss archaeal heterotrophic processes in terms of possible biogeochemical lipidomics. Reference [1] Biddle et al., (2006) PNAS, 103, 3846-3851. [2] Lipp et al., (2008) Nature, 454, 991-994. [3] Kallmeyer et al., (2012) PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1203849109 [4] Hinrichs and Inagaki, (2012) Science, 338, 204-205. [5] Takano et al., (2010) Nature Geosci., 3, 858-861. [6] Silbert et al., (1968) J Bacteriol., 95, 1658-1665. [7] Poulter et al., (1988) JACS, 110, 2620-2624. [8] Ohnuma et al., (1996) J Biochem., 119, 541-547.

  19. Biogeography of Planktonic and Benthic Archaeal Communities in a Subtropical Eutrophic Estuary of China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anyi; Hou, Liyuan; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that Archaea are widespread and abundant in aquatic and terrestrial habitats and play fundamental roles in global biogeochemical cycles, yet the pattern and its ecological drivers of biogeographic distribution of archaeal community in estuarine ecosystem are still not well understood. Here, we investigated planktonic and benthic archaeal communities in the human-impacted Jiulong River estuary (JRE), southern China by using real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and Illumina 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) amplicon sequencing. RT-PCR analysis indicated that Archaea accounted for an average of 0.79 and 5.31 % of prokaryotic biomass in water and sediment samples of the JRE, respectively. The diversity of planktonic archaeal community decreased gradually from the river runoff to seawater, whereas that of benthic community did not show the similar pattern. The results of taxonomic assignments indicated that Thaumarchaeota (Nitrosopumilus and Cenarchaeum), Methanocorpusculum, and Methanospirillum were significantly more abundant in planktonic than benthic communities, whereas the relative abundances of Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group, Marine Benthic Group-B/-D, anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea -1/-2D, and South Africa Gold Mine Euryarchaeotic Group 1 were higher in sediments than in surface waters. Moreover, planktonic archaeal community composition varied significantly at broad and finer-scale taxonomic levels along the salinity gradient. Multivariate statistical analyses revealed that salinity is the main factor structuring the JRE planktonic but not benthic archaeal community at both total community and population level. SourceTrakcer analysis indicated that river might be a major source of archaea in the freshwater zone of the JRE. Overall, this study advances our understanding of the biogeographic patterns and its ecological drivers of estuarine archaeal communities. PMID:25805214

  20. Benthic-Pelagic Coupling: Effects on Nematode Communities along Southern European Continental Margins

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Ellen; Jones, Daniel O. B.; Manini, Elena; Bezerra, Tania Nara; Vanreusel, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Along a west-to-east axis spanning the Galicia Bank region (Iberian margin) and the Mediterranean basin, a reduction in surface primary productivity and in seafloor flux of particulate organic carbon was mirrored in the in situ organic matter quantity and quality within the underlying deep-sea sediments at different water depths (1200, 1900 and 3000 m). Nematode standing stock (abundance and biomass) and genus and trophic composition were investigated to evaluate downward benthic-pelagic coupling. The longitudinal decline in seafloor particulate organic carbon flux was reflected by a reduction in benthic phytopigment concentrations and nematode standing stock. An exception was the station sampled at the Galicia Bank seamount, where despite the maximal particulate organic carbon flux estimate, we observed reduced pigment levels and nematode standing stock. The strong hydrodynamic forcing at this station was believed to be the main cause of the local decoupling between pelagic and benthic processes. Besides a longitudinal cline in nematode standing stock, we noticed a west-to-east gradient in nematode genus and feeding type composition (owing to an increasing importance of predatory/scavenging nematodes with longitude) governed by potential proxies for food availability (percentage of nitrogen, organic carbon, and total organic matter). Within-station variability in generic composition was elevated in sediments with lower phytopigment concentrations. Standing stock appeared to be regulated by sedimentation rates and benthic environmental variables, whereas genus composition covaried only with benthic environmental variables. The coupling between deep-sea nematode assemblages and surface water processes evidenced in the present study suggests that it is likely that climate change will affect the composition and function of deep-sea nematodes. PMID:23565176

  1. Field experiments on responses of a freshwater, benthic macroinvertebrate community to vertebrate predators

    SciTech Connect

    Thorp, J.H.; Bergey, E.A.

    1981-04-01

    The seasonal importance of vertebrate predators in potentially regulating the abundance and diversity of the benthic macroinvertebrates in the littoral zone of a soft-bottom reservoir that receives thermal effluent from a nuclear production reactor was examined. Thirty-six predator (fish and turtle) exclusion cages (4 m/sup 2/) were placed in shallow water at six locations along a thermal gradient in Par Pond, a 1100-ha cooling reservoir on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina, USA. An additional 36 control plots (4 m/sup 2/) were also set up. Cages were in place during three, 3-mo test periods beginning in September 1977. Estimates of benthic density, taxon richness, and distribution within functional groups (defined by feeding mechanism) were calculated for each test period. Effects of temperature on predator-prey relationships were also determined. Experimental results of this study suggest that vertebrate predation was not the fundamental parameter organizing the benthic macroinvertebrate community in the littoral zone of this reservoir. Neither taxon richness nor density of total macroinvertebrates was conclusively related to predator treatment. Relationships between predator treatment and community response (changes in density and taxon richness) were generally unaffected by either plot locality, temperature fluctuations from thermal effluent, or seasonal changes. When data from caged and control plots were pooled, however, both location and water temperature individually had direct impacts on the benthic community. From these results and other field studies it is hypothesized that individual species of keystone benthic predators do not occur in the littoral zone of freshwater lentic environments with soft bottoms.

  2. Zebra mussels affect benthic predator foraging success and habitat choice on soft sediments.

    PubMed

    Beekey, M A; McCabe, D J; Marsden, J E

    2004-09-01

    The introduction of zebra mussels ( Dreissena spp.) to North America has resulted in dramatic changes to the complexity of benthic habitats. Changes in habitat complexity may have profound effects on predator-prey interactions in aquatic communities. Increased habitat complexity may affect prey and predator dynamics by reducing encounter rates and foraging success. Zebra mussels form thick contiguous colonies on both hard and soft substrates. While the colonization of substrata by zebra mussels has generally resulted in an increase in both the abundance and diversity of benthic invertebrate communities, it is not well known how these changes affect the foraging efficiencies of predators that prey on benthic invertebrates. We examined the effect of zebra mussels on the foraging success of four benthic predators with diverse prey-detection modalities that commonly forage in soft substrates: slimy sculpin ( Cottus cognatus), brown bullhead ( Ameirus nebulosus), log perch ( Percina caprodes), and crayfish ( Orconectes propinquus). We conducted laboratory experiments to assess the impact of zebra mussels on the foraging success of predators using a variety of prey species. We also examined habitat use by each predator over different time periods. Zebra mussel colonization of soft sediments significantly reduced the foraging efficiencies of all predators. However, the effect was dependent upon prey type. All four predators spent more time in zebra mussel habitat than in either gravel or bare sand. The overall effect of zebra mussels on benthic-feeding fishes is likely to involve a trade-off between the advantages of increased density of some prey types balanced against the reduction in foraging success resulting from potential refugia offered in the complex habitat created by zebra mussels. PMID:15278426

  3. Benthic Primary Production Budget of a Caribbean Reef Lagoon (Puerto Morelos, Mexico)

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Malik S.; Jantzen, Carin; Haas, Andreas F.; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    High photosynthetic benthic primary production (P) represents a key ecosystem service provided by tropical coral reef systems. However, benthic P budgets of specific ecosystem compartments such as macrophyte-dominated reef lagoons are still scarce. To address this, we quantified individual and lagoon-wide net (Pn) and gross (Pg) primary production by all dominant functional groups of benthic primary producers in a typical macrophyte-dominated Caribbean reef lagoon near Puerto Morelos (Mexico) via measurement of O2 fluxes in incubation experiments. The photosynthetically active 3D lagoon surface area was quantified using conversion factors to allow extrapolation to lagoon-wide P budgets. Findings revealed that lagoon 2D benthic cover was primarily composed of sand-associated microphytobenthos (40%), seagrasses (29%) and macroalgae (27%), while seagrasses dominated the lagoon 3D surface area (84%). Individual Pg was highest for macroalgae and scleractinian corals (87 and 86 mmol O2 m?2 specimen area d?1, respectively), however seagrasses contributed highest (59%) to the lagoon-wide Pg. Macroalgae exhibited highest individual Pn rates, but seagrasses generated the largest fraction (51%) of lagoon-wide Pn. Individual R was highest for scleractinian corals and macroalgae, whereas seagrasses again provided the major lagoon-wide share (68%). These findings characterise the investigated lagoon as a net autotrophic coral reef ecosystem compartment revealing similar P compared to other macrophyte-dominated coastal environments such as seagrass meadows and macroalgae beds. Further, high lagoon-wide P (Pg: 488 and Pn: 181 mmol O2 m?2 lagoon area d?1) and overall Pg:R (1.6) indicate substantial benthic excess production within the Puerto Morelos reef lagoon and suggest the export of newly synthesised organic matter to surrounding ecosystems. PMID:24367570

  4. A culture-based calibration of benthic foraminiferal paleotemperature proxies: delta O-18 and Mg/Ca results

    E-print Network

    Filipsson, H. L.

    Benthic foraminifera were cultured for five months at four temperatures (4, 7, 14 and 21 °C) to establish the temperature dependence of foraminiferal calcite ?18O and Mg/Ca. Two Bulimina species (B. aculeata and B. marginata) ...

  5. Estimating benthic secondary production from aquatic insect emergence in streams affected by mountaintop removal coal mining, West Virginia USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining recountours the Appalachian landscape, buries headwater stream channels, and degrades downstream water quality. The goal of this study was to compare benthic community production estimates, based on seasonal insect emergen...

  6. The paramount role of active suspension feeders in benthic food webs (Gili and Coma 1998), as well as their commercial

    E-print Network

    Yahel, Gitai

    Abstract Sponges, bivalves, and tunicates play an important role in the trophic dynamics of many benthic, and removal efficiencies of some coral reef sponges, bivalves, and tunicates are presented and discussed

  7. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Supplement: An evaluation of benthic habitat primary productivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Balcom, B.J.; Foster, M.A.; Fourqurean, J.J.; Heine, J.N.; Leonard, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Literature on current primary productivity was reviewed and evaluated for each of nine benthic communities or habitats, estimates of daily and annual benthic primary productivity were derived within each community, the benthic primary estimates were related to an estimate of areal extent of each community within or adjacent to each OCS planning area. Direct comparisons between habitats was difficult because of the varying measures and methodologies used. Coastal marshes were the most prevalent habitat type evaluated. Mangrove and coral reef habitats were highly productive but occur within few planning areas. Benthic diatoms and blue-green algae are less productive in terms of estimated annual productivity on a per square meter basis; these habitats have the potential to occur across wide areas of the OCS and should not be overlooked.

  8. IMPORTANCE OF MATERNAL TRANSFER OF THE PHOTOREACTIVE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FLUORANTHENE FROM BENTHIC ADULT BIVALVES TO THEIR PELAGIC LARVAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if maternal transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from benthic adult bivalves could result in phototoxicity to their pelagic larvae when exposed to ultraviolet light (UV). In these experiments, adult bivalves were e...

  9. Relationships among levels of benthic vegetation and pore-water sulfides, burrowing shrimp and infaunal amphipods in Yaquina estuary, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic amphipods are an important component of estuarine food webs, which in turn support ecological services provided by near shore commercial and recreational fisheries. In this study relationships among biological and geochemical aspects of the intertidal community were inve...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A STREAM BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE INTEGRITY INDEX (SBMII) FOR WADEABLE STREAMS IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stream Benthic Macroinvertebrate Integrity Index (SBMII), a multimetric biotic index for assessing biological conditions of wadeable streams, was developed using seven macroinvertebrate metrics (Ephemeroptera richness, Plecoptera richness, Trichoptera richness, Collector-Filt...

  11. Adult demography and larval processes in coastal benthic populations : intertidal barnacles in Southern California and Baja California

    E-print Network

    Tapia, Fabián

    2005-01-01

    The geographic distribution and dynamics of coastal benthic populations are shaped by physical - biological interactions affecting larval dispersal and the demography of juvenile and adult individuals. This thesis focused ...

  12. PROCEDURES FOR THE DERIVATION OF EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING SEDIMENT BENCHMARKS (ESBS) FOR THE PROTECTION OF BENTHIC ORGANISMS: PAH MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document describes procedures to derive concentrations of PAH mixtures in sediment which are protective of the presence of benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it accounts for the ...

  13. Link Layer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühleisen, M.; Bültmann, D.; Klagges, K.; Schinnenburg, M.

    The Data Link Layer (DLL) is located above the PHY layer described in the previous chapter and below the network layer described in Chapter 16. All data received from these layers is digital. Today most parts of the DLL are implemented in software, either as device drivers running on general purpose Central Processing Units (CPUs) or as firmware running on dedicated network interface hardware.

  14. Layer Stripping John Sylvester

    E-print Network

    Sylvester, John

    Layer Stripping John Sylvester Dept. of Mathematics, Box 354350 University of Washington Seattle a rigorous layer stripping approach to inverse scattering for the Helmholtz equation in one dimension the Born approximation in each thin layer. 1 Introduction The layer stripping approach to inverse

  15. History of benthic research in the English Channel: From general patterns of communities to habitat mosaic description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauvin, Jean-Claude

    2015-06-01

    Benthic studies in the English Channel (EC), a shallow megatidal and epicontinental sea, began in the 1960s and 1970s with the work of teams led by Norman Holme (UK) and Louis Cabioch (F). During this period, benthic sampling was mainly qualitative, i.e. using a device such as the 'Rallier du Baty' dredge in the case of the French team and a modified anchor dredge in the case of the British team. Studies were focused on acquiring knowledge of the main distributions of benthic communities and species. Surveys on the scale of the whole EC led to the recognition of general features and two main patterns were identified: 1) the role of hydrodynamics on the spatial distribution of sediment, benthic species and communities; 2) the presence of a west-east climatic gradient of faunal impoverishment. Benthic studies in the 1980s-1990s were focused on the beginning of the implementation of long-term survey at a limited number of sites to identify seasonal and multi-annual changes. In the first decade of the 2000s, the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive to define the Ecological Quality Status of marine environments increased the need to acquire better information of the structure and functioning of benthic communities, since benthic species and habitats were recognised as good indicators of human pressure on marine ecosystems. Faced with the increase of human maritime activities, the appearance of invasive species and the need to preserve sensitive marine habitats, benthic studies have been focused on developing a 'toolkit' to help in the decision-making and planning for both sound governance and sustainable management of marine resources and human activities in the English Channel. Multidisciplinary approaches were used to differentiate habitats in a more precise detail. Both indirect (side-scan sonar, ROV) and direct (grab sampling with benthos identification and grain-size analyses) approaches were used and combined to allow the description of benthic habitats using numerous descriptors. These approaches were mainly applied on a local scale, leading to the identification of habitat mosaics mainly in coarse sands, gravels and pebbly areas which cover 80% of the EC seabed. They also allowed the enrichment of the EUNIS habitat classification for infralittoral and circalittoral zones taking into account the scale of observations of benthic habitats. Moreover, several recommendations for future benthic studies are proposed within a HABITAT approach.

  16. Controls on the CO2 system by benthic-pelagic coupling in the southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Heiko; Braeckman, Ulrike; Meysman, Filip

    2013-04-01

    The shallowness of coastal seas permits close interaction between the sediments, the water column and the atmosphere. Furthermore, shallow coastal seas are regions of high primary production which leads to high fluxes of organic matter to the sediment. In the context of coastal oceans acting as a continental shelf pump, that is transferring CO2 from coastal seas into the open ocean, the role of benthic processes are only partly understood. Recent studies from the East China Sea and the North Sea show that sediments could play a more important role than previously anticipated. This so-called "benthic-pelagic alkalinity connection" states that anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in sediments are an important alkalinity source for coastal seas like the North Sea. During a basin wide North Sea cruise in September 2011, we measured rates of sedimentary alkalinity (TA) generation within permeable and muddy sediments of the North Sea at 19 stations. Using closed sediment incubations, benthic fluxes of alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, nutrients and oxygen were determined. In May 2012 we sampled an additional 7 stations in the Dutch coastal zone for the same parameters. Here we present preliminary results from both cruises. In the northern North Sea benthic TA fluxes were zero. For the southern North Sea TA fluxes varied between 0 and 21 mmol m-2 d-1 (September 2011) and 3-19 mmol m-2 d-1 (May 2012). Fluxes for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were generally higher than TA fluxes with a maximum of 29 mmol m-2 d-1 (September 2011). Furthermore, positive correlations between oxygen consumption rates and TA/DIC fluxes are showing significant higher TA and DIC fluxes in sediments with high oxygen consumption rates compared to sediments with lower oxygen consumption rates. Our results show that benthic fluxes are an important source for the TA and DIC budgets in the southern North Sea. Benthic alkalinity fluxes can potentially alter the pCO2 of the seawater and thus influence the CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. Alkalinity generation in sediments can therefore play an important role in the pH dynamics and therefore acidification in coastal systems.

  17. Food web flows through a sub-arctic deep-sea benthic community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontikaki, E.; van Oevelen, D.; Soetaert, K.; Witte, U.

    2011-11-01

    The benthic food web of the deep Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC) was modelled by using the linear inverse modelling methodology. The reconstruction of carbon pathways by inverse analysis was based on benthic oxygen uptake rates, biomass data and transfer of labile carbon through the food web as revealed by a pulse-chase experiment. Carbon deposition was estimated at 2.2 mmol C m -2 d -1. Approximately 69% of the deposited carbon was respired by the benthic community with bacteria being responsible for 70% of the total respiration. The major fraction of the labile detritus flux was recycled within the microbial loop leaving merely 2% of the deposited labile phytodetritus available for metazoan consumption. Bacteria assimilated carbon at high efficiency (0.55) but only 24% of bacterial production was grazed by metazoans; the remaining returned to the dissolved organic matter pool due to viral lysis. Refractory detritus was the basal food resource for nematodes covering ?99% of their carbon requirements. On the contrary, macrofauna seemed to obtain the major part of their metabolic needs from bacteria (49% of macrofaunal consumption). Labile detritus transfer was well-constrained, based on the data from the pulse-chase experiment, but appeared to be of limited importance to the diet of the examined benthic organisms (<1% and 5% of carbon requirements of nematodes and macrofauna respectively). Predation on nematodes was generally low with the exception of sub-surface deposit-feeding polychaetes that obtained 35% of their energy requirements from nematode ingestion. Carnivorous polychaetes also covered 35% of their carbon demand through predation although the preferred prey, in this case, was other macrofaunal animals rather than nematodes. Bacteria and detritus contributed 53% and 12% to the total carbon ingestion of carnivorous polychaetes suggesting a high degree of omnivory among higher consumers in the FSC benthic food web. Overall, this study provided a unique insight into the functioning of a deep-sea benthic community and demonstrated how conventional data can be exploited further when combined with state-of-the-art modelling approaches.

  18. Carbon flows in the benthic food web at the deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN (Fram Strait)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oevelen, Dick; Bergmann, Melanie; Soetaert, Karline; Bauerfeind, Eduard; Hasemann, Christiane; Klages, Michael; Schewe, Ingo; Soltwedel, Thomas; Budaeva, Nataliya E.

    2011-11-01

    The HAUSGARTEN observatory is located in the eastern Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean) and used as long-term monitoring site to follow changes in the Arctic benthic ecosystem. Linear inverse modelling was applied to decipher carbon flows among the compartments of the benthic food web at the central HAUSGARTEN station (2500 m) based on an empirical data set consisting of data on biomass, prokaryote production, total carbon deposition and community respiration. The model resolved 99 carbon flows among 4 abiotic and 10 biotic compartments, ranging from prokaryotes up to megafauna. Total carbon input was 3.78±0.31 mmol C m -2 d -1, which is a comparatively small fraction of total primary production in the area. The community respiration of 3.26±0.20 mmol C m -2 d -1 is dominated by prokaryotes (93%) and has lower contributions from surface-deposit feeding macro- (1.7%) and suspension feeding megafauna (1.9%), whereas contributions from nematode and other macro- and megabenthic compartments were limited to <1%. The high prokaryotic contribution to carbon processing suggests that functioning of the benthic food web at the central HAUSGARTEN station is comparable to abyssal plain sediments that are characterised by strong energy limitation. Faunal diet compositions suggest that labile detritus is important for deposit-feeding nematodes (24% of their diet) and surface-deposit feeding macrofauna (˜44%), but that semi-labile detritus is more important in the diets of deposit-feeding macro- and megafauna. Dependency indices on these food sources were also calculated as these integrate direct (i.e. direct grazing and predator-prey interactions) and indirect (i.e. longer loops in the food web) pathways in the food web. Projected sea-ice retreats for the Arctic Ocean typically anticipate a decrease in the labile detritus flux to the already food-limited benthic food web. The dependency indices indicate that faunal compartments depend similarly on labile and semi-labile detritus, which suggests that the benthic biota may be more sensitive to changes in labile detritus inputs than when assessed from diet composition alone. Species-specific responses to different types of labile detritus inputs, e.g. pelagic algae versus sympagic algae, however, are presently unknown and are needed to assess the vulnerability of individual components of the benthic food web.

  19. Overview of the chemical ecology of benthic marine invertebrates along the western Antarctic peninsula.

    PubMed

    McClintock, James B; Amsler, Charles D; Baker, Bill J

    2010-12-01

    Thirteen years ago in a review that appeared in the American Zoologist, we presented the first survey of the chemical and ecological bioactivity of Antarctic shallow-water marine invertebrates. In essence, we reported that despite theoretical predictions to the contrary the incidence of chemical defenses among sessile and sluggish Antarctic marine invertebrates was widespread. Since that time we and others have significantly expanded upon the base of knowledge of Antarctic marine invertebrates' chemical ecology, both from the perspective of examining marine invertebrates in new, distinct geographic provinces, as well as broadening the evaluation of the ecological significance of secondary metabolites. Importantly, many of these studies have been framed within established theoretical constructs, particularly the Optimal Defense Theory. In the present article, we review the current knowledge of chemical ecology of benthic marine invertebrates comprising communities along the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP), a region of Antarctica that is both physically and biologically distinct from the rest of the continent. Our overview indicates that, similar to other regions of Antarctica, anti-predator chemical defenses are widespread among species occurring along the WAP. In some groups, such as the sponges, the incidence of chemical defenses against predation is comparable to, or even slightly higher than, that found in tropical marine systems. While there is substantial knowledge of the chemical defenses of benthic marine invertebrates against predators, much less is known about chemical anti-foulants. The sole survey conducted to date suggests that secondary metabolites in benthic sponges are likely to be important in the prevention of fouling by benthic diatoms, yet generally lack activity against marine bacteria. Our understanding of the sensory ecology of Antarctic benthic marine invertebrates, despite its great potential, remains in its infancy. For example, along the WAP, community-level non-consumptive effects occur when amphipods chemically sense fish predators and respond by seeking refuge in chemically-defended macroalgae. Such interactions may be important in releasing amphipods from predation pressure and facilitating their unusually high abundances along the WAP. Moreover, recent studies on the sensory biology of the Antarctic keystone sea star Odontaster validus indicate that chemotactile-mediated interactions between conspecifics and other sympatric predatory sea stars may have significant ramifications in structuring community dynamics. Finally, from a global environmental perspective, understanding how chemical ecology structures marine benthic communities along the WAP must increasingly be viewed in the context of the dramatic impacts of rapid climatic change now occurring in this biogeographic region. PMID:21558253

  20. The timing of termination I in benthic ?18O of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Mediterranean basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konijnendijk, T.

    2014-12-01

    Terminations used to be regarded as effectively globally synchronous events. As such they were used (amongst other features) in aligning cores by Lisiecki and Raymo (2005) in their widely accepted global benthic stack. Skinner and Shackleton (2005) showed, however, that this assumption of synchronicity may not hold. In a detailed study of the last glacial-interglacial transition, an Atlantic record from the Iberian Margin and a record from the deep eastern equatorial Pacific - both dated by 14C for a solid, independent age estimate - show a significant discrepancy in timing: ~4,000 years. Indeed, in 2009 Lisiecki and Raymo published a separate reconstruction for the Atlantic and Pacific records in their stack, and found indications for diachronous termination signals for the last five terminations. We compared the Atlantic and Pacific records of Skinner and Shackleton (2005) to the benthic isotope record of ODP site 968 in the eastern Mediterranean published by Ziegler et al. (2010), to see how the Mediterranean record feeds into this discussion. The age model for this record is constrained by the carbon dated boundaries of saproprel 1 as well as correlation to the radiometrically dated cave record of Sanbao-Hulu (Wang et al., 2008). The benthic ?18O record of ODP site 968 resembles the Pacific record much more than the geographically closer Iberian Margin record. This raises questions: whether the Late Glacial/Early Holocene benthic record of MD99-2334K on the Iberian Margin is representative of Atlantic benthic ?18O; what oceanographic factors could have influenced the benthic ?18O of the sites involved; whether there is, after all, a globally synchronous, two-step deglaciation in the Mediterranean, Atlantic, and Pacific basins. Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005. DOI: 10.1029/2004PA001071 Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005. DOI: 10.1029/2009PA001732 Skinner and Shackleton, 2005: DOI: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2004.11.008 Wang et al. 2008: doi:10.1038/nature06692. Ziegler et al., 2010: DOI: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2010.03.011

  1. Major methodological constraints to the assessment of environmental status based on the condition of benthic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, João Paulo; Pinto, Vanessa; Sá, Erica; Silva, Gilda; Azeda, Carla; Pereira, Tadeu; Quintella, Bernardo; Raposo de Almeida, Pedro; Lino Costa, José; José Costa, Maria; Chainho, Paula

    2014-05-01

    The Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) was published in 2008 and requires Member States to take the necessary measures to achieve or maintain good environmental status in aquatic ecosystems by the year of 2020. The MSFD indicates 11 qualitative descriptors for environmental status assessment, including seafloor integrity, using the condition of the benthic community as an assessment indicator. Member States will have to define monitoring programs for each of the MSFD descriptors based on those indicators in order to understand which areas are in a Good Environmental Status and what measures need to be implemented to improve the status of areas that fail to achieve that major objective. Coastal and offshore marine waters are not frequently monitored in Portugal and assessment tools have only been developed very recently with the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). The lack of historical data and knowledge on the constraints of benthic indicators in coastal areas requires the development of specific studies addressing this issue. The major objective of the current study was to develop and test and experimental design to assess impacts of offshore projects. The experimental design consisted on the seasonal and interannual assessment of benthic invertebrate communities in the area of future implementation of the structures (impact) and two potential control areas 2 km from the impact area. Seasonal benthic samples were collected at nine random locations within the impact and control areas in two consecutive years. Metrics included in the Portuguese benthic assessment tool (P-BAT) were calculated since this multimetric tool was proposed for the assessment of the ecological status in Portuguese coastal areas under the WFD. Results indicated a high taxonomic richness in this coastal area and no significant differences were found between impact and control areas, indicating the feasibility of establishing adequate control areas in marine ecosystems. Nevertheless, significant differences were found between different seasons and different years, showing that the coastal benthic communities important temporal variations. Although those variations did not affect the status assessment based on metrics that considered the ratio between sensitive and tolerant taxa, diversity indices showed different classifications between seasons and years. These results indicate the need for a temporal stratification of the monitoring programs. That might be achieved by setting different thresholds for specific seasons or selecting specific monitoring seasons. It might also require a regular assessment of the environmental conditions that support the identification of outlier years, which monitoring results should be carefully considered.

  2. Pelagic-benthic coupling within an upwelling system of the subtropical northeast Atlantic over the last 35 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. L.; Filipsson, H. L.; Romero, O. E.; Stuut, J.-B. W.; Donner, B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a high resolution, multiproxy study of the relationship between pelagic and benthic environments of a coastal upwelling system in the subtropical NE Atlantic Ocean. Marine sediments corresponding to late MIS3 to the Holocene in the radiocarbon dated core GeoB7926, retrieved off Mauritania (21°N) were analysed to reconstruct productivity in surface waters and its linkage to deep waters during the last 35 ka BP. High latitude cold events and changes in atmospheric and oceanographic dynamics influenced upwelling intensity over this time period. Subsequently, this caused changes in primary productivity off this low-latitude coastal upwelling locality. The benthic foraminiferal fauna displays four main community shifts corresponding to fundamental climatic events, first of all during late MIS3 (35-28 ka BP), secondly from 28 to 19 ka BP (including Heinrich event 2 and the LGM), thirdly within Heinrich event 1, the Bølling Allerød and the Younger Dryas (18-11.5 ka BP) and finally during the Holocene (11.5-0 ka BP). In particular, strong pelagic-benthic coupling is apparent in MIS 3, as demonstrated by increased primary productivity, indicated by moderate DAR and the dominance of benthic foraminiferal species which prefer fresh phytodetritus. A decline in upwelling intensity and nutrient availability follows, which resulted in a proportionately larger amount of older, degraded matter, provoking a shift in the benthic foraminifera fauna composition. This rapid response of the benthic environment continues with a progressive increase in upwelling intensity due to sea level and oceanographic changes and according high surface production during the LGM. During Heinrich event 1 and the Younger Dryas, extreme levels of primary production actually hindered benthic environment through the development of low oxygen conditions. After this period, a final change in benthic foraminiferal community composition occurs which indicates a return to more oxygenated conditions during the Holocene.

  3. Species diversity variations in Neogene deep-sea benthic foraminifera at ODP Hole 730A, western Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugm, Yuvaraja; Gupta, Anil K.; Panigrahi, Mruganka K.

    2014-10-01

    Deep-sea benthic foraminifera are an important and widely used marine proxy to understand paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes on regional and global scales, owing to their sensitivity to oceanic and climatic turnovers. Some species of benthic foraminifera are sensitive to changes in water mass properties whereas others are sensitive to organic fluxes and deep-sea oxygenation. Benthic faunal diversity has been found closely linked to food web, bottom water oxygen levels, and substrate and water mass stability. The present study is aimed at analyzing species diversity trends in benthic foraminifera and their linkages with Indian monsoon variability during the Neogene. Species diversity of benthic foraminifera is examined in terms of number of species (S), information function (H), equitability (E) and Sanders' rarefied values, which were combined with relative abundances of high and low productivity benthic foraminifera at Ocean Drilling Program Hole 730A, Oman margin, western Arabian Sea. The Oman margin offers the best opportunity to understand monsoon-driven changes in benthic diversity since summer monsoon winds have greater impact on the study area. The species diversity was higher during the early Miocene Climatic Optimum (˜17.2-16.4 Ma) followed by a decrease during 16.4-13 Ma coinciding with a major increase in Antarctic ice volume and increased formation of Antarctic Bottom Water. All the diversity parameters show an increase during 13-11.6 Ma, a gradual decrease during 11.6-9 Ma and then an increase with a maximum at 7 Ma. Thereafter the values show little change until 1.2 Ma when all the parameters abruptly decrease. The benthic foraminiferal populations and diversity at Hole 730A were mainly driven by the Indian monsoon, and polar waters might have played a minor or no role since early Neogene period as the Arabian Sea is an enclosed basin.

  4. Data report: Oligocene paleoceanography of the equatorial Pacific Ocean: planktonic and benthic stable isotope results from Site 1218 

    E-print Network

    Wade, Bridget S.; P??like, Heiko

    2005-01-01

    , J.V. (Eds.) Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results Volume 199 DATA REPORT: OLIGOCENE PALEOCEANOGRAPHY OF THE EQUATORIAL PACIFIC OCEAN: PLANKTONIC AND BENTHIC FORAMINIFER STABLE ISOTOPE RESULTS FROM SITE 1218 1 Bridget S... the Northern Hemisphere. Previous work has suggested that the volume of the Antarctic ice sheet 1 Wade, B.S., and P?like, H., 2005. Data report: Oligocene paleoceanography of the equatorial Pacific Ocean: planktonic and benthic foraminifer stable isotope...

  5. Data Report: Oligocene Paleoceanography of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean: Planktonic and Benthic Foraminifer Stable Isotope Results from Site 1218 

    E-print Network

    Wade, Bridget, S.; P??like, Heiko

    2005-01-01

    .) Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results Volume 199 17. DATA REPORT: OLIGOCENE PALEOCEANOGRAPHY OF THE EQUATORIAL PACIFIC OCEAN: PLANKTONIC AND BENTHIC FORAMINIFER STABLE ISOTOPE RESULTS FROM SITE 1218 1 Bridget S. Wade 2,3 and Heiko... Hemisphere. Previous work has suggested that the volume of the Antarctic ice sheet 1 Wade, B.S., and P?like, H., 2005. Data report: Oligocene paleoceanography of the equatorial Pacific Ocean: planktonic and benthic foraminifer stable isotope results from...

  6. Dissolved organic carbon concentration controls benthic primary production: results from in situ chambers in north-temperate lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godwin, Sean C.; Jones, Stuart E.; Weidel, Brian C.; Solomon, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated several potential drivers of primary production by benthic algae (periphyton) in north-temperate lakes. We used continuous dissolved oxygen measurements from in situ benthic chambers to quantify primary production by periphyton at multiple depths across 11 lakes encompassing a broad range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total phosphorous (TP) concentrations. Light-use efficiency (primary production per unit incident light) was inversely related to average light availability (% of surface light) in 7 of the 11 study lakes, indicating that benthic algal assemblages exhibit photoadaptation, likely through physiological or compositional changes. DOC alone explained 86% of the variability in log-transformed whole-lake benthic production rates. TP was not an important driver of benthic production via its effects on nutrient and light availability. This result is contrary to studies in other systems, but may be common in relatively pristine north-temperate lakes. Our simple empirical model may allow for the prediction of whole-lake benthic primary production from easily obtained measurements of DOC concentration.

  7. A Comparison of Trichoptera (Caddisfly) Species Diversity From Several Peninsular Florida Waterbodies Using Benthic and Terrestrial Sampling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, A. K.; Denson, D. R.

    2005-05-01

    Typically, environmental agencies tasked with water quality bioassessment solely use benthic sampling methods to collect aquatic insects. Because most aquatic insects live in water only as immatures, benthic samples consist largely of larvae. In Trichoptera, and most insect groups, alpha taxonomy is chiefly based on adult reproductive structures, thus specimens from benthic samples in many cases cannot be assigned species names. Therefore, benthic sampling gives a limited picture of species diversity within aquatic insect communities and may result in monitoring programs not detecting biological impairment involving population losses or declines. In this study of several waterbodies on the Florida peninsula we compare caddisfly species diversity in samples collected using benthic protocols used by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection with that of samples of adult caddisflies collected using UV-blacklight. Light-trap samples yielded significantly higher numbers of both caddisfly individuals and taxa. Benthic samples because of smaller sample sizes and genus-level determinations gave relatively incomplete characterizations of caddisfly community structure. So that aquatic communities can be better understood and protected, we recommend that environmental agencies begin to incorporate additional sampling methods such as light trapping into their assessment and monitoring programs.

  8. Preliminary observations on the benthic marine algae of the Gorringe seabank (northeast Atlantic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittley, Ian; da Silva Vaz Álvaro, Nuno Miguel; de Melo Azevedo Neto, Ana Isabel

    2014-06-01

    Examination of marine samples collected in 2006 from the Gettysburg and Ormonde seamounts on the Gorringe seabank southwest of Portugal has revealed 29 benthic Chlorophyta, Phaeophyceae (Ochrophyta), and Rhodophyta that were identified provisionally to genus and to species. Combining lists for the present and a previous expedition brings the total of algae thus far recorded to 48. The brown alga Zonaria tournefourtii and the red alga Cryptopleura ramosa were the most abundant species in the present collections. The kelp Laminaria ochroleuca was present only in the Gettysburg samples while Saccorhiza polyschides was observed only on the Ormonde seamount. Comparisons with the benthic marine algae recorded on seamounts in the mid-Atlantic Azores archipelago show features in common, notably kelp forests of L. ochroleuca at depths below 30 m and Z. tournefortii dominance in shallower waters.

  9. Steady-state model describing bioaccumulation of organic contaminants in benthic invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H.; Lazar, R.; Haffner, G.D.; Whittle, D.M.; Gobas, F.A.P.C.

    1995-12-31

    Although both Canada and the United States use the equilibrium partitioning (EP) method to establish sediment quality criteria guidelines, the ability of this method to accurately predict bioaccumulation has not been thoroughly tested. When predictions of the EP model were compared to PCB data, on five species of benthic invertebrates from western Lake Erie, actual concentrations exceeded predicted concentrations for congeners with log K{sub ow} > 6. A comparison of water/sediment, organism/sediment and organism/water fugacity ratios indicated that western Lake Erie is not in thermodynamic equilibrium. An alternative model to the EP model was derived which does not assume that the system is in equilibrium and provides a mechanism for biomagnification. The model accurately predicted bioaccumulation in benthic invertebrates.

  10. Interactive effects of hypoxia and PBDE on larval settlement of a marine benthic polychaete.

    PubMed

    Shin, Paul K S; Gopalakrishnan, Singaram; Chan, Alice K Y; Qian, P Y; Wu, Rudolf S S

    2014-08-30

    Marine benthic polychaete Capitella sp. I is widely known to adapt to polluted habitats; however, its response to xenobiotics under hypoxic conditions has been rarely studied. This research aimed to test the hypothesis that interactive effects of hypoxia and congener BDE-47 of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), which is ubiquitous in marine sediments, may alter the settlement of Capitella sp. I. Our results revealed that under hypoxic condition, settlement success and growth in body length of Capitella larvae were significantly reduced compared to those under normoxia of similar BDE-47 concentration. While no significant changes in morphology of settled larvae were noted in both exposure conditions, the presence of BDE-47 could enhance polychaete growth. The present findings demonstrated that the interactive effects of hypoxia and environmentally realistic concentrations of BDE-47 in sediments could affect polychaete settlement, which, in turn, reduce its recruitment and subsequent population size in the marine benthic ecosystem. PMID:24835374

  11. Benthic community of the Savannah River below a peaking hydropower station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Patrick L.; Nichols, S. Jerrine

    1986-01-01

    The Savannah River below Hartwell Dam, on the South Carolina-Georgia border, contains at least 206 benthic invertebrate taxa, even though this tailwater undergoes substantial daily fluctuations in water flow, temperature, and dissolved oxygen. Oligochaetes, chironomids, and amphipods dominate the community immediately below the dam. Farther downstream, larger organisms (i.e., Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, etc.) dominate the benthic community. The high diversity of this system is primarily attributed to the intensive effort we expended to identify invertebrates to species level. We conclude that tailwaters associated with peaking hydropower stations may in fact have the diverse community assemblages found in natural streams and that this has not been recognized by other investigators because the bulk of the fauna is made up of small forms that are easily overlooked. Comparisons of tailwater fauna communities with those in control areas should be limited to rivers of similar size.

  12. Now an empty mudflat: past and present benthic abundances in the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraan, Casper; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2011-03-01

    The benthic fauna of two areas in the western Dutch Wadden Sea, Posthuiswad and Staart van Schieringhals, was described in 1930-1960 and again between 1996 and 2005. Here, we document the changes. Whereas both areas formerly had high densities of species that biogenically structured the intertidal mudflats such as mussels Mytilus edulis and cockles Cerastoderma edule, by 1996 they had shown a tenfold decrease in the densities of molluscs, with no recovery till 2005. Although the number of species of polychaetes and crustaceans may not have changed much, their relative abundance did. Nowadays, more polychaete species are common than before. We briefly discuss whether the changes in benthic community composition could be due to industrial fishery practices or eutrophication effects.

  13. Surficial bioturbation and rapid benthic remineralization in the Cape Hatteras shelf/slope region. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Aller; Josephine Y. Aller; C. Lee; J. Kirk Cochran

    1999-03-17

    This is a final report for the DOE of grant DE-FG02-92ER61464 ''Surficial bioturbation and rapid benthic remineralization in the Cape Hatteras shelf slope region''. Over the past 6 years we have participated in a multidisciplinary field study called the Ocean margins Program (OMP) to examine the importance of continental margins in the global carbon cycle. Specifically, we have focused on the southern portion of the Mid-Atlantic Bight between Cape Hatteras and Chesapeake Bay where a large flux of freshwater and organic carbon enters the North Atlantic Ocean. Additionally, during the first stage of this project, we developed the use of CM-a distributions in sediments as a quantitative indicator of benthic C flux and remineralization rates. The primary objective of our research group has been to understand mechanisms and quantify biogeochemical processes in the seabed that affect cycling, flux, and storage of carbon on the ocean margin of the Mid-Atlantic Bight.

  14. Holocene melt-water variations recorded in Antarctic coastal marine benthic assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Berkman, P.A.

    1992-03-01

    Climate changes can influence the input of meltwater from the polar ice sheets. In Antarctica, signatures of meltwater input during the Holocene may be recorded in the benthic fossils which exist at similar altitudes above sea level in emerged beaches around the continent Interpreting the fossils as meltwater proxy records would be enhanced by understanding the modern ecology of the species in adjacent marine environments. Characteristics of an extant scallop assemblage in West McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, have been evaluated across a summer meltwater gradient to provide examples of meltwater records that may be contained in proximal scallop fossils. Integrating environmental proxies from coastal benthic assemblages around Antarctica, over ecological and geological time scales, is a necessary step in evaluating the marginal responses of the ice sheets to climate changes during the Holocene.

  15. Carriage of Clostridium perfringens by benthic crabs in a sewage-polluted estuary.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Luciano F; Redondo, Leandro M; Díaz Carrasco, Juan M; Pereyra, Ana María; Farber, Marisa; Jost, Helen; Fernández-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2015-08-15

    The Estuary of Bahía Blanca (EBB), Argentina, is an important wetland under intense sewage pollution. We investigated the occurrence of Clostridium perfringens (CP) in populations of two benthic crabs (Neohelice granulata and Cyrtograpsus angulatus) and in sediment from the EBB. CP was found in 49.1% of the crabs and all of the isolates were identified as type A. The alpha (cpa) and enterotoxin (cpe) encoding genes were identified. Genetic analyses identified 13 novel sequence types, and found no clustering among isolates, suggesting that CP is not part of the crabs' commensal flora. CP carriage was 51 times more likely in crabs from the area nearest sewage outfalls compared with crabs from a reference site. Our in vitro experiments suggest that the carriage of CP in crabs is transient. The use of these benthic crabs as monitoring organisms of sewage pollution in coastal habitats is proposed. PMID:26130524

  16. Analysis of selected benthic communities in Florida Everglades with reference to their physical and chemical environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1976-01-01

    Species diversity and numbers of benthic macroinvertebrates were determined at 12 sites, both canals and marshes, in the Everglades of south Florida. The values calculated are used to indicate long-term trends in water quality and variations between study areas. Species diversity at all sites was generally in a range indicative of degraded water quality. The number of organisms per square metre of bottom surface was highly variable ranging from 43 to 8,200 organisms. Chemical analysis of water and bottom material indicated no gross contamination from sewage or agricultural runoff in any of the canals where benthic organisms were collected. Other physical factors such as depth, velocity of flow, substrate type, and water-level fluctuation were responsible for the low species diversities and variable numbers of organisms, rather than contamination from urban or agricultural areas.

  17. Significance of microcystin production by benthic communities in water treatment systems of arid zones.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, I; Aboal, M; Zafra, E; Campillo, D

    2008-02-01

    The study of the dynamics of phytobenthic and phytoplankton communities was undertaken, during a year, in the regulation reservoir associated with a water treatment plant (WTP), which provides the city of Murcia (Spain) with drinking water. Water samples were collected in different stages of the treatment. In the reservoir, the presence of dissolved and intracellular microcystins is constant, both in benthos and in plankton. The collected samples show a positive correlation between the dissolved microcystins and the benthic ones in the reservoir itself, as well as in an upstream reservoir (Ojós Reservoir). The treatment process (ozone+clarification+ozone+activated carbon) is very effective in the removal of toxins, and the drinking water produced is totally free of microcystins. The incorporation of the benthic communities in the routine check for the presence of microcystins is recommended, since it is not compulsory according to the current legislation. PMID:17949775

  18. Nitrate Accumulation in Aerobic Hypolimnia: Relative Importance of Benthic and Planktonic Nitrifiers in an Oligotrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Warwick F.; Downes, Malcolm T.

    1981-01-01

    Both nitrate and nitrous oxide accumulate in the hypolimnion of the oligotrophic Lake Taupo, New Zealand, throughout stratification. The two forms of oxidized nitrogen increase in concentration with increasing depth toward the sediments, where the dissolved concentrations of reduced nitrogen are two orders of magnitude higher than concentrations in the overlying water. Nitrification rates were measured by dark [14C]CO2 assays with and without the inhibitor nitrapyrin. The fastest rates were recorded for planktonic nitrifiers in the epilimnion and benthic species in the surficial 2.5 mm of the sediments. Nitrifying bacteria were least active in the deep hypolimnion. Deepwater accumulation of NO3? in Lake Taupo must therefore be a product of benthic rather than planktonic nitrification. PMID:16345852

  19. Maintenance of abyssal benthic foraminifera under high pressure and low temperature: some preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, C. M.; Gooday, A. J.; Green, J. C.

    1993-04-01

    Abyssal benthic foraminifera have been maintained alive for periods of several weeks under laboratory simulated deep-sea conditions of high pressure and low temperature. In separate experiments, bacterial-sized fluorescent microspheres and three species of microalgae were supplied as food particles. Subsequent light and electron microscopy showed that the algae had been ingested by several foraminiferal species. Furthermore, the fine structure of the foraminiferal cytoplasm was well-preserved which indicates, along with the ingestion of algal food, that they had remained in a viable condition during the incubation. Other observations indicate that abyssal benthic foraminifera ingest naturally occurring photosynthetic cells carried to the deep-sea bed by rapidly sedimenting aggregates. The ability to keep foraminifera originating from depths exceeding 4000 m alive in the laboratory paves the way for the experimental investigation of some important issues in deep-sea biology and palaeoceanography.

  20. The nearshore benthic community of Kasatochi Island, one year after the 2008 volcanic eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jewett, S.C.; Bodkin, J.L.; Chenelot, H.; Esslinger, G.G.; Hoberg, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    A description is presented of the nearshore benthic community of Kasatochi Island 1012 months after a catastrophic volcanic eruption in 2008. The eruption extended the coastline of the island approximately 400 m offshore, mainly along the south, southeast, and southwest shores, to roughly the 20 m isobath. Existing canopy kelp of Eualaria (Alaria) fistulosa, as well as limited understory algal species and associated fauna (e.g., urchin barrens) on the hard substratum were apparently buried following the eruption. Samples and observations revealed the substrate around the island in 2009 was comprised almost entirely of medium and coarse sands with a depauperate benthic community, dominated by opportunistic pontogeneiid amphipods. Comparisons of habitat and biological communities with other nearby Aleutian Islands, as well as with the Icelandic volcanic island of Surtsey, confirm dramatic reductions in flora and fauna consistent with an early stage of recovery from a large-scale disturbance event. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  1. Rapid deterioration of sediment surface habitats in Bellingham Bay, Washington State, as indicated by benthic foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Elizabeth A; Martin, Ruth A; Martin, David E; Apple, Jude

    2015-08-15

    Foraminiferal assemblages in sediment grab samples were utilized to evaluate the impacts of anthropogenic activities on benthic habitats in Bellingham Bay, Washington State, U.S.A. Seventy-three samples taken in 1987, 1997, 2006 and 2010 yielded 35 species of foraminifera from 28 genera. Assemblage composition and diversity data indicate a marked deterioration between 1987 and 2010, contrary to the published Chemical Index, but analogous to the situation with macrobiota. Correlation of diversity with chemical pollutants and metals did not identify any significant correlations, however, an unrelated but highly relevant study of bottom water dissolved oxygen concentrations and pH in Bellingham Bay suggests eutrophication with accompanying hypoxia and acidification may be part of the cause. Thus, the metrics of contamination alone do not adequately characterize habitat viability, and benthic foraminiferal assemblages provide insight into the health of coastal ecosystems. PMID:26059642

  2. Mixed layer warming-deepening in the Mediterranean Sea and its effect on the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, Irene; Boero, Ferdinando; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Zambianchi, Enrico; Lionello, Piero

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at investigating the evolution of the ocean mixed layer in the Mediterranean Sea and linking it to the occurrence of mass mortalities of benthic invertebrates. The temporal evolution of selected parameters describing the mixed layer and the seasonal thermocline is provided for the whole Mediterranean Sea for spring, summer and autumn and for the period 1945-2011. For this analysis all temperature profiles collected in the basin with bottles, Mechanical Bathy-Thermographs (MBT), eXpendable Bathy-Thermographs (XBT), and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) have been used (166,990). These data have been extracted from three public sources: the MEDAR-MEDATLAS, the World Ocean Database 2013 and the MFS-VOS program. Five different methods for estimating the mixed layer depth are compared using temperature profiles collected at the DYFAMED station in the Ligurian Sea and one method, the so-called three-segment method, has been selected for a systematic analysis of the evolution of the uppermost part of the whole Mediterranean Sea. This method approximates the upper water column with three segments representing mixed layer, thermocline and deep layer and has shown to be the most suitable method for capturing the mixed layer depth for most shapes of temperature profiles. Mass mortalities events of benthic invertebrates have been identified by an extensive search of all data bases in ISI Web of Knowledge considering studies published from 1945 to 2011. Studies reporting the geographical coordinates, the timing of the events, the species involved and the depth at which signs of stress occurred have been considered. Results show a general increase of thickness and temperature of the mixed layer, deepening and cooling of the thermocline base in summer and autumn. Possible impacts of these changes are mass mortalities events of benthic invertebrates that have been documented since 1983 mainly in summer and autumn. It is also shown that most mass mortalities occurred in months with anomalously high mixed layer depth temperature leading to the conclusion that warming of upper Mediterranean Sea has allowed interannual temperature variability to reach environmental conditions beyond the thermal tolerance of some species.

  3. Benthic bacterial production and protozoan predation in a silty freshwater environment.

    PubMed

    Wieltschnig, C; Fischer, U R; Kirschner, A K T; Velimirov, B

    2003-07-01

    The interrelation of heterotrophic bacteria with bacterivorous protists has been widely studied in pelagic environments, but data on benthic habitats, especially in freshwater systems, are still scarce. We present a seasonal study focusing on bacterivory by heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and ciliates in the silty sediment of a temperate macrophyte-dominated oxbow lake. From January 2001 to February 2002 we monitored the standing stock of bacteria and protozoa, bacterial secondary production (BSP, (3)H-thymidine, and (14)C-leucine incorporation), and grazing rates of HNF and ciliates on bacteria (FLB uptake) in the oxic sediment of the investigated system. BSP ranged from 470 to 4050 micro g C L(-1) wet sediment h(-1). The bacterial compartment turned out to be highly dynamic, indicated by population doubling times (0.6-10.0 d), which were comparable to those in the water column of the investigated system. Yet, the control mechanisms acting upon the bacterial population led to a relative constancy of bacterial standing stock during a year. Ingestion rates of protozoan grazers were 0-20.0 bacteria HNF(-1) h(-1) and 0-97.6 bacteria ciliate(-1) h(-1). HNF and ciliates together cropped 0-14 (mean 4)% of BSP, indicating that they did not significantly contribute to benthic bacterial mortality during any period of the year. The low impact of protozoan grazing was due to the low numbers of HNF and ciliates in relation to bacteria (1.8-3.5 x 10(4) bacteria HNF(-1), 0.9-3.1 x 10(6) bacteria ciliate(-1)). Thus, grazing by HNF and ciliates could be ruled out as a parameter regulating bacterial standing stock or production in the sediment of the investigated system, but the factors responsible for the limitation of benthic protistan densities and the fate of benthic BSP remained unclear. PMID:12739079

  4. Integrating Multibeam Backscatter Angular Response, Mosaic and Bathymetry Data for Benthic Habitat Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam echosounders (MBES) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF) machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with their derivatives, constitutes an important improvement for studying the distribution of benthic habitats, which is necessary for effective marine spatial planning and resource management. PMID:24824155

  5. Rhythmic behaviour of marine benthopelagic species and the synchronous dynamics of benthic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Sbragaglia, Valerio; Tecchio, Samuele; Navarro, Joan; Company, Joan B.

    2015-01-01

    Light-intensity cycles drive the relentless motion of species in the oceans, and water column migrants may cyclically make contact with the seabed, hence influencing the temporal dynamism of benthic ecosystems. The influence of light on this process remains largely unknown to date. In this study, we focus on the occurrence of day-night changes in benthic communities on the western Mediterranean continental shelf (100 m depth) and slope (400 m depth) as a potential result of a behaviourally sustained benthopelagic coupling. We analysed fluctuations in species abundance based on trawling at hourly intervals over a 4-day period as a proxy of activity rhythms at the seabed. We also measured light in situ to assess how the depth-related decrease of its intensity influences species rhythms and the occurrence of the putative benthopelagic synchronisation. Temporal similarities in the catch patterns for different species were screened by dendrogram analysis. On the continental shelf, species performing diel migrations (i.e., over a 24 h period) that were either vertical (i.e., benthopelagic) or horizontal across depths (i.e., nektobenthic) clustered together separately from the more sedentary endobenthic and epibenthic species. At the same depth, waveform analysis showed a significant diurnal increase in the catch of water column species and benthic species at night. Such coupling was absent on the continental slope, where light intensity was several orders of magnitude lower than that on the shelf. Our data indicate that diel activity rhythms, which are well known for vertical pelagic migrators, are also evident in the benthos. We discuss the role of light as a major evolutionary driver shaping the composition and biodiversity of benthic communities via visual predation.

  6. QUANTITATIVE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BENTHIC ALGAL COMMUNITIES ALONG A DEPTH GRADIENT IN LAKE MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study analyzes the impact of conditions associated with depth upon benthic algal communities in Lake Michigan. Diatom abundance was greater at 9.1 and 14.6 m depths than 6.5, 22.6 and 27.4 m. Shallow (6.5 m), mid-depth (9.1 and 14.6 m) and deep (22.6 and 27.4 m) zones were d...

  7. Effect of oceanographic and depositional events on Neogene benthic foraminiferal biostratigraphy of California

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, G.H.

    1986-05-01

    The relationships between Neogene environmental events and associated faunal distributional patterns of continental margin benthic foraminiferal faunas are affected or controlled by both local and regional events. These events are related to the complex evolution of the oceanic environment and the California continental margin. Evidence from Deep Sea Drilling Project sites drilled in the Pacific Ocean indicates that major changes in the oceanic environment have produced major faunal turnovers, migrations, and reorganizations of deep-sea benthic foraminiferal assemblages during the Neogene. DSDP Sites 467, 468, and 469, and the Naples Bluff section of southern California, the distributional patterns of continental margin benthic foraminiferal assemblages are strongly related to Neogene climatic-oceanic events. The faunal changes and responses described from the continental margin assemblages are similar in composition and timing to changes documented in the deep sea. The response of the benthic foraminiferal faunas is almost simultaneous across the continental margin in regard to the regional oceanic-climatic events. Several of these events were associated with changes in surface productivity and expansion of the oxygen minima. Local events involved the change in sedimentation and tectonic activity. The oceanic reorganization that occurred 15-13 Ma is responsible for a major change in the faunal patterns across the continental margin. Early Neogene faunas (the Saucesian, Relizian, and Luisian assemblages) were replaced by the Mohnian assemblage. The climatic-oceanic event at 9 to 8 Ma involved an increase in Antarctic glaciation and a resultant increase in upwelling and surface productivity. The associated faunal changes consist of a shift in the character of the Mohnian assemblage. At approximately 5.2 Ma, the Repettian assemblage increased considerably probably in relation to the Messinian event.

  8. Changes in benthic ecosystems and ocean circulation in the Southeast Atlantic across Eocene Thermal Maximum 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennions, S. M.; Thomas, E.; Schmidt, D. N.; Lunt, D.; Ridgwell, A.

    2015-08-01

    Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2) occurred ~1.8 Myr after the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and, like the PETM, was characterized by a negative carbon isotope excursion and warming. We combined benthic foraminiferal and sedimentological records for Southeast Atlantic Sites 1263 (1500 m paleodepth) and 1262 (3600 m paleodepth) to show that benthic foraminiferal diversity and accumulation rates declined more precipitously and severely at the shallower site during peak ETM2. As the sites are in close proximity, differences in surface productivity cannot have caused this differential effect. Instead, we infer that changes in ocean circulation across ETM2 may have produced more pronounced warming at intermediate depths (Site 1263). The effects of warming include increased metabolic rates, a decrease in effective food supply and increased deoxygenation, thus potentially explaining the more severe benthic impacts at Site 1263. In response, bioturbation may have decreased more at Site 1263 than at Site 1262, differentially affecting bulk carbonate records. We use a sediment-enabled Earth system model to test whether a reduction in bioturbation and/or the likely reduced carbonate saturation of more poorly ventilated waters can explain the more extreme excursion in bulk ?13C and sharper transition in wt % CaCO3 at Site 1263. We find that both enhanced acidification and reduced bioturbation during the ETM2 peak are needed to account for the observed features. Our combined ecological and modeling analysis illustrates the potential role of ocean circulation changes in amplifying local environmental changes and driving temporary, but drastic, loss of benthic biodiversity and abundance.

  9. Distribution, abundance and benthic-pelagic coupling of suspended hydroids on Georges Bank1, 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concelman, Stephanie; Bollens, Stephen M.; Sullivan, Barbara K.; Madin, Laurence P.; Horgan, Erich; Butler, Mari; van Keuren, Donna

    Clytia spp. hydroids (Phylum Cnidaria), typically attached to a substrate during their asexual, polyp stage, have been found in significant numbers within the mesozooplankton on Georges Bank, North Atlantic Ocean. We examined unpublished historical records of the 1939-1941 cruises of the R/V Atlantis and obtained samples at four-study sites on Georges Bank in June/July 1995 in an attempt to (1) quantify the planktonic and benthic distributions of hydroids on Georges Bank, and (2) determine the coupling between benthic and pelagic habitats of this population. We found that planktonic hydroids have a patchy distribution, varying both spatially and temporally (most abundant in summer months, absent in winter). In 1939-1941 the planktonic hydroids were most broadly distributed following a spring (1940) with strong wind events; hydroids were absent from all samples in 1941. In 1995 we found the highest abundance of planktonic Clytia spp. hydroids (6213.5±1343.6 hydranths m -3) in the central crest of the bank, "downstream" in the Georges Bank circulation pattern from sites along the northeast peak of the Bank where large populations of benthic Clytia spp. hydroids were found (up to 6465 hydranths m -2). Our plankton sampling did not show significant numbers of hydroids in the water column at the Northeast peak sites, indicating that large numbers of planktonic hydroids are not being introduced into the Bank's circulation patterns from off-Bank sites to the northeast (e.g. Scotian shelf). The source population for planktonic hydroids found in the central region of the Bank is most likely the benthic habitats on the northeast peak of the Bank. We hypothesize, and our limited data suggest, that hydroids are detached from the benthos by storm action or other disturbance, advected clockwise with the mean residual circulation, and concentrated and retained in the central, low-advective region of the Bank.

  10. Effects of 4-nonylphenol on benthic macroinvertebrates and insect emergence in littoral enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Schmude, K.L.; Liber, K.; Corry, T.D.; Stay, F.S.

    1999-03-01

    The effect of 4-nonylphenol (NP) on benthic, freshwater macroinvertebrates in littoral enclosures was evaluated over a 2-year period. Enclosures received 11 NP applications, 48 h apart, with nominal rates of 3, 30, 100, and 300 {micro}g/L. Mean measured peak concentrations in integrated water column samples over the 20-d application period were 5 {+-} 4, 23 {+-} 11, 76 {+-} 21, and 243 {+-} 41 {micro}g/L NP. Concentrations of NP in the water column decreased rapidly after the last application. Maximum NP concentrations measured in sediments, pore water, and macrophytes of a 300-{micro}g/L enclosure were 27.4 mg/kg, 29.9 {micro}g/L, and 89.6 mg/kg, respectively. The most abundant macroinvertebrate groups, Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, and Mollusca, decreased in abundance after application. Effects on Mollusca were the most severe. Their numbers were significantly reduced at the highest treatment throughout most of the study. Oligochaetes and chironomids were also significantly reduced at the highest treatment, but populations recovered within 6 weeks. Snails and naidid oligochaetes were slightly affected at the second highest treatment (76 {+-} 21 {micro}g/L NP). Insect emergence was reduced during and immediately post-application, but the effects were likely caused or compounded by a surfactant sheen on the surface of the water that interfered with emergence and/or oviposition. The observed effects on the benthic community were most likely due to exposure from the water, although more persistent macrophyte-associated residues may have contributed to effects on Gastropoda, Naididae, and Tanytarsini. Macrophyte-associated NP residues may pose a small risk to benthic organisms, but it is probably minor compared to water exposures. The no-observed and lowest-observed-effect concentration for the benthic community was 23 {+-} 11 and 76 {+-} 21 {micro}g/L NP, respectively.

  11. Classifying benthic biotopes on sub-tropical continental shelf reefs: How useful are abiotic surrogates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Sarah; Stevens, Tim

    2014-02-01

    Biodiversity of marine areas beyond the reach of conventional diving technology (>30 m) is poorly known, yet subjected to increasing stresses from expanding recreational and commercial fishing, minerals exploration and other anthropogenic influences. In part, resource managers address this by using abiotic surrogates for patterns of biodiversity in planning marine protected areas or other management measures. However, the efficacy of these surrogates varies from place to place, and is often not quantified at the scale used by MPA designers and managers. This study surveyed and classified benthic assemblages of continental shelf rocky reefs across three depth categories from 30 to 70 m, using a suspended HD camera array, which is both non-destructive and cost-effective compared to any other methods of sampling at these depths. Five distinct benthic biotopes were defined, characterised primarily by variations in abundances of sea whips, sponges, kelp, and urchins. Derived patterns of benthic assemblage structure were compared to abiotic surrogates available at the scale (local) used in MPA planning. The individual factors with most influence on the classification were recreational fishing pressure, water temperature at the bottom, and distance from nearest estuary. The best combination of abiotic surrogates had a relatively strong relationship with the benthic assemblage, explaining 42% of the variation in assemblage structure (BIOENV ? = 0.65), however the performance of a classification based on commonly used physical surrogates was relatively poor, explaining only 22% of variation. The results underline the limitations of using abiotic variables for habitat mapping at the local scale, and the need for robust surveys to quantify patterns of biodiversity.

  12. Dark inorganic carbon fixation sustains the functioning of benthic deep-sea ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molari, Massimiliano; Manini, Elena; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    studies have provided evidence that dark inorganic carbon fixation is an important process for the functioning of the ocean interior. However, its quantitative relevance and ecological significance in benthic deep-sea ecosystems remain unknown. We investigated the rates of inorganic carbon fixation together with prokaryotic abundance, biomass, assemblage composition, and heterotrophic carbon production in surface sediments of different benthic deep-sea systems along the Iberian margin (northeastern Atlantic Ocean) and in the Mediterranean Sea. Inorganic carbon fixation rates in these surface deep-sea sediments did not show clear depth-related patterns, and, on average, they accounted for 19% of the total heterotrophic biomass production. The incorporation rates of inorganic carbon were significantly related to the abundance of total Archaea (as determined by catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization) and completely inhibited using an inhibitor of archaeal metabolism, N1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane. This suggests a major role of the archaeal assemblages in inorganic carbon fixation. We also show that benthic archaeal assemblages contribute approximately 25% of the total 3H-leucine incorporation. Inorganic carbon fixation in surface deep-sea sediments appears to be dependent not only upon chemosynthetic processes but also on heterotrophic/mixotrophic metabolism, as suggested by estimates of the chemolithotrophic energy requirements and the enhanced inorganic carbon fixation due to the increase in the availability of organic trophic resources. Overall, our data suggest that archaeal assemblages of surface deep-sea sediments are responsible for the high rates of inorganic carbon incorporation and thereby sustain the functioning of the food webs as well as influence the carbon cycling of benthic deep-sea ecosystems.

  13. Benthic Oxygen Demand in Three Former Salt Ponds Adjacent to South San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, Brent R.; Kuwabara, James S.; Athearn, Nicole D.; Takekawa, John Y.; Parcheso, Francis; Henderson, Kathleen D.; Piotter, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Sampling trips were coordinated in the second half of 2008 to examine the interstitial water in the sediment and the overlying bottom waters of three shallow (average depth 2 meters). The water column at all deployment sites was monitored with dataloggers for ancillary water-quality parameters (including dissolved oxygen, salinity, specific conductance, temperature, and pH) to facilitate the interpretation of benthic-flux results. Calculated diffusive benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) oxygen was consistently negative (that is, drawn from the water column into the sediment) and ranged between -0.5 x 10-6 and -37 x 10-6 micromoles per square centimeter per second (site averages depicted in table 2). Assuming pond areas of 1.0, 1.4, and 2.3 square kilometers for ponds A16, A14, and A3W, respectively, this converts to an oxygen mass flux into the ponds' sediment ranging from -1 to -72 kilograms per day. Diffusive oxygen flux into the benthos (listed as negative) was lowest in pond A14 (-0.5 x 10-6 to -1.8 x 10-6 micromoles per square centimeter per second) compared with diffusive flux estimates for ponds A16 and A3W (site averages -26 x 10-6 to -35 x 10-6 and -34 x 10-6 to -37 x 10-6 micromoles per square centimeter per second, respectively). These initial diffusive-flux estimates are of the order of magnitude of those measured in the South Bay using core-incubation experiments (Topping and others, 2004), which include bioturbation and bioirrigation effects. Estimates of benthic oxygen demand reported herein, based on molecular diffusion, serve as conservative estimates of benthic flux because solute transport across the sediment-water interface can be enhanced by multidisciplinary processes including bioturbation, bioirrigation, ground-water advection, and wind resuspension (Kuwabara and others, 2009).

  14. Benthic flux of dissolved nickel into the water column of south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, B.R.; Kuwabara, J.S.; Parcheso, Francis; Hager, S.W.; Arnsberg, A.J.; Murphy, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted between April, 1998 and May, 1999 to provide the first direct measurements of the benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) nickel between the bottom sediment and water column at three sites in the southern component of San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California. Dissolved nickel and predominant ligands (represented by dissolved organic carbon, and sulfides) were the solutes of primary interest, although a variety of ancillary measurements were also performed to provide a framework for interpretation. Results described herein integrate information needs identified by the State Water Resources Control Board and local stakeholders with fundamental research associated with the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. Dissolved-Ni concentrations in the bottom water over the three sampling dates ranged from 34 to 43 nanomoles per liter. Dissolved-macronutrient concentrations in the bottom water were consistently higher (frequently by orders of magnitude) than surface-water determinations reported for similar times and locations (Regional Monitoring Program, 2001). This is consistent with measured positive benthic fluxes for the macronutrients. Benthic-flux estimates for dissolved nickel from core-incubations, when areally averaged over the South Bay, were significant (that is, of equivalent or greater order of magnitude) relative to previously reported freshwater point and non-point sources. This observation is consistent with previous determinations for other metals, and with the potential remobilization of sediment-associated metals that have been ubiquitously distributed in the South Bay. Similar to dissolved-nickel results, benthic flux of macronutrients was also consistently significant relative to surface-water inputs. These results add to a growing body of knowledge that strongly suggests a need to consider contaminant transport across the sediment-water interface when establishing future management strategies for the watershed.

  15. Contribution of virus-induced lysis and protozoan grazing to benthic bacterial mortality estimated simultaneously in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ulrike R; Wieltschnig, Claudia; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Velimirov, Branko

    2006-08-01

    In contrast to the water column, the fate of bacterial production in freshwater sediments is still a matter of debate. Thus, the importance of virus-induced lysis and protozoan grazing of bacteria was investigated for the first time simultaneously in a silty sediment layer of a mesotrophic oxbow lake. Microcosms were installed in the laboratory in order to study the dynamics of these processes over 15 days. All microbial and physicochemical parameters showed acceptable resemblance to field data observed during a concomitant in situ study, and similar conclusions can be drawn with respect to the quantitative impact of viruses and protozoa on the bacterial compartment. Viral decay rates ranged from undetectable to 0.078 h(-1) (average, 0.033 h(-1)), and the control of bacterial production from below the detection limit to 36% (average, 12%). The contribution of virus-induced lysis of bacteria to the dissolved organic matter pool as well as to benthic bacterial nutrition was low. Ingestion rates of protozoan grazers ranged from undetectable to 24.7 bacteria per heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) per hour (average, 4.8 bacteria HNF(-1) h(-1)) and from undetectable to 73.3 bacteria per ciliate per hour (average, 11.2 bacteria ciliate(-1) h(-1)). Heterotrophic nanoflagellate and ciliates together cropped up to 5% (average, 1%) of bacterial production. The viral impact on bacteria prevailed over protozoan grazing by a factor of 2.5-19.9 (average, 9.5). In sum, these factors together removed up to 36% (average, 12%) of bacterial production. The high number of correlations between viral and protozoan parameters is discussed in view of a possible relationship between virus removal and the presence of protozoan grazers. PMID:16872403

  16. Shallow marine benthic invertebrates of the Seychelles Plateau: high diversity in a tropical oligotrophic environment.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Andrew S Y; Oliver, P Graham; Darbyshire, Teresa; Mortimer, Kate

    2005-01-15

    Soft sedimentary biotopes are extensive in the shallow Western Indian Ocean, especially on the Seychelles Plateau and Mascarene Ridge, yet pro rata compared with coral reefs the research effort devoted to them has been minimal. In this study we examine the benthic mollusc and polychaete worm assemblages of the shallow waters (11-62 m) around Mahe, in the Seychelles, and make direct comparisons with the temperate Irish Sea area and subtropical waters of Hong Kong, China (using identical methodology). Two assemblages were recognized, characterized by depth and sediment type. Of these, assemblage A (in shallow carbonate sands) was the most diverse, with diversity and richness measures exceeding those from the Irish Sea or Hong Kong. Hong Kong generally had the poorest fauna. Considering the Bivalvia alone, estimates of taxonomic distinctness showed this to be least for Seychelles assemblage A. The degree of conformity of the results to the concept of the latitudinal gradient in species richness and the possible underlying causes are discussed. Comparisons with other data suggest that the Seychelles support a benthic fauna at least as diverse as any other described from the tropics. A tentative examination of total bivalve species richness suggests a total of 400-500 for the Seychelles. This is in keeping with other Indian Ocean localities, but higher than known figures for continental east Africa. The findings of this paper support the case for widespread ecological and taxonomic studies of the Western Indian Ocean benthic invertebrates. PMID:15598633

  17. High dissolved organic carbon release by benthic cyanobacterial mats in a Caribbean reef ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Brocke, Hannah J; Wenzhoefer, Frank; de Beer, Dirk; Mueller, Benjamin; van Duyl, Fleur C; Nugues, Maggy M

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are increasing in abundance on coral reefs worldwide. However, their impacts on biogeochemical cycling in the surrounding water and sediment are virtually unknown. By measuring chemical fluxes in benthic chambers placed over sediment covered by BCMs and sediment with BCMs removed on coral reefs in Curaçao, Southern Caribbean, we found that sediment covered by BCMs released 1.4 and 3.5?mmol C m(-2) h(-1) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during day and night, respectively. Conversely, sediment with BCMs removed took up DOC, with day and night uptake rates of 0.9 and 0.6?mmol C m(-2) h(-1). DOC release by BCMs was higher than reported rates for benthic algae (turf and macroalgae) and was estimated to represent 79% of the total DOC released over a 24?h diel cycle at our study site. The high nocturnal release of DOC by BCMs is most likely the result of anaerobic metabolism and degradation processes, as shown by high respiration rates at the mat surface during nighttime. We conclude that BCMs are significant sources of DOC. Their increased abundance on coral reefs will lead to increased DOC release into the water column, which is likely to have negative implications for reef health. PMID:25747523

  18. Benthic foraminifera for environmental monitoring: a case study in the central Adriatic continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Capotondi, L; Bergami, C; Orsini, G; Ravaioli, M; Colantoni, P; Galeotti, S

    2015-04-01

    A study of benthic foraminifera was carried out in sediment samples collected from the central Adriatic coast of Italy, near the Ancona harbour and the Falconara Marittima oil refinery, in order to validate and support their use as bioindicators of ecosystem quality. On the basis of a principal component analysis (PCA), three biotopes (following the bathymetric gradient) have been documented, showing that the distribution pattern of benthic foraminifera is principally related to riverine inputs, organic matter contents at the seafloor, and sediment grain size. We observed higher abundances of opportunistic, low-oxygen tolerant taxa along the coastline, thus being representative of polluted environmental conditions. Near the Falconara Marittima oil refinery, the microfaunal assemblages is characterized by the absence of living specimens and by a low diversity associated with the dominance of opportunistic species. At this site, aberrant tests were also found. The data point out that Ammonia parkinsoniana and Quinqueloculina seem to be the most sensitive taxa and can be considered as good bioindicators of environmental stress in this area. This study confirms that faunal composition and morphology of benthic foraminifera respond to human-induced environmental perturbations, making their study potentially useful for biomonitoring in coastal-marine areas. PMID:25382496

  19. Persistent natural acidification drives major distribution shifts in marine benthic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Linares, C; Vidal, M; Canals, M; Kersting, D K; Amblas, D; Aspillaga, E; Cebrián, E; Delgado-Huertas, A; Díaz, D; Garrabou, J; Hereu, B; Navarro, L; Teixidó, N; Ballesteros, E

    2015-11-01

    Ocean acidification is receiving increasing attention because of its potential to affect marine ecosystems. Rare CO2 vents offer a unique opportunity to investigate the response of benthic ecosystems to acidification. However, the benthic habitats investigated so far are mainly found at very shallow water (less than or equal to 5 m depth) and therefore are not representative of the broad range of continental shelf habitats. Here, we show that a decrease from pH 8.1 to 7.9 observed in a CO2 vent system at 40 m depth leads to a dramatic shift in highly diverse and structurally complex habitats. Forests of the kelp Laminaria rodriguezii usually found at larger depths (greater than 65 m) replace the otherwise dominant habitats (i.e. coralligenous outcrops and rhodolith beds), which are mainly characterized by calcifying organisms. Only the aragonite-calcifying algae are able to survive in acidified waters, while high-magnesium-calcite organisms are almost completely absent. Although a long-term survey of the venting area would be necessary to fully understand the effects of the variability of pH and other carbonate parameters over the structure and functioning of the investigated mesophotic habitats, our results suggest that in addition of significant changes at species level, moderate ocean acidification may entail major shifts in the distribution and dominance of key benthic ecosystems at regional scale, which could have broad ecological and socio-economic implications. PMID:26511045

  20. Combining angular response classification and backscatter imagery segmentation for benthic biological habitat mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Backscatter information from multibeam echosounders (MBES) have been shown to contain useful information for the characterisation of benthic habitats. Compared to backscatter imagery, angular response of backscatter has shown advantages for feature discrimination. However its low spatial resolution inhibits the generation of fine scale habitat maps. In this study, angular backscatter response was combined with image segmentation of backscatter imagery to characterise benthic biological habitats in Discovery Bay Marine National Park, Victoria, Australia. Angular response of backscatter data from a Reson Seabat 8101 MBES (240 kHz) was integrated with georeferenced underwater video observations for constructing training data. To produce benthic habitat maps, decision tree supervised classification results were combined with mean shift image segmentation for class assignment. The results from mean angular response characteristics show effects of incidence angle at the outer angle for invertebrates (INV) and mixed red and invertebrates (MRI) classes, whilst mixed brown algae (MB) and mixed brown algae and invertebrates (MBI) showed similar responses independent from incidence angle. Automatic segmentation processing produce over segmented results but showed good discrimination between heterogeneous regions. Accuracy assessment from habitat maps produced overall accuracies of 79.6% (Kappa coefficient = 0.66) and 80.2% (Kappa coefficient = 0.67) for biota and substratum classifications respectively. MRI and MBI produced the lowest average accuracy while INV the highest. The ability to combine angular response and backscatter imagery provides an alternative approach for investigating biological information from acoustic backscatter data.

  1. Ammonite habitat revealed via isotopic composition and comparisons with co-occurring benthic and planktonic organisms.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Jocelyn Anne; Larina, Ekaterina; Knoll, Katja; Garb, Matthew; Cochran, J Kirk; Huber, Brian T; MacLeod, Kenneth G; Landman, Neil H

    2015-12-22

    Ammonites are among the best-known fossils of the Phanerozoic, yet their habitat is poorly understood. Three common ammonite families (Baculitidae, Scaphitidae, and Sphenodiscidae) co-occur with well-preserved planktonic and benthic organisms at the type locality of the upper Maastrichtian Owl Creek Formation, offering an excellent opportunity to constrain their depth habitats through isotopic comparisons among taxa. Based on sedimentary evidence and the micro- and macrofauna at this site, we infer that the 9-m-thick sequence was deposited at a paleodepth of 70-150 m. Taxa present throughout the sequence include a diverse assemblage of ammonites, bivalves, and gastropods, abundant benthic foraminifera, and rare planktonic foraminifera. No stratigraphic trends are observed in the isotopic data of any taxon, and thus all of the data from each taxon are considered as replicates. Oxygen isotope-based temperature estimates from the baculites and scaphites overlap with those of the benthos and are distinct from those of the plankton. In contrast, sphenodiscid temperature estimates span a range that includes estimates of the planktonic foraminifera and of the warmer half of the benthic values. These results suggest baculites and scaphites lived close to the seafloor, whereas sphenodiscids sometimes inhabited the upper water column and/or lived closer to shore. In fact, the rarity and poorer preservation of the sphenodiscids relative to the baculites and scaphites suggests that the sphenodiscid shells may have only reached the Owl Creek locality by drifting seaward after death. PMID:26630003

  2. Benthic macroinvertebrate communities affected by multiple stressors within tidal creeks in northeastern USA harbors

    SciTech Connect

    Papageorgis, C.; Murray, M.; Danis, C.; Yates, L.

    1995-12-31

    Surveys of water quality, substrate quality and benthic macroinvertebrates were conducted in a variety of tidal creeks located in the vicinity of a municipal solid waste landfill prior to the construction of a leachate collection system. In-Situ water quality data indicated high water temperatures and low dissolved oxygen values along with high turbidites. Sediment chemistry data indicated that all sediment within the study area exceed USEPA heavy metal criteria. Grain size and salinity data indicate that the study area lies within the Mesohaline Mud habitat class. Water quality data remained within similar concentrations with respect to indicators of leachate. The benthic macroinvertebrate community was consistently dominated by opportunistic Polychaete and Oligochaete worms. Both Shannon diversity and Rarefaction curves were used to evaluate trends in species diversity over time. The study includes a comparison to data obtained by USEPA R-EMAP monitoring programs. While large scale biomonitoring programs do not focus on small tidal creeks this study provides useful data regarding baseline benthic communities within tidal creeks affected by multiple stressors to include previous exposure and potential exposure to oil spills, continued point and non-point municipal and industrial wastewater discharges and physical stressors such as elevated water temperatures, homogeneous silt/clay substrate, and depressed dissolved oxygen values.

  3. Analytical models for the groundwater tidal prism and associated benthic water flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Jeffrey N.; Mehta, Ashish J.; Dean, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    The groundwater tidal prism is defined as the volume of water that inundates a porous medium, forced by one tidal oscillation in surface water. The pressure gradient that generates the prism acts on the subterranean estuary. Analytical models for the groundwater tidal prism and associated benthic flux are presented. The prism and flux are shown to be directly proportional to porosity, tidal amplitude, and the length of the groundwater wave; flux is inversely proportional to tidal period. The duration of discharge flux exceeds the duration of recharge flux over one tidal period; and discharge flux continues for some time following low tide. Models compare favorably with laboratory observations and are applied to a South Atlantic Bight study area, where tide generates an 11-m3 groundwater tidal prism per m of shoreline, and drives 81 m3 s??1 to the study area, which describes 23% of an observational estimate. In a marine water body, the discharge component of any oscillatory benthic water flux is submarine groundwater discharge. Benthic flux transports constituents between groundwater and surface water, and is a process by which pollutant loading and saltwater intrusion may occur in coastal areas.

  4. Benthic Primary Production in a Saltmarsh Pond: Insights from Fluxes of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, J. S.; Stanley, R. H.; Howard, E. M.; Spivak, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important carbon sinks that exist at continental margins and act as mediators in the exchange of nutrients and carbon between terrestrial and marine environments. Within salt marshes, 10-20% of total surface area is covered by marshtop ponds. The fractional area of marshtop ponds is predicted to increase as sea level rises. Despite their potential importance, the balance between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes within such ponds remain poorly understood. To quantify the balance of metabolic fluxes within salt marsh ponds, chemical fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) were measured in July, 2014 in benthic flux chambers inserted into a salt marsh pond in the Plum Island Estuary Long-Term Ecosystem Research (PIE-LTER) site. Light and dark chambers were used to enable separation of rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Separate chambers were used to enclose sediment covered by primarily benthic microalgae and primarily benthic macroalgae. Net ecosystem metabolism in the microalgae was ~10 and in the macroalgae ~15 mmol C/m2/hour. Respiration rates were ~10 mmol C/m2/ hour for both microalgae and macroalgae. The resulting fluxes of net ecosystem production in the ponds will be compared with overall marsh net ecosystem flux as measured by an eddy flux tower that was located 100 meters from the pond. Additionally, concurrent measurements of DIC and DO allow quantification of the C:O ratio during respiration (i.e. respiratory quotient) in this system.

  5. Ammonite habitat revealed via isotopic composition and comparisons with co-occurring benthic and planktonic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Sessa, Jocelyn Anne; Larina, Ekaterina; Knoll, Katja; Garb, Matthew; Cochran, J. Kirk; Huber, Brian T.; MacLeod, Kenneth G.; Landman, Neil H.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonites are among the best-known fossils of the Phanerozoic, yet their habitat is poorly understood. Three common ammonite families (Baculitidae, Scaphitidae, and Sphenodiscidae) co-occur with well-preserved planktonic and benthic organisms at the type locality of the upper Maastrichtian Owl Creek Formation, offering an excellent opportunity to constrain their depth habitats through isotopic comparisons among taxa. Based on sedimentary evidence and the micro- and macrofauna at this site, we infer that the 9-m-thick sequence was deposited at a paleodepth of 70–150 m. Taxa present throughout the sequence include a diverse assemblage of ammonites, bivalves, and gastropods, abundant benthic foraminifera, and rare planktonic foraminifera. No stratigraphic trends are observed in the isotopic data of any taxon, and thus all of the data from each taxon are considered as replicates. Oxygen isotope-based temperature estimates from the baculites and scaphites overlap with those of the benthos and are distinct from those of the plankton. In contrast, sphenodiscid temperature estimates span a range that includes estimates of the planktonic foraminifera and of the warmer half of the benthic values. These results suggest baculites and scaphites lived close to the seafloor, whereas sphenodiscids sometimes inhabited the upper water column and/or lived closer to shore. In fact, the rarity and poorer preservation of the sphenodiscids relative to the baculites and scaphites suggests that the sphenodiscid shells may have only reached the Owl Creek locality by drifting seaward after death. PMID:26630003

  6. Using benthic diatom assemblages to assess human impacts on streams across a rural to urban gradient.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Cao, Jin-Xiang; Pei, Guo-Feng; Liu, Guo-Xing

    2015-11-01

    Benthic diatom assemblages on the natural substrata were investigated at 21 sites of the Ganhe River watershed (China) once per season and in addition, early spring in 2013. A total of 487 diatom taxa from 36 genera were identified during five investigations. The assemblages were dominated by Achnanthidium minutissimum (Kützing) Czarnecki and Cocconeis placentula in the rural reach, whereas Navicula, Nitzschia, and Gomphonema species were characteristic of urbanized sites. Our results suggest that biodiversity was positively related to high nutrient levels and strongly negatively related to diatom-based indices. The periphyton biomass (expressed as chlorophyll a and ash-free dry mass) was not related to water quality. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that the nutrient concentration gradient was the most important factor that affected the diatom assemblage composition and species distribution. The diatom-based indices (specific pollution sensitivity index (IPS), biological diatom index (IBD), and trophic diatom index (TDI)) were significantly positively correlated with water quality and are adequate for use in China. Slight changes in the biodiversity and diatom-based indices followed a temporal pattern. The species composition was less related to the season or hydrological characteristics of the river but more strongly related to differences in the trophic status. In this region, urbanization masked the impact of rural land use on benthic diatoms. The research will expand the understanding of using benthic diatom assemblages for water quality monitoring in urban streams and improve watershed-scale management and conservation efforts in the Ganhe River, China. PMID:26174985

  7. What can flatfish ontogenies tell us about pelagic and benthic lifestyles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuiman, Lee A.

    1997-11-01

    Eye migration, asymmetrical pigmentation, and a 90° rotation in posture are developmental changes that unify all flatfishes and facilitate a transition from a pelagic to a benthic existence. Settlement places the fish in new environmental conditions which may require different types and levels of performance for survival compared to those needed in the water column. Since structure and performance vary as a consequence of ontogeny, it is likely that natural selection has acted on the ontogeny of flatfishes differently from fishes that do not settle (pelagic fishes) to provide different survival skills by the time flatfishes settle. This paper provides examples of quantitative methods for comparing fish ontogenies in the context of three predictions: (1) different flatfish species undergo settlement at a common ontogenetic state; (2) they have a common set of skills at settlement that differ from those of pelagic species of the same ontogenetic state; and (3) skills or features that appear earlier in the ontogenetic program of flatfishes than in pelagic fishes suggest attributes that are important to survival in a benthic habitat. Preliminary comparisons suggest that flatfishes may have accelerated development of their mechanosensory system relative to pelagic species. Firm conclusions about ecologically important differences between the pelagic and benthic habitats derived from analyses of ontogenetic events will require more kinds of data from a broader selection of species.

  8. Hydrogeomorphic Classification of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages in the Pacific Northwest Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuhaciyan, C. O.; Bledsoe, B. P.; Olden, J. D.; Poff, N. L.

    2005-05-01

    Existing physical classifications for streams do not explicitly include considerations of how primary environmental drivers such as flow regime, geophysical setting, intermediate-scale geomorphic processes, and anthropogenic impacts vary in importance across spatial scales in structuring biotic communities. We present a multi-scale hydrogeomorphic classification of 307 sites in 6 mountainous ecoregions of the Pacific Northwest. Innovative descriptors of flow regime, geophysical setting, valley geomorphology, and substrate are used to construct both a priori and a posteriori hydrogeomorphic classifications. Clusters based on benthic macroinvertebrate data from R/EMAP sites provide a neutral-model classification representing the best achievable classification of benthic invertebrate assemblages and the basis for a posteriori classification. Given the emphasis on geographically-dependent classifications in bioassessments, we also group sites by ecoregion. The relative strengths of the four classification schemes are assessed by the extent to which average within-class assemblage similarities exceed the average similarity between classes based on the Sorensen-Dice (presence / absence) similarity measure. A better understanding of the key hydrogeomorphic processes that filter benthic macroinvertebrate communities provides a process-based framework for interpreting biomonitoring information from diverse watershed contexts and systematically selecting reference streams that are similar with regard to the most relevant physical drivers within a region.

  9. Seasonal oxygen-driven migration of mobile benthic fauna affected by natural water column stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broszeit, Stefanie; Davenport, John; Bredendieck, Karl; Harman, Luke; McAllen, Rob

    2013-07-01

    Changes in mobile benthic fauna affected by a seasonal oxycline were studied at three-monthly intervals for one year at Lough Hyne, a marine reserve in county Cork, Ireland. This marine lake features regular seasonal anoxic conditions in the deepest part (the Western Trough). Building on previous studies of the effects of the oxycline on demersal fauna, a ROV was used to film the benthic assemblage. Transects above, within and below oxycline depth were filmed on each sampling occasion. Animals were identified and their sizes measured. Data on oxygen concentration of the water column were taken monthly during this period to correlate with the presence and absence of animals in the Trough. Most noteworthy was the establishment of a demersal fish assemblage during normoxic conditions in the deeper areas of the Trough. The goby Lesueurigobius friesii was the most abundant species and their population contained all size classes. They are territorial and build burrows into which they retreated when the ROV approached. The main factor influencing benthic fauna below oxycline depth was oxygen concentration, while the assemblage above the oxycline was never affected by hypoxia. This study shows that mobile animals make use of areas affected by hypoxia as soon as conditions improve, and can establish resident communities.

  10. Red algal beds increase the condition of nekto-benthic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordines, Francesc; Bauzá, Marco; Sbert, Miquel; Roca, Pilar; Gianotti, Magdalena; Massutí, Enric

    2015-01-01

    The present study analysed the effect of three different benthic habitats, the maërl, Peyssonnelia red algal beds and sandy bottoms, on the condition of two nekto-benthic fish species: Serranus cabrilla and Trigloporus lastoviza. Sampling was conducted during the MEDITS 2010 and 2011 surveys around the Balearic Islands. The condition of the spawning females of both species was determined by using i) biochemical measurements of proteins and lipids in the muscle, liver and gonads, and ii) weight at length relationships based on eviscerated, liver, and gonad weights. Moreover, based on the total weight at length relationship, the mean somatic condition (SC) of the sexually inactive individuals of S. cabrilla and males of T. lastoviza was calculated. Lipid reserves were higher in the livers of S. cabrilla and T. lastoviza from the maërl beds. Additionally, S. cabrilla showed higher lipid reserves in the gonads both in the maërl and Peyssonnelia beds. The mean weights of the liver and gonads at a given individual length revealed the same pattern as the lipids, whereas the mean eviscerated weight was higher in the maërl beds but only for S. cabrilla. A positive correlation was detected between the SC and the biomass of the algal species characterizing the maërl beds for both S. cabrilla and T. lastoviza. The high habitat quality of the red algal beds off the Balearic Islands increased the condition of nekto-benthic fish. In oligotrophic areas, such as the archipelago, these "oases" could help fish to maintain healthy populations.

  11. Response of benthic algae to environmental gradients in an agriculturally dominated landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, M.D.; Black, R.W.; Gruber, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Benthic algal communities were assessed in an agriculturally dominated landscape in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington, to determine which environmental variables best explained species distributions, and whether algae species optima models were useful in predicting specific water-quality parameters. Land uses in the study area included forest, range, urban, and agriculture. Most of the streams in this region can be characterized as open-channel systems influenced by intensive dryland (nonirrigated) and irrigated agriculture. Algal communities in forested streams were dominated by blue-green algae, with communities in urban and range streams dominated by diatoms. The predominance of either blue-greens or diatoms in agricultural streams varied greatly depending on the specific site. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated a strong gradient effect of several key environmental variables on benthic algal community composition. Conductivity and % agriculture were the dominant explanatory variables when all sites (n = 24) were included in the CCA; water velocity replaced conductivity when the CCA included only agricultural and urban sites. Other significant explanatory variables included dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), orthophosphate (OP), discharge, and precipitation. Regression and calibration models accurately predicted conductivity based on benthic algal communities, with OP having slightly lower predictability. The model for DIN was poor, and therefore may be less useful in this system. Thirty-four algal taxa were identified as potential indicators of conductivity and nutrient conditions, with most indicators being diatoms except for the blue-greens Anabaena sp. and Lyngbya sp.

  12. High dissolved organic carbon release by benthic cyanobacterial mats in a Caribbean reef ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Brocke, Hannah J.; Wenzhoefer, Frank; de Beer, Dirk; Mueller, Benjamin; van Duyl, Fleur C.; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are increasing in abundance on coral reefs worldwide. However, their impacts on biogeochemical cycling in the surrounding water and sediment are virtually unknown. By measuring chemical fluxes in benthic chambers placed over sediment covered by BCMs and sediment with BCMs removed on coral reefs in Curaçao, Southern Caribbean, we found that sediment covered by BCMs released 1.4 and 3.5?mmol C m?2 h?1 of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during day and night, respectively. Conversely, sediment with BCMs removed took up DOC, with day and night uptake rates of 0.9 and 0.6?mmol C m?2 h?1. DOC release by BCMs was higher than reported rates for benthic algae (turf and macroalgae) and was estimated to represent 79% of the total DOC released over a 24?h diel cycle at our study site. The high nocturnal release of DOC by BCMs is most likely the result of anaerobic metabolism and degradation processes, as shown by high respiration rates at the mat surface during nighttime. We conclude that BCMs are significant sources of DOC. Their increased abundance on coral reefs will lead to increased DOC release into the water column, which is likely to have negative implications for reef health. PMID:25747523

  13. Decoupling between water column oxygenation and benthic phosphate dynamics in a shallow eutrophic estuary.

    PubMed

    Kraal, Peter; Burton, Edward D; Rose, Andrew L; Cheetham, Michael D; Bush, Richard T; Sullivan, Leigh A

    2013-04-01

    Estuaries are crucial biogeochemical filters at the land-ocean interface that are strongly impacted by anthropogenic nutrient inputs. Here, we investigate benthic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) dynamics in relation to physicochemical surface sediment properties and bottom water mixing in the shallow, eutrophic Peel-Harvey Estuary. Our results show the strong dependence of sedimentary P release on Fe and S redox cycling. The estuary contains surface sediments that are strongly reducing and act as net P source, despite physical sediment mixing under an oxygenated water column. This decoupling between water column oxygenation and benthic P dynamics is of great importance to understand the evolution of nutrient dynamics in marine systems in response to increasing nutrient loadings. In addition, the findings show that the relationship between P burial efficiency and bottom water oxygenation depends on local conditions; sediment properties rather than oxygen availability may control benthic P recycling. Overall, our results illustrate the complex response of an estuary to environmental change because of interacting physical and biogeochemical processes. PMID:23477454

  14. Benthic community composition on submerged reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, T. E.; Moloney, J. M.; Sweatman, H. P. A.; Bridge, T. C. L.

    2015-06-01

    Community dynamics on coral reefs are often examined only in relatively shallow waters, which are most vulnerable to many disturbances. The Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA) includes extensive submerged reefs that do not approach sea level and are within depths that support many coral reef taxa that also occur in shallow water. However, the composition of benthic communities on submerged reefs in the GBRWHA is virtually unknown. We examined spatial patterns in benthic community composition on 13 submerged reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR) at depths of 10-30 m. We show that benthic communities on submerged reefs include similar species groups to those on neighbouring emergent reefs. The spatial distribution of species groups was well explained by depth and cross-shelf gradients that are well-known determinants of community composition on emergent reefs. Many equivalent species groups occurred at greater depths on submerged reefs, likely due to variability in the hydrodynamic environment among reef morphologies. Hard coral cover and species richness were lowest at the shallowest depth (6 m) on emergent reefs and were consistently higher on submerged reefs for any given depth. These results suggest that disturbances are less frequent on submerged reefs, but evidence that a severe tropical cyclone in 2011 caused significant damage to shallow regions of more exposed submerged reefs demonstrates that they are not immune. Our results confirm that submerged reefs in the central GBR support extensive and diverse coral assemblages that deserve greater attention in ecosystem assessments and management decisions.

  15. Benthic methylmercury production in lacustrine ecosystems of Nahuel Huapi National Park, Patagonia, Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribeiro, Guevara S.; Catan, S.P.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M.

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal trends of benthic methylmercury (methyl-Hg) production were examined in both littoral and open water sites of three lakes (Escondido, Moreno, and Morenito) in the North Andean Patagonia region of Argentina. Potentials of methyl-Hg production were measured by amending sediment samples with inorganic 197Hg(II), incubating for either 24 and 32 h at room temperature, and subsequently assaying the radiolabelled organomercury produced. Seasonal variations of benthic methyl-Hg production were studied but no significant correlation was observed. Lake littoral sites exhibited up to two fold higher methyl-Hg production potentials in most cases. Sediment from lakes Moreno and Morenito generally exhibited much lower (up to 10 fold) methyl-Hg production potentials than those from Lake Escondido, possibly due to differences in particulate and dissolved organic matter quantity and quality, which is higher in Lake Escondido and primarily allochthonous, whereas in lakes Moreno and Morenito is primarily autochthonous. This study represents the first to directly examine benthic microbial Hg(II)-methylation in aquatic ecosystems of Patagonia. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Trophic relationship of benthic invertebrate fauna from the continental slope of the Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamenko, Vladimir I.; Brandt, Angelika; Kiyashko, Serguei I.; Würzberg, Laura

    2013-02-01

    The Sea of Japan continental slope food web was examined by analysis of stable C and N isotopes and fatty acid compositions in ten species of common benthic organisms and in sediment and particulate organic matter. A considerable range of ?13C and ?15N values was found for benthic species, with ?13C values of -22.3‰ in crinoids (Heliometra glacialis) to -16.1‰ in asteroids (Ctenodiscus crispatus) and with ?15N values of 5.3‰ in foraminifera (Elphidium sp.) to 15.5‰ in C. crispatus. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant of the fatty acids in the total lipids of all investigated species. The organisms' individual fatty acid compositions show the importance of a variety of food sources, including phytoplankton, detritus, foraminiferans and zooplankton, for megabenthic species. Additionally, the presence of considerable amounts of the 20:4(n-6) and 20:1(n-13) fatty acids indicates the importance of the benthic microbial loop in the nutrition of some of the studied animals.

  17. Effects of mining-derived metals on riffle-dwelling benthic fishes in Southeast Missouri, USA.

    PubMed

    Allert, A L; Fairchild, J F; Schmitt, C J; Besser, J M; Brumbaugh, W G; Olson, S J

    2009-09-01

    We studied the ecological effects of mining-derived metals on riffle-dwelling benthic fishes at 16 sites in the Viburnum Trend lead-zinc mining district of southeast Missouri. Fish community attributes were compared to watershed features and to physical and chemical variables including metal concentrations in sediment pore water and fish. Ozark sculpin (Cottus hypselurus), rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum), Ozark madtom (Noturus albater), and banded sculpin (Cottus carolinae) were the most abundant fishes collected. Species richness and density of riffle-dwelling benthic fishes were negatively correlated with metal concentrations in pore water and in fish. Sculpin densities were also negatively correlated with metal concentrations in pore water and in fish, but positively correlated with distance from mines and upstream watershed area. These findings indicate that metals associated with active lead-zinc mining adversely affect riffle-dwelling benthic fishes downstream of mining areas in the Viburnum Trend. Sculpins may be useful as a sentinel species for assessing mining-related impacts on fish communities. PMID:19570577

  18. Benthic macroinvertebrate and fish communities in Lake Huron are linked to submerged groundwater vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Sanders T.; Biddanda, B.A.; Stricker, C.A.; Nold, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater can be an important source of nutrients and energy to aquatic ecosystems, but quantifying the inputs and biogeochemical importance remains challenging. A series of submerged groundwater vents in northern Lake Huron were examined to determine the linkage between groundwater nutrients and aquatic food webs. We collected samples of key food-web components from groundwater vent and reference habitats and analyzed them for 13C, 15N, and 34S isotopes. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the groundwater was depleted in 13C, while aqueous sulfate was enriched in 34S (mean differences between groundwater and reference sites were -3.9% and +12.0%, respectively). Benthic primary producers, macroinvertebrates, and benthivorous fish had significantly lower ??13C values in groundwater environments, and benthivorous fish were somewhat depleted (-2.5%) in ??34S at groundwater sites compared to reference sites. However, ??15N values were not different between groundwater and reference sites, and pelagic components of the ecosystems (plankton and planktivorous and piscivorous fish) were similar in both ??13C and ??15N. These data suggest benthic metazoan communities surrounding groundwater vents are partially linked to groundwater-derived benthic primary production, while planktivorous and piscivorous communities not directly associated with the benthos do not rely on groundwater nutrients. ?? Inter-Research 2011.

  19. Ecological Effects of Biochar on the Structure and Function of Stream Benthic Communities.

    PubMed

    Clements, William H; Stahl, Ralph G; Landis, Richard C

    2015-12-15

    The introduction of biochar, activated carbon, and other carbonaceous materials to aquatic ecosystems significantly reduces the toxicity and bioavailability of contaminants. However, previous studies have shown that these materials can have negative effects on aquatic organisms. We conducted field and mesocosm experiments to test the hypothesis that biochar altered the structure and function of stream benthic communities. After 30 d in the field, colonization by stoneflies (Plecoptera) was significantly lower in trays containing biochar compared to the results from the controls. In stream mesocosms, biochar increased macroinvertebrate drift and significantly reduced community metabolism. However, most measures of community composition showed little variation among biochar treatments, and significant responses were limited to a single stonefly species (Capnia confusa). When benthic communities were simultaneously exposed to biochar and Cu, effects were primarily associated with metal exposure. Because it is unlikely that biochar treatments would be employed in uncontaminated areas, these moderately negative effects should be considered within the context of the positive benefits associated with reduced contaminant bioavailability and toxicity. Additional research is necessary to improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for biochar effects on benthic communities and to identify the optimal application rates and size fractions that will maximize contaminant sorption but minimize potential negative effects. PMID:26560098

  20. Seasonal variation in accumulation of persistent organic pollutants in an Arctic marine benthic food web.

    PubMed

    Evenset, A; Hallanger, I G; Tessmann, M; Warner, N; Ruus, A; Borgå, K; Gabrielsen, G W; Christensen, G; Renaud, P E

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate seasonal variation in persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations, as well as food-web biomagnification, in an Arctic, benthic marine community. Macrozoobenthos, demersal fish and common eiders were collected both inside and outside of Kongsfjorden, Svalbard, during May, July and October 2007. The samples were analysed for a selection of legacy chlorinated POPs. Overall, low levels of POPs were measured in all samples. Although POP levels and accumulation patterns showed some seasonal variation, the magnitude and direction of change was not consistent among species. Overall, seasonality in bioaccumulation in benthic biota was less pronounced than in the pelagic system in Kongsfjorden. In addition, the results indicate that ?(15)N is not a good predictor for POP-levels in benthic food chains. Other factors, such as feeding strategy (omnivory, necrophagy versus herbivory), degree of contact with the sediment, and a high dependence on particulate organic matter (POM), with low POP-levels and high ?(15)N-values (due to bacterial isotope enrichment), seem to govern the uptake of the different POPs and result in loads deviating from what would be expected consulting the trophic position alone. PMID:26519572

  1. High dissolved organic carbon release by benthic cyanobacterial mats in a Caribbean reef ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocke, Hannah J.; Wenzhoefer, Frank; de Beer, Dirk; Mueller, Benjamin; van Duyl, Fleur C.; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2015-03-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are increasing in abundance on coral reefs worldwide. However, their impacts on biogeochemical cycling in the surrounding water and sediment are virtually unknown. By measuring chemical fluxes in benthic chambers placed over sediment covered by BCMs and sediment with BCMs removed on coral reefs in Curaçao, Southern Caribbean, we found that sediment covered by BCMs released 1.4 and 3.5 mmol C m-2 h-1 of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during day and night, respectively. Conversely, sediment with BCMs removed took up DOC, with day and night uptake rates of 0.9 and 0.6 mmol C m-2 h-1. DOC release by BCMs was higher than reported rates for benthic algae (turf and macroalgae) and was estimated to represent 79% of the total DOC released over a 24 h diel cycle at our study site. The high nocturnal release of DOC by BCMs is most likely the result of anaerobic metabolism and degradation processes, as shown by high respiration rates at the mat surface during nighttime. We conclude that BCMs are significant sources of DOC. Their increased abundance on coral reefs will lead to increased DOC release into the water column, which is likely to have negative implications for reef health.

  2. Fatty acid profiles of marine benthic microorganisms isolated from the continental slope of bay of bengal: a possible implications in the benthic Food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Surajit; Lyla, P. S.; Khan, S. Ajmal

    2007-12-01

    Marine bacteria, actinomycetes and fungal strains were isolated from continental slope sediment of the Bay of Bengal and studied for fatty acid profile to investigate their involvement in the benthic food-web. Fifteen different saturated and unsaturated fatty acids from bacterial isolates, 14 from actinomycetes and fungal isolates were detected. The total unsaturated fatty acids in bacterial isolates ranged from 11.85 to 37.26%, while the saturated fatty acid ranged between 42.34 and 80.74%. In actinomycetes isolates, total unsaturated fatty acids varied from 27.86 to 38.85% and saturated fatty acids ranged from 35.29 to 51.25%. In fungal isolates unsaturated fatty acids ranged between 44.62 and 65.52% while saturated FA ranged from 20.80 to 46.30%. The higher percentages of unsaturated fatty acids from the microbial isolates are helpful in anticipating the active participation in the benthic food-web of Bay of Bengal.

  3. Layers of the South Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On December 3, 1999, the Mars Polar Lander will touch down on the upper surface of a thick accumulation of layered material known as the 'South Polar Layered Deposits.' The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) has been providing stunning new pictures of the south polar layered deposits that, in conjunction with Mars Polar Lander observations, will eventually help answer many questions about this terrain.

    Both the north and south polar regions are blanketed by thick accumulations of layered material. This has been known since the 1971-1972 mission of Mariner 9. Based upon data from the Mariner and Viking projects in the 1970s, the polar layered deposits have long been considered to be accumulations of dust and ice. The layering is thought to indicate changes in how ice and dust accumulate at the poles over the course of millenia. Changes in climate might affect the thickness and composition of polar layers in a way that is analogous to how years of drought and years of plentiful rain change the width of rings in a tree trunk on Earth.

    The pictures shown here provide new details of what the south polar layered deposits look like at extremely high resolution from the MGS MOC. The picture on the left is a context frame taken at the same time as the high resolution view on the right. The context image covers an area about 115 km (71 mi) across and shows a thick, smooth blanket of material covering the upper 2/3 of the frame. This thick blanket is the south polar layered deposit material. The circular features at the lower left in the context image are craters occurring outside the polar layered deposit. More craters occur underneath the polar layered deposits. The small white box indicates the location of the MOC high resolution image (right) along the edge of the polar layered deposits. The picture is illuminated from the lower right.

    The picture on the right shows one of the clearest and highest-resolution images of south polar layered material ever obtained. Located at 73.0oS, 224.5oW, this picture covers an area approximately 550 km (340 miles) northwest of where the Mars Polar Lander will touch down in December. Illuminated from the lower right, this scene covers an area 1.5 km (0.9 mi) wide and 4.6 km (1.9 mi) long. The smallest objects that can be seen are about the sizes of automobiles. Small dark streaks in the upper right are formed from winds that have blown small patches of sediment across the surface of the layered material. Layers of only a few meters thickness are exposed along the edge of the polar layered deposits. The amount of dust versus ice in these layers is unknown. It is hoped that the Mars Polar Lander will be able to help determine--at least for the upper layers of the deposit--how much ice is present.

  4. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Victor A; Alaferdov, Andrei V; Vaz, Alfredo R; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A S; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S; Moshkalev, Stanislav A

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000 K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in "cold-wall" reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material. PMID:26100466

  5. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Victor A.; Alaferdov, Andrei V.; Vaz, Alfredo R.; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S.; Moshkalev, Stanislav A.

    2015-06-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000?K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in “cold-wall” reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material.

  6. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Victor A.; Alaferdov, Andrei V.; Vaz, Alfredo R.; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S.; Moshkalev, Stanislav A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000?K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in “cold-wall” reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material. PMID:26100466

  7. Benthic remineralisation rates in southern North Sea - from point measurements to areal estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2015-04-01

    The southern North Sea is enclosed by densely populated hinterland with intensive use by agriculture and industry and thus substantially affected by anthropogenic influences. As a coastal subsystem, this applies especially to the German Wadden Sea, a system of back-barrier tidal flats along the whole German Bight. Ongoing efforts to implement environmental protection policies during the last decades changed the significance of various pollutants such as reactive nitrogen or phosphate, which raises the desire for constant monitoring of the coastal ecosystem to assess the efficiency of the employed environmental protection measures. Environmental monitoring is limited to point measurements which thus have to be interpolated with appropriate models. However, existing models to estimate various sediment characteristics for the interpolation of point measurements appear insufficient when compared with actual field measurements in the southern North Sea. We therefore seek to improve these models by identifying and quantifying key variables of benthic solute fluxes by comprehensive measurements which cover the complete spatial and seasonal variability. We employ in-situ measurements with the eddy-correlation technique and flux chambers in combination with ex-situ incubations of sediment cores to establish benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients. Additional ex-situ measurements determine basic sediment characteristics such as permeability, volumetric reaction rates, and substrate concentration. With our first results we mapped the distribution of measured sediment permeability, which suggest that areas with water depth greater than 30 m are impervious whereas sediment in shallower water at the Dogger Bank and along the coast is substantially permeable with permeability between 10-12 m2 and 10-10 m2. This implies that benthic fluxes can be estimated with simple diffusion-type models for water depths >30 m, whereas estimates especially for coastal sediments require percolation modelling. We are further able to estimate sediment permeability and volumetric oxygen consumption rate on the basis of grain size distribution. Since grain size distribution is already mapped with high spatial resolution, we now have the prerequisites to interpolate two key variables for benthic consumption and influx of oxygen. With our next step we intend to assess model-based estimates of benthic oxygen and nutrient fluxes with our in-situ measurements as references to refine the underlying models. Our field measurements contribute to the NOAH project (North Sea; Observation and Assessment of Habitats), the established methods for routine monitoring contribute to the WiMO project (Wissenschaftliches Monitoring / Scientific Monitoring).

  8. Impacts of abrupt CO2 exposure on deep-sea benthic ecosystem functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, A. K.; Bøe, C.; Reigstad, L. J.; Durand, D.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is, at present, one of the most promising measures for immediate regulation of CO2 emissions, while non-petroleum energy sources are being sought. Norway has taken a leading role in developing and implementing CCS, whilst international conventions, such as London and OSPAR, and regulations (EU directives) are defining the regulatory framework for CCS, in particular, for CO2 storage in geological structures including those under the seabed. To implement sub-seabed CCS on a global scale it is first necessary to understand how leakage from a CCS reservoir will impact marine ecosystems. To quantify how deep-sea benthic ecosystems respond to elevated levels of CO2, we conducted 4 in-situ benthic chamber lander deployments in a Norwegian fjord at 350m depth in September 2011. During each lander deployment, sediments in one benthic respirometry chamber were exposed to elevated levels of CO2 acidified seawater (up to 20,000 ?atm), while those in a control chamber were exposed to seawater bubbled with air. Each experiment lasted approximately 40 hours. In the CO2 exposed chambers, benthic oxygen demand (respiration) increased and was negatively linearly correlated to pH. While bacterial and archael abundance showed no significant difference between the CO2 exposed chambers and the controls, bacterial and archael abundance was exponentially correlated to benthic oxygen demand, implying that microbial communities played a large role in forcing the strong correlation between respiration and pH. In terms of the effects of CO2 on sediment infauna, more macrofauna burrowed to deeper sediment depths in the CO2 exposed chambers relative to the control to potentially flee the low pH conditions in the experimental treatment. No large differences were seen in Pielou's evenness (J') (a measure of stress in diversity metrics) or the expected number of species between the control and experimental treatments, suggesting that no short-term (< 40 hrs) impacts on infaunal diversity are likely to be seen during a CO2 leakage event. Overall, the results collectively show that sedimentary ecosystems may respond very rapidly to CO2 exposure from a leakage event, and these responses may be manifested by higher respiration, but not necessarily by changes in sediment microbial abundance and faunal diversity. Results on faunal carbon uptakes rates between the 2 treatments will also be presented.

  9. Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemence, Caulle; Meryem, Mojtahid; Karoliina, Koho; Andy, Gooday; Gert-Jan, Reichart; Gerhard, Schmiedl; Frans, Jorissen

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy. C. Caulle1, M. Mojtahid1, K. Koho2,3, A. Gooday4, G. J. Reichart2,3, G. Schmiedl5, F. Jorissen1 1UMR CNRS 6112 LPG-BIAF, University of Angers, 2 bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers Cedex 2Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands 3Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (Royal NIOZ), Landsdiep 4, 1797 SZ 't Horntje (Texel) 4Southampton Oceanography Centre, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 5Department of Geosciences, University of Hamburg, Bundesstraße 55, 20146 Hamburg, Germany The thermohaline circulation oxygenates the deep ocean sediment and therefore enables aerobic life on the sea-floor. In the past, interruption of this deep water formation occurred several times causing hypoxic to anoxic conditions on the sea-floor leading to major ecological turnover. A better understanding of the interaction between climate and bottom water oxygenation is therefore essential in order to predict future oceanic responses. Presently, permanent (stable over decadal timescale) low-oxygen conditions occur naturally at mid-water depths in the northern Indian Ocean (Arabian Sea). Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) are key areas to understand the hypoxic-anoxic events and their impact on the benthic ecosystem. In this context, a good knowledge of the ecology and life cycle adaptations of the benthic foraminiferal assemblages living in these low oxygen areas is essential. A series of multicores were recovered from three transects showing an oxygen gradient across the OMZ: the Murray Ridge, the Oman margin and the Indian margin. The stations located at the same depths showed slightly different oxygen concentrations and large differences in organic matter content. These differences are mainly related to the geographic location in the Arabian Sea. We investigated at these stations live and dead benthic foraminiferal faunas. At each location, faunal diversity seems to be controlled by bottom-water oxygen content; limited diversity corresponding to low oxygen content. Foraminiferal abundances reflect organic matter quantity and quality; higher organic matter quality and quantity are related to higher foraminiferal abundances. When comparing the three study areas, similar foraminiferal species (live and dead) are observed suggesting that benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea predominantly respond to bottom-water oxygenation. Based on these observations, we aim to develop a paleo-oxygenation proxy based on live, dead and fossil faunas resulting from both our study and previous studies in the Arabian Sea.

  10. Benthic N2 fixation in coral reefs and the potential effects of human-induced environmental change

    PubMed Central

    Cardini, Ulisse; Bednarz, Vanessa N; Foster, Rachel A; Wild, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tropical coral reefs are among the most productive and diverse ecosystems, despite being surrounded by ocean waters where nutrients are in short supply. Benthic dinitrogen (N2) fixation is a significant internal source of “new” nitrogen (N) in reef ecosystems, but related information appears to be sparse. Here, we review the current state (and gaps) of knowledge on N2 fixation associated with coral reef organisms and their ecosystems. By summarizing the existing literature, we show that benthic N2 fixation is an omnipresent process in tropical reef environments. Highest N2 fixation rates are detected in reef-associated cyanobacterial mats and sea grass meadows, clearly showing the significance of these functional groups, if present, to the input of new N in reef ecosystems. Nonetheless, key benthic organisms such as hard corals also importantly contribute to benthic N2 fixation in the reef. Given the usually high coral coverage of healthy reef systems, these results indicate that benthic symbiotic associations may be more important than previously thought. In fact, mutualisms between carbon (C) and N2 fixers have likely evolved that may enable reef communities to mitigate N limitation. We then explore the potential effects of the increasing human interferences on the process of benthic reef N2 fixation via changes in diazotrophic populations, enzymatic activities, or availability of benthic substrates favorable to these microorganisms. Current knowledge indicates positive effects of ocean acidification, warming, and deoxygenation and negative effects of increased ultraviolet radiation on the amount of N fixed in coral reefs. Eutrophication may either boost or suppress N2 fixation, depending on the nutrient becoming limiting. As N2 fixation appears to play a fundamental role in nutrient-limited reef ecosystems, these assumptions need to be expanded and confirmed by future research efforts addressing the knowledge gaps identified in this review. PMID:24967086

  11. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  12. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  13. Rates of total oxygen uptake of sediments and benthic nutrient fluxes measured using an in situ autonomous benthic chamber in the sediment of the slope off the southwestern part of Ulleung Basin, East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Seong; An, Sung-Uk; Park, Young-Gyu; Kim, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongseon; Kwon, Jung No; Kang, Dong-Jin; Noh, Jae-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a new autonomous benthic lander for deep-sea research, the Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) Belc II and Belp II. The benthic lander was successfully tested at 950 and 1450 m water depths on the slope off the southwestern part of the Ulleung Basin in the East Sea of Korea. The ex situ measurements of the total oxygen uptake (TOU) rates at all the stations exceeded the in situ measurement values, and may indicate artificial effects from onboard incubation. The TOU rates were estimated to be 5.80 mmol m-2 d-1 and 3.77 mmol m-2 d-1 at water depths of 950 m and 1450 m, respectively. The benthic nutrient fluxes were also higher at water depths of 950 m, which indicates a partitioning of organic degradation with water depth. In addition, the negative phosphate and nitrogen benthic flux ratios and the higher nitrate removal flux via the sediment-water interface at the slope imply that the nitrogen in the bottom water may be preferentially removed via microbial respiration processes in the sediments, and may be coupled with the low nitrogen-to-phosphate ratio found in the deep water. Although our measurements comprised just two experiments in the slope sediment, the robust in situ measurement of the benthic fluxes in the slope sediment is a forerunner for new research into the biogeochemical cycles across the shelf edge-slope-basin system in the East Sea.

  14. 22 Layer Chocolate Raspberry Cake

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Desserts 22 Layer Chocolate Raspberry Cake #12;22 Layer Chocolate Raspberry Cake $9 6 layers of cake, 5 layers of chocolate, 5 layers of raspberry jam 5 layers of chocolate mousse, 1 layer in an Oreo crust topped with whipped cream & chopped peanuts drizzled with chocolate. Brownie Sundae Supreme

  15. Benthic Marine Cyanobacterial Mat Ecosystems: Biogeochemistry and Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats are complete ecosystems that can include processes of primary production, diagenesis and lithification. Light sustains oxygenic photosynthesis, which in turn provides energy, organic matter and oxygen to the community. Due to both absorption and scattering phenomena, incident light is transformed with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition. Mobile photo synthesizers optimize their position with respect to this light gradient. When photosynthesis ceases at night, the upper layers of the mat become reduced and sulfidic. Counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide combine to provide daily-contrasting environments separated on a scale of a few mm. The functional complexity of mats, coupled with the highly proximal and ordered spatial arrangement of biota, offers the potential for a staggering number of interactions. At a minimum, the products of each functional group of microorganisms affect the other groups both positively and negatively. For example, cyanobacteria generate organic matter (potential substrates) but also oxygen (a toxin for many anaerobes). Anaerobic activity recycles nutrients to the photosynthesizers but also generates potentially toxic sulfide. The combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods, and to various depths in the mat. Observations of mats have produced numerous surprises. For example, obligately anaerobic processes can occur in the presence of abundant oxygen, highly reduced gases are produced in the presence of abundant sulfate, meiofauna thrive at high sulfide concentrations, and the mats' constituent populations respond to environmental changes in complex ways. While photosynthetic bacteria dominate the biomass and productivity of the mat, nonphotosynthetic, anaerobic processes constitute the ultimate biological filter on the ecosystem's emergent biosignatures, including those sedimentary textures, organic compounds, and minerals that enter the fossil record. The ability of cyanobacterial mats to channel abundant solar energy into the creation and maintenance of complex structures and processes has created a multitude of consequences, both for sedimentation and for the early evolution of our biosphere.

  16. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Jae-Chul (Naperville, IL); Para, Adam (St. Charles, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  17. Is there a possibility of ranking benthic quality assessment indices to select the most responsive to different human pressures?

    PubMed

    Borja, Ángel; Marín, Sandra L; Muxika, Iñigo; Pino, Loreto; Rodríguez, José G

    2015-08-15

    Although a plethora of benthic indices exist, there is no agreement on what index or indices should be used by environmental managers to establish benthic quality. The objective of this investigation was to rank 35 benthic quality assessment indices used in different countries to evaluate the impact produced by 15 different human pressures (including multipressure, aquaculture, sewage discharges, eutrophication, physical alteration, chemical pollution, climate change, etc.). The ranking was determined by taking into account the coverage area of biogeographical provinces, number of citations testing a pressure and number of citations with significant correlation with pressure. We analysed 363 references, of which 169 showed quantitative data. Over a potential total score of 100, the highest values were obtained by the following indices: (i) AZTI's Marine Biotic Index (AMBI), which scored 77, tested by using 14 pressures in 14 provinces from the Arctic to tropical seas; (ii) multivariate AMBI (M-AMBI), which scored 74, tested with 12 pressures in 13 provinces; (iii) Bentix (BENTIX), which scored 68, tested with nine pressures in six provinces; (iv) Benthic Quality Index (BQI), which scored 66, tested with five pressures in seven provinces; and (v) Benthic Opportunistic Polychaetes Amphipods (BOPA) index, which scored 62, tested with eight pressures in six provinces. PMID:26099789

  18. HABITAT-SPECIFIC FORAGING AND SEX DETERMINE MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN SYMPATRIC BENTHIC AND LIMNETIC ECOTYPES OF THE THREESPINE STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Willacker, James J.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; Ackerly, Kerri L.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a widespread environmental contaminant known for the neurotoxicity of its methylated forms, especially monomethylmercury, which bioaccumulates and biomagnifies in aquatic food webs. Mercury bioaccumulation and biomagnification rates are known to vary among species utilizing different food webs (benthic vs limnetic) within and between systems. The authors assessed whether carbon and nitrogen stable isotope values and total Hg (THg) concentrations differed between sympatric benthic and limnetic ecotypes and sexes of threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from Benka Lake, Alaska, USA. The mean THg concentration in the limnetic ecotype was significantly higher (26 mg/kg dry wt, 16.1%) than that of the benthic ecotype. Trophic position and benthic carbon percentage utilized were both important determinants of THg concentration; however, the 2 variables were of approximately equal importance in females, whereas trophic position clearly explained more of the variance than benthic carbon percentage in males. Additionally, strong sex effects (45 mg/kg dry wt, 29.4%) were observed in both ecotypes, with female fish having lower THg concentrations than males. These results indicate that trophic ecology and sex are both important determinants of Hg contamination even within a single species and lake and likely play a role in governing Hg concentrations in higher trophic levels. PMID:23456641

  19. Water-Quality Parameters and Benthic Algal Communities at Selected Streams in Minnesota, August 2000 - Study Design, Methods and Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    Water-quality measurements and benthic algal samples were measured or collected from select Minnesota streams as part of a multiagency (Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Geological Survey) study. The goal of the multiagency study was to identify quantifiable thresholds of water-quality impairment and establish quantifiable indicators of nutrient enrichment for medium to high-order streams. This report describes the study design, sampling methods, and summarizes the physical, chemical, and benthic algal data for a component of the multiagency study that was designed to document diurnal water-quality measurements (specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen), benthic algal community composition and chlorophyll-a content, and primary productivity at 12 stream sites on 6 streams in Minnesota during August 2000. Specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen concentrations and percent dissolved oxygen saturation measurements were made with submersible data recorders at 30 minute intervals for a period of 3-6 days during August 2000. Benthic algae collected from wood and rock substrate were identified and enumerated. Biovolume (volume of algal cells per unit area), density (number of cells per unit area), and chlorophyll-a content from benthic algae were determined. These data can be used as part of the multiagency study to develop an understanding of the relations among nutrient concentrations, algal abundance, algal community composition, and primary production and respiration processes in rivers of differing ecoregions in Minnesota.

  20. Piezoelectric Resonator with Two Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephanou, Philip J. (Inventor); Black, Justin P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A piezoelectric resonator device includes: a top electrode layer with a patterned structure, a top piezoelectric layer adjacent to the top layer, a middle metal layer adjacent to the top piezoelectric layer opposite the top layer, a bottom piezoelectric layer adjacent to the middle layer opposite the top piezoelectric layer, and a bottom electrode layer with a patterned structure and adjacent to the bottom piezoelectric layer opposite the middle layer. The top layer includes a first plurality of electrodes inter-digitated with a second plurality of electrodes. A first one of the electrodes in the top layer and a first one of the electrodes in the bottom layer are coupled to a first contact, and a second one of the electrodes in the top layer and a second one of the electrodes in the bottom layer are coupled to a second contact.

  1. In press on River Research and Applications (paper accepted on 24th February 2010) Armanini et al., in press. Development of a benthic macroinvertebrate flow sensitivity index

    E-print Network

    Armanini, David G

    1 In press on River Research and Applications (paper accepted on 24th February 2010) Armanini et al., in press. Development of a benthic macroinvertebrate flow sensitivity index for Canadian rivers. DEVELOPMENT OF A BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE FLOW SENSITIVITY INDEX FOR CANADIAN RIVERS. ARMANINI D.G.1* , N

  2. Oyster reef restoration in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: effect of artificial substrate and sge on nekton and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Laura A.; Furlong, Jessica N.; Brown, Kenneth M.; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2013-01-01

    In the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM), reefs built by eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, provide critical habitat within shallow estuaries, and recent efforts have focused on restoring reefs to benefit nekton and benthic macroinvertebrates. We compared nekton and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages at historic, newly created (<5years) and old (>6years) shell and rock substrate reefs. Using crab traps, gill-nets, otter trawls, cast nets, and benthic macroinvertebrate collectors, 20 shallow reefs (<5m) in the northern GOM were sampled throughout the summer of 2011. We compared nekton and benthic assemblage abundance, diversity and composition across reef types. Except for benthic macroinvertebrate abundance, which was significantly higher on old rock reefs as compared to historic reefs, all reefs were similar to historic reefs, suggesting created reefs provide similar support of nekton and benthic assemblages as historic reefs. To determine refuge value of oyster structure for benthic macroinvertebrates compared to bare bottom, we tested preferences of juvenile crabs across depth and refuge complexity in the presence and absence of adult blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus). Juveniles were more likely to use deep water with predators present only when provided oyster structure. Provision of structural material to support and sustain development of benthic and mobile reef communities may be the most important factor in determining reef value to these assemblages, with biophysical characteristics related to reef location influencing assemblage patterns in areas with structure; if so, appropriately locating created reefs is critical.

  3. An Investigation of Metal Concentrations in Waste Rock Piles, Stream Water, Benthic Macroinvertebrates, and Stream Bed Sediments to Assess Long-term

    E-print Network

    Ryan, Joe

    An Investigation of Metal Concentrations in Waste Rock Piles, Stream Water, Benthic Engineering 2006 #12;This thesis entitled: An Investigation of Metal Concentrations in Waste Rock Piles) An Investigation of Metal Concentrations in Waste Rock Piles, Stream Water, Benthic Macroinvertebrates, and Stream

  4. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  5. Flow effects on benthic stream invertebrates and ecological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprivsek, Maja; Brilly, Mitja

    2010-05-01

    Flow is the main abiotic factor in the streams. Flow affects the organisms in many direct and indirect ways. The organisms are directly affected by various hydrodynamic forces and mass transfer processes like drag forces, drift, shear stress, food and gases supply and washing metabolites away. Indirect effects on the organisms are determining and distribution of the particle size and structure of the substrate and determining the morphology of riverbeds. Flow does not affect only on individual organism, but also on many ecological effects. To expose just the most important: dispersal of the organisms, habitat use, resource acquisition, competition and predator-prey interactions. Stream invertebrates are adapted to the various flow conditions in many kinds of way. Some of them are avoiding the high flow with living in a hyporeic zone, while the others are adapted to flow with physical adaptations (the way of feeding, respiration, osmoregulation and resistance to draught), morphological adaptations (dorsoventrally flattened shape of organism, streamlined shape of organism, heterogeneous suckers, silk, claws, swimming hair, bristles and ballast gravel) or with behaviour. As the flow characteristics in a particular stream vary over a broad range of space and time scales, it is necessary to measure accurately the velocity in places where the organisms are present to determine the actual impact of flow on aquatic organisms. By measuring the mean flow at individual vertical in a single cross-section, we cannot get any information about the velocity situation close to the bottom of the riverbed where the stream invertebrates are living. Just measuring the velocity near the bottom is a major problem, as technologies for measuring the velocity and flow of natural watercourses is not adapted to measure so close to the bottom. New researches in the last two decades has shown that the thickness of laminar border layer of stones in the stream is only a few 100 micrometers, what is not enough to make a shelter for stream invertebrates. It serves as a shelter only for microorganisms, but the stream invertebrates have to avoid the swift flow or adapt to flow with adaptations described above. To understand what conditions are subject to aquatic organisms and how to adapt, it is essential. Both, knowledge of fluid dynamics in natural watercourses and ecology are needed to understand to what conditions the stream invertebrates are exposed and how they cope with them. Some investigations of near bed flow will be performed on the Glinšica stream. The acoustic Doppler velocimeter SonTek will be adapted to measure so close to the bed as possible. It is expected we should be able to measure the velocities just 0,5 cm above the bed surface. We intend to measure the velocities on a natural and on a regulated reach and then compare the results.

  6. Long-term changes in the benthic communities of the Sea of Azov related to the sedimentation and hydrological regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Shokhin, I. V.; Nabozhenko, M. V.; Pol'Shin, V. V.

    2008-06-01

    The following periods reflected in the composition and distribution of benthic communities are distinguished in the development of the Sea of Azov during the last 80 years: (1) prior to the regulation of the Don River discharge, (2) after its regulation, (3) stabilization of the Don River hydrological regime, and (4) desalination of the sea. The distribution of benthic communities in the Sea of Azov is characterized by concentric patterns, which are distorted due to the changes in the hydrological and oxygen regimes after oxygen depletion. The basic factors that influence the distribution of macrozoobenthic communities are the aeration regime of the sea and the character of the sediment accumulation. The steady distribution of benthic communities composed largely of euryhaline species adapted to the conditions of an unstable salinity in the Sea of Azov shows no correlation with the salinity fluctuations from 9 to 14‰ during the 80-year-long period.

  7. Hydro-acoustic remote sensing of benthic biological communities on the shallow South East Australian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattray, Alex; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Burq, Shoaib; Reston, Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Information regarding the composition and extent of benthic habitats on the South East Australian continental shelf is limited. In this habitat mapping study, multibeam echosounder (MBES) data are integrated with precisely geo-referenced video ground-truth data to quantify benthic biotic communities at Cape Nelson, Victoria, Australia. Using an automated decision tree classification approach, 5 representative biotic groups defined from video analysis were related to hydro-acoustically derived variables in the Cape Nelson survey area. Using a combination of multibeam bathymetry, backscatter and derivative products produced highest overall accuracy (87%) and kappa statistic (0.83). This study demonstrates that decision tree classifiers are capable of integrating variable data types for mapping distributions of benthic biological assemblages, which are important in maintaining biodiversity and other system services in the marine environment.

  8. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages in Osaka Bay, southwestern Japan: Faunal changes over the last 50 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsujimoto, Akira; Nomura, Ritsuo; Yasuhara, Moriaki; Yoshikawa, Shusaku

    2006-01-01

    Live benthic foraminiferal assemblages from surface sediment in Osaka Bay collected in 1999 were analyzed to characterize the distribution of the modern foraminiferal assemblages. Foraminiferal assemblages were compared with those of previous studies to document environmental changes in Osaka Bay over the past 50 years. Sixty-one species of foraminifera belonging to 37 genera were recognized from the 1999 surface sediment samples. An agglutinated assemblage containing Trochammina hadai and Eggerella advena is dominant in the inner part of the bay and is related to eutrophication. The foraminiferal assemblage in areas deeper than about 20 m is composed of Eggerella advena, Ammonia beccarii forma A, and Pseudorotalia gaimardii. This assemblage may be influenced by the large clockwise Okinose Circulation Current which extends throughout the western bay. Foraminiferal assemblages in Osaka Bay have changed dramatically during the last 50 years. The Trochammina hadai-Eggerella advena assemblage became established in the inner part of the bay, reflecting eutrophication that progressed from the 1960s through the 1970s. This assemblage became dominant in 1983, and typically dominated the inner part of the bay. From 1983 to 1999, however, the abundance of taxa belonging to this assemblage decreased greatly following implementation of 1973 Osaka City bylaws that restricted wastewater discharge. Changes in benthic assemblages such as the decrease of Ammonia beccarii forma A and increase of Eggerella advena have occurred in response to decreased incidence of red tides, and floral change in the species that cause these tides. The results of this study demonstrate that the abundance and distribution of benthic foraminifers in Osaka Bay are intimately related to environmental changes related to the urbanization of coastal areas. ?? by the Palaeontological Society of Japan.

  9. Investigating the Benthic Foraminiferal Stilostomellid Extinction and Mid Pleistocene Phytoplankton Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kender, S.; Elmore, A.; McClymont, E.; Elderfield, H.; Emmanuel, D.

    2014-12-01

    As global climate cooled during the Mid Pleistocene Transition (MPT, ~1.1-0.6 Ma), the last great extinction of benthic foraminifera occurred. The so-called 'Stilostomella Extinction' saw the disappearance of almost two families of elongated uniserial species with distinctive apertural architecture. The stepwise extinction consisted of a gradual disappearance at different water depths and ocean basins over successive glacials. Understanding the causes of this extinction has proven difficult, in part because ecological preferences are not well known, and because their extinction has not been documented in high resolution along with other paleoenvironmental proxies. For instance, one hypothesis for the extinction is lowering bottom water temperature. We present new high-resolution (~5 ka time step) benthic foraminiferal data from ODP Site 593 in the Tasman Sea (~1068 m water depth) through the MPT, and compare with new intermediate water temperature (benthic Mg/Ca) and surface water productivity proxies (nannofossil assemblages and sediment pigment analyses). Extinction group occurrences do not correlate with intermediate water temperature. There are, however, clear changes in surface water productivity associated with the final phase of the extinction, at ~0.85 Ma. Pigments increase in abundance, indicating elevated glacial productivity across the MPT. Coccolith assemblages shift towards small Gephyrocapsa spp., and extinction occurs within the Reticulofenestra, both of which are global events. Comparisons with the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean extinction data indicates 0.85 Ma as a critical time interval in the global Stilostomella Extinction. This evidence strengthens the hypothesis that changes in the type of organic carbon reaching the sea floor, driven by reorganization within marine phytoplankton communities, may have been linked to the disappearance of the extinction group.

  10. Benthic marine landscapes of the Eastern Gulf of Finland, the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskela, Anu; Kotilainen, Aarno; Orlova, Marina; Ronkainen, Minna; Rousi, Heta; Ryabchuk, Daria

    2014-05-01

    Benthic marine landscapes are a combination of ecologically relevant hydrographical and geological datasets that characterize potential broad scale habitat distribution patterns with the overall aim to allocate conservation efforts on biodiversity and spaces instead of single species. At the best the benthic marine landscapes describe both the habitat distribution as well as the characteristics of the physical environment. This kind of spatial knowledge that informs both about geology and biology at the regional scale is very usable in ecosystem based management (ESBM) of marine areas. Here we will present the benthic marine landscapes of the Eastern Gulf of Finland at the scale of 1:500 000 and explain the analysis methods behind. The study area in the Eastern Gulf of Finland, the Baltic Sea, is a transboundary marine area shared by Finland and Russia. The HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan along with EU, Finnish and Russian legislation requires both countries to identify and assess the state of the marine environment in the Gulf of Finland. These appoint the need for shared knowledge on the marine environment, its state, physical characteristics and distribution of habitats among others. In order to produce ecologically relevant marine landscapes we have collected geological, hydrographical and biological data from the transboundary study area and studied their correlation. The statistical analyses have been run with Primer -software (BEST and LINKTREE). The study is a part of ENPI CBC funded Finnish-Russian co-operation project, the TOPCONS (http://www.merikotka.fi/topcons/). Project aims to develop innovative spatial tools for the regional planning of the sea areas in the Gulf of Finland, the Baltic Sea. The objective is to create methodology and tools to map the locations of the most diverse and sensitive marine landscapes. These will help the society when striving for the sustainable consolidation of human activities and the marine nature values. The TOPCONS is implemented in close relationship to the Finnish Inventory Programme for the Underwater Marine Environment (VELMU).

  11. Trends in Benthic macroinvertebrate community Biomass and Energy Budgets in Lake Sevan, 1928-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Jenderedjian, K.; Hakobyan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Water levels of Lake Sevan (Armenia) were artificially lowered by nearly 20 m between 1949 and 1997. Lowered water levels, combined with increased eutrophication, were associated with seasonally anoxic conditions (lasting 1–4 months) near the bottom of the profundal zone each year during 1976–2004. In addition, the extents of the macrophyte zone and of certain substrate types were severely reduced following drawdown. Maximal depth of occurrence decreased by 2–44 m for at least for 50 species of benthic macroinvertebrates between 1982 and 2004 compared to 1937–1961. Species richness of benthic macroinvertebrates declined from 25 to three species at depths where seasonal anoxia occurred. Total biomass increased by a factor of 10 from the period 1928–1948 to 1976–1979 then declined by a factor of 3 to 4 between 1987 and 2004. Energy flow through detritivores was more than tripled during 1976–2004 compared to 1928–1971, a result of increased plankton primary production. In contrast, energy flow through herbivorous benthic macroinvertebrates decreased by a factor of nearly 5, due to reduced areal coverage of macrophytes. Energy flow through filter feeders did not change over the time period examined, but energy flow through the entire zoobenthos community was nearly tripled. The biomasses of Oligochaeta, Chironomidae, and total zoobenthos showed a delayed response to changes in primary production of 7–9, 2, and 2–4 years, respectively. These patterns may provide a basis to predict results of restoration efforts based on the abundance of the zoobenthos in future years as the level of the lake is restored and water quality improves.

  12. Benthic sulfate reduction along the Chesapeake Bay central channel. I. Spatial trends and controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Capone, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    Factors controlling the spatial distribution of benthic sulfate reduction (SR) were investigated at 3 stations [upper (UB), mid (MB) and lower bay (LB)] along the Chesapeake Bay (eastern USA) central channel from early spring through late fall, 1989 to 1994. Annual rates of 0 to 12 cm depth-integrated SR were 0.96, 9.62 and 6.33 mol S m-2 yr-1 for UB, MB and LB, respectively, as calculated from 35SO42- incubations. SR was carbon limited at UB, LB, and at the sediment surface at MB, and SO42- limited at depth at MB. Temperature explained 33 to 68% of the variability in annual rates, with an apparent influence on SR which increased in the seaward direction in surface sediments. We speculate that the enhanced response of SR to temperature in LB surface sediments was linked to seasonal variations in macrofaunal activity associated with temperature. Estimates of reduced-S burial indicated that only 4 to 8% of sulfur reduced annually was buried as Fe-S minerals at MB and LB, with the remainder presumably being reoxidized. In contrast, >50% of the sulfur reduced annually was buried at UB, due to comparatively low SR rates and the high concentration of reactive iron in the oligohaline region. SR mineralized 18 to 32% of the annual primary production. Our results indicate that organic quality may be more important than the absolute quantity of organic loading in dictating the magnitude of benthic SR rates along an estuarine gradient. Spatial trends in SR reflected the combined influence of deposited organic matter quality and quantity, SO42- availability, the presence or absence of benthic macrofauna, overlying water dissolved O2 conditions, reduced-S reoxidation dynamics, and iron-sulfide mineral formation.

  13. Groundwater contaminants in the deep benthic zone of urban streams in Canada (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, J. W.; Bickerton, G.

    2010-12-01

    There is little information available on the potential threat that groundwater containing land-based contaminants poses to aquatic ecosystems in urban environments. In this study, a rapid screening approach was applied at the stream reach-scale for eight urban streams (reaches from 100 to < 1000 m). The objective was to determine what types of groundwater contaminants could be detected in the deeper benthic zone of these streams, if any, to start to address questions of whether such contaminants are a concern and which types are the most problematic. The benthic community may be especially at risk since it may experience higher contaminant concentrations than the stream itself due to fewer losses from sorption, degradation and volatilization processes. For each stream, groundwater samples from below the stream bed (typically 25-75 cm) were collected using a drive-point mini-profiler at intervals of 10-15 m along the stream and were subsequently analysed for general chemistry and a wide range of common and emerging urban contaminants. For a few test streams with known contamination, the area of contamination was identified with this technique. In addition, previously unknown contaminants or areas of contamination were identified at all nine streams. Identified contaminants included benzene and other petroleum hydrocarbons, fuel oxygenates (e.g. MTBE), perchlorate, pesticides, artificial sweeteners, and various chlorinated solvent compounds. In addition, elevated levels of nitrate, phosphate, some heavy metals, including cadmium and arsenic, and elevated chloride (likely indicating road salt) were detected. Most streams had many different types of contaminants, often overlapping over small stretches, and together often covering substantial portions of the monitored reach. The findings provide support for this screening approach for delineating areas of potential ecological concern and identifying possible sources of groundwater contamination, for urban settings. They also suggest that the presence of multiple groundwater contaminants may be a more common threat to the benthic community of urban streams than currently perceived.

  14. Response of Benthic Foraminiferal Size to Oxygen Concentration in Antarctic Sediment Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, D.; Keating-Bitonti, C.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen availability is important for biological reactions and the demand of oxygen is determined by the size of the organism. Few marine organisms can tolerate low oxygen conditions, but benthic foraminifera, a group of amoeboid protists that are highly sensitive to environmental factors, are known to live in these conditions. Benthic foraminifera may be able to live in oxygen stressed environments by changing the size and shape of their test. Low oxygen concentrations should favor smaller, thinner-shelled, flattened test morphologies. We hypothesize that the volume-to-surface area ratio of benthic foraminifera will decrease with decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations. To test this hypothesis, we picked two calcareous species (Epistominella exigua and Cassulinoides porrectus) and one agglutinated species (Portatrochammina antarctica) from three sediment cores collected from Explorer's Cove, Antarctica. Starting at the sediment-water interface, each core spans approximately 5-8 cm of depth. Profiles of dissolved oxygen concentrations were measured at the time of collection. At specific depths within the cores, we measured the three dimensions of picked foraminiferal tests using NIS-Elements. We calculated the volume and surface area of the tests assuming the shape of the foraminifers was an ellipsoid. The size trends of E. exigua confirm our hypothesis that the test volume-to-surface area ratios correlate positively with dissolved oxygen concentrations (p-value < 0.001). However, the size trends of the other species refute our hypothesis: P. antarctica shows no correlation and C. porrectus shows a negative correlation (p-value < 0.001) to dissolved oxygen concentrations. Thus, our results show that the change in size in response to variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations is species dependent. Moreover, we find that calcareous species are more sensitive to oxygen fluctuations than agglutinated species.

  15. A framework for investigating general patterns of benthic ?-diversity along estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Francisco; Blanchet, Hugues; Hammerstrom, Kamille; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; Oliver, John

    2014-08-01

    The description of major patterns in beta (?) diversity is important in order to understand changes in community composition and/or richness at different spatial and temporal scales, and can interrogate processes driving species distribution and community dynamics. Human impacts have pushed many estuarine systems far from their historical baseline of rich, diverse, and productive ecosystems. Despite the ecological and social importance of estuaries, there has not yet been an attempt to investigate patterns of ?-diversity and its partitioning along estuarine systems of different continents. We aimed to evaluate if benthic assemblages would show higher turnover than nestedness in tropical than in temperate systems, if well-known impacted estuaries would show greater nestedness than less polluted systems, and to propose a conceptual framework for studying benthic macrofauna beta diversity along estuaries. We analyzed subtidal benthic macrofaunal data from estuaries in Brazil, USA and France. We estimated alpha (?), beta (?) and gamma (?) diversity for each sampling time in each system, investigated patterns of ? -diversity as multivariate dispersion and the partitioning (nestedness and replacement) of ?-diversity along each estuary. There was a decrease in the ?-diversity along marine to freshwater conditions at most of the estuaries and sampling dates. Beta diversity as multivariate dispersion showed high variability. Most of the estuaries showed a greater proportion of the ?-diversity driven by replacement than nestedness. We suggest a conceptual framework for estuaries where relatively pristine estuaries would have their ?-diversity mostly driven by replacement while impacted estuaries subjected to several anthropogenic stressors would show total nestedness or total replacement, depending on the stress.

  16. Trophic state of benthic deep-sea ecosystems from two different continental margins off Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Anno, A.; Pusceddu, A.; Corinaldesi, C.; Canals, M.; Heussner, S.; Thomsen, L.; Danovaro, R.

    2013-05-01

    The bioavailability of organic matter in benthic deep-sea ecosystems, commonly used to define their trophic state, can greatly influence key ecological processes such as biomass production and nutrient cycling. Here, we assess the trophic state of deep-sea sediments from open slopes and canyons of the Catalan (NW Mediterranean) and Portuguese (NE Atlantic) continental margins, offshore east and west Iberia, respectively, by using a biomimetic approach based on enzymatic digestion of protein and carbohydrate pools. Patterns of sediment trophic state were analyzed in relation to increasing water depth, including repeated samplings over a 3 yr period in the Catalan margin. Two out of the three sampling periods occurred a few months after dense shelf water cascading events. The benthic deep-sea ecosystems investigated in this study were characterized by high amounts of bioavailable organic matter when compared to other deep-sea sediments. Bioavailable organic matter and its nutritional value were significantly higher in the Portuguese margin than in the Catalan margin, thus reflecting differences in primary productivity of surface waters reported for the two regions. Similarly, sediments of the Catalan margin were characterized by significantly higher food quantity and quality in spring, when the phytoplankton bloom occurs in surface waters, than in summer and autumn. Differences in the benthic trophic state of canyons against open slopes were more evident in the Portuguese than in the Catalan margin. In both continental margins, bioavailable organic C concentrations did not vary or increase with increasing water depth. Overall, our findings suggest that the intensity of primary production processes along with the lateral transfer of organic particles, even amplified by episodic events, can have a role in controlling the quantity and distribution of bioavailable organic detritus and its nutritional value along these continental margin ecosystems.

  17. Temperature tracking by North Sea benthic invertebrates in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Hiddink, Jan G; Burrows, Michael T; García Molinos, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is a major threat to biodiversity and distributions shifts are one of the most significant threats to global warming, but the extent to which these shifts keep pace with a changing climate is yet uncertain. Understanding the factors governing range shifts is crucial for conservation management to anticipate patterns of biodiversity distribution under future anthropogenic climate change. Soft-sediment invertebrates are a key faunal group because of their role in marine biogeochemistry and as a food source for commercial fish species. However, little information exists on their response to climate change. Here, we evaluate changes in the distribution of 65 North Sea benthic invertebrate species between 1986 and 2000 by examining their geographic, bathymetric and thermal niche shifts and test whether species are tracking their thermal niche as defined by minimum, mean or maximum sea bottom (SBT) and surface (SST) temperatures. Temperatures increased in the whole North Sea with many benthic invertebrates showing north-westerly range shifts (leading/trailing edges as well as distribution centroids) and deepening. Nevertheless, distribution shifts for most species (3.8-7.3 km yr(-1) interquantile range) lagged behind shifts in both SBT and SST (mean 8.1 km yr(-1)), resulting in many species experiencing increasing temperatures. The velocity of climate change (VoCC) of mean SST accurately predicted both the direction and magnitude of distribution centroid shifts, while maximum SST did the same for contraction of the trailing edge. The VoCC of SBT was not a good predictor of range shifts. No good predictor of expansions of the leading edge was found. Our results show that invertebrates need to shift at different rates and directions to track the climate velocities of different temperature measures, and are therefore lagging behind most temperature measures. If these species cannot withstand a change in thermal habitat, this could ultimately lead to a drop in benthic biodiversity. PMID:25179407

  18. Biophysical control of intertidal benthic macroalgae revealed by high-frequency multispectral camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Daphne; van Dalen, Jeroen; Wielemaker-van den Dool, Annette; Dijkstra, Jasper T.; Ysebaert, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Intertidal benthic macroalgae are a biological quality indicator in estuaries and coasts. While remote sensing has been applied to quantify the spatial distribution of such macroalgae, it is generally not used for their monitoring. We examined the day-to-day and seasonal dynamics of macroalgal cover on a sandy intertidal flat using visible and near-infrared images from a time-lapse camera mounted on a tower. Benthic algae were identified using supervised, semi-supervised and unsupervised classification techniques, validated with monthly ground-truthing over one year. A supervised classification (based on maximum likelihood, using training areas identified in the field) performed best in discriminating between sediment, benthic diatom films and macroalgae, with highest spectral separability between macroalgae and diatoms in spring/summer. An automated unsupervised classification (based on the Normalised Differential Vegetation Index NDVI) allowed detection of daily changes in macroalgal coverage without the need for calibration. This method showed a bloom of macroalgae (filamentous green algae, Ulva sp.) in summer with > 60% cover, but with pronounced superimposed day-to-day variation in cover. Waves were a major factor in regulating macroalgal cover, but regrowth of the thalli after a summer storm was fast (2 weeks). Images and in situ data demonstrated that the protruding tubes of the polychaete Lanice conchilega facilitated both settlement (anchorage) and survival (resistance to waves) of the macroalgae. Thus, high-frequency, high resolution images revealed the mechanisms for regulating the dynamics in cover of the macroalgae and for their spatial structuring. Ramifications for the mode, timing, frequency and evaluation of monitoring macroalgae by field and remote sensing surveys are discussed.

  19. Benthic Trophic Interactions in an Antarctic Shallow Water Ecosystem Affected by Recent Glacier Retreat

    PubMed Central

    Pasotti, Francesca; Saravia, Leonardo Ariel; De Troch, Marleen; Tarantelli, Maria Soledad; Sahade, Ricardo; Vanreusel, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The western Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing strong environmental changes as a consequence of ongoing regional warming. Glaciers in the area are retreating rapidly and increased sediment-laden meltwater runoff threatens the benthic biodiversity at shallow depths. We identified three sites with a distinct glacier-retreat related history and different levels of glacial influence in the inner part of Potter Cove (King George Island, South Shetland Islands), a fjord-like embayment impacted since the 1950s by a tidewater glacier retreat. We compared the soft sediment meio- and macrofauna isotopic niche widths (?13C and ?15N stable isotope analysis) at the three sites to investigate possible glacier retreat-related influences on benthic trophic interactions. The isotopic niches were locally shaped by the different degrees of glacier retreat-related disturbance within the Cove. Wider isotopic niche widths were found at the site that has become ice-free most recently, and narrower niches at the older ice-free sites. At an intermediate state of glacier retreat-related disturbance (e.g. via ice-growler scouring) species with different strategies could settle. The site at the earliest stage of post-retreat development was characterized by an assemblage with lower trophic redundancy. Generally, the isotopic niche widths increased with increasing size spectra of organisms within the community, excepting the youngest assemblage, where the pioneer colonizer meiofauna size class displayed the highest isotopic niche width. Meiofauna at all sites generally occupied positions in the isotopic space that suggested a detrital-pool food source and/or the presence of predatory taxa. In general ice scour and glacial impact appeared to play a two-fold role within the Cove: i) either stimulating trophic diversity by allowing continuous re-colonization of meiofaunal species or, ii) over time driving the benthic assemblages into a more compact trophic structure with increased connectedness and resource recycling. PMID:26559062

  20. Associations of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages with environmental variables in the upper Clear Creek watershed, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Larry R.; May, Jason T.; Wulff, Marissa

    2012-01-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrates are integral components of stream ecosystems and are often used to assess the ecological integrity of streams. We sampled streams in the upper Clear Creek drainage in the Klamath—Siskiyou Ecoregion of northwestern California in fall 2004 (17 sites) and 2005 (original 17 plus 4 new sites) with the objectives of documenting the benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages supported by the streams in the area, determining how those assemblages respond to environmental variables, assessing the biological condition of the streams using a benthic index of biotic integrity (IBI), and understanding the assemblages in the context of biodiversity of the ecoregion. We collected both reach-wide (RW) and targeted-riffle (TR) macroinvertebrate samples at each site. The macroinvertebrate assemblages were diverse, with over 150 genera collected for each sampling protocol. The macroinvertebrate assemblages appeared to be most responsive to a general habitat gradient based on stream size, gradient, flow, and dominance of riffles. A second important habitat gradient was based on elevation and dominance of riffles. A gradient in water quality based on concentrations of dissolved ions and metals was also important. Models based on these 3 gradients had Spearman's rank correlations with macroinvertebrate taxonomic composition of 0.60 and 0.50 for the TR and RW samples, respectively. The majority (>50%) of the sites were in good or very good biological condition based on IBI scores. The diversity of macroinvertebrate assemblages is associated with the diversity of habitats available in the Klamath—Siskiyou Ecoregion. Maintaining the aquatic habitats in good condition is important in itself but is also vital to maintaining biodiversity in this diverse and unique ecoregion.

  1. Effects of Atrazine, Metolachlor, Carbaryl and Chlorothalonil on Benthic Microbes and Their Nutrient Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Daniel; Bernot, Melody J.

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine, metolachlor, carbaryl, and chlorothalonil are detected in streams throughout the U.S. at concentrations that may have adverse effects on benthic microbes. Sediment samples were exposed to these pesticides to quantify responses of ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate uptake by the benthic microbial community. Control uptake rates of sediments had net remineralization of nitrate (?1.58 NO3 µg gdm?1 h?1), and net assimilation of phosphate (1.34 PO4 µg gdm?1 h?1) and ammonium (0.03 NH4 µg gdm?1 h?1). Metolachlor decreased ammonium and phosphate uptake. Chlorothalonil decreased nitrate remineralization and phosphate uptake. Nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate uptake rates are more pronounced in the presence of these pesticides due to microbial adaptations to toxicants. Our interpretation of pesticide availability based on their water/solid affinities supports no effects for atrazine and carbaryl, decreasing nitrate remineralization, and phosphate assimilation in response to chlorothalonil. Further, decreased ammonium and phosphate uptake in response to metolachlor is likely due to affinity. Because atrazine target autotrophs, and carbaryl synaptic activity, effects on benthic microbes were not hypothesized, consistent with results. Metolachlor and chlorothalonil (non-specific modes of action) had significant effects on sediment microbial nutrient dynamics. Thus, pesticides with a higher affinity to sediments and/or broad modes of action are likely to affect sediment microbes' nutrient dynamics than pesticides dissolved in water or specific modes of action. Predicted nutrient uptake rates were calculated at mean and peak concentrations of metolachlor and chlorothalonil in freshwaters using polynomial equations generated in this experiment. We concluded that in natural ecosystems, peak chlorothalonil and metolachlor concentrations could affect phosphate and ammonium by decreasing net assimilation, and nitrate uptake rates by decreasing remineralization, relative to mean concentrations of metolachlor and chlorothalonil. Our regression equations can complement models of nitrogen and phosphorus availability in streams to predict potential changes in nutrient dynamics in response to pesticides in freshwaters. PMID:25275369

  2. Roles of epiphytes associated with macroalgae in benthic food web of a eutrophic coastal lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xinqing; Huang, Lingfeng; Lin, Rongcheng; Du, Jianguo

    2015-11-01

    Macroalgae perform a significant function in the trophic dynamics in many coastal lagoons, and conventionally, they are the key trophic base that fuels the overall aquatic food web. However, few studies have considered the trophic contribution of epiphytes that attach to macroalgae in the diet of benthic primary consumers or their contribution to the trophic base of the aquatic food web. In this study, macrobenthic invertebrate biomass was combined with multiple-isotope-mixing models to distinguish the trophic importance of macroalgae and their associated epiphytic assemblages in the benthic food web during Ulva lactuca bloom in the Yundang Lagoon, a eutrophic coastal lagoon in Xiamen, China. Amphipods primarily dominated the zoobenthos, with the biomass varied from 40.9 g/m2 in January to 283.9 g/m2 in March. They mainly fed on U. lactuca and its associated epiphytes, which jointly contributed more than 60% to amphipod diets, but species-specific feeding habits were exhibited among amphipods. Using the zoobenthos biomass as a weighting factor, the contribution of U. lactuca and its epiphytes to total benthic communities during U. lactuca bloom exceeded 65%.The epiphytes were clearly utilized more than U. lactuca, with a median contribution ranging from 48.5% in January to 66.6% in March. Our findings demonstrate the trophic importance of the epiphytes in macroalgae-based coastal habitats, as found in many seagrass beds. Therefore, we propose that further food web studies of macroalgae-based ecosystems should pay greater attention to the role of epiphytes.

  3. Benthic macroinvertebrate communities as aquatic bioindicators of contamination by Giardia and Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Reboredo-Fernández, Aurora; Prado-Merini, Óscar; García-Bernadal, Teresa; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Ares-Mazás, Elvira

    2014-05-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrates (community composed mostly by aquatic forms of insects, such as stonefly nymphs, dragonfly nymphs, water bugs or beetle larvae) are often used in biological monitoring programmes to evaluate the ecological status of rivers and thus to indicate the repercussions of anthropogenic activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of this indicator community to detect human enteroprotozoan parasites that are transmitted via water. In total, 32 samples of macroinvertebrates were collected, with the aid of surber nets of mesh size 500 ?m, from nine rivers in Galicia (NW Spain), on different occasions between 2005 and 2009. The samples were homogenised (0.04 M phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.2), sieved (150 and 45 ?m mesh), and concentrated (by a diphasic method). Aliquots of the sediments were then analysed by a direct immunofluorescence technique with monoclonal antibodies against Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Giardia cysts were detected in one (3.1%) of the samples and Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in four (12.5%) of the samples. This work is the first study carried out to investigate the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in this benthic community. The results demonstrate that benthic invertebrates could be used as bioindicators of contamination by these waterborne protozoans. Moreover, as this aquatic organisms act as intermittent accumulators and its monitoring enables chronological analysis of perturbations, in both the short- and mid-term, this may represent a suitable alternative or complementary method to the usual techniques of detecting human and animal enteropathogens in water samples. PMID:24553978

  4. Benthic microbial communities of coastal terrestrial and ice shelf Antarctic meltwater ponds

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Stephen D. J.; McDonald, Ian R.; Herbold, Craig W.; Lee, Charles K.; Cary, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    The numerous perennial meltwater ponds distributed throughout Antarctica represent diverse and productive ecosystems central to the ecological functioning of the surrounding ultra oligotrophic environment. The dominant taxa in the pond benthic communities have been well described however, little is known regarding their regional dispersal and local drivers to community structure. The benthic microbial communities of 12 meltwater ponds in the McMurdo Sound of Antarctica were investigated to examine variation between pond microbial communities and their biogeography. Geochemically comparable but geomorphologically distinct ponds were selected from Bratina Island (ice shelf) and Miers Valley (terrestrial) (<40 km between study sites), and community structure within ponds was compared using DNA fingerprinting and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. More than 85% of total sequence reads were shared between pooled benthic communities at different locations (OTU0.05), which in combination with favorable prevailing winds suggests aeolian regional distribution. Consistent with previous findings Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla representing over 50% of total sequences; however, a large number of other phyla (21) were also detected in this ecosystem. Although dominant Bacteria were ubiquitous between ponds, site and local selection resulted in heterogeneous community structures and with more than 45% of diversity being pond specific. Potassium was identified as the most significant contributing factor to the cosmopolitan community structure and aluminum to the location unique community based on a BEST analysis (Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.632 and 0.806, respectively). These results indicate that the microbial communities in meltwater ponds are easily dispersed regionally and that the local geochemical environment drives the ponds community structure. PMID:26074890

  5. A survey of benthic assemblages of foraminifera in tropical coastal waters of pulau pinang, malaysia.

    PubMed

    Minhat, Fatin Izzati; Yahya, Khairun; Talib, Anita; Ahmad, Omar

    2013-08-01

    The distribution of benthic Foraminifera throughout the coastal waters of Taman Negara Pulau Pinang (Penang National Park), Malaysia was studied to assess the impact of various anthropogenic activities, such as fishing, ecotourism and floating cage culture. Samples were obtained at 200 m intervals within the subtidal zone, extending up to 1200 m offshore at Teluk Bahang, Teluk Aling, Teluk Ketapang and Pantai Acheh. The depth within coastal waters ranged between 1.5 m and 10.0 m, with predominantly muddy substrate at most stations. Water quality analysis showed little variation in micronutrient (nitrite, NO2; nitrate, NO3; ammonia, NH4 and orthophosphate, PO4) concentrations between sampling stations. Temperature (29.6±0.48°C), salinity (29.4±0.28 ppt), dissolved oxygen content (5.4±0.95 mg/l) and pH (8.5± 0.13) also showed little fluctuation between stations. A total of nine genera of foraminifera were identified in the study (i.e., Ammonia, Elphidium, Ammobaculites, Bigenerina, Quinqueloculina, Reopax, Globigerina, Textularia and Nonion). The distribution of benthic foraminifera was dominated by opportunistic groups that have a high tolerance to anthropogenic stressors. Ammonia had the highest frequency of occurrence (84.7%), followed by Bigenerina (50%), Ammobaculites (44.2%) and Elphidium (38.9%). The Ammonia-Elphidium Index (AEI) was used to describe the hypoxic condition of benthic communities at all sites. Teluk Bahang had the highest AEI value. The foraminiferal assemblages and distribution in Teluk Bahang, Teluk Aling, Teluk Ketapang and Pantai Acheh showed no correlation with physical or chemical environmental parameters. PMID:24575240

  6. Benthic ammonia oxidizers differ in community structure and biogeochemical potential across a riverine delta.

    PubMed

    Damashek, Julian; Smith, Jason M; Mosier, Annika C; Francis, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution in coastal zones is a widespread issue, particularly in ecosystems with urban or agricultural watersheds. California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, at the landward reaches of San Francisco Bay, is highly impacted by both agricultural runoff and sewage effluent, leading to chronically high nutrient loadings. In particular, the extensive discharge of ammonium into the Sacramento River has altered this ecosystem by vastly increasing ammonium concentrations and thus changing the stoichiometry of inorganic nitrogen stocks, with potential effects throughout the food web. This debate surrounding ammonium inputs highlights the importance of understanding the rates of, and controls on, nitrogen (N) cycling processes across the delta. To date, however, there has been little research examining N biogeochemistry or N-cycling microbial communities in this system. We report the first data on benthic ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities and potential nitrification rates for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, focusing on the functional gene amoA (which codes for the ?-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase). There were stark regional differences in ammonia-oxidizing communities, with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) outnumbering ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) only in the ammonium-rich Sacramento River. High potential nitrification rates in the Sacramento River suggested these communities may be capable of oxidizing significant amounts of ammonium, compared to the San Joaquin River and the upper reaches of San Francisco Bay. Gene diversity also showed regional patterns, as well as phylogenetically unique ammonia oxidizers in the Sacramento River. The benthic ammonia oxidizers in this nutrient-rich aquatic ecosystem may be important players in its overall nutrient cycling, and their community structure and biogeochemical function appear related to nutrient loadings. Unraveling the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of N cycling pathways, including benthic nitrification, is a critical step toward understanding how such ecosystems respond to the changing environmental conditions wrought by human development and climate change. PMID:25620958

  7. Benthic ammonia oxidizers differ in community structure and biogeochemical potential across a riverine delta

    PubMed Central

    Damashek, Julian; Smith, Jason M.; Mosier, Annika C.; Francis, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution in coastal zones is a widespread issue, particularly in ecosystems with urban or agricultural watersheds. California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, at the landward reaches of San Francisco Bay, is highly impacted by both agricultural runoff and sewage effluent, leading to chronically high nutrient loadings. In particular, the extensive discharge of ammonium into the Sacramento River has altered this ecosystem by vastly increasing ammonium concentrations and thus changing the stoichiometry of inorganic nitrogen stocks, with potential effects throughout the food web. This debate surrounding ammonium inputs highlights the importance of understanding the rates of, and controls on, nitrogen (N) cycling processes across the delta. To date, however, there has been little research examining N biogeochemistry or N-cycling microbial communities in this system. We report the first data on benthic ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities and potential nitrification rates for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, focusing on the functional gene amoA (which codes for the ?-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase). There were stark regional differences in ammonia-oxidizing communities, with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) outnumbering ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) only in the ammonium-rich Sacramento River. High potential nitrification rates in the Sacramento River suggested these communities may be capable of oxidizing significant amounts of ammonium, compared to the San Joaquin River and the upper reaches of San Francisco Bay. Gene diversity also showed regional patterns, as well as phylogenetically unique ammonia oxidizers in the Sacramento River. The benthic ammonia oxidizers in this nutrient-rich aquatic ecosystem may be important players in its overall nutrient cycling, and their community structure and biogeochemical function appear related to nutrient loadings. Unraveling the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of N cycling pathways, including benthic nitrification, is a critical step toward understanding how such ecosystems respond to the changing environmental conditions wrought by human development and climate change. PMID:25620958

  8. Complex Effects of Ecosystem Engineer Loss on Benthic Ecosystem Response to Detrital Macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca; Gribsholt, Britta; Gazeau, Frederic; Di Santo, Valentina; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2013-01-01

    Ecosystem engineers change abiotic conditions, community assembly and ecosystem functioning. Consequently, their loss may modify thresholds of ecosystem response to disturbance and undermine ecosystem stability. This study investigates how loss of the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina modifies the response to macroalgal detrital enrichment of sediment biogeochemical properties, microphytobenthos and macrofauna assemblages. A field manipulative experiment was done on an intertidal sandflat (Oosterschelde estuary, The Netherlands). Lugworms were deliberately excluded from 1× m sediment plots and different amounts of detrital Ulva (0, 200 or 600 g Wet Weight) were added twice. Sediment biogeochemistry changes were evaluated through benthic respiration, sediment organic carbon content and porewater inorganic carbon as well as detrital macroalgae remaining in the sediment one month after enrichment. Microalgal biomass and macrofauna composition were measured at the same time. Macroalgal carbon mineralization and transfer to the benthic consumers were also investigated during decomposition at low enrichment level (200 g WW). The interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment did not modify sediment organic carbon or benthic respiration. Weak but significant changes were instead found for porewater inorganic carbon and microalgal biomass. Lugworm exclusion caused an increase of porewater carbon and a decrease of microalgal biomass, while detrital enrichment drove these values back to values typical of lugworm-dominated sediments. Lugworm exclusion also decreased the amount of macroalgae remaining into the sediment and accelerated detrital carbon mineralization and CO2 release to the water column. Eventually, the interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment affected macrofauna abundance and diversity, which collapsed at high level of enrichment only when the lugworms were present. This study reveals that in nature the role of this ecosystem engineer may be variable and sometimes have no or even negative effects on stability, conversely to what it should be expected based on current research knowledge. PMID:23805256

  9. Stable isotope variations in benthic filter feeders across a large depth gradient on the continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerot, Caroline; Lorrain, Anne; Grall, Jacques; Gillikin, David P.; Munaron, Jean-Marie; Le Bris, Hervé; Paulet, Yves-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Spatial variations in carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (? 13C and ? 15N) of benthic filter feeders were investigated on an inshore-offshore gradient (0-250 km) along the continental shelf of the northern Bay of Biscay (NE Atlantic Ocean). ? 13C and ? 15N values were measured in muscle tissues of four filter-feeding mollusc species (epifaunal: Pecten maximus, Aequipecten opercularis; infaunal: Glycymeris glycymeris, Venus casina) and in benthic particulate organic matter along a corresponding water-depth gradient from 6 to 220 m. All four species showed a decreasing pattern of muscle ? 13C and ? 15N values with increasing depth. At the Ushant front (˜130 m water depth), where there is a decrease in both bottom water chlorophyll a and suspended particulate matter, muscle ? 13C and ? 15N values decreased in all species. Although ? 13C values of infaunal clams initially decreased at 30 m depth, ? 13C values of epifaunal scallops decreased around 120 m depth, far below the expected depth reduction in microphytobenthic production suggesting that carbon isotopes might not simply track microphytobenthic utilization. The difference between infaunal and epifaunal bivalve stable isotope values may reflect differences in feeding strategies. Muscle ? 15N values at the deepest stations (˜2‰) were lower than expected considering the typical trophic enrichment value of 3-4‰ between prey and consumers. These low ? 15N values may result from low metabolic rates and suggest the classic trophic enrichment may not hold true in species inhabiting deep waters. Stable isotopes in benthic filter feeders can reveal much information regarding their ecology and environment, but are not straightforward recorders of stable isotope baseline variations as is often assumed.

  10. A note on the laboratory culture of the benthic foraminifer Cornuloculina balkwilli (MacFadyen)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic studies of the Foraminifera provide valuable insights into marine speciation and biogeography, yet the discovery of vitally needed new genetic markers for this important group is being severely limited by an extreme lack of genetic data. The establishment of a laboratory culture from a single, asexually reproducing foraminifer, will be essential to provide enough pooled genetic material from these unicellular organisms, to facilitate full genome sequencing and genetic marker discovery, using next-generation sequencing techniques. Findings The aim of this study was to develop a simple and inexpensive method of culturing benthic foraminifera, via asexual reproduction, in a controlled laboratory environment. Individual specimens of the benthic foraminfer Cornuloculina balkwilli (MacFadyen) were placed in 7 cm plastic beakers, containing 50 ml natural seawater, filtered to 0.2 ?m, and kept at 23°C, with a 12-hour light/dark cycle, and fed weekly on a mixed algal diet of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Asexually derived cultures were successfully established from 4 specimens of Cornuloculina balkwilli, originally added to the culture vessels as immature specimens. Many thousands of individuals were present after 6 months. Conclusions The method presented here demonstrates that only basic laboratory equipment is required to establish and maintain a thriving culture of the benthic foraminfer, C. balkwilli, from a single asexually reproducing specimen, providing an excellent source of genetic material for use in next generation sequencing. The method is easily reproducible and will greatly aid in the discovery of critically needed new genetic markers in the Foraminifera. It also highlights C. balkwilli as a good candidate species for use in the field of environmental micropaleontology. PMID:24025185

  11. Benthic Foraminifera as ecological indicators for water quality on the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthicke, Sven; Nobes, Kristie

    2008-07-01

    Benthic foraminifera are established indicators for Water Quality (WQ) in Florida and the Caribbean. However, nearshore coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and other Pacific regions are also subjected to increased nutrient and sediment loads. Here, we investigate the use of benthic foraminifera as indicators to assess status and trends of WQ on GBR reefs. We quantified several sediment parameters and the foraminiferan assemblage composition on 20 reefs in four geographic regions of the GBR, and along a water column nutrient and turbidity gradient. Twenty-seven easily recognisable benthic foraminiferan taxa (>63 ?m) were distinguished. All four geographic regions differed significantly ( p < 0.05, ANOSIM) in their assemblage composition, and a redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that sediment parameters only explained a small proportion of the variance in the assemblage composition. On nine reefs along a previously studied water quality gradient, foraminifera showed a distinct shift in assemblage composition towards larger symbiont-bearing taxa from turbid inner shelf towards clearer outer shelf reefs. A RDA separated symbiotic and aposymbiotic (heterotrophic) taxa. In addition, total suspended solid and water column chlorophyll a concentrations were negatively correlated, and optical depth and distance to the mainland were positively correlated, with the abundance of symbiont-bearing taxa. Several large foraminifera were identified as indicators for offshore, clear water conditions. In contrast, heterotrophic rotaliids and a species retaining plastids ( Elphidium sp.) where highly characteristic for low light, higher nutrient conditions. Application of the FORAM index to GBR assemblage composition showed a significant increase in the value of this index with increased distance from the mainland in the Whitsunday region ( r2 = 0.75, p < 0.001), and therefore with increasing light and decreased nutrient availability. We conclude that it will be possible to apply this index to GBR and possibly other Pacific reefs after some adaptations and additional experimental work on species-specific limiting factors.

  12. Bioaccumulation of organic contaminants by benthic invertebrates of the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrough, K.; Dickhut, R.

    1995-12-31

    In situ partitioning of PCBs and PAHs between benthic invertebrates and the environment has been compared to previously obtained laboratory bioaccumulation results. Previous laboratory studies show a characteristic nonlinear plot when bioaccumulation factors (BAF) are plotted against octanol-water partition coefficients (K{sub ow}), on a log-log scale. This phenomena can be explained by desorption and elimination kinetics. However preliminary in situ studies show a different relationship between field BAFs and K{sub ow} which may be explained by other biogeochemical factors. In situ and laboratory PAH and PCB partitioning measurements will be used to determine major mechanisms affecting contaminant bioaccumulation.

  13. Investigation of Benthic Foraminiferal Non-Traditional Stable Isotopes to Reconstruct Methane Fluxes in Sedimentary Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrelli, C.; Gabitov, R. I.; Messenger, S. R.; Nguyen, A. N.; Torres, M. E.; Kessler, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, with a global warming potential much higher than carbon dioxide (CO2) on a short time scale. Even if the residence time of CH4 in the atmosphere is relatively short (tens of years), one of the products of CH4 oxidation is CO2, a greenhouse gas with a much longer residence time in the atmosphere (tens to hundreds of years). CH4 has been proposed as one of the trigger mechanisms for rapid global climate change today and in the geological past. With regards to the geological past, numerous studies proposed the benthic foraminiferal carbon isotope ratio (Delta13C) as a tool to reconstruct the impact of marine CH4 on rapid climate changes; however, the investigation of modern benthic foraminiferal Delta13C have produced inconclusive results. CH4 has a distinctive hydrogen isotope (Delta(D)) and Delta13C signature compared to seawater, and sulfate reduction, often coupled to CH4 anaerobic oxidation in sediments, changes the sulfur isotope signature (Delta34S) of the remaining sulfate in porewater. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Delta(D) and Delta34S signature of infaunal benthic foraminiferal species can provide a complementary approach to Delta13C to study CH4 dynamics in sedimentary environments. Here, we present the preliminary results obtained analyzing Uvigerina peregrina Delta(D) and Delta34S from three different locations at Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Unfortunately, the lack of chemical data related to the moment of foraminiferal calcification makes difficult to build a robust relationship among the U. peregrina stable isotopes and the CH4 fluxes at the sampling sites. However, our results look very promising, as each site is characterized by a different Delta(D) and Delta34S signature. We emphasize that this study represents the first step in the development of new proxies (Delta(D)) and Delta34S), which may complement the more traditional benthic foraminiferal Delta13C values, to reconstruct marine CH4 fluxes in the geological past.

  14. Benthic Community Composition and Seabed Characteristics of a Chukchi Sea Pockmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Bluhm, B.; Iken, K.; Gagaev, S.; Robinson, S.

    2005-12-01

    Several dozen seafloor features were mapped by Larry Mayer and his colleagues using swath bathymetry during a 2003 cruise with the USCGC HEALY near the eastern edge of the Chukchi Plateau (Chukchi Sea 76.6N, 163.9W). These were sub-circular depressions ranging from approximately 250 to over 1000m in width, with depths of up to 50m below the surrounding seabed, and situated in water depths from 500 to 950m. The origin of these features was undetermined, but one possibility was that they were pockmarks formed as a result of gas or fluid expulsion processes. We report here on benthic sampling undertaken at one of these pockmarks on 18 July 2005, also from USCGC HEALY. This elongated feature had maximum water depth of approximately 940m, was 1200m in maximum width, and was depressed approximately 40m below the surrounding seabed. The ocean in the vicinity of the pockmark was heavily ice-covered, which tightly restricted the ship's mobility during sampling operations. We used an ROV to collect and photograph the benthic epifauna during a 6h transit that crossed from the outside of the pockmark to near the center over a distance of 900m. We used a down-looking digital camera to collect over 800 pictures of the benthos at altitudes of 2 to 3m above the seabed. We also collected three cores with a 25x25cm box corer. Our investigations did not provide any direct evidence for gas or fluid flux through the seabed of this feature. Neither did we see any secondary indications of methane flux such as authigenic carbonates or bacterial mats. The abundance and diversity of benthic epifauna at this station was the highest among 8 stations sampled using similar methods during a 30 day cruise. The ROV observed brittle stars, various types of anemones, shrimps, eel pouts, stalked crinoids, benthic ctenophore (likely new species), burrows and mounts, gooseneck barnacles, mysids. Holothurians (c.f. Peneagone sp.) were the single most abundant group and were often photographed in densities of over 50 individuals per square meter. Preliminary analysis of the box core samples: Polychaetes (e.g. Chaetozone setose, Aricidea sp., Ophelina sp., Progoniada sp., Proclea graffi, Protula globifera), Foraminifera, Nemertini, Coronata (Cnidaria tubes), Sipunculida (Golfingia), Bivalvia, Anthozoa.

  15. Bathymetry and seafloor image surveys for benthic habitat mapping of Dokdo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hwan; Rho, Hyun Soo; Lee, Myung Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Dokdo (do means a island), our study area, is a volcanic island, which is located in the northeastern part of the Ulleung Back-Arc Basin, the East Sea and approximately 216.8 km away from the eastern part of the Korean peninsula. The Dokdo volcano anomalously emerges, rising abruptly from the sea floor (~2,100 m below sea level). Dokdo comprises two main islets (Seo-do and Dong-do) and the associated submerged volcanic edifice. To management the eco-system of coastal area and establish the policy against the change of marine environment, advanced nations for marine have conducted benthic habitat mapping studies like PIBHMC (Pacific Islands Benthic Habitat Mapping Center) and MESH (Mapping European Seabed Habitats) projects. For the benthic habitat mapping of the southern coastal area of Seo-do, the precise topographical map of the coastal area was made using the detailed bathymetry data from multi-beam echosounder (EM 3001, Kongsberg). The seafloor images of the survey area were obtained by Side Scan Sonar (4125, Edgetech). The grain size and TOC (Total Organic Carbon) of 6 surface sediment samples of the survey area were analyzed. We used small research vessels for this study, because of shallow water. The bathymetry data of the survey area show that the range of water depth is about from 1 m to 28 m and the underwater reefs are irregularly scattered and extended from inland of Seo-do, with shallow water depth (within about 10 m). In the underwater reefs area, the flank slopes are very steep and irregular, overlain by many large or small submerged rocks, indicating partial erosion due to waves, strong currents and weathering. And below ~15 m, the bathymetry gradually transitions to a relatively even undulation with a smooth slope. The seafloor images, from Side Scan Sonar, show that many large or small submerged rocks occur in the shallow water and other seabed area is covered with small gravels. The grain size of sediments is varied along bathymetric gradients. Gravel was dominated in shallow water whereas sand particles increased in deep water. TOC (Total Organic Carbon) values of the sediments are relatively high due to input of organic matters from islets and seagull excreta. Underwater video images are draped on the bathymetry for integrated analysis. The bathymetry, the integrated map, and the sediment data are fully utilized by benthic habitat mapping of Dokdo and habitat analysis of nearshore ecosystem.

  16. Upper Cretaceous and lower Paleogene benthic foraminiferal paleoecology from north-eastern Tunisia: El Melah section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallala, N.; Zaghbib-Turki, D.; Turki, M. M.; Arenillas, I.; Arz, J. A.; Molina, E.

    2009-04-01

    As an impact of the bolide and ejecta falls at the K/Pg boundary the planktonic Foraminifera have suffered sever mass extinction. However, no small Benthic Foraminifera species mass extinction at the K/Pg boundary has documented. Nevertheless many species have showed disturbance. The Maastrichtian assemblages may be different from those of the lower Paleogene by their species content, diversity and frequencies. At the El Melah section, the small benthic foraminifera indicate upper bathyal environment, and manifest significant faunal turnover. Until the uppermost Maastrichtian, their assemblages are highly diversified, with 109 species. They are dominated by endobenthic morphotypes (72 %). At the K/Pg boundary, although 34% of them seem to disappear, but only few species have really extinct such us Arenobulimina obesa. Nevertheless, the majority of species persist elsewhere at the Danian (e.g. Gaudryina aissana, Gaudryina inflata, Tritaxia midwayensis, Coryphostoma incrassata). At the lower Danian, the survivor Maastrichtian species are of 66%. Some of them disappeared temporary. Three survivor species were eclipsed during the Guembelitria cretacea zone (Globobulimina ovata, Praebulimina carseyae and Anomalinoides welleri) and 27 other species were diminished during the Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina subzone. They are composed of both calcareous fauna (e.g. Bulimina rugifera, Bolivina deccurens, Anomalinoides midwayensis, Dentalina colei, Marginulina cf. glabra) and agglutinated fauna (e.g. Spiroplectamina knebeli and Saccamina placenta). Throughout the Parasubbotina pseudobulloides subzone, 15 others species were progressiv