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Sample records for bepc ii positron

  1. Numerical Analyses on Transient Thermal Process of Gas - Cooled Current Leads in BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Yao, Z. L.; Wang, L.; Jia, L. X.

    2004-06-01

    A pair of high current leads will be used for the superconducting detector solenoid magnet and six pairs of low current leads will be used for the superconducting interaction quadruple magnets in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPC II). This paper reports the numerical analyses on the thermal processes in the current leads, including the power charging process and overloaded current case as well as the transient characteristic of the leads once the helium cooling is interrupted. The design parameters of the current leads are studied for the stable and unstable conditions.

  2. Upgrade of beam energy measurement system at BEPC-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Cai, Xiao; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Guo, Di-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Li; Liu, Bai-Qi; Achasov, M. N.; Krasnov, A. A.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Pyata, E. E.; Mamoshkina, E. V.; Harris, F. A.

    2016-07-01

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. In order to meet the requirements of data taking and improve the measurement accuracy, the system has continued to be upgraded, which involves the updating of laser and optics subsystems, replacement of a view-port of the laser to the vacuum insertion subsystem, the use of an electric cooling system for a high purity germanium detector, and improvement of the data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrade system guarantees the smooth and efficient measurement of beam energy at BEPC-II and enables accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III. Supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC)(11375206, 10775142, 10825524, 11125525, 11235011), the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015CB856700, 2015CB856705), State key laboratory of particle and detection and electronics; and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP); the RFBR grant(14-02-00129-a), U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, part of this work related to the design of ZnSe viewports is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (14-50-00080)

  3. Prospects for the study of gluonic states at Beijing Electron- Positron Collider (BEPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1989-01-11

    Progress in the study of gluonic states depends crucially on accumulating data samples of order 10/sup 8/ J//psi/ decays, in order to perform complete partial wave analyses of radiative and hadronic J//psi/ decays. This requirement is well matched to the capabilities of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, which has approached the necessary luminosity in its first two months of operation. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. CFD ANALYSES ON THE COOLING FOR SCQ MAGNETS IN BEPC II UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,Z.H.WANG,L.TANK,H.M.ZHANG,X.B.JIA,L.X.

    2003-09-22

    A pair of superconducting interaction region quadrupole magnets in Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) are to be cooled by supercritical helium in order to eliminate the flow instabilities in the constrained cooling channels. The fluid flow is simulated by the commercial computational dynamics fluid software. The heat loads to the superconducting quadrupole (SCQ) magnets from the radiation shields at 80 K and from the thermal conduction of mechanical supports are considered. The temperature distribution of the fluid in the liquid helium cooling channels, and the heat transfer in the SCQ magnet and by its supports are presented. The influence of mass flow rate on pressure drop in the cooling passage is analyzed.

  5. J/psi physics at BEPC

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1984-06-01

    J/psi physics is discussed which will be of interest at T > 1988, the period of operation of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. Emphasis is placed on the gluonic states which are best studied in radiative J/psi decay. The difficulties of these studies are discussed and the need for very high statistics is stressed. In particular it is essential to partial-wave-analyze the hadronic final states produced in J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..X. An estimate using fixed target data suggests that 0(10/sup 8/) J/psi decays are needed to do an unambiguous partial wave analysis for hadron masses up to about 2 GeV. This requirement is an excellent match to the BEPC design parameters, which imply production of 0(10/sup 8/) J/psi's per year. With a J/psi production rate an order of magnitude greater than other electron-positron storage rings, BEPC will be a unique world facility for these studies. 58 references.

  6. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Liu, R; Chi, Y

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper. PMID:26931839

  7. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  8. The electron-cloud instability in the arcs of the PEP-II positron ring

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.; Lambertson, Glen R.

    1998-03-01

    We have applied our simulation code ''POSINST'' to evaluate, in linear approximation, the contribution to the growth rate of the electron-cloud instability (ECI) from the pumping sections and the dipole bending magnets in the arcs of the PEP-II positron ring. A key ingredient in our model is a detailed description of the secondary emission process off the TiN-coated chambers. Another important element is the analytic computation of the electric field produced by the beam, including the effects from surface charges. Space-charge forces of the electron cloud upon itself are also included, although these forces are negligible under nominal conditions. Bunch-length effects are optionally included by slicing the bunch into several kicks. We conclude that the growth rate is dominated by the pumping sections and scales linearly with the photoelectric yield Y'. For Y' = 1, our present estimate is in the range {approx} 1000-1300 s{sup -1}, depending upon the value of the photon reflectivity R. This is in the range controllable by the transverse feedback system. The contributions to the growth rate from other magnets and from other sections of the ring remain to be evaluated.

  9. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density In The Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Krasnykh, A.K; Byrd, J.; Santis, S.De; Sonnad, K.G.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; /CERN

    2008-07-03

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  10. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud density In the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro T.F.; Krasnykh, Anatoly K.; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnaad, Kiran G.; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom

    2008-06-18

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electrons clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appears to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regionsif the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  11. Positron production in heavy ion collisions: Current status of the problem - II

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Dunford, R.W.; Last, J.; Kutschera, W.; Rhein, M.D.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wilt, P.; Wuosmaa, A.H.

    1994-08-01

    Narrow peaks have been observed at GSI Darmstadt in the energy spectra of positrons and sum-energy spectra of positron-electron pairs, produced in collisions of very heavy ions. To date, there is no satisfactory explanation of the origin of these lines although many differing models have been proposed. In this contribution, the authors describe the features of a new experiment aimed at the study of the line phenomenon and present the results of their first experiments. The specific goals of their experiment are to clarify the experimental situation regarding the lines through high-resolution, high-statistics data and, by direct measurement of the vector momenta of the peak pairs, to determine their kinematics.

  12. Large-dimension configuration-interaction calculations of positron binding to the group-II atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2006-03-15

    The configuration-interaction (CI) method is applied to the calculation of the structures of a number of positron binding systems, including e{sup +}Be, e{sup +}Mg, e{sup +}Ca, and e{sup +}Sr. These calculations were carried out in orbital spaces containing about 200 electron and 200 positron orbitals up to l=12. Despite the very large dimensions, the binding energy and annihilation rate converge slowly with l, and the final values do contain an appreciable correction obtained by extrapolating the calculation to the l{yields}{infinity} limit. The binding energies were 0.00317 hartree for e{sup +}Be, 0.0170 hartree for e{sup +}Mg, 0.0189 hartree for e{sup +}Ca, and 0.0131 hartree for e{sup +}Sr.

  13. Spectroscopic, Elemental and Thermal Analysis, and Positron Annihilation Studies on Ca(II), Sr(II), Ba(II), Pb(II), and Fe(III) Penicillin G Potassium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, M. S.; Sharshara, T.

    2015-11-01

    The [Pb(Pin)2] · 3H2O, [M(Pin)(H2O)2(Cl)] · nH2O (M = SrII, CaII or BaII; n = 0-1), and [Fe(Pin)2(Cl)(H2O)] · H2O penicillin G potassium (Pin) complexes were synthesized and characterized using elemental analyses, molar conductivity, thermal analysis and electronic spectroscopy techniques. The positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) and Doppler broadening (DB) techniques have been employed to probe the defects and structural changes of Pin ligand and its complexes. The PAL and DB line-shape parameters were discussed in terms of the structure, molecular weight, ligand-metal molar ratio, and other properties of the Pin complexes.

  14. A dedicated calibration tool for the MEG and MEG II positron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutar, G.; Bemporad, C.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cei, F.; Galli, L.; Kettle, P.-R.; Papa, A.

    2016-07-01

    The MEG experiment has set the latest limit of 5.7 ×10-13(90 % C.L.) on the branching ratio of the charged lepton flavor violating decay μ+ →e+ γ, making use of the most intense continuous surface muon beam in the world at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland. High resolutions in terms of energy, timing and relative opening angle are needed in the detection of the e+ and gamma, requiring careful calibration and monitoring of the experimental apparatus. A dedicated calibration method involving Mott scattering of a monochromatic positron beam at energies close to the MEG signal energy is presented.

  15. A search for supersymmetric electrons with the Mark II detector at PEP (Positron Electron Project)

    SciTech Connect

    LeClaire, B.W.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental search for selectrons, the supersymmetric partner of the electron, has been performed at the PEP storage ring at SLAC using the Mark II detector. The experimental search done was based upon hypothetical reaction in e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at PEP center of mass energies of 29 GeV. In this reaction the selectrons, e-tilde, are assumed produced by the interaction of one of initial state electrons with a photon radiated from the other initial state electron. This latter electron is assumed to continue down the beam pipe undetected. The photon and electron then produce a selectron and a photino, ..gamma..-tilde, in the supersymmetric analog of Compton scattering. The photino is assumed to be the lightest supersymmetric particle, and as such, does not interact in the detector, thereby escaping detection very much like a neutrino. The selectron is assumed to immediately decay into an electron and photino. This electron is produced with large p perpendicular with respect to the beam pipe, since it must balance the transverse momentum carried off by the photinos. Thus, the experimental signature of the process is a single electron in the detector with a large unbalanced tranverse momentum. No events of this type were observed in the original search of 123 pb/sup -1/ of data, resulting in a cross section limit of less than 2.4 x 10/sup -2/ pb (at the 95% CL) within the detector acceptance. This cross section upper limit applies to any process which produces anomalous single electron events with missing transverse momentum. When interpreted as a supersymmetry search it results in a lower selectron mass limit of 22.2 GeV/c/sup 2/ for the case of massless photinos. Limits for non-zero mass photinos have been calculated. 87 refs., 67 figs., 17 tabs.

  16. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  17. Positron follow-up in liquid water: II. Spatial and energetic study for the most important radioisotopes used in PET.

    PubMed

    Champion, C; Le Loirec, C

    2007-11-21

    With the increasing development of positron emission tomography (PET), beta(+)-emitters are more and more regularly used in nuclear medicine. Therefore, today it is of prime importance to have a reliable description of their behavior in living matter in order to quantify the full spectra of the molecular damages potentially radio-induced and then to access a cellular dosimetry. In this work, we present a detailed inter-comparison of the main isotopes commonly used in PET: (18)F, (11)C, (13)N, (15)O, (68)Ga and (82)Rb. We have used an event-by-event Monte Carlo code recently developed for positron tracking in water (Champion and Le Loirec 2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1707-23) which consists in simulating step-by-step, interaction after interaction, the history of each ionizing particle created during the irradiation of the biological matter. This simulation has been finally adapted for describing the decays of medically important positron emitters. Quantitative information about positron penetrations, Positronium formation, annihilation event distributions, energy deposit patterns and dose profiles is then accessible and compared to published measurements and/or calculations. PMID:17975286

  18. Propagation and Generation of Electromagnetic Waves at Proton Gyrofrequencies in a Relativistic Electron-Positron Plasma. II. Excitation of Electromagnetic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznyakov, V. V.; Bespalov, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    In part I of this work [1], we study the dispersion characteristics of low-frequency waves in a relativistic electron-positron plasma. In part II, we examine the electromagnetic wave instability in this plasma caused by an admixture of nonrelativistic protons with energy comparable with the energy of relativistic low-mass particles. The instability occurs in the frequency band between the fundamental harmonic of proton gyrofrequency and the fundamental harmonic of relativistic electron gyrofrequency. The results can be used for the interpretation of known observations of the pulsar emissions obtained with a high time and frequency resolution. The considered instability can probably be the initial stage of the microwave radio emission nanoshots typical of the pulsar in the Crab Nebula.

  19. Propagation and Generation of Electromagnetic Waves at Proton Gyrofrequencies in a Relativistic Electron-Positron Plasma. II. Excitation of Electromagnetic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznyakov, V. V.; Bespalov, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    In part I of this work [1], we study the dispersion characteristics of low-frequency waves in a relativistic electron-positron plasma. In part II, we examine the electromagnetic wave instability in this plasma caused by an admixture of nonrelativistic protons with energy comparable with the energy of relativistic low-mass particles. The instability occurs in the frequency band between the fundamental harmonic of proton gyrofrequency and the fundamental harmonic of relativistic electron gyrofrequency. The results can be used for the interpretation of known observations of the pulsar emissions obtained with a high time and frequency resolution. The considered instability can probably be the initial stage of the microwave radio emission nanoshots typical of the pulsar in the Crab Nebula.

  20. Meson spectroscopy viewed from J//PSI/ decay: Gluonic states at BEPC

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1987-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of the search for gluonic states is reviewed. Progress clearly requires much higher statistics studies of J//psi/ decay, as will be possible at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. 83 refs.

  1. Positron Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    I will give a review of the history of low-energy positron physics, experimental and theoretical, concentrating on the type of work pioneered by John Humberston and the positronics group at University College. This subject became a legitimate subfield of atomic physics under the enthusiastic direction of the late Sir Harrie Massey, and it attracted a diverse following throughout the world. At first purely theoretical, the subject has now expanded to include high brightness beams of low-energy positrons, positronium beams, and, lately, experiments involving anti-hydrogen atoms. The theory requires a certain type of persistence in its practitioners, as well as an eagerness to try new mathematical and numerical techniques. I will conclude with a short summary of some of the most interesting recent advances.

  2. Results of a prospective phase II trial evaluating interim positron emission tomography-guided high dose therapy for poor prognosis diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Douglas A; Kloiber, Reinhard; Owen, Carolyn; Bahlis, Nizar J; Duggan, Peter; Mansoor, Adnan; Bence-Bruckler, Isabelle

    2014-09-01

    Patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with a poor prognosis based upon advanced stage and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase achieve a 3-4-year progression-free survival (PFS) of only 55%. The role of interim fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to guide use of upfront high dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) for patients with poor prognosis DLBCL is unproven. A prospective phase II clinical trial was designed to evaluate the outcomes of HDCT/ASCT for patients with poor prognosis DLBCL aged 18-65 years who had unfavorable interim restaging PET scans. Of the 70 eligible patients, 36 had unfavorable and 34 favorable interim PET responses, with 3-year PFS rates of 65.2% and 52.7%, respectively. In conclusion, favorable interim PET response as defined in this study is not associated with improved PFS rates for patients with poor prognosis DLBCL treated with RCHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). A phase III trial evaluating this PET-guided approach is not warranted. PMID:24188476

  3. Impact of 18F-Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography on Treatment Strategy and Radiotherapy Planning for Stage I-II Hodgkin Disease: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pommier, Pascal; Dussart, Sophie; Girinsky, Theodore; Chabaud, Sylvie; Lagrange, Jean Leon; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Beckendorff, Veronique; D'Hombres, Anne; Artignan, Xavier; Bondiau, Pierre Yves; Carrie, Christian; Giammarile, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of preradiotherapy 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) on treatment strategy and radiotherapy planning for patients with Stage I/II Hodgkin disease included in a large prospective multicenter study. Patients and Methods: Conventional computed tomography and FDG-PET were performed just before the planned radiotherapy. The radiotherapy plan was first elaborated under blinded conditions for FDG-PET data. Then, the medical staff was asked to confirm or not confirm the treatment strategy and, if appropriate, to modify the radiotherapy plan based on additional information from FDG-PET. Results: Between January 2004 and January 2006, 137 patients were included (124 were available for analysis) in 11 centers (108 adults, 16 children). All but 1 patient had received chemotherapy before inclusion. Prechemotherapy work-up included FDG-PET for 61 patients, and data were available for elaboration of the first radiotherapy plan. Based on preradiotherapy FDG-PET data, the radiotherapy was cancelled in 6 patients (4.8%), and treatment plan modifications occurred in 16 patients (12.9%): total dose (11 patients), CTV volume (5 patients), number of beam incidences (6 patients), and number of CTV (6 patients). The concordance between the treatment strategies with or without preradiotherapy FDG-PET was 82.3%. Concordance results were not significantly different when prechemotherapy PET-CT information was available. Conclusion: Preradiotherapy FDG-PET for treatment planning in Hodgkin lymphoma may lead to significant modification of the treatment strategy and the radiotherapy planning in patients with Stage I or II Hodgkin disease, even in those who have undergone FDG-PET as part of the prechemotherapy work-up.

  4. The influence of microstructure on the sintering process in crystalline metal powders investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy: II. Tungsten powders with different powder-particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staab, T. E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Vetter, B.; Kieback, B.; Lange, G.; Klimanek, P.

    1999-02-01

    Compacts of tungsten powder with five different powder-particle sizes (from 0953-8984/11/7/010/img7 to 0953-8984/11/7/010/img8) are subjected to pressureless sintering. We investigate the change in microstructure during the sintering process by positron lifetime spectroscopy. So as to be able to distinguish between defects having the same positron lifetime, we investigate their kinetics when the sample is annealed. In particular, we consider the annealing out of vacancy clusters after low-temperature electron irradiation, as well as recovery and recrystallization of a tungsten sheet, in as-manufactured form. Making measurements on uncompacted powder, we find an increasing fraction of positrons annihilating in surface states with decreasing powder-particle size. The powder-particle and grain sizes (influencing the x-ray domain size) are monitored additionally by means of metallography and x-ray diffraction. We find that all of the methods give results in agreement with each other. The small grain sizes at lower temperature, about one fifth of the powder-particle size, cause positrons to annihilate at grain boundaries, leading to vacancy-cluster-like signals. At the intensive-shrinkage stage, there are certainly contributions from different shrinkage mechanisms. The observed shrinkage rates can be explained by Coble creep. It is possible that dislocations also play a role as vacancy sources and sinks, since the intensive-shrinkage stage occurs in a temperature region wherein recrystallization takes place.

  5. Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, D.

    2003-03-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a state of the art variable energy positron beam under construction at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL). Projected intensities on the order of the order of 10^7 e+/second using ^64Cu as the positron source are expected. Owing to is short half-life (t1/2 12.8 hrs), plans are to produce the ^64Cu isotope on-site using beam port 1 of NETL TRIGA Mark II reactor. Following tungsten moderation, the positrons will be electrostatically focused and accelerated from few 10's of eV up to 30 keV. This intensity and energy range should allow routine performance of several analytical techniques of interest to surface scientists (PALS, PADB and perhaps PAES and LEPD.) The TIPS project is being developed in parallel phases. Phase I of the project entails construction of the vacuum system, source chamber, main beam line, electrostatic/magnetic focusing and transport system as well as moderator design. Initial construction, testing and characterization of moderator and beam transport elements are underway and will use a commercially available 10 mCi ^22Na radioisotope as a source of positrons. Phase II of the project is concerned primarily with the Cu source geometry and thermal properties as well as production and physical handling of the radioisotope. Additional instrument optimizing based upon experience gained during Phase I will be incorporated in the final design. Current progress of both phases will be presented along with motivations and future directions.

  6. Positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E J; Phelps, M E

    1979-01-01

    Conventional nuclear imaging techniques utilizing lead collimation rely on radioactive tracers with little role in human physiology. The principles of imaging based on coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation produced in positron decay indicate that this mode of detection is uniquely suited for use in emission computed tomography. The only gamma-ray-emitting isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are positron emitters, which yield energies too high for conventional imaging techniques. Thus development of positron emitters in nuclear medicine imaging would make possible the use of a new class of physiologically active, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The application of these principles is described in the use of a physiologically active compound labeled with a positron emitter and positron-emission computed tomography to measure the local cerebral metabolic rate in humans. PMID:440173

  7. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  8. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  9. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  10. Positron binding to molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    While there is theoretical evidence that positrons can bind to atoms, calculations for molecules are much less precise. Unfortunately, there have been no measurements of positron-atom binding, due primarily to the difficulty in forming positron-atom bound states in two-body collisions. In contrast, positrons attach to molecules via Feshbach resonances (VFR) in which a vibrational mode absorbs the excess energy. Using a high-resolution positron beam, this VFR process has been studied to measure binding energies for more than 40 molecules. New measurements will be described in two areas: positron binding to relatively simple molecules, for which theoretical calculations appear to be possible; and positron binding to molecules with large permanent dipole moments, which can be compared to analogous, weakly bound electron-molecule (negative-ion) states. Binding energies range from 75 meV for CS2 (no dipole moment) to 180 meV for acetonitrile (CH3CN). Other species studied include aldehydes and ketones, which have permanent dipole moments in the range 2.5 - 3.0 debye. The measured binding energies are surprisingly large (by a factor of 10 to 100) compared to those for the analogous negative ions, and these differences will be discussed. New theoretical calculations for positron-molecule binding are in progress, and a recent result for acetonitrile will be discussed. This ability to compare theory and experiment represents a significant step in attempts to understand positron binding to matter. In collaboration with A. C. L. Jones, J. J. Gosselin, and C. M. Surko, and supported by NSF grant PHY 07-55809.

  11. Advanced positron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variola, A.

    2014-03-01

    Positron sources are a critical system for the future lepton colliders projects. Due to the large beam emittance at the production and the limitation given by the target heating and mechanical stress, the main collider parameters fixing the luminosity are constrained by the e+ sources. In this context also the damping ring design boundary conditions and the final performance are given by the injected positron beam. At present different schemes are being taken into account in order to increase the production and the capture yield of the positron sources, to reduce the impact of the deposited energy in the converter target and to increase the injection efficiency in the damping ring. The final results have a strong impact not only on the collider performance but also on its cost optimization. After a short introduction illustrating their fundamental role, the basic positron source scheme and the performance of the existing sources will be illustrated. The main innovative designs for the future colliders advanced sources will be reviewed and the different developed technologies presented. Finally the positrons-plasma R&D experiments and the futuristic proposals for positron sources will reviewed.

  12. Positrons from supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1993-01-01

    Positrons are produced in the ejecta of supernovae by the decay of nucleosynthetic Co-56, Ti-44, and Al-26. We calculate the probability that these positrons can survive without annihilating in the supernova ejecta, and we show that enough of these positrons should escape into the interstellar medium to account for the observed diffuse Galactic annihilation radiation. The surviving positrons are carried by the expanding ejecta into the interstellar medium where their annihilation lifetime of 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr is much longer than the average supernovae occurrence time of about 100 yr. Thus, annihilating positrons from thousands of supernovae throughout the Galaxy produce a steady diffuse flux of annihilation radiation. We further show that combining the calculated positron survival fractions and nucleosynthetic yields for current supernova models with the estimated supernova rates and the observed flux of diffuse Galactic annihilation radiation suggests that the present Galactic rate of Fe-56 nucleosynthesis is about 0.8 +/- 0.6 solar mass per 100 yr.

  13. Development of Texas intense positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köymen, A. R.; Ünlü, K.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Göktepeli, S.; Wehring, B. W.

    1999-02-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a reactor-based low-energy positron beam facility utilizing some novel techniques in positron beam production. This facility will be located at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) and is being developed by UT Austin and UT Arlington researchers. TIPS will use a large area (total area of 900-1800 cm 2) 64Cu source to supply fast β + particles for subsequent moderation to form an intense monoenergetic positron beam in the energy range of 0-50 keV with an expected intensity of 10 8 e +/s. Natural copper will be neutron activated near the core of the NETL 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor to produce the 64Cu isotope. The activated source will be transported to the moderator/remoderator assembly, outside the biological shield of the reactor. This assembly combines the primary moderation and posterior remoderation of the fast β + particles into one stage using solid Kr to produce a low-energy positron source of a few eV with a diameter of 8 mm. The low-energy positron beam is then extracted by an electrostatic modified SOA gun and after further acceleration to 5 keV, the beam is focused onto the object slit of a 90° bending magnet. After further focusing and another 90° bend, the beam enters the main accelerator/decelerator that transports the beam onto the target for experimentation. The components of TIPS have been manufactured and are currently being optimized. In this communication we present some of the details of the TIPS facility and furthermore briefly discuss its intended applications.

  14. Brucella ovis PA mutants for outer membrane proteins Omp10, Omp19, SP41, and BepC are not altered in their virulence and outer membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Sidhu-Muñoz, Rebeca S; Sancho, Pilar; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2016-04-15

    Mutants in several genes have been obtained on the genetic background of virulent rough (lacking O-polysaccharide) Brucella ovis PA. The target genes encode outer membrane proteins previously associated with the virulence of smooth (bearing O-polysaccharide chains in the lipopolysaccharide) Brucella strains. Multiple attempts to delete omp16, coding for a homologue to peptidoglycan-associated lipoproteins, were unsuccessful, which suggests that Omp16 is probably essential for in vitro survival of B. ovis PA. Single deletion of omp10 or omp19-that encode two other outer membrane lipoproteins--was achieved, but the simultaneous removal of both genes failed, suggesting an essential complementary function between both proteins. Two other deletion mutants, defective in the Tol-C-homologue BepC or in the SP41 adhesin, were also obtained. Surprisingly when compared to previous results obtained with smooth Brucella, none of the B. ovis mutants showed attenuation in the virulence, either in the mouse model or in cellular models of professional and non-professional phagocytes. Additionally, and in contrast to the observations reported with smooth Brucella strains, several properties related to the outer membrane remained almost unaltered. These results evidence new distinctive traits between naturally rough B. ovis and smooth brucellae. PMID:27016758

  15. Positron studies of defected metals, metallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.

    1991-01-01

    Specific problems proposed under this project included the treatment of electronic structure and momentum density in various disordered and defected systems. Since 1987, when the new high-temperature superconductors were discovered, the project focused extensively on questions concerning the electronic structure and Fermiology of high-[Tc] superconductors, in particular, (i) momentum density and positron experiments, (ii) angle-resolved photoemission intensities, (iii) effects of disorder and substitutions in the high-[Tc]'s.

  16. Positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y. Lucas; Thompson, Christopher J.; Diksic, Mirko; Meyer, Ernest; Feindel, William H.

    One of the most exciting new technologies introduced in the last 10 yr is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitative in-vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18. Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. This review analyzes the most recent trends in the imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology and clinical applications of positron emission tomography.

  17. Alternative positron-target design for electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J. ); Nelson, W.R. )

    1991-04-01

    Current electron-positron linear colliders are limited in luminosity by the number of positrons which can be generated from targets presently used. This paper examines the possibility of using an alternate wire-target geometry for the production of positrons via an electron-induced electromagnetic cascade shower. 39 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Intense positron beam at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yagishita, Akira; Enomoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Shidara, Tetsuo; Shirakawa, Akihiro; Nakahara, Kazuo; Saitou, Haruo; Inoue, Kouji; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Inoue, Yoshi; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Doyama, Masao

    2000-08-01

    A positron beam is a useful probe for investigating the electronic states in solids, especially concerning the surface states. The advantage of utilizing positron beams is in their simpler interactions with matter, owing to the absence of any exchange forces, in contrast to the case of low-energy electrons. However, such studies as low-energy positron diffraction, positron microscopy and positronium (Ps) spectroscopy, which require high intensity slow-positron beams, are very limited due to the poor intensity obtained from a conventional radioactive-isotope-based positron source. In conventional laboratories, the slow-positron intensity is restricted to 10 6 e +/s due to the strength of the available radioactive source. An accelerator based slow-positron source is a good candidate for increasing the slow-positron intensity. One of the results using a high intensity pulsed positron beam is presented as a study of the origins of a Ps emitted from SiO 2. We also describe the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) measurement system with slow-positron beams and a positron microscope.

  19. The Japanese Positron Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Sunaga, H.; Kaneko, H.; Takizawa, H.; Kawasuso, A.; Yotsumoto, K.; Tanaka, R.

    1999-06-01

    The Positron Factory has been planned at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The factory is expected to produce linac-based monoenergetic positron beams having world-highest intensities of more than 1010e+/sec, which will be applied for R&D of materials science, biotechnology and basic physics & chemistry. In this article, results of the design studies are demonstrated for the following essential components of the facilities: 1) Conceptual design of a high-power electron linac with 100 MeV in beam energy and 100 kW in averaged beam power, 2) Performance tests of the RF window in the high-power klystron and of the electron beam window, 3) Development of a self-driven rotating electron-to-positron converter and the performance tests, 4) Proposal of multi-channel beam generation system for monoenergetic positrons, with a series of moderator assemblies based on a newly developed Monte Carlo simulation and the demonstrative experiment, 5) Proposal of highly efficient moderator structures, 6) Conceptual design of a local shield to suppress the surrounding radiation and activation levels.

  20. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  1. Positron clouds within thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.; Smith, David M.; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Kelley, Nicole A.; Lowell, Alexander W.; Schaal, Meagan M.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2015-08-01

    We report the observation of two isolated clouds of positrons inside an active thunderstorm. These observations were made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, which flew on a Gulfstream V jet aircraft through the top of an active thunderstorm in August 2009. ADELE recorded two 511 keV gamma-ray count rate enhancements, 35 s apart, each lasting approximately 0.2 s. The enhancements, which were approximately a factor of 12 above background, were both accompanied by electrical activity as measured by a flat-plate antenna on the underside of the aircraft. The energy spectra were consistent with a source mostly composed of positron annihilation gamma rays, with a prominent 511 keV line clearly visible in the data. Model fits to the data suggest that the aircraft was briefly immersed in clouds of positrons, more than a kilometre across. It is not clear how the positron clouds were created within the thunderstorm, but it is possible they were caused by the presence of the aircraft in the electrified environment.

  2. Positron implantation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  3. The Upgrade of the Neutron Induced Positron Source NEPOMUC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Ceeh, H.; Gigl, T.; Lippert, F.; Piochacz, C.; Pikart, P.; Reiner, M.; Weber, J.; Zimnik, S.

    2013-06-01

    In summer 2012, the new NEutron induced POsitron Source MUniCh (NEPOMUC) was installed and put into operation at the research reactor FRM II. At NEPOMUC upgrade 80% 113Cd enriched Cd is used as neutron-gamma converter in order to ensure an operation time of 25 years. A structure of Pt foils inside the beam tube generates positrons by pair production. Moderated positrons leaving the Pt front foil are electrically extracted and magnetically guided to the outside of the reactor pool. The whole design, including Pt-foils, the electric lenses and the magnetic fields, has been improved in order to enhance both the intensity and the brightness of the positron beam. After adjusting the potentials and the magnetic guide and compensation fields an intensity of about 3·109 moderated positrons per second is expected. During the first start-up, the measured temperatures of about 90°C ensure a reliable operation of the positron source. Within this contribution the features and the status of NEPOMUC upgrade are elucidated. In addition, an overview of recent positron beam experiments and current developments at the spectrometers is given.

  4. Clinical applications with the HIDAC positron camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, P.; Schaller, G.; Christin, A.; Townsend, D.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Wensveen, M.; Donath, A.

    1988-06-01

    A high density avalanche chamber (HIDAC) positron camera has been used for positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging in three different human studies, including patients presenting with: (I) thyroid diseases (124 cases); (II) clinically suspected malignant tumours of the pharynx or larynx (ENT) region (23 cases); and (III) clinically suspected primary malignant and metastatic tumours of the liver (9 cases, 19 PET scans). The positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals used for the three studies were Na 124I (4.2 d half-life) for the thyroid, 55Co-bleomycin (17.5 h half-life) for the ENT-region and 68Ga-colloid (68 min half-life) for the liver. Tomographic imaging was performed: (I) 24 h after oral Na 124I administration to the thyroid patients, (II) 18 h after intraveneous administration of 55Co-bleomycin to the ENT patients and (III) 20 min following the intraveneous injection of 68Ga-colloid to the liver tumour patients. Three different imaging protocols were used with the HIDAC positron camera to perform appropriate tomographic imaging in each patient study. Promising results were obtained in all three studies, particularly in tomographic thyroid imaging, where a significant clinical contribution is made possible for diagnosis and therapy planning by the PET technique. In the other two PET studies encouraging results were obtained for the detection and precise localisation of malignant tumour disease including an estimate of the functional liver volume based on the reticulo-endothelial-system (RES) of the liver, obtained in vivo, and the three-dimensional display of liver PET data using shaded graphics techniques. The clinical significance of the overall results obtained in both the ENT and the liver PET study, however, is still uncertain and the respective role of PET as a new imaging modality in these applications is not yet clearly established. To appreciate the clinical impact made by PET in liver and ENT malignant tumour staging needs further investigation

  5. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.

    1985-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a new technique for noninvasively assessing myocardial metabolism and perfusion. It has provided new insight into the dynamics of myocardial fatty acid and glucose metabolism in normal subjects, patients with ischemic heart disease and those with cardiomyopathies, documenting regionally depressed fatty acid metabolism during myocardial ischemia and infarction and spatial heterogeneity of fatty acid metabolism in patients with cardiomyopathy. Regional myocardial perfusion has been studied with PET using water, ammonia and rubidium labeled with positron emitters, permitting the noninvasive detection of hypoperfused zones at rest and during vasodilator stress. With these techniques the relationship between perfusion and the metabolism of a variety of substrates has been studied. The great strides that have been made in developing faster high-resolution instruments and producing new labeled intermediates indicate the promise of this technique for facilitating an increase in the understanding of regional metabolism and blood flow under normal and pathophysiologic conditions. 16 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Positrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, A W

    2009-09-01

    We review the compelling case for establishing a capability to accelerate positrons at Jefferson Lab. The potential appplications range from the study of two-photon exchange and deeply-virtual Compton scattering to exploiting the charge current weak interaction to probe the flavor structure of hadrons and nuclei. There are also fascinating ideas for using such a capability to discover new physics beyond the Standard Model of nuclear and particle physics.

  7. Positron fraction, electron and positron spectra measured by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolotto, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    A precise measurement by AMS-02 of the electron spectrum up to 700 GeV and of the positron spectrum and positron fraction in primary cosmic rays up 500 GeV are presented. The combined measurement of the cosmic-ray electron and positron energy spectra and fraction provide a unique tool to improve our understanding of the production, acceleration and propagation mechanism of cosmic rays.

  8. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  9. Positron Implantation Profile in Kapton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, J.; Dryzek, E.

    2006-11-01

    The discussion presented in the paper focuses on processes accompanying positron implantation in condensed matter. They finally constitute the positron implantation profile which generally does not exhibit the exponential behavior as it is concluded from the Monte Carlo simulation made using the EGSnrc 4.0 code. The simulation was performed for the kapton and two commonly used positron sources 22Na and 68Ge\\68Ga. New formula for the implantation profile was proposed.

  10. Nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Aoutou, Kamel; Younsi, Smain; Amour, Rabia

    2009-07-15

    The problem of nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves involving the dynamics of mobile cold positrons is addressed. A theoretical work is presented to show their existence and possible realization in a simple four-component plasma model. The results should be useful for the understanding of the localized structures that may occur in space and laboratory plasmas as new sources of cold positrons are now well developed.

  11. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  12. The ATLAS Positron Experiment -- APEX

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Dunford, R.; Kutschera, W.; Rhein, M.D.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wilt, P.; Wuosmaa, A.; Austin, S.M.; Kashy, E.; Winfield, J.S.; Yurkon, J.E.; Bazin, D.; Calaprice, F.P.; Young, A.; Chan, K.C.; Chisti, A.; Chowhury, P.; Greenberg, J.S.; Kaloskamis, N.; Lister, C.J.; Fox, J.D.; Roa, E.; Freedman, S.; Maier, M.R.; Freer, M.; Gazes, S.; Hallin, A.L.; Liu, M.; Happ, T.; Perera, A.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Trainor, T.; Wolanski, M. |

    1994-03-01

    APEX -- the ATLAS Positron Experiment -- is designed to measure electrons and positrons emitted in heavy-ion collisions. Its scientific goal is to gain insight into the puzzling positron-line phenomena observed at the GSI Darmstadt. It is in operation at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab. The assembly of the apparatus is finished and beginning 1993 the first positrons produced in heavy-ion collisions were observed. The first full scale experiment was carried out in December 1993, and the data are currently being analyzed. In this paper, the principles of operation are explained and a status report on the experiment is given.

  13. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Measurement of radiation dose at the north interaction point of BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xiao-Hu; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Tian-Bao; Zhang, Qing-Jiang; Achasov, Mikhail; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Muchnoi, Nikolay; Qin, Qing; Qu, Hua-Min; Wang, Yi-Fang; Wu, Jing-Min; Xu, Jin-Qiang; Yu, Bo-Xiang

    2009-10-01

    The technique details for measuring radiation dose are expounded. The results of gamma and neutron radiation levels are presented and the corresponding radiation shielding is discussed based on the simplified estimation. In addition, the photon radiation level move as background for future experiments is measured by a NaI(Tl) detector.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  16. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  17. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  19. Positron production within our atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Positrons are commonly produced within our atmosphere by cosmic rays and the decay radioactive isotopes. Energetic positrons are also produced by pair production from the gamma rays generated by relativistic runaway electrons. Indeed, such positrons have been detected in Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs) in the inner magnetosphere by Fermi/GBM. In addition, positrons play an important role in relativistic feedback discharges (also known as dark lightning). Relativistic feedback models suggest that these discharges may be responsible for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) and some gamma-ray glows. When producing TGFs, relativistic feedback discharges may generate large, lightning-like currents with current moments reaching hundreds of kA-km. In addition, relativistic feedback discharges also may limit the electric field that is possible in our atmosphere, affecting other mechanisms for generating runaway electrons. It is interesting that positrons, often thought of as exotic particles, may play an important role in thunderstorm processes. In this presentation, the role of positrons in high-energy atmospheric physics will be discussed. The unusual observation of positron clouds inside a thunderstorm by the ADELE instrument on an NCAR/NSF Gulfstream V aircraft will also be described. These observations illustrate that we still have much to learn about positron production within our atmosphere.

  20. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of Positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Spencer

    2016-03-01

    Recent particle beam and laser-driven plasma wakefield experiments have produced high-quality electron beams accelerated by a GeV or more in less than a meter. Efforts are underway to put these beams to work as sources for free-electron lasers. By contrast, little work has been done to demonstrate the tractability of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) of positrons beams. The reasons for this are threefold: 1) positron beams are only useful for high-energy physics experiments, whereas electron beams are also useful as light sources, 2) there is a dearth of positron sources for PWFA experiments, and 3) the dynamics of accelerating positron beams in plasma is fundamentally different than that of electron beams. This talk will focus on the physics of accelerating positrons in plasma and contrast the dynamics of electron and positron beam-driven nonlinear plasma wakes. We describe recent experiments at the FACET test facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that for the first time demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of a positron beams in plasma. We also discuss an alternative acceleration technique called hollow channel acceleration that aims to symmetrize the dynamics of electron and positron beam-driven wakes.

  1. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Positron research at the University of Texas at Austin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goktepeli, Sinan

    The objective of the research presented in this dissertation is to advance the applications of positron annihilation research. An intense positron beam facility was designed and constructed, and a method was developed to better analyze the defect structure of solids. The Texas Reactor-based Intense Positron beam facility (TRIP) was designed to provide a monoenergetic/monodirectional beam of at least 108 e +/sec on a sample. This increase in beam intensity will enhance many positron research techniques both in atomic physics and materials science. The TRIP facility, the result of a collaboration between UT Austin and UT Arlington, is being developed around the concept of multiple scattering of positrons from solid krypton. A large area copper source will be irradiated in a beam port of the 1 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor at UT Austin. The source will form the bottom face of a cube with the remaining faces made of tungsten. All surfaces will be cooled down to 22 K and coated with krypton. The top face of the cube has a 1 cm diameter hole to allow for the passage of positrons. The fast beta particles emitted from the β+ decay of 64Cu will be moderated while passing through the krypton. The non- moderated positrons will lose their energy while interacting with the remaining walls. The positrons will be removed from the box by an electric field and electrostatically delivered to the sample. The work on the TRIP facility is ongoing. The results of early measurements at UT Arlington have shown that the facility will be able to achieve its goals. The method developed to better analyze the positron depth profiling (PDP) experiments uses the difference spectra of the measured Doppler broadened annihilation peaks. The difference spectra, which are obtained by subtracting the bulk peak shape from the peaks recorded for each incident positron energy, enhance the differences of the observed peaks, while removing the bulk annihilation term from the multi-state annihilation

  3. Positron driven plasma wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; Huang, C.; An, W.; Mori, W. B.; Muggli, P.

    2010-11-01

    The LHC is producing high-energy, high-charge proton bunches (1e11 protons at 1-7 TeV each) that could be used to accelerate ``witness'' electron bunches to TeV range eneregies via a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). Simulations [1] suggest that a proton ``drive'' bunch is able to excite large wakefields if the bunch size is on the order of 100 μm; however, the LHC paramters are currently on the 1 cm scale. SLAC'S FACET is able to supply positorn bunchs with the ideal parameters for driving a PWFA. Although at lower energy (2e10 positrons at 23 GeV each), initial simiulations in QuickPIC show that the physics of a positron drive bunch is very similar to that of a proton drive bunch. Differences in the physics arise from the mass difference: slower dephasing but faster transverse bunch evolution. Other considerations include driver head erosion and purity of the wakefield ion column. The physics of positive drivers for PWFA and the viability of this scheme for future high-energy colliders will be investigated at SLAC's FACET.[4pt] [1] Caldwell, et al. Nature Physics 5, 363 (2009).[0pt] [2] C.H. Huang, et al., J. Comp. Phys., 217(2), 658, (2006).

  4. Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lameka, Katherine; Farwell, Michael D; Ichise, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a minimally invasive imaging procedure with a wide range of clinical and research applications. PET allows for the three-dimensional mapping of administered positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (for imaging glucose metabolism). PET enables the study of biologic function in both health and disease, in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), that are more suited to study a body's morphologic changes, although functional MRI can also be used to study certain brain functions by measuring blood flow changes during task performance. This chapter first provides an overview of the basic physics principles and instrumentation behind PET methodology, with an introduction to the merits of merging functional PET imaging with anatomic CT or MRI imaging. We then focus on clinical neurologic disorders, and reference research on relevant PET radiopharmaceuticals when applicable. We then provide an overview of PET scan interpretation and findings in several specific neurologic disorders such as dementias, epilepsy, movement disorders, infection, cerebrovascular disorders, and brain tumors. PMID:27432667

  5. Positron-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Obliquely propagating positron-acoustic solitary waves (PASWs) in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma (containing nonthermal hot positrons and electrons, inertial cold positrons, and immobile positive ions) are precisely investigated by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the characteristics of the PASWs are significantly modified by the effects of external magnetic field, obliqueness, nonthermality of hot positrons and electrons, temperature ratio of hot positrons and electrons, and respective number densities of hot positrons and electrons. The findings of our results can be employed in understanding the localized electrostatic structures and the characteristics of PASWs in various space and laboratory plasmas.

  6. Positron emission mammography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Radio frequency elevator for a pulsed positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickmann, Marcel; Mitteneder, Johannes; Kögel, Gottfried; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter; Ackermann, Ulrich; Piochacz, Christian; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-06-01

    An elevator increases the potential energy of a particle beam with respect to ground potential without any alteration of kinetic energy and other beam parameters. This elevator is necessary for the implementation of the Munich Scanning Positron Microscope (SPM) at the intense positron source NEPOMUC at the research reactor FRM II in Munich. The principles of the rf elevator for pure electrostatically guided positrons are described. Measurements of beam quality behind the elevator are reported, which confirm that after the implementation of elevator and SPM at NEPOMUC the SPM can be operated at a considerably improved resolution (~ 0.3 μm) and event rate (~3.7 kHz) compared to the laboratory based β+-source.

  8. Intense source of slow positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, P.; Rosowsky, A.

    2004-10-01

    We describe a novel design for an intense source of slow positrons based on pair production with a beam of electrons from a 10 MeV accelerator hitting a thin target at a low incidence angle. The positrons are collected with a set of coils adapted to the large production angle. The collection system is designed to inject the positrons into a Greaves-Surko trap (Phys. Rev. A 46 (1992) 5696). Such a source could be the basis for a series of experiments in fundamental and applied research and would also be a prototype source for industrial applications, which concern the field of defect characterization in the nanometer scale.

  9. Cosmic Ray Positrons from Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are potential Galactic sources of positrons through pair cascades in their magnetospheres. There are, however, many uncertainties in establishing their contribution to the local primary positron flux. Among these are the local density of pulsars, the cascade pair multiplicities that determine the injection rate of positrons from the pulsar, the acceleration of the injected particles by the pulsar wind termination shock, their rate of escape from the pulsar wind nebula, and their propagation through the interstellar medium. I will discuss these issues in the context of what we are learning from the new Fermi pulsar detections and discoveries.

  10. [Fundamentals of positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Ostertag, H

    1989-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The method is based on: (1) radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. PMID:2667029

  11. Positron annihilation spectroscopy with magnetically analyzed beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetime measurements with magnetically analyzed positron beams were made in condensed media with uniform and non-uniform properties. As expected, the lifetime values with magnetically analyzed positron beams in uniform targets are similar to those obtained with conventional positron sources. The lifetime values with magnetically analyzed beams in targets which have non-uniform properties vary with positron energy and are different from the conventional positron source derived lifetime values in these targets.

  12. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1985-03-07

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  13. High Power Polarized Positron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailichenko, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the basics of polarized positron production by low energy polarized electrons. Efficiency of conversion ˜0.1-1% might be interesting for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the International Linear Collider (ILC).

  14. Positrons from accelerated particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

    1987-01-01

    Positron production from the decay of radioactive nuclei produced in nuclear interactions of accelerated particles is treated in detail. Laboratory data as well as theoretical considerations are used to construct energy-dependent cross sections for the production of a large number of radioactive positron emitters resulting from proton and alpha-particle interactions with ambient cosmic matter. Using these cross sections, positron production rates are calculated for a variety of energetic particle spectra, assuming solar abundances for both the energetic particles and the ambient medium. These results can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which emit annihilation radiation. In particular, the results have been applied to solar flares, where the observed 0.511 MeV line is shown to be due to positrons resulting from accelerated particle reactions.

  15. Modelling Positron Interactions with Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G.; Petrovic, Z.; White, R.; Buckman, S.

    2011-05-01

    In this work we link fundamental measurements of positron interactions with biomolecules, with the development of computer codes for positron transport and track structure calculations. We model positron transport in a medium from a knowledge of the fundamental scattering cross section for the atoms and molecules comprising the medium, combined with a transport analysis based on statistical mechanics and Monte-Carlo techniques. The accurate knowledge of the scattering is most important at low energies, a few tens of electron volts or less. The ultimate goal of this work is to do this in soft condensed matter, with a view to ultimately developing a dosimetry model for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The high-energy positrons first emitted by a radionuclide in PET may well be described by standard formulas for energy loss of charged particles in matter, but it is incorrect to extrapolate these formulas to low energies. Likewise, using electron cross-sections to model positron transport at these low energies has been shown to be in serious error due to the effects of positronium formation. Work was supported by the Australian Research Council, the Serbian Government, and the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Spain.

  16. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  17. Performance of the (n,{gamma})-Based Positron Beam Facility NEPOMUC

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckenbach, K.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Piochacz, C.; Stadlbauer, M.; Loewe, B.; Maier, J.; Pikart, P.

    2009-01-28

    The in-pile positron source of NEPOMUC at the neutron source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) provides at the experimental site an intense beam of monoenergetic positrons with selectable energy between 15 eV and 3 keV. The principle of the source is based on neutron capture gamma rays produced by cadmium in a beam tube tip close to the reactor core. The gamma ray absorption in platinum produces positrons which are moderated and formed to the beam. An unprecedented beam intensity of 9.10{sup 8} e{sup +}/s is achieved (1 keV). The performance and applications of the facility are presented.

  18. Performance of the (n,γ)-Based Positron Beam Facility NEPOMUC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreckenbach, K.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Löwe, B.; Maier, J.; Pikart, P.; Piochacz, C.; Stadlbauer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The in-pile positron source of NEPOMUC at the neutron source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) provides at the experimental site an intense beam of monoenergetic positrons with selectable energy between 15 eV and 3 keV. The principle of the source is based on neutron capture gamma rays produced by cadmium in a beam tube tip close to the reactor core. The gamma ray absorption in platinum produces positrons which are moderated and formed to the beam. An unprecedented beam intensity of 9.108 e+/s is achieved (1 keV). The performance and applications of the facility are presented.

  19. Positron spectroscopy for materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    One of the more active areas of research on materials involves the observation and characterization of defects. The discovery of positron localization in vacancy-type defects in solids in the 1960's initiated a vast number of experimental and theoretical investigations which continue to this day. Traditional positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques, including lifetime studies, angular correlation, and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are still being applied to new problems in the bulk properties of simple metals and their alloys. In addition new techniques based on tunable sources of monoenergetic positron beams have, in the last 5 years, expanded the horizons to studies of surfaces, thin films, and interfaces. In the present paper we briefly review these experimental techniques, illustrating with some of the important accomplishments of the field. 40 refs., 19 figs.

  20. E166: Polarized Positrons & Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, K.Peter; /DESY

    2011-12-06

    A proof-of-principle experiment has been carried out in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to demonstrate production of polarized positrons in a manner suitable for implementation at the International Linear Collider (ILC). A helical undulator of 2.54 mm period and 1 -m length produced circularly polarized photons with a first harmonic endpoint energy of 8 MeV when traversed by a 46.6 GeV electron beam. The polarized photons were converted to polarized positrons in a 0.2-radiation-length tungsten target. The polarization of these positrons was measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter to have peak value in excess of 80%.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  2. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  3. Instrumentation for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Budinger, T F; Derenzo, S E; Huesman, R H

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 mm full width at half maximum for quantitation in regions of interest 4 mm in diameter will become possible with the development of detectors that achieve ultrahigh resolution. Improved resolution will be possible using solid-state photodetectors for crystal identification or photomultiplier tubes with many small electron multipliers . Temporal resolution of 2 seconds and gating of cyclic events can be accomplished if statistical requirements are met. The major physical considerations in achieving high-resolution positron emission tomography are the degradation in resolution resulting from positron range, emission angle, parallax error, detector sampling density, the sensitivity of various detector materials and packing schemes, and the trade off between temporal resolution and statistical accuracy. The accuracy of data required for physiological models depends primarily on the fidelity of spatial sampling independent of statistical constraints. PMID:6611124

  4. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  5. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  6. Instrumentation in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a three-dimensional medical imaging technique that noninvasively measures the concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the body that are labeled with positron emitters. With the proper compounds, PET can be used to measure metabolism, blood flow, or other physiological values in vivo. The technique is based on the physics of positron annihilation and detection and the mathematical formulations developed for x-ray computed tomography. Modern PET systems can provide three-dimensional images of the brain, the heart, and other internal organs with resolutions on the order of 4 to 6 mm. With the selectivity provided by a choice of injected compounds, PET has the power to provide unique diagnostic information that is not available with any other imaging modality. This is the first five reports on the nature and uses of PET that have been prepared for the American Medical Association's Council on Scientific Affairs by an authoritative panel.

  7. Particle physics. Positrons ride the wave

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-08-26

    Here, experiments reveal that positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — can be rapidly accelerated using a plasma wave. The findings pave the way to high-energy electron–positron particle colliders.

  8. Particle physics. Positrons ride the wave

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-08-26

    Experiments reveal that positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — can be rapidly accelerated using a plasma wave. The findings pave the way to high-energy electron–positron particle colliders.

  9. Electrostatic Nonplanar Positron-Acoustic Shock Waves in Superthermal Electron-Positron-Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. J., Uddin; M. S., Alam; A. A., Mamun

    2015-06-01

    The basic properties of the nonlinear propagation of the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma containing immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated both analytically and numerically. The modified Burgers equation (mBE) is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. The basic features of PA SHWs are significantly modified by the cold positron kinematic viscosity (η), superthermal parameter of electrons (κe), superthermal parameter of hot positrons (κp), the ratio of the electron temperature to hot positron temperature (σ), the ratio of the electron number density to cold positron number density and the ratio of the hot positron number density to cold positron number density (μph). This study could be useful to identify the basic properties of nonlinear electrostatic disturbances in dissipative space and laboratory plasmas.

  10. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image...

  11. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. J.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  12. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  13. Positron microanalysis with high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more common applications for a high intensity slow positron facility will be microanalysis of solid materials. In the first section of this paper some examples are given of procedures that can be developed. Since most of the attendees of this workshop are experts in positron spectroscopy, comprehensive descriptions will be omitted. With the exception of positron emission microscopy, most of the procedures will be based on those already in common use with broad beams. The utility of the methods have all been demonstrated, but material scientists use very few of them because positron microbeams are not generally available. A high intensity positron facility will make microbeams easier to obtain and partially alleviate this situation. All microanalysis techniques listed below will have a common requirement, which is the ability to locate the microscopic detail or area of interest and to focus the positron beam exclusively on it. The last section of this paper is a suggestion of how a high intensity positron facility might be designed so as to have this capability built in. The method will involve locating the specimen by scanning it with the microbeam of positrons and inducing a secondary electron image that will immediately reveal whether or not the positron beam is striking the proper portion of the specimen. This scanning positron microscope' will be a somewhat prosaic analog of the conventional SEM. It will, however, be an indispensable utility that will enhance the practicality of positron microanalysis techniques. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Design of the NLC positron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Emma, P.; Gross, G.; Kulikov, A.; Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Rinolfi, L.; Turner, J.; Yeremian, D.

    1996-08-01

    The design of the positron source for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) is presented. The key features of this design include accelerating positrons at an L-band frequency (1428 MHz) and using a rotating positron target with multi-stage differential pumping. Positron yield simulations show that the L-band design yields at the source 2.5 times the beam intensity required at the interaction point and is easily upgrade to higher intensities required for the 1 TeV NLC upgrade. Multi-bunch beam loading compensation schemes in the positron capture and booster accelerators and the optics design of the positron booster accelerator are described. For improved source efficiency, the design boasts two parallel positron vaults adequately shielded from each other such that one serves as an on-line spare.

  15. Development of a transport system for the copper source of the Texas Intense Positron Source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, O.; Biegalski, S. R.; O'Kelly, S.; Hurst, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    The transport system design and construction for The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) facility has been completed. This facility is located on beam port 1 of The University of Texas at Austin TRIGA Mark II 1.1 MW research reactor. The TIPS will provide a high intensity, variable energy positron beam for use in material studies. The natural copper source is transported into beam port 1 of the reactor where it is irradiated at close proximity to the reactor core. The transport system is an L-shaped aluminum channel that utilizes pulleys to drive a source cart. The copper source is transported on the cart into and out of the beam port for irradiation. After removal from the beam port, the activated copper positron source will be placed into a vacuum chamber where the positrons are moderated with annealed tungsten foil and electrostatically extracted.

  16. Positron-annihilation spectroscopy of defects in metals: an assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has made significant contributions to our knowledge regarding lattice defects in metals in two areas: (i) the determination of atomic defect properties, particularly those of monovacancies, and (ii) the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development during post-irradiation of post-quench annealing. The application of PAS to the study of defects in metals is selectively reviewed and critically assessed within the context of other available techniques for such investigations. Possibilities for using the positron as a localized probe of the structure of atomic defects are discussed. Finally, the present status and future potential of PAS as a tool for the study of defects in metals are considered relative to other available techniques. 92 references, 20 figures.

  17. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek’s life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek’s life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  18. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek's life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek's life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  19. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  20. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, L.; Zecca, A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Beer-Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C4H6O2) in the incident positron energy range 0.15-50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1-1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ˜2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect.

  1. Nonplanar positron-acoustic Gardner solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-02-15

    Nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) Gardner solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized plasma system consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated. The modified Gardner equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, superthermal parameter of hot positrons and electrons, relative temperature ratios, and relative number density ratios on the PA Gardner SWs are studied by using the numerical simulations. The implications of our results in various space and laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  2. PEP-II Status

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.; Bertsche, K.; Browne, M.; Cai, Y.; Cheng, W.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Donald, M.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fisher, A.S.; Fox, J.; Heifets, S.; Himel, T.; Iverson, R.; Kulikov, A.; Novokhatski, A.; Pacak, V.; Pivi, M.; Rivetta, C.; Ross, M.; /SLAC /Saclay /Frascati

    2008-07-25

    PEP-II and BaBar have just finished run 7, the last run of the SLAC B-factory. PEP-II was one of the few high-current e+e- colliding accelerators and holds the present world record for stored electrons and stored positrons. It has stored 2.07 A of electrons, nearly 3 times the design current of 0.75 A and it has stored 3.21 A of positrons, 1.5 times more than the design current of 2.14 A. High-current beams require careful design of several systems. The feedback systems that control instabilities, the RF system stability loops, and especially the vacuum systems have to handle the higher power demands. We present here some of the accomplishments of the PEP-II accelerator and some of the problems we encountered while running high-current beams.

  3. Development of a transmission positron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuya, M.; Jinno, S.; Ootsuka, T.; Inoue, M.; Kurihara, T.; Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Fujinami, M.

    2011-07-01

    A practical transmission positron microscope (TPM) JEM-1011B has been developed to survey differences in the interaction of positron and electron beams with materials, and is installed in the Slow Positron Facility of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The TPM can share positron and electron beams, and can also be used as a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Positron transmission images up to magnification 10,000× (resolution: 50 nm) and positron diffraction patterns up to 044 family were successfully obtained by the TPM comparing them with those of electrons. The differences in material transmittances for both beams have been measured, and can be explained by the calculated results of the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE-2008.

  4. Positron annihilation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal; Ramaty, Reuven; Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Positronium formation and annihilation are studied in a model for the interstellar medium consisting of cold cloud cores, warm partially ionized cloud envelopes, and hot intercloud gas. The gamma-ray spectra resulting from positron annihilation in these components of the interstellar medium are calculated. The spectra from the individual components are then combined, using two limiting assumptions for the propagation of the positrons, namely, that the positrons propagate freely throughout the interstellar medium, and that the positrons are excluded from the cold cloud cores. In the first case, the bulk of the positrons annihilate in the cloud cores and the annihilation line exhibits broad wings resulting from the annihilation of positronium formed by charge exchange in flight. In the second case, the positrons annihilate mainly in the warm envelopes, and the line wings are suppressed.

  5. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Alex; Koymen, A. R.; Mehl, David; Jensen, K. O.; Lei, Chun; Lee, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Weiss et al. have demonstrated that it is possible to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons using a low energy (less than 30eV) beam of positrons. This mechanism makes possible a new electron spectroscopy, Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The probability of exciting an Auger transition is proportional to the overlap of the positron wavefunction with atomic core levels. Since the Auger electron energy provides a signature of the atomic species making the transition, PAES makes it possible to determine the overlap of the positron wavefunction with a particular element. PAES may therefore provide a means of detecting positron-atom complexes. Measurements of PAES intensities from clean and adsorbate covered Cu surfaces are presented which indicate that approx. 5 percent of positrons injected into CU at 25eV produce core annihilations that result in Auger transitions.

  6. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  7. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.

  8. The PEP-II design

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.K.

    1995-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Positron Electron Project-II (PEP-II) is a design for a high-luminosity, asymmetric energy, electron-positron colliding beam accelerator that will operate at the center-of-mass energy of the {Upsilon}4S (10.58 GeV). The goal of the design is to achieve a large enough integrated luminosity with a moving center-of-mass reference frame to he able to observe the predicted rare decay modes of the {Upsilon}4S that do not conserve charge parity (CP).

  9. Positron scattering and annihilation in hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. G.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2013-09-01

    Diagrammatic many-body theory is used to calculate the scattering phase shifts, normalized annihilation rates Zeff, and annihilation γ spectra for positron collisions with the hydrogenlike ions He+, Li2+, B4+, and F8+. Short-range electron-positron correlations and longer-range positron-ion correlations are accounted for by evaluating nonlocal corrections to the annihilation vertex and the exact positron self-energy. The numerical calculation of the many-body theory diagrams is performed using B-spline basis sets. To elucidate the role of the positron-ion repulsion, the annihilation rate is also estimated analytically in the Coulomb-Born approximation. It is found that the energy dependence and magnitude of Zeff are governed by the Gamow factor that characterizes the suppression of the positron wave function near the ion. For all of the H-like ions, the correlation enhancement of the annihilation rate is found to be predominantly due to corrections to the annihilation vertex, while the corrections to the positron wave function play only a minor role. Results of the calculations for s-, p-, and d-wave incident positrons of energies up to the positronium-formation threshold are presented. Where comparison is possible, our values are in excellent agreement with the results obtained using other, e.g., variational, methods. The annihilation-vertex enhancement factors obtained in the present calculations are found to scale approximately as 1+(1.6+0.46ℓ)/Zi, where Zi is the net charge of the ion and ℓ is the positron orbital angular momentum. Our results for positron annihilation in H-like ions provide insights into the problem of positron annihilation with core electrons in atoms and condensed matter systems, which have similar binding energies.

  10. Low energy positron interactions with biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanniarachchi, Indika L.

    Calculations of the positron density distribution which can be used for positrons bound to midsize and larger molecules have been tested for smaller molecules and subsequently applied to investigate the most likely e +e-- annihilation sites for positrons interacting with biological molecules containing C, H, O, and N. In order to allow consideration of positrons bound to extended molecules with regions of different character and no particular symmetry, atom-centered positron basis sets of Gaussian-type functions were developed for positrons bound to molecules containing O, N, C, H, Li, Na, and Be. Testing shows that there is no need to scale the positron basis functions to take into account different effective charges on the atoms in different molecules. Even at the HF level of theory the calculated positron and the contact density of e+LiH system is in qualitative agreement with the most accurate calculation was done in ECG method. Also it has been found that for larger biological molecules such as derivation of formaldehyde can leave out positron basis sets centered on H atoms and still get qualitatively acceptable contact density distribution. According to our results, the electronic and positronic wavefunctions have the most overlap in the regions of most negative electrostatic potential in the parent molecule, and we can expect that a positron bound to the molecule will be more likely to annihilate with one of the electrons in these regions. Also we find that the highest energy occupied electronic orbital often does not make the largest contribution to e+e -- annihilation, and that the energy liberated by subsequent electronic relaxation is sufficient to break the backbone in several places in di-peptides and other organic molecules.

  11. Positron emission tomography and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazziotta, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This a text on cerebral and myocardial imaging using positron emission tomography and autoradiography. Authorities in nuclear medicine and biophysics define the central principles of these complex and rapidly evolving imagine technologies-their theoretical foundations, the nature of the biochemical events being measured, the basis for constructing tracer kinetic models, the criteria governing radiopharmaceutical design, and the rationale for PET in the clinical setting. After reviewing the characteristics of cerebral and myocardial hemodynamics, transport, and metabolism, the contributors detail the theory of PET and autoradiography, the instrumentation required, and the procedures involved.

  12. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...

  16. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  17. Gas Permeations Studied by Positron Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jen-Pwu; Cao, Huimin; Jean, X.; Yang, Y. C.

    1997-03-01

    The hole volumes and fractions of PC and PET polymers are measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Direct correlations between the measured hole properties and gas permeabilities are observed. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy to study gas transport and separation of polymeric materials will be discussed.

  18. Positron Emission Mammotomography with Dual Planar Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Smith; Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski

    2003-06-29

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) is usually performed with two stationary planar detectors above and below a compressed breast. There is image blurring normal to the detectors due to the limited angular range of the lines of response. Positron emission mammotomography (PEM-T) with dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation.

  19. Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Denison, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

  20. Ionisation of atomic hydrogen by positron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicher, Gottfried; Olsson, Bjorn; Raith, Wilhelm; Sinapius, Guenther; Sperber, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    With the crossed beam apparatus the relative impact-ionization cross section of atomic hydrogen by positron impact was measured. A layout of the scattering region is given. The first measurements on the ionization of atomic hydrogen by positron impact are also given.

  1. Transient ions in electron and positron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'A Sanchez, Sergio; de Oliveira, Eliane M.; dos Santos, Josué S.; da Costa, Romarly F.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Lima, Marco A. P.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.

    2009-11-01

    We report on recent advances in studies of transient ions formed in electron and positron scattering by molecules. We briefly discuss elastic electron collisions against pyrrole and glycine, as well as electron affinities of glycine-water clusters. Positron scattering and annihilation on small molecules is also discussed.

  2. On the method of positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiyama, F.; Shizuma, K.; Nasai, H.; Nishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-slow coincidence system was constructed for the measurement of positron lifetimes in material. The time resolution of this system was 270 ps for the (60)Co gamma rays. Positron lifetime spectra for 14 kinds of alkali halides were measured with this system. Two lifetime components and their intensities were derived from analyses of the lifetime spectra.

  3. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  4. Positron acoustic shock waves in four-component plasmas with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Mamun, A. A.; Alam, M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Positron acoustic shock waves (PASWs) in an unmagnetized four-component plasma system consisting of a cold mobile viscous positron fluid, hot positrons and electrons following the nonthermal distributions of Cairns et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 22, 2709 (1995)], and immobile positive ions are studied both analytically and numerically. The well-known reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. The basic features of the PASWs are significantly modified by the effects of the kinematic viscosity, the nonthermal electrons and hot positrons, the ratio of the electron temperature to the hot positron temperature σ, and the ratio of the hot positron (electron) number density to the cold positron number density μ 1 ( μ 2). The importance of our results to various astrophysical and laboratory plasmas are concisely discussed.

  5. Applications of slow positrons to cancer research: Search for selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Y. C.; Li, Ying; Liu, Gaung; Chen, Hongmin; Zhang, Junjie; Gadzia, Joseph E.

    2006-02-01

    Slow positrons and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) have been applied to medical research in searching for positron annihilation selectivity to cancer cells. We report the results of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening energy spectroscopies in human skin samples with and without cancer as a function of positron incident energy (up to 8 μm depth) and found that the positronium annihilates at a significantly lower rate and forms at a lower probability in the samples having either basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) than in the normal skin. The significant selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer may open a new research area of developing positron annihilation spectroscopy as a novel medical tool to detect cancer formation externally and non-invasively at the early stages.

  6. Gaseous Positronics - Positron interactions with atoms and molecules and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen

    2011-05-01

    The advent of new technologies for accumulating, trapping and cooling positrons has led to a range of new experimental measurements of low energy positron interactions, and also prompted new, state-of-the-art theoretical advances in describing such interactions. This talk will present some of the recent experimental highlights of our program including the observation of threshold Wigner cusps, a search for quasi-bound positronic complexes or ``resonances,'' and measurements of positron interactions with biologically relevant molecules. The latter are an important precursor to the development of models of positron transport in soft matter and, ultimately, a positron dosimetry for techniques such as Positron Emission Tomography. Supported by the Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence Program.

  7. Positronic complexes with unnatural parity

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.; Varga, K.

    2007-06-15

    The structure of the unnatural parity states of PsH, LiPs, NaPs, and KPs are investigated with the configuration interaction and stochastic variational methods. The binding energies (in hartree) are found to be 8.17x10{sup -4}, 4.42x10{sup -4}, 15.14x10{sup -4}, and 21.80x10{sup -4}, respectively. These states are constructed by first coupling the two electrons into a configuration which is predominantly {sup 3}P{sup e}, and then adding a p-wave positron. All the active particles are in states in which the relative angular momentum between any pair of particles is at least L=1. The LiPs state is Borromean since there are no three-body bound subsystems (of the correct symmetry) of the (Li{sup +}, e{sup -}, e{sup -}, e{sup +}) particles that make up the system. The dominant decay mode of these states will be radiative decay into a configuration that autoionizes or undergoes positron annihilation.

  8. Visible and dark matter genesis and cosmic positron and electron excesses

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peihong; Sarkar, Utpal; Zhang Xinmin

    2009-10-01

    Dark and baryonic matter contribute comparable energy density to the present universe. The dark matter may also be responsible for the cosmic positron and electron excesses. We connect these phenomena with the Dirac seesaw for neutrino masses. In our model (i) the dark matter relic density is a dark matter asymmetry generated simultaneously with the baryon asymmetry so that we can naturally understand the coincidence between the dark and baryonic matter and (ii) the dark matter mostly decays into the leptons so that its decay can interpret the anomalous cosmic rays with positron and electron excesses.

  9. Positron deposition in plasmas by positronium beam ionization and transport of positrons in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    In a recently proposed positron transport experiment, positrons would be deposited in a fusion plasma by forming a positronium (Ps) beam and passing it through the plasma. Positrons would be deposited as the beam is ionized by plasma ions and electrons. Radial transport of the positrons to the limiter could then be measured by detecting the gamma radiation produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons in the limiter. This would allow measurements of the transport of electron-mass particles and might shed some light on the mechanisms of electron transport in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the deposition and transport of positrons in a tokamak are simulated and the annihilation signal determined for several transport models. Calculations of the expected signals are necessary for the optimal design of a positron transport experiment. There are several mechanisms for the loss of positrons besides transport to the limiter. Annihilation with plasma electrons and reformation of positronium in positron-hydrogen collisions are two such processes. These processes can alter the signal and place restrictions ons on the plasma conditions in which positron transport experiments can be effectively performed.

  10. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  11. Positron emission tomography: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, A. K.; Kumar, Utham

    2006-01-01

    The rate of glucose utilization in tumor cells is significantly enhanced as compared to normal cells and this biochemical characteristic is utilized in PET imaging using FDG as a major workhorse. The PET systems as well as cyclotrons producing positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals have undergone continuous technological refinements. While PET (CT) systems enable fusion images as well as precise attenuation correction, the self-shielded cyclotrons developed provide dedicated systems for in-house production of a large number of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The application of PET images in oncology includes those of pulmonary, colorectal, breast, lymphoma, head & neck, bone, ovarian and GI cancers. The PET has been recognized as promising diagnostic tool to predict biological and physiological changes at the molecular level and hence offer a potential area for future applications including Stem Cell research. PMID:21206635

  12. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  13. Dark matter with multiannihilation channels and the AMS-02 positron excess and antiproton data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Heng; Cheung, Kingman; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2016-01-01

    AMS-02 provided the unprecedented statistics in the measurement of the positron fraction from cosmic rays. That may offer a unique opportunity to distinguish the positron spectrum coming from various dark matter (DM) annihilation channels, if DM is the source of this positron excess. Therefore, we consider the scenario that the DM can annihilate into leptonic, quark, and massive gauge-boson channels simultaneously with floating branching ratios to test this hypothesis. We also study the impacts from MAX, MED, MIN, and DC diffusion models as well as from isothermal, NFW, and Einasto DM density profiles on our results. We found two parameter regions that can satisfy both AMS-02 e/+ e++e- and p ¯/p data sets at 95% C.L.: (i) under the NFW-MIN combination with Mχ⊂[10 ,30 ] TeV , and (ii) under the Einasto-DC combination with Mχ⊂[500 ,1500 ] GeV .

  14. Update on the Argonne positron accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.

    1993-07-01

    The injector for the Advanced Photon Source incorporates a 450-MeV positron accumulator ring (PAR) to decrease the filling time with the 2-Hz synchrotron. In addition to accumulating positrons from the linac, the PAR damps the beam and reduces the bunch length. The PAR lattice has been redesigned to use zero-gradient dipoles, while retaining essentially the same damping partition. Extensive simulations have been performed to set tolerances that will give high capture efficiency, in spite of the large momentum spread of the incoming positron beam.

  15. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  16. Slow-Positron Generator For Studying Polymer Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; St. Clair, Terry L.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1992-01-01

    Aspects of molecular structures probed by positron-annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Slow-positron-beam generator suitable for PAS measurements in thin polymer films. Includes Na22 source of positrons and two moderators made of well-annealed tungsten foil. With proper choice of voltage, positrons emitted by inward-facing surfaces of moderators made to stop in polymer films tested.

  17. The Buffer-Gas Positron Accumulator and Resonances in Positron-Molecule Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surko, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    This is a personal account of the development of our buffer-gas positron trap and the new generation of cold beams that these traps enabled. Dick Drachman provided much appreciated advice to us from the time we started the project. The physics underlying trap operation is related to resonances (or apparent resonances) in positron-molecule interactions. Amusingly, experiments enabled by the trap allowed us to understand these processes. The positron-resonance "box score" to date is one resounding "yes," namely vibrational Feshbach resonances in positron annihilation on hydrocarbons; a "probably" for positron-impact electronic excitation of CO and NZ;an d a "maybe" for vibrational excitation of selected molecules. Two of these processes enabled the efficient operation of the trap, and one almost killed it in infancy. We conclude with a brief overview of further applications of the trapping technology discussed here, such as "massive" positron storage and beams with meV energy resolution.

  18. Time-dependent behavior of positrons in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Wadehra, J.M. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Drallos, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium behaviors of positrons in several noble gases are reviewed. Our novel procedure for obtaining the time-dependent behavior of various swarm parameters -- such as the positron drift velocity, average positron energy, positron annihilation rate (or equivalently Z{sub eff}) etc. -- for positrons in pure ambient gases subjected to external electrostatic fields is described. Summaries of time-dependent as well as electric field-dependent results for positron swarms in various noble gases are presented. New time-dependent results for positron swarms in neon are also described in detail. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Electron and positron induced processes. POSMOL 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Campeanu, Radu; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ingólfsson, Oddur; Mason, Nigel; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Tanuma, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    POSMOL 2013, the international meeting on electron and positron induced processes comprising the XVII International Workshop on Low-Energy Positron and Positronium Physics and the XVIII International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms, was held at Kanazawa Bunka Hall, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan, from 19-21 July 2013. The XVII Workshop encompassed all aspects of positron, positronium and antiproton interactions with electrons, atoms, molecules and solid surfaces, and topics related to these, whereas the XVIII Symposium encompassed all aspects of electron interactions with molecules in both gaseous and condensed phases. Particular topics include studies of electron interactions with biomolecules, electron induced surface chemistry and the study of plasma processes. Recent research on the study of electron swarms was also highlighted. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Electron and Positron Induced Processes", edited by Michael Brunger, Radu Campeanu, Masamitsu Hoshino, Oddur Ingólfsson, Paulo Limão-Vieira, Nigel Mason, Yasuyuki Nagashima and Hajime Tanuma.

  20. Positron kinetics in an idealized PET environment.

    PubMed

    Robson, R E; Brunger, M J; Buckman, S J; Garcia, G; Petrović, Z Lj; White, R D

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic theory of non-relativistic positrons in an idealized positron emission tomography PET environment is developed by solving the Boltzmann equation, allowing for coherent and incoherent elastic, inelastic, ionizing and annihilating collisions through positronium formation. An analytic expression is obtained for the positronium formation rate, as a function of distance from a spherical source, in terms of the solutions of the general kinetic eigenvalue problem. Numerical estimates of the positron range - a fundamental limitation on the accuracy of PET, are given for positrons in a model of liquid water, a surrogate for human tissue. Comparisons are made with the 'gas-phase' assumption used in current models in which coherent scattering is suppressed. Our results show that this assumption leads to an error of the order of a factor of approximately 2, emphasizing the need to accurately account for the structure of the medium in PET simulations. PMID:26246002

  1. Positron kinetics in an idealized PET environment

    PubMed Central

    Robson, R. E.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; White, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic theory of non-relativistic positrons in an idealized positron emission tomography PET environment is developed by solving the Boltzmann equation, allowing for coherent and incoherent elastic, inelastic, ionizing and annihilating collisions through positronium formation. An analytic expression is obtained for the positronium formation rate, as a function of distance from a spherical source, in terms of the solutions of the general kinetic eigenvalue problem. Numerical estimates of the positron range - a fundamental limitation on the accuracy of PET, are given for positrons in a model of liquid water, a surrogate for human tissue. Comparisons are made with the ‘gas-phase’ assumption used in current models in which coherent scattering is suppressed. Our results show that this assumption leads to an error of the order of a factor of approximately 2, emphasizing the need to accurately account for the structure of the medium in PET simulations. PMID:26246002

  2. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Joanna Fowler

    2008-10-13

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  3. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    ScienceCinema

    Joanna Fowler

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  4. Positron kinetics in an idealized PET environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, R. E.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; White, R. D.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic theory of non-relativistic positrons in an idealized positron emission tomography PET environment is developed by solving the Boltzmann equation, allowing for coherent and incoherent elastic, inelastic, ionizing and annihilating collisions through positronium formation. An analytic expression is obtained for the positronium formation rate, as a function of distance from a spherical source, in terms of the solutions of the general kinetic eigenvalue problem. Numerical estimates of the positron range - a fundamental limitation on the accuracy of PET, are given for positrons in a model of liquid water, a surrogate for human tissue. Comparisons are made with the ‘gas-phase’ assumption used in current models in which coherent scattering is suppressed. Our results show that this assumption leads to an error of the order of a factor of approximately 2, emphasizing the need to accurately account for the structure of the medium in PET simulations.

  5. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, A.; Jibaly, M.; Lei, Chun; Mehl, D.; Mayer, R.; Lynn, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    We report on measurements of Auger electron emission from Cu and Fe due to core hole excitations produced by the removal of core electrons by matter-antimatter annihilation. Estimates are developed of the probability of positrons annihilating with a 3p electron in these materials. Several important advantages of Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES) for surface analysis are suggested. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Positron annihilation studies of organic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, H.L.; Lou, Y.; Ali, E.H.

    1994-09-01

    The positron lifetimes of two organic superconductors, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br, are measured as a function of temperature across {Tc}. A drop of positron lifetime below {Tc} is observed. Positron-electron momentum densities are measured by using 2D-ACAR to search for the Fermi surface in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. Positron density distributions and positron-electron overlaps are calculated by using the orthogonalized linear combination atomic orbital (OLCAO) method to interprete the temperature dependence due to the local charge transfer which is inferred to relate to the superconducting transition. 2D-ACAR results in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br are compared with theoretical band calculations based on a first-principles local density approximation. Importance of performing accurate band calculations for the interpretation of positron annihilation data is emphasized.

  7. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  8. Primary cosmic ray positrons and galactic annihilation radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

    1980-01-01

    The observation (Leventhal et al, 1978) of positron annihilation radiation at 0.511 MeV from the direction of the Galactic Center is reexamined, suggesting the possibility of a primary positron component of the cosmic rays. The observed 0.511 MeV emission requires a positron production rate nearly two orders of magnitude greater than the production rate of secondary cosmic ray positrons from pion decay produced in cosmic ray interactions. Possible sources of positrons are reviewed with both supernovae and pulsars appearing to be the more likely candidates. If only about 1% of these positrons were accelerated along with the cosmic ray nucleons and electrons to energies not less than 100 MeV, it is believed that these primary positrons would be comparable in intensity to those secondary positrons resulting from pion decay. Some observational evidence for the existence of primary positrons in the cosmic rays is also discussed.

  9. Positron production in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    The ATLAS Positron Experiment APEX was built to study positron emission in collisions between very heavy ions. Narrow peaks were observed in such collisions at GSI, Darmstadt in the spectra of positrons and in the sum-energy spectra of electron-positron coincidences. APEX is a second-generation experiment which was specifically designed to look for the coincidence events and measure the opening angle between electrons and positrons. The first beam-induced positrons were detected using APEX in March 1993, and since then three additional runs were carried out. The first results for the collision system {sup 238}U + {sup 181}Ta show no evidence for sharp peaks in the electron-positron sum-energy spectrum. The current emphasis in this work is to obtain a complete understanding of the APEX apparatus. The atomic group is studying events involving coincidences between heavy ions and electrons. Since APEX measures the laboratory angles and energies of both electrons and heavy ions, it is possible to make an event-by-event Doppler correction of the electron spectra. These Doppler-corrected spectra show a number of lines which are attributed to conversion electrons which are emitted when a nuclear excited state decays by ejecting an inner-shell electron. The study of these spectra provide an important confirmation of the proper functioning of APEX. We are particularly concerned with the atomic physics aspects of this process. In order to understand the electron spectra, it is necessary to account for the change in binding energy of the inner-shell electrons as a function of ionic charge. We are utilizing the GRASP relativistic atomic structure program to calculate the binding energies. This information, together with the measured gamma-ray energies, allows us to calculate the expected energies of the conversion electrons which we can then compare with the observed Doppler-corrected conversion electron energies.

  10. Van de Graaff based positron source production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Kasey Roy

    The anti-matter counterpart to the electron, the positron, can be used for a myriad of different scientific research projects to include materials research, energy storage, and deep space flight propulsion. Currently there is a demand for large numbers of positrons to aid in these mentioned research projects. There are different methods of producing and harvesting positrons but all require radioactive sources or large facilities. Positron beams produced by relatively small accelerators are attractive because they are easily shut down, and small accelerators are readily available. A 4MV Van de Graaff accelerator was used to induce the nuclear reaction 12C(d,n)13N in order to produce an intense beam of positrons. 13N is an isotope of nitrogen that decays with a 10 minute half life into 13C, a positron, and an electron neutrino. This radioactive gas is frozen onto a cryogenic freezer where it is then channeled to form an antimatter beam. The beam is then guided using axial magnetic fields into a superconducting magnet with a field strength up to 7 Tesla where it will be stored in a newly designed Micro-Penning-Malmberg trap. Several source geometries have been experimented on and found that a maximum antimatter beam with a positron flux of greater than 0.55x10 6 e+s-1 was achieved. This beam was produced using a solid rare gas moderator composed of krypton. Due to geometric restrictions on this set up, only 0.1-1.0% of the antimatter was being frozen to the desired locations. Simulations and preliminary experiments suggest that a new geometry, currently under testing, will produce a beam of 107 e+s-1 or more.

  11. Positron range estimations with PeneloPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cal-González, J.; Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Corzo, P. M. G.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.; Udias, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Technical advances towards high resolution PET imaging try to overcome the inherent physical limitations to spatial resolution. Positrons travel in tissue until they annihilate into the two gamma photons detected. This range is the main detector-independent contribution to PET imaging blurring. To a large extent, it can be remedied during image reconstruction if accurate estimates of positron range are available. However, the existing estimates differ, and the comparison with the scarce experimental data available is not conclusive. In this work we present positron annihilation distributions obtained from Monte Carlo simulations with the PeneloPET simulation toolkit, for several common PET isotopes (18F, 11C, 13N, 15O, 68Ga and 82Rb) in different biological media (cortical bone, soft bone, skin, muscle striated, brain, water, adipose tissue and lung). We compare PeneloPET simulations against experimental data and other simulation results available in the literature. To this end the different positron range representations employed in the literature are related to each other by means of a new parameterization for positron range profiles. Our results are generally consistent with experiments and with most simulations previously reported with differences of less than 20% in the mean and maximum range values. From these results, we conclude that better experimental measurements are needed, especially to disentangle the effect of positronium formation in positron range. Finally, with the aid of PeneloPET, we confirm that scaling approaches can be used to obtain universal, material and isotope independent, positron range profiles, which would considerably simplify range correction.

  12. Cylindrical and Spherical Positron-Acoustic Shock Waves in Nonthermal Electron-Positron-Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    The nonlinear propagation of cylindrical and spherical positron-acoustic shock waves (PASWs) in an unmagnetized four-component plasma (containing nonthermal distributed hot positrons and electrons, cold mobile viscous positron fluid, and immobile positive ions) is investigated theoretically. The modified Burgers equation is derived by employing the reductive perturbation method. Analytically, the effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, nonthermality of electrons and hot positrons, relative number density and temperature ratios, and cold mobile positron kinematic viscosity on the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of PASWs are briefly addressed. It is examined that the PASWs in nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The relevance of our results may be useful in understanding the basic characteristics of PASWs in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  13. Current Issues in Electron and Positron Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Robert

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we review the current status of transport theory for low energy electrons or positrons in gases, in the context of both kinetic theory and fluid modelling. In particular, we focus on the following issues: (i) Muliterm vs two-term representation of the velocity distribution function in solution of Boltzmann's equation; (ii) the effect of non-conservative collisions (attachment, ionization, positron annihilation) on transport properties; (iii) the enduring electron- hydrogen vibrational cross section controversy and possible implications for the Boltzmann equation itself; (iv) closure of the fluid equations and the heat flux ansatz; and (v) correct use of swarm transport coefficients in fluid modelling of low temperature plasmas. Both hydrodynamic and non-hydrodynamic examples will be given, with attention focussed on the Franck-Hertz experiment, particularly the ``window'' of fields in which oscillations of transport properties are produced, and the way in which electric and magnetic fields combine to affect transport properties. In collaboration with co-authors Z. LJ. Petrovi'c, Institute of Physics Belgrade, and R.D. White, James Cook University.

  14. Elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons in gases and solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three apparatuses were designed and built: The first, which is now operative, was designed to study the details of positron thermalization in solids and the subsequent emission of the low energy positrons from moderating foils; The second apparatus now under test is a positron bottle similar in design to an electron trap. It was built to store positrons at a fixed energy and to look at the number of stored positrons (storage time) as a function of a scattering gas in the vacuum chamber. The third apparatus is a crossed beam apparatus where positron-, alkali scattering will be studied. Much of the apparatus is now under test with electrons.

  15. A search for solar flare positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The detection of solar gamma-ray line emission and observations of the isotopes H2, H-3, and He-3 in solar cosmic rays provide direct evidence for the occurrence of high energy nuclear reactions in solar flare events. Appreciable numbers of other reaction products, including positrons with energies near about 1 MeV, should also be produced in such events. We have searched for positrons in the 0.16-1.6 MeV energy interval during 5 H-3 rich solar particle events. Based on calculations of positron and He-3 production at the sun, and using a simplified model of interplanetary propagation, we might expect comparable fluences of positrons and He-3 to be observed. Summing over these 5 events, we find the 0.16 to 1.6 MeV positron fluence to be a maximum of about 10% of the He-3 fluence with more tnan 1 MeV/nuc. This suggests that other processes, such as preferential trapping by the solar magnetic field, may be important.

  16. Electron capture from solids by positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.

    1987-08-01

    The capture of electrons in solids is modified from that in gasses by several factors. The most important is the collective interaction of the electrons which results in a density of electron states in the solid in wide bands. Also the high density of electrons in many solids gives a high frequency of interaction as compared to gasses, and quickly destroys any electron-positron states in the metal matrix. Consequently, most positrons implanted in a metal will rapidly thermalize, and unless they reach the surface will annihilate with an electron in an uncorrelated state. Positronium formation from positrons scattered at a metal surface is analogous to ion neutralization however, most of the positronium comes from positrons passing through the surface from the bulk. The dominant motivation for studying positronium formation has been the hope that the distribution of the electrons at the surface would be obtained through the annihilation properties of positrons trapped at the surface or through analysis of the energy and angular distributions of the positronium emitted into the vacuum. These distributions have been measured and are included in this paper. 17 refs.

  17. A CF4 based positron trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Srdjan; Bankovic, Ana; Dujko, Sasa; Deller, Adam; Cooper, Ben; Cassidy, David; Petrovic, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    All positron buffer gas traps in use rely on N2 as the primary trapping gas due to its conveniently placed a1 Π electronic excitation cross section that is large enough to compete with positronium (Ps) formation in the threshold region. Its energy loss of 8.5 eV is sufficient to capture positrons into a potential well upon a single collision. The competing Ps formation, however, limits the efficiency of the two stage trap to 25 %. As positron moderators produce beams with energies of several eV we have proposed to use CF4 in the first stage of the trap, due to its large vibrational excitation cross section, where several vibrational excitations would be sufficient to trap the positrons with small losses. Apart from the simulations we also report the results of attempts to apply this approach to an existing Surko-type positron trap. Operating the unmodified trap as a CF4 based device proved to be unsuccessful, due primarily to excessive scattering due to high CF4 pressure in the first stage. However, the performance was consistent with subsequent simulations using the real system parameters. This agreement indicates that an efficient CF4 based scheme may be realized in an appropriately designed trap. also at Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Knez Mihajlova 35, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.

  18. Positron studies of defected metals, metallic surfaces. Final report, July 1, 1985--December 1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.

    1991-12-31

    Specific problems proposed under this project included the treatment of electronic structure and momentum density in various disordered and defected systems. Since 1987, when the new high-temperature superconductors were discovered, the project focused extensively on questions concerning the electronic structure and Fermiology of high-{Tc} superconductors, in particular, (i) momentum density and positron experiments, (ii) angle-resolved photoemission intensities, (iii) effects of disorder and substitutions in the high-{Tc}`s.

  19. Observation of Magnetic Resonances in Electron Clouds in a Positron Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wang, L.F.; /SLAC

    2011-08-24

    The first experimental observation of magnetic resonances in electron clouds is reported. The resonance was observed as a modulation in cloud intensity for uncoated as well as TiN-coated aluminum surfaces in the positron storage ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. Electron clouds frequently arise in accelerators of positively charged particles, and severely impact the machines performance. The TiN coating was found to be an effective remedy, reducing the cloud intensity by three orders of magnitude.

  20. Positron astrophysics and areas of relation to low-energy positron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal

    2014-05-01

    I briefly review our general knowledge of positron astrophysics, focusing mostly on the theoretical and modelling aspects. The experimental/observational aspects of the topic have recently been reviewed elsewhere [E. Churazov et al., Mon. Nat. R. Astron. Soc. 411, 1727 (2011); N. Prantazos et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 1001 (2011)]. In particular, I highlight the interactions and cross sections of the reactions that the positrons undergo in various cosmic media. Indeed, these must be of high interest to both the positron astrophysics community and the low-energy positron physics community in trying to find common areas of potential collaboration for the future or areas of research that will help the astrophysics community make further progress on the problem. The processes undergone by positrons from the moments of their birth to their annihilation (in the interstellar medium or other locations) are thus examined. The physics of the positron interactions with gases and solids (dust grains) and the physical conditions and characteristics of the environments where the processes of energy loss, positronium formation, and annihilation take place, are briefly reviewed. An explanation is given about how all the relevant physical information is taken into account in order to calculate annihilation rates and spectra of the 511 keV emission in the ISM; special attention is paid to positron interactions with dust and with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, an attempt is made to show to what extent the interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains are similar to laboratory experiments in which beams of low-energy positrons impinge upon solids and surfaces. Sample results are shown for the effect of dust grains on positron annihilation spectra in some phases of the ISM which, together with high resolution spectra measured by satellites, can be used to infer useful knowledge about the environment where the annihilation is predominantly taking place

  1. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium oxide nanocrystallites and probing the vacancy-type defects through positron annihilation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anjan; Mandal, Atis Chandra; Roy, Soma; Prashanth, Pendem; Ahamed, Sk Izaz; Kar, Subhrasmita; Prasad, Mithun S.; Nambissan, P. M. G.

    2016-09-01

    Magnesium oxide nanocrystallites exhibit certain abnormal characteristics when compared to those of other wide band gap oxide semiconductors in the sense they are most prone to water absorption and formation of a hydroxide layer on the surface. The problem can be rectified by heating and pure nanocrystallites can be synthesized with controllable sizes. Inevitably the defect properties are distinctly divided between two stages, the one with the hydroxide layer (region I) and the other after the removal of the layer by annealing (region II). The lattice parameters, the optical band gap and even the positron annihilation characteristics are conspicuous by their distinct behavior in the two stages of the surface configurations of nanoparticles. While region I was specific with the formation of positronium-hydrogen complexes that drastically altered the defect-specific positron lifetimes, pick-off annihilation of orthopositronium atoms marked region II. The vacancy clusters within the nanocrystallites also trapped positrons. They agglomerated due to the effect of the higher temperatures and resulted in the growth of the nanocrystallites. The coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopic measurements supported these findings and all the more indicated the trapping of positrons additionally into the neutral divacancies and negatively charged trivacancies. This is apart from the Mg2+ monovacancies which acted as the dominant trapping centers for positrons.

  2. Future directions in high energy electron-positron experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Trilling, G.H.

    1988-09-01

    In this report, the possibilities of studying particle physics at the TeV scale with high energy electron-positron linear colliders are discussed. A status report on the SLC and the MARK II program is given to provide some insights on the feasibility of experiments at linear colliders. The technical issues in going from SLC to the development of TeV colliders are briefly discussed. Some of the elements of the e/sup +/e/sup -/ experimental environment which differentiate it from that in hadron colliders and give examples of processes particularly well suited to attack by e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are summarized. Finally, some concluding remarks are given. 8 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Embedded design based virtual instrument program for positron beam automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayapandian, J.; Gururaj, K.; Abhaya, S.; Parimala, J.; Amarendra, G.

    2008-10-01

    Automation of positron beam experiment with a single chip embedded design using a programmable system on chip (PSoC) which provides easy interfacing of the high-voltage DC power supply is reported. Virtual Instrument (VI) control program written in Visual Basic 6.0 ensures the following functions (i) adjusting of sample high voltage by interacting with the programmed PSoC hardware, (ii) control of personal computer (PC) based multi channel analyzer (MCA) card for energy spectroscopy, (iii) analysis of the obtained spectrum to extract the relevant line shape parameters, (iv) plotting of relevant parameters and (v) saving the file in the appropriate format. The present study highlights the hardware features of the PSoC hardware module as well as the control of MCA and other units through programming in Visual Basic.

  4. Defects in metals. [Positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    The application of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) to the study of defects in metals has led to increased knowledge on lattice-defect properties during the past decade in two areas: the determination of atomic defect properties, particularly those of monovacancies, and the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development during post-irradiation and post-quench annealing. The study of defects in metals by PAS is reviewed within the context of the other available techniques for defect studies. The strengths and weaknesses of PAS as a method for the characterization of defect microstructures are considered. The additional possibilities for using the positron as a localized probe of the atomic and electronic structures of atomic defects are discussed, based upon theoretical calculations of the annihilation characteristics of defect-trapped positrons and experimental observations. Finally, the present status and future potential of PAS as a tool for the study of defects in metals is considered. 71 references, 9 figures.

  5. Trapped positrons observed by PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. V.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F. S.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Consiglio, L.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobsky, S.; Krutkov, S. Yu; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A. A.; Malakhov, V. V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Merge, M.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Papini, P.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasiliev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of electron and positron spatial distributions in energy range from 80 MeV to several GeV below the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity were carried out using the PAMELA magnetic spectrometer. The instrument is installed on board the Resurs-DK satellite which was launched June 15th 2006 on an elliptical orbit with the inclination 70 degrees and the altitude 350-600 km. The procedure of trajectories calculations in the geomagnetic filed gives a way to separate stably trapped and short lived albedo components produced in interactions of cosmic ray protons with the residual atmosphere. The work presents spatial distributions of trapped, quasitrapped and short-lived albedo electrons and positrons in the near Earth space. Electron to positron ratio points out on different production mechanism of trapped and quasitrapped particles.

  6. Positron beam position measurement for a beam containing both positrons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, N.S.; Fuja, R.

    1996-08-01

    Positron beam position measurement for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac beam is affected by the presence of electrons that are also captured and accelerated along with the positrons. This paper presents a method of measuring positron position in a beam consisting of alternating bunches of positrons and electrons. The method is based on Fourier analysis of a stripline signal at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies. In the presence of a mixed species beam, a certain linear combination of bunching and first harmonic signals depends only on the position and charge of one specie of particle. A formula is derived for the stripline signal at all harmonics of the bunching frequency and is used to compute expected signal power at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies for typical electron and positron bunch charges. The stripline is calibrated by measuring the signal power content at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies for a single species beam. A circuit is presented that will be used with an APS positron linac stripline beam position monitor to detect the bunching and first harmonic signals for a beam of positrons and electrons.

  7. Position-resolved Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Butterling, M.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2013-06-01

    A new method which allows for position-resolved positron lifetime spectroscopy studies in extended volume samples is presented. In addition to the existing technique of in-situ production of positrons inside large (cm3) bulk samples using high-energy photons up to 16 MeV from bremsstrahlung production, granular position-sensitive photon detectors have been employed. A beam of intense bremsstrahlung is provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear Accelerator with high Brilliance and low Emittance) which delivers electron bunches of less than 10 ps temporal width and an adjustable bunch separation of multiples of 38 ns, average beam currents of 1 mA, and energies up to 40 MeV. Since the generation of bremsstrahlung and the transport to the sample preserves the sharp timing of the electron beam, positrons generated inside the entire sample volume by pair production feature a sharp start time stamp for positron annihilation lifetime studies with high timing resolutions and high signal to background ratios due to the coincident detection of two annihilation photons. Two commercially available detectors from a high-resolution medial positron-emission tomography system are being employed with 169 individual Lu2SiO5:Ce scintillation crystals, each. In first experiments, a positron-lifetime gated image of a planar Si/SiO2 (pieces of 12.5 mm × 25 mm size) sample and a 3-D structured metal in Teflon target could be obtained proving the feasibility of a three dimensional lifetime-gated tomographic system.

  8. Positron Binding Properties of Glycine and Its Aqueous Complexes.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Mikko; Raebiger, Hannes; Yoshida, Daisuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-06-16

    We investigate positron binding to glycine and its aqueous complexes by first-principles calculation. We show that while glycine in its ground state (Gly) does not bind positrons, several of its strongly polar conformers do, and in particular, its zwitterion form (GlyZI) binds positrons strongly. Aqueous complexes Gly·nH2O and GlyZI·nH2O also bind positrons, if their dipole moment μ > μcr. However, μ is not a sufficient quantity to describe positron binding to these complexes. We show that in addition to μ, positron binding strongly depends on the intramolecular bonding of glycine. In Gly·nH2O, positrons are weakly bound to the nitrogen in Gly, whereas in GlyZI·nH2O, the ionic oxygen in GlyZI is a strong "positron attractor". PMID:27232201

  9. Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2007-06-12

    Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

  10. Heuristic theory of positron-helium scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An error in a previous modified adiabatic approximation (Drachman, 1966), due to a lack of generality in the form of the short-range correlation part of the wave function for L greater than zero, is corrected heuristically by allowing the monopole suppression parameter to depend on L. An L-dependent local potential is constructed to fit the well-known positron-hydrogen s, p, and d wave phase shifts below the rearrangement threshold. The same form of potential yields a positron-helium cross-section in agreement with a recent experimental measurement near threshold.

  11. Microstructural Characterization of Polymers with Positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1997-01-01

    Positrons provide a versatile probe for monitoring microstructural features of molecular solids. In this paper, we report on positron lifetime measurements in two different types of polymers. The first group comprises polyacrylates processed on earth and in space. The second group includes fully-compatible and totally-incompatible Semi-Interpenetrating polymer networks of thermosetting and thermoplastic polyimides. On the basis of lifetime measurements, it is concluded that free volumes are a direct reflection of physical/electromagnetic properties of the host polymers.

  12. Cold positrons from decaying dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Dodelson, Scott; Vives, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often, heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here, we explore the possibilities which arise if one of the products in a (heavyparticle)→(darkmatter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models, but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  13. Positron emission tomography - a new approach to brain chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-11-11

    Positron emission tomography permits examination of the chemistry of the brain in living beings. Until recently, positron emission tomography had been considered a research tool, but it is rapidly moving into clinical practice. This report describes the uses and applications of positron emission tomography in examinations of patients with strokes, epilepsy, malignancies, dementias, and schizophrenia and in basic studies of synaptic neurotransmission.

  14. Production of slow-positron beams with an electron linac

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.; Stanek, M.

    1982-03-26

    Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency for low-energy positrons has been determined for electrons with 60 to 120 MeV energy, low-energy positron beams from a linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources.

  15. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric J.-M.

    2014-06-01

    Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  16. Propagation of solitary waves in relativistic electron-positron-ion plasmas with kappa distributed electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Asif; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.

    2011-11-15

    Electrostatic ion acoustic solitary waves are studied in a plasma system comprising of relativistic ions, kappa distributed electrons, and positrons. The increase in the relativistic streaming factor and positron and electron kappa parameters cause the soliton amplitude to thrive. However, the soliton amplitude diminishes as the positron concentration is increased in the system. Our results are general and may be helpful, in understanding nonlinear phenomena in the presence of kappa distibuted electrons, positrons, and relativistically streaming ions.

  17. Application of mathematical removal of positron range blurring in Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Uber, D.

    1990-04-01

    The range of positrons in tissue is an important limitation to the ultimate spatial resolution achievable in Positron Emission Tomography. In this work we applied a Fourier deconvolution technique to remove range blurring in images taken by the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph. Using phantom data, we found significant improvement in the image quality and the FWHM for both {sup 68}Ga and {sup 82}Rb. These were successfully corrected so that the images and FWHM almost matched those of {sup 18}F which has negligible positron range. However, statistical noise was increased by the deconvolution process and it was not practical to recover the full spatial resolution of the tomograph. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Application of mathematical removal of positron range blurring in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Uber, D. )

    1990-06-01

    The range of positrons in tissue is an important limitation to the ultimate spatial resolution achievable in positron emission tomography. In this work the authors have applied a Fourier deconvolution technique to remove range blurring in images taken by the Donner 600-crystal positron tomograph. Using phantom data, the authors have found significant improvement in the image quality and the FWHM for both {sup 68}Ga and {sup 82}Rb. These were successfully corrected so that the images and FWHM almost matched those of {sup 18}F which has negligible positron range. However, statistical noise was increased by the deconvolution process and it was not practical to recover the full spatial resolution of the tomograph.

  19. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  20. Positrons observed to originate from thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2011-05-01

    Thunderstorms are the result of warm, moist air moving rapidly upward, then cooling and condensing. Electrification occurs within thunderstorms (as noted by Benjamin Franklin), produced primarily by frictional processes among ice particles. This leads to lightning discharges; the types, intensities, and rates of these discharges vary greatly among thunderstorms. Even though scientists have been studying lightning since Franklin's time, new phenomena associated with thunderstorms are still being discovered. In particular, a recent finding by Briggs et al. [2011], based on observations by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) instrument on NASA's satellite-based Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), shows that positrons are also generated by thunderstorms. Positrons are the antimatter form of electrons—they have the same mass and charge as an electron but are of positive rather than negative charge; hence the name positron. Observations of positrons from thunderstorms may lead to a new tool for understanding the electrification and high-energy processes occurring within thunderstorms. New theories, along with new observational techniques, are rapidly evolving in this field.

  1. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  2. First results of a positron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Van House, J.; Rich, A.

    1988-01-18

    We have constructed a prototype transmission positron microscope (TPM) and taken magnified pictures of various objects with it. Information gained from the prototype TPM has allowed us to predict resolutions achievable in the near future using an upgraded TPM. Applications are discussed.

  3. New source of dense, cryogenic positron plasmas.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, L V; Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a new method, based on the ballistic transfer of preaccumulated plasmas, to obtain large and dense positron plasmas in a cryogenic environment. The method involves transferring plasmas emanating from a region with a low magnetic field (0.14 T) and relatively high pressure (10(-9) mbar) into a 15 K Penning-Malmberg trap immersed in a 3 T magnetic field with a base pressure better than 10(-13) mbar. The achieved positron accumulation rate in the high field cryogenic trap is more than one and a half orders of magnitude higher than the previous most efficient UHV compatible scheme. Subsequent stacking resulted in a plasma containing more than 1.2 x 10(9) positrons, which is a factor 4 higher than previously reported. Using a rotating wall electric field, plasmas containing about 20 x 10(6) positrons were compressed to a density of 2.6 x 10(10) cm(-3). This is a factor of 6 improvement over earlier measurements. PMID:16090691

  4. Positron Annihilation in the Bipositronium Ps2

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Frolov, Alexei M.

    2005-07-01

    The electron-positron-pair annihilation in the bipositronium PS2 is considered. In particular, the two-, three-, one- and zero-photon annihilation rates are determined to high accuracy. The corresponding analytical expressions are also presented. Also, a large number of bound state properties have been determined for this system.

  5. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  6. Positron elastic scattering from alkaline earth targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Luis A.; Assafrão, Denise; Mohallem, José R.

    2016-07-01

    A previously reported model potential approach [Poveda et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 052702 (2013)] was extended to study low energy positron elastic scattering from beryllium and magnesium. The cross sections were computed for energies ranging from 10-5 eV up to well above the positronium formation threshold. The present results are in good agreement with previous reports, including the prediction of a p-wave resonance in the cross section for magnesium. The emergence of this shape resonance is connected to a trend observed in the evolution of the partial wave cross section in going from Be to Mg target. This trend lead us to speculate that a sharp d-wave resonance should be observed in positron elastic scattering from calcium. The positron-target binding energies are investigated in detail, both using the scattering information and by direct computation of the bound state energies using the model potentials. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70120-y

  7. Positron source position sensing detector and electronics

    DOEpatents

    Burnham, Charles A.; Bradshaw, Jr., John F.; Kaufman, David E.; Chesler, David A.; Brownell, Gordon L.

    1985-01-01

    A positron source, position sensing device, particularly with medical applications, in which positron induced gamma radiation is detected using a ring of stacked, individual scintillation crystals, a plurality of photodetectors, separated from the scintillation crystals by a light guide, and high resolution position interpolation electronics. Preferably the scintillation crystals are several times more numerous than the photodetectors with each crystal being responsible for a single scintillation event from a received gamma ray. The light guide will disperse the light emitted from gamma ray absorption over several photodetectors. Processing electronics for the output of the photodetectors resolves the location of the scintillation event to a fraction of the dimension of each photodetector. Because each positron absorption results in two 180.degree. oppositely traveling gamma rays, the detection of scintillation in pairs permits location of the positron source in a manner useful for diagnostic purposes. The processing electronics simultaneously responds to the outputs of the photodetectors to locate the scintillations to the source crystal. While it is preferable that the scintillation crystal include a plurality of stacked crystal elements, the resolving power of the processing electronics is also applicable to continuous crystal scintillators.

  8. Laser Ponderomotive Electron-Positron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2004-12-07

    Relativistic ultrahigh laser fields can produce plasmas through quantum mechanical tunneling ionization mechanism, and accelerate produced electrons and ions to generate a relativistic electron beam and energetic ions in plasmas. This process will be followed by creation of electron-positron pairs through interaction of relativistic electrons with a Coulomb field of a nucleus in plasma ions or a strong laser field. In a relativistic strong laser field, the longitudinal accelerating force exerted on an electron is proportional to the square of the electric field, whereas the transverse quivering force is just linearly proportional to it. This is essence of the relativistic ponderomotive acceleration that dominantly produces energetic particles in interaction of ultraintese laser fields with particle beams and plasma. Therefore a tightly focused laser field can accelerate an electron-positron bunch longitudinally up to a remarkable energy and at the same time confines it transversely in the superposed ponderomotive potential of an intense ultrashort laser pulse. Here we propose acceleration and focusing of the electron-positron pair beam by the ponderomotive acceleration scheme to compose a high energy electron-positron collider with very high luminosity.

  9. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Holt, W.H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  10. Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Liang, E; Myatt, J; Price, D; Meyerhofer, D; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-08-25

    We measure up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx} 1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. The measurements indicate the laser produced, relativistic positron densities ({approx} 10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}) are the highest ever created in the laboratory.

  11. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  12. PREFACE: The International Workshop on Positron Studies of Defects 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Kazuki; Shirai, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    The International Workshop on Positron Studies of Defects 2014 (PSD-14) was held in Kyoto, Japan from 14-19 September, 2014. The PSD Workshop brought together positron scientists interested in studying defects to an international platform for presenting and discussing recent results and achievements, including new experimental and theoretical methods in the field. The workshop topics can be characterized as follows: • Positron studies of defects in semiconductors and oxides • Positron studies of defects in metals • New experimental methods and equipment • Theoretical calculations and simulations of momentum distributions, positron lifetimes and other characteristics for defects • Positron studies of defects in combination with complementary methods • Positron beam studies of defects at surfaces, interfaces, in sub-surface regions and thin films • Nanostructures and amorphous materials

  13. Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2010-07-06

    Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

  14. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S.; Sheppard, J. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S.

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  15. Positron Beam Propagation in a Meter Long Plasma Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, K.A.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W.B.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; O'Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

    2008-03-17

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that positron beams propagating in plasmas can be focused and also create wakes with large accelerating gradients. For similar parameters, the wakes driven by positron beams are somewhat smaller compared to the case of an electron beam. Simulations have shown that the wake amplitude can be increased if the positron beam is propagated in a hollow plasma channel (Ref. 1). This paper, compares experimentally, the propagation and beam dynamics of a positron beam in a meter scale homogeneous plasma, to a positron beam hollow channel plasma. The results show that positron beams in hollow channels are less prone to distortions and deflections. Hollow channels were observed to guide the positron beam onto the channel axis. Beam energy loss was also observed implying the formation of a large wake amplitude. The experiments were carried out as part of the E-162 plasma wakefield experiments at SLAC.

  16. High-yield positron systems for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1989-04-01

    Linear colliders, such as the SLC, are among those accelerators for which a high-yield positron source operating at the repetition rate of the accelerator is desired. The SLC, having electron energies up to 50 GeV, presents the possibility of generating positron bunches with useful charge even exceeding that of the initial electron bunch. The exact positron yield to be obtained depends on the particular capture, transport and damping system employed. Using 31 GeV electrons impinging on a W-type converter phase-space at the target to the acceptance of the capture rf section, the SLC source is capable of producing, for every electron, up to two positrons within the acceptance of the positron damping ring. The design of this source and the performance of the positron system as built are described. Also, future prospects and limitations for high-yield positron systems are discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Assessment of regional myocardial and renal blood flow with copper-PTSM and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Shelton, M E; Green, M A; Mathias, C J; Welch, M J; Bergmann, S R

    1990-09-01

    We recently demonstrated in isolated, perfused hearts that radiolabeled pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-PTSM) is well extracted throughout a range of conditions including ischemia, hypoxia, and hyperemia. Once extracted, binding of radioactivity by the isolated heart was essentially irreversible, giving this tracer microspherelike qualities. Because Cu-PTSM can be readily prepared with the generator-produced positron-emitting copper 62 and other gamma- or positron-emitting copper radionuclides, we evaluated its usefulness for measuring regional myocardial and renal blood flow in vivo in intact dogs at rest, after ischemia, or after coronary hyperemia was induced by intravenous administration of dipyridamole. After intravenous administration of radiolabeled Cu-PTSM, the tracer cleared rapidly from the blood. Myocardial uptake of single photon-emitting 67Cu-labeled Cu-PTSM was measured directly in myocardial samples 15 minutes after tracer administration, and it increased proportionally with blood flow throughout the flow range (estimated concomitantly with radiolabeled microspheres) of 0.0-6.0 ml/g/min (n = 340 samples from 17 dogs, r = 0.99, Ycopper radioactivity = 85Xmicrosphere flow -7 chi 2 + 17). Renal uptake of radiolabeled Cu-PTSM was also proportional to blood flow. Positron emission tomography was performed in four intact dogs after intravenous administration of 64Cu-labeled Cu-PTSM (19% positron decay, t1/2 = 12.8 hours). High-quality images of heart and kidney were obtained. Accordingly, radiolabeled Cu-PTSM should be a useful, generator-produced tracer for estimating regional myocardial and renal blood flow with positron emission tomography. PMID:2394015

  18. Positron and positronium studies of irradiation-induced defects and microvoids in vitreous metamict silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Saneyasu, M.; Tabata, M.; Tang, Z.; Nagai, Y.; Chiba, T.; Ito, Y.

    2000-05-01

    To study irradiation-induced defects and structural microvoids in vitreous silica (v-SiO2), positron lifetime, angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR), and electron spin resonance (ESR) were measured on v-SiO2 and quartz (c-SiO2) samples irradiated with fast neutrons up to a dose of 4.1×1020 n/cm2. Two kinds of positron-trapping defects have been found to form in v-SiO2 by fast neutron irradiation: type-I and type-II defects. Similar defects also appear in the irradiated c-SiO2, indicating that both the defects are common in v-SiO2 and c-SiO2. The detailed annealing and photo-illumination studies of positron annihilation and ESR for these two defects suggest that the type-I defects are non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), while the type-II defects are oxygen molecules which cannot be detected by ESR. Higher dose irradiation than 1.0×1020 n/cm2 causes c-SiO2 to change to metamict (amorphous) phase (m-SiO2). Positronium (Ps) atoms are found to form in microvoids with an average radius of about 0.3 nm in the v-SiO2 and m-SiO2. This suggests that microvoids proved by Ps are structurally intrinsic open spaces and reflect the topologically disordered structure of these phases in the subnanometer scale.

  19. Do positrons measure atomic and molecular diameters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Jan; Fedus, Kamil; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.

    2016-07-01

    We report on density functional calculations (DFT) of elastic integral scattering cross-sections for positron collisions with argon, krypton, nitrogen and methane. The long-range asymptotic polarization potential is described using higher-order terms going much beyond an induced dipole potential (- α / r 4) while the short-range interaction is modeled by two different forms of electron - positron correlation potential (Boroński-Nieminen and Quantum Monte Carlo potentials). The results of both approaches agree quite well with the recent theoretical and measured values. Based on the present and previous theoretical and experimental data we discuss some systematics observed in integral scattering cross-sections below the positronium formation threshold. In particular we point out on the correlation between the values of scattering cross-sections and atomic dimensions.

  20. Positronium formation in positron-helium scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    The positronium-formation cross sections in positron-helium scattering have been calculated with the use of a distorted-wave polarized-orbital method from the threshold to 100 eV. The results with and without the matrix elements involving the distorted target wave functions are found to differ appreciably. The results of the first Born approximation are not expected to be correct even at the incident-positron energy 100 eV. The measured values at 20 eV are found to be less than (1/2) of the present predicted values. The sharp rise of the formation cross section within the ore-gap region as observed by Charlton et al. has also been noticed by us. The minimum in the differential cross section has been found at all energies as in the case of hydrogen atom.

  1. Positron annihilation gamma rays from novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leising, Mark D.; Clayton, Donald D.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for observing annihilation gamma rays from novae is investigated. These gamma rays, a unique signature of the thermonuclear runaway models of novae, would result from the annihilation of positrons emitted by beta(+)-unstable nuclei produced near the peak of the runaway and carried by rapid convection to the surface of the nova envelope. Simple models, which are extensions of detailed published models, of the expansion of the nova atmospheres are evolved. These models serve as input into investigations of the fate of nearby Galactic fast novae could yield detectable fluxes of electron-positron annihilation gamma rays produced by the decay of N-13 and F-18. Although nuclear gamma-ray lines are produced by other nuclei, it is unlikely that the fluxes at typical nova distances would be detectable to present and near-future instruments.

  2. Application of positron annihilation in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.; Fluss, M.J.; Smedskjaer, L.C.

    1984-05-01

    Owing to the ability of the positron to annihilate from a variety of defect-trapped states, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has been applied increasingly to the characterization and study of defects in materials in recent years. In metals particularly, it has been demonstrated that PAS can yield defect-specific information which, by itself or in conjunction with more traditional experimental techniques, has already made a significant impact upon the determination of atomic-defect properties and the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development, as occurs during post-irradiation annealing. The applications of PAS are now actively expanding to the study of more complex defect-related phenomena in irradiated or deformed metals and alloys, phase transformations and structural disorder, surfaces and near-surface defect characterization. A number of these applications in materials science are reviewed and discussed with respect to profitable future directions.

  3. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Dodelson, Scott; Vives, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  4. Positron scattering and annihilation from hydrogenlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, S.A.; Bromley, M.W.J.; Mitroy, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Kohn variational method is used with a configuration-interaction-type wave function to determine the J=0 and J=1 phase shifts and annihilation parameter Z{sub eff} for positron-hydrogenic ion scattering. The phase shifts are within 1-2% of the best previous calculations. The values of Z{sub eff} are small and do not exceed unity for any of the momenta considered. At thermal energies Z{sub eff} is minute with a value of order 10{sup -50} occurring for He{sup +} at k=0.05a{sub 0}{sup -1}. In addition to the variational calculations, analytic expressions for the phase shift and annihilation parameters within the Coulomb wave Born approximation are derived and used to help elucidate the dynamics of positron collisions with positive ions.

  5. Microemulsion systems studied by positron annihilation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Boussaha, A.; Djermouni, B.; Fucugauchi, L.A.; Ache, H.J.

    1980-07-02

    The formation of thermalized positronium atoms is greatly reduced if increasing amounts of water become solubilized in reversed micelles formed by sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate in apolar solvents. Similar observations have been made if the surfactant is Triton X-100. The application of the positron annihilation technique to the study of microemulsions consisting of potassium oleate-alcohol-oil-water mixtures indicates, consistent with previous results, that microemulsion formation requires a certain water/oil ratio if the oil is a long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbon such as hexadecane. This ratio is 0.4 in the case of a 1-pentanol- and 0.2 for a 1-hexanol-containing mixture. This minimum water content is strongly reduced if the oil is an aromatic hydrocarbon. The positron annihilation data also sensitively reflect structural rearrangements in these solutions occurring upon further addition of water, such as the transition of spherical aggregates to a disk-like lamellae structure.

  6. Positron annihilation radiation from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Share, G. H.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Rieger, E.

    1983-01-01

    Positron-annihilation radiation has been observed from the June 21, 1980 and June 3, 1982 flares by the gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. The observed 0.511-MeV line fluences from the flares were 14.6 + or - 3.3 gamma/sq cm and 103 + or - 8 gamma/sq cm, respectively. Measurement of the line width establishes an upper limit to the temperature in the annihilation region of 3 x 10 to the 6th K. The time dependence of the 0.511-MeV line during the 1980 flare is consistent with the calculations of Ramaty et al. (1983) for positrons created in the decay of radioactive nuclei. The time dependence of the 0.511-MeV line for the 1982 flare is more complex and requires more detailed study.

  7. Positron spectroscopy of 2D materials using an advanced high intensity positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, A.; Chirayath, V.; Lim, Z.; Gladen, R.; Chrysler, M.; Fairchild, A.; Koymen, A.; Weiss, A.

    An advanced high intensity variable energy positron beam(~1eV to 20keV) has been designed, tested and utilized for the first coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) measurements on 6-8 layers graphene on polycrystalline Cu sample. The system is capable of simultaneous Positron annihilation induced Auger electron Spectroscopy (PAES) and CDB measurements giving it unparalleled sensitivity to chemical structure at external surfaces, interfaces and internal pore surfaces. The system has a 3m flight path up to a micro channel plate (MCP) for the Auger electrons emitted from the sample. This gives a superior energy resolution for PAES. A solid rare gas(Neon) moderator was used for the generation of the monoenergetic positron beam. The positrons were successfully transported to the sample chamber using axial magnetic field generated with a series of Helmholtz coils. We will discuss the PAES and coincidence Doppler broadening measurements on graphene -Cu sample and present an analysis of the gamma spectra which indicates that a fraction of the positrons implanted at energies 7-60eV can become trapped at the graphene/metal interface. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR 1508719 and DMR 1338130.

  8. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  9. Orbiting transmission source for positron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.B.; Moses, W.W.; Uber, D.C.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1988-02-01

    Accidental suppression and effective data rates have been measured for the orbiting transmission source as implemented in the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph. A mechanical description of the orbiting source and a description of the electronics used to discard scattered and accidental events is included. Since accidental coincidences were the rate-limiting factor in transmission data acquisition, the new method allows us to acquire sufficient transmission data in a shorter time with a more active transmission source.

  10. Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 10(exp 12) Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

  11. Reduction of Positron Range Effects by the Application of a Magnetic Field: for Use with Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond Robert

    The process of positron emission tomography has become a valuable medical research tool. This procedure involves the administration of a radiopharmaceutical labelled with a positron-emitting isotope to a living organism. Upon the emission and subsequent annihilation of a positron, the gamma rays produced are detected to create an image of metabolic activity within the subject. Many factors such as Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption of the gamma rays tend to limit the quality of these images. Another important limitation is the non-negligible distance the positron travels prior to annihilation. This phenomenon leads to the misplacement of data in the final image. A method for reducing this effect utilizing a magnetic field has been tested and evaluated. The application of a magnetic field constrains the positrons to travel in helical paths instead of their relatively straight courses. Thus, the effective distance the positrons travel from their point of emission is reduced. Results indicate that this technique is successful in reducing the blurring caused in PET images by positron range. The results also indicate that the amount of resolution improvement depends upon the choice of positron emitter and scanner resolution. Reduction of this blurring helps to produce clearer PET images which can allow for more precise localization of tumors, in addition to better measurement of metabolic rate constants. The use of a magnetic field to reduce the range of positrons will lead to more useful images produced by positron emission tomography.

  12. Positron Production at JLab Simulated Using Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Kossler, W. J.; Long, S. S.

    2009-09-02

    The results of a Geant4 Monte-Carlo study of the production of slow positrons using a 140 MeV electron beam which might be available at Jefferson Lab are presented. Positrons are produced by pair production for the gamma-rays produced by bremsstrahlung on the target which is also the stopping medium for the positrons. Positrons which diffuse to the surface of the stopping medium are assumed to be ejected due to a negative work function. Here the target and moderator are combined into one piece. For an osmium target/moderator 3 cm long with transverse dimensions of 1 cm by 1 mm, we obtain a slow positron yield of about 8.5centre dot10{sup 10}/(scentre dotmA) If these positrons were remoderated and re-emitted with a 23% probability we would obtain 2centre dot10{sup 10}/(scentre dotmA) in a micro-beam.

  13. Positron density enhancements recorded within a thunderstorm by ADELE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B.; Kelley, N. A.; Lowell, A. W.; Schaal, M.; Rassoul, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report the observation of two unusual positron density enhancements made inside an active thunderstorm by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) onboard a Gulfstream V aircraft in August 2009. ADELE recorded two count rate enhancements of 511 keV annihilation gamma rays, 35 seconds apart, that lasted approximately 0.2 seconds each. The enhancements were about a factor of 12 above background and had energy spectra consistent with clouds of positrons, approximately 1 km across, briefly surrounding the aircraft. A flat-plate antenna on the underside of the aircraft also recorded electrical activity during the positron enhancements. It is not clear how the positron clouds were created within the thunderstorm or whether the presence of the aircraft played a role in their production. In this presentation, we will show the ADELE data along with model fits of the positron spectra. We shall also discuss possible sources of the positron excesses.

  14. [Basic principles of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Standke, R

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography uses photons to receive regional information about dynamic, physiologic, and biochemical processes in the living body. A positron decay is measured indirectly by the simultaneous registration of both gamma rays created by the annihilation. The event is counted, if two directly opposite located detectors register gamma rays in coincidence. Unfortunately the detectors of a positron emission tomography system do not register only true coincident events. There are also scattered and random coincidences. Different types of positron tomographs are presented and scintillation crystals, which are in use for positron emission tomography are discussed. The 2D- and 3D-acquisition methods are described as well as preprocessing methods, such as correction for attenuation, scatter and dead time. For quantification the relative parameter standard uptake value (SUV) is explained. Finally hybrid systems, such as combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners and the use of computed tomography data for attenuation correction are introduced. PMID:12506765

  15. Kinetics of electron cooling of positrons in a storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Men'shikov, L. I.

    2008-06-15

    Kinetic equations are derived for the positron velocity distribution in storage rings with electron cooling. Both drag force and components of the velocity diffusion tensor are calculated. The mechanism of approach to a steady-state positron velocity distribution via electron cooling is discussed. It is shown that the resulting steady-state positron distribution is very close to the electron distribution when the magnetic field is sufficiently strong.

  16. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-19

    In this study, massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  17. Production of a positron microprobe using a transmission remoderator.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Masanori; Jinno, Satoshi; Fukuzumi, Masafumi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Oguma, Koichi; Akahane, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A production method for a positron microprobe using a beta+-decay radioisotope (22Na) source has been investigated. When a magnetically guided positron beam was extracted from the magnetic field, the combination of an extraction coil and a magnetic lens enabled us to focus the positron beam by a factor of 10 and to achieve a high transport efficiency (71%). A 150-nm-thick Ni(100) thin film was mounted at the focal point of the magnetic lens and was used as a remoderator for brightness enhancement in a transmission geometry. The remoderated positrons were accelerated by an electrostatic lens and focused on the target by an objective magnetic lens. As a result, a 4-mm-diameter positron beam could be transformed into a microprobe of 60 microm or less with 4.2% total efficiency. The S parameter profile obtained by a single-line scan of a test specimen coincided well with the defect distribution. This technique for a positron microprobe is available to an accelerator-based high-intensity positron source and allows 3-dimensional vacancy-type defect analysis and a positron source for a transmission positron microscope. PMID:18187852

  18. Positron-molecule bound states and positive ion production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventhal, M.; Passner, A.; Surko, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction was studied of low energy positrons with large molecules such as alkanes. These data provide evidencce for the existence of long lived resonances and bound states of positrons with neutral molecules. The formation process and the nature of these resonances are discussed. The positive ions produced when a positron annihilates with an electron in one of these resonances were observed and this positive ion formation process is discussed. A review is presented of the current state of the understanding of these positron-molecule resonances and the resulting positive ion formation. A number of outstanding issues in this area is also discussed.

  19. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-15

    Massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  20. Multi-component molecular orbital study on positron attachment to alkali-metal hydride molecules: nature of chemical bonding and dissociation limits of [LiH; e+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyamada, Takayuki; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2014-08-01

    We have performed multi-component full-configuration interaction calculations to investigate the nature of chemical bonding of [LiH;e+] at the small and large internuclear distance. We discuss the importance of geometrical changes in positronic compounds induced by a positron attachment in terms of the virial theorem, with a comparison of the adiabatic- and vertical-positron affinity (PA). The systematic improvement of the PA values achieved by optimisation of (i) the molecular geometry and (ii) the positronic basis centre is also discussed. The stable dissociation channel of [LiH;e+] is compared with the ionic- and neutral-dissociation channels of its parent molecule LiH through the analysis of the potential energy curve and the electronic and positronic densities. The vertical PA as a function of is also presented, which is the difference between the potential energy curve of the parent molecule (LiH → Li + H) and its positronic compound ([LiH; e+] → Li + [H; e+]). Unlike the preceding study of [M. Mella et al., J. Chem. Phys. 113, 6154 (2000)], it took more than bohr to converge the vertical PA due to the long-range ionic bonding interaction.

  1. Microstructure Evaluation of Fe-BASED Amorphous Alloys Investigated by Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Huang, Ping; Wang, Yuxin; Yan, Biao

    2013-07-01

    Microstructure of Fe-based amorphous and nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation technique (PAT). Doppler broadening measurement reveals that amorphous alloys (Finemet, Type I) which can form a nanocrystalline phase have more defects (free volume) than alloys (Metglas, Type II) which cannot form this microstructure. XRD and TEM characterization indicates that the nanocrystallization of amorphous Finemet alloy occurs at 460°C, where nanocrystallites of α-Fe with an average grain size of a few nanometers are formed in an amorphous matrix. With increasing annealing temperature up to 500°C, the average grain size increases up to around 12 nm. During the annealing of Finemet alloy, it has been demonstrated that positron annihilates in quenched-in defect, crystalline nanophase and amorphous-nanocrystalline interfaces. The change of line shape parameter S with annealing temperature in Finemet alloy is mainly due to the structural relaxation, the pre-nucleation of Cu nucleus and the nanocrystallization of α-Fe(Si) phase during annealing. This study throws new insights into positron behavior in the nanocrystallization of metallic glasses, especially in the presence of single or multiple nanophases embedded in the amorphous matrix.

  2. Positron beam optics for the 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the NEPOMUC beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, H.; Weber, J. A.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Leitner, M.; Boni, P.

    2014-04-01

    In the last year a conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer has been set up and brought to operation at TUM. Once the NEPOMUC beamline is extended to the new experimental hall at the research reactor FRM-II the conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer will be upgraded with a second sample chamber in order to be integrated to the NEPOMUC beamline facility. This spectrometer will add a complete new quality to 2D-ACAR experiments as it allows to track the evolution of the electronic structure from the surface to the bulk. We present the design features of the positron beam optics and the sample environment.

  3. Positron scattering from neon and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. C. L.; Makochekanwa, C.; Caradonna, P.; Slaughter, D. S.; Machacek, J. R.; McEachran, R. P.; Sullivan, J. P.; Buckman, S. J.; Stauffer, A. D.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.

    2011-03-15

    High-resolution measurements of positron interactions with Ne and Ar are presented, as well as theoretical treatments. The data extend over a range of 0.3 to 60 eV and comprise measurements of the grand total, positonium formation, and grand total minus positronium formation cross sections. Theoretical treatments of scattering from Ne and Ar are performed under the relativistic optical potential approach, as well as calculations using the convergent close-coupling method. Comparisons of the present measurements and theories are made with previous theoretical and experimental work.

  4. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  5. Positron emission tomography imaging of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Alastair J; Adamson, Philip D; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Inflammation has a central role in the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Recent developments in cardiovascular imaging with the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography have provided a window into the molecular pathophysiology underlying coronary plaque inflammation. Using novel radiotracers targeted at specific cellular pathways, the potential exists to observe inflammation, apoptosis, cellular hypoxia, microcalcification and angiogenesis in vivo. Several clinical studies are now underway assessing the ability of this hybrid imaging modality to inform about atherosclerotic disease activity and the prediction of future cardiovascular risk. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing coronary atherosclerosis may be the first step toward offering patients a more stratified, personalized approach to treatment. PMID:27322032

  6. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  8. Positron autoradiography for intravascular imaging: feasibility evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Easwaramoorthy, Balasubramaniam; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 70% of acute coronary artery disease is caused by unstable (vulnerable) plaques with an inflammation of the overlying cap and high lipid content. A rupturing of the inflamed cap of the plaque results in propagation of the thrombus into the lumen, blockage of the artery and acute ischaemic syndrome or sudden death. Morphological imaging such as angiography or intravascular ultrasound cannot determine inflammation status of the plaque. A radiotracer such as 18F-FDG is accumulated in vulnerable plaques due to higher metabolic activity of the inflamed cap and could be used to detect a vulnerable plaque. However, positron emission tomography (PET) cannot detect the FDG-labelled plaques because of respiratory and heart motions, small size and low activity of the plaques. Plaques can be detected using a miniature particle (positron) detector inserted into the artery. In this work, a new detector concept is investigated for intravascular imaging of the plaques. The detector consists of a storage phosphor tip bound to the end of an intravascular catheter. It can be inserted into an artery, absorb the 18F-FDG positrons from the plaques, withdrawn from the artery and read out. Length and diameter of the storage phosphor tip can be matched to the length and the diameter of the artery. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental evaluations of coronary plaque imaging with the proposed detector were performed. It was shown that the sensitivity of the storage phosphor detector to the positrons of 18F-FDG is sufficient to detect coronary plaques with 1 mm and 2 mm sizes and 590 Bq and 1180 Bq activities in the arteries with 2 mm and 3 mm diameters, respectively. An experimental study was performed using plastic tubes with 2 mm diameter filled with an FDG solution, which simulates blood. FDG spots simulating plaques were placed over the surface of the tube. A phosphor tip was inserted into the tube and imaged the plaques. Exposure time was 1 min in all simulations and

  9. Neurologic applications of positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, G L; Pantano, P

    1984-11-01

    The impact of computerized neuroimaging in the neurologic sciences has been so dramatic that it has completely changed our approach to the individual patient. Further changes may be expected from the newborn positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in order to help the reader digest a large bulk of data and fully realize the present state of the art of PET, the authors have shaped this review mainly on results rather than on methods and on published reports rather than on future potential. PMID:6335222

  10. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Acacia, P.; Campeanu, R.I.; Horbatsch, M.

    1993-05-01

    We will present integrated cross sections for ionization of atomic hydrogen by positrons. These have been calculated in a distorted-wave approximation using energy-dependent effective charges in the final channel as well as static and polarization potentials in the initial channel. We present two models for calculating the energy-dependent effective charges both of which produce results in good agreement with the recent experimental measurements of Spicher et al. This is in contrast to previous distorted-wave calculations which used fixed effective charges as well as classical trajectory calculations. Both of these latter methods produced results which were substantially below ours and the experimental data.

  11. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron–positron pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron–positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 1016 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 1018 cm-3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  12. A Simple Estimate of the Mass of the Positron.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Goronwy Tudor

    1993-01-01

    Discusses a small part of the final state of a high-energy neutrino interaction: a head-on collision of a positron and a stationary electron. Provides a bubble chamber picture and describes the resulting particle effects. Uses momentum to determine the mass of the positron. (MVL)

  13. Recent Developments in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Instrumentation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors.

  14. Moisture determination in composite materials using positron lifetime techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. R.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed which has the potential of providing information on the moisture content as well as its depth in the specimen. This technique was based on the dependence of positron lifetime on the moisture content of the composite specimen. The positron lifetime technique of moisture determination and the results of the initial studies are described.

  15. Electrons and positrons from expanding supernova envelopes in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    If antiprotons in cosmic rays are produced as secondary particles in sources, it is expected that positrons are also created by the same process. The interstellar spectra of positrons and electrons are calculated by taking into account such sources. Spectra are then compared with observations.

  16. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  17. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1988-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) has emerged as a powerful technique for research in condensed matter. It has been used extensively in the study of metals, ionic crystals, glasses and polymers. The present review concentrates on applications of positron lifetime measurements for elucidation of the physicochemical structure of polymers.

  18. Low-energy positron interactions with xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Jones, A. C. L.; Caradonna, P.; Slaughter, D. S.; McEachran, R. P.; Sullivan, J. P.; Buckman, S. J.; Bellm, S.; Lohmann, B.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Mueller, D. W.; Stauffer, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Low-energy interactions of positrons with xenon have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental measurements were carried out using a trap-based positron beam with an energy resolution of ˜80 meV, while the theoretical calculations were carried out using the convergent close-coupling method and the relativistic optical potential approach. Absolute values of the grand total, positronium formation and grand total minus positronium formation cross sections are presented over the energy range of 1-60 eV. Elastic differential cross sections (DCS), for selected energies, are also presented both below and above the positronium formation threshold. Fine energy-step measurements of the positronium formation cross section over the energy range of 4.4-8.4 eV, and measurements of the elastic DCS at the energies of 5.33 and 6.64 eV, have been carried out to investigate the ionization threshold regions corresponding to the 2P3/2 and 2P1/2 states of the Xe+ ion. The present results are compared with both experimental and theoretical values from the literature where available.

  19. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  20. Positron Annihilation in Medical Substances of Insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, R.; Szatanik, R.

    2005-05-01

    Positrons lifetimes were measured in medical substances of insulin (human and animal), differing as far as the degree of purity and time of their activity in the organism are concerned. In all of the cases the spectrum of positron lifetime was distributed into three components, with the long-life component ranging from 1.8 to 2.08 ns and the intensity taking on values from 18 to 24%. Making use of Tao-Eldrup model, the average radius of the free volume, in which o-Ps annihilated, and the degree of filling in the volume were determined. It was found that the value of the long-life component for human insulin is higher than that of animal insulin. Moreover, the value of this component clearly depends on the manner of purification of the insulin. It was also noticed that there occurs a correlation between the value of this component and the time after which it begins to be active in the organism, as well as the total time of its activity.

  1. ELECTRON-POSITRON FLOWS AROUND MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-11-10

    The twisted magnetospheres of magnetars must sustain a persistent flow of electron-positron plasma. The flow dynamics is controlled by the radiation field around the hot neutron star. The problem of plasma motion in the self-consistent radiation field is solved using the method of virtual beams. The plasma and radiation exchange momentum via resonant scattering and self-organize into the 'radiatively locked' outflow with a well-defined, decreasing Lorentz factor. There is an extended zone around the magnetar where the plasma flow is ultra-relativistic; its Lorentz factor is self-regulated so that it can marginally scatter thermal photons. The flow becomes slow and opaque in an outer equatorial zone, where the decelerated plasma accumulates and annihilates; this region serves as a reflector for the thermal photons emitted by the neutron star. The e {sup ±} flow carries electric current, which is sustained by a moderate induced electric field. The electric field maintains a separation between the electron and positron velocities, against the will of the radiation field. The two-stream instability is then inevitable, and the induced turbulence can generate low-frequency emission. In particular, radio emission may escape around the magnetic dipole axis of the star. Most of the flow energy is converted to hard X-ray emission, which is examined in an accompanying paper.

  2. Development of a Positron Source for JLab at the IAC

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Tony

    2013-10-12

    We report on the research performed towards the development of a positron sour for Jefferson Lab's (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, VA. The first year of work was used to benchmark the predictions of our current simulation with positron production efficiency measurements at the IAC. The second year used the benchmarked simulation to design a beam line configuration which optimized positron production efficiency while minimizing radioactive waste as well as design and construct a positron converter target. The final year quantified the performance of the positron source. This joint research and development project brought together the experiences of both electron accelerator facilities. Our intention is to use the project as a spring board towards developing a program of accelerator based research and education which will train students to meet the needs of both facilities as well as provide a pool of trained scientists.

  3. Quantum resonances in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eykhorn, Yu. L.; Korotchenko, K. B.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.; Takabayashi, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Calculations based on the use of realistic potential of the system of crystallographic planes confirm earlier results on existence of resonances in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons by the crystal surface, if the crystallographic planes are parallel to the surface.The physical reason of predicted phenomena, similar to the band structure of transverse energy levels, is connected with the Bloch form of the wave functions of electrons (positrons) near the crystallographic planes, which appears both in the case of planar channeling of relativistic electrons (positrons) and in reflection by a crystal surface. Calculations show that positions of maxima in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons by crystal surface specifically depend on the angle of incidence with respect to the crystal surface and relativistic factor of electrons/positrons. These maxima form the Darwin tables similar to that in ultra-cold neutron diffraction.

  4. Multi-pair states in electron-positron pair creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöllert, Anton; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    Ultra strong electromagnetic fields can lead to spontaneous creation of single or multiple electron-positron pairs. A quantum field theoretical treatment of the pair creation process combined with numerical methods provides a description of the fermionic quantum field state, from which all observables of the multiple electron-positron pairs can be inferred. This allows to study the complex multi-particle dynamics of electron-positron pair creation in-depth, including multi-pair statistics as well as momentum distributions and spin. To illustrate the potential benefit of this approach, it is applied to the intermediate regime of pair creation between nonperturbative Schwinger pair creation and perturbative multiphoton pair creation where the creation of multi-pair states becomes nonnegligible but cascades do not yet set in. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how spin and helicity of the created electrons and positrons are affected by the polarization of the counterpropagating laser fields, which induce the creation of electron-positron pairs.

  5. Positron Creation Using the TITAN Short Pulse Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Liang, E.; Myatt, J.; Cone, K.; Elberson, L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Schneider, M.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D.; Tommasini, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2008-11-01

    Using ultra-intense lasers to generate positrons was theorized some time ago[1] and demonstrated in principle in two previous experiments[2] where small numbers of positrons were measured. Recently, new experiments were performed on the LLNL Titan laser to study positron creation, where the laser pulse length, pre-plasma condition, target material and thickness were varied. Using newly built positron spectrometers, copious positron production was observed with good signal-to-background ratio. Hot electron spectra (out to 100 MeV) and bremsstrahlung photons were measured simultaneously to further constrain models for the experiment. This talk will present detailed experimental results and their comparison with theory and previous experimental data. [1] Shearer et al, PRA,(1973);Liang, AIP Conf. Proc.(1994); Shkolnikov et al, APL,(1997), Liang, Wilks and Tabak, PRL(1998); Nakashima and Takabe, PoP,(2002); Myatt et al,PRE (2008).[2] Cowan et al, LPB(1999); Gahn et al, APL(1998)

  6. Solitary waves in asymmetric electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-10-01

    > By solving the coupled equations of the electromagnetic field and electrostatic potential, we investigate solitary waves in an asymmetric electron-positron plasma and/or electron-positron-ion plasmas with delicate features. It is found that the solutions of the coupled equations can capture multipeak structures of solitary waves in the case of cold plasma, which are left out by using the long-wavelength approximation. By considering the effect of ion motion with respect to non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic temperature plasmas, we find that the ions' mobility can lead to larger-amplitude solitary waves; especially, this becomes more obvious for a high-temperature plasma. The effects of asymmetric temperature between electrons and positrons and the ion fraction on the solitary waves are also studied and presented. It is shown that the amplitudes of solitary waves decrease with positron temperature in asymmetric temperature electron-positron plasmas and decrease also with ion concentration.

  7. PET iterative reconstruction incorporating an efficient positron range correction method.

    PubMed

    Bertolli, Ottavia; Eleftheriou, Afroditi; Cecchetti, Matteo; Camarlinghi, Niccolò; Belcari, Nicola; Tsoumpas, Charalampos

    2016-02-01

    Positron range is one of the main physical effects limiting the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) images. If positrons travel inside a magnetic field, for instance inside a nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) tomograph, the mean range will be smaller but still significant. In this investigation we examined a method to correct for the positron range effect in iterative image reconstruction by including tissue-specific kernels in the forward projection operation. The correction method was implemented within STIR library (Software for Tomographic Image Reconstruction). In order to obtain the positron annihilation distribution of various radioactive isotopes in water and lung tissue, simulations were performed with the Monte Carlo package GATE [Jan et al. 2004 [1

  8. Distribution and detection of positrons from an orbiting nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Hones, E W; Higbie, P R

    1989-04-28

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer has on many occasions detected nuclear radiation produced by nuclear reactors carried on Soviet satellites. A unique feature of the observations is the measurement of bursts of 511-kiloelectron volt gamma rays that are thought to signal SMM encounters with positrons emanating from the Soviet satellites. A model of positron generation by an orbiting reactor has been developed that describes the resulting time-dependent distribution of positrons temporarily trapped in the geomagnetic field and estimates the response of the SMM spectrometer to passage through such distributions. The model successfully predicts onset times, durations, and intensities of the 511-kiloelectron volt gamma bursts, as we illustrate in a detailed analysis of one event, and thus confirms that these are due to positrons from the Soviet satellites. Reactor-generated positrons are potentially useful in magnetospheric research. PMID:17807611

  9. Nonlinear positron-acoustic waves in fully relativistic degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The nonlinear positron-acoustic (PA) waves propagating in a fully relativistic electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma (containing degenerate electrons and positrons, and immobile heavy ions) have been theoretically investigated. A fully relativistic hydrodynamic model, which is consistent with the relativistic principle has been used, and the reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the dynamical Korteweg-de Vries equation. The dynamics of electrons as well as positrons, and the presence of immobile heavy ions are taken into account. It is found that the effects of relativistic degeneracy of electrons and positrons, static heavy ions, plasma particles velocity, enthalpy, etc have significantly modified the basic properties of the PA solitary waves propagating in the fully relativistic EPI plasmas. The application of the results of our present work in astrophysical compact objects such as white dwarfs and neutron stars, etc are briefly discussed.

  10. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured. PMID:23742543