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Sample records for berkeley lab revision

  1. Guidelines for generators to meet HWHF acceptance requirements for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes at Berkeley Lab. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides performance standards that one, as a generator of hazardous chemical, radioactive, or mixed wastes at the Berkeley Lab, must meet to manage their waste to protect Berkeley Lab staff and the environment, comply with waste regulations and ensure the continued safe operation of the workplace, have the waste transferred to the correct Waste Handling Facility, and enable the Environment, Health and Safety (EH and S) Division to properly pick up, manage, and ultimately send the waste off site for recycling, treatment, or disposal. If one uses and generates any of these wastes, one must establish a Satellite Accumulation Area and follow the guidelines in the appropriate section of this document. Topics include minimization of wastes, characterization of the wastes, containers, segregation, labeling, empty containers, and spill cleanup and reporting.

  2. Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, N.

    2008-03-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers. The result is an energy efficient high-performing sustainable laboratory.

  3. Lawrence Berkeley Lab Indexing Toolbox

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-09-08

    The Lawrence Berkeley Lab Indexing Toolbox is intended to be used in the context of X-ray crystallography experiments involving biological macromolecules. Macromolecules such as proteins form 3-dimensional periodic arrays (crystal) which in turn lead to lattice-like diffraction patterns when the crystal sample is irradiated with collimated X-rays from a synchrotron or other X-ray source. Once the diffraction pattern is captured on an imaging device the next step is to deduce the periodic nature of themore » crystal sample, along with its internal symmetry. this analysis, known as "indexing" is a well-studied problem. However, there are no other implementations designed to operate in an automated setting, in which the human experimentalist is not prosent to manually verify the results of indexing. In particular LABELIT uses three novel algorithms to facilitate automation: a more robust way to verify the position of the incident X-ray beam on the image, a better way to verify that the deduced lattice is consistent with the observed crystal lattice, and new method to deduce the internal symmetry from measurements of the lattice. Moreover, the algorithms are implemented in a Python framework that permits indexing to fail (in rare cases) without crashing the program, thus allowing the software to be incorporated in robotic systems where unattended operation is expected. It will be especially useful for high throughput operations at snychrotron beamlines.« less

  4. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  5. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    ScienceCinema

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2013-05-29

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  6. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    ScienceCinema

    Ivan Berry

    2013-06-24

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  7. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Berry

    2012-07-30

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  8. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John A

    2008-12-12

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  9. Microbes to Biomes at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-28

    Microbes are the Earth's most abundant and diverse form of life. Berkeley Lab's Microbes to Biomes initiative -- which will take advantage of research expertise at the Joint Genome Institute, Advanced Light Source, Molecular Foundry, and the new computational science facility -- is designed to explore and reveal the interactions of microbes with one another and with their environment. Microbes power our planet’s biogeochemical cycles, provide nutrients to our plants, purify our water and are integral components in keeping the human body free of disease and may hold the key to the Earth’s future.

  10. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2014-09-15

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  11. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2013-05-17

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  12. Berkeley Lab: A Place of Wonder, Spring 2006

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    Video produced in early 2006. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab has been a leader in science and engineering research for more than 75 years. The Lab conducts a wide range of scientific research with key efforts in fundamental studies of the universe, quantitative biology, nanoscience, new energy systems and environmental solutions, and the use of computing as a tool for discovery. Located on a 200 acre site in the hills above the University of California's Berkeley campus, adjacent to the San Francisco Bay, Berkeley Lab holds the distinction of being the oldest of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories. Eleven Nobel laureates are associated with Berkeley Lab. It is managed by the University of California.

  13. Molecular Foundry Workshop draws overflow crowd to BerkeleyLab

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2002-11-27

    Nanoscale science and technology is now one of the top research priorities in the United States. With this background, it is no surprise that an overflow crowd or more than 350 registrants filled two auditoriums to hear about and contribute ideas for the new Molecular Foundry during a two-day workshop at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Scheduled to open for business at Berkeley Labin early 2006, the Molecular Foundry is one of three Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) put forward for funding by the DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES).

  14. Nuclear Medicine at Berkeley Lab: From Pioneering Beginnings to Today (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Budinger, Thomas [LBNL, Center for Functional Imaging

    2011-10-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Thomas Budinger, head of Berkeley Lab's Center for Functional Imaging, discusses Berkeley Lab's rich history pioneering the field of nuclear medicine, from radioisotopes to medical imaging.

  15. Berkeley Lab Answers Your Home Energy Efficiency Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain

    2013-02-14

    In this follow-up "Ask Berkeley Lab" video, energy efficiency expert Iain Walker answers some of your questions about home energy efficiency. How do you monitor which appliances use the most energy? Should you replace your old windows? Are photovoltaic systems worth the cost? What to do about a leaky house? And what's the single biggest energy user in your home? Watch the video to get the answers to these and more questions.

  16. Berkeley Lab Answers Your Home Energy Efficiency Questions

    ScienceCinema

    Walker, Iain

    2013-11-14

    In this follow-up "Ask Berkeley Lab" video, energy efficiency expert Iain Walker answers some of your questions about home energy efficiency. How do you monitor which appliances use the most energy? Should you replace your old windows? Are photovoltaic systems worth the cost? What to do about a leaky house? And what's the single biggest energy user in your home? Watch the video to get the answers to these and more questions.

  17. Better Batteries for Transportation: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Vince

    2011-01-01

    Vince Battaglia leads a behind-the-scenes tour of Berkeley Lab's BATT, the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Program he leads, where researchers aim to improve batteries upon which the range, efficiency, and power of tomorrow's electric cars will depend. This is the first in a forthcoming series of videos taking viewers into the laboratories and research facilities that members of the public rarely get to see.

  18. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    ScienceCinema

    Walker, Iain

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere ? university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  19. Better Batteries for Transportation: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema

    Battaglia, Vince

    2013-05-29

    Vince Battaglia leads a behind-the-scenes tour of Berkeley Lab's BATT, the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Program he leads, where researchers aim to improve batteries upon which the range, efficiency, and power of tomorrow's electric cars will depend. This is the first in a forthcoming series of videos taking viewers into the laboratories and research facilities that members of the public rarely get to see.

  20. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    ScienceCinema

    Sanii, Babak

    2013-05-29

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  1. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sanii, Babak

    2011-01-01

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  2. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  3. Berkeley Lab Sheds Light on Improving Solar Cell Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2007-07-20

    Typical manufacturing methods produce solar cells with an efficiency of 12-15%; and 14% efficiency is the bare minimum for achieving a profit. In work performed at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA, 5 10-486-577 1)--a US Department of Energy national laboratory that conducts unclassified scientific research and is managed by the University of California--scientist Scott McHugo has obtained keen insights into the impaired performance of solar cells manufactured from polycrystalline silicon. The solar cell market is potentially vast, according to Berkeley Lab. Lightweight solar panels are highly beneficial for providing electrical power to remote locations in developing nations, since there is no need to build transmission lines or truck-in generator fuel. Moreover, industrial nations confronted with diminishing resources have active programs aimed at producing improved, less expensive solar cells. 'In a solar cell, there is a junction between p-type silicon and an n-type layer, such as diffused-in phosphorous', explained McHugo, who is now with Berkeley Lab's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. 'When sunlight is absorbed, it frees electrons, which start migrating in a random-walk fashion toward that junction. If the electrons make it to the junction; they contribute to the cell's output of electric current. Often, however, before they reach the junction, they recombine at specific sites in the crystal' (and, therefore, cannot contribute to current output). McHugo scrutinized a map of a silicon wafer in which sites of high recombination appeared as dark regions. Previously, researchers had shown that such phenomena occurred not primarily at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline material, as might be expected, but more often at dislocations in the crystal. However, the dislocations themselves were not the problem. Using a unique heat treatment technique, McHugo performed electrical measurements to investigate the material

  4. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, Michael

    2002-12-17

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  5. Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR) for Linux Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, Paul H.; Duell, Jason C.

    2006-07-26

    This article describes the motivation, design andimplementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-levelcheckpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets thespace of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI.Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing andfault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and spaceefficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of anyapplication-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointingallows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to "faultprecursors" (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory ornetwork CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can alsoincrease the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idlecycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period orreallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fittingjobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting largejobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit thelength of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuabletool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters.

  6. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, Paul H.; Duell, Jason C.

    2006-09-01

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters.

  7. Guidelines for the segregation characterization management of dry waste at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Managing and disposing of dry low level radioactive waste at Berkeley Lab. is problematic. The Waste Management Group must assure off site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that dry waste from Berkeley Lab. is free of liquids and regulated metals (such as lead and mercury). RTR (Real Time Radioagraphy) used for waste to be rejected. This pamphlet helps to clarify dry waste management requirements that will ensure that Berkeley Lab. dry waste will be accepted for off site shipment. These issues are critical if we are to have an off site disposal option for your dry radioactive waste.

  8. Energy Efficient Buildings and Appliances: From Berkeley Lab to the Marketplace (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Rosenfeld, Art [Commissioner, California Energy Commission

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Art Rosenfeld, an appointee to the California Energy Commission and one of the architects of energy efficiency research at Berkeley Lab in the 1970s, discusses what it takes to shepherd innovative energy efficiency research from the lab to the real world.

  9. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    ScienceCinema

    Gray, Joe

    2013-05-29

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  10. The design and implementation of Berkeley Lab's linuxcheckpoint/restart

    SciTech Connect

    Duell, Jason

    2005-04-30

    This paper describes Berkeley Linux Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a linux kernel module that allows system-level checkpoints on a variety of Linux systems. BLCR can be used either as a stand alone system for checkpointing applications on a single machine, or as a component by a scheduling system or parallel communication library for checkpointing and restoring parallel jobs running on multiple machines. Integration with Message Passing Interface (MPI) and other parallel systems is described.

  11. Popular Berkeley Lab X-ray Data Booklet reissued

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2001-03-02

    X-ray scientists and synchrotron-radiation users who have been patiently waiting for an updated version of the popular X-Ray Data Booklet last published in 1986 by the Center for X-Ray Optics at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory can breathe a sigh of relief. The venerable ''little orange book'' has now been reissued under the auspices of CXRO and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with an April printing of 10,000 paper copies and the posting of a Web edition at http://xdb.lbl.gov.

  12. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  13. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  14. Revising Geology Labs To Explicitly Use the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannula, Kimberly A.

    2003-01-01

    Proposes that content- or skill-based labs can be revised to explicitly involve the scientific method by asking students to propose hypotheses before making observations. Students' self-assessment showed they felt that they learned a great deal from this style of labs and found the labs to be fun; however, students felt that they learned little…

  15. Solar Fridges and Personal Power Grids: How Berkeley Lab is Fighting Global Poverty (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Buluswar, Shashi; Gadgil, Ashok

    2012-11-26

    At this November 26, 2012 Science at the Theater, scientists discussed the recently launched LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies (LIGTT) at Berkeley Lab. LIGTT is an ambitious mandate to discover and develop breakthrough technologies for combating global poverty. It was created with the belief that solutions will require more advanced R&D and a deep understanding of market needs in the developing world. Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil, Shashi Buluswar and seven other LIGTT scientists discussed what it takes to develop technologies that will impact millions of people. These include: 1) Fuel efficient stoves for clean cooking: Our scientists are improving the Berkeley Darfur Stove, a high efficiency stove used by over 20,000 households in Darfur; 2) The ultra-low energy refrigerator: A lightweight, low-energy refrigerator that can be mounted on a bike so crops can survive the trip from the farm to the market; 3) The solar OB suitcase: A low-cost package of the five most critical biomedical devices for maternal and neonatal clinics; 4) UV Waterworks: A device for quickly, safely and inexpensively disinfecting water of harmful microorganisms.

  16. New Berkeley Lab Report Tracks a Decade of PV Installed Cost Trends

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Peterman, Carla; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-04-15

    U.S. PV market, the vast majority of the systems in the data sample are located in California (83%, by capacity) and New Jersey (12%), The remaining systems are located in Arizona, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. The PV systems in the dataset range in size from 100 W to 1.3 MW, almost 90% of which are smaller than 10 kW. This article briefly summarizes some of the key findings from the Berkeley Lab study (the full report can be downloaded at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/re-pubs.html). The article begins by summarizing trends related to the installed cost of PV systems prior to receipt of any financial incentives, and then discusses how changes in incentive levels over time and variation across states have impacted the net installed cost of PV to the customer, after receipt of incentives. Note that all cost and incentive data are presented in real 2007 dollars (2007$), and all capacity and dollars-perwatt ($/W) data are presented in terms of rated module power output under Standard Test Conditions (DC-STC).

  17. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  18. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-07-02

    In connection with the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 67 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 35 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. This paper contains a list of the CD-ROMs available.

  19. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-03-12

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 89 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 45 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access.

  20. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-01-16

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 72 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 37 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server ``cedrcd.lbl.gov``. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access. Please contact Deane Merrill (dwmerrill@lbl.gov) if you wish to make use of the data.

  1. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records frommore » IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of the frame and divider elements and corresponding edge-of-glass areas (based on generic correlations); The total solar and visible transmittance and reflectances of the glazing system. Color properties, i.e. L*, a*, and b* color coordinates, dominant wavelength, and purity for transmitted and reflected (outdoor) solar radiation; The damage-weighted transmittance of the glazing system between 0.3 an 0.38 microns; The angular dependence of the solar and visible transmittances, solar and visible reflectances, solar absorptance, and solar heat gain coefficient of the glazing system; The percent relative humidity of the inside and outside air for which condensation will occur on the interior and exterior glazing surfaces respectively; The center-of-glass temperature distribution.« less

  2. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    SciTech Connect

    Curcija, Dragan Charlie; Zhu, Ling; Czarnecki, Stephen; Mitchell, Robin D.; Kohler, Christian; Vidanovic, Simon V.; Huizenga, Charlie

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records from IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of the frame and divider elements and corresponding edge-of-glass areas (based on generic correlations); The total solar and visible transmittance and reflectances of the glazing system. Color properties, i.e. L*, a*, and b* color coordinates, dominant wavelength, and purity for transmitted and reflected (outdoor) solar radiation; The damage-weighted transmittance of the glazing system between 0.3 an 0.38 microns; The angular dependence of the solar and visible transmittances, solar and visible reflectances, solar absorptance, and solar heat gain coefficient of the glazing system; The percent relative humidity of the inside and outside air for which condensation will occur on the interior and exterior glazing surfaces respectively; The center-of-glass temperature distribution.

  3. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-10

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

  4. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    ... Directing mesenchymal stem cells to bone to ... Accounts of Chemical Research 44, 666 (2011). ... and C. R. Bertozzi. Cell surface glycoproteomic analysis of prostate cancer-derived PC-3 cells. ...

  5. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595–605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually. PMID:25713083

  6. Berkeley Researchers Create an Invisibility Cloak

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    A team led by Xiang Zhang, a principal investigator with Berkeley Labs Materials Sciences Division and director of UC Berkeley's Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center, has created a carpet cloak from nanostructured silicon that conceals the presence of objects placed under it from optical detection. (Video by Jensen Li) http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/05/01/invisibility-cloak/

  7. Berkeley Lab Scientists Create Molecular Paper

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    These fluorescence microscope images show free-floating peptoid nanosheets in liquid. Each peptoid sheet is just two molecules thick yet up to hundreds of square micrometers in area—a molecular paper large enough to be visible to the naked eye.

  8. Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart for Linux

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-11-15

    This package implements system-level checkpointing of scientific applications mnning on Linux clusters in a manner suitable for implementing preemption, migration and fault recovery by a batch scheduler The design includes documented interfaces for a cooperating application or library to implement extensions to the checkpoint system, such as consistent checkpointing of distnbuted MPI applications Using this package with an appropnate MPI implementation, the vast majority of scientific applications which use MPI for communucation are checkpointable withoutmore » any modifications to the application source code. Extending VMAdump code used in the bproc system, the BLCR kemel modules provide three additional features necessary for useful system-level checkpointing of scientific applications(installation of bproc is not required to use BLCR) First, this package provides the bookkeeping and coordination required for checkpointing and restoring multi-threaded and multi-process applications mnning on a single node Secondly, this package provides a system call interface allowing checkpoints to be requested by any aufhonzed process, such as a batch scheduler. Thirdly, this package provides a system call interface allowing applications and/or application libraries to extend the checkpoint capabilities in user space, for instance to proide coordination of checkpoints of distritsuted MPI applications. The "Iibcr" library in this package implements a wrapper around the system call interface exported by the kemel modules, and mantains bookkeeping to allow registration of callbacks by runtime libraries This library also provides the necesary thread-saftety and signal-safety mechanisms Thus, this library provides the means for applications and run-time libranes, such as MPI, to register callback functions to be run when a checkpoint is taken or when restarting from one. This library may also be used as a LD_PRELOAD to enable checkpointing of applications with development releases of BLCR (which cannot preempt unmodified applications otherwise). This package also includes simple command line utilities to request a checkpoint or restart of a process. These provide the means for a user, system administrator, or batch scheduler to use BLCR.« less

  9. Berkeley College, Yale University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, James S.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the controversial architectural technique of combining contemporary features with traditional designs at Yale University's Berkeley College, and discusses whether there is a place for this type of juxtaposition in architectural design. Photos and diagrams are included. (GR)

  10. Berkeley CMB Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, P. L.

    This paper describes the status of four CMB cosmology experiments which are currently being developed by the Berkeley group. These include the APEXSZ and South Pole Telescope searches for clusters of galaxies using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and the Polar Bear and EBEX CMB polarization anisotropy experiments. These experiments exploit new detector technologies with Superconducting TES bolometers and frequency domain output multiplexing, which has been developed at Berkeley.

  11. Graduate Education at Berkeley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duster, Troy

    1987-01-01

    Explains the history and orientation of Berkeley's graduate program in sociology which leans more toward the European than the U.S. tradition of postgraduate education. The doctoral student is most likely the principal architect of the research design and sole collector of primary data for the dissertation. The program emphasizes negotiation and a…

  12. Magnetic measurements at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Barale, P.; Callapp, L.; Case-Fortier, M.; Lerner, D.; Nelson, D.; Schermer, R.; Skipper, G.; Van Dyke, D.; Cork, C.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.; Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Harten, T.; Luchini, K.; Milburn, J.; Tanabe, J.; Zucca, F.; Keller, R.; Selph, F.; Gilbert, W.; Green, M.A.; O`Neil, J.; Schafer, R.; Taylor, C.; Greiman, W.; Hall, D.; MacFarlane, J.

    1991-08-01

    Recent magnetic measurement activities at LBL have been concentrated in two separate areas, electro-magnets and permanent magnets for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). A survey of the many different measurement systems is presented. These include: AC magnetic measurements of an ALS booster dipole engineering model magnet, dipole moment measurements of permanent magnet blocks for ALS wigglers and undulators, permeability measurements of samples destined for wiggler and undulator poles, harmonic error analysis of SSC one meter model dipoles and quadrupoles and five meter long SSC prototype quadrupoles, harmonic error analysis of ALS dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles, precision Hall probe mapping of ALS storage ring combined function magnets, and the design of the ALS insertion device magnets mapping system. We also describe a new UNIX based data acquisition system that is being developed for the SSC. Probes used for magnetic measurements include Helmholtz coils, integral coils, point coils, and bucking harmonic analysis coils, several different types of Hall probes, and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers. Both analog and digital integrators are used with the coils. Some problems that occurred and their rectification is described. The mechanisms used include rotating systems with optical encoders, X-Y mapping systems with optical encoders and a laser position measuring device. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  14. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Norman, E. B.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  15. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  16. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Berkeley's moral philosophy.

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, G

    1990-01-01

    Berkeley held that the moral duty of mankind was to obey God's laws; that--since God was a benevolent Creator--the object of His laws must be to promote the welfare and flourishing of mankind; and that, accordingly, humans could identify their moral duties by asking what system of laws for conduct would in fact tend to promote that object. This position--which is akin to that of 'rule' Utilitarianism--is neither unfamiliar nor manifestly untenable. He was surely mistaken, however, in his further supposition that, if this theory were accepted, the resolution of all (or most) particular moral dilemmas would be simple and straightforward. PMID:2181141

  18. Berkeley automated supernova search

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  19. Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-02-29

    The Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser provides graphical browsing functionality for genomic data organized, at a minimum, by sequence and position. While supporting the annotation browsing features typical of many other genomic browsers, additional emphasis is placed on viewing and utilizing quantitative data. Data may be read from GFF, SGR, FASTA or any column delimited format. Once the data has been read into the browser's buffer, it may be searched. filtered or subjected to mathematical transformation.more » The browser also supplies some graphical design manipulation functionality geared towards preparing figures for presentations or publication. A plug-in mechanism enables development outside the core functionality that adds more advanced or esoteric analysis capabilities. BBrowse's development and distribution is open-source and has been built to run on Linux, OSX and MS Windows operating systems.« less

  20. Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser

    SciTech Connect

    Hechmer, Aaron

    2008-02-29

    The Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser provides graphical browsing functionality for genomic data organized, at a minimum, by sequence and position. While supporting the annotation browsing features typical of many other genomic browsers, additional emphasis is placed on viewing and utilizing quantitative data. Data may be read from GFF, SGR, FASTA or any column delimited format. Once the data has been read into the browser's buffer, it may be searched. filtered or subjected to mathematical transformation. The browser also supplies some graphical design manipulation functionality geared towards preparing figures for presentations or publication. A plug-in mechanism enables development outside the core functionality that adds more advanced or esoteric analysis capabilities. BBrowse's development and distribution is open-source and has been built to run on Linux, OSX and MS Windows operating systems.

  1. Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika; Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank; Becker, Alex

    2007-01-01

    The Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) is an optimally designed active electromagnetic system that not only detects but also characterizes UXO. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters and eight pairs of differenced receivers. it has two modes of operation: (1) search mode, in which BUD moves along a profile and exclusively detects targets in its vicinity, providing target depth and horizontal location, and (2) discrimination mode, in which BUD, stationary above a target, from a single position, determines three discriminating polarizability responses together with the object location and orientation. The performance of the system is governed by a target size-depth curve. Maximum detection depth is 1.5 m. While UXO objects have a single major polarizability coincident with the long axis of the object and two equal transverse polarizabilities, scrap metal has three different principal polarizabilities. The results clearly show that there are very clear distinctions between symmetric intact UXO and irregular scrap metal, and that BUD can resolve the intrinsic polarizabilities of the target. The field survey at the Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona showed excellent results within the predicted size-depth range.

  2. Berkeley Disk Resource Manager

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-02-27

    The Berkeley Disk Resource Manager (B-DRM) is a middleware component whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of a shared disk system on the Grid. It provides space allocation and dynamic information on storage availability for the planning and execution of Grid jobs. The B-DRM manages two types of resources: space and files. Vi1en managing space, the B-DRM allocates space to the requesting client based on a default space quota, Thenmore » managing files, the B-DRM allocates space for files, invokes file transfer services to move files into the space, pins files for a certain lifetime, releases files upon the client’s request, and uses file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. The B-DRM is designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and making dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, the B-DRM performs automatic garbage collection of unused files when space is needed by removing selected files that were released by the client or whose lifetime has expired. The BDRM supports requests to get multiple files in a single call, manages a queue of the requested files, brings in as many files as the space quota permits, and continues to reuse the space when files are released to stream files to the client until the entire request is satisfied. Similarly, the B-DRM supports requests to put multiple files into its space, streaming files into the allocated space and reusing the space if necessary.« less

  3. Berkeley Disk Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex; Gu, Junmin

    2004-02-27

    The Berkeley Disk Resource Manager (B-DRM) is a middleware component whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of a shared disk system on the Grid. It provides space allocation and dynamic information on storage availability for the planning and execution of Grid jobs. The B-DRM manages two types of resources: space and files. Vi1en managing space, the B-DRM allocates space to the requesting client based on a default space quota, Then managing files, the B-DRM allocates space for files, invokes file transfer services to move files into the space, pins files for a certain lifetime, releases files upon the client’s request, and uses file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. The B-DRM is designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and making dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, the B-DRM performs automatic garbage collection of unused files when space is needed by removing selected files that were released by the client or whose lifetime has expired. The BDRM supports requests to get multiple files in a single call, manages a queue of the requested files, brings in as many files as the space quota permits, and continues to reuse the space when files are released to stream files to the client until the entire request is satisfied. Similarly, the B-DRM supports requests to put multiple files into its space, streaming files into the allocated space and reusing the space if necessary.

  4. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ES&H self-assessmentprogram

    SciTech Connect

    Chernowski, John G.

    2003-02-11

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is a multiprogram national research facility operated by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). DOE environment, safety, and health (ES&H) policy requires that all Berkeley Lab work be performed safely, with minimal adverse impact on the public and the environment. To facilitate safe and responsible work, Berkeley Lab divisions, directorates, and select departments must develop and implement Integrated Safety Management (ISM) plans. Berkeley Lab operates a formal internal ES&H self-assessment process to evaluate ES&H programs and policies and assure that ISM is implemented at all levels of activities and operations. ISM requires that: (1) work is defined, (2) hazards are identified, (3) controls are developed and implemented, (4) work is performed as authorized, and (5) feedback and improvement are continuous. These five ISM core functions are sustained by applying the seven guiding principles of ISM. These are: (1) line management responsibility and accountability for ES&H, (2) clear ES&H roles and responsibilities, (3) competency commensurate with responsibilities, (4) an ongoing balance between safety on the one hand and research and operational priorities on the other, (5) identification of standards and requirements, (6) hazard controls tailored to the work, and (7) operations authorization. Self-assessment at Berkeley Lab is a continuous process of information gathering and evaluation. The goals of the self-assessment program are: (a) Ensure that work activities and operations are done safely and in a manner that maximizes public and environmental protection. (b) Ensure that the five core functions and seven guiding principles of integrated safety management are employed effectively in work planning and performance. (c) Meet regulatory requirements for DOE oversight, self-assessment, and an integrated safety management system. (d) Meet contractual requirements for ES

  5. 76 FR 37650 - Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina... Berkeley Pier, Berkeley, CA in support of the 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display... used in the fireworks display. Background and Purpose The City of Berkeley Marina will sponsor the...

  6. Free Speech Advocates at Berkeley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, William A.; Whittaker, David

    1966-01-01

    This study compares highly committed members of the Free Speech Movement (FSM) at Berkeley with the student population at large on 3 sociopsychological foci: general biographical data, religious orientation, and rigidity-flexibility. Questionnaires were administered to 172 FSM members selected by chance from the 10 to 1200 who entered and "sat-in"…

  7. SERENDIP: The Berkeley SETI Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    UC Berkeley's SERENDIP program is an ongoing effort in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. It searches for stable narrowband spectral features in the radio frequency spectrum which could conceivably be a signaling beacon sent by an alien civilization. SERENDIP is a backronym 1 for the Search for Extraterrestrial Radio Emissions from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations.

  8. Berkeley, Still the Capital of Desegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laval S.

    1980-01-01

    Attempts to demonstrate why the public schools in Berkeley, California could be successfully desegregated. Describes some of the facets of the Berkeley desegregation model and the characteristics of the school system that made it amenable to desegregation. (MK)

  9. Results of the SNS front end commissioning at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ratti, A.; Ayers, J.J.; Doolittle, L.; Greer, J.B.; Keller, R.; Lewis, S.; Lionberger, C.; Monroy, M.; Pruyn, J.; Staples, J.W.; Syversrude, D.; Thomae, R.; Virostek, S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Shea, T.; SNS Accelerator Physics Group; SNS Beam Diagnostics Collaboration

    2002-08-16

    The Front-End Systems (FES) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project comprise an rf-driven H{sup -} ion source, an electrostatic 2-lens LEBT, a 2.5 MeV RFQ, followed by a 14-quadrupole, 4-rebuncher MEBT including traveling-wave fast choppers. The nominal 2.5 MeV H{sup -} beam has a current of 38 mA at a repetition rate of 60 Hz and 1 ms pulse length, for a macro duty-factor of 6%, and is chopped at a rate of approximately 1 MHz with a mini duty-factor of 68%. The normalized rms beam emittance at the MEBT exit, matching the first tank of a 402.5 MHz Alvarez linac, is measured to be approximately 0.3 {pi} mm mrad. Diagnostic elements include wire scanners, BPMs, fast current monitors, a slit-harp emittance device and RFQ field monitoring probes. The results of the beam commissioning and the operation of the RFQ and diagnostic instrumentation are reported. The entire FES was shut down at LBNL at the end of May 2002 and will be recommissioned at ORNL prior to installation of the drift-tube linac.

  10. #AskBerkeleyLab: Cost and Availability of Healthy Food

    SciTech Connect

    Buluswar, Shashi

    2014-10-22

    Shashi Buluswar, Executive Director at the LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies, answers a question from Ashley on why healthy food costs so much and is not available in low-income neighborhoods.

  11. Berkeley Lab to Help Build Straw Bale Building

    SciTech Connect

    Worsham, S.A.; Van Mechelen, G.

    1998-12-01

    The Shorebird Environmental Learning Center (SELC) is a new straw bale building that will showcase current and future technologies and techniques that will reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations. The building will also serve as a living laboratory to test systems and monitor their performance. The project will be the model for a building process that stops using our precious resources and reduces waste pollution. The rice straw that will be used for the bale construction is generally waste material that is typically burned--millions of tons of it a year--especially in California's San Joaquin Valley. Buildings have significant impacts on the overall environment. Building operations, including lighting, heating, and cooling, consume about 30% of the energy used in the United States. Building construction and the processes into making building materials consume an additional 8% of total energy. Construction also accounts for 39% of wood consumed in the U S, while 25% of solid waste volume is construction and demolition (C &D) debris. The SELC will incorporate a variety of materials and techniques that will address these and other issues, while providing a model of environmentally considered design for Bay Area residents and builders. Environmental considerations include energy use in construction and operations, selection of materials, waste minimization, and indoor air quality. We have developed five major environmental goals for this project: (1) Minimize energy use in construction and operations; (2) Employ material sources that are renewable, salvaged, recycled, and/or recyclable; (3) Increase building lifespan with durable materials and designs that permit flexibility and modification with minimal demolition; (4) Reduce and strive to eliminate construction debris; and (5) Avoid products that create toxic pollutants and make a healthy indoor environment.

  12. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-07-07

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory.

  13. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STUB OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ROOF BLOCKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF 51A TO SECOND FLOOR EXTERIOR EXIT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-066). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. PUMP MOUNTS, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR MOTORS OPPOSITE SWITCHGEAR RACKS, MECHANIC SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-108). March 2005. FAN ROOM WITH STAIR TO FILTER BANKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-143). March 2005. BUILDING 51A, EXTERIOR WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-005). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, AIR DUCT OPENINGS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR ROOM, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-107). March 2005. NORTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. REMNANTS OF HYDRAULIC FIXTURES, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-082). June 2005. CEILING AND CRANE OF BUILDING 51A, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-106). March 2005. SOUTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CENTRAL SUPPORT COLUMN EXTENDING THROUGH CRANES AND ROOF SUPPORT TRUSS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-052). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR TO SECOND FLOOR OF MECHANICAL WINE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-087). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-110). March 2005. SOUTH FAN FROM MEZZANINE, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CABLE RACEWAYS, CATWALK, AND WINDOWS OF OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-054). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-004). March 2005. ENTRY TO IGLOO, ILLUSTRATING THICKNESS OF IGLOO WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-077). March 2005. STUB OF SUPERHILAC BEAM, ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection XBD200503-00117-089). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, CONCRETE FOUNDATION FOR EQUIPMENT MOUNTS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-043). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, PLUNGING MECHANISM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-027). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-026). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, LOOKING TOWARD EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-047). March 2005. AREA OF MAGNET REMOVAL, NORTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. WALL AND WINDOW OVERLOOKING MAGNET ROOM, SECOND STORY OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SIDE OF MAGNET OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. END OF BEAMLINE LEAVING SHIELDING, MAGNET COILS IN EPOXY, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. FLOOR AND CEILING OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON IN CENTER OF MAGNET ROOM - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. MAGNET OF BEAMLINE, EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-158). March 2005. CONNECTION OF MAGNET ROOM CRANE TO OUTER TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ENTRANCE TO STAIRWAY TO TUNNEL UNDER MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-006). March 2005. JACKBOLTS BETWEEN MAGNET AND MAGNET FOUNDATION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-015). March 2005. INTERIOR WALL OF MAGNET INSIDE CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-012). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER QUADRANT AND DIFFUSION PUMPS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-050). March 2005. DIFFUSION PUMPS UNDER WEST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  17. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Chartock, Mike; Hansen, Todd

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  18. 77 FR 37604 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA... enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in the Captain of the... necessary to protect life and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated with the...

  19. 78 FR 29022 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA... enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in the Captain of the... necessary to protect life and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated with the...

  20. The Berkeley Digital Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, B.; Dreger, D.; Neuhauser, D.; Karavas, W.; Hellweg, M.; Uhrhammer, R.; Lombard, P.; Friday, J.; Lellinger, R.; Gardner, J.; McKenzie, M. R.; Bresloff, C.

    2007-05-01

    Since it began monitoring earthquakes in northern California 120 years ago, the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) has been striving to produce the highest quality and most complete seismic data possible in the most modern way. This goal has influenced choices in instrumentation, installation and telemetry, as well as the investment in expertise and manpower. Since the transition to broadband (BB) instrumentation in the mid- 1980s and to a fully digitally telemetered network in the early 1990s, we have continued these efforts. Each of our 25 BB installations includes three component BB seismometers (STS-1s or STS-2) and digital accelerometers to capture the full range of ground motion from distant teleseisms to large, nearby earthquakes (almost 250 dB). The ground motion is recorded on-site by 24 bit dataloggers. Additional environmental parameters, such as temperature and pressure, are also monitored continuously. Many stations record also C-GPS data that is transmitted continuously to the BSL via shared real-time telemetry. The BDSN's first stations were installed in abandoned mines. In the last 15 years, we developed installations using buried shipping containers to reduce environmental noise and provide security and easy access to the equipment. Data are transmitted in real-time at several sampling rates to one or more processing centers, using frame relay, radio, microwave, and/or satellite. Each site has 7-30 days of onsite data storage to guard against data loss during telemetry outages. Each station is supplied with backup batteries to provide power for 3 days. The BDSN real-time data acquisition, earthquake analysis and archiving computers are housed in a building built to "emergency grade" seismic standards, with air conditioning and power backed up by a UPS and a large generator. Data latency and power are monitored by automated processes that alert staff via pager and email. Data completeness and timing quality are automatically assessed on a daily

  1. Star Formation near Berkeley 59: Embedded Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosvick, J. M.; Majaess, D.

    2013-12-01

    A group of suspected protostars in a dark cloud northwest of the young (~2 Myr) cluster Berkeley 59 and two sources in a pillar south of the cluster have been studied in order to determine their evolutionary stages and ascertain whether their formation was triggered by Berkeley 59. Narrowband near-infrared observations from the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, 12CO (J = 3-2) and SCUBA-2 (450 and 850 μm) observations from the JCMT, 2MASS, and WISE images, and data extracted from the IPHAS survey catalog were used. Of 12 sources studied, two are Class I objects, while three others are flat/Class II, one of which is a T Tauri candidate. A weak CO outflow and two potential starless cores are present in the cloud, while the pillar possesses substructure at different velocities, with no outflows present. The CO spectra of both regions show peaks in the range v LSR = -15 to -17 km s-1, which agrees with the velocity adopted for Berkeley 59 (-15.7 km s-1), while spectral energy distribution models yield an average interstellar extinction AV and distance of 15 ± 2 mag and 830 ± 120 pc, respectively, for the cloud, and 6.9 mag and 912 pc for the pillar, indicating that the regions are in the same vicinity as Berkeley 59. The formation of the pillar source appears to have been triggered by Berkeley 59. It is unclear whether Berkeley 59 triggered the association's formation.

  2. The anticentre old open clusters Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34 and Berkeley 36: new additions to the BOCCE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P.; Bragaglia, A.; Cignoni, M.; Cocozza, G.; Tosi, M.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation of the evolutionary status of three open clusters: Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34 and Berkeley 36, all located in the Galactic anticentre direction. All of them were observed with SUperb Seeing Imager 2 at the New Technology Telescope using the Bessel B, V and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method, i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC and FST). This analysis shows that Berkeley 27 has an age between 1.5 and 1.7 Gyr, a reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.40-0.50 and a distance modulus (m-M)0 between 13.1 and 13.3; Berkeley 34 is older with an age in the range 2.1-2.5 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.57 and 0.64 and (m-M)0 between 14.1 and 14.3; Berkeley 36, with an age between 7.0 and 7.5 Gyr, has a reddening of E(B-V) ˜ 0.50 and a distance modulus (m-M)0 between 13.1 and 13.2. For all the clusters, our analysis suggests a subsolar metallicity in accord with their position in the outer Galactic disc. This work is based on data collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescopes under programme 076.D-0119.

  3. Berkeley Unified Parallel C (UPC) Compiler

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-04-06

    This program is a portable, open-source, compiler for the UPC language, which is based on the Open64 framework, and has extensive support for optimizations. This compiler operated by translating UPC into ANS/ISO C for compilation by a native compiler and linking with a UPC Runtime Library. This design eases portability to both shared and distributed memory parallel architectures. For proper operation the "Berkeley Unified Parallel C (UPC) Runtime Library" and its dependencies are required. Compatiblemore » replacements which implement "The Berkeley UPC Runtime Specification" are possible.« less

  4. SERENDIP - The UC Berkeley SETI project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, C.; Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Malina, R. F.

    1993-10-01

    The UC Berkeley SERENDIP (search for extraterrestrial radio emissions from nearby developed intelligent populations) SETI project searches for narrow band radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. The search is based on a piggyback data acquisition system and an off-line data analysis system. The SERENDIP systems are described and progress is reviewed.

  5. Berkeley, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Berkeley, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  6. Chapel Hill, Berkeley Head Graduate Rankings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides lists ranking the 25 largest producers of bachelor's, certified bachelor's, master's, and doctoral graduates in chemistry. University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) is the nation's largest producer of bachelor's degree chemistry graduates while the University of California (Berkeley) is the largest producer of Ph.D. chemistry graduates.…

  7. Reorganizing the Biological Sciences at Berkeley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trow, Martin A.

    1983-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley's substantial reorganization of the biological sciences due to internal and external needs is chronicled, focusing on the coordinated efforts of the institution and the strong, supportive leadership of the chancellor. The story is presented as an unusual case of institutional leadership within a highly…

  8. Virtual Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the potential of computers in teaching laboratories to spare the lives of animals; however, it is felt that in areas of physiology education, virtual labs are not as desirable a learning experience for advanced students as live animal labs. (Author/AIM)

  9. THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER BERKELEY 55

    SciTech Connect

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Marco, Amparo E-mail: amparo.marco@ua.es

    2012-02-15

    We present UBV photometry of the highly reddened and poorly studied open cluster Berkeley 55, revealing an important population of B-type stars and several evolved stars of high luminosity. Intermediate-resolution far-red spectra of several candidate members confirm the presence of one F-type supergiant and six late supergiants or bright giants. The brightest blue stars are mid-B giants. Spectroscopic and photometric analyses indicate an age 50 {+-} 10 Myr. The cluster is located at a distance d Almost-Equal-To 4 kpc, consistent with other tracers of the Perseus Arm in this direction. Berkeley 55 is thus a moderately young open cluster with a sizable population of candidate red (super)giant members, which can provide valuable information about the evolution of intermediate-mass stars.

  10. The geothermal program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1987-06-01

    The main purpose of the geothermal program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is to develop, improve and validate methods and instrumentation to: (1) determine geothermal reservoir parameters; (2) detect and characterize reservoir fractures and boundaries; and (3) identify and evaluate the importance of reservoir processes. The ultimate objective of the program, which includes field, theoretical and modeling activities, is to advance the state-of-the-art for characterizing geothermal systems and evaluating their productive capacity and longevity under commercial exploitation.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory laser-transmission method

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, H.; Novakov, T.

    1981-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory laser transmission method has been used to determine the absorption coefficients of aerosol particles generated at the First International Workshop on Light Absorption. Analysis of the results confirms that the optical attenuation measurement is insensitive to the scattering properties of the aerosol. A simple model calculation is presented which explains these observations and points out the critical role of the filter substrate as an almost perfect diffuse reflector in the technique.

  12. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    SciTech Connect

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-046). March 2005. ROOF SHIELDING BLOCK AND I-BEAM SUPPORT CONSTRUCTION, CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-129). March 2005. ENTRY TO ROOM 24, MAIN FLOOR, OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-009). March 2005. OPENINGS OF AIR DUCTS INTO PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-035). March 2005. WEST TANGENT VIEWED FROM INTERIOR OF BEVATRON. EQUIPMENT ACCESS STAIRWAY ON LEFT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-11). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, NORTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-139). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, INCLUDING WOOD STAIRWAY FROM OUTER EDGE OF SHIELDING TO TOP OF ROOF BLOCK SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-08). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, SOUTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-176). March 2005. CENTRAL COLUMN SUPPORT TO ROOF SHOWING CRANES CENTER SUPPORT TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00218-12). June 2005. DEEP TUNNEL INTO FOUNDATION UNDER BEVATRON, VIEW OF CART ON RAILS FOR TRANSPORTING EQUIPMENT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-031). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, WITH COVER OPEN, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-034). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT WITH COVER CLOSED, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, BUILDING 51 ROOF TRUSS, AND CENTRAL RING TRACK FOR MAGNET ROOM CRANE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM TO TOP OF OUTER LAYER OF CONCRETE SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY BETWEEN MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM AND SECOND FLOOR OF OFFICE-AND-SHOP SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-049). March 2005. TUNNEL ENTRY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM INTO CENTER OF BEVATRON, BENEATH SOUTHWEST QUADRANT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America's competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  10. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America`s competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  12. The Society for Women in the Physical Sciences: a successful mentoring program at UC Berkeley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kristine

    2000-04-01

    The Society for Women in the Physical Sciences (SWPS, http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ swps) at the University of California at Berkeley has been up and running successfully for three years. This organization aims to increase the number of women undergrad majors in physics, astronomy, and geology and to foster a general sense of community among all the women in these departments: faculty, postdocs, and students. The program consists of three parts: mentoring, events, and resources. The mentoring portion pairs 4 to 5 undergraduate women with one graduate mentor. These mentoring groups meet approximately weekly to visit labs, work on homework, go to science museums, or just talk and gather ideas from one another. SWPS also organizes monthly events that include all members of the department and which have in the past been social events, workshops, or discussion forums. Finally, SWPS writes and distributes, on paper and on our website, a series of guides which make “informal” information, such as where are the quiet places to study, more easily available. During this talk I will present more of the details of this program. In addition, I will present anecdotal and quantitative results of the program at Berkeley and discuss how this program has been implemented at other universities. Finally, I will discuss the general strategies behind the program and how they can be applied to other programs aimed at women in science.

  13. Berkeley Unified Parallel C (UPC) Runtime Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-03-31

    This software comprises a portable, open source implementation of a runtime library to support applications written in the Unified Parallel C (UPC) language. This library implements the UPC-specific functionality, including shared memory allocation and locks. The network-dependent functionality is implemented as a thin wrapper around a separate library implementing the GASNet (Global-Address Space Networking) specification. For true shared memory machines. GASNet is bypassed in favor of direct memory operations and local synchronization mechanisms. The Berkeleymore » UPC Runtime Library is currently the only implementation of the "Berkeley UPC Runtime Specification", and thus the only runtme library usable with the Berkeley UPC Compiler. Also, it is the only UPC runtime known to the author to provide two shared pointer representations: one for arbitrary blocksizes and one to optimize for the common cases of phaseless and blocksize=1. For distributed memory environments a library implementing the GASNet (Global-Address Space Networking) specification is required for communication. While no specialized hardware is required, a high-speed interconnet supported by the GASNet implementation is suggested for preformance. If no supported high-speed interconnect is available. GASNet can run over MPI. An external library is reqired for certain local memory allocation operations. A well defined interface allows for multiple implementations of this library, but at present the "umalloc" library from LBNL is the only compatible implementation.« less

  14. Careers in Data Science: A Berkeley Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Last year, I took on an amazing opportunity to serve as the Executive Director of the new Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS). After a 15-year career working with geospatial data to advance our understanding of the environment, I have been presented with a unique opportunity through BIDS to work with talented researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds. Founded in 2013, BIDS is a central hub of research and education at UC Berkeley designed to facilitate and nurture data-intensive science. We are building a community centered on a cohort of talented data science fellows and senior fellows who are representative of the world-class researchers from across our campus and are leading the data science revolution within their disciplines. Our initiatives are designed to bring together broad constituents of the data science community, including domain experts from the life, social, and physical sciences and methodological experts from computer science, statistics, and applied mathematics. While many of these individuals rarely cross professional paths, BIDS actively seeks new and creative ways to engage and foster collaboration across these different research fields. In this presentation, I will share my own story, along with some insights into how BIDS is supporting the careers of data scientists, including graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and research staff. I will also describe how these individuals we are helping support are working to address a number of data science-related challenges in scientific research.

  15. Experiences with lab-centric instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated collaborative activities, and a systematic sequence of activities that gradually increases in difficulty. Instructors also benefit from a deeper window into student progress and understanding. We follow with discussion of our experiences in courses at U.C. Berkeley, and using data from some of these investigate the effects of lab-centric instruction on student learning, procrastination, and course pacing. We observe that the lab-centric format helped students on exams but hurt them on extended programming assignments, counter to our hypothesis. Additionally, we see no difference in self-ratings of procrastination and limited differences in ratings of course pace. We do find evidence that the students who choose to attend lab-centric courses are different in several important ways from students who choose to attend the same course in a non-lab-centric format.

  16. The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Kirsch, L.; Leung, K. N.; Rogers, A.; Van Bibber, K.; Waltz, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) facility is the product of a consortium involving the Berkeley Geochronology Center (BGC), the U.C. Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Dept. (UCB/NE), and Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) National Labs. BINGE was initially designed (and funded by NSF) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. BINGE uses a plasma-based deuteron ion source and a self-loading Ti-surfaced target to induce deuteron-deuterium (DD) fusion via the reaction 2H(d,n)3He, producing 2.45 MeV neutrons. The limited neutron energy spectrum is aimed at reducing recoil effects, interfering nuclear reactions, and unwanted radioactive byproducts, all of which are undesirable consequences of conventional irradiation with 235U fission spectrum neutrons. Minimization of interfering reactions such as 40Ca(n,na)36Ar greatly reduces penalties for over-irradiation, enabling improved signal/background measurement of e.g. 39Ar. BINGE will also be used for a variety of nuclear physics and engineering experiments that require a high flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Neutron energies lower than 2.45 MeV can be obtained via irradiation ports within and external to polyethylene shielding. Initial commissioning produced a neutron flux of 108 n/sec/cm2 at 1 mA source current and 100 kV anode voltage, as expected. When scaled up to the 1 A source current as planned, this indicates that BINGE will achieve the design objective neutron flux of 1011 n/sec/cm2. Further progress towards this goal will be reported. Supported by NSF (grant #EAR-0960138), BGC, UCB/NE, University of California Office of the President, and DOE through LLNL under contract #DE-AC52-07NA27344 and LBNL under contract #DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. Lab Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses barriers individuals face in using computers in the classroom and the importance of eliminating these barriers. The article notes that visual, mobility, and hearing impairments are the disabilities most often encountered in school labs and that numerous software and hardware tools are available to help individuals with these disabilities…

  18. Reading Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Lorna

    This guide is intended for use in conducting a reading lab for a broad group of workers ranging from nonreaders to persons reading at a fifth-grade level. Presented first is a course overview that includes the following: information on the course's targeted population, student selection process, and demographics; strategies for adult remediation;…

  19. Labs: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igelsrud, Don, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a variety of topics discussed in this column and at a biology teachers' workshop concerning the quality and value of lab techniques used for teaching high school biology. Topics included are Drosophila salivary glands, sea urchins, innovations, dyes and networking. (CW)

  20. The Berkeley extreme ultraviolet calibration facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.; Jelinsky, Patrick; Malina, Roger F.

    1988-01-01

    The vacuum calibration facilities of the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley are designed for the calibration and testing of EUV and FUV spaceborne instrumentation (spectral range 44-2500 A). The facility includes one large cylindrical vacuum chamber (3 x 5 m) containing two EUV collimators, and it is equipped with a 4-axis manipulator of angular-control resolution 1 arcsec for payloads weighing up to 500 kg. In addition, two smaller cylindrical chambers, each 0.9 x 1.2 m, are available for vacuum and thermal testing of UV detectors, filters, and space electronics hardware. All three chambers open into class-10,000 clean rooms, and all calibrations are referred to NBS secondary standards.

  1. ORFEUS-SPAS - The Berkeley EUV spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Hurwitz, Mark

    1990-01-01

    The Berkeley EUV spectrometer of ORFEUS-SPAS, a joint project of NASA and the BMFT, incorporates a set of four novel spherically figured, varied line-space gratings used in a geometry that is similar to that of the classic Rowland mount to span an interval of 390 and 1200 A. Two spectral detector units containing curved microchannel plates and delay-line anodes encode the arriving photons in digital format for telemetry. An additional optic directs the image of the source in the entrance aperture onto a sealed FUV detector which is used to track the source as it drifts during an observation, enabling a postflight reconstruction of the spacecraft pointing vector. This in turn makes it possible to define with precision the wavelength of each recorded photon.

  2. Telescience at the University of California, Berkeley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Marchant, W. T.; Kaplan, G. C.; Dobson, C. A.; Jernigan, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley (UCB) is a member of a university consortium involved in telescience testbed activities under the sponsorship of NASA. The Telescience Testbed Project consists of three experiments using flight hardware being developed for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer project at UCB's Space Sciences Laboratory. The first one is a teleoperation experiment investigating remote instrument control using a computer network such as the Internet. The second experiment is an effort to develop a system for operation of a network of remote workstations allowing coordinated software development, evaluation, and use by widely dispersed groups. The final experiment concerns simulation as a method to facilitate the concurrent development of instrument hardware and support software. Progress in these areas is described.

  3. The Coronal Ultraviolet Berkeley Spectrometer (CUBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    1992-01-01

    We describe an instrument package to remotely measure thermospheric, exospheric, and plasmaspheric structure and composition. This instrument was flown aboard the second test flight of the Black Brant XII sounding rocket on December 5, 1989, which attained an apogee of 1460 km. The experiment package consisted of a spectrophotometer to measure He I 584 A, O II 834 A, O I 989 A, hydrogen Lyman beta (1025 A), hydrogen Lyman alpha (1216 A), and O I 1304 A transitions, and a photometer to measure the He II 304 A emission. The optical design of the spectrophotometer was identical to that of the Berkeley Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Airglow Rocket Spectrometer payload, flown on September 30, 1988 aboard the maiden flight of the Black Brant XII rocket. We present the initial data analysis and describe directions we will go toward the completion of our study.

  4. Telescience at the University of California, Berkeley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Marchant, W. T.; Kaplan, G. C.; Dobson, C. A.; Jernigan, J. G.; Lampton, M. L.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley (UCB) is a member of a university consortium involved in telescience testbed activities under the sponsorship of NASA. Our Telescience Testbed Project consists of three experiments using flight hardware being developed for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer project at UCB's Space Sciences Laboratory. The first one is a teleoperation experiment investigating remote instrument control using a computer network such as the Internet. The second experiment is an effort to develop a system for operation of a network of remote workstations allowing coordinated software development, evaluation, and use by widely dispersed groups. The final experiment concerns simulation as a method to facilitate the concurrent development of instrument hardware and support software. We describe our progress in these areas.

  5. Junior High Schools of Berkeley, California. Bulletin, 1923, No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, James T.; Clark, W. B.; Glessner, H. H.; Hennessey, D. L.

    1923-01-01

    This bulletin demonstrates that Berkeley, California's educational problem is and has been that of meeting the varied needs of a population such as may be found in any typical American city. The varied population needs, together with the rapid growth, have brought many difficult problems to Berkeley, just has they have to other cities. Based on…

  6. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  7. Lab architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-04-01

    There are few more dramatic illustrations of the vicissitudes of laboratory architecturethan the contrast between Building 20 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its replacement, the Ray and Maria Stata Center. Building 20 was built hurriedly in 1943 as temporary housing for MIT's famous Rad Lab, the site of wartime radar research, and it remained a productive laboratory space for over half a century. A decade ago it was demolished to make way for the Stata Center, an architecturally striking building designed by Frank Gehry to house MIT's computer science and artificial intelligence labs (above). But in 2004 - just two years after the Stata Center officially opened - the building was criticized for being unsuitable for research and became the subject of still ongoing lawsuits alleging design and construction failures.

  8. What Made Berkeley Great? The Sources of Berkeley's Sustained Academic Excellence. Research & Occasional Paper Series CSHE.3.11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslauer, George W.

    2011-01-01

    University of California (UC) Berkeley's chief academic officer explores the historical sources of Berkeley' academic excellence. He identifies five key factors: (1) wealth from many sources; (2) supportive and skilled governors; (3) leadership from key UC presidents; (4) the pioneering ethos within the State of California; and (5) a process of…

  9. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: A Low-Energy House in Berkeley, Kabul, and Washington DC (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Rick

    2007-09-17

    How well can we assess and improve building energy performance in California homes? How much energy-and carbon-do homes use in other parts of the world? Rick Diamond, deputy group leader of the Berkeley Lab Energy Performance of Buildings Group, discusses change, global solutions, and the stories of three houses in Berkeley, Kabul (Afghanistan), and Washington, D.C. Diamond, who is also a senior advisor at the California Institute for Energy and Environment, investigates user interactions with the built environment for improved building energy performance. The group has studied a wide range of issues related to energy use in housing, including duct system efficiency, user behavior, and infiltration and ventilation measurements.

  10. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: A Low-Energy House in Berkeley, Kabul, and Washington DC (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Diamond, Rick

    2011-04-28

    How well can we assess and improve building energy performance in California homes? How much energy-and carbon-do homes use in other parts of the world? Rick Diamond, deputy group leader of the Berkeley Lab Energy Performance of Buildings Group, discusses change, global solutions, and the stories of three houses in Berkeley, Kabul (Afghanistan), and Washington, D.C. Diamond, who is also a senior advisor at the California Institute for Energy and Environment, investigates user interactions with the built environment for improved building energy performance. The group has studied a wide range of issues related to energy use in housing, including duct system efficiency, user behavior, and infiltration and ventilation measurements.

  11. ORFEUS focal plane instrumentation: The Berkeley spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Bowyer, Stuart

    1988-01-01

    A spectrograph for the ORFEUS mission that incorporates four varied line-space, spherically figured diffraction gratings was designed. The ORFEUS, a 1-m normal incidence telescope is equipped with 2 focal plane spectrographs. The Berkeley spectrograph was developed with an optimizing raytracing computer code. Each grating accepts the light from 20 percent of the aperture of the telescope primary mirror and has a unique set of characteristics to cover a sub-bandpass within the 390 to 1200 A spectral range. Two photon-counting detectors incorporating a time delay readout system are used to record the spectra from all four gratings simultaneously. The nominal design achieves a spectral resolution (FWHM) in excess of 5500 at all wavelengths within the bandpass. The resolution is limited primarily by the detector spatial resolution. The 1 sigma astigmatism of this design varies between 13 and 150 micrometer on the same focal surface. An independent, direct imaging system tracks the drift of the target within the spectrometer aperture and allows measurement of the misalignment between the telescope optical axis and that of the external star tracker. The resolution and astigmatism achievable with this design are superior to those of a standard Rowland spectrograph designed with the same constraints.

  12. The Berkeley SETI Program: SERENDIP III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, C.; Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Ng, D.; Cobb, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Berkeley SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) program, named SERENDIP, was begun in the late 1970's. It is aimed at detecting narrow band radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. The SERENDIP I, II and III systems have operated autonomously in a piggyback search mode, conducting unobtrusive, long-term observations on the world's largest radio telescopes. The latest generation SERENDIP instrument, SERENDIP III, is a four million channel FFT-based spectrum analyzer operating at 0.6 Hz resolution with a 1.7 second integration time. SERENDIP III has been operating at the NAIC Arecibo Observatory since April, 1992. Several independent criteria suggest that this search is the most sensitive SETI search in operation. To date SERENDIP III has accumulated over 3600 hours of high quality telescope time, observing 75% of the sky visible by the Arecibo telescope. Over this period SERENDIP III has analyzed over 30 trillion spectral bins, and recorded information on 110 million strong narrow band signals in the 424--435 MHz band. A handful of these signals have survived our RFI rejection and signal detection algorithms, and have thus been added to our list of ETI candidate signals. A follow-up observation program will be conducted next year in an attempt to verify each of these candidate signals. This work has been supported by NASA grant NAGW-2722.

  13. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  14. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed.

  15. Former Fermilab boss to lead Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Particle physicist Michael Witherell - current vice-chancellor for research at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - has been appointed the next director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL).

  16. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O.

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Baseline review of three groundwater plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry; et al.

    2002-09-26

    During the closeout session, members of the technical assistance team conveyed to the site how impressed they were at the thoroughness of the site's investigation and attempts at remediation. Team members were uniformly pleased at the skilled detection work to identify sources, make quick remediation decisions, and change course when a strategy did not work well. The technical assistance team also noted that, to their knowledge, this is the only DOE site at which a world-class scientist has had primary responsibility for the environmental restoration activities. This has undoubtedly contributed to the successes observed and DOE should take careful note. The following overall recommendations were agreed upon: (1) The site has done a phenomenal job of characterization and identifying and removing source terms. (2) Technologies selected to date are appropriate and high impact, e.g. collection trenches are an effective remedial strategy for this complicated geology. The site should continue using technology that is adapted to the site's unique geology, such as the collection trenches. (3) The site should develop a better way to determine the basis of cleanup for all sites. (4) The sentinel well system should be evaluated and modified, if needed, to assure that the sentinel wells provide coverage to the current site boundary. Potential modifications could include installation, abandonment or relocation of wells based on the large amount of data collected since the original sentinel well system was designed. (5) Modeling to assist in remedial design and communication should continue. (6) The site should develop a plan to ensure institutional memory. (7) The most likely possibility for improving closure to 2006 is by removing the residual source of the Old Town plume and establishing the efficacy of remediation for the 51/64 plume.

  18. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W. P.; Duarte, R.; Fournier, S.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Lockhart, D.; Schroeder, C. B.; Toth, C.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, S.; Esarey, E.

    2010-11-04

    An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 GeV stage aims at operation in the quasi-linear regime, where the laser excited wakes are largely sinusoidal and offer the possibility of accelerating both electrons and positrons. Simulations show that a 10 GeV electron beam can be generated in a meter scale plasma channel guided LPA operating at a density of about 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and powered by laser pulses containing 30-40 J of energy in a 50-200 fs duration pulse, focused to a spotsize of 50-100 micron. The lay-out of the facility and laser system will be presented as well as the progress on building the facility.

  19. Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

  20. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Duarte, R.; Esarey, E.; Fournier, S.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Lockhart, D.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, S.

    2010-06-01

    An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 GeV stage aims at operation in the quasi-linear regime, where the laser excited wakes are largely sinusoidal and offer the possibility of accelerating both electrons and positrons. Simulations show that a 10 GeV electron beam can be generated in a meter scale plasma channel guided LPA operating at a density of about 1017 cm-3 and powered by laser pulses containing 30-40 J of energy in a 50- 200 fs duration pulse, focused to a spotsize of 50-100 micron. The lay-out of the facility and laser system will be presented as well as the progress on building the facility.

  1. Berkeley Lab Scientist Named MacArthur ''Genius'' Fellow for Audio Preservation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Carl

    2013-09-24

    Audio Preservationist Carl Haber was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013. The Fellowship is a $625,000, no-strings-attached grant for individuals who have shown exceptional creativity in their work and the promise to do more. Learn more at http://www.macfound.org/fellows.

  2. Berkeley Lab Scientist Named MacArthur ''Genius'' Fellow for Audio Preservation Research

    ScienceCinema

    Haber, Carl

    2013-10-22

    Audio Preservationist Carl Haber was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013. The Fellowship is a $625,000, no-strings-attached grant for individuals who have shown exceptional creativity in their work and the promise to do more. Learn more at http://www.macfound.org/fellows.

  3. Underwater lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The University of Southern California's Catalina Marine Science Center (CMSC) has announced plans to build an underwater marine research laboratory near Santa Catalina Island off the California coast. The project, which will take 2 years to build, will be sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The laboratory will be similar in concept to the U.S. Navy Sea Lab III, which was canceled some time ago.The project's purpose is to give divers access to a laboratory without having to surface. The project leader, Andrew Pilmanis, of the University of Southern California, stated recently (Industrial Research and Development, July 1983): “By the nature of the work, scientists require a lot of bottom time, and to do it by scuba isn't practical…. The only way to do that is with saturation diving. Once the diver is saturated with inert gas, whether the individual stays a few days or for months, only one decompression is required.” Divers will typically stay in the laboratory for 7-10 days. The laboratory will initially be placed at a depth of 20 m, later to be refloated and located at depths to 37 m.

  4. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. Pass-Fail Grading at Berkeley: Facts and Opinions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suslow, Sidney

    The facts and opinions regarding pass/no pass grading at Berkeley discussed in this report are based on three sources of information. These sources include a survey of faculty conducted in the spring quarter 1970, a survey of undergraduate students in the winter quarter 1971, and the records routinely generated in the Registrar's Office for the…

  6. For Berkeley's Sports Endowment, a Goal of $1-Billion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Josh

    2009-01-01

    Most athletics programs, if forced to raise $300-million to renovate a football stadium, would not set an ambitious endowment goal at the same time. The University of California at Berkeley is trying to do both. The university's California Memorial Stadium sits directly over an earthquake fault: it needs a major seismic retrofit that will take…

  7. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer - BEARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, D. M.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Berkeley EUV airglow rocket spectrometer (BEARS) instrument is described. The instrument was designed in particular to measure the dominant lines of atomic oxygen in the FUV and EUV dayglow at 1356, 1304, 1027, and 989 A, which is the ultimate source of airglow emissions. The optical and mechanical design of the instrument, the detector, electronics, calibration, flight operations, and results are examined.

  8. A Survey of Summer Quarter Students at Berkeley, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suslow, Sidney; Pieper, W. C., Jr.

    When the University of California at Berkeley initiated year-round operation in the summer of 1967, the prevailing question concerned whether such a system would work. Midway through the summer term of the following year, a mail survey of 2,100 students --a 25% sample of those enrolled in the 1968 Summer Quarter-- was conducted to evaluate the…

  9. Integration Defended: Berkeley Unified's Strategy to Maintain School Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Lisa; Frankenberg, Erica

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, the Supreme Court limited the tools that school districts could use to voluntarily integrate schools. In the aftermath of the decision, educators around the country have sought models of successful plans that would also be legal. One such model may be Berkeley Unified School District's (BUSD) plan. Earlier this year, the California…

  10. Asian Americans at Berkeley. A Report to the Chancellor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley.

    An advisory committee appointed in fall, 1987 was charged with carrying out an indepth study of Asian Americans on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley. Questions addressed concerned student educational experiences, faculty recruitment and advancement, and staff employment opportunities as well as questions about campus-Asian…

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  12. Teaching at Berkeley: A Guide for Foreign Teaching Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Robby, Ed.; Robin, Ron, Ed.

    A handbook for foreign teaching assistants (TAs) is presented by foreign graduate students with teaching experience and other educators who have worked closely with them. Language skills, teaching strategies, cultural issues, resources, and the environment at the University of California, Berkeley, are addressed in 16 articles. Article titles and…

  13. Hydrogeology and tritium transport in Chicken Creek Canyon,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston D.; Javandel, Iraj

    2007-10-31

    This study of the hydrogeology of Chicken Creek Canyon wasconducted by the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This canyon extends downhill fromBuilding 31 at LBNL to Centennial Road below. The leading edge of agroundwater tritium plume at LBNL is located at the top of the canyon.Tritium activities measured in this portion of the plume during thisstudy were approximately 3,000 picocuries/liter (pCi/L), which issignificantly less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinkingwaterof 20,000 pCi/L established by the Environmental ProtectionAgency.There are three main pathways for tritium migration beyond theLaboratory s boundary: air, surface water and groundwater flow. Thepurpose of this report is to evaluate the groundwater pathway.Hydrogeologic investigation commenced with review of historicalgeotechnical reports including 35 bore logs and 27 test pit/trench logsas well as existing ERP information from 9 bore logs. This was followedby field mapping of bedrock outcrops along Chicken Creek as well asbedrock exposures in road cuts on the north and east walls of the canyon.Water levels and tritium activities from 6 wells were also considered.Electrical-resistivity profiles and cone penetration test (CPT) data werecollected to investigate the extent of an interpreted alluvial sandencountered in one of the wells drilled in this area. Subsequent loggingof 7 additional borings indicated that this sand was actually anunusually well-sorted and typically deeply weathered sandstone of theOrinda Formation. Wells were installed in 6 of the new borings to allowwater level measurement and analysis of groundwater tritium activity. Aslug test and pumping tests were also performed in the wellfield.

  14. Scar revision

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevention, treatment, and revision. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap ... Hebe Molmenti, MD, PhD, private practice specializing in plastic and reconstructive surgery, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by ...

  15. Deciphering Your Lab Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... what a lab report may look like. (Note: Pathology reports, such as for a biopsy , will look ... lab report. For some examples of what a pathology report may look like, see The Doctor’s Doctor: ...

  16. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  17. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  18. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists: The Berkeley Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley sends more undergraduate students to economics PhD programs than any other public university. While this fact is surely a function of its size, there may be lessons from the Berkeley experience that others could adopt. To investigate why Berkeley generates so many economics PhD students, the author convened…

  19. Calibration of the Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Siegmund, Oswald

    1989-01-01

    The Berkeley Extreme-ultraviolet Airglow Rocket Spectrometer (BEARS), a multiinstrument sounding rocket payload, made comprehensive measurements of the earth's dayglow. The primary instruments consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers: one channel to measure several atomic oxygen features at high spectral resolution (about 1.5 A) in the band passes 980-1040 and 1300-1360 A, and the other to measure EUV dayglow and the solar EUV simultaneously in a much broader bandpass (250-1150 A) at moderate resolution (about 10 A). The payload also included a hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer to monitor the solar irradiance and goecoronal emissions. The instrument was calibrated at the EUV calibration facility at the University of California at Berkeley, and was subsequently launched successfully on September 30, 1988 aboard a four-stage experimental sounding rocket, Black Brant XII flight 12.041 WT. The calibration procedure and resulting data are presented.

  20. Guide to user facilities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories' user facilities are described. Specific facilities include: the National Center for Electron Microscopy; the Bevalac; the SuperHILAC; the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility; the National Tritium Labeling Facility; the 88 inch Cyclotron; the Heavy Charged-Particle Treatment Facility; the 2.5 MeV Van de Graaff; the Sky Simulator; the Center for Computational Seismology; and the Low Background Counting Facility. (GHT)

  1. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O.

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  2. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  3. Revision Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Loyo, Myriam; Wang, Tom D

    2016-01-01

    Revision rhinoplasty is one of the most challenging operations the facial plastic surgeon performs given the complex 3-dimensional anatomy of the nose and the psychological impact it has on patients. The intricate interplay of cartilages, bone, and soft tissue in the nose gives it its aesthetic and function. Facial harmony and attractiveness depends greatly on the nose given its central position in the face. In the following article, the authors review common motivations and anatomic findings for patients seeking revision rhinoplasty based on the senior author's 30-year experience with rhinoplasty and a review of the literature. PMID:26616705

  4. Analysis of background distributions of metals in the soil at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, David; Baskin, David; Brown, Dennis; Lund, Loren; Najita, Julie; Javandel, Iraj

    2009-03-15

    As part of its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (CAP), the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Restoration Program conducted an evaluation of naturally occurring metals in soils at the facility. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide a basis for determining if soils at specific locations contained elevated concentrations of metals relative to ambient conditions. Ambient conditions (sometimes referred to as 'local background') are defined as concentrations of metals in the vicinity of a site, but which are unaffected by site-related activities (Cal-EPA 1997). Local background concentrations of 17 metals were initially estimated by LBNL using data from 498 soil samples collected from borings made during the construction of 71 groundwater monitoring wells (LBNL 1995). These concentration values were estimated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) guidance that was available at that time (USEPA 1989). Since that time, many more soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals by the Environmental Restoration Program. In addition, the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal-EPA) subsequently published a recommended approach for calculating background concentrations of metals at hazardous waste sites and permitted facilities (Cal-EPA 1997). This more recent approach differs from that recommended by the USEPA and used initially by LBNL (LBNL 2002). The purpose of the 2002 report was to apply the recommended Cal-EPA procedure to the expanded data set for metals that was available at LBNL. This revision to the 2002 report has been updated to include more rigorous tests of normality, revisions to the statistical methods used for some metals based on the results of the normality tests, and consideration of the depth-dependence of some sample results. As a result of these modifications, estimated background concentrations for some metals have been slightly revised from

  5. The Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Norman, Eric; Smith, Alan; Poon, Alan; Chan, Yuen-Dat

    2015-10-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility at LBNL provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors, such as those studying dark matter or neutrinos. The BLBF also makes a variety of environmental measurements in search of other radioisotopes, such as fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 and other radioisotope monitoring activities. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. In 2015, the BLBF will be relocating its underground counting stations to a new, dedicated space on the 4850L of SURF. The Black Hills State University Underground Campus will host several low background counting stations and operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC will be presented.

  6. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  7. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  8. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  9. High speed optical links between LLNL and Berkeley

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1994-08-08

    The Advanced Telecommunications Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with Pacific Bell, is developing an experimental high speed, four wavelength, protocol independent optical link for evaluating wide area networking interconnection schemes and the use of fiber amplifiers. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote sited control centers and experiments. In this paper we discuss our vision of the future of Wide Area Networking and describe the plans for the wavelength division multiplexed link between Livermore and the University of California at Berkeley.

  10. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. II

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, Patrick

    1998-09-30

    Volume II of the Site Environmental Report for 1997 is published by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and nonroutine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data). Data presented in volume II are given in Systeme International (SI) units. The list below categorizes the volume II data sections with corresponding summary result tables in volume I: Stack Air, Ambient Air, Rainwater, Creeks, Creek Baseline Study, Hydraugers, Lakes, Stormwater, Sewer, Fixed Treatment Units, Soil, Sediment, Vegetation.

  11. Heinz Heinemann. The Berkeley Years (1978-1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Inger M.

    2009-08-27

    Heinz Heineman came to Berkeley in 1978 and stayed there for 15 years. This was the time of the energy crisis and we did not have anybody like him who had such a tremendous industrial experience with oil and coal conversion technology and science. He was interested in the conversion of coal to gaseous molecules and our studies with model catalysts appealed to him and attracted him. In a way, Heinz Heineman was bigger than life, since he played such a seminal role in the history of American catalysis science.

  12. Lipoprotein subclasses in genetic studies: The Berkeley Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.; Williams, P.T.; Blanche, P.J.; Cavanaugh, A.; Holl, L.G.; Austin, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    Data from the Berkeley Data Set was used to investigate familial correlations of HDL-subclasses. Analysis of the sibling intraclass correlation coefficient by HDL particle diameter showed that sibling HDL levels were significantly correlated for HDL{sub 2b}, HDL{sub 3a} and HDL{sub 3b} subclasses. The percentage of the offsprings` variance explained by their two parents. Our finding that parents and offspring-have the highest correlation for HDL{sub 2b} is consistent with published reports that show higher heritability estimates for HDL{sub 2} compared with HDL{sub 3}{minus} cholesterol.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  14. USING DOE-2.1 AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Building Energy Analysis Group.; Authors, Various

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this manual is to assist the DOE-2 user to run DOE-2 and its utility programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). It is organized to reflect the facts that every DOE-2 job run at LBL requires certain steps, and that there are options related to DOE-2 job runs available to any DOE-2 user. The standard steps for running a DOE-2 job are as follows: 1. Prepare a job deck 2. Process a job deck 3. Obtain standard output reports.

  15. NOT Another Lab Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  16. PRIME Lab Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D. J.; Mueller, K. A.; Ma, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is one of three NSF national facilities for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and is the only one capable of determining six cosmogenic radionuclides: 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. This abstract describes the current status of the radiocarbon analysis program at PRIME Lab.

  17. Making Real Virtual Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Harry E.; Keller, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Francis Bacon began defining scientific methodology in the early 17th century, and secondary school science classes began to implement science labs in the mid-19th century. By the early 20th century, leading educators were suggesting that science labs be used to develop scientific thinking habits in young students, and at the beginning of the 21st…

  18. Operating a Math Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary Curriculum Development.

    The rationale behind the use of mathematics laboratories is stated, then directions for organizing and implementing a math lab are given. Topics such as housekeeping, keeping an inventory, noise level, record keeping and assignments, giving grades, correlating textbooks with a math lab, and finding meaningful laboratory problems are each discussed…

  19. Physics Labs with Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  20. A Museum Learning Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandiver, Kathleen M.; Bijur, Jon Markowitz; Epstein, Ari W.; Rosenthal, Beryl; Stidsen, Don

    2008-01-01

    The "Learning Lab: The Cell" exhibit was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Museum and the MIT Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS). Specially designed for middle and high school students, the Learning Lab provides museum visitors of all ages with fascinating insights into how our living cells work. The…

  1. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  2. Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

  3. Clean option: Berkeley Pit water treatment and resource recovery strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development, established the Resource Recovery Project (RRP) in 1992 as a five-year effort to evaluate and demonstrate multiple technologies for recovering water, metals, and other industrial resources from contaminated surface and groundwater. Natural water resources located throughout the DOE complex and the and western states have been rendered unusable because of contamination from heavy metals. The Berkeley Pit, a large, inactive, open pit copper mine located in Butte, Montana, along with its associated groundwater system, has been selected by the RRP for use as a feedstock for a test bed facility located there. The test bed facility provides the infrastructure needed to evaluate promising technologies at the pilot plant scale. Data obtained from testing these technologies was used to assess their applicability for similar mine drainage water applications throughout the western states and at DOE. The objective of the Clean Option project is to develop strategies that provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to resource recovery using the Berkeley Pit water as a feedstock. The strategies not only consider the immediate problem of resource recovery from the contaminated water, but also manage the subsequent treatment of all resulting process streams. The strategies also employ the philosophy of waste minimization to optimize reduction of the waste volume requiring disposal, and the recovery and reuse of processing materials.

  4. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer: BEARS.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D M; Chakrabarti, S

    1992-09-20

    We describe the Berkeley extreme-UV airglow rocket spectrometer, which is a payload designed to test several thermospheric remote-sensing concepts by measuring the terrestrial O I far-UV and extreme-UV dayglow and the solar extreme-UV spectrum simultaneously. The instrument consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers and a Lyman-alpha photometer. The dayglow spectrometer covered two spectral regions from 980 to 1040 A and from 1300 to 1360 A with 1.5-A resolution. The solar spectrometer had a bandpass of 250-1150 A with an ~ 10-A resolution. All three spectra were accumulated by using a icrochannel-plate-intensified, two-dimensional imaging detector with three separate wedge-and strip anode readouts. The hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer was included to monitor the solar Lyman-alpha irradiance and geocoronal Lyman-alpha emissions. The instrument was designed, fabricated, and calibrated at the University of California, Berkeley and was successfully launched on 30 September 1988 aboard the first test flight of a four-stage sounding rocket, Black Brant XII. PMID:20733778

  5. EarthLabs: A National Model for Earth Science Lab Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2008-12-01

    As a response to the need for more rigorous, inquiry-based high school Earth science courses, a coalition of scientists, educators, and five states have created EarthLabs, a set of pilot modules that can serve as a national model for lab-based science courses. The content of EarthLabs chapters focuses on Earth system science and environmental literacy and conforms to the National Science Education Standards as well as the states' curriculum frameworks. The effort is funded by NOAA's Environmental Literacy program. The pilot modules present activities on Corals, Drought, Fisheries, and Hurricanes. The Fisheries and Hurricanes units were reviewed and field-tested by educators in Texas and Arizona. The feedback from this evaluation led to revisions of these units and guided development of the Corals and Drought chapters. Each module consists of activities that use online data sets, satellite imagery, web-based readings, and hands-on laboratory experiments. The project comprises two separate websites, one for the instructor and one for students. The instructor's site contains the pedagogical underpinnings for each lab including teaching materials, assessment strategies, and the alignment of activities with state and national science standards. The student site provides access to all materials that students need to complete the activities or, in the case of the hands-on labs, where they access additional information to help extend their learning. There are also formative and summative questions embedded in the student webpages to help scaffold learning through the activities.

  6. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy`s inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  8. LABS Foundational Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    They are the inventors of our generation dedicated to exceptional science, advancing the technologies of tomorrow. CO-LABS honors the outstanding achievements of researchers and their impact on the world.

  9. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  10. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  11. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-22

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  12. Virtual labs: a substitute for traditional labs?

    PubMed

    Scheckler, Rebecca K

    2003-01-01

    Current technologies give us the ability to enhance and replace developmental biology classes with computer-based resources, often called virtual labs. In the process of using these resources, teachers may be tempted to neglect the simpler technologies and lab bench activities, which can be labor intensive. In this paper, I take a critical look at the role of computer-based materials for the teaching of developmental biology in order to aid teachers in assessing their value. I conclude that while digital tools have value, they should not replace all of the traditional laboratory activities. Clearly, both computer-enhanced activities and traditional labs must be included in laboratory exercises. Reliance on only one or the other is inappropriate. In order to determine when it is appropriate to use a particular educational tool, the goals of the course and the needs of biology students for an education that gives them a realistic and engaged view of biology must be understood. In this paper, I dispel some of the myths of computer tools and give specific guidelines for assessing their usage, taking into account the special needs of a developmental biology class and the difficulties of observing all the developmental stages of subject organisms in the timescale of class meetings. PMID:12705675

  13. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2008-07-06

    Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Self-Assessment Program: Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Self-Assessment Program provides a formal process for assuring quality and regulatory compliance in all facets of Laboratory operations. The program, which integrates the ongoing self-assessment activities of the individual Divisions and Offices in a comprehensive, top-to-bottom process, provides assistance to the US Department of Energy (DOE), the University of California, and Laboratory management in their appraisals of Laboratory performance. This document describes the program goals, scope, responsibilities, elements, and implementation schedule. This document is also the implementation plan for the institutional level self-assessment program. Each Division is also required to develop a self-assessment program that contains the elements described in this document.

  15. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory geothermal program in northern Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirk, K. F.; Wollenberg, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's geothermal program began with consideration of regions where fluids in the temperature range of 150 to 230 C may be economically accessible. Three valleys, located in an area of high regional heat flow in north central Nevada, were selected for geological, geophysical, and geochemical field studies. The objective of these ongoing field activities is to select a site for a 10-MW demonstration plant. Field activities (which started in September 1973) are described. A parallel effort has been directed toward the conceptual design of a 10-MW isobutane binary plant which is planned for construction at the selected site. Design details of the plant are described. Project schedule with milestones is shown together with a cost summary of the project.

  16. Morphological and functional platelet abnormalities in Berkeley sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Shet, Arun S; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jirouskova, Marketa; Janczak, Christin A; Stevens, Jacqueline R M; Adamson, Adewole; Mohandas, Narla; Manci, Elizabeth A; Cynober, Therese; Coller, Barry S

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley sickle cell mice are used as animal models of human sickle cell disease but there are no reports of platelet studies in this model. Since humans with sickle cell disease have platelet abnormalities, we studied platelet morphology and function in Berkeley mice (SS). We observed elevated mean platelet forward angle light scatter (FSC) values (an indirect measure of platelet volume) in SS compared to wild type (WT) (37+/-3.2 vs. 27+/-1.4, mean+/-SD; p<0.001), in association with moderate thrombocytopenia (505+/-49 x 10(3)/microl vs. 1151+/-162 x 10(3)/microl; p<0.001). Despite having marked splenomegaly, SS mice had elevated levels of Howell-Jolly bodies and "pocked" erythrocytes (p<0.001 for both) suggesting splenic dysfunction. SS mice also had elevated numbers of thiazole orange positive platelets (5+/-1% vs. 1+/-1%; p<0.001), normal to low plasma thrombopoietin levels, normal plasma glycocalicin levels, normal levels of platelet recovery, and near normal platelet life spans. Platelets from SS mice bound more fibrinogen and antibody to P-selectin following activation with a threshold concentration of a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide compared to WT mice. Enlarged platelets are associated with a predisposition to arterial thrombosis in humans and some humans with SCD have been reported to have large platelets. Thus, additional studies are needed to assess whether large platelets contribute either to pulmonary hypertension or the large vessel arterial occlusion that produces stroke in some children with sickle cell disease. PMID:18374611

  17. Scar revision

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mohit; Wakure, Abhijeet

    2013-01-01

    Most surgical patients end up with a scar and most of these would want at least some improvement in the appearance of the scar. Using sound techniques for wound closure surgeons can, to a certain extent, prevent suboptimal scars. This article reviews the principles of prevention and treatment of suboptimal scars. Surgical techniques of scar revision, i.e., Z plasty, W plasty, and geometrical broken line closure are described. Post-operative care and other adjuvant therapies of scars are described. A short description of dermabrasion and lasers for management of scars is given. It is hoped that this review helps the surgeon to formulate a comprehensive plan for management of scars of these patients. PMID:24516292

  18. Narrative and Spectacle in the Hollywood Musical: Contrasting the Choreography of Busby Berkeley and Gene Kelly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattullo, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between narrative and spectacle in the Hollywood musical, with reference to the work of Busby Berkeley and Gene Kelly. It discusses Busby Berkeley's "backstage" musicals in terms of his "aggregate" approach to dealing with the narrative/spectacle relationship, and considers the effect of the backstage musical's…

  19. Decontamination and decommissioning of rooms 62-248 and 62-250 at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, G.

    1996-05-01

    This document details the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) process of Rooms 248 and 250 of Building 62 at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The document describes the D&D efforts for the rooms, their contents, and adjacent areas containing ancillary equipment. The rooms and equipment, before being released, were required to meet the unrestricted release criteria and requirements set forth in DOE orders 5400.5 and 5480.11, LBNL`s internal release-criteria procedure (EH&S Procedure 708), and the LBNL Radiological Control Manual. The radioactive material and items not meeting the release criteria were either sent to the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) for disposal or transferred to other locations approved for radioactive material. The D&D was undertaken by the Radiation Protection Group of LBNL`s Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) Division at the request of the Materials Sciences Division. Current and past use of radioactive material in both Rooms 248 and 250 necessitated the D&D in order to release both rooms for nonradioactive work. (1) Room 248 was designated a {open_quotes}controlled area.{close_quotes} There was contained radioactive material in some of the equipment. The previous occupants of Room 248 had worked with radioactive materials. (2) Room 250 was designated a {open_quotes}Radioactive Materials Management Area{close_quotes} (RMMA) because the current occupants used potentially dispersible radioisotopes. Both laboratories, during the occupancy of U.C. Berkeley Professor Leo Brewer and Ms. Karen Krushwitz, were kept in excellent condition. There was a detailed inventory of all radioactive materials and chemicals. All work and self surveys were documented. The labs were kept extremely orderly, clean, and in compliance. In October 1993 Ms. Krushwitz received an award in recognition of her efforts in Environmental Protection, Health, and Safety at LBNL.

  20. CFDP: The Revised Standard and Some Handy Lab Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, Juan Antonio; Valverde, Alberto; Taylor, Chis; Magistrati, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    The original recommendation for the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) was published in 2002 and since then it has been adopted by many NASA missions for transferring files to and from the flight segment. Conversely, ESA missions have tended to rely on adaptation of the ECSS Packet Utilisation Standard. However, there are now ESA missions under design that will be using CFDP as the standard mechanism for file transfer. The first mission that is using CFDP as File Transfer Protocol is Euclid, to be launch in 2020 and destined to orbit the second Lagrange point (L2). The CFDP engine will be integrated in the Euclid mass memory, allowing the large data files produced by the scientific instruments to be directly downloaded on a KA band link. Moreover, it has also been proposed to be used in the JUICE mission, that will study the Jupiter moons. Due to the considerable distance from Earth, Juice has extremely challenging data transfer requirements but due to the flexibility of CFDP the requirements of both missions can be met. This report aims at presenting an overview of CFDP, the new modifications presently proposed to the standard and the tools that in the Data System division at ESTEC are using for simulation, testing and verification.

  1. Revision sphenoidethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Eichel, B S

    1985-03-01

    In 1981, a series of 236 intranasal ethmoidectomy (INE) procedures was reported with a complication rate of 1.8%. Special attention has subsequently been directed to the surgical failures; namely, recurrent nasal polyposis which accounted for approximately 17%. The reason for recurrence in most instances was felt due to failure to do a more thorough posterior ethmoidectomy and enter and clean out the sphenoid sinuses. Subsequently, in all revision cases where a more thorough sphenoidethmoidectomy (RSE) was performed, the overall long-term success rate raised to better than 90%. Attention to skeletonizing the middle turbinate by stripping mucosa and leaving a thin bony shell is an important technical factor. An attempt is made to leave some of this bony skeletonized medial wall of the middle turbinate as it represents the most crucial landmark in doing the surgery via the intranasal route. There still remains approximately 8% to 10% of this patient population with nasal polyposis and sinusitis of such severity that surgery has offered only a temporary measure of relief. In dealing with this group it may be necessary to see these patients postoperatively at four to six-week intervals, carefully suctioning the ethmoid labyrinth and occasionally doing minor office "touch-up" ethmoidectomy-polypectomy procedures to clean off redundant mucosa or early polyposis. This paper is written to offer a compromise to the two schools of intranasal ethmoidectomy surgery as to the necessity of removing the middle turbinate in its entirety. PMID:3974381

  2. LCOGT Imaging Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufts, Joseph R.; Lobdill, Rich; Haldeman, Benjamin J.; Haynes, Rachel; Hawkins, Eric; Burleson, Ben; Jahng, David

    2008-07-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) is an ambitious project to build and operate, within 5 years, a worldwide robotic network of 50 0.4, 1, and 2 m telescopes sharing identical instrumentation and optimized for precision photometry of time-varying sources. The telescopes, instrumentation, and software are all developed in house with two 2 m telescopes already installed. The LCOGT Imaging Lab is responsible for assembly and characterization of the network's cameras and instrumentation. In addition to a fully equipped CNC machine shop, two electronics labs, and a future optics lab, the Imaging Lab is designed from the ground up to be a superb environment for bare detectors, precision filters, and assembled instruments. At the heart of the lab is an ISO class 5 cleanroom with full ionization. Surrounding this, the class 7 main lab houses equipment for detector characterization including QE and CTE, and equipment for measuring transmission and reflection of optics. Although the first science cameras installed, two TEC cooled e2v 42-40 deep depletion based units and two CryoTiger cooled Fairchild Imaging CCD486-BI based units, are from outside manufacturers, their 18 position filter wheels and the remainder of the network's science cameras, controllers, and instrumentation will be built in house. Currently being designed, the first generation LCOGT cameras for the network's 1 m telescopes use existing CCD486-BI devices and an in-house controller. Additionally, the controller uses digital signal processing to optimize readout noise vs. speed, and all instrumentation uses embedded microprocessors for communication over ethernet.

  3. SenseLab

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito J.; Marenco, Luis N.; Liu, Nian; Morse, Thomas M.; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Lai, Peter C.; Bahl, Gautam; Masiar, Peter; Lam, Hugo Y.K.; Lim, Ernest; Chen, Huajin; Nadkarni, Prakash; Migliore, Michele; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the latest developments in neuroscience information dissemination through the SenseLab suite of databases: NeuronDB, CellPropDB, ORDB, OdorDB, OdorMapDB, ModelDB and BrainPharm. These databases include information related to: (i) neuronal membrane properties and neuronal models, and (ii) genetics, genomics, proteomics and imaging studies of the olfactory system. We describe here: the new features for each database, the evolution of SenseLab’s unifying database architecture and instances of SenseLab database interoperation with other neuroscience online resources. PMID:17510162

  4. The NOAO Data Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Olsen, K.; Stobie, E. B.; Mighell, K. J.; Norris, P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the NOAO Data Lab to help community users take advantage of current large surveys and prepare them even larger surveys in the era of LSST. The Data Lab will allow users to efficiently utilize catalogs of billions of objects, combine traditional telescope image and spectral data with external archives, share custom results with collaborators, publish data products to other users, and experiment with analysis toolkits. Specific science cases will be used to develop a prototype framework and tools, allowing us to work directly with scientists from survey teams to ensure development remains focused on scientifically productive tasks.

  5. Modernizing Natural History: Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology in Transition.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the twentieth century calls to modernize natural history motivated a range of responses. It was unclear how research in natural history museums would participate in the significant technological and conceptual changes that were occurring in the life sciences. By the 1960s, the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, was among the few university-based natural history museums that were able to maintain their specimen collections and support active research. The MVZ therefore provides a window to the modernization of natural history. This paper concentrates on the directorial transitions that occurred at the MVZ between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the MVZ had four directors: Alden H. Miller (Director 1940-1965), an ornithologist; Aldo Starker Leopold (Acting Director 1965-1966), a conservationist and wildlife biologist; Oliver P. Pearson (Director 1966-1971), a physiologist and mammalogist; and David B. Wake (Director 1971-1998), a morphologist, developmental biologist, and herpetologist. The paper explores how a diversity of overlapping modernization strategies, including hiring new faculty, building infrastructure to study live animals, establishing new kinds of collections, and building modern laboratories combined to maintain collections at the MVZ's core. The paper examines the tensions between the different modernization strategies to inform an analysis of how and why some changes were institutionalized while others were short-lived. By exploring the modernization of collections-based research, this paper emphasizes the importance of collections in the transformation of the life sciences. PMID:22990484

  6. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  7. Spin-Off Successes of SETI Research at Berkeley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, K. A.; Anderson, D. P.; Bankay, R.; Chen, H.; Cobb, J.; Korpela, E. J.; Lebofsky, M.; Parsons, A.; von Korff, J.; Werthimer, D.

    2009-12-01

    Our group contributes to the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) by developing and using world-class signal processing computers to analyze data collected on the Arecibo telescope. Although no patterned signal of extra-terrestrial origin has yet been detected, and the immediate prospects for making such a detection are highly uncertain, the SETI@home project has nonetheless proven the value of pursuing such research through its impact on the fields of distributed computing, real-time signal processing, and radio astronomy. The SETI@home project has spun off the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) and the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Networked Computing (BOINC), both of which are responsible for catalyzing a smorgasbord of new research in scientific disciplines in countries around the world. Futhermore, the data collected and archived for the SETI@home project is proving valuable in data-mining experiments for mapping neutral galatic hydrogen and for detecting black-hole evaporation.

  8. Visualization and Communication of Pharmacometric Models With Berkeley Madonna

    PubMed Central

    Krause, A; Lowe, P J

    2014-01-01

    Population or other pharmacometric models are a useful means to describe, succinctly, the relationships between drug administration, exposure (concentration), and downstream changes in pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarkers and clinical endpoints, including the mixed effects of patient factors and random interpatient variation (fixed and random effects). However, showing a set of covariate equations to a drug development team is perhaps not the best way to get a message across. Visualization of the consequences of the knowledge encapsulated within the model is the key component. Yet in many instances, it can take hours, perhaps days, to collect ideas from teams, write scripts, and run simulations before presenting the results—by which time they have moved on. How much better, then, to seize the moment and work interactively to decide on a course of action, guided by the model. We exemplify here the visualization of pharmacometric models using the Berkeley Madonna software with a particular focus on interactive sessions. The examples are provided as Supplementary Material. PMID:24872204

  9. Design, operational experiences and beam results obtained with the SNS H- ion source and LEBT at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Thomae, R.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2002-04-15

    The ion source and Low-Energy Transport (LEBT) system that will provide H{sup -} ion beams to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)** Front End and the accelerator chain have been developed into a mature unit that fully satisfies the operational requirements through the commissioning and early operating phases of SNS. Compared to the early R&D version, many features of the ion source have been improved, and reliable operation at 6% duty factor has been achieved producing beam currents in the 35-mA range and above. LEBT operation proved that the purely electrostatic focusing principle is well suited to inject the ion beam into the RFQ accelerator, including the steering and pre-chopping functions. This paper will discuss the latest design features of the ion source and LEBT, give performance data for the integrated system, and report on commissioning results obtained with the SNS RFQ and Medium-Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) system. Prospects for further improvements will be outlined in concluding remarks.

  10. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.