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Sample records for beryllium halides

  1. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF BERYLLIUM WITH PLUTONIUM AND THE LIKE

    DOEpatents

    Runnals, O.J.C.

    1959-02-24

    The production of alloys of beryllium with one or more of the metals uranium, plutonium, actinium, americium, curium, thorium, and cerium are described. A halide salt of the metal to be alloyed with the beryllium is heated at 1300 deg C in the presence of beryllium to reduce the halide to metal and cause the latter to alloy directly with the beryllium. Although the heavy metal halides are more stable, thermodynamically, than the beryllium halides, the reducing reaction proceeds to completion if the beryllium halide product is continuously removed by vacuum distillation.

  2. Method of making alloys of beryllium with plutonium and the like

    DOEpatents

    Runnals, O J.C.

    1959-02-24

    The production or alloys of beryllium with one or more of the metals uranium, plutonium, actinium, americium, curium, thorium, and cerium is described. A halide salt or the metal to be alloyed with the beryllium is heated at l3O0 deg C in the presence of beryllium to reduce the halide to metal and cause the latter to alloy directly with the beryllium. Although the heavy metal halides are more stable, thermodynamically, than the beryllium halides, the reducing reaction proceeds to completion if the beryllium halide product is continuously removed by vacuum distillation.

  3. METHOD OF ALLOYING REACTIVE METALS WITH ALUMINUM OR BERYLLIUM

    DOEpatents

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1957-10-15

    A halide of one or more of the reactive metals, neptunium, cerium and americium, is mixed with aluminum or beryllium. The mass is heated at 700 to 1200 deg C, while maintaining a substantial vacuum of above 10/sup -3/ mm of mercury or better, until the halide of the reactive metal is reduced and the metal itself alloys with the reducing metal. The reaction proceeds efficiently due to the volatilization of the halides of the reducing metal, aluminum or beryllium.

  4. Beryllium Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... potential for exposure to it. People working in industries where beryllium is mined, processed, machined, or converted into metal, alloys, and other chemicals may be exposed to high levels of beryllium. ...

  5. Beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

  6. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... an immune response or “allergy” to beryllium metal, ceramic or alloy, termed beryllium sensitization (BeS). Beryllium sensitization ... Mroz MM, Newman LS. Beryllium disease screening in ceramics industry: Blood test performance and exposure-disease relations. ...

  7. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Smith, Frank M.; O'Leary, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  8. Beryllium fluoride film protects beryllium against corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O donnell, P. M.; Odonnell, P. M.

    1967-01-01

    Film of beryllium fluoride protects beryllium against corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in water containing chloride ion concentrations. The film is formed by exposing the beryllium to fluorine gas at 535 degrees C or higher and makes beryllium suitable for space applications.

  9. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  10. THORIUM-BERYLLIUM ALLOYS AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

    1959-09-01

    >The preparation is described of thorium-berylium alloys from halides of the metals by stmultaneously reducing thorium fluoride and beryllium fluoride with calcium at approximately 650 deg C and maintaining the temperature until the thorium-beryhltum alloy separates from the slag.

  11. Laser fabrication of beryllium components

    SciTech Connect

    Hanafee, J.E.; Ramos, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    Working with the beryllium industry on commercial applications and using prototype parts, the authors have found that the use of lasers provides a high-speed, low-cost method of cutting beryllium metal, beryllium alloys, and beryllium-beryllium oxide composites. In addition, they have developed laser welding processes for commercial structural grades of beryllium that do not need a filler metal; i.e., autogenous welds were made in commercial structural grades of beryllium by using lasers.

  12. The Silver Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrates the type of fractional bonding for solid silver halides. Treats the silver halides as electron excess compounds, and develops a model of a localized bonding unit that may be iterated in three dimensions to describe the bulk phase. (MLH)

  13. Superplasticity of beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papirov, I. I.; Nikolaenko, A. A.; Shokurov, V. S.; Tuzov, Yu. V.

    2016-04-01

    Beryllium is a metal having unique physicomechanical properties, including a record specific rigidity, but it undergoes cold and red brittleness. As a result of long-term investigations, we were the first to manufacture high-purity fine-grained beryllium, which has the room-temperature plasticity that is higher than that of commercial-purity powdered beryllium by an order of magnitude and exhibits superplastic flow at elevated temperatures. In this review, we summarize the results of the long-term study of the superplastic flow of beryllium and the mechanisms of high-temperature deformation.

  14. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  15. METHOD OF BRAZING BERYLLIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hanks, G.S.; Keil, R.W.

    1963-05-21

    A process is described for brazing beryllium metal parts by coating the beryllium with silver (65- 75 wt%)-aluminum alloy using a lithium fluoride (50 wt%)-lithium chloride flux, and heating the coated joint to a temperature of about 700 un. Concent 85% C for about 10 minutes. (AEC)

  16. METHOD OF WORKING BERYLLIUM

    DOEpatents

    Macherey, R.E.

    1959-02-01

    >A process is presented for fabricating beryllium metal. The billet cf beryllium metal is sheathed with a jacket of either copper or stainless steel. It may then be worked by drawing or the like at a tcmperature of 300 to 400 C.

  17. Radiation growth of beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakin, V. P.; Posevin, А. О.; Оbukhov, А. V.; Silantyev, P. P.

    2009-04-01

    Beryllium will be used as a neutron multiplier material in the present European HCPB (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed) blanket concept of the DEMO fusion reactor. Therefore, investigation of neutron irradiation influence on dimension stability of beryllium is very important. In this paper, the radiation damage of the TE-56 beryllium grade manufactured by hot extrusion was investigated. The beryllium samples were irradiated in the SM reactor at the temperatures of 70 °С and 200 °С up to neutron fluence of (1.3-14.2) 10 22 cm -2 (Е > 0.1 MeV). The measurements of the sample dimensions and density as well as microstructure examinations by X-rays and TEM were carried out. It was shown that superposition of two processes - radiation growth and anisotropic swelling occurs in beryllium under neutron irradiation.

  18. Crucible cast from beryllium oxide and refractory cement is impervious to flux and molten metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrzebski, Z. D.

    1966-01-01

    Crucible from a mixture of a beryllium oxide aggregate and hydraulic refractory cement, and coated with an impervious refractory oxide will not deteriorate in the presence of fused salt- molten metal mixtures such as uranium- magnesium-zinc-halide salt systems. Vessels cast by this process are used in the flux reduction of oxides of thorium and uranium.

  19. Beryllium disease: a clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, H.L.

    1980-02-01

    A relatively new occupational disease, beryllium poisoning, is discussed. The history of this respiratory disease among workers after beryllium exposure from extraction and alloy manufacturing is not well documented in the US Attempts by industry to delay investigations into beryllium toxicity are described. The specific incidents occurring at a fluorescent lamp manufacturing plant in Salem, Massachusetts are presented. Clinical observations of chronic beryllium disease are discussed. Symptoms are described. The current status of diagnosis and treatment of beryllium poisoning is presented.

  20. Beryllium Manufacturing Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A

    2006-06-30

    This report is one of a number of reports that will be combined into a handbook on beryllium. Each report covers a specific topic. To-date, the following reports have been published: (1) Consolidation and Grades of Beryllium; (2) Mechanical Properties of Beryllium and the Factors Affecting these Properties; (3) Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Beryllium; (4) Joining of Beryllium; (5) Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and other Properties of Beryllium; and (6) Beryllium Coating (Deposition) Processes and the Influence of Processing Parameters on Properties and Microstructure. The conventional method of using ingot-cast material is unsuitable for manufacturing a beryllium product. Beryllium is a highly reactive metal with a high melting point, making it susceptible to react with mold-wall materials forming beryllium compounds (BeO, etc.) that become entrapped in the solidified metal. In addition, the grain size is excessively large, being 50 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, while grain sizes of 15 {micro}m or less are required to meet acceptable strength and ductility requirements. Attempts at refining the as-cast-grain size have been unsuccessful. Because of the large grain size and limited slip systems, the casting will invariably crack during a hot-working step, which is an important step in the microstructural-refining process. The high reactivity of beryllium together with its high viscosity (even with substantial superheat) also makes it an unsuitable candidate for precision casting. In order to overcome these problems, alternative methods have been developed for the manufacturing of beryllium. The vast majority of these methods involve the use of beryllium powders. The powders are consolidated under pressure in vacuum at an elevated temperature to produce vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) blocks and vacuum hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) forms and billets. The blocks (typically cylindrical), which are produced over a wide range of sizes (up to 183 cm dia. by 61

  1. Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Parsonage, Tom; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrications of large Beryllium optical components are fundamentally limited by available facility capabilities. To overcome this limitation, NASA funded Brush Wellman Corp to study a Be joining process. Four 76 mm diameters samples and a 0.5 mm diameter Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (JBMD) were fabricated. This presentation will review the fabrication of these samples and summarize the results of their cryogenic testing at MSFCs XRCF.

  2. Some Properties of Beryllium Oxide and Beryllium Oxide - Columbium Ceramals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robards, C F; Gangler, J J

    1951-01-01

    High-temperature tensile and thermal-shock investigations were conducted on beryllium oxide and beryllium oxide plus columbium metal additions. X-ray diffraction and metallographic results are given. The tensile strength of 6150 pounds per square inch for beryllium oxide at 1800 degrees F compared favorably with the zirconia bodies previously tested. Additions of 2, 5, 8, 10, 12, and 15 percent by weight of columbium metal failed to improve the shock resistance over that of pure beryllium oxide.

  3. Containerless processing of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wouch, G.; Keith, G. H.; Frost, R. T.; Pinto, N. P.

    1977-01-01

    Melting and solidification of a beryllium alloy containing 1.5% BeO by weight in the weightless environment of space has produced cast beryllium with a relatively uniform dispersion of BeO throughout. Examination of the cast material shows that it is coarse grained, although the BeO is not heavily agglomerated in the flight specimen. Ground based comparison experiments show extreme agglomeration and segregation of BeO, resulting in large zones which are practically free of the oxide. Several postulated hypotheses for the failure to grain refine the beryllium are formulated. These are: (1) spherodization of the BeO particles during specimen preparation and during the molten phase of the experiment; (2) loss of nucleation potency through aging in the molten phase; and (3) inability of BeO to act as a grain refiner for beryllium. Further investigation with non spherodized particles and shorter dwell times molten may delineate which of these hypotheses are valid. The results of this flight experiment indicate that the weightless environment of space is an important asset in conducting research to find grain refiners for beryllium and other metals for which cast dispersions of grain refining agents cannot be prepared terrestrially due to gravitationally driven settling and agglomeration.

  4. HANFORD BERYLLIUM STEERING GROUP CHARTER

    SciTech Connect

    HEWITT, E.R.

    2003-11-19

    The purpose of the Beryllium Steering Group (BSG) is to (1) provide a forum for discussion of beryllium issues and concerns among Hanford prime contractors and DOE; (2) review proposed changes in prime contractor Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Programs (CBDPP) to determine if these changes will result in significant impacts to other contractors and their employees; (3) review proposed changes to Beryllium Hanford Facilities List prior to updating of this list.

  5. Beryllium and compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Beryllium and compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 41 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  6. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF BERYLLIUM, BERYLLIUM CHLORIDE, BERYLLIUM FLUORIDE, AND BERYLLIUM NITRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Beryllium is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B2 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a). vidence on potential arcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient," and the evidence from human studies is "Inadequa...

  7. Designer ligands for beryllium: Stability and detection of beryllium?

    SciTech Connect

    Keizer, T. S.; Scott, B. L.; Sauer, N. N.; McCleskey, T. M.

    2004-01-01

    With the incorporation of beryllium into mainstream consumer products, there is a concern with the environmental and health implications of wide spread beryllium use. With little experimental research undertaken to address the toxic nature of beryllium (the worst case leading to chronic beryllium disease), there is a need for a fundamental understanding of the way the metal interacts with the environment and it's interaction within the human body. In addition, a better insight into beryllium interactions can lead to improvements in detection methods, which are vital with respect to preventing exposure and for the rapid clean up of beryllium in the environment. The MHC-class II receptor has been identified as the receptor that binds Be in the body. The proposed key binding sites in the antigen consist of two sections of the sequence, and each section contains three carboxylates in a row. Therefore, efforts in characterization of compounds with multiple carboxylates and hydroxides species are pursued.

  8. Reprocessing technology development for irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Sakamoto, N.; Tatenuma, K.

    1995-09-01

    At present, beryllium is under consideration as a main candidate material for neutron multiplier and plasma facing material in a fusion reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the beryllium reprocessing technology for effective resource use. And, we have proposed reprocessing technology development on irradiated beryllium used in a fusion reactor. The preliminary reprocessing tests were performed using un-irradiated and irradiated beryllium. At first, we performed beryllium separation tests using un-irradiated beryllium specimens. Un-irradiated beryllium with beryllium oxide which is a main impurity and some other impurities were heat-treated under chlorine gas flow diluted with Ar gas. As the results high purity beryllium chloride was obtained in high yield. And it appeared that beryllium oxide and some other impurities were removed as the unreactive matter, and the other chloride impurities were separated by the difference of sublimation temperature on beryllium chloride. Next, we performed some kinds of beryllium purification tests from beryllium chloride. And, metallic beryllium could be recovered from beryllium chloride by the reduction with dry process. In addition, as the results of separation and purification tests using irradiated beryllium specimens, it appeared that separation efficiency of Co-60 from beryllium was above 96%. It is considered that about 4% Co-60 was carried from irradiated beryllium specimen in the form of cobalt chloride. And removal efficiency of tritium from irradiated beryllium was above 95%.

  9. T cell recognition of beryllium.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shaodong; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; McKee, Amy S; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium and characterized by the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to beryllium-induced disease is strongly associated with HLA-DP alleles possessing a glutamic acid at the 69th position of the β-chain (βGlu69). The structure of HLA-DP2, the most prevalent βGlu69-containing molecule, revealed a unique solvent-exposed acidic pocket that includes βGlu69 and represents the putative beryllium-binding site. The delineation of mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that complete the αβTCR ligand for beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells suggests a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of altered self-peptides, blurring the distinction between hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. PMID:23978481

  10. Rocky Flats Beryllium Health Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Stange, A W; Furman, F J; Hilmas, D E

    1996-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Beryllium Health Surveillance Program (BHSP), initiated in June 1991, was designed to provide medical surveillance for current and former employees exposed to beryllium. The BHSP identifies individuals who have developed beryllium sensitivity using the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT). A detailed medical evaluation to determine the prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is offered to individuals identified as beryllium sensitized or to those who have chest X-ray changes suggestive of CBD. The BHSP has identified 27 cases of CBD and another 74 cases of beryllium sensitization out of 4268 individuals tested. The distribution of BeLPT values for normal, sensitized, and CBD-identified individuals is described. Based on the information collected during the first 3 1/3 years of the BHSP, the BeLPT is the most effective means for the early identification of beryllium-sensitized individuals and to identify individuals who may have CBD. The need for BeLPT retesting is demonstrated through the identification of beryllium sensitization in individuals who previously tested normal. Posterior/anterior chest X-rays were not effective in the identification of CBD. PMID:8933045

  11. Rocky Flats beryllium health surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, A.W.; Furman, F.J.; Hilmas, D.E.

    1996-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Beryllium Health Surveillance Program (BHSP), initiated in June 1991, was designed to provide medical surveillance for current and former employees exposed to beryllium. The BHSP identifies individuals who have developed beryllium sensitivity using the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT). A detailed medical evaluation to determine the prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is offered to individuals identified as beryllium sensitized or to those who have chest X-ray changes suggestive of CBD. The BHSP has identified 27 cases of CBD and another 74 cases of beryllium sensitization out of 4268 individuals tested. The distribution of BeLPT values for normal, sensitized, and CBD-identified individuals is described. Based on the information collected during the first 3 1/3 years of the BHSP, the BeLPT is the most effective means for the early identification of beryllium-sensitized individuals and to identify individuals who may have CBD. The need for BeLPT retesting is demonstrated through the identification of beryllium sensitization in individuals who previously tested normal. Posterior/anterior chest X-rays were not effective in the identification of CBD. 12 refs., 8 tabs.

  12. Joining of Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A

    2006-02-01

    A handbook dealing with the many aspects of beryllium that would be important for the users of this metal is currently being prepared. With an introduction on the applications, advantages and limitations in the use of this metal the following topics will be discussed in this handbook: physical, thermal, and nuclear properties; extraction from the ores; purification and casting of ingots; production and types of beryllium powders; consolidation methods, grades, and properties; mechanical properties with emphasis on the various factors affecting these properties; forming and mechanical working; welding, brazing, bonding, and fastening; machining; powder deposition; corrosion; health aspects; and examples of production of components. This report consists of ''Section X--Joining'' from the handbook. The prefix X is maintained here for the figures, tables and references. In this section the different methods used for joining beryllium and the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of each are presented. The methods discussed are fusion welding, brazing, solid state bonding (diffusion bonding and deformation bonding), soldering, and mechanical fastening. Since beryllium has a high affinity for oxygen and nitrogen with the formation of oxides and nitrides, considerable care must be taken on heating the metal, to protect it from the ambient atmosphere. In addition, mating surfaces must be cleaned and joints must be designed to minimize residual stresses as well as locations for stress concentration (notch effects). In joining any two metals the danger exists of having galvanic corrosion if the part is subjected to moisture or to any type of corroding environment. This becomes a problem if the less noble (anodic) metal has a significantly smaller area than the more noble (cathodic) metal since the ions (positive charges) from the anodic (corroding) metal must correspond to the number of electrons (negative charges) involved at the cathode. Beryllium is anodic to almost

  13. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, Carl M; Adams, Chris D; Hull, Lawrence M; Gray III, George T; Prime, Michael B; Addessio, Francis L; Wynn, Thomas A; Brown, Eric N

    2012-08-24

    Beryllium metal has many excellent structural properties in addition to its unique radiation characteristics, including: high elastic modulus, low Poisson's ratio, low density, and high melting point. However, it suffers from several major mechanical drawbacks: 1) high anisotropy - due to its hexagonal lattice structure and its susceptibility to crystallographic texturing; 2) susceptibility to impurity-induced fracture - due to grain boundary segregation; and 3) low intrinsic ductility at ambient temperatures thereby limiting fabricability. While large ductility results from deformation under the conditions of compression, the material can exhibit a brittle behavior under tension. Furthermore, there is a brittle to ductile transition at approximately 200 C under tensile conditions. While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. The beryllium used in this study was Grade S200-F (Brush Wellman, Inc., Elmore, OH) material. The work focused on high strain rate deformation and examine the validity of constitutive models in deformation rate regimes, including shock, the experiments were modeled using a Lagrangian hydrocode. Two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, were calibrated using the same set of quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data taken at temperatures from 77K to 873K and strain rates from 0.001/sec to 4300/sec. In spite of being calibrated on the same data, the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured wave profiles. These high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to

  14. 5. VIEW OF BERYLLIUM PROCESSING AREA, ROLLING MILL. BERYLLIUM FORMING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF BERYLLIUM PROCESSING AREA, ROLLING MILL. BERYLLIUM FORMING BEGAN IN SIDE A OF THE BUILDING IN 1962. (11/5/73) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. Chronic Beryllium Disease and Sensitization at a Beryllium Processing Facility

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, Kenneth; Hertzberg, Vicki; Rice, Carol; Reilly, Mary Jo; Aronchick, Judith; Parker, John E.; Regovich, Jackie; Rossman, Milton

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a medical screening for beryllium disease of 577 former workers from a beryllium processing facility. The screening included a medical and work history questionnaire, a chest radiograph, and blood lymphocyte proliferation testing for beryllium. A task exposure and a job exposure matrix were constructed to examine the association between exposure to beryllium and the development of beryllium disease. More than 90% of the cohort completed the questionnaire, and 74% completed the blood and radiograph component of the screening. Forty-four (7.6%) individuals had definite or probable chronic beryllium disease (CBD), and another 40 (7.0%) were sensitized to beryllium. The prevalence of CBD and sensitization in our cohort was greater than the prevalence reported in studies of other beryllium-exposed cohorts. Various exposure measures evaluated included duration; first decade worked; last decade worked; cumulative, mean, and highest job; and highest task exposure to beryllium (to both soluble and nonsoluble forms). Soluble cumulative and mean exposure levels were lower in individuals with CBD. Sensitized individuals had shorter duration of exposure, began work later, last worked longer ago, and had lower cumulative and peak exposures and lower nonsoluble cumulative and mean exposures. A possible explanation for the exposure–response findings of our study may be an interaction between genetic predisposition and a decreased permanence of soluble beryllium in the body. Both CBD and sensitization occurred in former workers whose mean daily working lifetime average exposures were lower than the current allowable Occupational Safety and Health Administration workplace air level of 2 μg/m3 and the Department of Energy guideline of 0.2 μg/m3. PMID:16203248

  16. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  17. Method for fabricating beryllium structures

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1977-01-01

    Thin-walled beryllium structures are prepared by plasma spraying a mixture of beryllium powder and about 2500 to 4000 ppm silicon powder onto a suitable substrate, removing the plasma-sprayed body from the substrate and placing it in a sizing die having a coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of the beryllium, exposing the plasma-sprayed body to a moist atmosphere, outgassing the plasma-sprayed body, and then sintering the plasma-sprayed body in an inert atmosphere to form a dense, low-porosity beryllium structure of the desired thin-wall configuration. The addition of the silicon and the exposure of the plasma-sprayed body to the moist atmosphere greatly facilitate the preparation of the beryllium structure while minimizing the heretofore deleterious problems due to grain growth and grain orientation.

  18. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H.

    1995-09-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m{sup 2} to 5 MW/m{sup 2} and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m{sup 2}. These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures {le} 600{degrees}C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T{sub max} {le} 750{degrees}C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with {Phi} = 25 MW/m{sup 2} and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed.

  19. The INEL beryllium multiplication experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; King, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    The experiment to measure the multiplication of 14-MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium has been completed. The experiment consists of determining the ratio of {sup 56}Mn activities induced in a large manganese bath by a central 14-MeV neutron source, with and without a beryllium sample surrounding the source. In the manganese bath method a neutron source is placed at the center of a totally-absorbing aqueous solution of MnSo{sub 4}. The capture of neutrons by Mn produces a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the emission rate of the source. As applied to the measurement of the multiplication of 14- MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium, the neutron source is a tritium target placed at the end of the drift tube of a small deuteron accelerator. Surrounding the source is a sample chamber. When the sample chamber is empty, the neutrons go directly to the surrounding MnSO{sub 4} solution, and produce a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate. When the chamber contains a beryllium sample, the neutrons first enter the beryllium and multiply through the (n,2n) process. Neutrons escaping from the beryllium enter the bath and produce a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate multiplied by the effective value of the multiplication in bulk beryllium. The ratio of the activities with and without the sample present is proportional to the multiplication value. Detailed calculations of the multiplication and all the systematic effects were made with the Monte Carlo program MCNP, utilizing both the Young and Stewart and the ENDF/B-VI evaluations for beryllium. Both data sets produce multiplication values that are in excellent agreement with the measurements for both raw and corrected values of the multiplication. We conclude that there is not real discrepancy between experimental and calculated values for the multiplication of neutrons in bulk beryllium. 12 figs., 11 tabs., 18 refs.

  20. Lessons learned in recent beryllium mirror fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, J. A.; Lombard, C. M.; Sloan, G. B.; Moore, W. W.; Martin, C. E.

    1991-09-01

    The lessons learned in recent fabrication of beryllium mirrors could have a significant impact on how beryllium optics of the future are produced. This paper provides an overview of the latest techniques for beryllium optics fabrication and a comparison of the results achieved. Specific technical ureas discussed include: new beryllium powders, results of consolidation, beryllium material property improvements, modified machining procedures, thermal stabilization, single point turning, burnishing techniques, replica faceplates, support structure bonding, mirror superpolishing, and new optical testing techniques.

  1. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  2. The natural history of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, L.S. |; Lloyd, J.; Daniloff, E.

    1996-10-01

    With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressing into clinical disease. This article discusses the historical, recent, and ongoing studies germane to our understanding of CBD natural history, including the immunologic and inflammatory basis of the disease, the environmental and host risk factors for disease progression, biological markers of disease severity and activity that may help predict outcome, and the implications for broad-based workplace screening to identify patients at the earliest stages of beryllium sensitization and disease. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  3. The natural history of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L S; Lloyd, J; Daniloff, E

    1996-01-01

    With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressing into clinical disease. This article discusses the historical, recent, and ongoing studies germane to our understanding of CBD natural history, including the immunologic and inflammatory basis of the disease, the environmental and host risk factors for disease progression, biological markers of disease severity and activity that may help predict outcome, and the implications for broad-based workplace screening to identify patients at the earliest stages of beryllium sensitization and disease. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 1. D PMID:8933038

  4. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. N.; Cady, C. M.; Gray, G. T., III; Hull, L. M.; Cooley, J. H.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Addessio, F. L.

    2014-05-01

    Explosively driven arrested beryllium experiments were performed with post mortem characterization to evaluate the failure behaviors. The test samples were encapsulated in an aluminum assembly that was large relative to the sample, and the assembly features both axial and radial momentum traps. The sample carrier was inserted from the explosively-loaded end and has features to lock the carrier to the surrounding cylinder using the induced plastic flow. Calculations with Lagrangian codes showed that the tensile stresses experienced by the Be sample were below the spall stress. Metallographic characterization of the arrested Be showed radial cracks present in the samples may have been caused by bending moments. Fractography showed the fractures propagated from the side of the sample closest to the explosives, the side with the highest tensile stress. There was evidence that the fractures may have propagated from the circumferential crack outward and downward radially.

  5. PREPARATION OF HALIDES OF PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Garner, C.S.; Johns, I.B.

    1958-09-01

    A dry chemical method is described for preparing plutonium halides, which consists in contacting plutonyl nitrate with dry gaseous HCl or HF at an elevated temperature. The addition to the reaction gas of a small quantity of an oxidizing gas or a reducing gas will cause formation of the tetra- or tri-halide of plutonium as desired.

  6. Adsorption on Alkali Halides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzua Duran, Gilberto Antonio

    1995-01-01

    Using a variety of interionic potentials, I have computed the configurations of adsorbed alkali halides monomers on the (001) surface of selected alkali halides crystals. In the majority of cases studied it is found that the monomer adsorbs perpendicular to the surface with the cation sitting nearly on top of the surface anion. In about ten percent of the cases though the monomer adsorbs tilted from the vertical. In these cases the ion that is closer to the surface can be the cation or the anion. The effect of polarization forces is found to be important. In order to discuss the effects of surface retaxation with adsorbates, I have evaluated the surface relaxation of the alkali halide crystals, using a shell model for the interionic forces. It is found that surface relaxation and rumpling are generally small, especially when the van der Waals forces are included. A theory of the effect of substrate vibrations on the binding of an adsorbed atom is developed. At T = 0 the binding energy is D_0-E, where D_0 is the surface well depth (classical binding energy) and E is the quantum correction. For several simple models, it is found that E is surprisingly model-independent. We compare D _0-E with the binding energies to a rigid substrate, D_0-E_{rs}, and to a vibrationally averaged substrate, D _0-E_{va}. We prove that E_{va}>=q E>=q E_ {rs} and that similar relations hold at finite temperature for the free energy of binding. In most cases E_{rs} is better than E_{va} as an approximation to E.

  7. Beryllium Interactions in Molten Salts

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Smolik; M. F. Simpson; P. J. Pinhero; M. Hara; Y. Hatano; R. A. Anderl; J. P. Sharpe; T. Terai; S. Tanaka; D. A. Petti; D.-K. Sze

    2006-01-01

    Molten flibe (2LiF·BeF2) is a candidate as a cooling and tritium breeding media for future fusion power plants. Neutron interactions with the salt will produce tritium and release excess free fluorine ions. Beryllium metal has been demonstrated as an effective redox control agent to prevent free fluorine, or HF species, from reacting with structural metal components. The extent and rate of beryllium solubility in a pot design experiments to suppress continuously supplied hydrogen fluoride gas has been measured and modeled[ ]. This paper presents evidence of beryllium loss from specimens, a dependence of the loss upon bi-metal coupling, i.e., galvanic effect, and the partitioning of the beryllium to the salt and container materials. Various posttest investigative methods, viz., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to explore this behavior.

  8. Halide laser glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-14

    Energy storage and energy extraction are of prime importance for efficient laser action and are affected by the line strengths and linewidths of optical transitions, excited-state lifetimes, nonradiative decay processes, spectroscopic inhomogeneities, nonlinear refractive index, and damage threshold. These properties are all host dependent. To illustrate this, the spectroscopic properties of Nd/sup 3 +/ have been measured in numerous oxide, oxyhalide, and halide glasses. A table summarizes the reported ranges of stimulated emission cross sections, peak wavelengths, linewidths, and radiative lifetimes associated with the /sup 4/F/sub 3/2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/I/sub 11/2/ lasing transition.

  9. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET.

  10. Beryllium Related Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F

    2008-12-23

    In recent months, LLNL has identified, commenced, and implemented a series of interim controls, compensatory measures, and initiatives to ensure worker safety, and improve safety processes with regards to potential worker exposure to beryllium. Many of these actions have been undertaken in response to the NNSA Independent Review (COR-TS-5/15/2008-8550) received by LLNL in November of 2008. Others are the result of recent discoveries, events or incidents, and lessons learned, or were scheduled corrective actions from earlier commitments. Many of these actions are very recent in nature, or are still in progress, and vary in the formality of implementation. Actions are being reviewed for effectiveness as they progress. The documentation of implementation, and review of effectiveness, when appropriate, of these actions will be addressed as part of the formal Corrective Action Plan addressing the Independent Review. The mitigating actions taken fall into the following categories: (1) Responses to specific events/concerns; (2) Development of interim controls; (3) Review of ongoing activities; and (4) Performance improvement measures.

  11. Processing Irradiated Beryllium For Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    T. J. Tranter; R. D. Tillotson; N. R. Mann; G. R. Longhurst

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a process for decontaminating irradiated beryllium that will allow it to be disposed of through normal radwaste channels. Thus, the primary objectives of this ongoing study are to remove the transuranic (TRU) isotopes to less than 100 nCi/g and remove {sup 60}Co, and {sup 137}Cs, to levels that will allow the beryllium to be contact handled. One possible approach that appears to have the most promise is aqueous dissolution and separation of the isotopes by selected solvent extraction followed by precipitation, resulting in a granular form for the beryllium that may be fixed to prevent it from becoming respirable and therefore hazardous. Beryllium metal was dissolved in nitric and fluorboric acids. Isotopes of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 85}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs were then added to make a surrogate beryllium waste solution. A series of batch contacts was performed with the spiked simulant using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD) and polyethylene glycol diluted with sulfone to extract the isotopes of Cs and Sr. Another series of batch contacts was performed using a combination of octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in tributyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with dodecane for extracting the isotopes of Pu and Am. The results indicate that greater than 99.9% removal can be achieved for each isotope with only three contact stages.

  12. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed. PMID:25530462

  13. Machining of low percentage beryllium copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habermeyer, J. G.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne beryllium sampling during machining of low percentage beryllium-copper alloys shows that normal dry machining creates 45.2 microgram/cu m of airborne beryllium in the casting operators breathing zone and 2.3 microgram/cu m in an adjacent machine working area. A small vacuum system placed over the tool effectively removes airborne beryllium in the breathing zone sample to 0.2 microgram/cu m.

  14. Mineral resource of the month: beryllium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses information about Beryllium. It notes that Beryllium is a light metal that has a gray color. The metal is used in the production of parts and devices including bearings, computer-chip heat sinks, and output windows of X-ray tubes. The article mentions Beryllium's discovery in 1798 by French chemist, Louis-Nicolas Vanquelin. It cites that bertrandite and beryl are the principal mineral components for the commercial production of beryllium.

  15. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL HALIDES

    DOEpatents

    Hendrickson, A.V.

    1958-11-18

    The conversion of plutonium halides from plutonium peroxide can be done by washing the peroxide with hydrogen peroxide, drying the peroxide, passing a dry gaseous hydrohalide over the surface of the peroxide at a temperature of about lOO icient laborato C until the reaction rate has stabillzed, and then ralsing the reaction temperature to between 400 and 600 icient laborato C until the conversion to plutonium halide is substantially complete.

  16. 10 CFR 850.33 - Beryllium emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Beryllium emergencies. (a) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(l) for handling beryllium emergencies related to decontamination and decommissioning operations. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(q) for handling beryllium emergencies related to all...

  17. 10 CFR 850.33 - Beryllium emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Beryllium emergencies. (a) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(l) for handling beryllium emergencies related to decontamination and decommissioning operations. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(q) for handling beryllium emergencies related to all...

  18. 10 CFR 850.33 - Beryllium emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Beryllium emergencies. (a) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(l) for handling beryllium emergencies related to decontamination and decommissioning operations. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(q) for handling beryllium emergencies related to all...

  19. 10 CFR 850.33 - Beryllium emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Beryllium emergencies. (a) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(l) for handling beryllium emergencies related to decontamination and decommissioning operations. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(q) for handling beryllium emergencies related to all...

  20. 10 CFR 850.33 - Beryllium emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Beryllium emergencies. (a) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(l) for handling beryllium emergencies related to decontamination and decommissioning operations. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(q) for handling beryllium emergencies related to all...

  1. Beryllium--important for national defense

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the lightest and stiffest metals, but there was little industrial demand for it until the 1930s and 1940s when the aerospace, defense, and nuclear sectors began using beryllium and its compounds. Beryllium is now classified by the U.S. Department of Defense as a strategic and critical material because it is used in products that are vital to national security. The oxide form of beryllium was identified in 1797, and scientists first isolated metallic beryllium in 1828. The United States is the world's leading source of beryllium. A single mine at Spor Mountain, Utah, produced more than 85 percent of the beryllium mined worldwide in 2010. China produced most of the remainder, and less than 2 percent came from Mozambique and other countries. National stockpiles also provide significant amounts of beryllium for processing. To help predict where future beryllium supplies might be located, U.S.Geological Survey (USGS) scientists study how and where beryllium resources are concentrated in Earth's crust and use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered beryllium resources may exist. Techniques to assess mineral resources have been developed by the USGS to support the stewardship of Federal lands and to better evaluate mineral resource availability in a global context. The USGS also compiles statistics and information on the worldwide supply of, demand for, and flow of beryllium. These data are used to inform U.S. national policymaking.

  2. METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF SINTERABLE BERYLLIUM OXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Sturm, B.J.

    1963-08-13

    High-purity beryllium oxide for nuclear reactor applications can be prepared by precipitation of beryllium oxalate monohydrate from aqueous solution at a temperature above 50 deg C and subsequent calcination of the precipitate. Improved purification with respect to metallic impurities is obtained, and the product beryllium oxide sinters reproducibly to a high density. (AEC)

  3. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M.; Tsai, H.

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  4. Cryogenic Properties of Aluminum-Beryllium and Beryllium Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation were obtained for the aluminum- beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 (38%Al-62%Be), at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-32O F) and (- 252.8 C) (-423 F)) temperatures, and for an optical grade beryllium, O-30H (99%Be), at -252.8 C. AlBeMet162 material was purchased to the requirements of SAE- AMs7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions". O-30H material was purchased to the requirements of Brush Wellman Inc. specification O-30H Optical Grade Beryllium. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths for extruded AlBeMet162 material increased with decreasing temperature, and the percent elongation decreased with decreasing temperature. Design properties for the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percent elongation for extruded AlBeMetl62 were generated. It was not possible to distinguish a difference in the room and cryogenic ultimate strength for the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'ed) O-30H material. The O-30H elongation decreased with decreasing temperature.

  5. Cryogenic Properties of Aluminum Beryllium and Beryllium Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 (38%Al-62%Be), at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-320 F) and (-252.8 C) (-423 F)) temperatures, and for an optical grade beryllium, O-30H (99%Be), at -252.8 C. AlBeMetl62 material was purchased to the requirements of SAE-AMS7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions." O-30H material was purchased to the requirements of Brush Wellman Inc. specification O-30H Optical Grade Beryllium. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths for extruded AlBeMetl62 material increased with decreasing temperature, and the percent elongation decreased with decreasing temperature. Design properties for the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percent elongation for extruded AlBeMetl62 were generated. It was not possible to distinguish a difference in the room and cryogenic ultimate strength for the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'ed) O-30H material. The O30H elongation decreased with decreasing temperature.

  6. Beryllium Technology Research in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Robert A. Anderl; M. Kay Adleer-Flitton; Gretchen E. Matthern; Troy J. Tranter; Kendall J. Hollis

    2005-02-01

    While most active research involving beryllium in the United States remains tied strongly to biological effects, there are several areas of technology development in the last two years that should be mentioned. (1) Beryllium disposed of in soil vaults at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) has been encapsulated in-situ by high-temperature and pressure injection of a proprietary wax based material to inhibit corrosion. (2) A research program to develop a process for removing heavy metals and cobalt from irradiated beryllium using solvent extraction techniques has been initiated to remove components that prevent the beryllium from being disposed of as ordinary radioactive waste. (3) The JUPITER-II program at the INL Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has addressed the REDOX reaction of beryllium in molten Flibe (a mixture of LiF and BeF2) to control tritium, particularly in the form of HF, bred in the Flibe by reactions involving both beryllium and lithium. (4) Work has been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to produce beryllium high heat flux components by plasma spray deposition on macro-roughened substrates. Finally, (5) corrosion studies on buried beryllium samples at the RWMC have shown that the physical form of some of the corroded beryllium is very filamentary and asbestos-like. This form of beryllium may exacerbate the contraction of chronic beryllium disease.

  7. US Beryllium Case Registry through 1977

    SciTech Connect

    Sprince, N.L.; Kazemi, H.

    1980-02-01

    A synopsis of the cases reported to the Beryllium Case Registry between 1973 and 1977 is presented. As of 1973, there were 832 cases of beryllium disease entered into the Registry. In the five years since that report, 55 additional cases have been added, 40 men and 15 women. Exposures occured in the electronics and nuclear industries in the production and use of beryllium containing alloys and beryllium oxide ceramis. Pathological changes in the lung tissue are described. Cases continue to be reported in which the diagnosis was sarcoidosis until the history of beryllium exposure led to the finding of beryllium in the lung tissue or mediastinal lymph node biopsy. Data from the Registry support the fact that chronic beryllium disease is a continued occupational hazard.

  8. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Kato, M.

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  9. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-11-24

    A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

  10. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Zwick, Bill D.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Clark, David L.; Watkin, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  11. Notes on UHV beryllium windows

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.L.

    1986-10-01

    Techniques are described for making large ultrahigh vacuum beryllium windows for use in synchrotron radiation installations. Procedures are given for affecting both hard brazed seals and demountable seals involving either lead or copper gaskets. Brazed seals can be made to either stainless steel or copper. Possible alternative methods are suggested.

  12. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environment, Safety, Health & Quality

    2009-12-28

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, “Minnema Report.”

  13. Radiochemical synthesis of pure anhydrous metal halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Method uses radiation chemistry as practical tool for inorganic preparations and in particular deposition of metals by irradiation of their aqueous metal salt solutions with high energy electrons. Higher valence metal halide is dissolved in organic liquid and exposed to high energy electrons. This causes metal halide to be reduced to a lower valence metal halide.

  14. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOEpatents

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  15. Beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease at a former nuclear weapons facility.

    PubMed

    Stange, A W; Hilmas, D E; Furman, F J; Gatliffe, T R

    2001-03-01

    The prevalence of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease by job category was examined among individuals tested in the Rocky Flats Beryllium Health Surveillance Program. The program offered ongoing beryllium health surveillance for any current or former employee who believed they may have been exposed to beryllium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Of the 18,589 living individuals contacted, 7,573 requested participation and 6,614 (87.3%) eventually participated. Of this group, 78.2 percent were found to have verifiable job and building histories. The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test was used to identify beryllium-sensitized individuals. Sensitization and chronic beryllium disease rates were analyzed with respect to gender, building work location(s), and length of employment at Rocky Flats. Several job categories and buildings were strongly associated with the 81 cases of chronic beryllium disease and the additional 154 cases of beryllium sensitization in this population. Beryllium sensitization was highest among beryllium machinists, 11.4 percent (odds ratio = 3.04, compared to the remainder of those tested, 95 % confidence interval = 1.48, 3.97) and health physics technicians, 11.9 percent (odds ratio = 2.87, 95% confidence interval = 1.12, 7.36). However, odds ratios were also increased among custodial employees, 5.64 percent (odds ratio = 1.30, 95% confidence interval = 0.92, 1.85) and other job titles that were thought to have only minimal potential for exposure to beryllium. PMID:11297055

  16. OVERVIEW OF BERYLLIUM SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, M

    2009-04-01

    Because of its unique properties as a lightweight metal with high tensile strength, beryllium is widely used in applications including cell phones, golf clubs, aerospace, and nuclear weapons. Beryllium is also encountered in industries such as aluminium manufacturing, and in environmental remediation projects. Workplace exposure to beryllium particulates is a growing concern, as exposure to minute quantities of anthropogenic forms of beryllium may lead to sensitization and to chronic beryllium disease, which can be fatal and for which no cure is currently known. Furthermore, there is no known exposure-response relationship with which to establish a 'safe' maximum level of beryllium exposure. As a result, the current trend is toward ever lower occupational exposure limits, which in turn make exposure assessment, both in terms of sampling and analysis, more challenging. The problems are exacerbated by difficulties in sample preparation for refractory forms of beryllium, such as beryllium oxide, and by indications that some beryllium forms may be more toxic than others. This chapter provides an overview of sources and uses of beryllium, health risks, and occupational exposure limits. It also provides a general overview of sampling, analysis, and data evaluation issues that will be explored in greater depth in the remaining chapters. The goal of this book is to provide a comprehensive resource to aid personnel in a wide variety of disciplines in selecting sampling and analysis methods that will facilitate informed decision-making in workplace and environmental settings.

  17. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to

  18. Advances in Identifying Beryllium Sensitization and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Dan; Kowalski, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Beryllium is a lightweight metal with unique qualities related to stiffness, corrosion resistance, and conductivity. While there are many useful applications, researchers in the 1930s and l940s linked beryllium exposure to a progressive occupational lung disease. Acute beryllium disease is a pulmonary irritant response to high exposure levels, whereas chronic beryllium disease (CBD) typically results from a hypersensitivity response to lower exposure levels. A blood test, the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), was an important advance in identifying individuals who are sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for developing CBD. While there is no true “gold standard” for BeS, basic epidemiologic concepts have been used to advance our understanding of the different screening algorithms. PMID:20195436

  19. Method for hot pressing beryllium oxide articles

    DOEpatents

    Ballard, Ambrose H.; Godfrey, Jr., Thomas G.; Mowery, Erb H.

    1988-01-01

    The hot pressing of beryllium oxide powder into high density compacts with little or no density gradients is achieved by employing a homogeneous blend of beryllium oxide powder with a lithium oxide sintering agent. The lithium oxide sintering agent is uniformly dispersed throughout the beryllium oxide powder by mixing lithium hydroxide in an aqueous solution with beryllium oxide powder. The lithium hydroxide is converted in situ to lithium carbonate by contacting or flooding the beryllium oxide-lithium hydroxide blend with a stream of carbon dioxide. The lithium carbonate is converted to lithium oxide while remaining fixed to the beryllium oxide particles during the hot pressing step to assure uniform density throughout the compact.

  20. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM FOIL

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO,Y.; WANG,H.

    2000-03-31

    The electrical conductivity of beryllium at radio frequency (800 MHz) and liquid nitrogen temperature were investigated and measured. This summary addresses a collection of beryllium properties in the literature, an analysis of the anomalous skin effect, the test model, the experimental setup and improvements, MAFIA simulations, the measurement results and data analyses. The final results show that the conductivity of beryllium is not as good as indicated by the handbook, yet very close to copper at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  1. Brazing of beryllium for structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogan, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Progress made in fabricating a beryllium compression tube structure and a stiffened beryllium panel. The compression tube was 7.6cm in diameter and 30.5cm long with titanium end fittings. The panel was 203cm long and stiffened with longitudinal stringers. Both units were assembled by brazing with BAg-18 braze alloy. The detail parts were fabricated by hot forming 0.305cm beryllium sheet and the brazing parameters established.

  2. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  3. Vacuum brazing beryllium to Monel

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, T.G.; Grotsky, V.K.; Keller, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    The tensile strength of beryllium to Monel vacuum furnace brazed joints was studied. The filler used was the 72% Ag-28%Cu(BAg-8) alloy. The strength of these joints, which require the use of a titanium hydride powder or physical vapor deposited titanium wetting agent on the beryllium, was found to approach the yield strength of the base metals. Strength was found to be reduced by the interaction of increased titanium hydride quantity and brazing time. Metallographic and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies correlated these effects with microstructure. The formation of the brittle copper-beryllium delta phase was found to require conditions of high brazing temperature and the presence of a reservoir of the copper-containing filler such as found in fillet areas. Two other filler metals: pure silver, and a 60% Ag-30% Cu-10%Sn (BAg-17) alloy were shown to be acceptable alternatives to the BAg-8 alloy in cases where the filler metal can be preplaced between the base metal surfaces.

  4. The beryllium "double standard" standard.

    PubMed

    Egilman, David S; Bagley, Sarah; Biklen, Molly; Golub, Alison Stern; Bohme, Susanna Rankin

    2003-01-01

    Brush Wellman, the world's leading producer and supplier of beryllium products, has systematically hidden cases of beryllium disease that occurred below the threshold limit value (TLV) and lied about the efficacy of the TLV in published papers, lectures, reports to government agencies, and instructional materials prepared for customers and workers. Hypocritically, Brush Wellman instituted a zero exposure standard for corporate executives while workers and customers were told the 2 microgram standard was "safe." Brush intentionally used its workers as "canaries for the plant," and referred to them as such. Internal documents and corporate depositions indicate that these actions were intentional and that the motive was money. Despite knowledge of the inadequacy of the TLV, Brush has successfully used it as a defense against lawsuits brought by injured workers and as a sales device to provide reassurance to customers. Brush's policy has reaped an untold number of victims and resulted in mass distribution of beryllium in consumer products. Such corporate malfeasance is perpetuated by the current market system, which is controlled by an organized oligopoly that creates an incentive for the neglect of worker health and safety in favor of externalizing costs to victimized workers, their families, and society at large. PMID:14758859

  5. MANAGING BERYLLIUM IN NUCLEAR FACILITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    R. Rohe; T. N. Tranter

    2011-12-01

    Beryllium plays important roles in nuclear facilities. Its neutron multiplication capability and low atomic weight make it very useful as a reflector in fission reactors. Its low atomic number and high chemical affinity for oxygen have led to its consideration as a plasma-facing material in fusion reactors. In both applications, the beryllium and the impurities in it become activated by neutrons, transmuting them to radionuclides, some of which are long-lived and difficult to dispose of. Also, gas production, notably helium and tritium, results in swelling, embrittlement, and cracking, which means that the beryllium must be replaced periodically, especially in fission reactors where dimensional tolerances must be maintained. It has long been known that neutron activation of inherent iron and cobalt in the beryllium results in significant {sup 60}Co activity. In 2001, it was discovered that activation of naturally occurring contaminants in the beryllium creates sufficient {sup 14}C and {sup 94}Nb to render the irradiated beryllium 'Greater-Than-Class-C' for disposal in U.S. radioactive waste facilities. It was further found that there was sufficient uranium impurity in beryllium that had been used in fission reactors up to that time that the irradiated beryllium had become transuranic in character, making it even more difficult to dispose of. In this paper we review the extent of the disposal issue, processes that have been investigated or considered for improving the disposability of irradiated beryllium, and approaches for recycling.

  6. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined form the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing(HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified.

  7. Beryllium thin films for resistor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiet, O.

    1972-01-01

    Beryllium thin films have a protective oxidation resistant property at high temperature and high recrystallization temperature. However, the experimental film has very low temperature coefficient of resistance.

  8. Beryllium Use in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) began operation in 1967. It makes use of a unique serpentine fuel core design and a beryllium reflector. Reactor control is achieved with rotating beryllium cylinders to which have been fastened plates of hafnium. Over time, the beryllium develops rather high helium content because of nuclear transmutations and begins to swell. The beryllium must be replaced at nominally 10-year intervals. Determination of when the replacement is made is by visual observation using a periscope to examine the beryllium surface for cracking and swelling. Disposition of the irradiated beryllium was once accomplished in the INL’s Radioactive Waste Management Complex, but that is no longer possible. Among contributing reasons are high levels of specific radioactive contaminants including transuranics. The INL is presently considering disposition pathways for this irradiated beryllium, but presently is storing it in the canal adjacent to the reactor. Numerous issues are associated with this situation including (1) Is there a need for ultra-low uranium material? (2) Is there a need to recover tritium from irradiated beryllium either because this is a strategic material resource or in preparation for disposal? (3) Is there a need to remove activation and fission products from irradiated beryllium? (4) Will there be enough material available to meet requirements for research reactors (fission and fusion)? In this paper will be discussed the present status of considerations on these issues.

  9. Development of Halide and Oxy-Halides for Isotopic Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Jana Pfeiffer; Martha R. Finck

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this project was to synthesize a volatile form of Np for introduction into mass spectrometers at INL. Volatile solids of the 5f elements are typically those of the halides (e.g. UF6), however fluorine is highly corrosive to the sensitive internal components of the mass separator, and the other volatile halides exist as several different stable isotopes in nature. However, iodide is both mono-isotopic and volatile, and as such presents an avenue for creation of a form of Np suitable for introduction into the mass separator. To accomplish this goal, the technical work in the project sought to establish a novel synthetic route for the conversion NpO2+ (dissolved in nitric acid) to NpI3 and NpI4.

  10. Process for synthesis of beryllium chloride dietherate

    DOEpatents

    Bergeron, Charles; Bullard, John E.; Morgan, Evan

    1991-01-01

    A low temperature method of producing beryllium chloride dietherate through the addition of hydrogen chloride gas to a mixture of beryllium metal in ether in a reaction vessel is described. A reflux condenser provides an exit for hydrogen produced form the reaction. A distillation condenser later replaces the reflux condenser for purifying the resultant product.

  11. Fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemon, D. D.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the fracture toughness, sustained-load flaw growth, and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of S200E hot-pressed beryllium at room temperature. It also reviews the literature pertaining to the influence of various factors on the fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium determined using fatigue-cracked specimens.

  12. Use of Beryllium and Beryllium Oxide in Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L. L.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2005-02-06

    Beryllium and beryllium oxide are attractive candidate materials for neutron reflector application in space reactors due to their beneficial combination of low density and high neutron moderation and reflection capabilities. Drawbacks to their use include the expense of working with toxic materials, a limited industrial infrastructure, and material properties that are challenging in the non-irradiated state and seriously degrade under neutron irradiation. As an example of neutron effects, mechanical properties degrade under relevant conditions to the point where encasement in structural alloys is necessary. Such measures are required if neutron fluence exceeds {approx}1x1024 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV). At high temperatures (>500 deg. C for Be and >600 deg. C for BeO), irradiation-induced swelling may also limit the maximum allowable dose without additional engineering measures. Significant volumetric swelling (>5%) can occur in these materials during neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures for neutron fluences above 1x1025 n/m2. This paper will review Be and BeO fabrication considerations, and summarize the effects of neutron irradiation on material properties.

  13. Beryllium for fusion application - recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutov, A.; Barabash, V.; Chakin, V.; Chernov, V.; Davydov, D.; Gorokhov, V.; Kawamura, H.; Kolbasov, B.; Kupriyanov, I.; Longhurst, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Shestakov, V.

    2002-12-01

    The main issues for the application of beryllium in fusion reactors are analyzed taking into account the latest results since the ICFRM-9 (Colorado, USA, October 1999) and presented at 5th IEA Be Workshop (10-12 October 2001, Moscow Russia). Considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the problems connected with the selection of the beryllium grades for different applications, characterization of the beryllium at relevant operational conditions (irradiation effects, thermal fatigue, etc.), and development of required manufacturing technologies. The key remaining problems related to the application of beryllium as an armour in near-term fusion reactors (e.g. ITER) are discussed. The features of the application of beryllium and beryllides as a neutron multiplier in the breeder blanket for power reactors (e.g. DEMO) in pebble-bed form are described.

  14. Beryllium in sediments of Nagoya harbor estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.

    1986-06-01

    Beryllium occurs naturally in minerals and oils. Other than the natural sources, considerable quantity of beryllium has been discharged from its smelting industry. Soil pollutants caused by beryllium in the circumference of its smelting industry on the banks of Nagoya harbor estuaries have been reported. Several methods for the spectroscopic determination of beryllium can not eliminate the interference caused by fluoride ion which remains in the digestion solution when hydrofluoric acid is used to degradate the silicate lattice. Accordingly, the authors attempted to improve the pretreatment in order to eliminate the effect of fluoride ion, and to make the procedure simpler and faster with high precision. A simple and sensitive method is presented for the determination of beryllium in sediments by atomic absorption spectroscopy using methylisobutylketone extraction with acetylacetone. They have carried out an extensive investigation on the pollution of sea water and sediments of Nagoya harbor estuaries, which is located in one of the most active industrial areas in Japan.

  15. Development of beryllium mirror turning technology

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.B.

    1991-04-01

    Because of the unique properties of beryllium (Be) and the advantages of single point turning, a development program has been instituted to single point turn beryllium as a means to produce optics. Initial effort to diamond turn beryllium resulted in less than desirable results and development efforts were directed at finding a more suitable tool material. Both single and polycrystalline tool materials were evaluated and cubic boron nitride (CBN) was found to produce the better results. Tool wear has been the primary limitation in precision machining beryllium and advances have allowed a two order-of-magnitude reduction in this problem. After considerable efforts, results with CBN appear to be approaching a limit, and diamond, as tool material, was re-evaluated with promising results. A development program is now under way to determine if diamond may be used to machine larger and more complex beryllium parts.

  16. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  17. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  18. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements.

  19. 40 CFR 721.4095 - Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... trialkylamine halides. 721.4095 Section 721.4095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4095 Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides. (a... generically as quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides (PMNs...

  20. TRANSURANIC METAL HALIDES AND A PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Fried, S.

    1951-03-20

    Halides of transuranic elements are prepared by contacting with aluminum and a halogen, or with an aluminum halide, a transuranic metal oxide, oxyhalide, halide, or mixture thereof at an elevated temperature.

  1. Structural Characterization of Methanol Substituted Lanthanum Halides

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Alam, Todd M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Yang, Pin; Mcintyre, Sarah K.

    2010-01-01

    The first study into the alcohol solvation of lanthanum halide [LaX3] derivatives as a means to lower the processing temperature for the production of the LaBr3 scintillators was undertaken using methanol (MeOH). Initially the de-hydration of {[La(µ-Br)(H2O)7](Br)2}2 (1) was investigated through the simple room temperature dissolution of 1 in MeOH. The mixed solvate monomeric [La(H2O)7(MeOH)2](Br)3 (2) compound was isolated where the La metal center retains its original 9-coordination through the binding of two additional MeOH solvents but necessitates the transfer of the innersphere Br to the outersphere. In an attempt to in situ dry the reaction mixture of 1 in MeOH over CaH2, crystals of [Ca(MeOH)6](Br)2 (3) were isolated. Compound 1 dissolved in MeOH at reflux temperatures led to the isolation of an unusual arrangement identified as the salt derivative {[LaBr2.75•5.25(MeOH)]+0.25 [LaBr3.25•4.75(MeOH)]−0.25} (4). The fully substituted species was ultimately isolated through the dissolution of dried LaBr3 in MeOH forming the 8-coordinated [LaBr3(MeOH)5] (5) complex. It was determined that the concentration of the crystallization solution directed the structure isolated (4 concentrated; 5 dilute) The other LaX3 derivatives were isolated as [(MeOH)4(Cl)2La(µ-Cl)]2 (6) and [La(MeOH)9](I)3•MeOH (7). Beryllium Dome XRD analysis indicated that the bulk material for 5 appear to have multiple solvated species, 6 is consistent with the single crystal, and 7 was too broad to elucidate structural aspects. Multinuclear NMR (139La) indicated that these compounds do not retain their structure in MeOD. TGA/DTA data revealed that the de-solvation temperatures of the MeOH derivatives 4 – 6 were slightly higher in comparison to their hydrated counterparts. PMID:20514349

  2. 40 CFR 421.150 - Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary beryllium subcategory. 421.150 Section 421.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Beryllium Subcategory § 421.150 Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium... beryllium by primary beryllium facilities processing beryllium ore concentrates or beryllium hydroxide...

  3. 40 CFR 421.150 - Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary beryllium subcategory. 421.150 Section 421.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Beryllium Subcategory § 421.150 Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium... beryllium by primary beryllium facilities processing beryllium ore concentrates or beryllium hydroxide...

  4. 40 CFR 421.150 - Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary beryllium subcategory. 421.150 Section 421.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Beryllium Subcategory § 421.150 Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium... beryllium by primary beryllium facilities processing beryllium ore concentrates or beryllium hydroxide...

  5. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wolfer, W.; Fulton, F.J.; Lee, J.D.; Maninger, R.C.; Moir, R.W.; Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented.

  6. Beryllium recycling in the United States in 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Larry D.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the flow of beryllium in the United States in 2000 with emphasis on the extent to which beryllium was either recycled or reused. Beryllium was recycled mostly from new scrap that was generated during the manufacture of beryllium-related components. In 2000, about 35 metric tons of beryllium was either recycled or reused, about 14 percent of which was derived from old scrap. The beryllium recycling rate was calculated to be about 10 percent, and beryllium scrap recycling efficiency, about 7 percent.

  7. Beryllium Recycling in the United States in 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Larry D.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the flow of beryllium in the United States in 2000 with emphasis on the extent to which beryllium was either recycled or reused. Beryllium was recycled mostly from new scrap that was generated during the manufacture of beryllium-related components. In 2000, about 35 metric tons of beryllium was either recycled or reused, about 14 percent of which was derived from old scrap. The beryllium recycling rate was calculated to be about 10 percent, and beryllium scrap recycling efficiency, about 7 percent.

  8. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.C.

    1995-09-01

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-independent properties described within are: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion, and elastic constants. Irradiation-dependent properties include: yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic tangent modulus, uniform and total tensile elongation, thermal and irradiation-induced creep strength, He-induced swelling and tritium retention/release. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium -- the material chosen for ITER PFC application -- as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined from the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified.

  9. Study of beryllium and beryllium-lithium complexes in single-crystal silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Robertson, J. B.; Gilmer, T. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    When beryllium is thermally diffused into silicon, it gives rise to acceptor levels 191 and 145 meV above the valence band. Quenching and annealing studies indicate that the 145-meV level is due to a more complex beryllium configuration than the 191-meV level. When lithium is thermally diffused into a beryllium-doped silicon sample, it produces two new acceptor levels at 106 and 81 meV. Quenching and annealing studies indicate that these new levels are due to lithium forming a complex with the defects responsible for the 191- and 145-meV beryllium levels, respectively. Electrical measurements imply that the lithium impurity ions are physically close to the beryllium impurity atoms. The ground state of the 106-meV beryllium-lithium level is split into two levels, presumably by internal strains. Tentative models are proposed to explain these results.

  10. A study of beryllium and beryllium-lithium complexes in single crystal silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Robertson, J. B.; Gilmer, T. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    When beryllium is thermally diffused into silicon, it gives rise to acceptor levels 191 MeV and 145 meV above the valence band. Quenching and annealing studies indicate that the 145-MeV level is due to a more complex beryllium configuration than the 191-MeV level. When lithium is thermally diffused into a beryllium-doped silicon sample, it produces two acceptor levels at 106 MeV and 81 MeV. Quenching and annealing studies indicate that these levels are due to lithium forming a complex with the defects responsible for the 191-MeV and 145-MeV beryllium levels, respectively. Electrical measurements imply that the lithium impurity ions are physically close to the beryllium impurity atoms. The ground state of the 106-MeV beryllium level is split into two levels, presumably by internal strains. Tentative models are proposed.

  11. Cohesive Energy-Lattice Constant and Bulk Modulus-Lattice Constant Relationships: Alkali Halides, Ag Halides, Tl Halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    In this note we present two expressions relating the cohesive energy, E(sub coh), and the zero pressure isothermal bulk modulus, B(sub 0), of the alkali halides. Ag halides and TI halides, with the nearest neighbor distances, d(sub nn). First, we show that the product E(sub coh)d(sub 0) within families of halide crystals with common crystal structure is to a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 2%. Secondly, we demonstrate that within families of halide crystals with a common cation and common crystal structure the product B(sub 0)d(sup 3.5)(sub nn) is a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 1.36%.

  12. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  13. Immune mechanisms in beryllium lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Deodhar, S.D.; Barna, B.P. )

    1991-03-01

    The role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of beryllium lung disease has been suspected for years. The observation of cutaneous hypersensitivity to beryllium led to the development of the lymphocyte blast transformation test; the test clearly distinguishes between healthy subjects, who show little or no blast transformation response, and patients with beryllium lung disease, who demonstrate significant responses. The degree of blast transformation also correlates with the severity of the clinical disease. Animal studies have demonstrated the importance of histocompatibility antigens in development of the disease, and support the participation of cellular immune mechanisms.22 references.

  14. Chronic beryllium disease: computed tomographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Patel, Jeet; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2010-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is a rare multisystem granulomatous disease predominantly involving the lungs and resulting from an immunologic response to long-term occupational exposure. Computed tomography of the chest reveals important lung parenchymal and mediastinal findings and plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up assessment of patients with chronic beryllium disease. Its significance lies in the exact localization and evaluation of the extent of lesions. We present an overview of the subject and a pictorial review of the spectrum of computed tomographic features of beryllium disease. PMID:21084914

  15. Carbon monoxide adsorption on beryllium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, A.

    2013-02-01

    Density functional calculations are here carried out to study the carbon monoxide molecule adsorption on pristine, hydrogenated and hydroxylated beryllium Be (0001) surfaces. The adsorption energies and structures, the activation barriers to molecular adsorption and dissociation are calculated. These reactions are described in terms of potential energy surfaces and electronic density of states. The quantum results are discussed along two directions: the beryllium surface reactivity in the domain of nuclear fusion devices and the possible usage of beryllium as a catalyst of Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis.

  16. Beryllium at Argonne East, past and present

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.L.; Davis, J.T.

    1998-07-01

    The focus of this presentation is the present activities at Argonne related to the control of beryllium exposure. However, since present activities involve some of the past uses of beryllium, the authors will review briefly the history as they have been able to resurrect it from records, memory and interviews with some of the people involved. The goal of the program is to identify past contaminated areas for remedial action, identify employees with past and current exposure who may benefit from additional medical monitoring and provide guidance and support so that any ongoing activities involving beryllium can be conducted safely.

  17. Crystallization of Beryllium-Boron Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Wall, M A; Nieh, T G

    2002-02-14

    Prior studies of evaporation and sputter deposition show that the grain size of pure beryllium can be dramatically refined through the incorporation of metal impurities. Recently, the addition of boron at a concentration greater than 11% is shown to serve as a glassy phase former in sputter deposited beryllium. Presently, thermally induced crystallization of the beryllium-boron metallic glass is reported. The samples are characterized during an in-situ anneal treatment with bright field imaging and electron diffraction using transmission electron microscopy. A nanocrystalline structure evolves from the annealed amorphous phase and the crystallization temperature is affected by the boron concentration.

  18. Multiple-Wavelength Metal/Halide Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N. M.

    1984-01-01

    Single device produces multiple lasing lines. Laser capable of producing many lasing lines has several reservoirs of halide lasant mixed with chlorides of copper, manganese and iron. Convection-control technique possible to rapidly change from one metal halide to another at maximum energy.

  19. Chemical Analysis Of Beryllium Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, J; Cook, R

    2005-11-17

    There is a need to understand the level of high-Z impurities in Beryllium shells prepared by sputter coating. The Ignition Point Design Requirements state the following: ''Except for allowed ingredients, as listed in the ablator composition entries, the ablator material in all layers shall contain sufficiently low impurity levels that the sum over all impurities of atom fraction*Z{sup 2} shall be less than or equal to 0.2''. This is a tight specification that requires careful materials analysis. Early in the first quarter of FY06, we undertook a study of Be shell impurities via ICP-MS{sup 2} and determined that the impurity levels in the sputtered shells are very close to the specification.

  20. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  1. Nitrogen reactivity toward beryllium: surface reactions.

    PubMed

    Allouche, A

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments with nitrogen as a seeding gas in fusion plasma devices together with the option of using beryllium as an armor material in the future ITER tokamak (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) have raised new interest in the interactions of beryllium surfaces with nitrogen (atomic or molecular). The strong reactivity of nitrogen implies the formation of beryllium nitrite and, in conjunction with oxygen and other possible impurities, experimentalists have to consider the probability of generating various complex moieties such as imine, amine or oxyamine, and amide radicals. This chemistry would obviously dramatically perturb the plasma, and quantum investigations can be of great predictive help. Nitrogen adsorption on beryllium basal surfaces is investigated through quantum density functional theory. Different situations are examined: molecular or atomic nitrogen reactions; nitride radical adsorption or formation on surfaces; hydrogen retention on surfaces; combined nitrogen/oxygen reactivity and hydrogen retention. A tentative comparison with experiment is also proposed. PMID:23594802

  2. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  3. Drinking-water criteria document for beryllium. Draft report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, J.

    1990-01-01

    Beryllium (Be) is a hard grayish-white metal of the alkaline earth family. The major route of exposure by which beryllium enters the body is inhalation. Beryllium also occurs naturally in various tobaccos and may be inhaled during smoking. The greatest potential for beryllium exposure occurs in the work place and in the vicinity of the industries that process beryllium ore or compounds. Although evidence exists that beryllium is a carcinogen by the inhalation route, no definitive evidence exists that correlates the ingestion of beryllium with tumor appearance since it has not been tested orally at the MTD. However, since beryllium is carcinogenic by inhalation and parenteral routes, and also induces chromosomal abnormalities, it is possible that beryllium in water could pose a carcinogenic risk to man.

  4. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  5. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VHmore » is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.« less

  6. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Halogen vacancies (VH ) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr. Both C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH , in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbB r3 (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of n s2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 , and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH , such as those with large cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH . The results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  7. Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Vinyl Halides with Alkyl Halides.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Keywan A; Biswas, Soumik; Weix, Daniel J

    2016-05-23

    An improved method for the reductive coupling of aryl and vinyl bromides with alkyl halides that gave high yields for a variety of substrates at room temperature with a low (2.5 to 0.5 mol %) catalyst loading is presented. Under the optimized conditions, difficult substrates, such as unhindered alkenyl bromides, can be coupled to give the desired olefins with minimal diene formation and good stereoretention. These improved conditions also worked well for aryl bromides. For example, a gram-scale reaction was demonstrated with 0.5 mol % catalyst loading, whereas reactions at 10 mol % catalyst loading completed in as little as 20 minutes. Finally, a low-cost single-component pre-catalyst, (bpy)NiI2 (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) that is both air- and moisture-stable over a period of months was introduced. PMID:27017436

  8. Toxicity of organometal halide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, Aslihan; Ethirajan, Anitha; Muller, Marc; Conings, Bert

    2016-03-01

    In the last few years, the advent of metal halide perovskite solar cells has revolutionized the prospects of next-generation photovoltaics. As this technology is maturing at an exceptional rate, research on its environmental impact is becoming increasingly relevant.

  9. Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

  10. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.; Fullam, Harold T.

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  11. Hydrogen Halides on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.

    2001-07-01

    The quest to detect gaseous HCl, HBr, and HF in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has led to a tentative detection of 1 ppb HCl near Saturn's cloud deck. The detection is puzzling because, while these hydrogen halides may be present several scale heights below the clouds, they are expected to react with ammonia to form solid ammonium halide salts in the upper troposphere. I show that the loss timescale for condensation of gaseous hydrogen halides onto particles is ˜10 3-10 5 s for realistic cloud densities and particle sizes, which is much less than the ˜10 8 s residence time of upper tropospheric air. The hydrogen halides can only survive transport up to the cloud layer if less than 1 in 10 6 of their collisions with particle surfaces leads to condensation, which is unlikely. Even in the absence of foreign particles, homogeneous nucleation would probably prevent supersaturations in excess of a few hundred, which is ˜10 20-10 40 times too low to explain the observation. These calculations therefore suggest that hydrogen halides cannot exist at part-per-billion levels in the upper troposphere. The interplanetary source of halogens is also too low to produce detectable quantities of hydrogen halides except perhaps at pressures less than 1 mbar. A possible detection of chlorine by the Galileo probe at pressures exceeding 9 bars on Jupiter may be consistent with the equilibrium abundance of gaseous HCl or NH 4Cl.

  12. Characteristics of beryllium exposure to small particles at a beryllium production facility.

    PubMed

    Virji, M Abbas; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Day, Gregory A; Stanton, Marcia L; Kent, Michael S; Kreiss, Kathleen; Schuler, Christine R

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported process-specific elevated prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) among workers. However, exposure-response relationships have been inconsistent, possibly due to incomplete characterization of many biologically relevant aspects of exposure, including particle size. In 1999, two surveys were conducted 3-5 months apart at a beryllium metal, oxide, and alloy production facility during which personal impactor samples (n = 198) and personal 37-mm closed-face cassette (CFC) 'total' samples (n = 4026) were collected. Among process areas, median particle mass median aerodynamic diameter ranged from 5 to 14 μm. A large fraction of the beryllium aerosol was in the nonrespirable size range. Respirable beryllium concentrations were among the highest for oxide production [geometric mean (GM) = 2.02 μg m⁻³, geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.3] and pebbles plant (GM = 1.05 μg m⁻³, GSD = 2.9), areas historically associated with high risk of BeS and CBD. The relationship between GM 'CFC total' and GM respirable beryllium for jobs varied by process areas; the rank order of the jobs showed high overall consistency (Spearman r = 0.84), but the overall correlation was moderate (Pearson r = 0.43). Total beryllium concentrations varied greatly within and between workers among process areas; within-worker variance was larger than between-worker variance for most processes. A review of exposure characteristics among process areas revealed variation in chemical forms and solubility. Process areas with high risk of BeS and CBD had exposure to both soluble and insoluble forms of beryllium. Consideration of biologically relevant aspects of exposure such as beryllium particle size distribution, chemical form, and solubility will likely improve exposure assessment. PMID:20805261

  13. REVIEWS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS: VI. BERYLLIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of the scientific literature on the biological and environmental effects of beryllium. Included in the review are a general summary and a comprehensive discussion of the following topics as related to beryllium and specific beryllium compounds: physical and...

  14. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.20 Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of...

  15. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.20 Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of...

  16. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.20 Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of...

  17. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.20 Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of...

  18. 20 CFR 30.508 - What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring? 30... sensitivity monitoring? Beryllium sensitivity monitoring shall consist of medical examinations to confirm and monitor the extent and nature of a covered Part B employee's beryllium sensitivity. Monitoring shall...

  19. 20 CFR 30.508 - What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring? 30... sensitivity monitoring? Beryllium sensitivity monitoring shall consist of medical examinations to confirm and monitor the extent and nature of a covered Part B employee's beryllium sensitivity. Monitoring shall...

  20. 20 CFR 30.508 - What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring? 30... sensitivity monitoring? Beryllium sensitivity monitoring shall consist of medical examinations to confirm and monitor the extent and nature of a covered Part B employee's beryllium sensitivity. Monitoring shall...

  1. 20 CFR 30.508 - What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring? 30... sensitivity monitoring? Beryllium sensitivity monitoring shall consist of medical examinations to confirm and monitor the extent and nature of a covered Part B employee's beryllium sensitivity. Monitoring shall...

  2. 20 CFR 30.508 - What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring? 30... sensitivity monitoring? Beryllium sensitivity monitoring shall consist of medical examinations to confirm and monitor the extent and nature of a covered Part B employee's beryllium sensitivity. Monitoring shall...

  3. Evaluation of beryllium for space shuttle components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trapp, A. E.

    1972-01-01

    Application of beryllium to specific full-scale space shuttle structural components and assemblies was studied. Material evaluations were conducted to check the mechanical properties of as-received material to gain design information on characteristics needed for the material in the space shuttle environment, and to obtain data needed for evaluating component and panel tests. Four beryllium structural assemblies were analyzed and designed. Selected components of these assemblies, representing areas of critical loading or design/process uncertainty, were designed and tested, and two panel assemblies were fabricated. Trends in cost and weight factors were determined by progressive estimation at key points of preliminary design, final design, and fabrication to aid in a cost/weight evaluation of the use of beryllium.

  4. Mineral resource of the month: beryllium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2006-01-01

    Beryllium metal is lighter than aluminum and stiffer than steel. These and other properties, including its strength, dimensional stability, thermal properties and reflectivity, make it useful for aerospace and defense applications, such as satellite and space-vehicle structural components. Beryllium’s nuclear properties, combined with its low density, make it useful as a neutron reflector and moderator in nuclear reactors. Because it is transparent to most X rays, beryllium is used as X-ray windows in medical, industrial and analytical equipment.

  5. Preliminary results for explosion bonding of beryllium to copper

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, D.J.; Dombrowski, D.E.

    1995-09-01

    This program was undertaken to determine if explosive bonding is a viable technique for joining beryllium to copper substrates. The effort was a cursory attempt at trying to solve some of the problems associated with explosive bonding beryllium and should not be considered a comprehensive research effort. There are two issues that this program addressed. Can beryllium be explosive bonded to copper substrates and can the bonding take place without shattering the beryllium? Thirteen different explosive bonding iterations were completed using various thicknesses of beryllium that were manufactured with three different techniques.

  6. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  7. The Remarkable Reactivity of Aryl Halides with Nucleophiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunnett, Joseph F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the reactivity of aryl halides with nucleophilic or basic reagents, including nucleophilic attacks on carbon, hydrogen, halogen, and arynes. Suggestions are made concerning revisions of the sections on aryl halide chemistry courses and the corresponding chapters in textbooks. (CC)

  8. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  9. Status of beryllium development for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.C.; Donne, M.D.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    Beryllium is a leading candidate material for the neutron multiplier of tritium breeding blankets and the plasma facing component of first wall and divertor systems. Depending on the application, the fabrication methods proposed include hot-pressing, hot-isostatic-pressing, cold isostatic pressing/sintering, rotary electrode processing and plasma spraying. Product forms include blocks, tubes, pebbles, tiles and coatings. While, in general, beryllium is not a leading structural material candidate, its mechanical performance, as well its performance with regard to sputtering, heat transport, tritium retention/release, helium-induced swelling and chemical compatibility, is an important consideration in first-wall/blanket design. Differential expansion within the beryllium causes internal stresses which may result in cracking, thereby affecting the heat transport and barrier performance of the material. Overall deformation can result in loading of neighboring structural material. Thus, in assessing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications, it is important to have a good database in all of these performance areas, as well as a set of properties correlations and models for the purpose of interpolation/extrapolation.

  10. Potential exposures and risks from beryllium-containing products.

    PubMed

    Willis, Henry H; Florig, H Keith

    2002-10-01

    Beryllium is the strongest of the lightweight metals. Used primarily in military applications prior to the end of the Cold War, beryllium is finding new applications in many commercial products, including computers, telecommunication equipment, and consumer and automotive electronics. The use of beryllium in nondefense consumer applications is of concern because beryllium is toxic. Inhalation of beryllium dust or vapor causes a chronic lung disease in some individuals at concentrations as low as 0.01 microg/m3 in air. As beryllium enters wider commerce, it is prudent to ask what risks this might present to the general public and to workers downstream of the beryllium materials industry. We address this question by evaluating the potential for beryllium exposure from the manufacturing, use, recycle, and disposal of beryllium-containing products. Combining a market study with a qualitative exposure analysis, we determine which beryllium applications and life cycle phases have the largest exposure potential. Our analysis suggests that use and maintenance of the most common types of beryllium-containing products do not result in any obvious exposures of concern, and that maintenance activities result in greater exposures than product use. Product disposal has potential to present significant individual risks, but uncertainties concerning current and future routes of product disposal make it difficult to be definitive. Overall, additional exposure and dose-response data are needed to evaluate both the health significance of many exposure scenarios, and the adequacy of existing regulations to protect workers and the public. Although public exposures to beryllium and public awareness and concern regarding beryllium risks are currently low, beryllium risks have psychometric qualities that may lead to rapidly heightened public concern. PMID:12442995

  11. 40 CFR 721.575 - Substituted alkyl halide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted alkyl halide. 721.575... Substances § 721.575 Substituted alkyl halide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted alkyl halide (PMN P-83-1222)...

  12. Method for recovering hydrocarbons from molten metal halides

    DOEpatents

    Pell, Melvyn B.

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy carbonaceous materials by contacting such carbonaceous materials with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst to produce hydrocarbons having lower molecular weights and thereafter recovering the hydrocarbons so produced from the molten metal halide, an improvement comprising injecting into the spent molten metal halide, a liquid low-boiling hydrocarbon stream is disclosed.

  13. Recent advances in technetium halide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Poineau, Frederic; Johnstone, Erik V; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Sattelberger, Alfred P

    2014-02-18

    Transition metal binary halides are fundamental compounds, and the study of their structure, bonding, and other properties gives chemists a better understanding of physicochemical trends across the periodic table. One transition metal whose halide chemistry is underdeveloped is technetium, the lightest radioelement. For half a century, the halide chemistry of technetium has been defined by three compounds: TcF6, TcF5, and TcCl4. The absence of Tc binary bromides and iodides in the literature was surprising considering the existence of such compounds for all of the elements surrounding technetium. The common synthetic routes that scientists use to obtain binary halides of the neighboring elements, such as sealed tube reactions between elements and flowing gas reactions between a molecular complex and HX gas (X = Cl, Br, or I), had not been reported for technetium. In this Account, we discuss how we used these routes to revisit the halide chemistry of technetium. We report seven new phases: TcBr4, TcBr3, α/β-TcCl3, α/β-TcCl2, and TcI3. Technetium tetrachloride and tetrabromide are isostructural to PtX4 (X = Cl or Br) and consist of infinite chains of edge-sharing TcX6 octahedra. Trivalent technetium halides are isostructural to ruthenium and molybdenum (β-TcCl3, TcBr3, and TcI3) and to rhenium (α-TcCl3). Technetium tribromide and triiodide exhibit the TiI3 structure-type and consist of infinite chains of face-sharing TcX6 (X = Br or I) octahedra. Concerning the trichlorides, β-TcCl3 crystallizes with the AlCl3 structure-type and consists of infinite layers of edge-sharing TcCl6 octahedra, while α-TcCl3 consists of infinite layers of Tc3Cl9 units. Both phases of technetium dichloride exhibit new structure-types that consist of infinite chains of [Tc2Cl8] units. For the technetium binary halides, we studied the metal-metal interaction by theoretical methods and magnetic measurements. The change of the electronic configuration of the metal atom from d(3) (Tc

  14. Beryllium surface levels in a military ammunition plant.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Wayne T; Leonard, Stephanie; Ott, Darrin; Fuortes, Laurence; Field, William

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the presence of beryllium surface contamination in a U.S. conventional munitions plant as an indicator of possible past beryllium airborne and skin exposure and used these measurements to classify job categories by potential level of exposure. Surface samples were collected from production and nonproduction areas of the plant and at regional industrial reference sites with no known history of beryllium use. Surface samples of premoistened wiping material were analyzed for beryllium mass content using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and results expressed as micrograms of beryllium per 100 square centimeters (micro g/100 cm(2)). Beryllium was detected in 87% of samples collected at the munitions plant and in 72% of the samples collected at regional reference sites. Two munitions plant samples from areas near sanders and grinders were above 3.0 micro g/100 cm(2) (U.S. Department of Energy surface contamination limit). The highest surface level found at the reference sites was 0.44 micro g/100 cm(2). Workers in areas where beryllium-containing alloy tools were sanded or ground, but not other work areas, may have been exposed to airborne beryllium concentrations above levels encountered in other industries where metal work is conducted. Surface sampling provided information useful for categorizing munitions plant jobs by level of past beryllium airborne and skin exposure and, subsequently, for identifying employees within exposure strata to be screened for beryllium sensitization. PMID:18569510

  15. Beryllium contamination inside vehicles of machine shop workers

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, W.T.; Henneberger, P.K.; Martyny, J.; Ellis, K.; Mroz, M.M.; Newman, L.S. |

    1999-04-01

    Inhalation of beryllium particles causes a chronic, debilitating lung disease--chronic beryllium disease (CBD)--in immunologically sensitized workers. Evidence that very low concentrations of beryllium may initiate this chronic disease is provided by incidences of the illness in family members exposed to beryllium dust from workers` clothes and residents in neighborhoods surrounding beryllium refineries. This article describes the results of a cross-sectional survey to evaluate potential take-home beryllium exposures by measuring surface concentrations on the hands and in vehicles of workers at a precision machine shop where cases of CBD had recently been diagnosed. Many workers did not change out of their work clothes and shoes at the end of their shift, increasing the risk of taking beryllium home to their families. Wipe samples collected from workers` hands and vehicle surfaces were analyzed for beryllium content by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The results ranged widely, from nondetectable to 40 {micro}g/ft{sup 2} on workers` hands and up to 714 {micro}g/fg{sup 2} inside their vehicles, demonstrating that many workers carried residual beryllium on their hands and contaminated the inside of their vehicles when leaving work. The highest beryllium concentrations inside the workers` vehicles were found on the drivers` floor (GM = 19 {micro}g/ft{sup 2}, GSD = 4.9), indicating that workers were carrying beryllium on their shoes into their vehicles. A safe level of beryllium contamination on surfaces is not known, but it is prudent to reduce the potential for workers to carry beryllium away from the work site.

  16. Control of beryllium powder at a DOE facility

    SciTech Connect

    Langner, G.C.; Creek, K.L.; Castro, R.G.

    1997-12-31

    Beryllium is contained in a number of domestic and national defense items. Although many items might contain beryllium in some manner, few people need worry about the adverse effects caused by exposure to beryllium because it is the inhalable form of beryllium that is most toxic. Chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a granulomas and fibrotic lung disease with long latency, can be developed after inhalation exposures to beryllium. It is a progressive, debilitating lung disease. Its occurrence in those exposed to beryllium has been difficult to predict because some people seem to react to low concentration exposures whereas others do not react to high concentration exposures. Onset of the disease frequently occurs between 15 to 20 years after exposure begins. Some people develop the disease after many years of low concentration exposures but others do not develop CBD even though beryllium is shown to be present in lungs and urine. Conclusions based on these experiences are that their is some immunological dependence of developing CBD in about 3--4% of the exposed population, but the exact mechanism involved has not yet been identified. Acute beryllium disease can occur after a single exposure to a concentration of greater than 0.100 mg/m3 (inhalation exposure); it is characterized by the development of chemical pneumoconiosis, a respiratory disease. The acute effect of skin contact is a dermatitis characterized by itching and reddened, elevated, or fluid-accumulated lesions which appear particularly on the exposed surfaces of the body, especially the face, neck, arms, and hands. Small particles of beryllium that enter breaks in the skin can lead to the development of granulomas and/or open sores that do not heal until the beryllium has been removed. Our interest is only airborne beryllium, which is found in areas that machine or produce beryllium.

  17. Plasma cleaning of beryllium coated mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, L.; Marot, L.; Steiner, R.; Newman, M.; Widdowson, A.; Ivanova, D.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Pintsuk, G.; Rubel, M.; Meyer, E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Cleaning systems of metallic first mirrors are needed in more than 20 optical diagnostic systems from ITER to avoid reflectivity losses. Currently, plasma sputtering is considered as one of the most promising techniques to remove deposits coming from the main wall (mainly beryllium and tungsten). This work presents the results of plasma cleaning of rhodium and molybdenum mirrors exposed in JET-ILW and contaminated with typical tokamak elements (including beryllium and tungsten). Using radio frequency (13.56 MHz) argon or helium plasma, the removal of mixed layers was demonstrated and mirror reflectivity improved towards initial values. The cleaning was evaluated by performing reflectivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ion beam analysis.

  18. Carcinogenicity of beryllium hydroxide and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, D.H.; Kommineni, C.; Mackay, G.R.

    1980-02-01

    Animal experiments are presented which show that Be metal, BeAl alloy, passivated Be metal, and beryllium hydroxide are pulmonary carcinogens in rats. These findings are supported by successful transplantation experiments. In addition, other alloys of Be, VBe/sub 12/, TiBe/sub 12/, TaBe/sub 12/, NbBe/sub 12/, Be/sub 2/B, and Be/sub 4/B were found to produce pulmonary metaplasia, frequently a preneoplastic lesion in rats. Old rats are shown to be more susceptible to the induction of pulmonary metaplasia than young adult rats. These results indicate that a lower dose of Be would be required to produce cancer in old animals compared to young adult animals. A discussion on the lung cancer incidence in beryllium production workers is presented.

  19. Vibration-Resistant Support for Halide Lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J.

    1987-01-01

    Lamp envelope protected against breakage. Old and new mounts for halide arc lamp sealed in housing with parabolic refector and quartz window. New version supports lamp with compliant garters instead of rigid brazed joint at top and dimensionally unstable finger stock at bottom.

  20. Molecular compressibility of some halides in alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serban, C.; Auslaender, D.

    1974-01-01

    After measuring ultrasonic velocity and density, the molecular compressibility values from Wada's formula were calculated, for alkali metal halide solutions in methyl, ethyl, butyl, and glycol alcohol. The temperature and concentration dependence were studied, finding deviations due to the hydrogen bonds of the solvent.

  1. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  2. Beryllium window for an APS diagnostics beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Yang, B.X.; Sharma, Y.S.

    1997-09-01

    A beryllium (Be) window for an Advanced Photon Source (APS) diagnostics beamline has been designed and built. The window, which has a double concave axisymmetrical profile with a thickness of 0.5 mm at the center, receives 160 W/mm{sup 2} (7 GeV/100 mA stored beam) from an undulator beam. The window design as well as thermal and thermomechanical analyses, including thermal buckling of the Be window, are presented.

  3. Surface chemistry and structure of beryllium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Eager, M.H.; Smithwick, R.W. III; Smyrl, N.R.

    1982-02-01

    Detailed examination of nitrogen sorption isotherms related to the surface chemistry and structure of high-purity beryllium oxide and the products of alkali treatment aid in a better understanding of the topochemical problems encountered in the production of ceramic items. Details are corroborated by additional techniques: diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT); mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP); and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results correlate well with studies on other oxides when the unique thermophysical properties of this material are considered.

  4. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Paducha, M.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Karpinski, L.; Pytel, K.

    2014-08-21

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction {sup 9}Be(n, α){sup 6}He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, {sup 6}He, decays with half-life T{sub 1/2} = 0.807 s emitting β{sup −} particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of β–particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known β–source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5–the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of β{sup −} particles emitted from radioactive {sup 6}He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  5. Dynamic Behavior of Beryllium as a Function of Texture

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, W.R.; Abeln, S.P.; Mataya, M.C.; Gray, G.T. III; Cannon, D.D.

    1999-01-05

    The high-strain-rate stress-strain responses of commercial hot-pressed beryllium and rolled-sheet beryllium were studied as a function of orientation in compression and room temperature. Hot-pressed beryllium exhibits isotropic mechanical properties; whereas 16:1 rolled sheet was highly anisotropic. Rolled sheet displayed a factor of two difference in strength between the thickness and in-plane (lowest) directions. Twinning is a key deformation mechanism at high rates.

  6. Prevalence of beryllium sensitization among aluminium smelter workers

    PubMed Central

    Slade, M. D.; Cantley, L. F.; Kirsche, S. R.; Wesdock, J. C.; Cullen, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Beryllium exposure occurs in aluminium smelters from natural contamination of bauxite, the principal source of aluminium. Aims To characterize beryllium exposure in aluminium smelters and determine the prevalence rate of beryllium sensitization (BeS) among aluminium smelter workers. Methods A population of 3185 workers from nine aluminium smelters owned by four different aluminium-producing companies were determined to have significant beryllium exposure. Of these, 1932 workers participated in medical surveillance programmes that included the serum beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), confirmation of sensitization by at least two abnormal BeLPT test results and further evaluation for chronic beryllium disease in workers with BeS. Results Personal beryllium samples obtained from the nine aluminium smelters showed a range of <0.01–13.00 μg/m3 time-weighted average with an arithmetic mean of 0.25 μg/m3 and geometric mean of 0.06 μg/m3. Nine workers were diagnosed with BeS (prevalence rate of 0.47%, 95% confidence interval = 0.21–0.88%). Conclusions BeS can occur in aluminium smelter workers through natural beryllium contamination of the bauxite and further concentration during the refining and smelting processes. Exposure levels to beryllium observed in aluminium smelters are similar to those seen in other industries that utilize beryllium. However, compared with beryllium-exposed workers in other industries, the rate of BeS among aluminium smelter workers appears lower. This lower observed rate may be related to a more soluble form of beryllium found in the aluminium smelting work environment as well as the consistent use of respiratory protection. PMID:20610489

  7. Analysis of DC magnetron sputtered beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.W.; Hsieh, E.J.; Lindsey, E.F.; Pierce, E.L.; Norberg, J.C.

    1988-10-01

    We are evaluating techniques that alter the columnar grain structure in sputtered beryllium films on fused silica substrates. The films are formed by DC magnetron sputtering, and the columnar structure, which is characteristic of this and most other deposition techniques, is highly detrimental to the tensile strength of the films. Attempts to modify the columnar structure by using RF-biased sputtering combined with nitrogen pulsing have been successful, and this paper describes the analyses of these films. Sputtered beryllium films are quite brittle, and the columnar structure in particular tends to form a distinct intergranular fracture; therefore, the grain structure was analyzed in fractured specimens using the high-resolution capability of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a field emission gun (FESEM). Ion microanalysis using secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was conducted on some specimens to determining relative contamination levels introduced by nitrogen pulsing. The capability to perform quantitative SIMS analyses using ion-implanted specimens as standards also is being developed. This work confirms that the structure of DC magnetron sputtered beryllium can be improved significantly with combined nitrogen pulsing and RF-biased sputtering. 8 refs.

  8. The Cryogenic Properties of Several Aluminum-Beryllium Alloys and a Beryllium Oxide Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Performance related mechanical properties for two aluminum-beryllium (Al-Be) alloys and one beryllium-oxide (BeO) material were developed at cryogenic temperatures. Basic mechanical properties (Le., ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percent elongation, and elastic modulus were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 at cryogenic [-195.5"C (-320 F) and -252.8"C (-423"F)I temperatures. Basic mechanical properties for the Be0 material were obtained at cyrogenic [- 252.8"C (-423"F)] temperatures. Fracture properties were obtained for the investment cast alloy Beralcast 363 at cryogenic [-252.8"C (-423"F)] temperatures. The AlBeMetl62 material was extruded, the Be0 material was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) consolidated, and the Beralcast 363 material was investment cast.

  9. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Epidemiology of beryllium sensitization and disease in nuclear workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiss, K.; Mroz, M.M.; Zhen, B.; Martyny, J.W.; Newman, L.S. )

    1993-10-01

    We examined the epidemiology of chronic beryllium disease among a stratified, random sample (n = 895) of nuclear weapons workers using the blood beryllium lymphocyte transformation (BeLT) test and chest radiograph for case identification. Of 18 new cases of beryllium sensitization, 12 had beryllium disease, and three more developed pulmonary granulomas on lung biopsy over the succeeding 2 yr. Beryllium-sensitized cases did not differ from noncases in age, gender, race, ethnicity, smoking, most respiratory symptoms, spirometric or radiographic abnormalities, or job tenure. The six sensitized cases without initial disease differed from beryllium disease cases in having greater pack-years of smoking. Sensitization occurred among workers with inadvertent or bystander exposure, such as a secretary and security guard. However, beryllium sensitization risk was higher for machinists (4.7%) and for persons reporting measured overexposure (7.4%, odds ratio 5.1); exposure beginning before 1970 (3.6%, odds ratio 2.7); consistent beryllium exposure (3.4%); and sawing (4.7%) or band sawing (6.0%) of beryllium metal. We conclude that both individual susceptibility to sensitization and exposure circumstances are important in developing disease.

  11. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site beryllium characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, D.M.; Miller, J.R.; Allen, D.F.

    1999-06-01

    A site beryllium characterization project was completed at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in 1997. Information from historical reviews, previous sampling surveys, and a new sampling survey were used to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the locations and levels of beryllium contamination in 35 buildings. A feature of the sampling strategy was to test if process knowledge was a good predictor of where beryllium contamination could be found. Results revealed that this technique was effective at identifying where surface contamination levels might exceed the RFETS smear control level but that it was not effective in identifying where low concentrations of beryllium might be found.

  12. Possible health risks from low level exposure to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Stange, A W; Hilmas, D E; Furman, F J

    1996-07-17

    The first case of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) was diagnosed in a machinist in 1984. Rocky Flats, located 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is part of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex. Research and development operations using beryllium began at Rocky Flats in 1953, and beryllium production operations began in 1957. Exposures could have occurred during foundry operations, casting, shearing, rolling, cutting, welding, machining, sanding, polishing, assembly, and chemical analysis operations. The Beryllium Health Surveillance Program (BHSP) was established in June 1991 at Rocky Flats to provide health surveillance for beryllium exposed employees using the Lymphocyte Proliferation Test (LPT) to identify sensitized individuals. Of the 29 cases of CBD and 76 cases of beryllium sensitization identified since 1991, several cases appear to have had only minimal opportunistic exposures to beryllium, since they were employed in administrative functions rather than primary beryllium operations. In conjunction with other health surveillance programs, a questionnaire and interview are administered to obtain detailed work and health histories. These histories, along with other data, are utilized to estimate the extent of an individual's exposure. Additional surveillance is in progress to attempt to characterize the possible risks from intermittent or brief exposures to beryllium in the workplace. PMID:8711738

  13. Beryllium-10 in Australasian tektites - Evidence for a sedimentary precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, D. K.; Moniot, R. K.; Kruse, T. H.; Herzog, G. F.; Tuniz, C.

    1982-01-01

    Each of seven Australasian tektites contains about 100 micron atoms of beryllium-10 (half-life, 1.53 million years) per gram. Cosmic-ray bombardment of the australites cannot have produced the measured amounts of beryllium-10 either at the earth's surface or in space. The beryllium-10 contents of these australites are consistent with a sedimentary precursor that adsorbed from precipitation beryllium-10 produced in the atmosphere. The sediments must have spent several thousand years at the earth's surface within a few million years of the tektite-producing event.

  14. Beryllium-10 in australasian tektites: evidence for a sedimentary precursor.

    PubMed

    Pal, D K; Tuniz, C; Moniot, R K; Kruse, T H; Herzog, G F

    1982-11-19

    Each of seven Australasian tektites contains about 1 x l0(8) atoms of beryllium-10 (half-life, 1.53 x 10(6) years) per gram. Cosmic-ray bombardment of the australites cannot have produced the measured amounts of beryllium-10 either at the earth's surface or in space. The beryllium-10 contents of these australites are consistent with a sedimentary precursor that adsorbed from precipitation beryllium-10 produced in the atmosphere. The sediments must have spent several thousand years at the earth's surface within a few million years of the tektite-producing event. PMID:17771035

  15. Beryllium-10 in Australasian tektites: evidence for a sedimentary precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, D.K.; Tuniz, C.; Moniot, R.K.; Kruse, T.H.; Herzog, G.F.

    1982-11-19

    Each of seven Australasian tektites contains about 1 x 10/sup 8/ atoms of beryllium-10 (half-life, 1.53 x 10/sup 6/ years) per gram. Cosmic-ray bombardment of the australites cannot have produced the measured amounts of beryllium-10 either at the earth's surface or in space. The beryllium-10 contents of these australites are consistent with a sedimentary precursor that adsorbed from precipitation beryllium-10 produced in the atmosphere. The sediments must have spent several thousand years at the earth's surface within a few million years of the tektite-producing event.

  16. Piezoresistance and hole transport in beryllium-doped silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlejohn, M. A.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The resistivity and piezoresistance of p-type silicon doped with beryllium have been studied as a function of temperature, crystal orientation, and beryllium doping concentration. It is shown that the temperature coefficient of resistance can be varied and reduced to zero near room temperature by varying the beryllium doping level. Similarly, the magnitude of the piezoresistance gauge factor for beryllium-doped silicon is slightly larger than for silicon doped with a shallow acceptor impurity such as boron, while the temperature coefficient of piezoresistance is about the same for material containing these two dopants. These results are discussed in terms of a model for the piezoresistance of compensated p-type silicon.

  17. The bioinorganic chemistry and associated immunology of chronic beryllium disease†

    PubMed Central

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Chaudhary, Anu; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Gnanakaran, S.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating, incurable, and often fatal disease that is caused by the inhalation of beryllium particulates. The growing use of beryllium in the modern world, in products ranging from computers to dental prosthetics (390 tons of beryllium in the US in the year 2000) necessitates a molecular based understanding of the disease in order to prevent and cure CBD. We have investigated the molecular basis of CBD at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the past six years, employing a multidisciplinary approach of bioinorganic chemistry and immunology. The results of this work, including speciation, inhalation and dissolution, and immunology will be discussed. PMID:18566702

  18. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2006-10-31

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  19. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2010-08-24

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  20. Determination of Natural Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Swipe Samples Utilizing Yttrium/Beryllium Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-30

    1. Objective: A method to determine whether beryllium (Be) components in surface swipe samples are from a natural source is needed. 2. Methods: Soil samples and surface swipes from area facilities were analyzed for marker elements to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be). To be useful, the natural marker element must be present at reasonably consistent levels across the site, must correlate with the Be concentration, and not have the potential to be present from non-natural sources. 3. Results: The research on marker elements used to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be) concentrations demonstrates a clear correlation between Be and yttrium (Y) in natural soils on the Nevada National Security Site. The Y/Be ratio is proposed as a method to characterize the source of Be in soil and surface swipe samples and to aid in recommendations for follow up actions. Swipe samples are analyzed using an ICP/MS method and compared with results from soil samples. Natural soil constituent levels and the Y/Be Ratio range is determined for the occupied and historical facilities and surrounding areas. Y/Be ratios within the statistical range established indicate the Be is from a natural source. Y/Be ratios lower than this range indicate the presence of another Be source, and may then be correlated to alloy, ceramic, or other operational sources by the ratios of copper, nickel, cobalt, uranium, and/or niobium. Example case studies of evaluations of buildings with historical operational beryllium usage, current ongoing technical processes, and heavy equipment used in large building demolitions are included demonstrating the value of the ratio approach. 4. Conclusions: This differentiation is valuable as there is no known correlation between natural beryllium in soil and beryllium disease.

  1. Functionally Graded Nanophase Beryllium/Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Beryllium, beryllium alloys, beryllium carbide, and carbon are the ingredients of a class of nanophase Be/Be2C/C composite materials that can be formulated and functionally graded to suit a variety of applications. In a typical case, such a composite consists of a first layer of either pure beryllium or a beryllium alloy, a second layer of B2C, and a third layer of nanophase sintered carbon derived from fullerenes and nanotubes. The three layers are interconnected through interpenetrating spongelike structures. These Be/Be2C/C composite materials are similar to Co/WC/diamond functionally graded composite materials, except that (1) W and Co are replaced by Be and alloys thereof and (2) diamond is replaced by sintered carbon derived from fullerenes and nanotubes. (Optionally, one could form a Be/Be2C/diamond composite.) Because Be is lighter than W and Co, the present Be/Be2C/C composites weigh less than do the corresponding Co/WC/diamond composites. The nanophase carbon is almost as hard as diamond. WC/Co is the toughest material. It is widely used for drilling, digging, and machining. However, the fact that W is a heavy element (that is, has high atomic mass and mass density) makes W unattractive for applications in which weight is a severe disadvantage. Be is the lightest tough element, but its toughness is less than that of WC/Co alloy. Be strengthened by nanophase carbon is much tougher than pure or alloy Be. The nanophase carbon has an unsurpassed strength-to-weight ratio. The Be/Be2C/C composite materials are especially attractive for terrestrial and aerospace applications in which there are requirements for light weight along with the high strength and toughness of the denser Co/WC/diamond materials. These materials could be incorporated into diverse components, including cutting tools, bearings, rocket nozzles, and shields. Moreover, because Be and C are effective as neutron moderators, Be/Be2C/C composites could be attractive for some nuclear applications.

  2. Beryllium Metal II. A Review of the Available Toxicity Data

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Beryllium metal was classified in Europe collectively with beryllium compounds, e.g. soluble salts. Toxicological equivalence was assumed despite greatly differing physicochemical properties. Following introduction of the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation, beryllium metal was classified as individual substance and more investigational efforts to appropriately characterize beryllium metal as a specific substance apart from soluble beryllium compounds was required. A literature search on toxicity of beryllium metal was conducted, and the resulting literature compiled together with the results of a recently performed study package into a comprehensive data set. Testing performed under Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development guidelines and Good Laboratory Practice concluded that beryllium metal was neither a skin irritant, an eye irritant, a skin sensitizer nor evoked any clinical signs of acute oral toxicity; discrepancies between the current legal classification of beryllium metal in the European Union (EU) and the experimental results were identified. Furthermore, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity were discussed in the context of the literature data and the new experimental data. It was concluded that beryllium metal is unlikely to be a classical nonthreshold mutagen. Effects on DNA repair and morphological cell transformation were observed but need further investigation to evaluate their relevance in vivo. Animal carcinogenicity studies deliver evidence of carcinogenicity in the rat; however, lung overload may be a species-specific confounding factor in the existing studies, and studies in other species do not give convincing evidence of carcinogenicity. Epidemiology has been intensively discussed over the last years and has the problem that the studies base on the same US beryllium production population and do not distinguish between metal and soluble compounds. It is noted that the correlation

  3. Three-coordinate beryllium β-diketiminates: synthesis and reduction chemistry.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Merle; Hill, Michael S; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; MacDougall, Dugald J; Mahon, Mary F; Mallov, Ian

    2012-12-17

    A series of mononuclear, heteroleptic beryllium complexes supported by the monoanionic β-diketiminate ligand [HC{CMeNDipp}(2)](-) (L; Dipp = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) have been synthesized. Halide complexes of the form [LBeX] (X = Cl, I) and a bis(trimethylsilyl)amide complex were produced via salt metathesis routes. Alkylberyllium β-diketiminate complexes of the form [LBeR] (R = Me, (n)Bu) were obtained by salt metathesis from the chloride precursor [LBeCl]. Controlled hydrolysis of [LBeMe] afforded an air-stable, monomeric β-diketiminatoberyllium hydroxide complex. [LBeMe] also underwent facile protonolysis with alcohols to form the corresponding β-diketiminatoberyllium alkoxides [LBeOR] (R = Me, (t)Bu, Ph). High temperatures and prolonged reaction times were required for protonolysis of [LBeMe] with primary amines to yield the β-diketiminatoberyllium amide complexes [LBeNHR] (R = (n)Bu, CH(2)Ph, Ph). No reactions were observed between [LBeMe] and silanes, terminal acetylenes, or secondary amines. All compounds were characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (9)Be NMR spectroscopy and, in most cases, by X-ray crystallography. Reduction of the beryllium chloride complex with potassium metal resulted in apparent hydrogen-atom transfer between two β-diketiminate backbones, yielding two dimeric, potassium chloride bridged diamidoberyllium species. X-ray analysis of a cocrystallized mixture of the 18-crown-6 adducts of these species allowed unambiguous identification of the two reduced diketiminate ligands, one of which had been deprotonated at a backbone methyl substituent and the other reduced by hydride addition to the β-imine position. It is proposed that this process occurs by the formation of an unobserved radical anion species and intermolecular hydrogen-atom transfer by a radical-based hydrogen abstraction mechanism. PMID:23215345

  4. Transport of Soil Halides through Rice Paddies: A Viable Mechanism for Rapid Dispersion of the Soil Halide Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redeker, K. R.; Manley, S.; Wang, N.; Cicerone, R.

    2002-05-01

    On short time scales (1-10 years) soil halide concentrations have been assumed to be primarily driven by leaching and deposition processes. Recent results however, have shown that terrestrial plants volatilize soil halides in the form of methyl halides. Emissions of methyl chloride, methyl bromide and methyl iodide represent major pathways for delivery of inorganic halogen radicals to the atmosphere. Inorganic halogen radicals destroy ozone in the stratosphere and modify the oxidative capacity of the lower atmosphere. We have previously shown that rice paddies emit methyl halides and that emissions depend on growth stage of the rice plant as well as field water management. We show here that rice grown in a greenhouse at UCI is capable of volatilizing and/or storing up to 30%, 5%, and 10% of the available chloride, bromide and iodide within the top meter of soil. The percent of plant tissue halide volatilized as methyl halide over the course of the season is calculated to be 0.05%, 0.25% and 85.0% for chloride, bromide and iodide. We compare our greenhouse soil halide concentrations to other commercial rice fields around the world and estimate the e-folding time for soil halides within each region. We suggest that rice agriculture is the driving removal mechanism for halides within rice paddies and that terrestrial plants play a larger role in global cycling of halides than previously estimated.

  5. Chronic beryllium disease and beryllium sensitization at Rocky Flats: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Viet, S M; Torma-Krajewski, J; Rogers, J

    2000-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to evaluate the risk of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium sensitization (SENS) associated with various levels of historical beryllium exposure at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons facility. Fifty CBD and 74 SENS cases were matched to controls of the same age group, race, gender, and smoking status. A job exposure matrix was developed from job history data and fixed airhead (FAH) exposure data available from 1960 to 1988. Job titles and building areas were assigned factors based on exposure relative to a machinist in the Building 444 Beryllium Shop. Concurrence on these factors was obtained from past and present Rocky Flats industrial hygienists. Using the matrix, long-term mean and cumulative exposures were estimated for each subject. Both exposure estimates (p < 0.0001) and years of employment (p = 0.010) were found to be significantly higher for CBD cases as compared with their controls, but not so for the SENS cases as compared with their controls. Logistic regression analyses showed statistically significant relationships between both cumulative and mean exposure and CBD, but not for SENS. These findings suggest that reduced worker exposures might lower the future incidence of CBD, but may not necessarily lower the incidence of SENS. PMID:10782196

  6. Flame inhibition by hydrogen halides - Some spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of an air-propane diffusion flame inhibited with hydrogen halides has been studied. Plots of the absorption of light by hydrogen halides as a function of position in the flame and also as a function of the amount of hydrogen halide added to the flame have been obtained. The hydrogen halides are shown to be more stable on the fuel side of the reaction zone than they are on the air side. Thermal diffusion is seen to be important in determining the concentration distribution of the heavier hydrogen halides in diffusion flames. The relationship between the concentration distribution of the hydrogen halides in the flame and the flame inhibition mechanism is discussed.

  7. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-01

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites. PMID:26376773

  8. Dissolution of beryllium in artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    Dissolution of a lung burden of poorly soluble beryllium particles is hypothesized to be necessary for development of chronic beryllium lung disease (CBD) in humans. As such, particle dissolution rate must be sufficient to activate the lung immune response and dissolution lifetime sufficient to maintain chronic inflammation for months to years to support development of disease. The purpose of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that poorly soluble beryllium compounds release ions via dissolution in lung fluid. Dissolution kinetics of 17 poorly soluble particulate beryllium materials that span extraction through ceramics machining (ores, hydroxide, metal, copper-beryllium [CuBe] fume, oxides) and three CuBe alloy reference materials (chips, solid block) were measured over 31 d using artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (pH 4.5). Differences in beryllium-containing particle physicochemical properties translated into differences in dissolution rates and lifetimes in artificial phagolysosomal fluid. Among all materials, dissolution rate constant values ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-10)gcm(-2)d(-1) and half-times ranged from tens to thousands of days. The presence of magnesium trisilicate in some beryllium oxide materials may have slowed dissolution rates. Materials associated with elevated prevalence of CBD had faster beryllium dissolution rates [10(-7)-10(-8)gcm(-2)d(-1)] than materials not associated with elevated prevalence (p<0.05). PMID:21251696

  9. 2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. AIR FILTERS AND SWIPES ARE DISSOLVED WITH ACIDS AND THE REMAINING RESIDUES ARE SUSPENDED IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTION. THE SOLUTION IS PROCESSED THROUGH THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER TO DETECT THE PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF BERYLLIUM. - Rocky Flats Plant, Health Physics Laboratory, On Central Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Modeling Airborne Beryllium Concentrations From Open Air Dynamic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. M.

    2003-12-01

    A heightened awareness of airborne beryllium contamination from industrial activities was reestablished during the late 1980's and early 1990's when it became recognized that Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD) had not been eradicated, and that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration standards for occupational air exposure to beryllium may not be sufficiently protective. This was in response to the observed CBD increase in multiple industrial settings where beryllium was manufactured and/or machined, thus producing beryllium particulates which are then available for redistribution by airborne transport. Sampling and modeling design activities were expanded at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico to evaluate potential airborne beryllium exposure to workers who might be exposed during dynamic testing activities associated with nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship. Herein is presented the results of multiple types of collected air measurements that were designed to characterize the production and dispersion of beryllium used in components whose performance is evaluated during high explosive detonation at open air firing sites. Data from fallout, high volume air, medium volume air, adhesive film, particle size impactor, and fine-particulate counting techniques will be presented, integrated, and applied in dispersion modeling to assess potential onsite and offsite personal exposures resulting from dynamic testing activities involving beryllium.

  11. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy... Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of the... inventory, the responsible employer must: (1) Review current and historical records; (2) Interview...

  12. Electron topological transitions of 3½ kind in beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitik, G. P.; Sharlai, Yu. V.

    2015-12-01

    An analysis of known experimental literature data on the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of beryllium. It is shown that this dependence can be explained if we take into account that beryllium has an electron topological transition of 3½ kind near the Fermi level.

  13. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's assessment of the noncancer health effects and carcinogenic potential of Beryllium was added to the IRIS database in 1998. The IRIS program is updating the IRIS assessment for Beryllium. This update will incorporate health effects information published since the last assess...

  14. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOEpatents

    Beitz, James V.; Williams, Clayton W.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  15. EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF TOTAL ORGANIC HALIDE IN WATER AND WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various methods for the determination of total organic halides (TOX) in groundwater and in waste oil samples have been evaluated. Of three inorganic halide species generation approaches and three inorganic halide determinative techniques evaluated for groundwater analyses, one co...

  16. Interpulse kinetics in copper and copper halide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    The various rate processes that govern the interpulse relaxation in metal vapor and metal halide vapor lasers are considered. Computer calculations indicate that the rapid metastable levels relaxation observed in copper and copper halide laser experiments requires the existence of a relatively small resonance in the cross section for metastable excitation or deexcitation near threshold. The accurate calculation of interpulse relaxation requires knowledge of rate constants presently not well known; this is especially so for metal halide lasers.

  17. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  18. Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-09-01

    Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

  19. Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.; Letts, S.; Miller, P.; Saculla, M.; Cook, R.

    1995-10-04

    We report the formation of beryllium doped plasma polymerized coatings derived from a helical resonator deposition apparatus, using diethylberyllium as the organometaric source. These coatings had an appearance not unlike plain plasma polymer and were relatively stable to ambient exposure. The coatings were characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Coating rates approaching 0.7 {mu}m hr{sup {minus}1} were obtained with a beryllium-to-carbon ratio of 1:1.3. There is also a significant oxygen presence in the coating as well which is attributed to oxidation upon exposure of the coating to air. The XPS data show only one peak for beryllium with the preponderance of the XPS data suggesting that the beryllium exists as BeO. Diethylberyllium was found to be inadequate as a source for beryllium doped plasma polymer, due to thermal decomposition and low vapor recovery rates.

  20. Release of beryllium into artificial airway epithelial lining fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    Inhaled beryllium particles that deposit in the lung airway lining fluid may dissolve and interact with immune-competent cells resulting in sensitization. As such, solubilization of 17 beryllium-containing materials (ore, hydroxide, metal, oxide, alloys, and process intermediates) was investigated using artificial human airway epithelial lining fluid. The maximum beryllium release in 7 days was 11.78% (from a beryl ore melter dust), although release from most materials was < 1%. Calculated dissolution half-times ranged from 30 days (reduction furnace material) to 74,000 days (hydroxide). Despite rapid mechanical clearance, billions of beryllium ions may be released in the respiratory tract via dissolution in airway lining fluid. Beryllium-containing particles that deposit in the respiratory tract dissolve in artificial lung epithelial lining fluid, thereby providing ions for absorption in the lung and interaction with immune-competent cells in the respiratory tract. PMID:23074979

  1. Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Beryllium by Mean Centering of Ratio Spectra.

    PubMed

    Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Samghani, Kobra; Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad Hossein; Heidari, Tahereh

    2016-07-01

    Trace amounts of beryllium has been determined by spectrofluorimetric method that used morin as fluorimetric reagent. Beryllium gives a highly fluorescent complex with morin. The excitation wavelength of morin and Be-morin complex were 410 and 430. The fluorescence spectra of morin and Be-morin complex were overlaped in excitation wavelength of 430 nm. A method based on mean centering of ratio spectra has been performed to remove the interference caused by morin as it overlaps with the Be-morin spectra. The linear range of beryllium concentration is in 0.2-200 ppb range. The parameters of detection limit and RSD were 0.18 ppb and 4.6 % respectively. This method was used for determination of beryllium in copper-beryllium alloy as a real sample. In determination of Be(II), the interference by Cu(II) was very serious, which was eliminated by adding triethanolamine. PMID:27265354

  2. Method for fabricating beryllium-based multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Skulina, Kenneth M.; Bionta, Richard M.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Alford, Craig S.

    2003-02-18

    Beryllium-based multilayer structures and a process for fabricating beryllium-based multilayer mirrors, useful in the wavelength region greater than the beryllium K-edge (111 .ANG. or 11.1 nm). The process includes alternating sputter deposition of beryllium and a metal, typically from the fifth row of the periodic table, such as niobium (Nb), molybdenum (Mo), ruthenium (Ru), and rhodium (Rh). The process includes not only the method of sputtering the materials, but the industrial hygiene controls for safe handling of beryllium. The mirrors made in accordance with the process may be utilized in soft x-ray and extreme-ultraviolet projection lithography, which requires mirrors of high reflectivity (>60%) for x-rays in the range of 60-140 .ANG. (60-14.0 nm).

  3. Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S. A. Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.

    2014-09-15

    Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

  4. New decade of shaped beryllium blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, Don H.; Heberling, Jody; Campbell, Jeffrey; Morales, Amanda; Sayer, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    Near-net-shape powder consolidation technology has been developing over the past 30+ years. One relatively recent example is production of hexagonal shaped beryllium mirror blanks made for the James Webb Space Telescope. More cost saving examples, specifically from the past decade, utilizing growing experience and lesson's learned whether from a mirror substrate or structure will be discussed to show the latitude of production technology. Powder consolidation techniques include Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) for either round or shaped blanks and Vacuum Hot Pressing (VHP) consolidation for round blanks. The range of sizes will be presented to further illustrate the latitude of current production capability.

  5. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  6. Double Photoionization of excited Lithium and Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Frank L.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2010-05-20

    We present total, energy-sharing and triple differential cross sections for one-photon, double ionization of lithium and beryllium starting from aligned, excited P states. We employ a recently developed hybrid atomic orbital/ numerical grid method based on the finite-element discrete-variable representation and exterior complex scaling. Comparisons with calculated results for the ground-state atoms, as well as analogous results for ground-state and excited helium, serve to highlight important selection rules and show some interesting effects that relate to differences between inter- and intra-shell electron correlation.

  7. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  8. Making and Breaking of Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Manser, Joseph S; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Christians, Jeffrey A; Bakr, Osman M; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-02-16

    A new front-runner has emerged in the field of next-generation photovoltaics. A unique class of materials, known as organic metal halide perovskites, bridges the gap between low-cost fabrication and exceptional device performance. These compounds can be processed at low temperature (typically in the range 80-150 °C) and readily self-assemble from the solution phase into high-quality semiconductor thin films. The low energetic barrier for crystal formation has mixed consequences. On one hand, it enables inexpensive processing and both optical and electronic tunability. The caveat, however, is that many as-formed lead halide perovskite thin films lack chemical and structural stability, undergoing rapid degradation in the presence of moisture or heat. To date, improvements in perovskite solar cell efficiency have resulted primarily from better control over thin film morphology, manipulation of the stoichiometry and chemistry of lead halide and alkylammonium halide precursors, and the choice of solvent treatment. Proper characterization and tuning of processing parameters can aid in rational optimization of perovskite devices. Likewise, gaining a comprehensive understanding of the degradation mechanism and identifying components of the perovskite structure that may be particularly susceptible to attack by moisture are vital to mitigate device degradation under operating conditions. This Account provides insight into the lifecycle of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites, including (i) the nature of the precursor solution, (ii) formation of solid-state perovskite thin films and single crystals, and (iii) transformation of perovskites into hydrated phases upon exposure to moisture. In particular, spectroscopic and structural characterization techniques shed light on the thermally driven evolution of the perovskite structure. By tuning precursor stoichiometry and chemistry, and thus the lead halide charge-transfer complexes present in solution, crystallization

  9. Mechanism and Selectivity in Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Aryl Halides with Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soumik; Weix, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The direct cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, such as an aryl halide with an alkyl halide, offers many advantages over conventional cross-coupling methods that require a carbon nucleophile. Despite its promise as a versatile synthetic strategy, a limited understanding of the mechanism and origin of cross selectivity has hindered progress in reaction development and design. Herein, we shed light on the mechanism for the nickel-catalyzed cross-electrophile coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides and demonstrate that the selectivity arises from an unusual catalytic cycle that combines both polar and radical steps to form the new C-C bond. PMID:23952217

  10. High Precision Spectroscopy of Neutral Beryllium-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Chui Yu; Williams, Will

    2015-05-01

    We report on the progress of high precision spectroscopy of the 2s2p singlet and triplet states in beryllium-9. Our goal is to improve the experimental precision on the energy levels of the 2s2p triplet J = 0, 1, and 2 states by a factor of 500, 100, and 500 respectively in order to delineate various theoretical predictions. The goal for the 2s2p singlet (J = 1) state is to improve the experimental precision on the energy level by a factor of 600 as a test of quantum electrodynamics. Our experimental setup consists of an oven capable of 1400 C that produces a collimated beam of neutral beryllium-9. The triplet states are probed with a 455 nm ECDL stabilized to a tellurium-210 line. The singlet state is probed with 235nm light from a frequency quadrupled titanium sapphire laser, where the frequency doubled light at 470 nm is stabilized to another tellurium-210 line. We also present our progress on improving the absolute accuracy of our frequency reference by using an ultrastable/low drift fiber coupled cavity.

  11. Thick beryllium coatings by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H; Nikroo, A; Youngblood, K; Moreno, K; Wu, D; Fuller, T; Alford, C; Hayes, J; Detor, A; Wong, M; Hamza, A; van Buuren, T; Chason, E

    2011-04-14

    Thick (>150 {micro}m) beryllium coatings are studied as an ablator material of interest for fusion fuel capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). As an added complication, the coatings are deposited on mm-scale spherical substrates, as opposed to flats. DC magnetron sputtering is used because of the relative controllability of the processing temperature and energy of the deposits. We used ultra small angle x-ray spectroscopy (USAXS) to characterize the void fraction and distribution along the spherical surface. We investigated the void structure using a combination focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results show a few volume percent of voids and a typical void diameter of less than two hundred nanometers. Understanding how the stresses in the deposited material develop with thickness is important so that we can minimize film cracking and delamination. To that end, an in-situ multiple optical beam stress sensor (MOSS) was used to measure the stress behavior of thick Beryllium coatings on flat substrates as the material was being deposited. We will show how the film stress saturates with thickness and changes with pressure.

  12. Sarcoidosis and chronic beryllium disease: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Annyce S; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Maier, Lisa A

    2014-06-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disease that may be pathologically and clinically indistinguishable from pulmonary sarcoidosis, except through use of immunologic testing, such as the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT). Similar to sarcoidosis, the pulmonary manifestations of CBD are variable and overlap with other respiratory diseases. Definitive diagnosis of CBD is established by evidence of immune sensitization to beryllium and diagnostic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsy. However, the diagnosis of CBD can also be established on a medically probable basis in beryllium-exposed patients with consistent radiographic imaging and clinical course. Beryllium workers exposed too much higher levels of beryllium in the past demonstrated a much more fulminant disease than is usually seen today. Some extrapulmonary manifestations similar to sarcoidosis were noted in these historic cohorts, although with a narrower spectrum. Extrapulmonary manifestations of CBD are rare today. Since lung-predominant sarcoidosis can very closely resemble CBD, CBD is still misdiagnosed as sarcoidosis when current or past exposure to beryllium is not recognized and no BeLPT is obtained. This article describes the similarities and differences between CBD and sarcoidosis, including clinical and diagnostic features that can help physicians consider CBD in patients with apparent lung-predominant sarcoidosis. PMID:25007084

  13. Controlling Metal-Halide Vapor Density in Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Streams of buffer gas convect and dilute metal-halide vapor. Technique uses flow of buffer gas through reservoir, which contains heated metal halide, to convect vapors into discharge tube. Second stream of buffer gas dilutes vapor. Final vapor density in laser tube controlled and changed by adjusting either one or both of buffer gas flow rates.

  14. [Emissions of methyl halides from coastal salt marshes: A review].

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-xia; Zhao, Quan-sheng; Cui, Yu-qian; Du, Hui-na; Ye, Si-yuan

    2015-11-01

    Methyl halides are the major carrier of halogens in the atmosphere, and they play an important role in tropospheric and stratospheric ozone depletion. Meanwhile, methyl halides can act as greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and they are also environmentally significant because of their toxicity. Coastal salt marshes, the important intertidal ecosystems at the land-ocean interface, have been considered to be a large potential natural source of methyl halides. In this paper, the research status of the natural source or sink of methyl halides, the mechanisms of their emission from coastal salt marshes and affecting factors were summarized. In view of this, the following research fields need to be strengthened in the future: 1) Long time-scale and large region-range researches about the emission of methyl halides and the evaluation of their source and sink function, 2) Accurate quantification of contribution rates of different plant species and various biological types to fluxes of methyl halides, 3) Further researches on effects of the tidal fluctuation process and flooding duration on methyl halides emission, 4) Effects of the global change and human activities on methyl halides emission. PMID:26915215

  15. A Novel Biomarker for Beryllium Sensitization in Humans - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, R. J.

    2001-04-16

    This research project will determine the T-cell receptor (TCR) gene usages of beryllium reactive T-lymphocytes isolated directly from the peripheral blood of individuals exposed at a U.S. Department of Energy site. The objective is to develop a sensitive and novel biomarker for identifying early human sensitization to environmental beryllium. This is a collaborative project involving the Genetics Laboratory of the University of Vermont and both the Center for Epidemiological Research and the scientific staff of the Cytogenetics Program at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). The > 2000 beryllium exposed workers who have been contacted for participation in the ORISE study ''Follow-up of Beryllium Workers at the Y-12 Plant/Efficacy of the Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Proliferation (LPT) and other Non-Invasive Procedures for Diagnosis of Chronic Beryllium Disease'' will provide the pool of potential participants for the proposed study. Beryllium reactive T-lymphocytes will be directly isolated from peripheral blood using a novel antigen-independent method of surrogate selection for in vivo arising hprt mutants as representatives of clones that are undergoing chronic proliferation. The T-cells undergoing chronic proliferation in beryllium sensitized individuals will be enriched for beryllium reactive cells. The TCR gene usage of these T-cell isolates will be determined and their junctional (CDR3) regions sequenced. Beryllium reactive T-cell clones will also be recovered following in vitro beryllium stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from these same individuals and the TCR gene CDR3 region sequences similarly determined. The TCR genes used by the beryllium reactive isolates and their CRD3 region sequences will be compared within (in vivo vs. in vitro derived) and among individuals with attention to kinds and durations of beryllium exposure and HPA DPB Glu 69 status. A method for quantitating total body loads of these antigen reactive T

  16. Historical perspectives on the uses and health risks of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, O.P.

    1985-07-01

    Unawareness of the health risks of beryllium resulted in a decade of unmitigated exposure of several thousand workers and numerous cases of beryllium disease in employees and nearby residents. Subsequent adoption of exposure limits and their implementation with effective technical controls reduced the occurrence of new cases, which were mainly due to accidental exposures, to a minimum. The fact that continuously growing production and consumption did not alter this trend demonstrates the effectiveness of the present threshold limit value. It shows that the potential health hazard can be well contained and that beryllium can be produced and fabricated without undue risk to employees or the general public.

  17. Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, D H

    2007-02-21

    On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: {sm_bullet} reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, {sm_bullet} minimize the levels of, and potential for, expos exposure to beryllium, and {sm_bullet} establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease.

  18. Radiation effects in beryllium used for plasma protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Dalle Donne, M.; Sernyaev, G.A.; Kawamura, H.

    1993-09-01

    Beryllium is presently a leading candidate material for fusion reactor first wall coating and divertor applications. This paper reviews the literature on beryllium, emphasizing the effects of irradiation on essential properties. Swelling and embrittlement experiments as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and as a function of neutron spectrum are described, and the results are quantified, where possible. Effects of impurity content are also reported, from which optimum composition specifications can be defined. Microstructural information has also been obtained to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The available information indicates that beryllium divertors can be expected to embrittle quickly and may need frequent replacement.

  19. Ab initio study of hydrogen on beryllium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachurin, D. V.; Vladimirov, P. V.

    2015-11-01

    Static ab initio calculations were performed for five principal hexagonal close-packed beryllium surfaces: basal, prismatic (type I and II) and pyramidal (type I and II). The basal plane was found to be the most energetically favorable, while the energies of the prismatic (type I) and pyramidal (type I) planes were slightly higher followed by the type II planes. Beryllium is known to show extreme interlayer distance relaxation near the surface. Up to five outermost atomic layers were involved in surface relaxation. The presence of hydrogen on the beryllium surfaces led to a noticeable reduction of the surface energy.

  20. Measurement of Beryllium in Biological Samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Applications for Studying Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Finkel, R C; Martinelli, R E; McAninch, J E; Nelson, D O; Turtletaub, K W

    2004-04-15

    A method using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been developed for quantifying attomoles of beryllium (Be) in biological samples. This method provides the sensitivity to trace Be in biological samples at very low doses with the purpose of identifying the molecular targets involved in chronic beryllium disease. Proof of the method was tested by administering 0.001, 0.05, 0.5 and 5.0 {micro}g {sup 9}Be and {sup 10}Be by intraperitoneal injection to male mice and removing spleen, liver, femurs, blood, lung, and kidneys after 24 h exposure. These samples were prepared for AMS analysis by tissue digestion in nitric acid, followed by further organic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ammonium persulfate and lastly, precipitation of Be with ammonium hydroxide, and conversion to beryllium oxide at 800 C. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio of the extracted beryllium oxide was measured by AMS and Be in the original sample was calculated. Results indicate that Be levels were dose-dependent in all tissues and the highest levels were measured in the spleen and liver. The measured {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios spanned 4 orders of magnitude, from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -14}, with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -14}, which is equivalent to 0.8 attomoles of {sup 10}Be. These results show that routine quantification of nanogram levels of Be in tissues is possible and that AMS is a sensitive method that can be used in biological studies to understand the molecular dosimetry of Be and mechanisms of toxicity.

  1. Cosmis Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Cassé, M.

    Light element nucleosynthesis is an important chapter of nuclear astrophysics. Specifically, the rare and fragile light nuclei Lithium, Beryllium and Boron (LiBeB) are not generated in the normal course of stellar nucleosynthesis (except Lithium-7) and are, in fact, destroyed in stellar interiors. This characteristic is reflected in the low abundance of these simple species. Up to recently, the most plausible interpretation was that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) interact with interstellar CNO to form LiBeB. Other origins have been also identified, primordial and stellar (Lithium-7) and supernova neutrino spallation (Lithium-7 and Boron-11). In contrast, Beryllium-9, Boron-10 and Lithium-6 are pure spallative products. This last isotope presents a special interest since the Lithium-7/Lithium-6 ratio has been measured in a few halo stars offering a new constraint on the early galactic evolution. However, in the nineties, new observations prompted astrophysicists to reassess the question. Optical measurements of the beryllium and boron abundances in halo stars have been achieved by the 10 meters KECK telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. These observations indicate a quasi linear correlation between Be and B vs Fe, at least at low metallicity, unexpected on the basis of GCR scenario, predicting a quadratic relationship. As a consequence, the origin and the evolution of the LiBeB nuclei has been revisited. This linearity implies the acceleration of C and O nuclei freshly synthesized and their fragmentation on the the interstellar Hydrogen and Helium. Wolf-Rayet stars and supernovae via the shock waves induced, are the best candidates to the acceleration of their own material enriched into C and O; so LiBeB is produced independently of the Interstellar Medium chemical composition. Moreover, neutrinos emitted by the newly born neutron stars interacting with the C layer of the supernova could produce specifically Lithium-7 and Boron-11. This process is supported by the

  2. Progression from Beryllium Exposure to Chronic Beryllium Disease: An Analytic Model

    PubMed Central

    Harber, Philip; Bansal, Siddharth; Balmes, John

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding the progression from beryllium exposure (BeE) to chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is essential for optimizing screening and early intervention to prevent CBD. Methods We developed an analytic Markov model of progression to CBD that assigns annual probabilities for progression through three states: from BeE to beryllium sensitization and then to CBD. We used calculations of the number in each state over time to assess which of several alternative progression models are most consistent with the limited available empirical data on prevalence and incidence. We estimated cost-effectiveness of screening considering both incremental (cost/case) and cumulative program costs. Results No combination of parameters for a simple model in which risk of progression remains constant over time can meet the empirical constraints of relatively frequent early cases and continuing development of new cases with long latencies. Modeling shows that the risk of progression is initially high and then declines over time. Also, it is likely that there are at least two populations that differ significantly in risk. The cost-effectiveness of repetitive screening declines over time, although new cases will still be found with long latencies. However, screening will be particularly cost-effective when applied to persons with long latencies who have not been previously screened. Conclusions To optimize use of resources, the intensity of screening should decrease over time. Estimation of lifetime cumulative CBD risk should consider the declining risk of progression over time. PMID:19590692

  3. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces. PMID:26753786

  4. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of mercuric halides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templet, P.; Mcdonald, J. R.; Mcglynn, S. P.; Kendrow, C. H.; Roebber, J. L.; Weiss, K.

    1972-01-01

    The gas phase transitions of the mercuric halides were observed in the UV region by operating at temperatures above 400 K and at vapor pressures on the order of 0.5 mm. Spectral features exhibited by the chloride, bromide, and iodide of mercury correlate energetically with bands previously designated as intermolecular charge transfer transitions. The solution spectra of mercuric iodide and deep color of the crystals (if not due to some solid state interactions) indicate that this molecule may also have longer wavelength transitions.

  5. Raman spectra of hydroxide-halide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiriyanova, I. D.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2012-08-01

    The Raman spectra of molten binary mixtures based on sodium hydroxide and containing (mol %) 35 NaCl, 30 NaBr, and 30 NaI have been recorded at various temperatures. An increase in the vibrational frequency and the force constant of the O-H bond is detected under isothermal conditions upon a variation of the anionic composition of a melt in the series I → Br → Cl. Based on the experimental data, the viscosity of the hydroxide-halide melts is estimated.

  6. Simulations of threshold displacement in beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Matthew L.; Fossati, Paul C. M.; Grimes, Robin W.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic scale molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage have been performed on beryllium. Direct threshold displacement simulations along a geodesic projection of directions were used to investigate the directional dependence with a high spatial resolution. It was found that the directionally averaged probability of displacement increases from 0 at 35 eV, with the energy at which there is a 50% chance of a displacement occurring is 70 eV and asymptotically approaching 1 for higher energies. This is, however, strongly directionally dependent with a 50% probability of displacement varying from 35 to 120 eV, with low energy directions corresponding to the nearest neighbour directions. A new kinetic energy dependent expression for the average maximum displacement of an atom as a function of energy is derived which closely matches the simulated data.

  7. Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, B.J.

    1998-12-01

    A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter.

  8. Large-area beryllium metal foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, J. O., Jr.

    1997-02-01

    To manufacture beryllium filters having diameters up to 82 mm and thicknesses in the range 0.1-1 μm, it was necessary to construct apparatus in which the metal could safely be evaporated, and then to find an acceptable substrate and evaporation procedure. The metal was evaporated resistively from a tantalum dimple boat mounted in a baffled enclosure that could be placed in a conventional vacuum bell jar, obviating the need for a dedicated complete vacuum system. Substrates were 102 mm × 127 mm × 0.05 mm cleaved mica sheets, coated with 0.1 μm of NaCl, then with approximately 50 μg/cm 2 of cellulose nitrate. These were mounted on poly(methyl methacrylate) sheets 3 mm thick that were in turn clamped to a massive aluminum block for thermal stability. Details of the processes for evaporation, float off, and mounting are given, and the resulting foils described.

  9. Toxicological profile for beryllium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The ATSDR Toxicological Profile for Beryllium is intended to characterize succinctly the toxicological and health-effects information for the substance. It identifies and reviews the key literature. More comprehensive sources of specialty information are referenced. The profile begins with a public-health statement, which describes in nontechnical language the substance's relevant toxicological properties. Following the statement is material that presents levels of significant human exposure and, where known, significant health effects. The adequacy of information to determine the substance's health effects is described. Research gaps in toxicologic and health effects information are described. Research gaps that are of significance to the protection of public health will be identified in a separate effort. The focus of the document is on health and toxicological information.

  10. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M.

    1995-09-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T{sub irr}.> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power {approximately} 5 MW/m{sup 2}). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses {ge} 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10{sup 25}m{sup -2}.

  11. Preparation of selenium coatings onto beryllium foils

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, E.D.; Tassano, P.L.; Reiss, R.H.; Griggs, G.E.

    1984-09-01

    A technique for preparing selenium films onto 50.8 microns thick beryllium foils is described. The selenium was deposited in vacuum from a resistance heated evaporation source. Profilometry measurements of the coatings indicate deposit thicknesses of 5.5, 12.9, 37.5, 49.8 and 74.5 microns. The control of deposition rate and of coating thickness was facilitated using a commercially available closed-loop programmable thin film controller. The x-ray transmission of the coated substrates was measured using a tritiated zirconium source. The transmissivities of the film/substrate combination are presented for the range of energies from 4 to 20 keV. 15 references, 3 figures.

  12. Primordial beryllium as a big bang calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2011-03-25

    Many models of new physics including variants of supersymmetry predict metastable long-lived particles that can decay during or after primordial nucleosynthesis, releasing significant amounts of nonthermal energy. The hadronic energy injection in these decays leads to the formation of ⁹Be via the chain of nonequilibrium transformations: Energy(h)→T, ³He→⁶He, ⁶Li→⁹Be. We calculate the efficiency of this transformation and show that if the injection happens at cosmic times of a few hours the release of O(10 MeV) per baryon can be sufficient for obtaining a sizable ⁹Be abundance. The absence of a plateau structure in the ⁹Be/H abundance down to a O(10⁻¹⁴) level allows one to use beryllium as a robust constraint on new physics models with decaying or annihilating particles. PMID:21517297

  13. Polarizabilities of the beryllium clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.

    2010-11-15

    The polarizabilities of the three lowest states of the beryllium atom are determined from a large basis configuration interaction calculation. The polarizabilities of the 2s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sup e} ground state (37.73a{sub 0}{sup 3}) and the 2s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0}{sup o} metastable state (39.04a{sub 0}{sup 3}) are found to be very similar in size and magnitude. This leads to an anomalously small blackbody radiation shift at 300 K of -0.018(4) Hz for the 2s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sup e}-2s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0}{sup o} clock transition. Magic wavelengths for simultaneous trapping of the ground and metastable states are also computed.

  14. Beryllium isotope geochemistry in tropical river basins

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.T.; Edmond, J.M. ); Raisbeck, G.M.; Bourles, D.L.; Yiou, F. ); Measures, C.I. )

    1992-04-01

    The distributions of beryllium-9 and beryllium-10 in rivers within the Orinoco and Amazon basins have been examined to extend the understanding of their geochemical cycles and to develop their use both in geochronometry, and in studying erosional processes. Analyses of {sup 9}Be in dissolved and suspended material from rivers with a wide range of chemical compositions indicate that its geochemistry is primarily controlled by two major factors: (1) its abundance in the rocks of the watershed and (2) the extent of its adsorption onto particle surfaces. The relative importance of these parameters in individual rivers is determined by the extent of interaction with flood-plain sediments and the riverine pH. This understanding of {sup 9}Be geochemistry forms a basis for examination of the geochemical cycling of {sup 10}Be. In rivers which are dominated by interaction with sediments, the riverine concentration of dissolved {sup 10}Be is far lower than that in the incoming rainwater, indicating that a substantial proportion of it is retained within the soils of the basin or is adsorbed onto riverine particles. However, in acidic rivers in which the stable dissolved Be concentration is determined by the Be level in the rocks of the drainage basin, dissolved {sup 10}Be has essentially the same concentration as in precipitation. These observations imply that the soil column in such regions must be saturated with respect to {sup 10}Be, and that the ratio of the inventory to the flux does not represent an age, as may be the case in temperate latitudes, but rather a residence time.

  15. On chemical bonding and helium distribution in hcp beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakai, A. S.; Timoshevskii, A. N.; Yanchitsky, B. Z.

    2011-10-01

    The electron densities of states and spatial distribution of electron density in the system hcp beryllium-helium were investigated by means of ab-initio methods of simulation. It was found that contrary to predictions of the "jelly" model, the energetically more favorable configuration is that where a helium atom is located at the most restricted position, on a triangular face of two adjacent tetrahedrons, and where the charge density of electrons is maximal. It is established that this occurs due to hybridization of electron states of helium and nearest beryllium atom. The helium binding energy is about 5.6 eV. The spatial distribution of the charge density is investigated in details. Calculation of solution energy of helium in hcp beryllium was performed. The helium location at lattice sites in different interstitial positions and in divacancy complexes were considered. It is found that helium implemented into hcp beryllium favors formation of divacancies.

  16. The mechanical behavior of cross-rolled beryllium sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henkener, J. A.; Spiker, I. K.; Castner, W. L.

    1992-01-01

    In response to the failure of a conical section of the Insat C satellite during certification testing, the use of beryllium for payload structures, particularly in sheet product form, is being reevaluated. A test program was initiated to study the tensile, shear, and out-of-plane failure modes of beryllium cross-rolled sheet and to apply data to the development of an appropriate failure criterion. Tensile test results indicated that sanding the surface of beryllium sheet has no significant effect on yield strength but can produce a profound reduction in ultimate strength and results obtained by finite element analysis. Critical examination of these test results may contribute to the modification of a JSC policy for the use of beryllium in orbiter and payload structures.

  17. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  18. Beryllium based multilayers for normal incidence extreme ultraviolet reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Skulina, K.; Alford, C.; Bionta, R.; Makowiecki, D.; Gullikson, E.; Soufli, R.; Kortright, J.; Underwood, J.

    1994-11-01

    We report the experimental results of beryllium based multilayer mirrors for use in the 11.4 nm region. Mirrors using molybdenum as the high-Z material have demonstrated 68.7% peak reflectance at 11.3 nm.

  19. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  20. Mortality study of beryllium industry workers' occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, T.F.

    1980-02-01

    A cohort of 3685 white males employed during 1937 to 1948 in two major industries manufacturing beryllium was followed to the end of 1976 to evaluate lung cancer mortality experience. Lung cancer mortality among beryllium-exposed workers was contrasted with that of workers employed in the viscose rayon industry. Study results demonstrated that lung cancer mortality among berylliumm-exposed workers was significantly greater than that expected on the basis of lung cancer mortality experience of workers in the viscose rayon industry having similar employment patterns. The results of the present study are consistent with earlier animal bioassay studies and recent epidemiologic studies indicating that beryllium is carcinogenic. The results of the present study are not consistent with speculation attributing the excessive lung cancer mortality among beryllium-exposed workers to personal characteristics of individuals having unstable employment patterns.

  1. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  2. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  3. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  4. Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2013-01-25

    Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify

  5. Effects of Beryllium on Human Serum Immunoglobulin and Lymphocyte Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, DaeSeong; Won, Yong Lim; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of short-term exposure of beryllium on the human immune system, the proportion of T-lymphocytes such as CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD95, and NK cells, andthe proportion of B cells and TNFα level in peripheral blood and immunoglobulins in the serum of 43 exposed workers and 34 healthy control subjects were studied. External exposure to beryllium was measured by atomic absorption spectrometer as recommended by the NIOSH analytical method 7300. T lymphocyte subpopulation analysis was carried out with flow cytometer. The working duration of exposed workers was less than 3 months and the mean ambient beryllium level was 3.4 μg/m3, 112.3 μg/m3, and 2.3 μg/m3 in molding (furnace), deforming (grinding), and sorting processes, respectively (cited from Kim et al., 2008). However, ambient beryllium level after process change was non-detectable (< 0.1 μg/m3). The number of T lymphocytes and the amount of immunoglobulins in the beryllium-exposed workers and control subjects were not significantly different, except for the total number of lymphocytes and CD95 (APO1/FAS). The total number of lymphocytes was higher in the beryllium-exposed individuals than in the healthy control subjects. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed lymphocytes to be affected by beryllium exposure (odd ratio = 7.293; p < 0.001). These results show that short-term exposure to beryllium does not induce immune dysfunction but is probably associated with lymphocytes proliferation. PMID:24278637

  6. Actinide/beryllium neutron sources with reduced dispersion characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Schulte, Louis D.

    2012-08-14

    Neutron source comprising a composite, said composite comprising crystals comprising BeO and AmBe.sub.13, and an excess of beryllium, wherein the crystals have an average size of less than 2 microns; the size distribution of the crystals is less than 2 microns; and the beryllium is present in a 7-fold to a 75-fold excess by weight of the amount of AmBe.sub.13; and methods of making thereof.

  7. Methyl halide production associated with kelp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, Minoo N.; Manley, Steven L.

    1985-01-01

    Methyl halides (MeX) are important trace constituents of the atmosphere because they, mostly MeCl, have a major impact on the atmospheric ozone layer. Also, MeCl may account for 5 pct. of the total Cl budget and MeI may have a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of iodine. High MeI concentrations were found in seawater from kelp beds and it has been suggested that MeI is produced by kelps and that MeI and MeBr along with numerous other halocarbons were released by non-kelp marine macroalgae. The objective was to determine if kelps (and other seaweeds) are sources of MeX and to assess their contribution to the estimated global source strength (EGSS) of MeX. Although the production of MeX appears to be associated with kelp, microbes involved with kelp degradation also produce MeX. Microbial MeX production may be of global significance. The microbial MeX production potential, assuming annual kelp production equals kelp degradation and 100 pct. conversion of kelp halides to MeX, is approx. 2 x the EGSS. This is not achieved but indicates that microbial production of MeX may be of global significance.

  8. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vectormore » machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.« less

  9. Finding New Perovskite Halides via Machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach towards rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning) via building a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 181 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. The trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.

  10. Removing tritium and other impurities during industrial recycling of beryllium from a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dylst, K.; Seghers, J.; Druyts, F.; Braet, J.

    2008-07-15

    Recycling beryllium used in a fusion reactor might be a good way to overcome problems related to the disposal of neutron irradiated beryllium. The critical issues for the recycling of used first wall beryllium are the presence of tritium and (transuranic) impurities. High temperature annealing seems to be the most promising technique for detritiation. Purification of the de-tritiated beryllium can be achieved by chlorination of the irradiated beryllium and the subsequent reduction of beryllium chloride to highly pure metallic beryllium. After that, the beryllium can be re-fabricated into first wall tiles via powder metallurgy which is already a mature industrial practice. This paper outlines the path to define the experimental needs for beryllium recycling and tackles problems related to the detritiation and the purification via the chlorine route. (authors)

  11. Significance of the blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, L.S.

    1996-10-01

    The blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is an in vitro measure of the beryllium antigen-specific cell-mediated immune response. This response to beryllium is now understood to play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Although there remain some unresolved methodologic issues with testing, the blood BeLPT has already undergone sufficient development and field assessment to lead to a number of important conclusions: (a) The BeLPT identifies beryllium sensitization and CBD earlier and better than any other clinical test presently available. (b) The CBD cases identified with the blood test are clinically significant. (c) A subset of the people identified by the BeLPT who do not yet have clinical disease will progress and require treatment with corticosteroids for impairing illness. (d) The BeLPT can be used to improve clinical diagnostic accuracy and to correct mistaken diagnoses. (e) The blood test can be used in screening large numbers of exposed workers because it is sensitive and specific and has high positive and negative predictive value for CBD. (f) In every workforce studied to date, the BeLPT has identified beryllium sensitization and CBD that had been missed by conventional screening efforts. (g) Worker populations that have been characterized using the BeLPT can help to elucidate the role of exposure genetics and dysregulated inflammation in the genesis of occupational lung disease. 28 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Beryllium pressure vessels for creep tests in magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Neef, W.S.

    1990-07-20

    Beryllium has interesting applications in magnetic fusion experimental machines and future power-producing fusion reactors. Chief among the properties of beryllium that make these applications possible is its ability to act as a neutron multiplier, thereby increasing the tritium breeding ability of energy conversion blankets. Another property, the behavior of beryllium in a 14-MeV neutron environment, has not been fully investigated, nor has the creep behavior of beryllium been studied in an energetic neutron flux at thermodynamically interesting temperatures. This small beryllium pressure vessel could be charged with gas to test pressures around 3, 000 psi to produce stress in the metal of 15,000 to 20,000 psi. Such stress levels are typical of those that might be reached in fusion blanket applications of beryllium. After contacting R. Powell at HEDL about including some of the pressure vessels in future test programs, we sent one sample pressure vessel with a pressurizing tube attached (Fig. 1) for burst tests so the quality of the diffusion bond joints could be evaluated. The gas used was helium. Unfortunately, budget restrictions did not permit us to proceed in the creep test program. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the lessons learned to date, including photographs of the test pressure vessel that show the tooling necessary to satisfactorily produce the diffusion bonds. This document can serve as a starting point for those engineers who resume this task when funds become available.

  13. Significance of the blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L S

    1996-01-01

    The blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is an in vitro measure of the beryllium antigen-specific cell-mediated immune response. This response to beryllium is now understood to play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Although there remain some unresolved methodologic issues with testing, the blood BeLPT has already undergone sufficient development and field assessment to lead to a number of important conclusions: a) The BeLPT identifies beryllium sensitization and CBD earlier and better than any other clinical test presently available. b) The CBD cases identified with the blood test are clinically significant. c) A subset of the people identified by the BeLPT who do not yet have clinical disease will progress and require treatment with corticosteroids for impairing illness. d) The BeLPT can be used to improve clinical diagnostic accuracy and to correct mistaken diagnoses. e) The blood test can be used in screening large numbers of exposed workers because it is sensitive and specific and has high positive and negative predictive value for CBD. f) In every workforce studied to date, the BeLPT has identified beryllium sensitization and CBD that had been missed by conventional screening efforts. g) Worker populations that have been characterized using the BeLPT can help to elucidate the role of exposure genetics and dysregulated inflammation in the genesis of occupational lung disease. PMID:8933041

  14. Impurities effect on the swelling of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Donne, M.D.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    1995-09-01

    An important factor controlling the swelling behaviour of fast neutron irradiated beryllium is the impurity content which can strongly affect both the surface tension and the creep strength of this material. Being the volume swelling of the old beryllium (early sixties) systematically higher than that of the more modem one (end of the seventies), a sensitivity analysis with the aid of the computer code ANFIBE (ANalysis of Fusion Irradiated BEryllium) to investigate the effect of these material properties on the swelling behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium has been performed. Two sets of experimental data have been selected: the first one named Western refers to quite recently produced Western beryllium, whilst the second one, named Russian refers to relatively old (early sixties) Russian beryllium containing a higher impurity rate than the Western one. The results obtained with the ANFIBE Code were assessed by comparison with experimental data and the used material properties were compared with the data available in the literature. Good agreement between calculated and measured values has been found.

  15. Pulmonary function in beryllium workers: assessment of exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel, D; Sprince, N L; Eisen, E A; Greaves, I A

    1988-01-01

    The inhalation of beryllium causes a serious lung disease characterised by pronounced radiographic and functional impairments and occurs in workers engaged in the extraction and manufacture of the metal. This paper describes the beryllium exposure levels and refining processes in a large beryllium factory operating since the 1930s. Lifetime beryllium exposure histories were estimated for the 309 workers present at a health survey conducted in 1977. Beryllium exposure levels in the plant were high for many years, with some estimated exposure levels in excess of 100 micrograms/m3. As late as 1975, there were exposures to beryllium above 10 micrograms/m3 in some jobs. After about 1977, the plant was in compliance with the permissible exposure limit of 2.0 micrograms/m3. The median cumulative exposure in this cohort was 65 micrograms/m3-years and the median duration of exposure was 17 years. From these data a series of exposure parameters, functions of the exposure histories that characterise biologically important dimensions of exposure were calculated for each worker. PMID:3342199

  16. Exposure and genetics increase risk of beryllium sensitisation and chronic beryllium disease in the nuclear weapons industry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, M. V.; Martyny, John W.; Mroz, M. M.; Silveira, L. J.; Strand, M.; Cragle, D. L.; Tankersley, W. G.; Wells, S. M.; Newman, L. S.; Maier, L. A.

    2011-04-02

    Beryllium sensitisation (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) are caused by exposure to beryllium with susceptibility affected by at least one well-studied genetic host factor, a glutamic acid residue at position 69 (E69) of the HLA-DPb chain (DPbE69). However, the nature of the relationship between exposure and carriage of the DPbE69 genotype has not been well studied. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between DP{beta}E69 and exposure in BeS and CBD. Current and former workers (n=181) from a US nuclear weapons production facility, the Y-12 National Security Complex (Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA), were enrolled in a case-control study including 35 individuals with BeS and 19 with CBD. HLA-DPB1 genotypes were determined by PCR-SSP. Beryllium exposures were assessed through worker interviews and industrial hygiene assessment of work tasks. After removing the confounding effect of potential beryllium exposure at another facility, multivariate models showed a sixfold (OR 6.06, 95% CI 1.96 to 18.7) increased odds for BeS and CBD combined among DP{beta}E69 carriers and a fourfold (OR 3.98, 95% CI 1.43 to 11.0) increased odds for those exposed over an assigned lifetime-weighted average exposure of 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Those with both risk factors had higher increased odds (OR 24.1, 95% CI 4.77 to 122). DP{beta}E69 carriage and high exposure to beryllium appear to contribute individually to the development of BeS and CBD. Among workers at a beryllium-using facility, the magnitude of risk associated with either elevated beryllium exposure or carriage of DP{beta}E69 alone appears to be similar.

  17. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  18. Halide-Substituted Electronic Properties of Organometal Halide Perovskite Films: Direct and Inverse Photoemission Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi; Wei, Jian; Sato, Mikio; Koike, Harunobu; Xie, Zhong-Zhi; Li, Yan-Qing; Kanai, Kaname; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2016-05-11

    Solution-processed perovskite solar cells are attracting increasing interest due to their potential in next-generation hybrid photovoltaic devices. Despite the morphological control over the perovskite films, quantitative information on electronic structures and interface energetics is of paramount importance to the optimal photovoltaic performance. Here, direct and inverse photoemission spectroscopies are used to determine the electronic structures and chemical compositions of various methylammonium lead halide perovskite films (MAPbX3, X = Cl, Br, and I), revealing the strong influence of halide substitution on the electronic properties of perovskite films. Precise control over halide compositions in MAPbX3 films causes the manipulation of the electronic properties, with a qualitatively blue shift along the I → Br → Cl series and showing the increase in ionization potentials from 5.96 to 7.04 eV and the change of transport band gaps in the range from 1.70 to 3.09 eV. The resulting light absorption of MAPbX3 films can cover the entire visible region from 420 to 800 nm. The results presented here provide a quantitative guide for the analysis of perovskite-based solar cell performance and the selection of optimal carrier-extraction materials for photogenerated electrons and holes. PMID:27101940

  19. Unraveling the Role of Monovalent Halides in Mixed-Halide Organic-Inorganic Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Melepurath; Ramos, F Javier; Shivaprasad, S M; Ahmad, Shahzada

    2016-03-16

    The performance of perovskite solar cells is strongly influenced by the composition and microstructure of the perovskite. A recent approach to improve the power conversion efficiencies utilized mixed-halide perovskites, but the halide ions and their roles were not directly studied. Unraveling their precise location in the perovskite layer is of paramount importance. Here, we investigated four different perovskites by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and found that among the three studied mixed-halide perovskites, CH3 NH3 Pb(I0.74 Br0.26 )3 and CH3 NH3 PbBr3-x Clx show peaks that unambiguously demonstrate the presence of iodide and bromide in the former, and bromide and chloride in the latter. The CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Clx perovskite shows anomalous behavior, the iodide content far outweighs that of the chloride; a small proportion of chloride, in all likelihood, resides deep within the TiO2 /absorber layer. Our study reveals that there are many distinguishable structural differences between these perovskites, and that these directly impact the photovoltaic performances. PMID:26717046

  20. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Sodium Halide and Hydrogen Halide Aqueous Solutions: Application to Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levering, L. M.; Liu, D.; Allen, H. C.

    2003-12-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on the surfaces of atmospheric aerosols play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. These reactions are capable of converting alkyl and hydrogen halides (common constituents of marine boundary aerosols) into active halogen compounds. Fundamental questions still remain concerning surface species and reaction mechanisms pertaining to marine boundary aerosols. The first step in beginning to understand these heterogeneous reactions is to determine how ions in solution affect the structure of water at the interface. Vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy is used to examine the air-liquid interface of sodium halide and hydrogen halide (i.e. strong acid) solutions. In addition, comparison of the bulk water structure to that of the interface is accomplished using Raman spectroscopy. The hydrogen-bonding environment at the surface of NaCl is found to be similar to that of the air-water interface. In contrast, the interfacial water structure of NaBr, HCl, and HBr solutions is significantly altered from that of neat water. In the bulk, NaCl, NaBr, HCl, and HBr solutions disturb the hydrogen-bonding network of neat water. A comparison between the corresponding salts and acids show that the salts produce greater disorder (i.e. less coupling of the water symmetric stretching modes) in the bulk water structure.

  1. Modulating the strength of tetrel bonding through beryllium bonding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxiu; Yang, Li; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang

    2016-08-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the stability of the ternary complexes BeH2···XMH3···NH3 (X = F, Cl, and Br; M = C, Si, and Ge) and the corresponding binary complexes at the atomic level. Our results reveal that the stability of the XMH3···BeH2 complexes is mainly due to both a strong beryllium bond and a weak tetrel-hydride interaction, while the XMH3···NH3 complexes are stabilized by a tetrel bond. The beryllium bond with a halogen atom as the electron donor has many features in common with a beryllium bond with an O or N atom as the electron donor, although they do exhibit some different characteristics. The stability of the XMH3···NH3 complex is dominated by the electrostatic interaction, while the orbital interaction also makes an important contribution. Interestingly, as the identities of the X and M atoms are varied, the strength of the tetrel bond fluctuates in an irregular manner, which can explained by changes in electrostatic potentials and orbital interactions. In the ternary systems, both the beryllium bond and the tetrel bond are enhanced, which is mainly ascribed to increased electrostatic potentials on the corresponding atoms and charge transfer. In particular, when compared to the strengths of the tetrel and beryllium bonds in the binary systems, in the ternary systems the tetrel bond is enhanced to a greater degree than the beryllium bond. Graphical Abstract A tetrel bond can be strengthened greatly by a beryllium bond. PMID:27464738

  2. Effects of nitrogen pulsing on sputter-deposited beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Price, C.W.; Pierce, E.L.; Wirtenson, R.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Beryllium films have been used as a heat sink'' layer between the reflective coating of a mirror and its glass substrate to improve the mirror's radiation resistance to prompt deposition of x rays. Under x-ray irradiation, the beryllium heat sink layer is subjected to tensile stresses caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficients. Test results indicated that the predominant failure mode was the film's crazing under tensile stress. The inherent columnar structure of the beryllium films deposited under normal conditions is detrimental to the tensile strength of the films and may be responsible for this type of failure. We successfully suppressed the inherent columnar growth in beryllium films by incorporating periodic N{sub 2} pulses during sputter deposition. The traditional substrate biasing approach did not seem to be as effective in modifying the grain structure. The results showed that higher N{sub 2} pulse rates during deposition were more effective in suppressing the columnar growth. However, we noticed that films deposited with nitrogen pulsing show higher secondary-electron emission in SEM micrographs, which indicates a significant incorporation of contaminants into the beryllium films. Quantitative analyses were conducted for nitrogen and oxygen contamination in the beryllium films using standards prepared by ion implantation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiles were obtained for oxygen and nitrogen using mass isotopes {sup 16}O and 23({sup 9}Be+{sup 14}N). More than 2% of contaminants was observed in beryllium films at the higher pulse rates that were used. Thus, a minimum pulsing frequency and duration should be selected that provides grain refinement with a minimum amount of contamination.

  3. Passive particle dosimetry. [silver halide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Present methods of dosimetry are reviewed with emphasis on the processes using silver chloride crystals for ionizing particle dosimetry. Differences between the ability of various crystals to record ionizing particle paths are directly related to impurities in the range of a few ppm (parts per million). To understand the roles of these impurities in the process, a method for consistent production of high purity silver chloride, and silver bromide was developed which yields silver halides with detectable impurity content less than 1 ppm. This high purity silver chloride was used in growing crystals with controlled doping. Crystals were grown by both the Czochalski method and the Bridgman method, and the Bridgman grown crystals were used for the experiments discussed. The distribution coefficients of ten divalent cations were determined for the Bridgman crystals. The best dosimeters were made with silver chloride crystals containing 5 to 10 ppm of lead; other impurities tested did not produce proper dosimeters.

  4. Metal halide perovskites for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Eperon, Giles E.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2016-06-01

    Exploring prospective materials for energy production and storage is one of the biggest challenges of this century. Solar energy is one of the most important renewable energy resources, due to its wide availability and low environmental impact. Metal halide perovskites have emerged as a class of semiconductor materials with unique properties, including tunable bandgap, high absorption coefficient, broad absorption spectrum, high charge carrier mobility and long charge diffusion lengths, which enable a broad range of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Since the first embodiment of perovskite solar cells showing a power conversion efficiency of 3.8%, the device performance has been boosted up to a certified 22.1% within a few years. In this Perspective, we discuss differing forms of perovskite materials produced via various deposition procedures. We focus on their energy-related applications and discuss current challenges and possible solutions, with the aim of stimulating potential new applications.

  5. Photodesorption from copper, beryllium and thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.J.; Korn, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ever increasing circulating currents in electron-positron colliders and light sources demand lower and lower photodesportion (PSD) from the surfaces of their vacuum chambers and their photon absorbers. This is particularly important in compact electron storage rings and B meson factories where photon power of several kw cm{sup {minus}1} is deposited on the surfaces. Given the above factors we have measured PSD from 1m long bars of (1) solid copper and solid beryllium, and (2), TiN, Au and C thin films deposited on solid copper bars. Each sample was exposed to about 10{sup 23} photons/m with a critical energy of 500 eV at the VUV ring of the NSLS. PSD was recorded for two conditions: after a 200{degrees}C bake-out and after an Ar glow discharge cleaning. In addition, we also measured reflected photons, photoelectrons and desorption as functions of normal, 75 mrad, 100 mrad, and 125 mrad incident photons. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Photodesorption from copper, beryllium and thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.J.; Korn, G.

    1991-12-31

    Ever increasing circulating currents in electron-positron colliders and light sources demand lower and lower photodesportion (PSD) from the surfaces of their vacuum chambers and their photon absorbers. This is particularly important in compact electron storage rings and B meson factories where photon power of several kw cm{sup {minus}1} is deposited on the surfaces. Given the above factors we have measured PSD from 1m long bars of (1) solid copper and solid beryllium, and (2), TiN, Au and C thin films deposited on solid copper bars. Each sample was exposed to about 10{sup 23} photons/m with a critical energy of 500 eV at the VUV ring of the NSLS. PSD was recorded for two conditions: after a 200{degrees}C bake-out and after an Ar glow discharge cleaning. In addition, we also measured reflected photons, photoelectrons and desorption as functions of normal, 75 mrad, 100 mrad, and 125 mrad incident photons. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The unusual properties of beryllium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stumpf, R. ||; Hannon, J.B. |; Plummer, E.W. |

    1994-12-31

    Be is a ``marginal metal.`` The stable phase, hcp-Be, has a low Fermi-level density of states and very anisotropic structural and elastic properties, similar to a semiconductor`s. At the Be(0001) surface, surface states drastically increase the Fermi-level density of states. The different nature of bonding in bulk-Be and at the Be(0001) surface explains the large outward relaxation. The presence of surface states causes large surface core-level shifts by inducing a higher electrostatic potential in the surface layers and by improving the screening at the surface. The authors experimental and theoretical investigations of atomic vibrations at the Be(0001) surface demonstrate clearly that Be screening of atomic motion by the surface states makes the surface phonon dispersion fundamentally different from that of the bulk. Properties of Be(0001) are so different from those of the bulk that the surface can be considered a new ``phase`` of beryllium with unique electronic and structural characteristics. For comparison they also study Be(11{bar 2}0), a very open surface without important surface states. Be(11{bar 2}0) is the only clean s-p metal surface known to reconstruct (1 {times} 3 missing row reconstruction).

  8. Electronic and Ionic Transport Dynamics in Organolead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Wang, Gongming; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-07-26

    Ion migration has been postulated as the underlying mechanism responsible for the hysteresis in organolead halide perovskite devices. However, the electronic and ionic transport dynamics and how they impact each other in organolead halide perovskites remain elusive to date. Here we report a systematic investigation of the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskite microplate crystals and thin films using temperature-dependent transient response measurements. Our study reveals that thermally activated ionic and electronic conduction coexist in perovskite devices. The extracted activation energies suggest that the electronic transport is easier, but ions migrate harder in microplates than in thin films, demonstrating that the crystalline quality and grain boundaries can fundamentally modify electronic and ionic transport in perovskites. These findings offer valuable insight on the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskites, which is critical for optimizing perovskite devices with reduced hysteresis and improved stability and efficiency. PMID:27315525

  9. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease

    PubMed Central

    Falta, Michael T.; Mack, Douglas G.; Tinega, Alex N.; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M.; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A.; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4+ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4+ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLA-DP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4+ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD. PMID:23797096

  10. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Falta, Michael T; Pinilla, Clemencia; Mack, Douglas G; Tinega, Alex N; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-07-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4⁺ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4⁺ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4⁺ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLADP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4⁺ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD. PMID:23797096

  11. Validation of cleaning method for various parts fabricated at a Beryllium facility

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Cynthia M.

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated and documented a cleaning process that is used to clean parts that are fabricated at a beryllium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of evaluating this cleaning process was to validate and approve it for future use to assure beryllium surface levels are below the Department of Energy’s release limits without the need to sample all parts leaving the facility. Inhaling or coming in contact with beryllium can cause an immune response that can result in an individual becoming sensitized to beryllium, which can then lead to a disease of the lungs called chronic beryllium disease, and possibly lung cancer. Thirty aluminum and thirty stainless steel parts were fabricated on a lathe in the beryllium facility, as well as thirty-two beryllium parts, for the purpose of testing a parts cleaning method that involved the use of ultrasonic cleaners. A cleaning method was created, documented, validated, and approved, to reduce beryllium contamination.

  12. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  13. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included.

  14. 40 CFR 421.150 - Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary beryllium subcategory. 421.150 Section 421.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Beryllium Subcategory § 421.150 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  15. 40 CFR 421.150 - Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary beryllium subcategory. 421.150 Section 421.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Beryllium Subcategory § 421.150 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of foils made of nanocrystalline beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhigalina, O. M.; Semenov, A. A.; Zabrodin, A. V.; Khmelenin, D. N.; Brylev, D. A.; Lizunov, A. V.; Nebera, A. L.; Morozov, I. A.; Anikin, A. S.; Orekhov, A. S.; Kuskova, A. N.; Mishin, V. V.; Seryogin, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The phase composition and structural features of (45-90)-μm-thick foils obtained from nanocrystalline beryllium during multistep thermomechanical treatment have been established using electron microscopy, electron diffraction, electron backscattering diffraction, and energy-dispersive analysis. This treatment is shown to lead to the formation of a structure with micrometer- and submicrometer-sized grains. The minimum average size of beryllium grains is 352 nm. The inclusions of beryllium oxide (BeO) of different modifications with tetragonal (sp. gr. P42/ mnm) and hexagonal (sp. gr. P63/ mmc) lattices are partly ground during deformation to a size smaller than 100 nm and are located along beryllium grain boundaries in their volume, significantly hindering migration during treatment. The revealed structural features of foils with submicrometer-sized crystallites provide the thermal stability of their structural state. Beryllium with this structure is a promising material for X-ray instrument engineering and for the production of ultrathin (less than 10 μm) vacuum-dense foils with very high physicomechanical characteristics.

  17. Erosion of beryllium under ITER - Relevant transient plasma loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Kurbatova, L. A.; Porezanov, N. P.; Podkovyrov, V. L.; Muzichenko, A. D.; Zhitlukhin, A. M.; Gervash, A. A.; Safronov, V. M.

    2015-08-01

    Beryllium will be used as a armor material for the ITER first wall. It is expected that erosion of beryllium under transient plasma loads such as the edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will mainly determine a lifetime of the ITER first wall. This paper presents the results of recent experiments with the Russian beryllium of TGP-56FW ITER grade on QSPA-Be plasma gun facility. The Be/CuCrZr mock-ups were exposed to up to 100 shots by deuterium plasma streams (5 cm in diameter) with pulse duration of 0.5 ms and heat loads range of 0.2-0.5 MJ/m2 at different temperature of beryllium tiles. The temperature of Be tiles has been maintained about 250 and 500 °C during the experiments. After 10, 40 and 100 shots, the beryllium mass loss/gain under erosion process were investigated as well as evolution of surface microstructure and cracks morphology.

  18. Effects of nitrogen pulsing on sputter-deposited beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Price, C.W.; Pierce, E.L.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1989-08-09

    Beryllium films have been used as a heat sink'' layer between the reflective coating of a mirror and its glass substrate to improve the mirror's radiation resistance to prompt deposition of x-rays. Under x-ray irradiation, the beryllium heat sink'' layer is subjected to tensile stresses caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficients. Test results indicated that the predominant failure mode was the film's crazing under tensile stress. The inherent columnar structure of the beryllium films deposited under normal conditions in detrimental to the tensile strength of the films and may be responsible for this type of failure. We successfully suppressed the inherent columnar growth in beryllium films by incorporating periodic N{sub 2} pulses during sputter deposition. Quantitative analyses were conducted for nitrogen and oxygen contamination in the beryllium films using standards prepared by ion implantation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiles were obtained for oxygen and nitrogen using mass isotopes {sup 16}O and 23({sup 9}Be + {sup 14}N).

  19. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  20. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Manly, W.D.; Dombrowski, D.E.

    1995-08-01

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

  1. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) COPPER FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium...

  2. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COPPER FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium copper...

  3. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COPPER FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium copper...

  4. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) COPPER FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium...

  5. 40 CFR 468.20 - Applicability; description of the beryllium copper forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... beryllium copper forming subcategory. 468.20 Section 468.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) COPPER FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beryllium Copper Forming Subcategory § 468.20 Applicability; description of the beryllium...

  6. Skin as a route of exposure and sensitization in chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tinkle, Sally S; Antonini, James M; Rich, Brenda A; Roberts, Jenny R; Salmen, Rebecca; DePree, Karyn; Adkins, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is an occupational lung disease that begins as a cell-mediated immune response to beryllium. Although respiratory and engineering controls have significantly decreased occupational beryllium exposures over the last decade, the rate of beryllium sensitization has not declined. We hypothesized that skin exposure to beryllium particles would provide an alternative route for sensitization to this metal. We employed optical scanning laser confocal microscopy and size-selected fluorospheres to demonstrate that 0.5- and 1.0- micro m particles, in conjunction with motion, as at the wrist, penetrate the stratum corneum of human skin and reach the epidermis and, occasionally, the dermis. The cutaneous immune response to chemical sensitizers is initiated in the skin, matures in the local lymph node (LN), and releases hapten-specific T cells into the peripheral blood. Topical application of beryllium to C3H mice generated beryllium-specific sensitization that was documented by peripheral blood and LN beryllium lymphocyte proliferation tests (BeLPT) and by changes in LN T-cell activation markers, increased expression of CD44, and decreased CD62L. In a sensitization-challenge treatment paradigm, epicutaneous beryllium increased murine ear thickness following chemical challenge. These data are consistent with development of a hapten-specific, cell-mediated immune response following topical application of beryllium and suggest a mechanistic link between the persistent rate of beryllium worker sensitization and skin exposure to fine and ultrafine beryllium particles. PMID:12842774

  7. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form I, _______ have carefully read...

  8. Risk-based approach for controlling beryllium exposure in a manufacturing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, W. E.; Clawson, C. D.; Ellis, K. K.

    2003-01-01

    There are many diverse uses for beryllium in both military and industrial applications. Unfortunately, there are certain worker health risks associated with the manufacture and production of beryllium products. Respiratory illnesses due to prolonged contact with beryllium particulate are of paramount concern. However, these health risks can be controlled provided that the appropriate protective measures to prevent worker exposure from beryllium are in place. But it is no1 always a straightforward process to identify exactly what the beryllium protective measures should be in order to realize a true risk savings. Without prudent attention to a systematic inquiry and suitable evaluative criteria, a program for controlling beryllium health risks can be lacking in completeness and overall effectiveness. One approach that took into account the necessary ingredients for risk-based determination of beryllium protective measures was developed for a beryllium operation at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. The methodological framework that was applied at this facility, as well as a discussion of the final beryllium protective measures that were determined by this approach will be presented. Regulatory aspects for working with beryllium, as well as a risk-assessment strategy for ranking beryllium-handling activities with respect to exposure potential will also be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a synopsis of lessons-learned as gleaned from this case study, as well as providing the participants with a constructive blueprint that can be adapted to other processes involving beryllium.

  9. Density functional studies on hydrogen-bonded clusters of hydrogen halides and the interaction on halide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmala, V.; Kolandaivel, P.

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the structures and stability of X-·(HX)n=2-5 clusters where X = F, Cl, Br at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. The presence of halide ions in these clusters disintegrates the hydrogen halide clusters. All the hydrogen halides are then hydrogen bonded to the centrally placed halide ions, thereby forming multiple hydrogen bonds. The interaction energies have been corrected for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) using Boy's counterpoise correction method. Evidence for the destruction of hydrogen bonds in hydrogen halide clusters due to the presence of halide ions is further obtained from topological analysis and natural bond orbital analysis. The chemical hardness and chemical potential have been calculated for all the anion clusters. The above analysis reveals that hydrogen bonding in these systems is not an essentially electrostatic interaction. The nature of the stabilization interactions operative in these multiple hydrogen-bonded clusters has been explained in terms of many-body contribution to interaction energies. From these studies, an attempt has been made to understand the nature of the molecular properties resulting from different electronegativities of the halogens.

  10. RCRA designation of discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kirner, N.P.

    1994-09-01

    Many sealed sources containing americium and beryllium are used throughout construction, industry, and research, and will eventually require disposal. For planning purposes it is necessary to determine whether these sources, when disposed, constitute a mixed waste, i.e., a waste containing hazardous constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and radioactive constituents regulated under the Atomic Energy Act. Waste designation criteria contained in 40 CFR 261 are evaluated in detail in this report. It is determined that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources do not contain any wastes listed in Subpart D of 40 CFR 261, nor do the discarded sources exhibit any hazardous characteristics. Therefore, it is concluded that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources are not a mixed waste under regulations established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Hazardous waste regulatory programs delegated to States, however, may have regulations that differ from those of the Federal government.

  11. Photochemical Behavior of Beryllium Complexes with Subporphyrazines and Subphthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Montero-Campillo, M Merced; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2016-07-14

    Structures of beryllium subphthalocyanines and beryllium subporphyrazines complexes with different substituents are explored for the first time. Their photochemical properties are studied using time-dependent density functional theory calculations and compared to boron-related compounds for which their photochemical activity is already known. These beryllium compounds were found to be thermodynamically stable in a vacuum and present features similar to those of boron-containing analogues, although the nature of bonding between the cation and the macrocycle presents subtle differences. Most important contributions to the main peak in the Q-band region arise from HOMO to LUMO transitions in the case of subphthalocyanines and alkyl subporphyrazine complexes, whereas a mixture of that contribution and a HOMO-2 to LUMO contribution are present in the case of thioalkyl subporphyrazines. The absorption in the visible region could make these candidates suitable for photochemical devices if combined with appropriate donor groups. PMID:26812068

  12. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful; Halder, Amal

    2015-05-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data.

  13. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful; Halder, Amal

    2015-05-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data.

  14. Ab Initio Simulation Beryllium in Solid Molecular Hydrogen: Elastic Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Carlo L.; Perlado, Jose M.

    2016-03-01

    In systems of inertial confinement fusion targets Deuterium-Tritium are manufactured with a solid layer, it must have specific properties to increase the efficiency of ignition. Currently there have been some proposals to model the phases of hydrogen isotopes and hence their high pressure, but these works do not allow explaining some of the structures present at the solid phase change effect of increased pressure. By means of simulation with first principles methods and Quantum Molecular Dynamics, we compare the structural difference of solid molecular hydrogen pure and solid molecular hydrogen with beryllium, watching beryllium inclusion in solid hydrogen matrix, we obtain several differences in mechanical properties, in particular elastic constants. For C11 the difference between hydrogen and hydrogen with beryllium is 37.56%. This may produce a non-uniform initial compression and decreased efficiency of ignition.

  15. Surface binding energies of beryllium/tungsten alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyoeroek, Michael; Kaiser, Alexander; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Hermansson, Kersti; Probst, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Binding energies of beryllium and tungsten atoms on surfaces of the alloys Be2W and Be12W were obtained from density functional theory calculations. Values of 4.08-5.63 eV for beryllium and 6.81-10.04 eV for tungsten were obtained. An analytical force field agrees for beryllium, but its tungsten surface atoms are too strongly bound. The surface binding energies of Be and W on Be12W surfaces is slightly smaller than on the pure Be and W surfaces, respectively. For higher tungsten content, i.e. for Be2W, the situation is more complicated. For some surfaces of this alloy the surface binding energies are enhanced while for others they are diminished, compared to the pure metal surfaces. The dependency of the cohesive energy on the mole fraction follows a linear relationship.

  16. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Beryllium fracture toughness test specimens were fatigue cracked using reversed cycling with a compression load two to three times the tension load. In worked beryllium, textures may be produced which result in fatigue cracks that are out of plane with the starter notch. Specimens of hot pressed stock exhibited load displacement records which were nonlinear throughout their course. Fracture specimens of both hot pressed and forged stock showed essentially no reduction of thickness and the fracture surfaces were flat and normal to the load axis. However, the stress intensity factor at maximum load increased with decreasing thickness. Load-displacement and electric potential records for the hot pressed beryllium specimens exhibited several anomalies such as negative residual crack mouth displacements and a decrease in electrical potential with increasing load.

  17. Force-field parameters for beryllium complexes in amorphous layers.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Svetlana; Chashchikhin, Vladimir; Bagaturyants, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Unknown force-field parameters for metal organic beryllium complexes used in emitting and electron transporting layers of OLED structures are determined. These parameters can be used for the predictive atomistic simulations of the structure and properties of amorphous organic layers containing beryllium complexes. The parameters are found for the AMBER force field using a relaxed scan procedure and quantum-mechanical DFT calculations of potential energy curves for specific internal (angular) coordinates in a series of three Be complexes (Bebq2; Be(4-mpp)2; Bepp2). The obtained parameters are verified in calculations of some molecular and crystal structures available from either quantum-mechanical DFT calculations or experimental data. Graphical Abstract Beryllium complexes in amorphous layersᅟ. PMID:27550375

  18. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugler, J. A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5×106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by mass to range from 0.9 to 1.1 M⊙. They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H]=-0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and the Gecko spectrograph on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis and were analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, metallicity, and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to decrease linearly with metallicity down to [Fe/H]˜-4.0 with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread ˜1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K.

  19. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugler, Julie A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5x106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by their mass to be in a mass range of 0.9 to 1.1 solar masses as determined by Lambert & Reddy (2004). They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H] -0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken over several nights, with forty-six spectra taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and six spectra on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) using the Gecko spectrograph. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis, fitting a 4Å region around the resonance lines of Be II. The data were then analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, and metallicity and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to increase with metallicity and the linear relationship evident when extended to metallicities down to -4.0 dex with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread 1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K. This research was conducted through the Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) program at the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy and was funded by the NSF.

  20. Tailoring material properties of sputtered beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    Doped beryllium is a material of considerable interest to both the ICF and the weapons communities, as well as finding application in specialized industrial settings (e.g., x-ray windows and mirrors). Some of these uses require conformal coating of thin films on (possibly) irregularly-shaped surfaces. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) is often used to accomplish this, and sputtering is often the technique of choice. Among its advantages are that the depositing atoms are relatively energetic, leading to more compact films. Moreover, by simply applying a voltage bias to the substrate, ambient noble gas ions will bombard the growing film, which can cause further densification and other modifications to the microstructure. Sputtering is also well suited to the introduction of dopants, even those that are insoluble. Most applications of these novel materials will require fundamental knowledge of their properties. Because so many can be devised, such information is generally unavailable. The objective of the effort has been to systematically study the properties of films produced under different conditions, with an emphasis on surface finish and permeability. They have made extensive use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy to determine the microstructure of the films, along with composition probes (mainly x-ray fluorescence) to quantify the chemical structure. The studies can be roughly divided into three categories. First, there are those in which the properties of pure or Cu-doped Be films have been investigated, especially on randomly-agitated spherical capsules. Included are studies of the effects of a constant substrate bias ranging from 0 to 120 v and application of an intermittent bias during deposition. Second, there are experiments in which the structure of the depositing films has been modified via the incorporation of dopants, primarily boron. Finally, there have been numerous attempts to characterize the permeability of Be coatings at

  1. The cosmochemical behavior of beryllium and boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauretta, Dante S.; Lodders, Katharina

    1997-01-01

    The chemistry of Be and B in the solar nebula is reinvestigated using thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The dominant Be gases are monatomic Be at high temperatures and the hydroxides BeOH and Be(OH)2 at lower temperatures. Beryllium condenses as gugiaite (Ca2BeSi2O7) in solid solution with melilite with a 50% condensation temperature of 1490 K. If an ideal solid solution of chrysoberyl (BeAl2O4) into spinel is assumed, most of the Be condenses into spinel, yielding a 50% condensation temperature of 1501 K. However, the difference in the crystal structures of spinel and chrysoberyl indicates that their solid solution may be non-ideal. At high temperatures the dominant B gases are BO, HBO, and HBO2, while NaBO2, KBO2, and LiBO2 are dominant at lower temperatures. Boron is less refractory than Be and is calculated to condense into solid solution with feldspar. The majority of B condenses as danburite (CaB2Si2O8) in solid solution with anorthite. At lower temperatures, when the feldspar composition is more albitic, the remaining B condenses as reedmergnerite (NaBSi3O8). The 50% condensation temperature of B is 964 K. The 50% condensation temperature of B is similar to that of Na and much higher than that of S. Therefore, normalized B abundances in chondrites are expected to correlate with Na abundances. Be is predicted to be concentrated in melilite, a conclusion which is consistent with the few measurements of Be concentrations in calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). Boron is predicted to be concentrated in feldspar, but no analytical data are available to test this prediction.

  2. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  3. Elemental composition in sealed plutonium-beryllium neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Xu, N; Kuhn, K; Gallimore, D; Martinez, A; Schappert, M; Montoya, D; Lujan, E; Garduno, K; Tandon, L

    2014-10-22

    Five sealed plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) neutron sources from various manufacturers were disassembled. Destructive chemical analyses for recovered PuBe materials were conducted for disposition purposes. A dissolution method for PuBe alloys was developed for quantitative plutonium (Pu) and beryllium (Be) assay. Quantitation of Be and trace elements was performed using plasma based spectroscopic instruments, namely inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Pu assay was accomplished by an electrochemical method. Variations in trace elemental contents among the five PuBe sources are discussed. PMID:25464182

  4. Comparison of Cleaning Methods for Analysis of Underground Beryllium Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2006-03-01

    The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Laboratory contains neutronactivated beryllium metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term underground corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates of the disposed beryllium to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in the surrounding arid vadose zone environment. During the corrosion analysis, two cleaning methods were used. This paper describes the cleaning methods and presents a comparison of the results.

  5. Fluorometric study of the beryllium-morin system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, M.H.

    1965-01-01

    Three principal beryllium-morin complexes, a (1 + 1) monomer, a (1 + 1) dimer, and a (1 + 2) complex are found and conditional equilibrium constants for their formation are evaluated. Approximate ionization constants, absorption spectra, and the relative fluorescence intensities for five ionic species of morin are also determined in a spectrophotometric and fluorometric study of morin. The following interrelationships are discussed: pH, ionization of morin, absorption spectra of the various ionic species of morin and of the berylliummorin complexes, equilibria for the reactions between beryllium and morin, the period of time between preparation of the solution and measurement of the fluorescence, and fluorescence intensity.

  6. Failure prediction of thin beryllium sheets used in spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roschke, Paul N.; Papados, Photios; Mascorro, Edward

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to predict failure for cross-rolled beryllium sheet structures, high order macroscopic failure criteria are used. These require the knowledge of in-plane uniaxial and shear strengths. Test results are included for in-plane biaxial tension, uniaxial compression for two different material orientations, and shear. All beryllium specimens have the same chemical composition. In addition, all experimental work was performed in a controlled laboratory environment. Numerical simulation complements these tests. A brief bibliography supplements references listed in a previous report.

  7. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  8. Color silver halide hologram production and mastering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Huang, Qiang

    1997-04-01

    Color reflection holograms recorded with the Denisyuk geometry have been demonstrated by the recently formed HOLOS Corporation in New Hampshire. The Slavich red-green-blue (RGB) sensitized ultra-high resolution silver halide emulsion was used for the hologram recording. The employed laser wavelengths were 647 nm, 532 nm, and 476 nm, generated by an argon ion, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG, and a krypton ion laser, respectively. A beam combination mechanism with dichroic filters enabled a simultaneous RGB exposure, which made the color balance and overall exposure energy easy to control as well as simplifying the recording procedure. HOLOS has been producing limited edition color holograms in various sizes from 4' X 5' to 12' X 16'. A 30 foot long optical table and high power lasers will enable HOLOS to record color holograms up to the size of one meter square in the near future. Various approaches have been investigated in generating color hologram masters which have sufficiently high diffraction efficiency to contact copy the color images onto photopolymer materials. A specially designed test object including the 1931 CIE chromaticity diagram, a rainbow ribbon cable, pure yellow dots, and a cloisonne elephant was used for color recording experiments. In addition, the Macbeth Color Checker chart was used. Both colorimetric evaluation and scattering noise measurements were performed using the PR-650 Photo Research SpectraScan SpectraCalorimeter.

  9. Charge carrier mobility in hybrid halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The charge transport properties of hybrid halide perovskites are investigated with a combination of density functional theory including van der Waals interaction and the Boltzmann theory for diffusive transport in the relaxation time approximation. We find the mobility of electrons to be in the range 5–10 cm2V−1s−1 and that for holes within 1–5 cm2V−1s−1, where the variations depend on the crystal structure investigated and the level of doping. Such results, in good agreement with recent experiments, set the relaxation time to about 1 ps, which is the time-scale for the molecular rotation at room temperature. For the room temperature tetragonal phase we explore two possible orientations of the organic cations and find that the mobility has a significant asymmetry depending on the direction of the current with respect to the molecular axis. This is due mostly to the way the PbI3 octahedral symmetry is broken. Interestingly we find that substituting I with Cl has minor effects on the mobilities. Our analysis suggests that the carrier mobility is probably not a key factor in determining the high solar-harvesting efficiency of this class of materials. PMID:26235910

  10. 20 CFR 30.207 - How does a claimant prove a diagnosis of a beryllium disease covered under Part B?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Beryllium sensitivity or sensitization is established with an abnormal LPT performed on either blood or lung... or after January 1, 1993, beryllium sensitivity (as established in accordance with paragraph (b) of... respiratory disorder. (E) Immunologic tests showing beryllium sensitivity (skin patch test or beryllium...

  11. 20 CFR 30.207 - How does a claimant prove a diagnosis of a beryllium disease covered under Part B?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Beryllium sensitivity or sensitization is established with an abnormal LPT performed on either blood or lung... or after January 1, 1993, beryllium sensitivity (as established in accordance with paragraph (b) of... respiratory disorder. (E) Immunologic tests showing beryllium sensitivity (skin patch test or beryllium...

  12. 20 CFR 30.207 - How does a claimant prove a diagnosis of a beryllium disease covered under Part B?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Beryllium sensitivity or sensitization is established with an abnormal LPT performed on either blood or lung... or after January 1, 1993, beryllium sensitivity (as established in accordance with paragraph (b) of... respiratory disorder. (E) Immunologic tests showing beryllium sensitivity (skin patch test or beryllium...

  13. 20 CFR 30.207 - How does a claimant prove a diagnosis of a beryllium disease covered under Part B?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Beryllium sensitivity or sensitization is established with an abnormal LPT performed on either blood or lung... or after January 1, 1993, beryllium sensitivity (as established in accordance with paragraph (b) of... respiratory disorder. (E) Immunologic tests showing beryllium sensitivity (skin patch test or beryllium...

  14. 20 CFR 30.207 - How does a claimant prove a diagnosis of a beryllium disease covered under Part B?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Beryllium sensitivity or sensitization is established with an abnormal LPT performed on either blood or lung... or after January 1, 1993, beryllium sensitivity (as established in accordance with paragraph (b) of... respiratory disorder. (E) Immunologic tests showing beryllium sensitivity (skin patch test or beryllium...

  15. Beryllium and titanium cost-adjustment report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, John; Ulph, Eric, Sr.

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes cost adjustment factors for beryllium (Be, S200) and titanium (Ti, 6Al-4V) that were derived relative to aluminum (Al, 7075-T6). Aluminum is traditionally the material upon which many of the Cost Analysis Office, Missile Division cost estimating relationships (CERs) are based. The adjustment factors address both research and development and production (Q > 100) quantities. In addition, the factors derived include optical elements, normal structure, and structure with special requirements for minimal microcreep, such as sensor assembly parts and supporting components. Since booster cost per payload pound is an even larger factor in total missile launch costs than was initially presumed, the primary cost driver for all materials compared was the missiles' booster cost per payload pound for both R&D and production quantities. Al and Ti are 1.5 and 2.4 times more dense, respectively, than Be, and the cost to lift the heavier materials results in greater booster expense. In addition, Al and Ti must be 2.1 and 2.8, respectively, times the weight of a Be component to provide equivalent stiffness, based on the example component addressed in the report. These factors also increase booster costs. After review of the relative factors cited above, especially the lower costs for Be when stiffness and booster costs are taken into consideration, affordability becomes an important issue. When this study was initiated, both government and contractor engineers said that Be was the material to be used as a last resort because of its prohibitive cost and extreme toxicity. Although the initial price of Be may lead one to believe that any Be product would be extremely expensive, the total cost of Be used for space applications is actually competitive with or less costly than either Al or Ti. Also, the Be toxicity problem has turned out to be a non-issue for purchasers of finished Be components since no machining or grinding operations are required on the finished

  16. Research and development study for optimization of beryllium production operations. Task II report. Volume 1. Recommendations for subscale demonstration models

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlke, J.R.

    1983-04-01

    The eleven evaluation reports in this Task II, Volume 1 report, are the results of a comprehensive literature search and study of new concepts or alternatives for beryllium metal production, currently available in industry today. Modifications to the current beryllium metal production process were also studied. Three processes were selected for in-depth evaluation and comparison to the current process with proposed improvements: sodium reduction of beryllium chloride to produce metallic beryllium; modified Hall process for beryllium flake; and electrowinning of beryllium chloride to produce metallic beryllium.

  17. Tritium release from beryllium discs and lithium ceramics irradiated in the SIBELIUS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.; Kopasz, J.P.; Baldwin, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    The SIBELIUS experiment was designed to obtain information on the compatibility between beryllium and ceramics, as well as beryllium and steel, in a neutron environment. This experiment comprised irradiation of eight capsules, seven of which were independently purged with a He/0.1% H{sub 2} gas mixture. Four capsules were used to examine beryllium/ceramic (Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}) and beryllium/steel (Types 316L and 1.4914) compacts. Isothermal anneal experiments have been run on representative beryllium and ceramic disks from each of the four capsules at 550{degrees}C to 850{degrees}C in steps of 100{degrees}C. The results indicate that tritium release from the beryllium did not exhibit burst release behavior, as previously reported, but rather a progressive release with increasing temperature. Generally, {approximately}99% of the tritium was released by 850{degrees}C. Tritium release from the ceramic discs was quite similar to the behavior shown in other dynamic tritium release experiments on lithium ceramics. The tritium content in beryllium discs adjacent to a steel sample was found to be significantly lower than that found in a beryllium disc adjacent to a ceramic sample. Recoil of tritium from the ceramic into the beryllium appears to be the source of tritium entering the beryllium, probably residing in the beryllium oxide layer.

  18. Beryllium solubility in occupational airborne particles: Sequential extraction procedure and workplace application.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Davy; Durand, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Modification of an existing sequential extraction procedure for inorganic beryllium species in the particulate matter of emissions and in working areas is described. The speciation protocol was adapted to carry out beryllium extraction in closed-face cassette sampler to take wall deposits into account. This four-step sequential extraction procedure aims to separate beryllium salts, metal, and oxides from airborne particles for individual quantification. Characterization of the beryllium species according to their solubility in air samples may provide information relative to toxicity, which is potentially related to the different beryllium chemical forms. Beryllium salts (BeF(2), BeSO(4)), metallic beryllium (Bemet), and beryllium oxide (BeO) were first individually tested, and then tested in mixtures. Cassettes were spiked with these species and recovery rates were calculated. Quantitative analyses with matched matrix were performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Method Detection Limits (MDLs) were calculated for the four matrices used in the different extraction steps. In all cases, the MDL was below 4.2 ng/sample. This method is appropriate for assessing occupational exposure to beryllium as the lowest recommended threshold limit values are 0.01 µg.m(-3) in France([) (1) (]) and 0.05 µg.m(-3) in the USA.([ 2 ]) The protocol was then tested on samples from French factories where occupational beryllium exposure was suspected. Beryllium solubility was variable between factories and among the same workplace between different tasks. PMID:26327570

  19. Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Siemer, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

  20. Genetic Control of Methyl Halide Production in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Ostergaard, L.; Saltzman, E. S.; Yanofsky, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the primary carriers of natural chlorine and bromine to the stratosphere where they catalyze the destruction of ozone, whereas methyl iodide influences aerosol formation and ozone loss in the troposphere. Methyl bromide is also an agricultural fumigant whose use is scheduled to be phased out by international agreement. Despite the economic and environmental importance of these methyl halides, their natural sources and biological production mechanisms are poorly understood. Currently identified sources include oceans, biomass burning, industrial and agricultural use, fuel combustion, salt marshes, wetlands, rice paddies, certain terrestrial plants and fungi, and abiotic processes. We demonstrate that the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana produces and emits methyl halides and that the enzyme primarily responsible for the production is encoded by the HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER (HOL) gene located on chromosome II. In mutant plants that have a disruption of the HOL gene, methyl halide production is largely eliminated. A phylogenetic analysis using the HOL gene suggests that the ability to produce methyl halides is widespread among vascular plants. This approach provides a genetic basis for understanding and predicting patterns of methyl halide production by plants.

  1. Halide Perovskites: Poor Man's High-Performance Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-07-01

    Halide perovskites are a rapidly developing class of medium-bandgap semiconductors which, to date, have been popularized on account of their remarkable success in solid-state heterojunction solar cells raising the photovoltaic efficiency to 20% within the last 5 years. As the physical properties of the materials are being explored, it is becoming apparent that the photovoltaic performance of the halide perovskites is just but one aspect of the wealth of opportunities that these compounds offer as high-performance semiconductors. From unique optical and electrical properties stemming from their characteristic electronic structure to highly efficient real-life technological applications, halide perovskites constitute a brand new class of materials with exotic properties awaiting discovery. The nature of halide perovskites from the materials' viewpoint is discussed here, enlisting the most important classes of the compounds and describing their most exciting properties. The topics covered focus on the optical and electrical properties highlighting some of the milestone achievements reported to date but also addressing controversies in the vastly expanding halide perovskite literature. PMID:27174223

  2. Two Dimensional Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanorods with Tunable Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-05-11

    Organo-metal halide perovskite is an efficient light harvester in photovoltaic solar cells. Organometal halide perovskite is used mainly in its "bulk" form in the solar cell. Confined perovskite nanostructures could be a promising candidate for efficient optoelectronic devices, taking advantage of the superior bulk properties of organo-metal halide perovskite, as well as the nanoscale properties. In this paper, we present facile low-temperature synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) lead halide perovskite nanorods (NRs). These NRs show a shift to higher energies in the absorbance and in the photoluminescence compared to the bulk material, which supports their 2D structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the NRs demonstrates their 2D nature combined with the tetragonal 3D perovskite structure. In addition, by alternating the halide composition, we were able to tune the optical properties of the NRs. Fast Fourier transform, and electron diffraction show the tetragonal structure of these NRs. By varying the ligands ratio (e.g., octylammonium to oleic acid) in the synthesis, we were able to provide the formation mechanism of these novel 2D perovskite NRs. The 2D perovskite NRs are promising candidates for a variety of optoelectronic applications, such as light-emitting diodes, lasing, solar cells, and sensors. PMID:27089497

  3. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  4. The effect of processing parameters on plasma sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.A.; Cowgill, D.F.; Snead, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Plasma spraying is being investigated as a potential coating technique for applying thin (0.1--5mm) layers of beryllium on plasma facing surfaces of blanket modules in ITER and also as an in-situ repair technique for repairing eroded beryllium surfaces in high heat flux divertor regions. High density spray deposits (>98% of theoretical density) of beryllium will be required in order to maximize the thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. A preliminary investigation was done to determine the effect of various processing parameters (particle size, particle morphology, secondary gas additions and reduced chamber pressure) on the as-deposited density of beryllium. The deposits were made using spherical beryllium feedstock powder which was produced by centrifugal atomization at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Improvements in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the beryllium spray deposits will be discussed along with the corresponding thermal conductivity and outgassing behavior of these deposits.

  5. Regeneration of zinc halide catalyst used in the hydrocracking of polynuclear hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1978-01-01

    Improved recovery of spent molten zinc halide hydro-cracking catalyst is achieved in the oxidative vapor phase regeneration thereof by selective treatment of the zinc oxide carried over by the effluent vapors from the regeneration zone with hydrogen halide gas under conditions favoring the reaction of the zinc oxide with the hydrogen halide, whereby regenerated zinc halide is recovered in a solids-free state with little loss of zinc values.

  6. The uses and adverse effects of beryllium on health

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: This review describes the health effects of beryllium exposure in the workplace and the environment. Aim: To collate information on the consequences of occupational and environmental exposure to beryllium on physiological function and well being. Materials and Methods: The criteria used in the current review for selecting articles were adopted from proposed criteria in The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Articles were classified based on acute and chronic exposure and toxicity of beryllium. Results: The proportions of utilized and nonutilized articles were tabulated. Years 2001–10 gave the greatest match (45.9%) for methodological parameters, followed by 27.71% for 1991–2000. Years 1971–80 and 1981–90 were not significantly different in the information published and available whereas years 1951–1960 showed a lack of suitable articles. Some articles were published in sources unobtainable through requests at the British Library, and some had no impact factor and were excluded. Conclusion: Beryllium has some useful but undoubtedly harmful effects on health and well-being. Measures need to be taken to prevent hazardous exposure to this element, making its biological monitoring in the workplace essential. PMID:20386622

  7. Biological Exposure Metrics of Beryllium-Exposed Dental Technicians

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Moshe; Lerman, Yehuda; Kapel, Arik; Pardo, Asher; Schwarz, Yehuda; Newman, Lee; Maier, Lisa; Fireman, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium is commonly used in the dental industry. This study investigates the association between particle size and shape in induced sputum (IS) with beryllium exposure and oxidative stress in 83 dental technicians. Particle size and shape were defined by laser and video, whereas beryllium exposure data came from self-reports and beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) results. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) gene expression in IS was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A high content of particles (92%) in IS > 5 µ in size is correlated to a positive BeLPT risk (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9–13). Use of masks, hoods, and type of exposure yielded differences in the transparency of IS particles (gray level) and modulate HO1 levels. These results indicate that parameters of size and shape of particles in IS are sensitive to workplace hygiene, affect the level of oxidative stress, and may be potential markers for monitoring hazardous dust exposures. PMID:24205960

  8. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  9. REACTOR CORE SURROUNDED BY BERYLLIUM MODERATOR. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR CORE SURROUNDED BY BERYLLIUM MODERATOR. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN AND TOWARD NORTH INTO LOWER GRID CASTING. HOLES OF VARIOUS SIZES ACCOMMODATE COOLANT WATER AND EXPERIMENTAL POSITIONS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 4197. Unknown Photographer, 2/11/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Be-Cu-Si (Beryllium-Copper-Silicon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materials Science International Team MSIT

    This document is part of Subvolume C2 'Non-Ferrous Metal Systems. Part 2: Selected Copper Systems' of Volume 11 'Ternary Alloy Systems - Phase Diagrams, Crystallographic and Thermodynamic Data critically evaluated by MSIT®' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It provides data of the ternary system Beryllium-Copper-Silicon.

  11. Temporal variability of beryllium-7 fallout in southwest UK.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Keith-Roach, M J; Iurian, A R; Mabit, L; Blake, W H

    2016-08-01

    Cosmogenic beryllium-7 has been widely employed as a sediment tracing tool and continued development of its use as a soil erosion tracer requires knowledge of fallout temporal dynamics. Data regarding beryllium-7 fallout in the UK are scarce and here the authors provide a record of beryllium-7 fallout in southwest England spanning a two-year period. A monthly fallout record was developed for Plymouth, UK using regular rainfall sampling to determine beryllium-7 rainfall activity concentration (Bq L(-1)) and deposition flux (Bq m(-2)). Data showed a general tendency for higher activity during the spring/summer months and lower activity in the autumn/winter months. Comparison with data for other UK sites (Chilton and Aberporth) for the same period found significant differences in (7)Be activity in rainwater and lower variability in Plymouth than Chilton and Aberporth. Total deposition was largely controlled by rainfall in Plymouth although regression coefficients suggested greater importance of other atmospheric controls at the Chilton and Aberporth sites. Use of a deposition proportion to rainfall proportion ratio identified periods when deposition was influenced by varying (7)Be activity in rainfall. Broad ranges in ratios were found for Chilton and Aberporth and this has implications for sediment tracer studies requiring estimates of (7)Be deposition flux across months or seasons. PMID:27155526

  12. The acute toxicity of inhaled beryllium metal in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, P.J.; Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Cuddihy, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors exposed rats once by nose only for 50 min to a mean concentration of 800 [mu]g/m[sup 3] of beryllium metal to characterize the acute toxic effects within the lung. Histological changes within the lung and enzyme changes within bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were evaluated at 3, 7, 10, 14, 31, 59, 115, and 171 days postexposure (dpe). Beryllium metal-exposed rats developed acute, necrotizing, hemorrhagic, exudative pneumonitis and intraalveolar fibrosis that peaked at 14 dpe. By 31 dpe, inflammatory lesions were replaced by minimal interstitial and intraalveolar fibrosis. Necrotizing inflammation was observed again at 59 dpe which progressed to chronic-active inflammation by 115 dpe. Low numbers of diffusely distributed lymphocytes were also present but they were not associated with granulomas as is observed in beryllium-induced disease in man. Lymphocytes were not elevated in BAL samples collected from beryllium-exposed rats at any time after exposure. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), [beta]-glucuronidase, and protein levels were elevated in BAL fluid from 3 through 14 dpe but returned to near normal levels by 31 dpe. LDH increased once again at 59 dpe and remained elevated at 171 dpe. [beta]-Glucuronidase and protein levels were slightly, but not significantly, elevated from 31 through 171 dpe.

  13. 9. VIEW OF FOUNDRY FURNACE, DEPLETED URANIUM INGOTS, BERYLLIUM INGOTS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF FOUNDRY FURNACE, DEPLETED URANIUM INGOTS, BERYLLIUM INGOTS, AND ALUMINUM SHAPES WERE PRODUCED IN THE FOUNDRY. (10/30/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A.; Rolli, R.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  15. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) (63 FR 66940). After considering the comments received, DOE published its final rule establishing CBDPP on December 8, 1999 (64 FR 68854). At that time, DOE sought to... establish both surface level and aggressive air sampling criteria (modeled after the U.S....

  16. Anisotropic swelling behavior of hot-extruded beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Jang, Jinsung; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jung, Myung Hwan; Lee, Jae Sang

    2016-04-01

    The lifetime of beryllium reflector assemblies is usually determined by neutron irradiation induced swelling, which results in mechanical interferences or fractures of the beryllium elements. Therefore, the dimensional stability and microstructure variations of beryllium during irradiation are important issues to study. In this paper, the microstructure characteristics of S-200-F and EHP-56 beryllium blocks, which were manufactured by using vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and hot extrusion (HE), respectively, were investigated. BeO distributions, grain shapes, and preferred orientations were investigated by using SEM-EPMA and SEM-EBSD systems. Dissimilarly to S-200-F, a strong fiber texture developed in the EHP-56 during the HE process; the basal planes in the majority of grains were arranged along the extrusion direction. To emulate the microstructure evolution during neutron irradiation, we irradiated the electro-polished surface of EHP-56 with protons at room temperature, where the acceleration voltage and the number of protons were 120 keV and 2.0 × 1018 ions/cm2, respectively. Irradiation-induced cavities were observed to be considerably longer along the basal plane in the EHP-56 specimen. Correspondingly, the amount of dimensional change was smaller along the direction parallel to the basal plane.

  17. Beryllium deposits of the western Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sainsbury, C.L.

    1963-01-01

    Deposits of beryllium ore in the Lost River area of the western Seward Peninsula, Alaska, consist of replacement veins, pipes, and stringer lodes is limestone in a zone about 7 miles long and 2 to 3 miles wide which is faulted and intruded by dikes and stocks. The ores are remarkably alike and typically consist of the following minerals, in percent: fluorite, 45-65; diaspore, 5-10; tourmaline, 0-10; chrysoberyl, 3-10; white mica, 0-5; small amounts of hematite, sulfide minerals, manganese oxide, other beryllium minerals; and traces of minerals not yet identified. The ores generally are cut by late veinlets which are of the same mineralogy as the groundmass ore, or which consist of fluorite, white mica, and euclase. The ores are fine grained, and many of the individual mineral grains, except fluorite, are less than 1 mm in size. The beryllium content of bulk samples of ore ranges from 0.11 to 0.54 percent (0.31 to 1.50 percent BeO). High-grade nodules, composed principally of chrysoberyl, diaspore, fluorite, and mica, contain as much as 6 percent BeO. Geochemical reconnaissance has disclosed other areas of anomalous beryllium in stream sediments elsewhere on the Seward Peninsula, generally around biotite granites that have them associated with tin deposits; additional exploration probably will disclose other deposits.

  18. PREPARATION OF COMPACTS MADE FROM URANIUM AND BERYLLIUM BY SINTERING

    DOEpatents

    Angier, R.P.

    1961-04-11

    A powder metallurgical method for making high-density compacts of uranium and beryllium is reported. Powdered UBe/sub 9/ and powdered Be are blended, compacted, and then sintered by rapidly heating to a temperature of approximately 1220 to 1280 deg C in an inert atmosphere.

  19. 18. VIEW OF ENGINEERING CONTROLS USED IN THE BERYLLIUM SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF ENGINEERING CONTROLS USED IN THE BERYLLIUM SHOP TO REDUCE EMPLOYEE EXPOSURE. THE LATHE IS COVERED BY A HOOD WITH A SEPARATE AIR-HANDLING SYSTEM. PRECISION EQUIPMENT IS CONTROLLED DIGITALLY. (11/13/89) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  20. Subscale Beryllium Mirrors Demonstrator (SBMD) Program Summary and Ball Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendrick, Stephen; Brown, Robert; Stahl, Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The SBMD Program was to design, fabricate, and test a 0.5-m beryllium lightweighted mirror applicable to space deployable systems with demanding optical and areal density requirements. This presentation summarizes the program's objectives and the mirror's tested technical performance along with lessons learned. In addition, test results are compared to modeling predictions. The SBMD Program was funded by NASA MSFC.

  1. A NOVEL BIOMARKER FOR BERYLLIUM SENSITIZATION IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project will determine the T-cell receptor (TCR) gene usages of beryllium reactive T-lymphocytes isolated directly from the peripheral blood of individuals exposed at a U.S. Department of Energy site. The objective is to develop a sensitive and novel biomarker for i...

  2. Biological exposure metrics of beryllium-exposed dental technicians.

    PubMed

    Stark, Moshe; Lerman, Yehuda; Kapel, Arik; Pardo, Asher; Schwarz, Yehuda; Newman, Lee; Maier, Lisa; Fireman, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Beryllium is commonly used in the dental industry. This study investigates the association between particle size and shape in induced sputum (IS) with beryllium exposure and oxidative stress in 83 dental technicians. Particle size and shape were defined by laser and video, whereas beryllium exposure data came from self-reports and beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) results. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) gene expression in IS was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A high content of particles (92%) in IS >5 μ in size is correlated to a positive BeLPT risk (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9-13). Use of masks, hoods, and type of exposure yielded differences in the transparency of IS particles (gray level) and modulate HO1 levels. These results indicate that parameters of size and shape of particles in IS are sensitive to workplace hygiene, affect the level of oxidative stress, and may be potential markers for monitoring hazardous dust exposures. PMID:24205960

  3. Risks of beryllium disease related to work processes at a metal, alloy, and oxide production plant.

    PubMed Central

    Kreiss, K; Mroz, M M; Zhen, B; Wiedemann, H; Barna, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe relative hazards in sectors of the beryllium industry, risk factors of beryllium disease and sensitisation related to work process were sought in a beryllium manufacturing plant producing pure metal, oxide, alloys, and ceramics. METHODS: All 646 active employees were interviewed; beryllium sensitisation was ascertained with the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation blood test on 627 employees; clinical evaluation and bronchoscopy were offered to people with abnormal test results; and industrial hygiene measurements related to work processes taken in 1984-93 were reviewed. RESULTS: 59 employees (9.4%) had abnormal blood tests, 47 of whom underwent bronchoscopy. 24 new cases of beryllium disease were identified, resulting in a beryllium disease prevalence of 4.6%, including five known cases (29/632). Employees who had worked in ceramics had the highest prevalence of beryllium disease (9.0%). Employees in the pebble plant (producing beryllium metal) who had been employed after 1983 also had increased risk, with a prevalence of beryllium disease of 6.4%, compared with 1.3% of other workers hired in the same period, and a prevalence of abnormal blood tests of 19.2%. Logistic regression modelling confirmed these two risk factors for beryllium disease related to work processes and the dependence on time of the risk at the pebble plant. The pebble plant was not associated with the highest gravimetric industrial hygiene measurements available since 1984. CONCLUSION: Further characterisation of exposures in beryllium metal production may be important to understanding how beryllium exposures confer high contemporary risk of beryllium disease. PMID:9326165

  4. Hanford Site Beryllium Program: Past, Present, and Future - 12428

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Mark; Garcia, Pete; Goeckner, Julie; Millikin, Emily; Stoner, Mike

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a long history of beryllium use because of the element's broad application to many nuclear operations and processes. At the Hanford Site beryllium alloy was used to fabricate parts for reactors, including fuel rods for the N-Reactor during plutonium production. Because of continued confirmed cases of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), and data suggesting CBD occurs at exposures to low-level concentrations, the DOE decided to issue a rule to further protect federal and contractor workers from hazards associated with exposure to beryllium. When the beryllium rule was issued in 1999, each of the Hanford Site contractors developed a Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) and initial site wide beryllium inventories. A new site-wide CBDPP, applicable to all Hanford contractors, was issued in May, 2009. In the spring of 2010 the DOE Headquarters Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) conducted an independent inspection to evaluate the status of implementation of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The report identified four Findings and 12 cross-cutting Opportunities for Improvement (OFIs). A corrective action plan (CAP) was developed to address the Findings and crosscutting OFIs. The DOE directed affected site contractors to identify dedicated resources to participate in development of the CAP, along with involving stakeholders. The CAP included general and contractor-specific recommendations. Following initiation of actions to implement the approved CAP, it became apparent that additional definition of product deliverables was necessary to assure that expectations were adequately addressed and CAP actions could be closed. Consequently, a supplement to the original CAP was prepared and transmitted to DOE-HQ for approval. Development of the supplemental CAP was an eight month effort. From the onset a core group of CAP development members were identified to develop a mechanism for

  5. High Biomass Specific Methyl Halide Production Rates of Selected Coastal Marsh Plants and its Relationship to Halide Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, S. L.; Wang, N.; Cicerone, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    Salt tolerant coastal marsh plants (halophytes) have previously been shown to be globally significant producers of methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl bromide (MeBr). While halophytes are known for their high salt content, there are few reports of their halide content. Our studies have attempted to quantify biomass specific methyl halide (MeX) production from these plants and relate it to tissue halide levels. MeCl, MeBr and MeI production rates and tissue chloride, bromide and iodide concentrations from selected coastal marsh plants were measured for nearly a year. Certain halophyte species (i.e. Batis and Frankenia) have very high summer biomass specific production rates for MeX (e.g. Frankenia: 1 ug MeCl /gfwt/hr; 80 ng MeBr/gfwt/hr; 8 ng MeI/gfwt/hr). These rates of MeCl and MeBr production are much higher than those from other coastal marsh plants or seaweeds. Plant halide levels remain high throughout the year, while MeX production peaks at a high level in mid summer falling to low winter rates. This implies a linkage to plant growth. Higher levels of chloride and bromide were seen in the fleshy marsh plants such as Batis (saltwort, approximately 20 percent dry wt chloride, 0.4 percent dry wt bromide) and Salicornia (pickleweed) than in the others such as Frankenia (alkali heath) approx 7 percent dry wt chloride, 0.1 percent dry wt bromide) or Spartina (cordgrass). No such trend was seen for iodide, which ranged from 4 - 10 ppm. Calculations show the daily halide losses from MeX production are far less than the variability in tissue halide content. MeX production removes a small fraction of the total tissue halide from these plants suggesting that MeX production is not a mechanism used by these species to control internal halide levels. Saltwort cell-free extracts incubated with bromide or iodide in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) produced the corresponding MeX. MeBr production was inhibited by caffeic acid the substrate of lignin-specific O

  6. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and... FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. Ballast efficiency means, in the case of...

  7. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 431.322 Section 431.322 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide...

  8. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 431.322 Section 431.322 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide...

  9. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 431.322 Section 431.322 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  14. Unsuspected exposure to beryllium: potential implications for sarcoidosis diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Laczniak, Andrew N; Gross, Nathan A; Fuortes, Laurence J; Field, R William

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to Beryllium (Be) can cause sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in some individuals.  Even relatively low exposures may be sufficient to generate an asymptomatic, or in some cases a symptomatic, immune response. Since the clinical presentation of CBD is similar to that of sarcoidosis, it is helpful to have information on exposure to beryllium in order to reduce misdiagnosis. The purpose of this pilot study is to explore the occurrence of Be surface deposits at worksites with little or no previous reported use of commercially available Be products.  The workplaces chosen for this study represent a convenience sample of businesses in eastern Iowa. One hundred thirty-six surface dust samples were collected from 27 businesses for analysis of Be. The results were then divided into categories by the amount of detected Be according to U.S. Department of Energy guidelines as described in 10 CFR 850.30 and 10 CFR 850.31. Overall, at least one of the samples at 78% of the work sites tested contained deposited Be above the analytical limit of quantitation (0.035 µg beryllium per sample).  Beryllium was detected in 46% of the samples collected. Twelve percent of the samples exceeded 0.2 µg/100 cm² and 4% of the samples exceeded a Be concentration of 3 µg/100 cm². The findings from this study suggest that there may be a wider range and greater number of work environments that have the potential for Be exposure than has been documented previously.  These findings could have implications for the accurate diagnosis of sarcoidosis. PMID:25078645

  15. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures are identified which may be suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures above 600 C. The use of metal-halides is appropriate because of their tendency to form two immiscible melts with a density difference, which reduces scale formation and solidification on heat transfer surfaces. Also, the accumulation of phase change material along the melt interface is avoided by the self-dispersing characteristic of some metal-halides, in particular Sr-SrCl2, Ba-BaCl2, and Ba-BaBr2 mixtures. Further advantages lie in their high thermal conductivities, ability to cope with thermal shock, corrosion inhibition, and possibly higher energy densities.

  16. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of lead halide perovskite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idowu, Mopelola A.; Yau, Sung H.; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    Recently, lead halide perovskites which are organic-inorganic hybrid structures, have been discovered to be highly efficient as light absorbers. Herein, we show the investigation of the excited state dynamics and emission properties of non-stoichiometric precursor formed lead halide perovskites grown by interdiffusion method using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. The influence of the different ratios of the non-stoichiometric precursor solution was examined. The observed photoluminescence properties were correlated with the femtosecond transient absorption measurements.

  17. Thermodynamic reactivity, growth and characterization of mercurous halide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mazelsky, R.; Singh, M.; Glicksman, M. E.; Paradies, C.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations were carried out for the Hg-X-O system (X = Cl, Br, I) to identify the potential sources of contamination and relative stability of oxides and oxy-halide phases. The effect of excess mercury vapor pressure on the optical quality of mercurous halide crystal was studied by growing several mercurous chloride crystals from mercury-rich composition. The optical quality of crystals was examined by birefringence interferometry and laser scattering studies. Crystals grown in slightly mercury-rich composition showed improved optical quality relative to stoichiometric crystals.

  18. Thallous halide materials for use in cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, William N. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Thallous halides, either alone or in combination with other ceramic materials, are used in cryogenic applications such as heat exchange material for the regenerator section of a closed-cycle cryogenic refrigeration section, as stabilizing coatings for superconducting wires, and as dielectric insulating materials. The thallous halides possess unusually large specific heats at low temperatures, have large thermal conductivities, are nonmagnetic, and are nonconductors of electricity. They can be formed into a variety of shapes such as spheres, bars, rods, or the like and can be coated onto substrates.

  19. Boron and aluminum halides under pressure - polymerization and chemical transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yansun

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure phase transitions of boron and aluminum halides have been theoretically studied. At low pressure, crystals of the familiar monomers (BX3) and dimers (Al2X6) are the structures of choice. While the higher oligomers as well as three dimensional infinite polymers are unstable at ambient pressure, they are stabilized by application of external pressure, taking advantage of the extra orbitals made accessible by the increased coordination. Several new crystal structures of boron and aluminum halides have been predicted at high pressures. Calculated x-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra of these phases are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  20. Applications of Raman scattering spectroscopy to halide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendow, B.; Banerjee, P. K.; Drexhage, M. G.

    1983-04-01

    Polarized Raman scattering spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating fundamental vibrational properties, structure and bonding, origins of IR edge absorption, and dispersion of the IR refractive index. In this paper, the application of Raman spectroscopy to halide glasses and, in particular, heavy metal fluoride glasses, is described. The spectra of the latter differ substantially from those of simple oxide, halide or chalcogenide glasses and, moreover, display a wide range of vibrational characteristics, depending on composition. In combination with infrared spectroscopy, useful guidelines can be developed for tailoring glass compositions for specific applications.

  1. Evaluation of historical beryllium abundance in soils, airborne particulates and facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark; Bibby, Richard K; Eppich, Gary R; Lee, Steven; Lindvall, Rachel E; Wilson, Kent; Esser, Bradley K

    2012-10-15

    Beryllium has been historically machined, handled and stored in facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since the 1950s. Additionally, outdoor testing of beryllium-containing components has been performed at LLNL's Site 300 facility. Beryllium levels in local soils and atmospheric particulates have been measured over three decades and are comparable to those found elsewhere in the natural environment. While localized areas of beryllium contamination have been identified, laboratory operations do not appear to have increased the concentration of beryllium in local air or water. Variation in airborne beryllium correlates to local weather patterns, PM10 levels, normal sources (such as resuspension of soil and emissions from coal power stations) but not to LLNL activities. Regional and national atmospheric beryllium levels have decreased since the implementation of the EPA's 1990 Clean-Air-Act. Multi-element analysis of local soil and air samples allowed for the determination of comparative ratios for beryllium with over 50 other metals to distinguish between natural beryllium and process-induced contamination. Ten comparative elemental markers (Al, Cs, Eu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Tl) that were selected to ensure background variations in other metals did not collectively interfere with the determination of beryllium sources in work-place samples at LLNL. Multi-element analysis and comparative evaluation are recommended for all workplace and environmental samples suspected of beryllium contamination. The multi-element analyses of soils and surface dusts were helpful in differentiating between beryllium of environmental origin and beryllium from laboratory operations. Some surfaces can act as "sinks" for particulate matter, including carpet, which retains entrained insoluble material even after liquid based cleaning. At LLNL, most facility carpets had beryllium concentrations at or below the upper tolerance limit determined by sampling facilities

  2. Chronic beryllium disease and cancer risk estimates with uncertainty for beryllium released to the air from the Rocky Flats Plant.

    PubMed Central

    McGavran, P D; Rood, A S; Till, J E

    1999-01-01

    Beryllium was released into the air from routine operations and three accidental fires at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado from 1958 to 1989. We evaluated environmental monitoring data and developed estimates of airborne concentrations and their uncertainties and calculated lifetime cancer risks and risks of chronic beryllium disease to hypothetical receptors. This article discusses exposure-response relationships for lung cancer and chronic beryllium disease. We assigned a distribution to cancer slope factor values based on the relative risk estimates from an occupational epidemiologic study used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine the slope factors. We used the regional atmospheric transport code for Hanford emission tracking atmospheric transport model for exposure calculations because it is particularly well suited for long-term annual-average dispersion estimates and it incorporates spatially varying meteorologic and environmental parameters. We accounted for model prediction uncertainty by using several multiplicative stochastic correction factors that accounted for uncertainty in the dispersion estimate, the meteorology, deposition, and plume depletion. We used Monte Carlo techniques to propagate model prediction uncertainty through to the final risk calculations. We developed nine exposure scenarios of hypothetical but typical residents of the RFP area to consider the lifestyle, time spent outdoors, location, age, and sex of people who may have been exposed. We determined geometric mean incremental lifetime cancer incidence risk estimates for beryllium inhalation for each scenario. The risk estimates were < 10(-6). Predicted air concentrations were well below the current reference concentration derived by the EPA for beryllium sensitization. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10464074

  3. Chronic beryllium disease and cancer risk estimates with uncertainty for beryllium released to the air from the Rocky Flats Plant.

    PubMed

    McGavran, P D; Rood, A S; Till, J E

    1999-09-01

    Beryllium was released into the air from routine operations and three accidental fires at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado from 1958 to 1989. We evaluated environmental monitoring data and developed estimates of airborne concentrations and their uncertainties and calculated lifetime cancer risks and risks of chronic beryllium disease to hypothetical receptors. This article discusses exposure-response relationships for lung cancer and chronic beryllium disease. We assigned a distribution to cancer slope factor values based on the relative risk estimates from an occupational epidemiologic study used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine the slope factors. We used the regional atmospheric transport code for Hanford emission tracking atmospheric transport model for exposure calculations because it is particularly well suited for long-term annual-average dispersion estimates and it incorporates spatially varying meteorologic and environmental parameters. We accounted for model prediction uncertainty by using several multiplicative stochastic correction factors that accounted for uncertainty in the dispersion estimate, the meteorology, deposition, and plume depletion. We used Monte Carlo techniques to propagate model prediction uncertainty through to the final risk calculations. We developed nine exposure scenarios of hypothetical but typical residents of the RFP area to consider the lifestyle, time spent outdoors, location, age, and sex of people who may have been exposed. We determined geometric mean incremental lifetime cancer incidence risk estimates for beryllium inhalation for each scenario. The risk estimates were < 10(-6). Predicted air concentrations were well below the current reference concentration derived by the EPA for beryllium sensitization. PMID:10464074

  4. Beryllium Alters Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Intracellular Phosphorylation and Cytokine Release in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Shannon; Ganguly, Kumkum; Fresquez, Theresa M.; Gupta, Goutam; McCleskey, T. Mark; Chaudhary, Anu

    2013-01-01

    Beryllium exposure in susceptible individuals leads to the development of chronic beryllium disease, a lung disorder marked by release of inflammatory cytokine and granuloma formation. We have previously reported that beryllium induces an immune response even in blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. In this study, we investigate the effects of beryllium on lipopolysaccharide - mediated cytokine release in blood mononuclear and dendritic cells from healthy individuals. We find that in vitro treatment of beryllium sulfate inhibits the secretion of lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin 10, while the release of interleukin 1β is enhanced. Additionally, not all lipopolysaccharide - mediated responses are altered, as interleukin 6 release in unaffected upon beryllium treatment. Beryllium sulfate treated cells show altered phosphotyrosine levels upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Significantly, beryllium inhibits the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transducer 3, induced by lipopolysaccharide. Finally, inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase mimic the effects of beryllium in inhibition of interleukin 10 release, while they have no effect on interleukin 1β secretion. This study strongly suggests that prior exposures to beryllium could alter host immune responses to bacterial infections in healthy individuals, by altering intracellular signaling. PMID:19894180

  5. Fallout beryllium-7 as a soil and sediment tracer in river basins: current status and needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Alex; Blake, Will H.; Smith, Hugh G.; Mabit, Lionel; Keith-Roach, Miranda J.

    2013-04-01

    Beryllium-7 is a cosmogenic radionuclide formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation of nitrogen and oxygen. Its constant natural production and fallout via precipitation coupled with its ability to bind to soil particles have underpinned its application as a sediment tracer. The short half-life of beryllium-7 (53.3 days) lends itself to tracing sediment dynamics over short time periods, thus, enabling assessment of the effect of land use change upon soil redistribution. Although beryllium-7 has been widely applied as a tracer to date, there remain crucial gaps in understanding relating to the assumptions for its use. To further support the application of beryllium-7 as a tracer across a range of environments requires consideration of both the current strengths and shortcomings of the technique to direct research needs. Here we review research surrounding the assumptions underpinning beryllium-7 use as a tracer and identify key knowledge gaps relating to i) the effects of rain shadowing and vegetation interception upon beryllium-7 fallout uniformity at the hillslope-scale; ii) the effect of preferential flow pathways upon beryllium-7 depth distribution in soil and overland flow upon beryllium-7 inventory uniformity and iii) the potential for beryllium-7 desorption in saline and reducing environments. To provide continued support for the use of beryllium-7 as a hillslope and catchment-scale tracer, there is an urgent need to undertake further research to quantify the effect of these factors upon tracer estimates.

  6. Application of beryllium antibodies in risk assessment and health surveillance: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S M; Thurlow, S M; Hilmas, D E

    1995-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that current standards used by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to establish an area free from potential beryllium contamination may be inadequate. Using the Beryllium Antibody Assay, it was shown that workers exposed to former beryllium work areas, thought to be sanitized and to meet OSHA standards, experienced statistically significant rises in blood beryllium antibody titers. This finding raises the question of whether the equipment currently required to protect workers in beryllium-laden environments is sufficient. The project mission of decommissioning/decontaminating the former nuclear weapons plant at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), instituted in 1992, has necessitated development of new technology directed toward safe and responsible cleanup. Challenges have been posed not only by the need to dispose of radioactive and chemical waste, but also by the problem of cleaning up hazardous metals such as the element beryllium. Beryllium was used extensively in research and the manufacture of nuclear weapons components at Rocky Flats for over 40 years. Since inhalation of this element can induce chronic beryllium disease (Eisenbud and Lisson, 1983), an antibody assay was developed to screen workers for internal exposure to beryllium. Exposure is indicated by a titer of antibodies greater than two standard deviations above a normal population control (defined as the mean titer of pooled samples from 51 individuals with no known exposure to beryllium) and a p-value of < 0.05. This paper describes two new applications for the assay: risk assessment and health surveillance. Case study 1 involves a team of three workers who cleaned a beryllium plenum and whose beryllium antibody titers provided a quantitative assessment of their exposure. Case study 2 describes the use of the antibody assay to determine the probable manner in which one worker was exposed to beryllium while performing his duties as an

  7. A mortality study of workers at seven beryllium processing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, E.; Okun, A.; Ruder, A.; Fingerhut, M.; Steenland, K. )

    1992-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has found that the evidence for the carcinogenicity of beryllium is sufficient based on animal data but limited based on human data. This analysis reports on a retrospective cohort mortality study among 9,225 male workers employed at seven beryllium processing facilities for at least 2 days between January 1, 1940, and December 31, 1969. Vital status was ascertained through December 31, 1988. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lung cancer in the total cohort was 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.12-1.42); significant SMRs for lung cancer were observed for two of the oldest plants located in Lorain, Ohio (SMR = 1.69; 95% CI = 1.28-2.19) and Reading, Pennsylvania (SMR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.03-1.48). For the overall cohort, significantly elevated SMRs were found for all deaths (SMR = 1.05; 95% CI = 1.01-1.08), ischemic heart disease (SMR = 1.08; 95% CI = 1.01-1.14), pneumoconiosis and other respiratory diseases (SMR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.21-1.80), and chronic and unspecified nephritis, renal failure, and other renal sclerosis (SMR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.00-2.12). Lung cancer SMRs did not increase with longer duration of employment, but did increase with longer latency (time since first exposure). Lung cancer was particularly elevated (SMR = 3.33; 95% CI = 1.66-5.95) among workers at the Lorain plant with a history of (primarily) acute beryllium disease, which is associated with very high beryllium exposure. The lung cancer excess was not restricted to plants operating in the 1940s, when beryllium exposures were known to be extraordinarily high. Elevated lung cancer SMRs were also observed for four of the five plants operating in the 1950s for workers hired during that decade. Neither smoking nor geographic location fully explains the increased lung cancer risk. Occupational exposure to beryllium compounds is the most plausible explanation for the increased risk of lung cancer observed in this study.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10698 - Polyfluorinated alkyl halide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyfluorinated alkyl halide (generic). 721.10698 Section 721.10698 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances §...

  9. Kinetic Studies of the Solvolysis of Two Organic Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, J. A.; Pasto, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment which utilizes the solvolysis of organic halides to demonstrate first and second order reaction kinetics. The experiment also investigates the effect of a change of solvent polarity on reaction rate, common-ion and noncommon-ion salt effects, and the activation parameters of a…

  10. Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Billie J.

    1979-01-01

    A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

  11. Methyl halide emission estimates from domestic biomass burning in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, M. I.; Khan, M. A. H.; White, I. R.; Nickless, G.; Shallcross, D. E.

    Inventories of methyl halide emissions from domestic burning of biomass in Africa, from 1950 to the present day and projected to 2030, have been constructed. By combining emission factors from Andreae and Merlet [2001. Emission of trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15, 955-966], the biomass burning estimates from Yevich and Logan [2003. An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 17(4), 1095, doi:10.1029/2002GB001952] and the population data from the UN population division, the emission of methyl halides from domestic biomass usage in Africa has been estimated. Data from this study suggest that methyl halide emissions from domestic biomass burning have increased by a factor of 4-5 from 1950 to 2005 and based on the expected population growth could double over the next 25 years. This estimated change has a non-negligible impact on the atmospheric budgets of methyl halides.

  12. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  13. On the Boiling Points of the Alkyl Halides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, John

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the variety of explanations in organic chemistry textbooks of a physical property of organic compounds. Focuses on those concepts explaining attractive forces between molecules. Concludes that induction interactions play a major role in alkyl halides and other polar organic molecules and should be given wider exposure in chemistry texts.…

  14. Semiempirical and DFT Investigations of the Dissociation of Alkyl Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waas, Jack R.

    2006-01-01

    Enthalpy changes corresponding to the gas phase heats of dissociation of 12 organic halides were calculated using two semiempirical methods, the Hartree-Fock method, and two DFT methods. These calculated values were compared to experimental values where possible. All five methods agreed generally with the expected empirically known trends in the…

  15. CO2 electrochemical reduction via adsorbed halide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Kotaro; Salazar-Villalpando, Maria D.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of CO2 was studied utilizing halide ions as electrolytes, specifically, aqueous solutions of KCl, KBr, KI. Electrochemical experiments were carried out in a laboratory-made, divided H-type cell. The working electrode was a copper mesh, while the counter and reference electrodes were a Pt wire and an Ag/AgCl electrode, respectively. The results of our work suggest a reaction mechanism for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 where the presence of Cu-X as the catalytic layer facilitates the electron transfer from the electrode to CO2. Electron-transfer to CO2 may occur via the X- ad(Br-, Cl-, I-)-C bond, which is formed by the electron flow from the specifically adsorbed halide anion to the vacant orbital of CO2. The stronger the adsorption of the halide anion to the electrode, the more strongly CO2 is restrained, resulting in higher CO2 reduction current. Furthermore, it is suggested that specifically adsorbed halide anions could suppress the adsorption of protons; leading to a higher hydrogen overvoltage. These effects may synergistically mitigate the over potential necessary for CO2 reduction, and thus increase the rate of electrochemical CO2 reduction.

  16. Electro-optic contribution to Raman scattering from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G.D.; Subbaswamy, K.R.

    1986-06-15

    The electro-optic contributions to second-order Raman scattering and field-induced first-order scattering from alkali halides are calculated explicitly in terms of the ionic hyperpolarizability coefficients. The relevant local-field corrections are evaluated. Illustrative numerical results are presented.

  17. Beryllium and Boron Evolution in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casuso, E.; Beckman, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    We present a model for the evolution of the light-nuclide abundances in the Galaxy, aimed especially at interpreting the observed beryllium and boron abundances as a function of that of iron. We present two models, one for the Galactic halo and the other for the Galactic disk. The main characteristics of the halo model are (1) the relatively rapid change in the physical conditions, on a timescale of less than 2 Gyr, because of the exponentially increasing flow of gas from the halo to form the Galactic bulge--after this period, less than 30% of the initial gas remains in the halo, and star formation there is brought to a halt; (2) the low inferior mass limit for the initial mass function (ml = 0.01), implying that ~60% of the mass that condenses into massive bodies takes the form of substellar objects (masses <=0.1 M⊙). With these assumptions, we can explain the abrupt increase in the observed metallicity distribution of halo stars near [Fe/H] = -1.7, the evolution of [O/Fe], 4He/H, [N/Fe], and 12C/13C versus [Fe/H], and that of [C/O] versus [O/H], and give an account of [Fe/H] as a function of time, during the halo phase. The main characteristics of the disk model are (1) a timescale of order 15 Gyr and (2) an exponentially increasing infall of gas with very low metallicity. With these assumptions, we can explain the prominent peak in the observed metallicity distribution of disk stars near [Fe/H] = -0.4, the evolution of [O/Fe], 4He/H, [N/Fe], and 12C/13C versus [Fe/H], and that of [C/O] versus [O/H] and also give a good fit to observed [Fe/H] as a function of time. The production of light elements (D, 3He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10B, and 11B) occurs principally via Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) reactions for all nuclides except deuterium and 3He. Differences between the halo and the disk are (1) a flatter GCR energy flux spectrum and (2) more GCR flux at early epochs (halo) than more recently (disk), as a result of better GCR confinement, both conditions first suggested by

  18. A preliminary assessment of beryllium dust oxidation during a wet bypass accident in a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brad J. Merrill; Richard L. Moore; J. Phillip Sharp

    2008-09-01

    A beryllium dust oxidation model has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the Fusion Safety Program (FSP) for the MELCOR safety computer code. The purpose of this model is to investigate hydrogen production from beryllium dust layers on hot surfaces inside a fusion reactor vacuum vessel (VV) during in-vessel loss-of-cooling accidents (LOCAs). This beryllium dust oxidation model accounts for the diffusion of steam into a beryllium dust layer, the oxidation of the dust particles inside this layer based on the beryllium-steam oxidation equations developed at the INL, and the effective thermal conductivity of this beryllium dust layer. This paper details this oxidation model and presents the results of the application of this model to a wet bypass accident scenario in the ITER device.

  19. Epidemiological aspects of beryllium-induced nonmalignant lung disease: a 30-year update

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbud, M.; Lisson, J.

    1983-03-01

    The unusual epidemiology of beryllium disease observed in the early studies of beryllium disease led in 1951 to the hypothesis that the chronic form of the disease is the result of an acquired sensitization to beryllium or its compounds. After 30 years, the role of sensitization has been confirmed in a number of laboratory and clinical studies. The unusual epidemiological features first summarized by Sterner and Eisenbud continue to be evident. The early studies also led to formulation of standards that have resulted in effective control of both the acute and chronic pulmonary forms of beryllium disease. No case of acute chemical pneumonitis has been reported among beryllium workers in about 15 years, and the number of chronic cases has diminished greatly despite a marked increase in the use of beryllium.

  20. A novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of beryllium antibodies.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S M

    1991-03-01

    A novel immunological method has been developed for detecting antibodies (IgG molecules) specific to beryllium, a light metal used in industry and capable of causing chronic beryllium disease. Beryllium metal was vacuum deposited onto commercially available immunological microsticks, which were then exposed to test plasma containing the putative antibodies. Antigen-antibody complexes were located using a biotin-avidin amplification method. One employee diagnosed with chronic beryllium disease and one diagnosed as "sensitized" (lymphocyte transformation positive) exhibited antibody titers graphically and statistically different and higher than a pooled baseline control population. Plasma from these two employees (former beryllium workers) was used in four different approaches to validate the presence of beryllium antibodies. The assay proved to be reproducible. PMID:2010619

  1. Development of materials and fabrication of porous and pebble bed beryllium multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, D. A.; Solonin, M. I.; Markushkin, Yu. E.; Gorokhov, V. A.; Gorlevsky, V. V.; Nikolaev, G. N.

    2000-12-01

    Beryllium is considered to be a neutron multiplier material for the reference ITER breeding blanket. The main requirements for the porous beryllium multiplier for the breeding blanket are: (1) inherently open porosity within 20 ± 2% for easy removal of radioactive gases; (2) high thermal conductivity; (3) close contact with a stainless steel (SS) shell to provide high heat transfer. A beryllium multiplier can be fabricated by two different techniques: by manufacturing porous or pebble bed beryllium. The method designed (patent 2106931 RU) in SSC RF-VNIINM (Russia) provides for the production of porous beryllium conforming to the requirements mentioned above. For comparative fission tests and the optimization of breeding zone functional capabilities, porous (21.9%) and binary pebble bed (density=78%) beryllium multipliers were fabricated. DEMO breeding blanket models and a mock-up of fission (IVV-2M reactor) tests have been manufactured at SSC RF-VNIINM.

  2. Removal of beryllium from drinking water by chemical coagulation and lime softening

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, D.A.; Summers, R.S.; Sorg, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. Jar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride) and lime softening performed in removing beryllium from spiked waters. Centrifugation was used to simulate filtration. The two source waters used were raw Ohio River water and groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer. The impact of initial beryllium concentration, coagulant dose, turbidity and pH on beryllium removal was examined and optimum treatment conditions were determined. Jar tests using alum and ferric chloride coagulants were able to achieve 95% and 85% removal of beryllium respectively from surface water. Removal efficiency increased as the pH was increased. Based on the data collected in the study, coprecipitation and precipitation are the two likely mechanisms responsible for beryllium removal.

  3. Risk of Chronic Beryllium Disease by HLA-DPB1 E69 Genotype and Beryllium Exposure in Nuclear Workers

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, Mike V.; Martyny, John W.; Mroz, Margaret M.; Silveira, Lori J.; Strand, Matt; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Sato, Hiroe; Newman, Lee S.; Maier, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) are determined by at least one genetic factor, a glutamic acid at position 69 (E69) of the HLA-DPB1 gene, and by exposure to beryllium. The relationship between exposure and the E69 genotype has not been well characterized. Objectives: The study goal was to define the relationship between beryllium exposure and E69 for CBD and BeS. Methods: Workers (n = 386) from a U.S. nuclear weapons facility were enrolled into a case–control study (70 BeS, 61 CBD, and 255 control subjects). HLA-DPB1 genotypes were determined by sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction. Beryllium exposures were reconstructed on the basis of worker interviews and historical exposure measurements. Measurements and Main Results: Any E69 carriage increased odds for CBD (odds ratio [OR], 7.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.66–15.84) and each unit increase in lifetime weighted average exposure increased the odds for CBD (OR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.26–4.09). Compared with E69-negative genotypes, a single E69-positive *02 allele increased the odds for BeS (OR, 12.01; 95% CI, 4.28–33.71) and CBD (OR, 3.46; 95% CI, 1.42–8.43). A single non-*02 E69 allele further increased the odds for BeS (OR, 29.54; 95% CI, 10.33–84.53) and CBD (OR, 11.97; 95% CI, 5.12–28.00) and two E69 allele copies conferred the highest odds for BeS (OR, 55.68; 95% CI, 14.80–209.40) and CBD (OR, 22.54; 95% CI, 7.00–72.62). Conclusions: E69 and beryllium exposure both contribute to the odds of CBD. The increased odds for CBD and BeS due to E69 appear to be differentially distributed by genotype, with non-*02 E69 carriers and E69 homozygotes at higher odds than those with *02 genotypes. PMID:21471109

  4. Machining of beryllium with the LLNL Precision Engineering Research Lathe

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    In August 1984, six flat samples of beryllium, which were prepared by Brush-Wellmen Corp. using various pressing and sintering processes, were machined at LLNL on the recently completed Precision Engineering Research Lathe (PERL). The purpose of this study, which was conducted in cooperation with the Hughes Aircraft Corporation and partially funded by that organization, was to determine the optical properties of machined beryllium surfaces when prepared under highly controlled conditions using high quality machine tools and CBN (cubic boron nitrite) cutting tools. This report will summarize the materials properties, the machining conditions used on the PERL and a comparison of the completed samples using optical measuring techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mirror surface reflecting measurements in the IR region are to be made by the group at Hughes Aircraft and will be exchanged with LLNL as a part of this joint technical effort. 3 refs., 14 figs.

  5. Ultrasonic evaluation of beryllium-copper diffusion bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, E.E.

    2000-06-08

    A study was performed to compare the effectiveness of several advanced ultrasonic techniques when used to determine the strength of diffusion bonded beryllium-copper, which heretofore have each been applied to only a few material systems. The use of integrated backscatter calculations, frequency domain reflection coefficients, and time-of-flight variance was compared in their ability to characterize the bond strength in a series of beryllium-copper diffusion bond samples having a wide variation in bond quality. Correlation of integrated backscatter calculations and time-of-flight variance with bond strength was good. Some correlation of the slope of the frequency based reflection coefficient was shown for medium and high strength bonds, while its Y-intercept showed moderate correlation for all bond strengths.

  6. Status of RF beryllium characterization for ITER Fist Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Roedig, M.; Gervash, A. А.; Linke, I. J.; Kurbatova, L. A.; Perevalov, S. I.; Giniyatulin, R. N.

    2011-10-01

    The status of RF R&D activities in production and characterization of TGP-56FW beryllium grade is presented. The results of metallographic studies of microstructure and cracks morphology are reported for full-scale Be tiles (56 × 56 × 10 mm) subjected to VDE simulation tests in TSEFEY-M testing facility (VDE-10 MJ/m 2 during 0.1 s, 1 shot ) and following low cycle thermal fatigue tests (500 thermal cycles at 1.5 MW/m 2). First results of plasma disruption tests ( E = 1.2-5 MJ/m 2, 5 ms), which were obtained during the realization of Thermal Shock/VDE Qualification program of RF beryllium in JUDITH-1 facility, are also discussed.

  7. Beryllium and boron in metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, Francesca

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge of lithium, beryllium, and boron abundances in stars of the Galactic halo and disk plays a major role in our understanding of Big Bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic-ray physics, and stellar interiors. 9Be and 10B are believed to originate entirely from spallation reactions in the interstellar medium (ISM) between α-particles and protons and heavy nuclei like carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen (CNO), whereas 11B may have an extra production channel via neutrino-spallation. Beryllium and boron are both observationally challenging, with their main resonant doublets falling respectively at 313 nm and at 250 nm. The advent of 8-10m class telescopes equipped with highly sensitive (in the near-UV/blue) spectrographs has opened up a new era of Be abundance studies. Here, I will review and discuss the most interesting results of recent observational campaigns in terms of formation and evolution of these two light elements.

  8. Purfication kinetics of beryllium during vacuum induction melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, J. L.; Gupta, K. P.; Li, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The kinetics of evaporation in binary alloys were quantitatively treated. The formalism so developed works well for several systems studied. The kinetics of purification of beryllium was studied through evaporation data actually acquired during vacuum induction melting. Normal evaporation equations are shown to be generally valid and useful for understanding the kinetics of beryllium purification. The normal evaporation analysis has been extended to cover cases of limited liquid diffusion. It was shown that under steady-state evaporation, the solute concentration near the surface may be up to six orders of magnitude different from the bulk concentration. Corrections for limited liquid diffusion are definitely needed for the highly evaporative solute elements, such as Zn, Mg, and Na, for which the computed evaporation times are improved by five orders of magnitude. The commonly observed logarithmic relation between evaporation time and final concentration further supports the validity of the normal evaporation equations.

  9. Beryllium reflected cavity reactor for UF6 critical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, G. A.; Bernard, W.; Helmick, H. H.; White, R.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical studies are being conducted for NASA on critical assemblies with one-meter diam by one-meter long low-density cores surrounded by a thick beryllium reflector. These assemblies make extensive use of existing nuclear propulsion reactor components, facilities, and instrumentation. Due to excessive porosity in the reflector, the initial critical mass was 19 kg U(93.2). Addition of a 17-cm-thick by 89-cm-diam beryllium flux trap in the cavity reduced the critical mass to 7 kg when all the uranium was in the zone just outside the flux trap. A mockup aluminum UF6 container was placed inside the flux trap and fueled with uranium-graphite elements. Fission distributions and reactivity worths of fuel and structural materials are available. These results will be used to guide the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test energy removal by optical radiation.

  10. A joint fracture toughness evaluation of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, H.; Sargent, G. A.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point bend specimens cut from hot-pressed beryllium obtained from two suppliers. The test specimens had dimensions conforming to ASTM fracture toughness standard E399-72. A total of 42 specimens were machined from each batch of material. Six specimens from each batch were then distributed to seven independent laboratories for testing. The test data from the laboratories were collected and analyzed for differences between the laboratories and the two batches of material. It is concluded that ASTM 399-72 can be used as a valid test procedure for determining the fracture toughness of beryllium, providing that Kf(max) in fatigue cracking could be up to 80 percent of the K(0) value.

  11. Elastic scattering of Beryllium isotopes near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Amorini, F.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Randisi, G.; Rizzo, F.; Santonocito, D.; Scalia, G.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Papa, M.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Perez-Bernal, F.; Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O.

    2011-10-28

    In this contribution, results of experiments performed with the three Beryllium isotopes {sup 9,10,11}Be on a medium mass {sup 64}Zn target, at a center of mass energy of {approx_equal}1.4 the Coulomb barrier, will be discussed. Elastic scattering angular distributions have been measured for the {sup 9,10}Be reactions. In the {sup 11}Be case the quasielastic scattering angular distribution was obtained. In the halo nucleus case, the angular distribution exhibit a non-Fresnel-type pattern with a strong damping of the Coulomb-nuclear interference peak. Moreover, it is found that the total reaction cross-section for the halo nucleus induced collision is more than double the ones extracted in the collisions induced by the non-halo Beryllium isotopes. A large contribution to the total-reaction cross-section in the {sup 11}Be case could be attributed to transfer and/or break-up events.

  12. Final Results of the Ball AMSD Beryllium Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaney, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The 1.4-meter semi-rigid, beryllium Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) mirror completed initial cryogenic testing at Marshall's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) in August of 2003. Results of this testing show the mirror to have very low cryogenic surface deformation and possess exceptional figure stability. Subsequent to this cryogenic testing beryllium was selected as the material of choice for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) multi-segment primary mirror. Therefore, the AMSD mirror was sent back to SSG-Tinsley for additional ambient polishing to JWST requirements. The mirror was successfully polished to less than 22nm rms of low frequency error. Those additional results are presented with comparisons to the JWST requirements.

  13. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  14. Statistical methods for the blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; Smith, M.H.; Littlefield, L.G.

    1996-10-01

    The blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is a modification of the standard lymphocyte proliferation test that is used to identify persons who may have chronic beryllium disease. A major problem in the interpretation of BeLPT test results is outlying data values among the replicate well counts ({approx}7%). A log-linear regression model is used to describe the expected well counts for each set of Be exposure conditions, and the variance of the well counts is proportional to the square of the expected count. Two outlier-resistant regression methods are used to estimate stimulation indices (SIs) and the coefficient of variation. The first approach uses least absolute values (LAV) on the log of the well counts as a method for estimation; the second approach uses a resistant regression version of maximum quasi-likelihood estimation. A major advantage of these resistant methods is that they make it unnecessary to identify and delete outliers. These two new methods for the statistical analysis of the BeLPT data and the current outlier rejection method are applied to 173 BeLPT assays. We strongly recommend the LAV method for routine analysis of the BeLPT. Outliers are important when trying to identify individuals with beryllium hypersensitivity, since these individuals typically have large positive SI values. A new method for identifying large SIs using combined data from the nonexposed group and the beryllium workers is proposed. The log(SI)s are described with a Gaussian distribution with location and scale parameters estimated using resistant methods. This approach is applied to the test data and results are compared with those obtained from the current method. 24 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Beryllium and Boron abundances in population II stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The scientific focus of this program was to undertake UV spectroscopic abundance analyses of extremely metal poor stars with attention to determining abundances of light elements such as beryllium and boron. The abundances are likely to reflect primordial abundances within the early galaxy and help to constrain models for early galactic nucleosynthesis. The general metal abundances of these stars are also important for understanding stellar evolution.

  16. Fracture in hexagonal closed packed metals, zinc and beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamdar, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that fracture in zinc and beryllium is nucleation controlled and is independent of the nature of the barrier from which fracture nucleates. The double cantilever cleavage technique was used to determine the energy required to propagate a crack on the basal plane (0001) in single crystals. Tensile fracture data from single and asymmetric bicrystals were used to calculate the energy needed to initiate a cleavage crack on the (0001) plane.

  17. Creating σ-holes through the formation of beryllium bonds.

    PubMed

    Brea, Oriana; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2015-09-01

    Through the use of ab initio theoretical models based on MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ-optimized geometries and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ and CCSD(T)/aug-c-pVDZ total energies, it has been shown that the significant electron density rearrangements that follow the formation of a beryllium bond may lead to the appearance of a σ-hole in systems that previously do not exhibit this feature, such as CH3 OF, NO2 F, NO3 F, and other fluorine-containing systems. The creation of the σ-hole is another manifestation of the bond activation-reinforcement (BAR) rule. The appearance of a σ-hole on the F atoms of CH3 OF is due to the enhancement of the electronegativity of the O atom that participates in the beryllium bond. This atom recovers part of the charge transferred to Be by polarizing the valence density of the F into the bonding region. An analysis of the electron density shows that indeed this bond becomes reinforced, but the F atom becomes more electron deficient with the appearance of the σ-hole. Importantly, similar effects are also observed even when the atom participating in the beryllium bond is not directly attached to the F atom, as in NO2 F, NO3 F, or NCF. Hence, whereas the isolated CH3 OF, NO2 F, and NO3 F are unable to yield F⋅⋅⋅Base halogen bonds, their complexes with BeX2 derivatives are able to yield such bonds. Significant cooperative effects between the new halogen bond and the beryllium bond reinforce the strength of both noncovalent interactions. PMID:26212472

  18. Cleaning and activation of beryllium-copper electron multiplier dynodes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a cleaning and activation procedure followed in preparing beryllium-copper dynodes for electron multipliers used in sounding-rocket experiments to detect auroral electrons. The initial degreasing step involved a 5-min bath in trichloroethylene in an ultrasonic cleaner. This was followed by an ultrasonic rinse in methanol and by a two-step acid pickling treatment to remove the oxides. Additional rinsing in water and methanol was followed by activation in a stainless-steel RF induction oven.

  19. Determination of beryllium in ores and rocks by a dilution-fluorometric method with morin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, R.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1961-01-01

    Beryllium in concentrations as little as a few parts per million is determined fluorometrically with morin in low grade ores by a dilution method without separations. A high sensitivity is obtained by the adoption of instrumental and reaction conditions that give a satisfactory ratio of beryllium to blank fluorescence and at the same time minimize iron interference. Data on the behavior of 47 ions are given. The method is applied to ores containing bertrandite and beryl as the beryllium minerals.

  20. Elastic, micro- and macroplastic properties of polycrystalline beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardashev, B. K.; Kupriyanov, I. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Young's modulus and the internal friction of beryllium polycrystals (size grain from 6 to 60 μm) prepared by the powder metallurgy method have been studied as functions of the amplitude and temperature in the range from 100 to 873 K. The measurements have been performed using the composite piezoelectric vibrator method for longitudinal vibrations at frequencies about 100 kHz. Based on the acoustic measurements, the data have been obtained on the elastic and inelastic (microplastic) properties as functions of vibration stress amplitudes within the limits from 0.2 to 30-60 MPa. The microplastic deformation diagram is shown to become nonlinear at the amplitudes higher than 5 MPa. The beryllium mechanical characteristics (the yield strength σ 0.2, the ultimate strength σ u , and the conventional microscopic yield strength σ y ) obtained with various grain sizes are compared. At room temperature, all the parameters satisfactorily obey the Hall-Petch relationship, although there is no complete similarity. The temperature dependences are quite different, namely: σ 0.2( T) and σ u ( T) decrease monotonically during heating from room temperature to higher temperatures; however, σ y ( T) behaves unusually, and it has a minimum near 400 K. The different levels of stresses and the absence of similarity indicate that the scattering of the ultrasound energy and the formation of a level of the macroscopic flow stresses in beryllium occur on dislocation motion obstacles of different origins.

  1. Interaction of high flux deuterium/nitrogen plasmas with beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, T.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Oberkofler, M.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Tabarés, F.

    2011-12-01

    Before nitrogen can be used as a radiator for edge plasma temperature control in experiments with beryllium as the wall material, the compatibility of nitrogen-containing plasma with beryllium has to be tested. Therefore beryllium samples were exposed to a variety of mixed N2/D2 plasmas in PISCES-B and codeposits from the sputtered material were collected. It was found that introducing N2 to a D2 plasma reduces Be erosion significantly but recovery to the pre-N2 levels is possible in pure D2 plasma. Berylliated vessel walls can be a reservoir for N2 and chemical processes probably play a significant role during nitriding and N2 removal. Nitrided target samples remain conductive and do not lead to additional arcing, but codeposits are insulating. Thermal desorption measurements of nitrided and un-nitrided target samples are comparable, while codeposits show a slightly reduced D retention. However, D release for both target and codeposits is shifted ≈100 K to higher temperatures, above 510 K.

  2. Hydrogen retention in beryllium: concentration effect and nanocrystalline growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardanaud, C.; Rusu, M. I.; Martin, C.; Giacometti, G.; Roubin, P.; Ferro, Y.; Allouche, A.; Oberkofler, M.; Köppen, M.; Dittmar, T.; Linsmeier, Ch

    2015-12-01

    We herein report on the formation of BeD2 nanocrystalline domes on the surface of a beryllium sample exposed to energetic deuterium ions. A polycrystalline beryllium sample was exposed to D ions at 2 keV/atom leading to laterally averaged deuterium areal densities up to 3.5 1017 D cm-2, and studied using nuclear reaction analysis, Raman microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy and quantum calculations. Incorporating D in beryllium generates a tensile stress that reaches a plateau at  ≈1.5 1017 D cm-2. For values higher than 2.0 1017 cm-2, we observed the growth of  ≈90 nm high dendrites, covering up to 10% of the surface in some zones of the sample when the deuterium concentration was 3  ×  1017 D cm-2. These dendrites are composed of crystalline BeD2, as evidenced by Raman microscopy and quantum calculations. They are candidates to explain low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy peaks observed when bombarding Be samples with D ions with fluencies higher than 1.2 1017 D cm-2.

  3. Hydrogen retention in beryllium: concentration effect and nanocrystalline growth.

    PubMed

    Pardanaud, C; Rusu, M I; Martin, C; Giacometti, G; Roubin, P; Ferro, Y; Allouche, A; Oberkofler, M; Köppen, M; Dittmar, T; Linsmeier, Ch

    2015-12-01

    We herein report on the formation of BeD2 nanocrystalline domes on the surface of a beryllium sample exposed to energetic deuterium ions. A polycrystalline beryllium sample was exposed to D ions at 2 keV/atom leading to laterally averaged deuterium areal densities up to 3.5 10(17) D cm(-2), and studied using nuclear reaction analysis, Raman microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy and quantum calculations. Incorporating D in beryllium generates a tensile stress that reaches a plateau at  ≈1.5 10(17) D cm(-2). For values higher than 2.0 10(17) cm(-2), we observed the growth of  ≈90 nm high dendrites, covering up to 10% of the surface in some zones of the sample when the deuterium concentration was 3  ×  10(17) D cm(-2). These dendrites are composed of crystalline BeD2, as evidenced by Raman microscopy and quantum calculations. They are candidates to explain low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy peaks observed when bombarding Be samples with D ions with fluencies higher than 1.2 10(17) D cm(-2). PMID:26558478

  4. Development of methods to estimate beryllium exposure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.H.

    1988-06-30

    The project was designed to access data, provide preliminary exposure rankings, and delineate the process for detailing retrospective exposure assessments for beryllium among workers at processing facilities. A literature review was conducted, and walk-through surveys were conducted at two facilities still in operation. More than 8000 environmental records were entered into a computer file. Descriptive statistics were then generated and the process of rank ordering exposures across facilities was begun. In efforts to formulate crude indices of exposure, job titles of persons in the NIOSH mortality study were reviewed and categorized for any beryllium exposure, chemical form of beryllium exposure, and exposure to acid mists. Daily Weighted Average exposure estimates were reviewed by job title, across all facilities. The mean exposure at each facility was calculated. The strategy developed for retrospective exposure assessment is described. Tasks included determination of the usefulness of the Pennsylvania Workers' Compensation files; cataloging the numbers of samples available from company sources; investigating data holdings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and obtaining records from the Department of Energy Library.

  5. Vacuum Brazing of Beryllium Copper Components for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tyhurst, C.C.; Cunningham, M.A.

    2002-06-04

    A process for vacuum brazing beryllium copper anode assemblies was required for the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell System, or PEPC, a component for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial problems with the joint design and wettability of the beryllium copper drove some minor design changes. Brazing was facilitated by plating the joint surface of the beryllium copper rod with silver 0.0006 inch thick. Individual air sampling during processing and swipe tests of the furnace interior after brazing revealed no traceable levels of beryllium.

  6. The beryllium quandary: will the lower exposure limits spur new developments in sampling and analysis?

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, Michael

    2013-06-03

    At the time this article was written, new rulemakings were under consideration at OSHA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that would propose changes to occupational exposure limits for beryllium. Given these developments, it’s a good time to review the tools and methods available to IHs for assessing beryllium air and surface contamination in the workplace—what’s new and different, and what’s tried and true. The article discusses limit values and action levels for beryllium, problematic aspects of beryllium air sampling, sample preparation, sample analysis, and data evaluation.

  7. Proteomic analysis of beryllium-induced genotoxicity in an Escherichia coli mutant model system.

    PubMed

    Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J; Wang, Zaolin; Sauer, Nancy N; Marrone, Babetta L

    2006-03-01

    Beryllium is the second lightest metal, has a high melting point and high strength-to-weight ratio, and is chemically stable. These unique chemical characteristics make beryllium metal an ideal choice as a component material for a wide variety of applications in aerospace, defense, nuclear weapons, and industry. However, inhalation of beryllium dust or fumes induces significant health effects, including chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. In this study, the mutagenicity of beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)) and the comutagenicity of beryllium with a known mutagen 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) were evaluated using a forward mutant detection system developed in Escherichia coli. In this system, BeSO(4) was shown to be weakly mutagenic alone and significantly enhanced the mutagenicity of MNNG up to 3.5-fold over MNNG alone. Based on these results a proteomic study was conducted to identify the proteins regulated by BeSO(4). Using the techniques of 2-DE and oMALDI-TOF MS, we successfully identified 32 proteins being differentially regulated by beryllium and/or MNNG in the E. coli test system. This is the first study to describe the proteins regulated by beryllium in vitro, and the results suggest several potential pathways for the focus of further research into the mechanisms underlying beryllium-induced genotoxicity. PMID:16447159

  8. Low temperature coefficient of resistance and high gage factor in beryllium-doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. B.; Littlejohn, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    The gage factor and resistivity of p-type silicon doped with beryllium was studied as a function of temperature, crystal orientation, and beryllium doping concentration. It was shown that the temperature coefficient of resistance can be varied and reduced to zero near room temperature by varying the beryllium doping level. Similarly, the magnitude of the piezoresistance gage factor for beryllium-doped silicon is slightly larger than for silicon doped with a shallow acceptor impurity such as boron, whereas the temperature coefficient of piezoresistance is about the same for material containing these two dopants. These results are discussed in terms of a model for the piezoresistance of compensated p-type silicon.

  9. Beryllium Science: US-UK agreement on the use of Atomic Energy for mutual defense

    SciTech Connect

    Hanafee, J.E.

    1988-02-19

    Twenty-seven papers are presented on beryllium supply, production, fabrication, safe handling, analysis, powder technology, and coatings. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (DLC)

  10. Introduction to beryllium: uses, regulatory history, and disease.

    PubMed

    Kolanz, M E

    2001-05-01

    Beryllium is an ubiquitous element in the environment, and it has many commercial applications. Because of its strength, electrical and thermal conductivity, corrosion resistance, and nuclear properties, beryllium products are used in the aerospace, automotive, energy, medical, and electronics industries. What eventually came to be known as chronic beryllium disease (CBD) was first identified in the 1940s, when a cluster of cases was observed in workers from the fluorescent light industry. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission recommended the first 8-hour occupational exposure limit (OEL) for beryllium of 2.0 microg/m3 in 1949, which was later reviewed and accepted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the vast majority of countries and standard-setting bodies worldwide. The 2.0 microg/m3 standard has been in use by the beryllium industry for more than 50 years and has been considered adequate to protect workers against clinical CBD. Recently, improved diagnostic techniques, including immunological testing and safer bronchoscopy, have enhanced our ability to identify subclinical CBD cases that would have formerly remained unidentified. Some recent epidemiological studies have suggested that some workers may develop CBD at exposures less than 2.0 microg/m3. ACGIH is currently reevaluating the adequacy of the current 2.0 microg/m3 guideline, and a plethora of research initiatives are under way to provide a better understanding of the cause of CBD. The research is focusing on the risk factors and exposure metrics that could be associated with CBD, as well as on efforts to better characterize the natural history of CBD. There is growing evidence that particle size and chemical form may be important factors that influence the risk of developing CBD. These research efforts are

  11. Spectroscopic effects of disorder and vibrational localization in mixed-halide metal-halide chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Love, S.P.; Scott, B.; Worl, L.A.; Huckett, S.C.; Saxena, A.; Huang, X.Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Swanson, B.I.

    1993-02-01

    Resonance Raman techniques, together with lattice-dynamics and Peierls-Hubbard modelling, are used to explore the electronic and vibrational dynamics of the quasi-one-dimensional metal-halogen chain solids [Pt(en){sub 2}][R(en){sub 2}X{sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 4}, (en = C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2} and X=Cl, Br), abbreviated ``PLX.`` The mixed-halide materials PtCl{sub 1-x}Br{sub x} and PtCl{sub 1-x}I{sub x} consist of long mixed chains with heterojunctions between segments of the two constituent materials. Thus, in addition to providing mesoscale modulation of the chain electronic states, they serve as prototypes for elucidating the properties to be expected for macroscopic heterojunctions of these highly nonlinear materials. Once a detailed understanding of the various local vibrational modes occurring in these disordered solids is developed, the electronic structure of the chain segments and junctions can be probed by tuning the Raman excitation through their various electronic resonances.

  12. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of hydrogen halide and halogen complexes with nitrosyl halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; Lucas, Donald; Pimentel, George C.

    1982-01-01

    Matrix isolation infrared spectra of nitrosyl halide (XNO) complexes with HX and X2 (X = Cl, Br) are presented. The relative frequency shifts of the HX mode are modest (ClNO H-Cl, delta-nu/nu = -0.045; BrNO H-Br, delta-nu/nu = -0.026), indicating weak hydrogen bonds 1-3 kcal/mol. These shifts are accompanied by significant shifts to higher frequencies in the XN-O stretching mode (CIN-O HCl, delta-nu/nu = +0.016; BrN-O HBr, delta-nu/nu = +0.011). Similar shifts were observed for the XN-O X2 complexes (ClN-O Cl2, delta-nu/nu = +0.009; BrN-O-Br2, delta-nu/nu = +0.013). In all four complexes, the X-NO stretching mode relative shift is opposite in sign and about 1.6 times that of the NO stretching mode. These four complexes are considered to be similar in structure and charge distribution. The XN-O frequency shift suggests that complex formation is accompanied by charge withdrawal from the NO bond ranging from about .04 to .07 electron charges. The HX and X2 molecules act as electron acceptors, drawing electrons out of the antibonding orbital of NO and strengthening the XN-O bond. The implications of the pattern of vibrational shifts concerning the structure of the complexes are discussed.

  13. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  14. Release of beryllium from mineral ores in artificial lung and skin surface fluids.

    PubMed

    Duling, Matthew G; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Lawrence, Robert B; Chipera, Steve J; Virji, M Abbas

    2012-06-01

    Exposure to some manufactured beryllium compounds via skin contact or inhalation can cause sensitization. A portion of sensitized persons who inhale beryllium may develop chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Little is understood about exposures to naturally occurring beryllium minerals. The purpose of this study was to assess the bioaccessibility of beryllium from bertrandite ore. Dissolution of bertrandite from two mine pits (Monitor and Blue Chalk) was evaluated for both the dermal and inhalation exposure pathways by determining bioaccessibility in artificial sweat (pH 5.3 and pH 6.5), airway lining fluid (SUF, pH 7.3), and alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (PSF, pH 4.5). Significantly more beryllium was released from Monitor pit ore than Blue Chalk pit ore in artificial sweat buffered to pH 5.3 (0.88 ± 0.01% vs. 0.36 ± 0.00%) and pH 6.5 (0.09 ± 0.00% vs. 0.03 ± 0.01%). Rates of beryllium released from the ores in artificial sweat were faster than previously measured for manufactured forms of beryllium (e.g., beryllium oxide), known to induce sensitization in mice. In SUF, levels of beryllium were below the analytical limit of detection. In PSF, beryllium dissolution was biphasic (initial rapid diffusion followed by latter slower surface reactions). During the latter phase, dissolution half-times were 1,400 to 2,000 days, and rate constants were ~7 × 10(-10) g/(cm(2)·day), indicating that bertrandite is persistent in the lung. These data indicate that it is prudent to control skin and inhalation exposures to bertrandite dusts. PMID:21866318

  15. Beryllium Metal I. Experimental Results on Acute Oral Toxicity, Local Skin and Eye Effects, and Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  16. Methods and Mechanisms for Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Csp(2) Halides with Alkyl Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Weix, Daniel J

    2015-06-16

    Cross-electrophile coupling, the cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, avoids the need for preformed carbon nucleophiles, but development of general methods has lagged behind cross-coupling and C-H functionalization. A central reason for this slow development is the challenge of selectively coupling two substrates that are alike in reactivity. This Account describes the discovery of generally cross-selective reactions of aryl halides and acyl halides with alkyl halides, the mechanistic studies that illuminated the underlying principles of these reactions, and the use of these fundamental principles in the rational design of new cross-electrophile coupling reactions. Although the coupling of two different electrophiles under reducing conditions often leads primarily to symmetric dimers, the subtle differences in reactivity of aryl halides and alkyl halides with nickel catalysts allowed for generally cross-selective coupling reactions. These conditions could also be extended to the coupling of acyl halides with alkyl halides. These reactions are exceptionally functional group tolerant and can be assembled on the benchtop. A combination of stoichiometric and catalytic studies on the mechanism of these reactions revealed an unusual radical-chain mechanism and suggests that selectivity arises from (1) the preference of nickel(0) for oxidative addition to aryl halides and acyl halides over alkyl halides and (2) the greater propensity of alkyl halides to form free radicals. Bipyridine-ligated arylnickel intermediates react with alkyl radicals to efficiently form, after reductive elimination, new C-C bonds. Finally, the resulting nickel(I) species is proposed to regenerate an alkyl radical to carry the chain. Examples of new reactions designed using these principles include carbonylative coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides to form ketones, arylation of epoxides to form β-aryl alcohols, and coupling of benzyl sulfonate esters with aryl halides to form

  17. Methods and Mechanisms for Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Csp2 Halides with Alkyl Electrophiles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Cross-electrophile coupling, the cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, avoids the need for preformed carbon nucleophiles, but development of general methods has lagged behind cross-coupling and C–H functionalization. A central reason for this slow development is the challenge of selectively coupling two substrates that are alike in reactivity. This Account describes the discovery of generally cross-selective reactions of aryl halides and acyl halides with alkyl halides, the mechanistic studies that illuminated the underlying principles of these reactions, and the use of these fundamental principles in the rational design of new cross-electrophile coupling reactions. Although the coupling of two different electrophiles under reducing conditions often leads primarily to symmetric dimers, the subtle differences in reactivity of aryl halides and alkyl halides with nickel catalysts allowed for generally cross-selective coupling reactions. These conditions could also be extended to the coupling of acyl halides with alkyl halides. These reactions are exceptionally functional group tolerant and can be assembled on the benchtop. A combination of stoichiometric and catalytic studies on the mechanism of these reactions revealed an unusual radical-chain mechanism and suggests that selectivity arises from (1) the preference of nickel(0) for oxidative addition to aryl halides and acyl halides over alkyl halides and (2) the greater propensity of alkyl halides to form free radicals. Bipyridine-ligated arylnickel intermediates react with alkyl radicals to efficiently form, after reductive elimination, new C–C bonds. Finally, the resulting nickel(I) species is proposed to regenerate an alkyl radical to carry the chain. Examples of new reactions designed using these principles include carbonylative coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides to form ketones, arylation of epoxides to form β-aryl alcohols, and coupling of benzyl sulfonate esters with aryl

  18. Electrolytic systems and methods for making metal halides and refining metals

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Justin M.; Cecala, David M.

    2015-05-26

    Disclosed are electrochemical cells and methods for producing a halide of a non-alkali metal and for electrorefining the halide. The systems typically involve an electrochemical cell having a cathode structure configured for dissolving a hydrogen halide that forms the halide into a molten salt of the halogen and an alkali metal. Typically a direct current voltage is applied across the cathode and an anode that is fabricated with the non-alkali metal such that the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed adjacent the anode. Electrorefining cells and methods involve applying a direct current voltage across the anode where the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed and the cathode where the non-alkali metal is electro-deposited. In a representative embodiment the halogen is chlorine, the alkali metal is lithium and the non-alkali metal is uranium.

  19. Alkali Halide Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Wincheski, R. A.; Albin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  20. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F(-), Cl(-), Br(-)). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs. PMID:27184228

  1. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F−, Cl−, Br−). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs. PMID:27184228

  2. Alkali halide microstructured optical fiber for X-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    DeHaven, S. L. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Wincheski, R. A. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Albin, S.

    2015-03-31

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  3. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-05-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F‑, Cl‑, Br‑). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs.

  4. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-06-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.

  5. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-11-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.

  6. Electronic excitation in bulk and nanocrystalline alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Bichoutskaia, Elena; Pyper, Nicholas C

    2012-11-14

    The lowest energy excitations in bulk alkali halides are investigated by considering five different excited state descriptions. It is concluded that excitation transfers one outermost halide electron in the fully ionic ground state to the lowest energy vacant s orbital of one closest cation neighbour to produce the excited state termed dipolar. The excitation energies of seven salts were computed using shell model description of the lattice polarization produced by the effective dipole moment of the excited state neutral halogen-neutral metal pair. Ab initio uncorrelated short-range inter-ionic interactions computed from anion wavefunctions adapted to the in-crystal environment were augmented by short-range electron correlation contributions derived from uniform electron-gas density functional theory. Dispersive attractions including wavefunction overlap damping were introduced using reliable semi-empirical dispersion coefficients. The good agreement between the predicted excitation energies and experiment provides strong evidence that the excited state is dipolar. In alkali halide nanocrystals in which each ionic plane contains only four ions, the Madelung energies are significantly reduced compared with the bulk. This predicts that the corresponding intra-crystal excitation energies in the nanocrystals, where there are two excited states depending on whether the halide electron is transferred to a cation in the same or in the neighbouring plane, will be reduced by almost 2 eV. For such an encapsulated KI crystal, it has been shown that the greater polarization in the excited state of the bulk crystal causes these reductions to be lowered to a 1.1 eV-1.5 eV range for the case of charge transfer to a neighbouring plane. For intra-plane charge transfer the magnitude of the polarization energy is further reduced thus causing the excitation in these encapsulated materials to be only 0.2 eV less than in the bulk crystal. PMID:23163361

  7. Oxidative alkoxylation of phosphine in alcohol solutions of copper halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polimbetova, G. S.; Borangazieva, A. K.; Ibraimova, Zh. U.; Bugubaeva, G. O.; Keynbay, S.

    2016-08-01

    The phosphine oxidation reaction with oxygen in alcohol solutions of copper (I, II) halides is studied. Kinetic parameters, intermediates, and by-products are studied by means of NMR 31Р-, IR-, UV-, and ESR- spectroscopy; and by magnetic susceptibility, redox potentiometry, gas chromatography, and elemental analysis. A reaction mechanism is proposed, and the optimum conditions are found for the reaction of oxidative alkoxylation phosphine.

  8. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bijay

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N’,N’-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1) as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields. PMID:26734088

  9. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bijay; Giri, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1) as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields. PMID:26734088

  10. Organolead Halide Perovskites for Low Operating Voltage Multilevel Resistive Switching.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Sunghak; Lee, Joohee; Hong, Kootak; Kim, Do-Hong; Moon, Cheon Woo; Park, Gyeong Do; Suh, Junmin; Hwang, Jinyeon; Kim, Soo Young; Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu; Han, Seungwu; Nam, Ki Tae; Jang, Ho Won

    2016-08-01

    Organolead halide perovskites are used for low-operating-voltage multilevel resistive switching. Ag/CH3 NH3 PbI3 /Pt cells exhibit electroforming-free resistive switching at an electric field of 3.25 × 10(3) V cm(-1) for four distinguishable ON-state resistance levels. The migration of iodine interstitials and vacancies with low activation energies is responsible for the low-electric-field resistive switching via filament formation and annihilation. PMID:27192161

  11. The Cryogenic Tensile Properties of an Extruded Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    Basic mechanical properties; i.e., ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percent elongation, and elastic modulus, were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMet162, at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F)) temperatures. The material evaluated was purchased to the requirements of SAE-AMS7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions."

  12. Protection of beryllium metal against microbial influenced corrosion using silane self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Deshpande, Alina; Hersman, Larry; Brozik, Susan M.; Butt, Darryl

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of a self-assembled silane monolayer as protection for beryllium against microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) was demonstrated. Four-point bend tests on coated and uncoated beryllium samples were conducted after microbiological exposures, and the effectiveness of these coatings as MIC protection was reported through mechanical property evaluations. Application of the silane monolayer to the beryllium surfaces was found to prevent degradation of the failure strength and displacement-to-failure of beryllium in bending. In contrast, the uncoated beryllium samples exhibited a severe reduction in these mechanical properties in the presence of the marine Pseudomonas bacteria. The potentiodynamic measurements showed that both the uncoated and coated samples pitted at the open-circuit potential. However, the size and distribution of the corrosion pits formed on the surface of the beryllium samples were significantly different for the various cases (coated vs uncoated samples exposed to control vs inoculated medium). This study demonstrates the following: (1) the deleterious effects of MIC on the mechanical properties of beryllium and (2) the potential for developing fast, easy, and cost-effective MIC protection for beryllium metal using silane self-assemblies.

  13. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements of 49 CFR 173.417(a). (b) The general license applies only to a licensee who has a quality... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material... RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material....

  14. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirements of 49 CFR 173.417(a). (b) The general license applies only to a licensee who has a quality... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material... RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material....

  15. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements of 49 CFR 173.417(a). (b) The general license applies only to a licensee who has a quality... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material... RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material....

  16. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... comply with all of the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 61, subpart A. (b) You must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, that are specified... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium...

  17. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... comply with all of the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 61, subpart A. (b) You must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, that are specified... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium...

  18. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... comply with all of the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 61, subpart A. (b) You must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, that are specified... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium...

  19. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION... my lungs and breathing / / Chest X-ray / / Spirometry (a breathing test) / / Blood test called...

  20. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION... my lungs and breathing / / Chest X-ray / / Spirometry (a breathing test) / / Blood test called...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION... my lungs and breathing / / Chest X-ray / / Spirometry (a breathing test) / / Blood test called...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION... my lungs and breathing / / Chest X-ray / / Spirometry (a breathing test) / / Blood test called...

  3. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  4. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements of 49 CFR 173.417(a). (b) The general license applies only to a licensee who has a quality... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material... RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material....

  5. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements of 49 CFR 173.417(a). (b) The general license applies only to a licensee who has a quality... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material... RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material....

  6. 20 CFR 30.615 - What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may disqualify certain claimants from receiving benefits under... Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.615 What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

  7. 20 CFR 30.615 - What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may disqualify certain claimants from receiving benefits under... Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.615 What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

  8. 20 CFR 30.615 - What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may disqualify certain claimants from receiving benefits under... Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.615 What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

  9. 20 CFR 30.615 - What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may disqualify certain claimants from receiving benefits under... Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.615 What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

  10. 20 CFR 30.615 - What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may disqualify certain claimants from receiving benefits under... Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.615 What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...

  11. 20 CFR 30.507 - What compensation will be provided to covered Part B employees who only establish beryllium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? 30.507 Section 30... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? The establishment of beryllium sensitivity does not entitle a covered Part B employee, or the eligible surviving beneficiary...

  12. 20 CFR 30.507 - What compensation will be provided to covered Part B employees who only establish beryllium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? 30.507 Section 30... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? The establishment of beryllium sensitivity does not entitle a covered Part B employee, or the eligible surviving beneficiary...

  13. 20 CFR 30.507 - What compensation will be provided to covered Part B employees who only establish beryllium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? 30.507 Section 30... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? The establishment of beryllium sensitivity does not entitle a covered Part B employee, or the eligible surviving beneficiary...

  14. 20 CFR 30.507 - What compensation will be provided to covered Part B employees who only establish beryllium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? 30.507 Section 30... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? The establishment of beryllium sensitivity does not entitle a covered Part B employee, or the eligible surviving beneficiary...

  15. 20 CFR 30.507 - What compensation will be provided to covered Part B employees who only establish beryllium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? 30.507 Section 30... Part B employees who only establish beryllium sensitivity under Part B of EEOICPA? The establishment of beryllium sensitivity does not entitle a covered Part B employee, or the eligible surviving beneficiary...

  16. Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Lai, Minliang; Gibson, Natalie A.; Wong, Andrew B.; Dou, Letian; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lin-Wang; Leone, Stephen R.; Yang, Peidong

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly growing field of nanoscale lasers can be advanced through the discovery of new, tunable light sources. The emission wavelength tunability demonstrated in perovskite materials is an attractive property for nanoscale lasers. Whereas organic–inorganic lead halide perovskite materials are known for their instability, cesium lead halides offer a robust alternative without sacrificing emission tunability or ease of synthesis. Here, we report the low-temperature, solution-phase growth of cesium lead halide nanowires exhibiting low-threshold lasing and high stability. The as-grown nanowires are single crystalline with well-formed facets, and act as high-quality laser cavities. The nanowires display excellent stability while stored and handled under ambient conditions over the course of weeks. Upon optical excitation, Fabry–Pérot lasing occurs in CsPbBr3 nanowires with an onset of 5 μJ cm−2 with the nanowire cavity displaying a maximum quality factor of 1,009 ± 5. Lasing under constant, pulsed excitation can be maintained for over 1 h, the equivalent of 109 excitation cycles, and lasing persists upon exposure to ambient atmosphere. Wavelength tunability in the green and blue regions of the spectrum in conjunction with excellent stability makes these nanowire lasers attractive for device fabrication. PMID:26862172

  17. Quantum Size Effect in Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Sichert, Jasmina A; Tong, Yu; Mutz, Niklas; Vollmer, Mathias; Fischer, Stefan; Milowska, Karolina Z; García Cortadella, Ramon; Nickel, Bert; Cardenas-Daw, Carlos; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Urban, Alexander S; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-10-14

    Organometal halide perovskites have recently emerged displaying a huge potential for not only photovoltaic, but also light emitting applications. Exploiting the optical properties of specifically tailored perovskite nanocrystals could greatly enhance the efficiency and functionality of applications based on this material. In this study, we investigate the quantum size effect in colloidal organometal halide perovskite nanoplatelets. By tuning the ratio of the organic cations used, we can control the thickness and consequently the photoluminescence emission of the platelets. Quantum mechanical calculations match well with the experimental values. We find that not only do the properties of the perovskite, but also those of the organic ligands play an important role. Stacking of nanoplatelets leads to the formation of minibands, further shifting the bandgap energies. In addition, we find a large exciton binding energy of up to several hundreds of meV for nanoplatelets thinner than three unit cells, partially counteracting the blueshift induced by quantum confinement. Understanding of the quantum size effects in perovskite nanoplatelets and the ability to tune them provide an additional method with which to manipulate the optical properties of organometal halide perovskites. PMID:26327242

  18. Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Samuel W; Lai, Minliang; Gibson, Natalie A; Wong, Andrew B; Dou, Letian; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lin-Wang; Leone, Stephen R; Yang, Peidong

    2016-02-23

    The rapidly growing field of nanoscale lasers can be advanced through the discovery of new, tunable light sources. The emission wavelength tunability demonstrated in perovskite materials is an attractive property for nanoscale lasers. Whereas organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite materials are known for their instability, cesium lead halides offer a robust alternative without sacrificing emission tunability or ease of synthesis. Here, we report the low-temperature, solution-phase growth of cesium lead halide nanowires exhibiting low-threshold lasing and high stability. The as-grown nanowires are single crystalline with well-formed facets, and act as high-quality laser cavities. The nanowires display excellent stability while stored and handled under ambient conditions over the course of weeks. Upon optical excitation, Fabry-Pérot lasing occurs in CsPbBr3 nanowires with an onset of 5 μJ cm(-2) with the nanowire cavity displaying a maximum quality factor of 1,009 ± 5. Lasing under constant, pulsed excitation can be maintained for over 1 h, the equivalent of 10(9) excitation cycles, and lasing persists upon exposure to ambient atmosphere. Wavelength tunability in the green and blue regions of the spectrum in conjunction with excellent stability makes these nanowire lasers attractive for device fabrication. PMID:26862172

  19. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ionsmore » prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.« less

  20. Environmental controls over methyl halide emissions from rice paddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redeker, K. R.; Cicerone, R. J.

    2004-03-01

    This paper examines primary controlling factors that affect methyl halide emissions from rice paddy ecosystems. Observations of four cultivars under multiple growth conditions during studies in commercial fields and the University of California, Irvine, greenhouse lead to the conclusion that daily emissions of methyl halides are primarily determined by the growth stage of the rice plant, with the exception that methyl chloride emissions show no clear seasonal pattern. Methyl chloride emissions appear to be more from the paddy water and/or soil as opposed to the plants; however, in soils with high chloride content, these emissions appear to peak during the reproductive phase. Strong secondary influences include air temperature, soil halide concentration, and soil pore water saturation. The cultivars studied had statistically separate seasonally integrated emissions. Irradiant light and aboveground biomass appear to have little effect on emissions. Emissions of methyl chloride, methyl bromide, and methyl iodide are estimated to be 3.5, 2.3, and 48 mg/m2/yr, or 5.3, 3.5, and 72 Gg/yr, from rice paddies globally.

  1. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Keum, Jong; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Belianinov, Alex; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-20

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films, a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g., I(-), Cl(-), Br(-)) in the formation of the mixed-halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl(-) ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or, alternatively, where they are located is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br(-) or Cl(-) ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I(-) ions prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl(-) ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performing and cost-effective optoelectronic devices. PMID:26931634

  2. Insights from the Adsorption of Halide Ions on Graphene Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang; Yang, Gang

    2016-08-18

    Graphene has recently found applications in a wide range of fields. Density functional calculations show that halide ions can be adsorbed on pristine graphene, but only F(-) has an appreciable binding energy (-97.0 kJ mol(-1) ). Graphene materials, which are mainly electron donors, can be made strong electron acceptors by edge functionalization with F atoms. The binding strengths of halide ions are greatly enhanced by edge functionalization and show direct proportionality with the degree of functionalization Θ and increased charge transfer. In contrast, the adsorption strengths of metal ions on pristine graphene are clearly superior to those of halide ions but decline substantially with increasing degree of edge functionalization, and for Θ=100 %, the binding energies of -95.7, -44.8, and -25.9 kJ mol(-1) that are calculated for Li(+) , Na(+) , and K(+) , respectively, are obviously inferior to that of F(-) (-186.3 kJ mol(-1) ). Thus, the electronic properties of graphene are fundamentally regulated by edge functionalization, and the preferential adsorption of certain metal ions or anions can be facilely realized by choice of an appropriate degree of functionalization. Adsorbed metal ions and anions behave differently on gradual addition of water molecules, and their binding strengths remain substantial when graphene materials are in the pristine and highly edge functionalized states, respectively. PMID:27127939

  3. Depth profile of halide anions under highly charged biological membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Woongmo; Wang, Wenjie; Lee, Jonggwan; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2015-03-01

    Halide ion (Cl- and I-) distribution under a cationic Langmuir monolayer consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3 trimethylammonium-propane (DPTAP) molecules was investigated by vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) and X-ray spectroscopy. From VSFG spectra, it was observed that large halide anions (I-) screen surface charge more efficiently so that interfacial water alignment becomes more randomized. On the other hand, number density of ions directly measured by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at grazing incidence angle reveals that the ion densities within 6 ~ 8 nm are the same for both I- and Cl-. Since the observed ion densities in both cases are almost equal to the charge density of the DPTAP monolayer, we propose that larger halide anions are attracted closer to the surface making direct binding with the charged headgroups of the molecules in the monolayer, accomplishing charge neutrality in short distance. This direct adsorption of anions also disturbs the monolayer structure both in terms of the conformation of alkyl chains and the vertical configuration of the monolayer, with iodine having the stronger effect. Our study shows that the length scale that ions neutralize a charged interface varies significantly and specifically even between monovalent ions.

  4. Iodomethane-Mediated Organometal Halide Perovskite with Record Photoluminescence Lifetime.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weidong; McLeod, John A; Yang, Yingguo; Wang, Yimeng; Wu, Zhongwei; Bai, Sai; Yuan, Zhongcheng; Song, Tao; Wang, Yusheng; Si, Junjie; Wang, Rongbin; Gao, Xingyu; Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Lijia; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-09-01

    Organometallic lead halide perovskites are excellent light harvesters for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, as the key component in these devices, a perovskite thin film with good morphology and minimal trap states is still difficult to obtain. Herein we show that by incorporating a low boiling point alkyl halide such as iodomethane (CH3I) into the precursor solution, a perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) film with improved grain size and orientation can be easily achieved. More importantly, these films exhibit a significantly reduced amount of trap states. Record photoluminescence lifetimes of more than 4 μs are achieved; these lifetimes are significantly longer than that of pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx films. Planar heterojunction solar cells incorporating these CH3I-mediated perovskites have demonstrated a dramatically increased power conversion efficiency compared to the ones using pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. Photoluminescence, transient absorption, and microwave detected photoconductivity measurements all provide consistent evidence that CH3I addition increases the number of excitons generated and their diffusion length, both of which assist efficient carrier transport in the photovoltaic device. The simple incorporation of alkyl halide to enhance perovskite surface passivation introduces an important direction for future progress on high efficiency perovskite optoelectronic devices. PMID:27529636

  5. Extensive and Highly Accurate Line Lists for Hydrogen Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Bernath, P. F.; Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Richard, C.; Le Roy, R. J.; Coxon, J. A.; Hajigeorgiou, P.

    2011-06-01

    New dipole moment functions (DMF) for the ground X 1Σ+ electronic states of the hydrogen halides (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) have been obtained using a direct fit approach that fits the best available and appropriately weighted experimental line intensity data for individual ro-vibrational transitions. Combining the newly developed (taking into account the most recent experiments) empirical potential energy functions and the DMFs, line positions and line intensities of the hydrogen halides and their isotopologues have been calculated numerically using program LEVEL. In addition, new semi-empirical algorithms for assigning line-shape parameters for these species have been developed. Using these improvements, new line lists for hydrogen halides were created to update the HITRAN spectroscopic database. These new lists are more accurate and significantly more extensive than those included in the current version of the database (HITRAN2008). R.J. Le Roy, ``LEVEL 8.0, 2007'', University of Waterloo Chemical Physics Research Report CP-663 (2007); see http://leroy.uwaterloo.ca/programs/. L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, A. Barbe, D.C. Benner, P.F. Bernath, et al., ``The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database,'' JQSRT 110, 532-572 (2009).

  6. Beryllium resources of the tin-spodumene belt, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, Wallace R.

    1954-01-01

    Pegmatite dikes in the tin-spodumene belt of North and South Carolina uniformly contain about 0.05 percent BeO. The most abundant minerals in the pegmatite contain from 0. 0001 to 0.01 percent BeO. Beryl, having 12.0 to 12.3 percent BeO, is the only beryllium-rich mineral and contains more than 80 percent of the total beryllium in the rock. Beryl-bearing pegmatite crops out on hillsides near streams that flow through the pegmatite belt. Much of the pegmatite contains spodumene, feldspar, mica, cassiterite, and columbite, as well as beryl, but separating these minerals will require milling. The minable spodumene ore in the Kings Mountain area, above a depth of 300 feet contains about 40,000 tons of beryl, equivalent to 6, 000 tons of BeO, if 80 percent of the BeO is assumed to be in beryl. Other pegmatite in that area contains an additional 238,000 tons of beryl, or 35, 900 tons of BeO. On the basis of the same assumptions the spodumene ore above a depth of 300 feet 1 in the Beaverdam Creek area contains 6, 000 tons of beryl, or 800 tons of BeO, and all other pegmatite in that area contains an additional 13, 000 tons of beryl, or 1, 700 tons of BeO. The entire tin-spodumene belt contains 823, 000 tons of beryl, equivalent to 122,800 tons of BeO. Little beryllium was found in the Piedmont province outside of the tin-spodumene belt.

  7. A canine model of beryllium-induced granulomatous lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, P.J.; Finch, G.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Harmsen, A.G.; Hahn, F.F.; Hoover, M.D.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Bice, D.E. )

    1989-08-01

    Groups of beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to attain either low or high initial lung burdens (ILB) of BeO calcined at 500 degrees or 1000 degrees C. Dogs were killed at 8, 32, 64, 180, and 365 days after exposure for evaluation of beryllium tissue burdens and histopathologic examination. Histologic lesions were characterized by perivascular and peribronchiolar infiltrates of lymphocytes and macrophages 8 days after exposure. These lesions progressed to distinct microgranulomas accompanied by patchy granulomatous pneumonia. Lesions were more severe in dogs exposed to 500 degrees C BeO. Additional dogs were sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage at 3, 6, 7, 11, 15, 18, and 22 months after exposure for characterization of lung cytology and lung immune responses. Lymphocyte percentages and numbers were increased in lavage samples 3 months after exposure in dogs with both the high and low ILB of 500 degrees C. Values for both parameters decreased rapidly thereafter. Dogs with either low or high ILB of 1000 degrees C-treated BeO displayed negligible to low and variable changes in both lymphocyte percentages and numbers. In vitro lymphocyte stimulation by beryllium was increased 180 and 210 days after exposure in dogs with the high ILB 500 degrees C BeO only. A marked degree of individual variation in both histologic lesions and lymphocyte responses among dogs was noted. Less soluble 1000 degrees C-treated BeO was retained in the lung longer than the more soluble 500 degrees C-treated material that was cleared almost entirely by 1 year after exposure. Because these changes are similar to those reported in humans with chronic beryllium disease, these data suggest that the beagle represents a good model to study histologic and immunologic aspects of this disease syndrome.

  8. CC chemokine receptor 5 gene polymorphisms in beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Silveira, L; Spagnolo, P; Gillespie, M; Gottschall, E B; Welsh, K I; du Bois, R M; Newman, L S; Maier, L A

    2010-08-01

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is expressed on type-1 T-helper cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of the granulomatous lung disease chronic beryllium disease (CBD). CCR5 gene (CCR5) polymorphisms are associated with sarcoidosis severity. The present study explores associations between CCR5 polymorphisms and CBD and its disease progression. Eight CCR5 polymorphisms were genotyped in CBD (n = 88), beryllium sensitisation (BeS; n = 86) and beryllium-exposed nondiseased controls (n = 173) using PCR with sequence-specific primers. Pulmonary function and bronchoalveolar lavage data were examined for associations with genotypes. There were no significant differences in genotype and allele frequency between CBD, BeS individuals and controls. In CBD, associations were found with decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity and the CCR5 -3458 thymidine (T)T genotype (p<0.0001), and an increase in alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference at rest (p = 0.003) and at maximum exercise (p = 0.01) and the -5663 adenine allele. Increased bronchoalveolar lavage lymphocyte numbers were associated with CCR5 -2459 guanine/-2135T (p = 0.01) only in the combined CBD and BeS group. This is the first study showing that CCR5 polymorphisms are associated with worsening pulmonary function over time in CBD, suggesting that CCR5 is important in the progression of pulmonary function in CBD. Further studies would be useful to clarify the mechanism whereby CCR5 polymorphisms affect progression of CBD. PMID:20075058

  9. Animal models of beryllium-induced lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Hahn, F.F.

    1996-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is conducting research to improve the understanding of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium-induced lung cancer. Initial animal studies examined beagle dogs that inhaled BeO calcined at either 500 or 1000{degrees}C. At similar lung burdens, the 500{degrees}C BeO induced more severe and extensive granulomatous pneumonia, lymphocytic infiltration into the lung, and positive Be-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses in vitro than the 1000{degrees}C BeO. However, the progressive nature of human CBD was not duplicated. More recently, Strains A/J and C3H/HeJ mice were exposed to Be metal by inhalation. This produced a marked granulomatous pneumonia, diffuse infiltrates, and multifocal aggregates of interstitial lymphocytes with a pronounced T helper component and pulmonary in situ lymphocyte proliferation. With respect to lung cancer, at a mean lung burden as low as 17 pg Be/g lung, inhaled Be metal induced benign and/or malignant lung tumors in over 50% of male and female F344 rats surviving {ge}1 year on study. Substantial tumor multiplicity was found, but K-ras and p53 gene mutations were virtually absent. In mice, however, a lung burden of approximately 60 {mu}g ({approximately}300 {mu}g Be/g lung) caused only a slight increase in crude lung tumor incidence and multiplicity over controls in strain A/J mice and no elevated incidence in strain C3H mice. Taken together, this research program constitutes a coordinated effort to understand beryllium-induced lung disease in experimental animal models. 47 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Detection of beryllium treatment of natural sapphires by NRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, P. C.; Ynsa, M.-D.; Climent-Font, A.; Calligaro, T.

    2010-06-01

    Since the 1990's, artificial treatment of natural sapphires (Al 2O 3 crystals coloured by impurities) by diffusion of beryllium at high temperature has become a growing practice. This process permits to enhance the colour of these gemstones, and thus to increase their value. Detection of such a treatment - diffusion of tens of μg/g of beryllium in Al 2O 3 crystals - is usually achieved using high sensitivity techniques like laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP/MS) or laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) which are unfortunately micro-destructive (leaving 50-100-μm diameter craters on the gems). The simple and non-destructive alternative method proposed in this work is based on the nuclear reaction 9Be(α, nγ) 12C with an external helium ion beam impinging on the gem directly placed in air. The 4439 keV prompt γ-ray tagging Be atoms are detected with a high efficiency bismuth germanate scintillator. Beam dose is monitored using the 2235 keV prompt γ-ray produced during irradiation by the aluminium of the sapphire matrix through the 27Al(α, pγ) 30Si nuclear reaction. The method is tested on a series of Be-treated sapphires previously analyzed by LA-ICP/MS to determine the optimal conditions to obtain a peak to background appropriate to reach the required μg/g sensitivity. Using a 2.8-MeV external He beam and a beam dose of 200 μC, beryllium concentrations from 5 to 16 μg/g have been measured in the samples, with a detection limit of 1 μg/g.

  11. Indirect detection of halide ions via fluorescence quenching of quinine sulfate in microcolumn ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Toyohide; Sumida, Junichi

    2004-06-01

    Halide ions could be visualized via fluorescence quenching in microcolumn ion chromatography. The fluorescence of quinine sulfate, which was contained in an acidic eluent, was quenched by halide ions. The observed fluorescence quenching values increased in this order: iodide, bromide, and chloride. The present detection system was relatively sensitive to halide ions except for fluoride: other anions gave smaller signals than halide ions. The present detection system provided quantitative information, so it could be applied to the determination of chloride in water samples. PMID:15228124

  12. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

  13. Systematic analysis of the unique band gap modulation of mixed halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongseob; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Chung, Choong-Heui; Hong, Ki-Ha

    2016-02-14

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic hybrid metal halide perovskites have been proven to be one of the most promising candidates for the next generation thin film photovoltaic cells. Mixing Br or Cl into I-based perovskites has been frequently tried to enhance the cell efficiency and stability. One of the advantages of mixed halides is the modulation of band gap by controlling the composition of the incorporated halides. However, the reported band gap transition behavior has not been resolved yet. Here a theoretical model is presented to understand the electronic structure variation of metal mixed-halide perovskites through hybrid density functional theory. Comparative calculations in this work suggest that the band gap correction including spin-orbit interaction is essential to describe the band gap changes of mixed halides. In our model, both the lattice variation and the orbital interactions between metal and halides play key roles to determine band gap changes and band alignments of mixed halides. It is also presented that the band gap of mixed halide thin films can be significantly affected by the distribution of halide composition. PMID:26791587

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro. PMID:8629860

  15. Beryllium concentrations in ambient air and its source identification. A case study.

    PubMed

    Thorat, D D; Mahadevan, T N; Ghosh, D K; Narayan, S

    2001-06-01

    Beryllium concentrations in atmospheric particulate and soil samples in and around a Beryllium Processing Facility (BPF) have been measured. The mean air concentration level of beryllium in and around the fence line of the BPF is 0.48 +/- 0.43 ng m(-3) (n = 397) and is mostly influenced by diurnal and seasonal changes. The observed air concentration levels were well below the prescribed ambient air quality (AAQ) standard of 10 ng m(-3). The soil concentration levels of beryllium in the study area were found to be in the range of 1.42-2.75 microg g(-1). The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of beryllium aerosols in ambient air was found to be 6.9 microm. Source identification using the Enrichment Factor (EF) approach indicates soil as the predominant contributory source for air concentrations at the site. PMID:11393544

  16. Recent advances in understanding the biomolecular basis of chronic beryllium disease: a review.

    PubMed

    McCleskey, T Mark; Buchner, Virginia; Field, R William; Scott, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    In this review we summarize the work conducted over the past decade that has advanced our knowledge of pulmonary diseases associated with exposure to beryllium that has provided a molecular-based understanding of the chemistry, immunopathology, and immunogenetics of beryllium toxicity. Beryllium is a strong and lightweight metal that generates and reflects neutrons, resists corrosion, is transparent to X-rays, and conducts electricity. Beryllium is one of the most toxic elements on the periodic table, eliciting in susceptible humans (a) an allergic immune response known as beryllium sensitization (BeS); (b) acute beryllium disease, an acutely toxic, pneumonitis-like lung condition resulting from exposure to high beryllium concentrations that are rarely seen in modern industry; and (c) chronic beryllium disease (CBD) following either high or very low levels of exposure. Because of its exceptional strength, stability, and heat-absorbing capability, beryllium is used in many important technologies in the modern world. In the early 1940s, beryllium was recognized as posing an occupational hazard in manufacturing and production settings. Although acute beryllium disease is now rare, beryllium is an insidious poison with a latent toxicity and the risk of developing CBD persists. Chronic beryllium disease-a systemic granulomatous lung disorder caused by a specific delayed immune response to beryllium within a few months to several decades after exposure-has been called the "unrecognized epidemic". Although not a disease in itself, BeS, the innate immune response to beryllium identified by an abnormal beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test result, is a population-based predictor of CBD. Genetic susceptibility to CBD is associated with alleles of the major histocompatibility gene, human leukocyte antigen DP (HLA-DP) containing glutamic acid at the 69th position of the beta chain (HLA-DPbeta-E69). Other genes are likely to be involved in the disease process, and research on

  17. Residual stress measurement and microstructural characterization of thick beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Detor, A; Wang, M; Hodge, A M; Chason, E; Walton, C; Hamza, A V; Xu, H; Nikroo, A

    2008-02-11

    Beryllium films are synthesized by a magnetron sputtering technique incorporating in-situ residual stress measurement. Monitoring the stress evolution in real time provides quantitative through-thickness information on the effects of various processing parameters, including sputtering gas pressure and substrate biasing. Specimens produced over a wide range of stress states are characterized via transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, in order to correlate the stress data with microstructure. A columnar grain structure is observed for all specimens, and surface morphology is found to be strongly dependent on processing conditions. Analytical models of stress generation are reviewed and discussed in terms of the observed microstructure.

  18. Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and Other Properties of Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A

    2006-02-01

    This report is part of a series of documents that provide a background to those involved in the construction of beryllium components and their applications. This report is divided into five sub-sections: Atomic/Crystal Structure, Elastic Properties, Thermal Properties, Nuclear Properties, and Miscellaneous Properties. In searching through different sources for the various properties to be included in this report, inconsistencies were at times observed between these sources. In such cases, the values reported by the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics was usually used. In equations, except where indicated otherwise, temperature (T) is in degrees Kelvin.

  19. Tritium analyses of COBRA-1A2 beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Selected tritium measurements have been completed for the COBRA-1A2 experiment C03 and D03 beryllium pebbles. The completed results, shown in Tables 1, 2, and 3, include the tritium assay results for the 1-mm and 3-mm C03 pebbles, and the 1-mm D03 pebbles, stepped anneal test results for both types of 1-mm pebbles, and the residual analyses for the stepped-anneal specimens. All results have been reported with date-of-count and are not corrected for decay. Stepped-anneal tritium release response is provided in addenda.

  20. Beryllium ignition target design for indirect drive NIF experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Clark, D. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Marinak, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Beryllium (Be) ablator offers multiple advantages over carbon based ablators for indirectly driven NIF ICF ignition targets. These are higher mass ablation rate, ablation pressure and ablation velocity, lower capsule albedo, and higher thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. Such advantages can be used to improve the target robustness and performance. While previous NIF Be target designs exist, they were obtained a long time ago and do not incorporate the latest improved physical understanding and models based upon NIF experiments. Herein, we propose a new NIF Be ignition target design at 1.45 MJ, 430 TW that takes all this knowledge into account.

  1. Use of notched beams to establish fracture criteria for beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Mayville, R.A.

    1980-01-04

    The fracture of an improved form of pure beryllium was studied under triaxial tensile stresses. This state of stress was produced by testing notched beams, which were thick enough to be in a state of plane strain at the center. A plane strain, elastic-incremental plasticity finite element program was then used to determine the stress and strain distributions at fracture. A four-point bend fixture was used to load the specimens. It was carefully designed and manufactured to eliminate virtually all of the shear stresses at the reduced section of the notched beams. The unixial properties were obtained.

  2. Double K-shell photoionization of atomic beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, F. L.; Martin, F.; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2011-11-15

    Double photoionization of the core 1s electrons in atomic beryllium is theoretically studied using a hybrid approach that combines orbital and grid-based representations of the Hamiltonian. The {sup 1} S ground state and {sup 1} P final state contain a double occupancy of the 2s valence shell in all configurations used to represent the correlated wave function. Triply differential cross sections are evaluated, with particular attention focused on a comparison of the effects of scattering the ejected electrons through the spherically symmetric valence shell with similar cross sections for helium, representing a purely two-electron target with an analogous initial-state configuration.

  3. Excited S-symmetry states of positronic lithium and beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasburger, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of the existence of excited S-symmetry states of positronic lithium and beryllium, resulting from the positron attachment to high-spin P parent atomic states, is examined and confirmed with variational calculations in the basis of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The unexpectedly different order of the energies of the S and P states is explained by the formation of the positronium cluster structure and associated disappearance of the destabilizing centrifugal force. The annihilation properties of newly discovered states are discussed in the context of prospective experimental detection.

  4. Excited S-symmetry states of positronic lithium and beryllium.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Krzysztof

    2016-04-14

    The possibility of the existence of excited S-symmetry states of positronic lithium and beryllium, resulting from the positron attachment to high-spin P parent atomic states, is examined and confirmed with variational calculations in the basis of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The unexpectedly different order of the energies of the S and P states is explained by the formation of the positronium cluster structure and associated disappearance of the destabilizing centrifugal force. The annihilation properties of newly discovered states are discussed in the context of prospective experimental detection. PMID:27083730

  5. Cryogenic optical tests of a lightweight HIP beryllium mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melugin, Ramsey K.; Miller, Jacob H.; Young, J. A.; Howard, Steven D.; Pryor, G. Mark

    1989-01-01

    Five interferometric tests were conducted at cryogenic temperatures on a lightweight, 50 cm diameter, hot isostatic pressed (HIP) beryllium mirror in the Ames Research Center (ARC) Cryogenic Optics Test Facility. The purpose of the tests was to determine the stability of the mirror's figure when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Test temperatures ranged from room ambient to 8 K. One cycle to 8 K and five cycles to 80 K were performed. Optical and thermal test methods are described. Data is presented to show the amount of cryogenic distortion and hysteresis present in the mirror when measured with an earlier, Shack interferometer, and with a newly-acquired, phase-measuring interferometer.

  6. Abiotic Formation of Methyl Halides in the Terrestrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, F.

    2011-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the most abundant chlorine and bromine containing organic compounds in the atmosphere. Since both compounds have relatively long tropospheric lifetimes they can effectively transport halogen atoms from the Earth's surface, where they are released, to the stratosphere and following photolytic oxidation form reactive halogen gases that lead to the chemical destruction of ozone. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide account for more than 20% of the ozone-depleting halogens delivered to the stratosphere and are predicted to grow in importance as the chlorine contribution to the stratosphere from anthropogenic CFCs decline. Today methyl chloride and methyl bromide originate mainly from natural sources with only a minor fraction considered to be of anthropogenic origin. However, until as recently as 2000 most of the methyl chloride and methyl bromide input to the atmosphere was considered to originate from the oceans, but investigations in recent years have clearly demonstrated that terrestrial sources such as biomass burning, wood-rotting fungi, coastal salt marshes, tropical vegetation and organic matter degradation must dominate the atmospheric budgets of these trace gases. However, many uncertainties still exist regarding strengths of both sources and sinks, as well as the mechanisms of formation of these naturally occurring halogenated gases. A better understanding of the atmospheric budget of both methyl chloride and methyl bromide is therefore required for reliable prediction of future ozone depletion. Biotic and abiotic methylation processes of chloride and bromide ion are considered to be the dominant pathways of formation of these methyl halides in nature. In this presentation I will focus on abiotic formation processes in the terrestrial environment and the potential parameters that control their emissions. Recent advances in our understanding of the abiotic formation pathway of methyl halides will be discussed. This will

  7. Chronic beryllium disease in a precious metal refinery. Clinical epidemiologic and immunologic evidence for continuing risk from exposure to low level beryllium fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, M.R.; Kominsky, J.R.; Rossman, M.D.; Cherniack, M.G.; Rankin, J.A.; Balmes, J.R.; Kern, J.A.; Daniele, R.P.; Palmer, L.; Naegel, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Five workers at a precious metal refinery developed granulomatous lung disease between 1972 and 1985. The original diagnosis was sarcoidosis, but 4 of the workers were subsequently proved to have hypersensitivity to beryllium by in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. Review of medical records of coworkers and extensive industrial hygiene surveillance of the plant demonstrated that 4 cases occurred in the furnace area where air concentrations of beryllium fume were consistently below the permissible exposure limit of 2 micrograms/M3. A single case has been recognized from parts of the refinery where exposures to cold beryllium dust often exceeded the standard by as much as 20-fold. These data demonstrate that chronic beryllium disease still occurs and confirm the importance of specific immunologic testing in patients suspected of having sarcoidosis but with potential exposure to beryllium. The data raise concern about the adequacy of modern industrial controls, especially in the setting of exposure to highly respirable beryllium fumes.

  8. The mechanism for production of beryllium fluoride from the product of ammonium fluoride processing of beryllium- containing raw material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraydenko, R. I.; Dyachenko, A. N.; Malyutin, L. N.; Petlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The technique of fluorite-phenacite-bertrandite ores from Russian Ermakovskoe deposit processing by ammonium bifluoride is described. To determine the temperature mode and the thermal dissociation mechanism of ammonium tetrafluoroberyllate (the product of ammonium-fluoride leaching of the ore) the TG/DTA have been carried out. By IR spectroscopy and XRD the semi-products of ammonium tetrafluoroberyllate thermal dissociation have been identified. The hygroscopic low-temperature beryllium fluoride forms higher than 380°C. The less hydroscopic form of BeF2 have been produced at 600°C.

  9. SOURCE AND PATHWAY DETERMINATION FOR BERYLLIUM FOUND IN BECHTEL NEVADA NORTH LAS VEGAS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-07-01

    In response to the report ''Investigation of Beryllium Exposure Cases Discovered at the North Las Vegas Facility of the National Nuclear Security Administration'', published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in August 2003, Bechtel Nevada (BN) President and General Manager Dr. F. A. Tarantino appointed the Beryllium Investigation & Assessment Team (BIAT) to identify both the source and pathway for the beryllium found in the North Las Vegas (NLV) B-Complex. From September 8 to December 18, 2003, the BIAT investigated the pathway for beryllium and determined that a number of locations existed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which could have contained sufficient quantities of beryllium to result in contamination if transported. Operations performed in the B-1 Building as a result of characterization activities at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD); Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (RMAD); Test Cells A and C; and the Central Support Facility in Area 25 had the greatest opportunity for transport of beryllium. Investigative monitoring and sampling was performed at these sites with subsequent transport of sample materials, equipment, and personnel from the NTS to the B-1 Building. The timeline established by the BIAT for potential transport of the beryllium contamination into the B-1 Building was from September 1997 through November 2002. Based on results of recently completed swipe sampling, no evidence of transport of beryllium from test areas has been confirmed. Results less than the DOE beryllium action level of 0.2 ???g/100 cm2 were noted for work support facilities located in Area 25. All of the identified sites in Area 25 worked within the B-1 tenant's residency timeline have been remediated. Legacy contaminants have either been disposed of or capped with clean borrow material. As such, no current opportunity exists for release or spread of beryllium contamination. Historical

  10. Geochemistry of beryllium isotopes: Applications in geochronometry. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.T.

    1990-01-01

    The cosmogenic radioisotope beryllium-10 (half-life= 1.5 Myr) has been determined in suites of samples from tropical river systems and from areas of the oceans influenced by input from the continents, and also within the mineral lattices of quartz grains from Antarctic moraines. These data have been used to investigate the geochemistry of 10Be and apply that knowledge to development of geochronometric techniques. Beryllium-10 is primarily produced by neutron-induced spallation of 14N and 16O in the atmosphere; its flux to the Earth's surface at low latitude was examined through measurements in tropical rainfall. Distributions of 10Be and 9Be (the stable isotope) in dissolved and particulate phases in tropical rivers were used, in conjunction with major ion data, to delineate the geochemical cycle of Be in these river systems. The present work applies in situ cosmogenic production to the examination of the deposition history of moraines of varying ages in Antarctica. It also yields estimates of 10Be and 26Al production rates: 6.4(+5.9-1.5) at/g yr and 42(+20-6) at/g yr at sea level and high geomagnetic latitude.

  11. Failure prediction for cross-rolled beryllium sheet material

    SciTech Connect

    Roschke, P.; Mascorro, E.

    1996-04-01

    A failure model for cross-rolled beryllium SR-200 sheets is developed for material loaded in a complex state of stress. Coefficients of the Tsai-Wu criterion are determined from a series of special laboratory experiments. Tests include circular plates loaded by a concentric ring, as well as in-plane compression and off-axis plate specimens. Complex states of stress lead to brittle failure of the anisotropic material. Failure surfaces obtained from the criterion form a family of ellipses when plotted in standard Cartesian coordinates. The criterion is incorporated into a general purpose finite element analysis code. Numerical simulation incrementally applies loads to a structural component that i being designed and checks each nodal point in the model for exceedance of the failure criterion. To demonstrate applicability of the predictive capability of the criterion, a 2.54-mm thick beryllium plate is placed under clamped edge conditions and loaded to failure by a central transverse point load. A numerical model of the structure predicts the failure load to within 3%.

  12. Steam chemical reactivity of plasma-sprayed beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Castro, R.G.

    1998-07-01

    Plasma-spraying with the potential for in-situ repair makes beryllium a primary candidate for plasma facing and structural components in experimental magnetic fusion machines. Deposits with good thermal conductivity and resistance to thermal cycling have been produced with low pressure plasma-spraying (LPPS). A concern during a potential accident with steam ingress is the amount of hydrogen produced by the reactions of steam with hot components. In this study the authors measure the reaction rates of various deposits produced by LPPS with steam from 350 C to above 1,000 C. They correlate these reaction rates with measurements of density, open porosity and BET surface areas. They find the reactivity to be largely dependent upon effective surface area. Promising results were obtained below 600 C from a 94% theoretical dense (TD) deposit with a BET specific surface area of 0.085 m{sup 2}/g. Although reaction rates were higher than those for dense consolidated beryllium they were substantially lower, i.e., about two orders of magnitude, than those obtained from previously tested lower density plasma-sprayed deposits.

  13. Elastic constants of beryllium: a first-principles investigation.

    PubMed

    Dal Corso, Andrea

    2016-02-24

    We apply several recently introduced projector-augmented wave, ultrasoft, and norm-conserving pseudopotentials (PPs) to the calculation of the elastic constants of beryllium and compare the results with previous theory and experiments. We discuss how the elastic constants depend on the Brillouin zone integration, the PP type, and the exchange and correlation functional. We find that although in percentage terms the elastic constants of beryllium depend on the PPs more than the crystal parameters or the bulk moduli, the differences between the local density approximation (LDA) and the Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized-gradient approximation are larger than the PP differences. The LDA overestimates compared to experiments, while the PBE values are higher than those of experiments but show a much better agreement. The PBEsol functional gives values that are slightly higher than those from PBE, with differences comparable to the PP uncertainty. We propose a simple formula to rationalize the internal relaxations in hexagonal close-packed crystals and show that Be relaxations are in reasonable agreement with this formula. The effects of internal relaxations on the values of C11 and C12 amount to a few per cent of C11, but up to 50% of C12. PMID:26809146

  14. Elastic constants of beryllium: a first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Corso, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    We apply several recently introduced projector-augmented wave, ultrasoft, and norm-conserving pseudopotentials (PPs) to the calculation of the elastic constants of beryllium and compare the results with previous theory and experiments. We discuss how the elastic constants depend on the Brillouin zone integration, the PP type, and the exchange and correlation functional. We find that although in percentage terms the elastic constants of beryllium depend on the PPs more than the crystal parameters or the bulk moduli, the differences between the local density approximation (LDA) and the Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized-gradient approximation are larger than the PP differences. The LDA overestimates compared to experiments, while the PBE values are higher than those of experiments but show a much better agreement. The PBEsol functional gives values that are slightly higher than those from PBE, with differences comparable to the PP uncertainty. We propose a simple formula to rationalize the internal relaxations in hexagonal close-packed crystals and show that Be relaxations are in reasonable agreement with this formula. The effects of internal relaxations on the values of C 11 and C 12 amount to a few per cent of C 11, but up to 50% of C 12.

  15. Refractive beryllium x-ray lens with variable focal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederstroem, Bjoern; Danielsson, Mats; Lundqvist, Mats

    2001-01-01

    A refractive lens for hard X-rays comprising two saw-tooth profiles is presented. This lens has the same focusing properties as a parabolic compound refractive lens. One advantage is the remarkably low fabrication cost, since curved surfaces are replaced by planar ones. In addition, the focal length of the lens can be easily varied by adjusting the angle between the two halves. Since the index of refraction depends on the X-ray energy, the lens is chromatic and acts as a band- pass filter for a broad energy spectrum. Combined with the tunability of the focal length, this allows versatile spectral shaping of the X-ray beam. Calculations and numerical examples of the focusing properties are presented. Due to its low atomic number, beryllium is an excellent choice for refractive optics and a prototype in beryllium has been fabricated using diamond turning technique. Surface metrology shows a deviation from the ideal shape of about 400 nm rms, indicating a loss of intensity of between 20% and 50%, depending on the geometry an X-ray energy.

  16. Immobilisation of beryllium in solid waste (red-mud) by fixation and vitrification.

    PubMed

    Bhat, P N; Ghosh, D K; Desai, M V M

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain information on the immobilization of beryllium (Be) in solid waste generated in the extraction process of beryllium from its ore, Beryl. This solid waste, termed red-mud, contains oxides of iron, aluminium, calcium, magnesium and beryllium. The red-mud waste contains beryllium at levels above the permissible limit, which prevents its disposal as solid waste. The total beryllium content in the red-mud analysed showed value ranging from 0.39 to 0.59% Be The studies showed that 50% of the total beryllium in red-mud can be extracted by water by repeated leaching over a period of 45 days. The cement mix, casting into cement blocks, was subjected to leachability studies over a period of 105 days and immobilization factor (IF factor) was determined. These IF values, of the order of 102, were compared with those obtained by performing leachability study on vitrified red-mud masses produced at different temperature conditions. Direct heating of the red-mud gave the gray coloured, non-transparent vitreous mass (as 'bad glass') showed effective immobilisation factor for beryllium in red-mud of the order of 10(4). PMID:12092765

  17. Research and development of radiation resistant beryllium grades for nuclear fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Gorokhov, V. A.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Burmistrov, V. N.

    1996-10-01

    Research and development results on beryllium with high radiation resistance obtained recently are described in this report. Data are presented on nine different grades of isotropic beryllium manufactured by VNIINM which differ both by initial powder characteristics and properties of billets made from these powders. The average grain size of the investigated beryllium grades varied from 8 to 26 μm, the content of oxide in the beryllium varied from 0.9 to 3.9 wt%, the dispersity of the beryllium oxide particles was 0.04 to 0.5 μm, and the tensile strength varied from 250 to 650 MPa. All materials were irradiated in the SM-2 reactor over the temperature range 550-780°C. The results of the investigation showed, that HIP beryllium grades are less susceptible to swelling at higher temperatures in comparison with hot pressed and extruded grades. Beryllium samples having the smallest grain size demonstrated minimal swelling, which was less than 0.8% at 750°C and a fluence FS = 3.7 · 10 21 cm -2 ( E≫ 0.1 MeV). The mechanical properties, creep and microstructure parameters, measured before and after irradiation, are presented.

  18. Development of radiation resistant grades of beryllium for nuclear and fusion facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Nikolaev, G.N.

    1995-09-01

    R&D results on beryllium with high radiation resistance obtained recently are described in this report. The data are presented on nine different grades of isotropic beryllium manufactured by VNIINM and distinguished by both initial powder characteristics and properties of billets, made of these powders. The average grain size of the investigated beryllium grades varied from 8 to 26 {mu}m, the content of beryllium oxide was 0.9 - 3.9 wt.%, the dispersity of beryllium oxide - 0.04 - 0.5 {mu}m, tensile strength -- 250 - 650 MPa. All materials were irradiated in SM - 2 reactor over the temperature range 550 - 780{degrees}C. The results of the investigation showed, that HIP beryllium grades are less susceptible to swelling at higher temperatures in comparison with hot pressed and extruded grades. Beryllium samples, having the smallest grain size, demonstrated minimal swelling, which was less than 0.8 % at 750{degrees}C and Fs = 3.7 {center_dot}10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). The mechanical properties, creep and microstructure parameters, measured before and after irradiation, are presented.

  19. New and Emerging Technologies for Real-Time Air and Surface Beryllium Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Churnetski, E.L.; Cooke, L.E.; Reed, J.J.; Howell, M.L.; Smith, V.D.

    2001-09-01

    In this study, five emerging technologies were identified for real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium: Microwave-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (MIPS), Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (ABFLIPS), Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy, and Micro-Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec). Desired features of real-time air beryllium monitoring instrumentation were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies as well as their unique demonstrated capability to provide real-time monitoring of similar materials. However, best available technologies were considered, regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features. None of the five technologies have the capability to measure the particle size of airborne beryllium. Although reducing the total concentration of airborne beryllium is important, current literature suggests that reducing or eliminating the concentration of respirable beryllium is critical for worker health protection. Eight emerging technologies were identified for surface monitoring of beryllium. CalSpec, MIPS, SERS, LIBS, Laser Ablation, Absorptive Stripping Voltametry (ASV), Modified Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectroscopy, and Gamma BeAST. Desired features of real-time surface beryllium monitoring were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies. However, the best available technologies were considered regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features.

  20. Artificial Synapses: Organometal Halide Perovskite Artificial Synapses (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cho, Himchan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Young-Tae; Wolf, Christoph; Park, Chan-Gyung; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-07-01

    A synapse-emulating electronic device based on organometal halide perovskite thin films is described by T.-W. Lee and co-workers on page 5916. The device successfully emulates important characteristics of a biological synapse. This work extends the application of organometal halide perovskites to bioinspired electronic devices, and contributes to the development of neuromorphic electronics. PMID:27442971