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Sample records for beta particle calibrations

  1. Measurement quality assurance for beta particle calibrations at NIST

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, C.G.; Pruitt, J.S.

    1993-12-31

    Standardized beta-particle fields have been established in an international standard and have been adopted for use in several U.S. dosimeter and instrument testing standards. Calibration methods and measurement quality assurance procedures employed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for beta-particle calibrations in these reference fields are discussed. The calibration facility including the NIST-automated extrapolation ionization chamber is described, and some sample results of calibrations are shown. Methods for establishing and maintaining traceability to NIST of secondary laboratories are discussed. Currently, there are problems in finding a good method for routine testing of traceability to NIST. Some examples of past testing methods are given and solutions to this problem are proposed.

  2. Dose Rate Calibration of a Commercial Beta-Particle Irradiator Used In Archeological and Geological Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.M.

    2004-10-31

    The 801E Multiple Sample Irradiator, manufactured by Daybreak Nuclear Systems, is capable of exposing up to 30 samples to beta radiation by placing each sample one by one directly beneath a heavily shielded ceramic Sr-90/Y-90 source and opening a specially designed shutter. Daybreak Nuclear Systems does not provide the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y dose rate to the sample because of variations of up to 20% in the nominal activity of the beta sources (separately manufactured by AEA Technology). Thus it is left to the end user to determine. Here aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), in the form of Landauer's Luxel{trademark}, was irradiated to different known doses using a calibrated {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particle irradiator, and the OSL signal monitored after each irradiation to generate a calibration curve. Comparison of the OSL Signal from the unknown 801E Irradiator dose with the calibration curve enabled the dose and therefore dose rate to be determined. The timing accuracy of the 801E Irradiator was also evaluated and found to be +/- 0.5 seconds. The dose rate of the beta source was found to be 0.147 +/- 0.007 Gy/s.

  3. Gamma-ray blind beta particle probe

    DOEpatents

    Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2001-01-01

    An intra-operative beta particle probe is provided by placing a suitable photomultiplier tube (PMT), micro channel plate (MCP) or other electron multiplier device within a vacuum housing equipped with: 1) an appropriate beta particle permeable window; and 2) electron detection circuitry. Beta particles emitted in the immediate vicinity of the probe window will be received by the electron multiplier device and amplified to produce a detectable signal. Such a device is useful as a gamma insensitive, intra-operative, beta particle probe in surgeries where the patient has been injected with a beta emitting radiopharmaceutical. The method of use of such a device is also described, as is a position sensitive such device.

  4. Automated calibration of a flight particle spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    A system for calibrating both electron and ion imaging particle spectrometers was devised to calibrate flight instruments in a large vacuum facility in the Space Science Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center. An IBM-compatible computer was used to control, via an IEEE 488 buss protocol, a two-axis gimbled table, constructed to fit inside the tank. Test settings of various diagnostic voltages were also acquired via the buss. These spectrometers constructed by the author at UCSD were calibrated in an automatic procedure programmed on the small computer. Data was up-loaded to the SSL VAX where a program was developed to plot the results.

  5. Beowulf - Beta-Gamma Detector Calibration Graphical User Interface

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.

    2009-09-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated significant advancement in using beta-gamma coincidence detectors to detect a wide range of radioxenon isotopes. To obtain accurate activities with the detector it must be properly calibrated by measuring a series of calibration gas samples. The data is analyzed to create the calibration block used in the International Monitoring System file format. Doing the calibration manually has proven to be tedious and prone to errors, requiring a high degree of expertise. The Beowulf graphical user interface (GUI) is a software application that encompasses several components of the calibration task and generates a calibration block, as well as, a detailed report describing the specific calibration process used. This additional document can be used as a Quality assurance certificate to assist in auditing the calibration. This paper consists of two sections. Section 1 will describe the capabilities of Beowulf and section 2 will be a representative report generated or the 137Cs calibration and quality assurance source.

  6. Absolute Efficiency Calibration of a Beta-Gamma Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Lidey, Lance S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2013-04-10

    Abstract- Identification and quantification of nuclear events such as the Fukushima reactor failure and nuclear explosions rely heavily on the accurate measurement of radioxenon releases. One radioxenon detection method depends on detecting beta-gamma coincident events paired with a stable xenon measurement to determine the concentration of a plume. Like all measurements, the beta-gamma method relies on knowing the detection efficiency for each isotope measured. Several methods are commonly used to characterize the detection efficiency for a beta-gamma detector. The most common method is using a NIST certified sealed source to determine the efficiency. A second method determines the detection efficiencies relative to an already characterized detector. Finally, a potentially more accurate method is to use the expected sample to perform an absolute efficiency calibration; in the case of a beta-gamma detector, this relies on radioxenon gas samples. The complication of the first method is it focuses only on the gamma detectors and does not offer a solution for determining the beta efficiency. The second method listed is not similarly constrained, however it relies on another detector to have a well-known efficiency calibration. The final method using actual radioxenon samples to make an absolute efficiency determination is the most desirable, but until recently it was not possible to produce all four isotopically pure radioxenon. The production, by University of Texas (UT), of isotopically pure radioxenon has allowed the beta-gamma detectors to be calibrated using the absolute efficiency method. The first four radioxenon isotope calibration will be discussed is this paper.

  7. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  8. Towards a Precise Energy Calibration of the CUORE Double Beta Decay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dally, Adam G.

    The mass of the neutrino may hold the key to many problems in cosmology and astrophysics. The observation of neutrino oscillations shows that neutrinos have mass, which was something that was not accounted for in the Standard Model of particle physics. This thesis covers topics relating to measuring the value of neutrino mass directly using bolometers. The first section will discuss the neutrino mass and different experiments for measuring the mass using bolometers. The mass of the neutrino can be measured directly from beta-decay or inferred from observation of neutrinoless double beta decay (0nubetabeta). In this work I present Monte Carlo and analytic simulation of the MARE experiment including, pile-up and energy resolution effects. The mass measurement limits of a micro-calorimeter experiments as it relates to the quantity of decays measured is provided. A similar simulation is preformed for the HolMES experiment. The motivation is to determine the sensitivity of such experiments and the detector requirements to reach the goal sensitivity. Another possible method for determining the neutrino mass is to use neutrinoless double beta decay. The second section will cover the Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) detector calibration system (DCS). CUORE is a neutrinoless double beta decay (0nubetabeta) experiment with an active mass of 206 kg of 130Te. The detector consists of 988 TeO2 bolometers operating at 10 mK. The signature of 0 nubetabeta decay is an excess of events at the Q-value of 2528 keV. Understanding the energy response is critical for event identification, but this presents many challenges. Calibration is necessary to associate a known energy from a gamma with a voltage pulse from the detector. The DCS must overcome many design challenges. The calibration source must be placed safely and reliable within the detector. The temperature of the detector region of the cryostat must not be changed during calibration. To achieve this

  9. Calibration of single particle sizing velocimeters using photomask reticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Holve, D. J.; Hovenac, E. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of photomask reticle calibration standards for single particle instruments is discussed. The calibration method studied involves the use of photomask reticles where the particle artifacts are actually disks of chrome thin film in the clear field reticles produced by photolithography and etching processes. Consideration is given to various aspects of theory, design, and performance.

  10. Automated calibration of a flight particle spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    An automatic calibration system was designed for use in the vacuum facility at the Space Science Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center. That system was developed and used in the intervening winter to calibrate the ion spectrometer that eventually flew in May 1986 aboard the NASA project, CRIT 1. During this summer, it is planned to implement the calibration of both an ion and electron spectrometer of a new design whose basic elements were conceived during the winter of 1985 to 1986. This spectrometer was completed in the summer and successfully mounted in the vacuum tank for calibration. However, the source gate valve malfunctioned, and, at the end of the summer, it still needed a replacement. During the inevitable delays in the experimental research, the numerical model of the Critical Velocity effect was completed and these results were presented.

  11. HgI2 low energy beta particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, K. S.; Squillante, M. R.; Entine, G.

    1990-01-01

    An HgI2 device structure was designed and tested which allows HgI2 to be used to make low-energy beta-particle detectors. The devices detected tritium beta particles with an efficiency of about 25 percent. A protective encapsulant has been developed which should protect the devices for up to 20 years and will attenuate only a small fraction of the beta particles. It is noted that the devices hold significant promise to provide a practical alternative to liquid scintillation counters and gas flow-through proportional counters.

  12. [Determination of average particle diameter and size distribution of ultra-fine beta zeolite by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Xue, Yan; Yang, Haiying; Yang, Yongtan

    2004-09-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of average particle diameter and size distribution of ultra-fine beta zeolite by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The dispersion and stabilization conditions of ultra-fine beta zeolite powder in suspensions were investigated by measuring the isoelectric point (IEP) of the powder suspension. Stable dispersion condition of beta zeolite ultrafine particles in aqueous solution was obtained by adding beta zeolite into the buffer (1.25 mmol/L NaHCO3-5 mmol/L Na2CO3, pH 10.82). The calibration equation between migration time and particle size was established to obtain the data of particle diameter by relating the beta zeolite diameters determined by laser particle sizer with the migration time from electropherogram of beta zeolite through the cumulative percentage of particle distribution. The calibration equation between particle size and amount was also established to correct the deviation of the response caused by particle size as the special relating principle suggested in the paper. The method is advantageous in small sample quantity required, low cost and short measurement period for each individual analysis. PMID:15706938

  13. Preparation of calibrated test packages for particle impact noise detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A standard calibration method for any particle impact noise detection (PIND) test system used to detect loose particles responsible for failures in hybrid circuits was developed along with a procedure for preparing PIND standard test devices. Hybrid packages were seeded with a single gold ball, hermetically sealed, leak tested, and PIND tested. Conclusions are presented.

  14. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  15. A Sr-90/Y-90 field calibrator for performance testing of beta-gamma survey instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Olsher, R.H.; Haynie, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    ANSI and regulatory agency guidelines prescribe periodic performance tests for radiation protection instrumentation. Reference readings should be obtained for one point on each scale or decade normally used. A small and lightweight calibrator has been developed that facilitates field testing of beta-gamma survey instruments. The calibrator uses a 45 microcurie Sr-90/Y-90 beta source with a filter wheel to generate variable dose rates in the range from 4 to 400 mrad/hr. Thus, several ranges may be checked by dialing in appropriate filters. The design, use, and typical applications of the calibrator are described.

  16. Self-absorption of tritium betas in metal tritide particles.

    PubMed

    Kropf, R F; Wang, Y; Cheng, Y S

    1998-10-01

    Inhaling metal tritide particles is a potential occupational hazard. The radiation dose to tissue from tritide particles depends on their solubility and retention in the body. In each tritide particle, a portion of the beta particles from decay of tritium is absorbed by the metal matrix and therefore cannot contribute to absorbed radiation dose to tissue. A theoretical model for estimating the self-absorption of tritium betas in spherical metal tritide particles is presented. Numerical calculations are made with this method for titanium, zirconium, and erbium particles from 0.5 to 50 microm in diameter. The tritium spectrum is divided into energy groups to facilitate estimation of the energy that escapes the particle for dose calculations. Our results show considerable absorption of beta particles and their energy, even for respirable particles smaller than 5 microm. Limited experimental data of self-absorption for titanium and zirconium tritides supported the theoretical calculation. It is concluded that the self-absorption factors should be required for counting tritide particle samples as well as for estimating absorbed radiation dose to tissue. PMID:9753363

  17. Characterization of large-area reference sources for the calibration of beta-contamination monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janßen, H.; Klein, R.

    1996-02-01

    A method has been developed whereby the activity of a large-area reference source for the calibration of beta-contamination monitors can be determined from a series of measured countrates in a suitable detection system as a function of the distance between the surface of the source and the front face of the detector.

  18. A technical study of TLD beta calibration factor for exposures to depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; McMahan, K.L.; Souleyrette, M.L.; Bogard, R.S.

    1995-06-01

    The beta calibration factor for converting light output (on reading a thermoluminescent dosimeter) to shallow dose equivalent has been reexamined through theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. The results support the previously determined value for contact with a depleted uranium slab but indicate that for many actual workplace situations, the contact value may be overly conservative.

  19. Further measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N

    SciTech Connect

    France III, R. H.; Wilds, E. L.; McDonald, J. E.; Gai, M.

    2007-06-15

    We measured the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission spectrum of {sup 16}N with a sensitivity for {beta}-decay branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -10}. The {sup 16}N nuclei were produced using the d({sup 15}N,{sup 16}N)p reaction with 70 MeV {sup 15}N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The {sup 16}N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} tilted at 7 deg. with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particles were measured using a time-of-flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources ({sup 148}Gd, {sup 241}Am, {sup 208,209}Po, and {sup 227}Ac) as well as {alpha} particles and {sup 7}Li from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time-of-flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission from {sup 8}Li that was produced using the d({sup 7}Li,{sup 8}Li)p reaction with the same setup. The line shape was corrected to account for the variation in the energy and time resolution and a high statistics spectrum of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N is reported. However, our data (as well as earlier Mainz data and unpublished Seattle data) do not agree with an earlier measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N taken at TRIUMF after averaging over the energy resolution of our collection system. This disagreement, among other issues, prohibits accurate inclusion of the f-wave component in the R-matrix analysis.

  20. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of beta-induced Alfven eigenmode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. S.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Xiao, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W. L.

    2010-11-15

    The beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE) in toroidal plasmas is studied using global gyrokinetic particle simulations. The BAE real frequency and damping rate measured in the initial perturbation simulation and in the antenna excitation simulation agree well with each other. The real frequency is slightly higher than the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accumulation point frequency due to the kinetic effects of thermal ions. Simulations with energetic particle density gradient show exponential growth of BAE with a growth rate sensitive to the energetic particle temperature and density. The nonperturbative contributions by energetic particles modify the mode structure and reduce the frequency relative to the MHD theory. The finite Larmor radius effects of energetic particles reduce the BAE growth rate. Benchmarks between gyrokinetic particle simulation and hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic simulation show good agreement in BAE real frequency and mode structure.

  1. On the calibration of astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry for microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cierpka, C.; Rossi, M.; Segura, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is a method to determine three components (3C) of the velocity field in a volume (3D) using a single camera. The depth position of the particles is coded by optical distortions caused by a cylindrical lens in the optical setup. This technique is particularly suited for microfluidic applications as measurement errors due to spatial averaging and depth of correlation, typically encountered with μPIV approaches, are eliminated so that the measurement precision is enhanced. Unfortunately, the current state of the technique is limited by the small measurement region achievable with the current calibration procedures as well as by higher order image aberrations (Cierpka et al 2010 Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 045401). In order to extend the size of the measurement volume and to account for all image aberrations, a new intrinsic calibration procedure, based on the imaging function of the particles, is proposed in the paper at hand. It provides an extended measurement depth, taking into account all image aberrations. In this work, the calibration procedure was applied to a μPIV arrangement but could also be implemented on macroscopic experimental setups. The calibration procedure is qualified with synthetic data as well as Poiseuille flow in a straight rectangular micro-channel with a cross-sectional area of 200 × 500 µm2. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of the whole channel was resolved via APTV with uncertainties of 0.9% and 3.7% of the centerline velocity, uc, for the in-plane and out-of-plane components, respectively. Further investigations using different cylindrical-lens focal lengths, magnifications and particle sizes provide information about achievable measurement depths and help to design and adapt the optimal system for the desired experiment.

  2. Calibration of a liquid scintillation counter for alpha, beta and Cerenkov counting

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpitta, S.C.; Fisenne, I.M.

    1996-07-01

    Calibration data are presented for 25 radionuclides that were individually measured in a Packard Tri-Carb 2250CA liquid scintillation (LS) counter by both conventional and Cerenkov detection techniques. The relationships and regression data between the quench indicating parameters and the LS counting efficiencies were determined using microliter amounts of tracer added to low {sup 40}K borosilicate glass vials containing 15 mL of Insta-Gel XF scintillation cocktail. Using {sup 40}K, the detection efficiencies were linear over a three order of magnitude range (10 - 10,000 mBq) in beta activity for both LS and Cerenkov counting. The Cerenkov counting efficiency (CCE) increased linearly (42% per MeV) from 0.30 to 2.0 MeV, whereas the LS efficiency was >90% for betas with energy in excess of 0.30 MeV. The CCE was 20 - 50% less than the LS counting efficiency for beta particles with maximum energies in excess of 1 MeV. Based on replicate background measurements, the lower limit of detection (LLD) for a 1-h count at the 95% confidence level, using water as a solvent, was 0.024 counts sec-{sup -1} and 0.028 counts sec-1 for plastic and glass vials, respectively. The LLD for a 1-h-count ranged from 46 to 56 mBq (2.8 - 3.4 dpm) for both Cerenkov and conventional LS counting. This assumes: (1) a 100% counting efficiency, (2) a 50% yield of the nuclide of interest, (3) a 1-h measurement time using low background plastic vials, and (4) a 0-50 keV region of interest. The LLD is reduced an order of magnitude when the yield recovery exceeds 90% and a lower background region is used (i.e., 100 - 500 keV alpha region of interest). Examples and applications of both Cerenkov and LS counting techniques are given in the text and appendices.

  3. A novel method for large-area sources preparation for the calibration of beta- and alpha-contamination monitors.

    PubMed

    Tsoupko-Sitniko, V; Picolo, J L; Carrier, M; Peulon, S; Moutard, G

    2002-01-01

    A method is proposed for the preparation of large-area reference sources for the calibration of beta- and alpha-contamination monitors. It is based on the incorporation, by the ion-exchange mechanism, of the radionuclide in a thin film of a conducting polymer ion-exchanger preliminarily grown on a metal support. Conducting pyrrole-based polymer functionalized by carboxylic cation-exchange groups is used to prepare 60Co and 90Sr-90Y beta-particle sources. Electrochemical polymerization of the corresponding monomer on different conducting supports is studied and a special electrochemical equipment developed permitting the preparation of large-area polymer films of controlled and reproducible thickness. The ion-exchanger obtained is characterized in terms of chemical affinity for cations Co2+ and Sr2+. Incorporation of the radionuclides in the large-area ion-exchanger films thus obtained is studied and optimized with respect to the uniform distribution of the radionuclide. The performance of the procedure is demonstrated using the example of circular sources 44 mm in diameter prepared on stainless steel supports. The sources obtained are characterized in terms of activity, beta-particle flux, uniformity and source efficiency. PMID:11839017

  4. Calibration of low-level beta-gamma coincidence detector systems for xenon isotope detection.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, K; Wieslander, J S E; Auer, M; Gheddou, A

    2016-03-01

    The beta-gamma coincidence detector systems used for the measurement of the CTBT-relevant xenon isotopes (Xe-131m, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-135) in the International Monitoring System network and in the On-Site Inspection are reviewed. These detectors typically consist of a well-type or bore-through NaI crystal into which a measurement cell, serving also as a sample container, is inserted. This work describes the current calibration procedure for energy, resolution and efficiency, implementation challenges, availability and uncertainties of the specific nuclear decay data and the path forward to full calibration validation using GEANT4. PMID:26702548

  5. Particle swarm optimization algorithm based low cost magnetometer calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. S.; Siddharth, S., Syed, Z., El-Sheimy, N.

    2011-12-01

    Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) consist of accelerometers, gyroscopes and a microprocessor provide inertial digital data from which position and orientation is obtained by integrating the specific forces and rotation rates. In addition to the accelerometers and gyroscopes, magnetometers can be used to derive the absolute user heading based on Earth's magnetic field. Unfortunately, the measurements of the magnetic field obtained with low cost sensors are corrupted by several errors including manufacturing defects and external electro-magnetic fields. Consequently, proper calibration of the magnetometer is required to achieve high accuracy heading measurements. In this paper, a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based calibration algorithm is presented to estimate the values of the bias and scale factor of low cost magnetometer. The main advantage of this technique is the use of the artificial intelligence which does not need any error modeling or awareness of the nonlinearity. The estimated bias and scale factor errors from the proposed algorithm improve the heading accuracy and the results are also statistically significant. Also, it can help in the development of the Pedestrian Navigation Devices (PNDs) when combined with the INS and GPS/Wi-Fi especially in the indoor environments

  6. Tumor dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy: Methods of calculation for beta particles

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K. ); Kwok, C.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Calculational methods of beta-particle dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are reviewed for clinical and experimental studies and computer modeling of tumors. In clinical studies, absorbed-dose estimates are usually based on the [ital in]-[ital vivo] quantitation of the activity in tumors from gamma camera images. Because of the limited spatial resolution of gamma cameras, clinical dosimetry is necessarily limited to the macroscopic level (macrodosimetry) and the MIRD formalism for absorbed-dose calculations is appropriate. In experimental RIT, tumor dimensions are often comparable to or smaller than the beta-particle range of commonly used radionuclides (for example, [sup 131]I, [sup 67]Cu, [sup 186]Re, [sup 188]Re, [sup 90]Y) and deviations from the equilibrium dose must be taken into account in absorbed-dose calculations. Additionally, if small tumors are growing rapidly at the time of RIT, the effects of tumor growth will need to be included in absorbed-dose estimates. In computer modeling of absorbed-dose distributions, analytical, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods have been used to investigate the consequences of uniform and nonuniform activity distributions and the effects of inhomogeneous media. Measurements and calculations of the local absorbed dose at the multicellular level have shown that variations in this dose are large. Knowledge of the absorbed dose is essential for any form of radiotherapy. Therefore, it is important that clinical, experimental, and theoretical investigations continue to provide information on tumor dosimetry that is necessary for a better understanding of the radiobiological effects of RIT.

  7. Monte Carlo based calibration of an air monitoring system for gamma and beta+ radiation.

    PubMed

    Sarnelli, A; Negrini, M; D'Errico, V; Bianchini, D; Strigari, L; Mezzenga, E; Menghi, E; Marcocci, F; Benassi, M

    2015-11-01

    Marinelli beaker systems are used to monitor the activity of radioactive samples. These systems are usually calibrated with water solutions and the determination of the activity in gases requires correction coefficients accounting for the different mass-thickness of the sample. For beta+ radionuclides the different distribution of the positrons annihilation points should be also considered. In this work a Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4 is used to compute correction coefficients for the measurement of the activity of air samples. PMID:26356044

  8. Theoretical investigation of the dependence of double beta decay tracks in a Ge detector on particle and nuclear physics parameters and separation from gamma ray events

    SciTech Connect

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.; Krivosheina, I.V.; Titkova, I.V.

    2006-01-01

    The sizes of tracks of events of neutrinoless double-beta decay in a Germanium detector depend on particle physics and nuclear physics parameters such as neutrino mass, right-handed current parameters, etc., and nuclear matrix elements. In this paper for the first time Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-accompanied (2{nu}{beta}{beta}) and neutrinoless double-beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) events, and of various kinds of background processes such as multiple and other {gamma} interactions are reported for a Ge detector. The time history of the evolution of the individual events is followed and the sizes of the events (partial volumes in the detector inside which the energy of the event is released) are investigated. Effects of the angular correlations of the two electrons in {beta}{beta} decay, which again depend on the above nuclear and (for 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay) on particle physics parameters, are taken into account and have been calculated for this purpose for the first time on basis of the experimental half-life of {sup 76}Ge and of realistic nuclear matrix elements. The sizes determine, together with the location of the events in the detector, the pulse shapes to be observed. It is shown for {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 76}Ge, that {beta}{beta} events should be selectable with high efficiency by rejecting large size (high multiplicity) {gamma} events. Double-escape peaks of similar energy of {gamma} lines show concerning their sizes similar behavior as 0{nu}{beta}{beta} events, and in that sense can be of some use for corresponding 'calibration' of pulse shapes of the detector. The possibility to distinguish {beta}{beta} events from {gamma} events is found to be essentially independent of the particle physics parameters of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} process. A brief outlook is given on the potential of future experiments with respect to determination of the particle physics parameters ,<{lambda}>,<{eta}>.

  9. Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec; Smith, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

  10. Calibration of particle position on digital holography using transparent resin block with dispersed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Yoshino, T.; Harada, D.; Murata, S.

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes the use of a Calibration Block (CB) for evaluating the accuracy of digital holography in particle position measurement. CB made of acrylic has three layers and the gap between the layers is filled with transparent resin. The refractive index of the resin and the layers is almost the same (1.49). Fin Block (FB), which is not filled with resin, is introduced in order to evaluate effects of the resin. The fringe edges of several holographic patterns are observed by using three kinds of CB and FB. Each layer is coated with spherical particles (diameter: 16.36 ± 0.42 μ m). The influence of multiple scattering on the detected depth of the particles is evaluated by changing the number density of particles. Three kinds of CB and FB are prepared (averaged particle density in the holographic pattern; 83.2, 166.5 and 249.7). The fringe edges of the holographic patterns generated in CB and FB are observed, respectively. It is found that the fringe edges of CB are clearer than FB. Also, Multiple scattering acts as a source of background noise with high spatial frequency, which has almost the same frequency as that of the particle diffraction on the fringe patterns, and reduces the effective signal-to-noise ratio of the holographic pattern. CB can be used to evaluate the influence of multiple scattering on the detected particle depth.

  11. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, William L.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    1998-07-07

    The instant invention discloses method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, and sampling probes, in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream.

  12. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, W.L.; Renzi, R.F.

    1998-07-07

    The invention discloses a method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, sampling probes, and in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream. 6 figs.

  13. Non-intrusive calibration for three-dimensional particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schosser, Constantin; Fuchs, Thomas; Hain, Rainer; Kähler, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    This letter introduces a non-intrusive calibration scheme for three-dimensional (3D) optical flow velocimetry techniques. For these 3D techniques, including tomographic PIV and 3D-PTV, calibration targets need to be imaged within the measurement volume at different depth positions. However, for domains with limited access and with small dimensions, it is difficult or impossible to place a calibration target. Therefore, a non-intrusive calibration approach is proposed to overcome these drawbacks, by employing light reflections of a continuous wave laser in the measurement domain. The laser is translated to different locations, yielding a set of calibration points, comprising the spatial coordinates of the light reflections and their corresponding sensor coordinates.

  14. Böhm extrapolation chamber: Study of its behavior in beta radiation fields at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    The Calibration Laboratory (LCI) at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) is going to establish a Böhm extrapolation chamber as a primary standard system for the dosimetry and calibration of beta radiation sources and detectors. This chamber was already tested in beta radiation beams with an aluminized Mylar entrance window, and now, it was characterized with an original Hostaphan entrance window. A comparison between the results of the extrapolation chamber with the two entrance windows was performed. The results showed that this extrapolation chamber presents the same effectiveness in beta radiation fields as a primary standard system with both entrance windows, showing that any one of them may be utilized.

  15. Energy Calibration for a Sensitive Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay: Using the Cuoricino Experience to Prepare for CUORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejzak, Larissa M.

    Neutrinos, which were long believed to be massless particles, are now known to have a tiny finite mass. A thorough understanding of the properties of their masses may provide vital clues to the history of the development of the universe as we know it. An intensive experimental search is underway for evidence of a Majorana mass component to the neutrino via many current and upcoming detectors seeking to observe the rare nuclear process neutrinoless double-beta decay (0nubetabeta). These detectors must be able to achieve very low backgrounds and a precise understanding of their energy scales. This paper presents the experimental approach of one of these 0nubetabeta experiments, the Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE), and the attendant challenges of achieving excellent energy calibration performance in the detector from the perspectives of both hardware design and analysis. Experience and data from Cuoricino, the predecessor of CUORE, have been extensively leveraged to prepare optimized operational procedures for CUORE. The expected sensitivity profile of CUORE as a function of time is also presented and compared with those of other leading 0nubetabeta experiments.

  16. Next Generation Beta Decay Studies: Refinements in Detector System Calibration and Response Function Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutz, Kenneth

    2013-10-01

    High precision β-decay studies provide constraints on extensions to the standard model of particle physics. In order to continue to provide competitive limits with LHC measurements for new tensor and scalar interactions, the uncertainties in neutron and nuclear β-decay studies must be pushed to the 0.1% level and below. In order to control the systematic errors in particle detection at these levels, new detector systems (highly-segmented, large area, thick Si detectors) are being implemented. In order to realize gains in detector response, new capabilities must be developed to calibrate the detectors and characterize their response function. As an alternative to conventional sources mounted on thin foils, an electron beam provides a regular grid of calibration and detector response measurements which are essentially unperturbed by scattering effects. We have developed a 1 MeV electron accelerator that will deliver electrons in a tunable range covering the energy spectrum of neutron β-decay. We present our efforts to implement this accelerator as well as our development of thin backing foils and detector systems in this poster.

  17. Change Of Calibration Of Diffraction-Based Particle Suers In Dense Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Lee G.

    1984-10-01

    A calibration procedure for diffraction-based particle-sizing instru-ments using multielement detectors is briefly reviewed. The effects of multiple scattering due to dense sprays on the calibration of these instruments are then examined over a range of sprays with Sauter mean diameters from 20 to 55 um. An empirical scheme to correct for changes in calibration due to dense sprays or other scattering media is presented.

  18. Direct Reading Particle Counters: Calibration Verification and Multiple Instrument Agreement via Bump Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankovic, John; Zontek, Tracy L.; Ogle, Burton R.; Hollenbeck, Scott

    2015-01-27

    We examined the calibration records of two direct reading instruments designated as condensation particle counters in order to determine the number of times they were found to be out of tolerance at annual manufacturer's recalibration. For both instruments were found to be out of tolerance more times than within tolerance. And, it was concluded that annual calibration alone was insufficient to provide operational confidence in an instrument's response. Thus, a method based on subsequent agreement with data gathered from a newly calibrated instrument was developed to confirm operational readiness between annual calibrations, hereafter referred to as bump testing. The method consists of measuring source particles produced by a gas grille spark igniter in a gallon-size jar. Sampling from this chamber with a newly calibrated instrument to determine the calibrated response over the particle concentration range of interest serves as a reference. Agreement between this reference response and subsequent responses at later dates implies that the instrument is performing as it was at the time of calibration. Side-by-side sampling allows the level of agreement between two or more instruments to be determined. This is useful when simultaneously collected data are compared for differences, i.e., background with process aerosol concentrations. A reference set of data was obtained using the spark igniter. The generation system was found to be reproducible and suitable to form the basis of calibration verification. Finally, the bump test is simple enough to be performed periodically throughout the calibration year or prior to field monitoring.

  19. EFFECTS OF CHARGED PARTICLES ON CASCADE IMPACTOR CALIBRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a determination of collection characteristics for charged and uncharged particles in cascade impactors. Impaction collection efficiency was shown to be as much as 20 percent greater for charged particles than for uncharged particles with certain substr...

  20. Method, apparatus and system for low-energy beta particle detection

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Drigert, Mark W.

    2012-09-25

    An apparatus, method, and system relating to radiation detection of low-energy beta particles are disclosed. An embodiment includes a radiation detector with a first scintillator and a second scintillator operably coupled to each other. The first scintillator and the second scintillator are each structured to generate a light pulse responsive to interaction with beta particles. The first scintillator is structured to experience full energy deposition of low-energy beta particles, and permit a higher-energy beta particle to pass therethrough and interact with the second scintillator. The radiation detector further includes a light-to-electrical converter operably coupled to the second scintillator and configured to convert light pulses generated by the first scintillator and the second scintillator into electrical signals. The first scintillator and the second scintillator have at least one mutually different characteristic to enable an electronic system to determine whether a given light pulse is generated in the first scintillator or the second scintillator.

  1. Calibration of H-alpha/H-beta Indexes for Emission Line Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    In Joner and Hintz (2015) they report on a standard star system for calibration of H-alpha and H-beta observations. This work was based on data obtained with the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 1.2-m telescope. As part of the data acquisition for that project, a large number of emission line objects were also observed. We will report on the preliminary results for the emission line data set. This will include a comparison of equivalent width measurements of each line with the matching index. We will also examine the relation between the absorption line objects previously published and the emission line objects, along with a discussion of the transition point. Object types included are Be stars, high mass x-ray binaries, one low mass x-ray binary, Herbig Ae/Be stars, pre-main sequence stars, T Tauri stars, young stellar objects, and one BY Draconis star. Some of these objects come from Cygnus OB-2, NGC 659, NGC 663, NGC 869 and NGC 884.

  2. Calibration of TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kesten, J.; Reineking, A.; Porstendoerfer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The registration efficiency of the TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter for Ag and NaCl particles of between 2 and 20 nm in diameter was determined. Taking into account the different shapes of the input aerosol size distributions entering the differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and the transfer function of the DMA, the counting efficiencies of condensation nucleus counters (CNC) for monodisperse Ag and NaCl particles were estimated. In addition, the dependence of the CNC registration efficiency on the particle concentration was investigated.

  3. Polymer gel dosimetry applied to beta particles, electrons and 300 kV X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Md. Nurul

    Polymer gels were used with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions for beta particles, electron and x-rays beams that are used in radiotherapy. The manufacturing processes and calibration procedures for two dosimeters (hypoxic PAG and normoxic MAGIC gels) were investigated. The response of both gels was energy independent over a range of electron and photon energies commonly used for radiotherapy. However, dose response of both gels was dependent on the temperature at the time of MR scanning, while MAGIC was also dependent on the temperature at the time of irradiation, which had not been previously reported. Results suggest that MAGIC gel is superior to PAG, since it is easier to manufacture and unaffected by oxygen diffusion through wall materials. The potential usefulness of both types of gel in different areas of radiotherapy was studied, including vascular brachytherapy. Results were compared with doses measured using radio- chromic film, confirming that dose distributions for vascular brachytherapy sources with a high dose gradient can be measured using PAG. However, because of the disadvantages of the gel manufacturing process and the need for access to a high-resolution scanner, it was concluded that radio-chromic film would be the method of choice for routine quality assurance in brachytherapy. PAG and MAGIC gels were also used for dosimetry across the junction of 6MV photon and 12MeV electron fields that are often used in radiotherapy. Different photon field configurations were studied, and dose profiles were measured. For each configuration either significant "hot" or "cold spots" were measured, with good agreement between the MAGIC and PAG and radio- chromic film. This work has confirmed the usefulness of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy in general, and in beta and electron dosimetry in particular. In addition, these studies have quantified the advantages of normoxic gels over the hypoxic PAG.

  4. Hot beta particles in the lung: Results from dogs exposed to fission product radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.; Hobbs, C.H.

    1995-12-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident resulted in the release of uranium dioxide fuel and fission product radionuclides into the environment with the fallout of respirable, highly radioactive particles that have been termed {open_quotes}hot beta particles.{close_quotes} There is concern that these hot beta particles (containing an average of 150-20,000 Bq/particle), when inhaled and deposited in the lung, may present an extraordinary hazard for the induction of lung cancer. We reviewed data from a group of studies in dogs exposed to different quantities of beta-emitting radionuclides with varied physical half-lives to determine if those that inhaled hot beta particles were at unusual risk for lung cancer. This analysis indicates that the average dose to the lung is adequate to predict biologic effects of lung cancer for inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides in the range of 5-50 Gy to the lung and with particle activities in the range of 0.10-50 Bq/particle.

  5. Calibration of particle detectors for secondary cosmic rays using gamma-ray beams from thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Hovsepyan, G.

    2015-09-01

    After observation of hundreds of Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) we measure energy spectra of particles originated in clouds and directed towards Earth. We use these "beams" for calibration of cosmic ray detectors located beneath the clouds at an altitude of 3200 m at Mount Aragats in Armenia. The calibrations of particle detectors with fluxes of TGE gamma rays are in good agreement with simulation results and allow estimation of the energy thresholds and efficiencies of numerous particle detectors used for studying galactic and solar cosmic rays.

  6. Calibration and Laboratory Test of the Department of Energy Cloud Particle Imager

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, GM; Um, J

    2012-02-17

    Calibration parameters from the Connolly et al. (2007) algorithm cannot be applied to the Department of Energy's (DOE) CPI because the DOE CPI is version 2.0. Thus, Dr. Junshik Um and Prof. Greg McFarquhar brought the DOE CPI to the University of Manchester, UK, where facilities for calibrating it were available. In addition, two other versions of CPIs (1.0 and 1.5) were available on-site at the University of Manchester so that an intercomparison of three different versions of the CPI was possible. The three CPIs (versions 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) were calibrated by moving glass calibration beads and ice analogues of known size parallel to the object plane. The distance between the object plane and a particle, the particle's focus, its apparent maximum dimension, and a background image were measured in order to derive calibration parameters for each CPI version. The calibration parameters are used in two empirical equations that are applied to in situ CPI data to determine particle size and depth of field, and hence particle size distributions (PSDs). After the tests with the glass calibration beads to derive the calibration parameters, the three CPIs were installed at the base of the Manchester Ice Cloud Chamber and connected to air pumps that drew cloud through the sample volume. Warm liquid clouds at a temperature of 1-2 C and ice clouds at a temperature of -5 C were generated, and the resulting PSDs for each of the CPIs were determined by applying the results of each calibration.

  7. Calibration and Readiness of the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an intravehicular energetic particle detector designed to measure a broad spectrum of charged particle and neutron radiation unique to the ISS radiation environment. In this presentation, a summary of calibration and readiness of the RAD Sensor Head (RSH) - also referred to as the Charged Particle Detector (CPD) - for ISS will be presented. Calibration for the RSH consists of p, He, C, O, Si, and Fe ion data collected at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). The RSH consists of four detectors used in measuring the spectroscopy of charged particles - A, B, C, and D; high-energy neutral particles and charged particles are measured in E; and the last detector - F - is an anti-coincidence detector. A, B, and C are made from Si; D is made from BGO; E and F are made from EJ260XL plastic scintillator.

  8. Absorption of Beta Particles in Different Materials: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The absorption of beta rays from a radioactive source in different materials was investigated by the use of a simple setup based on a Geiger counter and a set of absorber sheets. The number of electrons traversing the material was measured as a function of its thickness. Detailed GEANT simulations were carried out to reproduce the obtained…

  9. Direct Reading Particle Counters: Calibration Verification and Multiple Instrument Agreement via Bump Testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jankovic, John; Zontek, Tracy L.; Ogle, Burton R.; Hollenbeck, Scott

    2015-01-27

    We examined the calibration records of two direct reading instruments designated as condensation particle counters in order to determine the number of times they were found to be out of tolerance at annual manufacturer's recalibration. For both instruments were found to be out of tolerance more times than within tolerance. And, it was concluded that annual calibration alone was insufficient to provide operational confidence in an instrument's response. Thus, a method based on subsequent agreement with data gathered from a newly calibrated instrument was developed to confirm operational readiness between annual calibrations, hereafter referred to as bump testing. The methodmore » consists of measuring source particles produced by a gas grille spark igniter in a gallon-size jar. Sampling from this chamber with a newly calibrated instrument to determine the calibrated response over the particle concentration range of interest serves as a reference. Agreement between this reference response and subsequent responses at later dates implies that the instrument is performing as it was at the time of calibration. Side-by-side sampling allows the level of agreement between two or more instruments to be determined. This is useful when simultaneously collected data are compared for differences, i.e., background with process aerosol concentrations. A reference set of data was obtained using the spark igniter. The generation system was found to be reproducible and suitable to form the basis of calibration verification. Finally, the bump test is simple enough to be performed periodically throughout the calibration year or prior to field monitoring.« less

  10. Time-of-flight neutral particle analyzer and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W. S.; Garate, E. P.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Roche, T.; Trask, E.; Zhang Yang

    2008-10-15

    A time-of-flight diagnostic has been implemented on the Irvine field reversed configuration (IFRC) to obtain an energy distribution function from charge-exchanged neutral hydrogen. The diagnostic includes a 13 cm radius slotted disk rotating at 165 Hz in vacuum which chops the emitted neutrals at a rate of 26 kHz. In situ timing verification was performed with a dc xenon discharge lamp with an uncertainty less than 100 ns for a 38 {mu}s chopping period. Energy calibration was accomplished with a singly ionized lithium source in the range of 300-1500 eV, achieving an average energy uncertainty, {delta}E/E, of 0.11. The diagnostic has measured neutrals in the range of 20-80 eV from the IFRC and the corresponding energy distribution function has been obtained.

  11. Accurate Quantification of High Density Lipoprotein Particle Concentration by Calibrated Ion Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Patrick M.; Ronsein, Graziella E.; Monette, Jeffrey S.; Pamir, Nathalie; Wimberger, Jake; He, Yi; Anantharamaiah, G.M.; Kim, Daniel Seung; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Vaisar, Tomas; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is critical to develop new metrics to determine whether high density lipoprotein (HDL) is cardioprotective in humans. One promising approach is HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) – the size and concentration of HDL in plasma or serum. However, the two methods currently used to determine HDL-P yield concentrations that differ more than 5-fold. We therefore developed and validated an improved approach to quantify HDL-P, termed calibrated ion mobility analysis (calibrated IMA). Methods HDL was isolated from plasma by ultracentrifugation, introduced into the gas phase with electrospray ionization, separated by size, and quantified by particle counting. A calibration curve constructed with purified proteins was used to correct for the ionization efficiency of HDL particles. Results The concentrations of gold nanoparticles and reconstituted HDLs measured by calibrated IMA were indistinguishable from concentrations determined by orthogonal methods. In plasma of control (n=40) and cerebrovascular disease (n=40) subjects, three subspecies of HDL were reproducibility measured, with an estimated total HDL-P of 13.4±2.4 µM (mean±SD). HDL-C accounted for 48% of the variance in HDL-P. HDL-P was significantly lower in subjects with cerebrovascular disease, and this difference remained significant after adjustment for HDL cholesterol levels. Conclusions Calibrated IMA accurately and reproducibly determined the concentration of gold nanoparticles and synthetic HDL, strongly suggesting the method could accurately quantify HDL particle concentration. Importantly, the estimated stoichiometry of apoA-I determined by calibrated IMA was 3–4 per HDL particle, in excellent agreement with current structural models. Furthermore, HDL-P associated with cardiovascular disease status in a clinical population independently of HDL cholesterol. PMID:25225166

  12. The Nuclear and Particle Physics of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Wick

    2014-03-01

    Fortuitous properties of nuclei allow us to isolate and study the rare second-order weak process of double beta decay. In particular, the decay channel in which a final state of two electrons and no neutrinos is produced - neutrinoless double beta decay - provides our best test of lepton number conservation and the Majorana mass of the electron neutrino. I will describe the connections between this process and the charge conjugation properties of the neutrino, including the possibility that the presence of both Dirac and Majorana masses accounts for the anomalous scale of neutrino masses. The extraordinary progress made over the past two decades has prepared the way for next-generation experiments that will probe Majorana masses at levels where nonzero rates may be found, given what we now know about neutrino mass splittings. I will describe some of the heroic efforts underway to develop detectors of unprecedented size, radiopurity, depth, and thus sensitivity. Work supported by the Office of Science, US DOE.

  13. Development of a Cerenkov radiation sensor to detect low-energy beta-particles.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Han, Ki-Tek; Shin, Sang Hun; Seo, Jeong Ki; Jeon, Dayeong; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-11-01

    We fabricated a novel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor using a Cerenkov radiator for measuring beta-particles. Instead of employing a scintillator, transparent liquids having various refractive indices were used as a Cerenkov radiator to serve as a sensing material. The experimental results showed that the amount of Cerenkov radiation due to the interaction with beta-particles increased as the refractive index of the Cerenkov radiator was increased as a results of a decrease of the Cerenkov threshold energy for electrons. PMID:23582496

  14. Automatic Calibration of a Semi-Distributed Hydrologic Model Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, E. G.; Nicklow, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrologic simulation models need to be calibrated and validated before using them for operational predictions. Spatially-distributed hydrologic models generally have a large number of parameters to capture the various physical characteristics of a hydrologic system. Manual calibration of such models is a very tedious and daunting task, and its success depends on the subjective assessment of a particular modeler, which includes knowledge of the basic approaches and interactions in the model. In order to alleviate these shortcomings, an automatic calibration model, which employs an evolutionary optimization technique known as Particle Swarm Optimizer (PSO) for parameter estimation, is developed. PSO is a heuristic search algorithm that is inspired by social behavior of bird flocking or fish schooling. The newly-developed calibration model is integrated to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). SWAT is a physically-based, semi-distributed hydrologic model that was developed to predict the long term impacts of land management practices on water, sediment and agricultural chemical yields in large complex watersheds with varying soils, land use, and management conditions. SWAT was calibrated for streamflow and sediment concentration. The calibration process involves parameter specification, whereby sensitive model parameters are identified, and parameter estimation. In order to reduce the number of parameters to be calibrated, parameterization was performed. The methodology is applied to a demonstration watershed known as Big Creek, which is located in southern Illinois. Application results show the effectiveness of the approach and model predictions are significantly improved.

  15. Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Hans-Joachim

    Commercial spectrographic systems are usually supplied with some wave-length calibration, but it is essential that the experimenter performs his own calibration for reliable measurements. A number of sources emitting well-known emission lines are available, and the best values of their wavelengths may be taken from data banks accessible on the internet. Data have been critically evaluated for many decades by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the USA [13], see also p. 3. Special data bases have been established by the astronomy and fusion communities (Appendix B).

  16. Beta particle measurement and dosimetry requirements at NRC-licensed facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, L.A.

    1983-10-01

    Beta radiation measurements have been conducted under laboratory and field conditions to assess the degree of measurement problem and offer suggestions for possible remedies. The dosimeters tested included 4 types of film badges, 4 types of TLD badges, and 1 type of pocket ionization chamber. The results indicate there appears to be two types of radiation fields where beta dose rates may be limiting. The first case involves sources which are essentially pure beta emitters (e.g., fuel fabrication facilities). The second, involving commercial nuclear power plants, occurs where sources are very thin and relatively small. Although the results for one type of commercial dosimeter are not yet available, it appears that the typical film and TLD badges used to measure beta doses usually do not respond properly to beta spectra found at NRC-licensed facilities. The pocket ionization chambers do not respond directly to beta particles. However, the bremsstrahlung from the higher energy beta fields will cause the pocket ionization chambers to register some dose. 4 references, 7 figures, 7 tables. (ACR)

  17. Calibration of impact ionization dust detectors with porous or fluffy dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Hillier, J. K.; Bugiel, S.; Srama, R.; Armes, S. P.; Fielding; L. A.; Lovett, J. R.; Grün, E.

    2013-07-01

    Impact ionization instruments like the ones flying on Cassini, Galileo, Helios and Ulysses have been calibrated using compact particles made of conductive materials like iron, or of minerals (like Olivine, Orthopyroxene, Magnetite, Pyrite) coated with a thin layer of conductive material. These calibrations were performed by shooting cosmic dust analogues with hypervelocity speeds from 1 to 80 km/s onto the flight spares of these instruments, using the Van de Graaff dust accelerator facility in Heidelberg. Here, we perform first measurements with Cassini CDA of the influence of the density of these dust particles on the resulting signal by, for a given impact speed, comparing signals from micron-sized particles made of compact PPy-coated silica to those from (PPy-coated) hollow silica spheres. The degree of impact ionization depends on the ratio of the densities of the target material and the impactor material and hence, different signals may result from impacts with diffe! rent density or porosity.

  18. Reversal of particle flux in collisional-finite beta tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Weiland, J.; Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.

    2015-01-15

    The mixed gradient method [Zhong et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 265001 (2013)] is adopted and effects of collisions and finite beta are included in the Weiland 9-equation fluid model. The particle flux and particle pinch, obtained using the Weiland anomalous transport fluid model, are compared with Tore Supra experimental results. Particle transport is also studied using predictive simulation data for an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak discharge in which neutral beam heating is utilized. The effects of collisions on particle transport are studied by turning collisions on and off in the Weiland model. It is found that the particle pinch region is related to the mode structure. The particle pinch region coincides with the region where the strong ballooning modes are present due to large gradients. The general properties of the fluid model are examined by finding regions where collisions can enhance the particle pinch.

  19. Particle generators for the calibration and testing of narcotic and explosive vapor/particle detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, John P.; Hallowell, Susan F.; Hoglund, David E.

    1994-03-01

    A review of data on narcotics and explosives particulates is presented. Methods to generate particles of narcotics and explosives will be discussed with respect to resulting particle size distribution and mass output. The application of these standards to the testing of narcotic and explosive particle detection systems will be addressed.

  20. Applications of Beta Particle Detection for Synthesis and Usage of Radiotracers Developed for Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooraghi, Alex Abreu

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging tool that requires the use of a radioactive compound or radiotracer which targets a molecular pathway of interest. We have developed and employed three beta particle radiation detection systems to advance PET. Specifically, the goals of these systems are to: 1. Automate dispensing of solutions containing a positron emitting isotope. 2. Monitor radioactivity on-chip during synthesis of a positron emitting radiotracer. 3. Assay cellular uptake on-chip of a positron emitting radiotracer. Automated protocols for measuring and dispensing solutions containing radioisotopes are essential not only for providing an optimum environment for radiation workers, but also to ensure a quantitatively accurate workflow. For the first project, we describe the development and performance of a system for automated radioactivity distribution of beta particle emitting radioisotopes such as fluorine-18 (F-18). Key to the system is a radiation detector in-line with a peristaltic pump. The system demonstrates volume accuracy within 5 % for volumes of 20 muL or greater. When considering volumes of 20 muL or greater, delivered radioactivity is in agreement with the requested radioactivity as measured with the dose calibrator. The integration of the detector and pump leads to a flexible system that can accurately dispense solutions containing F-18 in radioactivity concentrations directly produced from a cyclotron (~ 0.1-1 mCi/muL), to low activity concentrations intended for preclinical mouse scans (~ 1-10 muCi/muL), and anywhere in between. Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) is an attractive microfluidic platform for batch synthesis of PET radiotracers. Visualization of radioisotopes on-chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. For the second project, we describe the development and performance of a Cerenkov/real-time imaging system for PET radiotracer synthesis on EWOD. We also investigate

  1. Acrylic bone cements modified with beta-TCP particles encapsulated with poly(ethylene glycol).

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Blanca; Ginebra, María Pau; Gil, Xavier; Planell, Josep Antón; San Román, Julio

    2005-07-01

    Beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) has been encapsulated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to improve the filler/cement interface, and it was later incorporated to a poly(methyl methacrylate) bone cement in order to obtain cements with improved stability in the long term. Size and size distribution of the agglomerates forming the initial powder was drastically changed after its dispersion in a PEG aqueous solution. Whereas the initial beta-TCP particles had a 584 microm average diameter, the treated particles (TCP-PEG) presented more than 60% of the particles in a range of 2-6 microm. The effect of adding the treated particles to an acrylic cement was evaluated in terms of curing parameters, in vitro behaviour and mechanical performance. The presence of the TCP-PEG particles did not affect either peak temperature or setting time, indicating a good homogeneity of polymerising mass in contrast to the effect observed with the plain beta-TCP particles, which gave rise to higher setting times. In vitro behaviour studies revealed hydration degree values of the modified cements comparable to that of PMMA cements. Early stages of water uptake was Fickian in nature for all the experimental formulations indicating that the water absorption followed a diffusion controlled mechanism. After 3 months of storage in SBF the experimental formulations presented values of compressive strength in the range 76-78 MPa, higher than the minimum required by ISO 5833 (70 MPa) and those of tensile strength in the range 42-48 MPa, higher than the minimum reported for commercial formulations (30 MPa), but no significant differences in the strengths and elastic modulus were observed with the treatment of the filler particles. This observation was confirmed by ESEM analysis of the tensile fracture surfaces, which revealed a rather good cohesion between the bioceramic particles with some gaps around them, independently of the type of particles. The themogravimetric analysis of dry and wet

  2. Characteristics of a 85Kr beta-particle source applied in Series 1 reference irradiations of DIS-1 direct ion storage dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Hakanen, A T; Sipilä, P M; Sahla, T T

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics necessary to specify an ISO 6980 Series 1 reference radiation field were determined for a commercially available 85Kr beta-particle source, using a BEAM EGS4 Monte Carlo code. The characteristics include residual maximum beta energy, E(res), and the uniformity of the dose rate over the calibration area. The E(res) and the uniformity were also determined experimentally, using an extrapolation ionization chamber (EC) and a 0.2 cm3 parallel plate ionization chamber, respectively. The depth-dose curve measured with the EC gave a value 0.62 MeV for the E(res). Series 2 90Sr + 90Y and Series 1(85) Kr beta-particle sources calibrated for H(p)(0.07) at the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) of STUK were used to determine the energy and angular responses of DIS-1 direct ion storage dosemeters. The averaged zero angle H(p)(0.07) responses to the 90Sr + 90Y and 85Kr reference radiations were 135 and 80%, respectively. The responses were normalized to 100%, H(p)(0.07) response to 137Cs photon radiation. PMID:17548464

  3. Improved methods of measurement and analysis of conversion electron and beta-particle spectra

    PubMed

    Dragoun; Spalek; Rysavy; Kovalik; Yakushev; Brabec; Frana; Venos

    2000-03-01

    A general statistical test of the stability of measurement conditions was demonstrated on the beta-spectra of 241Pu cumulated during four years. The alpha- and gamma-ray spectroscopy indicated stability of the 241Pu source. Monte Carlo modelling of individual collision events clarified the role of electron scattering and energy losses within a radioactive source down to energies of several hundreds of eV. The impact ionization by beta-particles of carbon and oxygen atoms in a surface contamination layer on the 241Pu and 63Ni sources was observed. PMID:10724379

  4. Fusion alpha-particle losses in a high-beta rippled tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bunno, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Tani, K.

    2013-08-15

    In tokamak plasmas, the confinement of energetic ions depends on the magnetic field structure. If the plasma pressure is finite, the equilibrium current (i.e., the Pfirsch-Schlüter current and diamagnetic current) flows in the plasma to maintain the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium. These plasma currents generate poloidal and toroidal magnetic field and alter the field structure. Moreover, if we consider the non-axisymmetry of magnetic field structures such as toroidal field (TF) ripples, the non-axisymmetric component of the equilibrium current can alter TF ripples themselves. When the plasma beta becomes high, the changes in the field structure due to the equilibrium current might affect the confinement of energetic ions significantly. We intend to clarify how these currents alter the field structure and affect the confinement of alpha particles in high-beta plasma. The MHD equilibrium is calculated using VMEC and the orbits of fusion alpha particles are followed by using the fully three-dimensional magnetic field orbit-following Monte Carlo code. In relatively low-beta plasma (e.g., the volume-averaged beta value <β>≤2%), the changes in the magnetic field component due to the plasma current negligibly affect the confinement of alpha particles except for the Shafranov shift effect. However, for <β>≥3%, the diamagnetic effect reduces the magnetic field strength and significantly increases alpha-particle losses. In these high-beta cases, the non-axisymmetric field component generated by the equilibrium current also increases these losses, but not as effectively as compared to the diamagnetic effect.

  5. A calibration procedure for beam monitors in a scanned beam of heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, O; Hartmann, G H; Karger, C P; Heeg, P; Vatnitsky, S

    2004-05-01

    An international code of practice (CoP) for dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water has recently been published by the IAEA [Technical Report Series No. 398, 2000] (TRS-398). This new CoP includes procedures for proton and heavy ion beams as well as all other beam qualities. In particular it defines reference conditions to which dose measurements should refer to. For proton and ion beams these conditions include dose measurements in the center of all possible modulated Bragg peaks. The recommended reference conditions in general are used also for the calibration of beam monitors. For a dynamic beam delivery system using beam scanning in combination with energy variation, like, e.g., at the German carbon ion radiotherapy facility, this calibration procedure is not appropriate. We have independently developed a different calibration procedure. Similar to the IAEA CoP this procedure is based on the measurement of absorbed dose to water. This is translated in terms of fluence which finally results in an energy-dependent calibration of the beam monitor in units of particle number per monitor unit, which is unique for all treatment fields. In contrast to the IAEA CoP, the reference depth is chosen to be very small. The procedure enables an accurate and reliable determination of calibration factors. In a second step, the calibration is verified by measurements of absorbed dose in various modulated Bragg peaks by comparing measured against calculated doses. The agreement between measured and calculated doses is usually better than 1% for homogeneous fields and the mean deviation for more inhomogeneous treatment fields, as they are used for patient treatments, is within 3%. It is proposed that the CoP in general, and in particular the IAEA TRS-398 should include explicit recommendations for the beam monitor calibration. These recommendations should then distinguish between systems using static and dynamic beams. PMID:15191285

  6. Gyrokinetic study of the role of {beta} on electron particle transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, T.; Angioni, C.; Fable, E.; Candy, J.

    2010-10-15

    Electromagnetic effects on the radial transport of electrons in the core of tokamak plasmas are studied by means of linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations with the code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] and by an analytical derivation. The impact of a finite {beta}, that is, a finite ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure, is considered on the fluctuations of the magnetic field through Ampere's law, as well as on the geometrical modification of the vertical drift produced by the Shafranov shift in the magnetic equilibrium, which, for realistic descriptions, has to be included in both electrostatic and electromagnetic modeling. The condition of turbulent particle flux at the null, which allows the determination of stationary logarithmic density gradients when neoclassical transport and particle sources are negligible, is investigated for increasing values of {beta}, in regimes of ion temperature gradient and trapped electron mode turbulence. The loss of adiabaticity of passing electrons produced by fluctuations in the magnetic vector potential produces an outward convection. When the magnetic equilibrium geometry is kept fixed, this induces a strong reduction of the stationary logarithmic density gradient with increasing {beta}. This effect is partly compensated by the geometrical effect on the vertical drift. This compensation effect, however, is significantly weaker in nonlinear simulations as compared to quasilinear calculations. A detailed comparison between quasilinear and nonlinear results reveals that the predicted value of the logarithmic density gradient is highly sensitive on the assumptions on the wave number spectrum applied in the quasilinear model. The qualitative consistency of the theoretical predictions with the experimental results obtained so far on the dependence of density peaking on {beta} is discussed by considering the additional impact, with increasing {beta}, of a particle source delivered

  7. Beta dependence of electron heating in decaying whistler turbulence: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Peter Gary, S.

    2012-01-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out to study electron beta dependence of decaying whistler turbulence and electron heating in a homogeneous, collisionless magnetized plasma. Initially, applied whistler fluctuations at relatively long wavelengths cascade their energy into shorter wavelengths. This cascade leads to whistler turbulence with anisotropic wavenumber spectra which are broader in directions perpendicular to the background magnetic field than in the parallel direction. Comparing the development of whistler turbulence at different electron beta values, it is found that both the wavenumber spectrum anisotropy and electron heating anisotropy decrease with increasing electron beta. This indicates that higher electron beta reduces the perpendicular energy cascade of whistler turbulence. Fluctuation energy dissipation by electron Landau damping responsible for the electron parallel heating becomes weaker at higher electron beta, which leads to more isotropic heating. It suggests that electron kinetic processes are important in determining the properties of whistler turbulence. This kinetic property is applied to discuss the generation of suprathermal strahl electron distributions in the solar wind.

  8. Computational methods for analyzing the transmission characteristics of a beta particle magnetic analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Computational methods were developed to study the trajectories of beta particles (positrons) through a magnetic analysis system as a function of the spatial distribution of the radionuclides in the beta source, size and shape of the source collimator, and the strength of the analyzer magnetic field. On the basis of these methods, the particle flux, their energy spectrum, and source-to-target transit times have been calculated for Na-22 positrons as a function of the analyzer magnetic field and the size and location of the target. These data are in studies requiring parallel beams of positrons of uniform energy such as measurement of the moisture distribution in composite materials. Computer programs for obtaining various trajectories are included.

  9. Counting particles in tissue sections: choices of methods and importance of calibration to minimize biases.

    PubMed

    von Bartheld, C

    2002-04-01

    Investigators must choose between counting methods to quantify microscopic particles in tissues. The conventional profile-based ("model-based" or "2D-") counting methods have been criticized for their potential biases due to assumptions about shapes, sizes, and orientation of particles when converting profile counts into cell numbers. New stereological methods ("design-based" or "3D-") methods such as the optical disector or physical disector were initially introduced as being inherently unbiased. Recent calibration analyses and comparisons of results from different investigators have revealed the potential for significant biases in the most efficient and most frequently used design-based method, the optical disector. This review aims to objectively assess the strengths and limitations of current profile- and disector-based cell counting methods by examination of studies in which these methods have been calibrated against the "gold-standard", counts obtained by 3-dimensional reconstruction of serial sections. Advantages and disadvantages of each counting method and the associated embedding and sectioning techniques are compared and frequent mistakes and pitfalls of each technique are discussed. The importance of a calibration step for each technique is emphasized, and a protocol is provided for a quick and simple calibration by a "sampling" 3-D reconstruction of limited serial sections. Trends in the usage of counting methods are analyzed in four major journals. It is hoped that this review will be helpful, for both investigators and manuscript reviewers, in clarifying some of the contentious issues in the choice and implementation of appropriate methods for particle counting in tissue sections. PMID:11962763

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode driven by energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Briguglio, S; Chen, L; Di Troia, C; Fogaccia, G; Vlad, G; Zonca, F

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear saturation of a beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode, driven by slowing down energetic particles via transit resonance, is investigated by the nonlinear hybrid magnetohyrodynamic gyrokinetic code. Saturation is characterized by frequency chirping and symmetry breaking between co- and counter-passing particles, which can be understood as the evidence of resonance detuning. The scaling of the saturation amplitude with the growth rate is also demonstrated to be consistent with radial resonance detuning due to the radial nonuniformity and mode structure. PMID:23214643

  11. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of beta-induced Alfven-acoustic eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lin, Z.; Zhang, W. L.

    2016-04-01

    The beta-induced Alfven-acoustic eigenmode (BAAE) in toroidal plasmas is verified and studied by global gyrokinetic particle simulations. When ion temperature is much lower than electron temperature, the existence of the weakly damped BAAE is verified in the simulations using initial perturbation, antenna excitation, and energetic particle excitation, respectively. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, the unstable BAAE can be excited by realistic energetic particle density gradient, even though the stable BAAE (in the absence of energetic particles) is heavily damped by the thermal ions. In the simulations with reversed magnetic shear, BAAE frequency sweeping is observed and poloidal mode structure has a triangle shape with a poloidal direction similar to that observed in tokamak experiments. The triangle shape changes the poloidal direction, and no frequency sweeping is found in the simulations with normal magnetic shear.

  12. An application of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hot particle methodology for determining the most effective beta particle energy in causing skin ulcers

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the effectiveness of hot particles with different energy betas in producing ulcers on skin. The sources were man-made hot particles similar in size and activity to those found in the commercial nuclear power industry. Four different particle types were used. These were thulium (Tm-170) with a 0.97 MeV maximum energy beta, ytterbium (Yb-175) with a maximum beta energy of 0.47 MeV, scandium (Sc-46) with a 0.36 MeV beta, which was used as a surrogate for cobalt-60 (0.31 MeV beta) and uranium (in the carbide form) with an average maximum beta energy of about 2.5 MeV. Since higher energy beta particles penetrate further in skin, they will affect a higher number and different populations of target cells. The experiments were designed as threshold studies such that the dose needed to produce ulcers ten percent of the time (ED 10%) for each particle type could be compared against each other.

  13. Particle filtering for sensor-to-sensor self-calibration and motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yafei; Li, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of calibrating the six degrees-of-freedom rigid body transform between a camera and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) while at the same time estimating the 3D motion of a vehicle. A high-fidelity measurement model for the camera and IMU are derived and the estimation algorithm are implemented within the particle filter (PF) framework. Belonging to the class of Monte Carlo sequential methods, the filter uses the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) to generate importance proposal distribution. It can not only avoid the limitation of the UKF which can only apply to Gaussian distribution, but also avoid the limitation of the standard PF which can not include the new measurements. Moreover, the proposed algorithm requires no additional hardware equipment. Simulation results illustrate the ill effects of misalignment on motion estimation and demonstrate accurate estimation of both the calibration parameters and the state of the vehicle.

  14. Calibrations for Charged Particle Tracking with the GlueX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staib, Michael; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Two gas detectors comprise the tracking system for the GlueX experiment, the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) and the Forward Drift Chamber (FDC). The CDC is a cylindrical straw-tube detector covering polar angles between 6° and 168°, delivering spatial resolution of ~150 μm. The FDC is a Cathode Strip Chamber consisting of four packages, each with six alternating layers of anode wires and cathode strips. The FDC is designed to track forward-going charged particles with polar angles between 1° and 20° with a spatial resolution of ~200 μm. Both tracking detectors record timing information and energy loss measurements useful for particle identification. During Fall 2014 and Spring 2015, the first photon beam was delivered on target for commissioning of the GlueX detector in Hall-D at Jefferson Lab. These data are currently being used in a large effort to calibrate the individual detector subsystems to achieve design performance. Methods and results for calibrations of each of the tracking detectors are presented. Techniques for alignment of the tracking system using a combination of cosmic rays and beam data is discussed. Finally, some early results of physics measurements including charged final-state particles are presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  15. Calibration Method in Elasticity Evaluation of Regenerating Cartilage Based on Ultrasonic Particle Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Hyodo, Koji; Misawa, Masaki; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Shirasaki, Yoshio; Homma, Kazuhiro; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    It is important in regenerative medicine to evaluate the maturity of regenerating tissue. In the maturity evaluation of regenerating cartilage, it is useful to measure the temporal change in elasticity because the maturity of regenerating tissue is closely related to its elasticity. In this study, a quantitative elasticity evaluation of extracted regenerating cartilage samples, which is based on the laser Doppler measurement of ultrasonic particle velocity and calibration, was experimentally investigated using agar-based phantoms with different Young's moduli and regenerating cartilage samples extracted from beagles in animal experiments. The experimental results verified the feasibility of the proposed method for the elasticity evaluation of regenerating cartilage samples.

  16. hydroPSO: A Versatile Particle Swarm Optimisation R Package for Calibration of Environmental Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano-Bigiarini, M.; Rojas, R.

    2012-04-01

    Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) is a recent and powerful population-based stochastic optimisation technique inspired by social behaviour of bird flocking, which shares similarities with other evolutionary techniques such as Genetic Algorithms (GA). In PSO, however, each individual of the population, known as particle in PSO terminology, adjusts its flying trajectory on the multi-dimensional search-space according to its own experience (best-known personal position) and the one of its neighbours in the swarm (best-known local position). PSO has recently received a surge of attention given its flexibility, ease of programming, low memory and CPU requirements, and efficiency. Despite these advantages, PSO may still get trapped into sub-optimal solutions, suffer from swarm explosion or premature convergence. Thus, the development of enhancements to the "canonical" PSO is an active area of research. To date, several modifications to the canonical PSO have been proposed in the literature, resulting into a large and dispersed collection of codes and algorithms which might well be used for similar if not identical purposes. In this work we present hydroPSO, a platform-independent R package implementing several enhancements to the canonical PSO that we consider of utmost importance to bring this technique to the attention of a broader community of scientists and practitioners. hydroPSO is model-independent, allowing the user to interface any model code with the calibration engine without having to invest considerable effort in customizing PSO to a new calibration problem. Some of the controlling options to fine-tune hydroPSO are: four alternative topologies, several types of inertia weight, time-variant acceleration coefficients, time-variant maximum velocity, regrouping of particles when premature convergence is detected, different types of boundary conditions and many others. Additionally, hydroPSO implements recent PSO variants such as: Improved Particle Swarm

  17. A Beta-Particle Hodoscope Constructed Using Scintillating Optical Fibers and Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, Jim; Hossbach, Todd W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2006-09-19

    A hodoscopic detector was constructed using a position-sensitive plastic scintillator active area to determine the location of beta-active micron-sized particulates on air filters. The ability to locate beta active particulates on airsample filters is a tool for environmental monitoring of anthropogenic production of radioactive material. A robust, field-deployable instrument can provide localization of radioactive particulate with position resolution of a few millimeters. The detector employs a novel configuration of scintillating plastic elements usually employed at much higher charged particle energies. A filter is placed on this element for assay. The detector is intended to be sensitive to activity greater than 1 Bq. The physical design, position reconstruction method, and expected detector sensitivity are reported.

  18. Calibration of the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John L.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Gellert, Ralf; Andrushenko, Stefan M.; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Maxwell, John A.; King, Penelope L.; Schofield, Céleste D. M.

    2012-09-01

    The alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission was calibrated for routine analysis of: Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, and Y. The following elements were also calibrated, but may be too low to be measured (10s-100s ppm) for their usual abundance on Mars: V, Cu, Ga, As, Se and W. An extensive suite of geological reference materials, supplemented by pure chemical elements and compounds was used. Special attention was paid to include phyllosilicates, sulfates and a broad selection of basalts as these are predicted minerals and rocks at the Gale Crater landing site. The calibration approach is from first principles, using fundamental physics parameters and an assumed homogeneous sample matrix to calculate expected elemental signals for a given instrument setup and sample composition. Resulting concentrations for most elements accord with expected values. Deviations in elements of lower atomic number (Na, Mg, Al) indicate significant influences of mineral phases, especially in basalts, ultramafic rocks and trachytes. The systematics of these deviations help us to derive empirical, iterative corrections for different rock groups, based on a preliminary APXS analysis which assumes a homogeneous sample. These corrections have the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of APXS analyses, especially when other MSL instrument results, such as the X-ray diffraction data from CheMin, are included in the overall analysis process.

  19. Particle sizing calibration with refractive index correction for light scattering optical particle counters and impacts upon PCASP and CDP data collected during the Fennec campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, P. D.; Dean, A. R.; Williams, P. I.; Dorsey, J. R.; Minikin, A.; Pickering, M. A.; Petzold, A.

    2012-05-01

    Optical particle counters (OPCs) are used regularly for atmospheric research, measuring particle scattering cross sections to generate particle size distribution histograms. This manuscript presents two methods for calibrating OPCs with case studies based on a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP), both of which are operated on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146 research aircraft. A probability density function based method is provided for modification of the OPC bin boundaries when the scattering properties of measured particles are different to those of the calibration particles due to differences in refractive index or shape. This method provides mean diameters and widths for OPC bins based upon Mie-Lorenz theory or any other particle scattering theory, without the need for smoothing, despite the highly nonlinear and non-monotonic relationship between particle size and scattering cross section. By calibrating an OPC in terms of its scattering cross section the optical properties correction can be applied with minimal information loss, and performing correction in this manner provides traceable and transparent uncertainty propagation throughout the whole process. Analysis of multiple calibrations has shown that for the PCASP the bin centres differ by up to 30% from the manufacturer's nominal values and can change by up to approximately 20% when routine maintenance is performed. The CDP has been found to be less sensitive than the manufacturer's specification with differences in sizing of between 1.6 ± 0.8 μm and 4.7 ± 1.8 μm for one flight. Over the course of the Fennec project in the Sahara the variability of calibration was less than the calibration uncertainty in 6 out of 7 calibrations performed. As would be expected from Mie-Lorenz theory, the impact of the refractive index corrections has been found to be largest for absorbing materials and the impact on Saharan dust measurements made

  20. A probabilistic respiratory tract dosimetry model with application to beta-particle and photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, Eduardo Balderrama

    2002-01-01

    Predicting equivalent dose in the human respiratory tract is significant in the assessment of health risks associated with the inhalation of radioactive aerosols. A complete respiratory tract methodology based on the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 66 model was used in this research project for beta-particle and photon emitters. The conventional methodology has been to use standard values (from Reference Man) for parameters to obtain a single dose value. However, the methods used in the current study allow lung dose values to be determined as probability distributions to reflect the spread or variability in doses. To implement the methodology, a computer code, LUDUC, has been modified to include inhalation scenarios of beta-particle and photon emitters. For beta particles, a new methodology was implemented into Monte Carlo simulations to determine absorbed fractions in target tissues within the thoracic region of the respiratory tract. For photons, a new mathematical phantom of extrathoracic and thoracic regions was created based on previous studies to determine specific absorbed fractions in several tissues and organs of the human body due to inhalation of radioactive materials. The application of the methodology and developed data will be helpful in dose reconstruction and prediction efforts concerning the inhalation of short-lived radionuclides or radionuclides of Inhalation Class S. The resulting dose distributions follow a lognormal distribution shape for all scenarios examined. Applying the probabilistic computer code LUDUC to inhalation of strontium and yttrium aerosols has shown several trends, which could also be valid for many S radionuclide compounds that are beta-particle emitters. The equivalent doses are, in general, found to follow lognormal distributions. Therefore, these distributions can be described by geometric means and geometric standard deviations. Furthermore, a mathematical phantom of the extrathoracic and

  1. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of fast-electron driven beta-induced Aflvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Junyi; Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Li, Ding; Chen, Yang; Cao, Jintao

    2016-05-01

    The fast-electron driven beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (e-BAE) in toroidal plasmas is investigated for the first time using global gyrokinetic particle simulations, where the fast electron is described by the drift kinetic equation. The simulation shows that the e-BAE propagates in the fast electron diamagnetic direction and its polarization is close to an ideal MHD mode. The phase space structure shows that only the fast electron processional resonance is responsible for the e-BAE excitations while fast-ion driven BAE can be excited through all the channels, including transit, bounce, and processional resonance.

  2. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  3. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  4. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  5. Improvements on particle swarm optimization algorithm for velocity calibration in microseismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Wen, Jian; Chen, Xiaofei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we apply particle swarm optimization (PSO), an artificial intelligence technique, to velocity calibration in microseismic monitoring. We ran simulations with four 1-D layered velocity models and three different initial model ranges. The results using the basic PSO algorithm were reliable and accurate for simple models, but unsuccessful for complex models. We propose the staged shrinkage strategy (SSS) for the PSO algorithm. The SSS-PSO algorithm produced robust inversion results and had a fast convergence rate. We investigated the effects of PSO's velocity clamping factor in terms of the algorithm reliability and computational efficiency. The velocity clamping factor had little impact on the reliability and efficiency of basic PSO, whereas it had a large effect on the efficiency of SSS-PSO. Reassuringly, SSS-PSO exhibits marginal reliability fluctuations, which suggests that it can be confidently implemented.

  6. Interaction of high-energy trapped particles with ballooning modes in a tokamak with a high-. beta. plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Novakovaskii, S. V.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    1988-12-01

    A theory is derived for the interaction of high-energy trapped particleswith ballooning modes in a tokamak with a high-..beta.. plasma. A dispersionrelation is derived to describe the ballooning modes in the presence ofsuch particles; the effects of the high plasma ..beta.. are taken into account.The stability boundary for ballooning modes with zero and finite frequenciesis studied. The effects of finite bananas on the stability of ballooningmodes with zero frequencies are determined.

  7. Pareto optimal calibration of highly nonlinear reactive transport groundwater models using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, A. J.; Prommer, H.; Welter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater management and remediation requires the implementation of numerical models in order to evaluate the potential anthropogenic impacts on aquifer systems. In many situations, the numerical model must, not only be able to simulate groundwater flow and transport, but also geochemical and biological processes. Each process being simulated carries with it a set of parameters that must be identified, along with differing potential sources of model-structure error. Various data types are often collected in the field and then used to calibrate the numerical model; however, these data types can represent very different processes and can subsequently be sensitive to the model parameters in extremely complex ways. Therefore, developing an appropriate weighting strategy to address the contributions of each data type to the overall least-squares objective function is not straightforward. This is further compounded by the presence of potential sources of model-structure errors that manifest themselves differently for each observation data type. Finally, reactive transport models are highly nonlinear, which can lead to convergence failure for algorithms operating on the assumption of local linearity. In this study, we propose a variation of the popular, particle swarm optimization algorithm to address trade-offs associated with the calibration of one data type over another. This method removes the need to specify weights between observation groups and instead, produces a multi-dimensional Pareto front that illustrates the trade-offs between data types. We use the PEST++ run manager, along with the standard PEST input/output structure, to implement parallel programming across multiple desktop computers using TCP/IP communications. This allows for very large swarms of particles without the need of a supercomputing facility. The method was applied to a case study in which modeling was used to gain insight into the mobilization of arsenic at a deepwell injection site

  8. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooraghi, A. A.; Vu, N. T.; Silverman, R. W.; Farrell, R.; Shah, K. S.; Wang, J.; Heath, J. R.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2013-06-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm-2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm-2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ˜180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ˜200 µm of additional LDPE film. Lastly

  9. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    PubMed Central

    Dooraghi, AA; Vu, NT; Silverman, RW; Farrell, R; Shah, KS; Wang, J; Heath, JR; Chatziioannou, AF

    2013-01-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm−2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm−2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ~180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ~200 µm of additional LDPE film

  10. Nuclear and particle physics aspects of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornicky, R.; Simkovic, F.; Faessler, A.

    2007-10-12

    A discussion is given on possible realization of the Single State Dominance (SSD) hypothesis in the case of the two-neutrino double beta decay (2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay) of {sup l50}Nd with 1{sup -} ground state of the intermediate nucleus. We conclude that the SSD hypothesis is expected to be ruled out by precision measurement of differential characteristics of this process in running NEMO 3 or planed SuperNEMO experiments unlike some unknown low-lying 1{sup +} state of {sup 150}Pm does exist. This problem can be solved via (d,{sup 2}He) charge-exchange experiment on {sup l50}Sm. Further, we address the question about possible violation of the Pauli exclusion principle for neutrinos and its consequences for the energy distributions of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay of {sup l50}Nd. This phenomenon might be a subject of interest of NEMO 3 and SuperNEMO experiments as well.

  11. Optical imaging of the spatial distribution of beta-particles emerging from surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Charpak, G; Dominik, W; Zaganidis, N

    1989-01-01

    The multiplication in gases of ionization electrons, by the effect of the electric fields between parallel electrodes, leads to the emission of light from the molecules excited in the avalanche process. The optical imaging of this light, with intensifiers, on charge-coupled devices permits the localization, in the gaseous volume, of the entrance points of the beta-particles emitted by radioactive compounds placed close to or at the cathode electrode. Thin slices of anatomical samples labeled with 3H show detailed structures 30 microns in size. Gels carrying 32P or 35S are imaged with accuracies of the order of 0.5 mm (full width at half maximum). In comparison with photographic emulsion, the gain in time for data taking is close to a factor of 100, with the advantage of linearity and wider dynamic range in the intensity measurement and a greatly improved signal-to-noise ratio. Images PMID:2928300

  12. Direct determination of 90Sr and 147Pm in Chernobyl hot particles collected in Kiev using beta absorption method.

    PubMed

    Papp, Z; Bolyós, A; Dezsó, Z; Daróczy, S

    1997-12-01

    59 hot particles were collected in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1987. All but one were prepared from a moss carpet of 360 cm2 area. Radionuclide composition of the hot particles was investigated by gamma-spectrometry and beta absorption method. Pure beta emitters 90Sr and 147Pm were determined in 25 hot particles measuring the beta absorption curves of the hot particles with an end-window Geiger-Müller counter and decomposing the curves in order to obtain the contributions of 90Sr and 147Pm to the total beta counting rate. All but one of the hot particles were found to be the debris of the fuel. The activity ratio 90Sr:l44Ce was 0.052 in good agreement with theoretical calculations on core inventories. This means that strontium behaved as a nonvolatile element in the process of the formation of the hot particles investigated. The activity ratio 147Pm:144Ce was 0.078 which is half of the theoretical result. Although 147Pm is considered to be a refractory nuclide, it seems that significant part of 147Pm went to the homogeneous fraction of the general fallout. The surface density of hot particles (of higher than about 50 Bq activity) was about 1,600 m(-2) and that of the activities of the nuclides 90Sr, 106Ru, 134Cs, 137Cs, 144Ce and 147Pm as components of hot particles was 12.2, 54.3, 5.9, 9.7, 234 and 18.3 kBq m(-2) (activity values counted for 26 April 1986), respectively, in downtown Kiev city in 1987. PMID:9373073

  13. Localization and quantitation of tritiated compounds in tissue sections with a gaseous detector of beta particles: Comparison with film autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tribollet, E.; Dreifuss, J.J.; Charpak, G.; Dominik, W.; Zaganidis, N. )

    1991-02-15

    Quantitative analysis of tritium polymer standards and of brain sections labeled with tritiated vasopressin was carried out by using a gaseous detector of beta particles designed for this purpose. The gaseous detector showed major advantages compared with film autoradiography: the linearity and the large dynamic range of intensity measurements as well as the short time needed for data acquisition.

  14. Localization and quantitation of tritiated compounds in tissue sections with a gaseous detector of beta particles: comparison with film autoradiography.

    PubMed Central

    Tribollet, E; Dreifuss, J J; Charpak, G; Dominik, W; Zaganidis, N

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of tritium polymer standards and of brain sections labeled with tritiated vasopressin was carried out by using a gaseous detector of beta particles designed for this purpose. The gaseous detector showed major advantages compared with film autoradiography: the linearity and the large dynamic range of intensity measurements as well as the short time needed for data acquisition. Images PMID:1996346

  15. Cellular uptake of beta-carotene from protein stabilized solid lipid nano-particles prepared by homogenization-evaporation method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a homogenization-evaporation method, beta-carotene (BC) loaded nano-particles were prepared with different ratios of food-grade sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), or soy protein isolate (SPI) to BC and evaluated for their physiochemical stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and cel...

  16. Particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-beta pair plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Daughton, William; Li, Xiaocan; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    Plasma energization through magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime featured by low plasma beta ( β = 8 π n k T 0 / B 2 ≪ 1 ) and/or high magnetization ( σ = B 2 / ( 4 π n m c 2 ) ≫ 1 ) is important in a series of astrophysical systems such as solar flares, pulsar wind nebula, and relativistic jets from black holes. In this paper, we review the recent progress on kinetic simulations of this process and further discuss plasma dynamics and particle acceleration in a low-β reconnection layer that consists of electron-positron pairs. We also examine the effect of different initial thermal temperatures on the resulting particle energy spectra. While earlier papers have concluded that the spectral index is smaller for higher σ, our simulations show that the spectral index approaches p = 1 for sufficiently low plasma β, even if σ ˜ 1 . Since this predicted spectral index in the idealized limit is harder than most observations, it is important to consider effects that can lead to a softer spectrum such as open boundary simulations. We also remark that the effects of three-dimensional reconnection physics and turbulence on reconnection need to be addressed in the future.

  17. Beta camera for static and dynamic imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in biologic samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ljunggren, K.; Strand, S.E. )

    1990-12-01

    A detection system based on microchannel plates has been constructed to image charged particles emitted by radionuclides in biomedical samples. This technique has significant advantages over conventional film autoradiography for investigating the distribution of radiolabeled compounds: shorter acquisition times due to the high sensitivity, easier sample handling, direct quantification and the ability to perform dynamic studies. The detector performance shows a spatial resolution of 0.9 mm for carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) (0.156 MeV), good linearity and homogeneity. The noise level is below 50/(cm{sup 2}.sec). Successful imaging with this system has been performed with beta-emitters {sup 14}C, sulfur-35 ({sup 35}S), iodine-131 ({sup 131}I), yttrium-90 (90Y), and positron emitters gallium-68 ({sup 68}Ga), and fluorine-18 ({sup 18}F). Dynamic studies of axonal transport of {sup 35}S-methionine in a nerve, and static images of 90Y-labeled monoclonal antibodies in slices of tumors are presented. The system shows promise for rapid quantitative imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in small biologic samples.

  18. Calibration of Semi-analytic Models of Galaxy Formation Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Andrés N.; Cora, Sofía A.; Padilla, Nelson D.; Domínguez, Mariano J.; Vega-Martínez, Cristian A.; Tecce, Tomás E.; Orsi, Álvaro; Yaryura, Yamila; García Lambas, Diego; Gargiulo, Ignacio D.; Muñoz Arancibia, Alejandra M.

    2015-03-01

    We present a fast and accurate method to select an optimal set of parameters in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution (SAMs). Our approach compares the results of a model against a set of observables applying a stochastic technique called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), a self-learning algorithm for localizing regions of maximum likelihood in multidimensional spaces that outperforms traditional sampling methods in terms of computational cost. We apply the PSO technique to the SAG semi-analytic model combined with merger trees extracted from a standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter N-body simulation. The calibration is performed using a combination of observed galaxy properties as constraints, including the local stellar mass function and the black hole to bulge mass relation. We test the ability of the PSO algorithm to find the best set of free parameters of the model by comparing the results with those obtained using a MCMC exploration. Both methods find the same maximum likelihood region, however, the PSO method requires one order of magnitude fewer evaluations. This new approach allows a fast estimation of the best-fitting parameter set in multidimensional spaces, providing a practical tool to test the consequences of including other astrophysical processes in SAMs.

  19. Laboratory Simulation of Impacts upon Aluminum Foils of the Stardust Spacecraft: Calibration of Dust Particle Size from Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Horz, F.; Cole, M. J.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic aluminium alloy foils exposed on the forward, comet-facing surface of the aerogel tray on the Stardust spacecraft are likely to have been impacted by the same cometary particle population as the dedicated impact sensors and the aerogel collector. The ability of soft aluminium alloy to record hypervelocity impacts as bowl-shaped craters offers an opportunistic substrate for recognition of impacts by particles of a wide potential size range. In contrast to impact surveys conducted on samples from low Earth orbit, the simple encounter geometry for Stardust and Wild 2, with a known and constant spacecraft-particle relative velocity and effective surface-perpendicular impact trajectories, permits closely comparable simulation in laboratory experiments. For a detailed calibration programme we have selected a suite of spherical glass projectiles of uniform density and hardness characteristics, with well-documented particle size range from 10 microns to nearly 100 microns. Light gas gun buckshot firings of these particles at approximately 6km s)exp -1) onto samples of the same foil as employed on Stardust have yielded large numbers of craters. Scanning electron microscopy of both projectiles and impact features has allowed construction of a calibration plot, showing a linear relationship between impacting particle size and impact crater diameter. The close match between our experimental conditions and the Stardust mission encounter parameters should provide another opportunity to measure particle size distributions and fluxes close to the nucleus of Wild 2, independent of the active impact detector instruments aboard the Stardust spacecraft.

  20. Beta experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A focused laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was developed for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter (beta) from aerosols at infrared wavelengths. A Doppler signal generator was used in mapping the coherent sensitive focal volume of a focused LDV system. System calibration data was analyzed during the flight test activity scheduled for the Beta system. These analyses were performed to determine the acceptability of the Beta measurement system's performance.

  1. Effects of anisotropic fluences and angular depended spectra of beta-particles in the use of large area reference sources.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahiro; Kawada, Yasushi; Ishizu, Hidetake; Yamamoto, Shinich; Yunoki, Akira; Sato, Yasushi; Unno, Yasuhiro; Hino, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    Calibrations of instrument efficiency of surface contamination meters are usually made with extended reference sources which are standardized in terms of 2π surface β-particle emission rates from the source surface including backscattered particles. Extended sources supplied from various metrology institutes or calibration laboratories, but the source-types such as structure, preparation method, backing and covering materials vary between manufacturers. In this work first we show how the calibration results are dependent on the source type. Second, in order to clarify the possible reason of such discrepancy, we examined the isotropy of β-particle fluences by the use of a proportional counter and also observed the angular dependence of β-particle spectra by the use of small plastic scintillation spectrometer, where the source mount can rotate relative to the detector window at various obliquities. The discrepancy in the instrument-calibration of surface contamination meters, which are mainly used under the conditions of large source-to-detector geometry, can be explained. PMID:22424745

  2. Determining PM2.5 calibration curves for a low-cost particle monitor: common indoor residential aerosols.

    PubMed

    Dacunto, Philip J; Klepeis, Neil E; Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2015-11-01

    Real-time particle monitors are essential for accurately estimating exposure to fine particles indoors. However, many such monitors tend to be prohibitively expensive for some applications, such as a tenant or homeowner curious about the quality of the air in their home. A lower cost version (the Dylos Air Quality Monitor) has recently been introduced, but it requires appropriate calibration to reflect the mass concentration units required for exposure assessment. We conducted a total of 64 experiments with a suite of instruments including a Dylos DC1100, another real-time laser photometer (TSI SidePak™ Model AM-510 Personal Aerosol Monitor), and a gravimetric sampling apparatus to estimate Dylos calibration factors for emissions from 17 different common indoor sources including cigarettes, incense, fried bacon, chicken, and hamburger. Comparison of minute-by-minute data from the Dylos with the gravimetrically calibrated SidePak yielded relationships that enable the conversion of the raw Dylos particle counts less than 2.5 μm (in #/0.01 ft(3)) to estimated PM2.5 mass concentration (e.g. μg m(-3)). The relationship between the exponentially-decaying Dylos particle counts and PM2.5 mass concentration can be described by a theoretically-derived power law with source-specific empirical parameters. A linear relationship (calibration factor) is applicable to fresh or quickly decaying emissions (i.e., before the aerosol has aged and differential decay rates introduce curvature into the relationship). The empirical parameters for the power-law relationships vary greatly both between and within source types, although linear factors appear to have lower uncertainty. The Dylos Air Quality Monitor is likely most useful for providing instantaneous feedback and context on mass particle levels in home and work situations for field-survey or personal awareness applications. PMID:26487426

  3. Preliminary calibration plan for the Advanced Particles and Field Observatory (APAFO) magnetometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C. V.; Langel, R. A.; Slavin, J.; Lancaster, E. R.; Jones, S.

    1991-01-01

    Prelaunch and postlaunch calibration plans for the APAFO magnetometer experiment are presented. A study of tradeoffs between boom length and spacecraft field is described; the results are summarized. The prelaunch plan includes: calibration of the Vector Fluxgate Magnetometer (VFM), Star Sensors, and Scalar Helium Magnetometer (SHM); optical bench integration; and acquisition of basic spacecraft field data. Postlaunch calibration has two phases. In phase one, SHM data are used to calibrate the VFM, total vector magnetic field data are used to calibrate a physical model of the spacecraft field, and both calibrations are refined by iteration. In phase two, corrected vector data are transformed into geocentric coordinates, previously undetected spacecraft fields are isolated, and initial geomagnetic field models are computed. Provided the SHM is accurate to the required 1.0 nT and can be used to calibrate the VFM to the required 3.0- nT accuracy, the tradeoff study indicates that a 12 m boom and a spacecraft field model uncertainty of 5 percent together allow the 1.0 nT spacecraft field error requirement to be met.

  4. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  5. Stardust: An overview of the tracks in the aerogel (calibration, classification and particle size distribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Fairey, S. J.; Hörz, F.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Brownlee, D. E.; See, T. H.; Westphal, A.; Green, S. F.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The NASA Stardust mission (1) to comet P/Wild-2 returned to Earth in January 2006 carrying a cargo of dust captured in aerogel and residue rich craters in aluminium foils (2). Aerogel is a low density, highly porous material (3, 4). The aerogel that was carried by Stardust in the cometary dust collector trays was a SiO2 aerogel, arranged in blocks 4 cm x 2 cm (front face) and 3 cm deep, with density which varied smoothly from 5 mg/cc at the front surface to 50 mg/cc at the rear surface (5). A first look at the whole cometary dust tray at NASA showed that there were many impact features in the aerogel. During the Preliminary Examination period about 15% of the aerogel blocks were removed and studied in detail. The tracks observed in these blocks were classified into three groups: Type A were long relatively narrow tracks of "carrot shape", Type B tracks were again fairly long but had a large bulbous region at the top and appear like the bowl and stem of a flute champagne glass, Type C were purely bulbous tracks with no stem emerging beneath them. Data on the sizes and relative populations of these tracks will be given (also see (6)) along with a discussion of their implications for impactor composition. Laboratory calibrations of the impacts in aerogel have been carried out using glass beads and these permit an estimate of the size of the impactor based on the measured track properties (6). When applied to the tracks measured in the Stardust aerogel, a cumulative particle size distribution was obtained (7) which will be discussed. References (1) Brownlee D.E. et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108, E10, 8111, 2003. (2) Brownlee D.E. et al., Science 314, 1711 - 1716. 2006. (3) Kistler S.S., Nature 127, 741, 1931. (4) Burchell M.J. et al., Ann. Rev. Earth. Planet. Sci. 34, 385 - 418, 2006. (5) Tsou P. et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108(E10), 8113, 2003. (6) Burchell et al., submitted to MAPS, 2006. (7) Hörz F. et al., Science 314, 1716 - 1719, 2006.

  6. Precision calibration of calorimeter electronics in the D0 liquid argon/uranium particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The ability to cross calibrate thousands of channels of detector electronics is of prime importance. This paper will describe the system used to deliver and distribute a 300 nanosecond pulse across 50,000 channels of electronics with better than 0.25% difference between channels from a location more than 200 feet away. The system is used for both cross calibration and functionality checking, (i.e., missing channels). Design of a fixed width pulse generator of high stability is presented as a key ingredient in the system`s overall performance. In addition, the design of a controlled impedance distribution system is discussed. 2 refs.

  7. Balancing Particle Diversity in Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods for Dual Calibration-Data Assimilation Problems in Hydrologic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F.; Liang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Given the inherent uncertainty in almost all of the variables involved, recent research is re-addressing the problem of calibrating hydrologic models from a stochastic perspective: the focus is shifting from finding a single parameter configuration that minimizes the model error, to approximating the maximum likelihood multivariate probability distribution of the parameters. To this end, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) formulations are widely used, where the distribution is defined as a smoothed ensemble of particles or members, each of which represents a feasible parameterization. However, the updating of these ensembles needs to strike a careful balance so that the particles adequately resemble the real distribution without either clustering or drifting excessively. In this study, we explore the implementation of two techniques that attempt to improve the quality of the resulting ensembles, both for the approximation of the model parameters and of the unknown states, in a dual calibration-data assimilation framework. The first feature of our proposed algorithm, in an effort to keep members from clustering on areas of high likelihood in light of the observations, is the introduction of diversity-inducing operators after each resampling. This approach has been successfully used before, and here we aim at testing additional operators which are also borrowed from the Evolutionary Computation literature. The second feature is a novel arrangement of the particles into two alternative data structures. The first one is a non-sorted Pareto population which favors 1) particles with high likelihood, and 2) particles that introduce a certain level of heterogeneity. The second structure is a partitioned array, in which each partition requires its members to have increasing levels of divergence from the particles in the areas of larger likelihood. Our newly proposed algorithm will be evaluated and compared to traditional MCMC methods in terms of convergence speed, and the

  8. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Freeman, C G; Fiksel, G; Stoeckl, C; Sinenian, N; Canfield, M J; Graeper, G B; Lombardo, A T; Stillman, C R; Padalino, S J; Mileham, C; Sangster, T C; Frenje, J A

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW. PMID:21806176

  9. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, C. G.; Fiksel, G.; Stoeckl, C.; Sinenian, N.; Canfield, M. J.; Graeper, G. B.; Lombardo, A. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Padalino, S. J.; Mileham, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Frenje, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW.

  10. Real-time particle monitor calibration factors and PM2.5 emission factors for multiple indoor sources.

    PubMed

    Dacunto, Philip J; Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Klepeis, Neil E; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2013-08-01

    Indoor sources can greatly contribute to personal exposure to particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5). To accurately assess PM2.5 mass emission factors and concentrations, real-time particle monitors must be calibrated for individual sources. Sixty-six experiments were conducted with a common, real-time laser photometer (TSI SidePak™ Model AM510 Personal Aerosol Monitor) and a filter-based PM2.5 gravimetric sampler to quantify the monitor calibration factors (CFs), and to estimate emission factors for common indoor sources including cigarettes, incense, cooking, candles, and fireplaces. Calibration factors for these indoor sources were all significantly less than the factory-set CF of 1.0, ranging from 0.32 (cigarette smoke) to 0.70 (hamburger). Stick incense had a CF of 0.35, while fireplace emissions ranged from 0.44-0.47. Cooking source CFs ranged from 0.41 (fried bacon) to 0.65-0.70 (fried pork chops, salmon, and hamburger). The CFs of combined sources (e.g., cooking and cigarette emissions mixed) were linear combinations of the CFs of the component sources. The highest PM2.5 emission factors per time period were from burned foods and fireplaces (15-16 mg min(-1)), and the lowest from cooking foods such as pizza and ground beef (0.1-0.2 mg min(-1)). PMID:23784066

  11. Detection and Identification: Instrumentation and Calibration for Air/Liquid/Surface-borne Nanoscale Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tsz Yan; Zuo, Zhili; Pui, David Y. H.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoscale particles can be found in the air-borne, liquid-borne and surface-borne dispersed phases. Measurement techniques for nanoscale particles in all three dispersed phases are needed for the environmental, health and safety studies of nanomaterials. We present our studies on connecting the nanoparticle measurements in different phases to enhance the characterization capability. Microscopy analysis for particle morphology can be performed by depositing air-borne or liquid-borne nanoparticles on surfaces. Detection limit and measurement resolution of the liquid-borne nanoparticles can be enhanced by aerosolizing them and taking advantage of the well-developed air-borne particle analyzers. Sampling electrically classified air-borne virus particles with a gelatin filter provides higher collection efficiency than a liquid impinger.

  12. Integrated development facility for the calibration of low-energy charged particle flight instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a low-energy ion facility for development and calibration of thermal ion instrumentation is examined. A directly heated cathode provides the electrons used to produce ions by impact ionization and an applied magnetic field increases the path length followed by the electrons. The electrostatic and variable geometry magnetic mirror configuration in the ion source is studied. The procedures for the charge neutralization of the beam and the configuration and function of the 1.4-m drift tube are analyzed. A microcomputer is utilized to control and monitor the beam energy and composition, and the mass- and angle-dependent response of the instrument under testing. The facility produces a high-quality ion beam with an adjustable range of energies up to 150 eV; the angular divergence and uniformity of the beam is obtained from two independent retarding potential analyzers. The procedures for calibrating the instrument being developed are described.

  13. Design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope for particle sizing via goniometry and optical scatter imaging in transmission.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Vincent M; Jacques, Steven L

    2016-06-13

    Goniometry and optical scatter imaging have been used for optical determination of particle size based upon optical scattering. Polystyrene microspheres in suspension serve as a standard for system validation purposes. The design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope (DFHM) are reported. Of crucial importance is the appropriate scaling of scattering angle space in the conjugate Fourier plane. A detailed description of this calibration process is described. Spatial filtering of the acquired digital hologram to use photons scattered within a restricted angular range produces an image. A pair of images, one using photons narrowly scattered within 8 - 15° (LNA), and one using photons broadly scattered within 8 - 39° (HNA), are produced. An image based on the ratio of these two images, OSIR = HNA/LNA, following Boustany et al. (2002), yields a 2D Optical Scatter Image (OSI) whose contrast is based on the angular dependence of photon scattering and is sensitive to the microsphere size, especially in the 0.5-1.0µm range. Goniometric results are also given for polystyrene microspheres in suspension as additional proof of principle for particle sizing via the DFHM. PMID:27410298

  14. Pulmonary carcinogenicity of relatively low doses of beta-particle radiation from inhaled 144CeO2 in rats.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, D L; Hahn, F F; Griffith, W C; Hubbs, A F; Nikula, K J; Newton, G J; Cuddihy, R G; Boecker, B B

    1996-11-01

    This study was conducted to examine the carcinogenic effects of inhaled beta-particle-emitting radionuclides, particularly in lower dose regions in which there were substantial uncertainties associated with available information. A total of 2751 F344/N rats (1358 males and 1393 females) approximately 12 weeks of age at exposure were used. Of these, 1059 rats were exposed to aerosols of 144CeO2 to achieve mean desired initial lung burdens (ILBs) of 18 kBq (low level), 247 rats to achieve mean ILBs of 60 kBq (medium level) and 381 rats to achieve mean ILBs of 180 kBq (high level). Control rats (total of 1064) were exposed to aerosols of stable CeO2. Based on the 95% confidence intervals of the median survival times and the cumulative survival curves, there were no significant differences in the survival of groups of female and male exposed rats relative to controls. The mean lifetime beta-particle doses to the lungs of the rats in the four groups were: low level, 3.6 +/- 1.3 (+/-SD) Gy; medium level, 12 +/- 4.5 Gy; and high level, 37 +/- 5.9 Gy. The crude incidence of lung neoplasms increased linearly with increasing doses to the lungs (controls, 0.57%; low level, 2.0%; medium level, 6.1%; and high level, 19%). The estimated linear risk coefficients for lung neoplasms per unit of dose to the lung were not significantly different for the three dose levels studied. The risk coefficient at the lower level was 39 +/- 14 (+/-SE) excess lung neoplasms per 10(4) rat Gy; at the medium level the risk was 47 +/- 12; and at the higher level the risk was 50 +/- 9.0. The relationship of beta-particle dose to the lung and the crude incidence of lung neoplasms was described adequately by a linear function. We concluded that the risk of lung neoplasms in rats per unit of radiation dose did not increase with decreasing mean beta-particle dose to the lung over the range of 3.6 to 37 Gy. The weighted average of these three values was 47 +/- 6.4 (+/-SE) excess lung neoplasms per 10

  15. Electron calibration of instrumentation for low energy, high intensity particle measurements at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Daly, S. F.; Eraker, J. H.; Perkins, M. A.; Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    Unique identification of the high intensity, impulsively accelerated charged particle fluxes discovered during Mariner 10's first encounter with Mercury (March 1974) requires a detailed knowledge of the responses of the two University of Chicago charged particle telescopes to low energy fluxes over a wide dynamic range of flux levels. The results of detailed analyses show that these telescopes can separate and identify unambiguously the presence of electron and proton fluxes for a wide range of electron spectra and intensities in the relevant overall range of about 30 keV to 2 MeV.

  16. An integrated development facility for the calibration of low-energy charged particle flight instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A system was developed for the calibration and development of thermal ion instrumentation. The system provides an extended beam with usable current rates, approx. 1 pA/sq cm, at beam energies as low as 1 eV, with much higher values available with increasing energy. A tandem electrostatic and variable geometry magnetic mirror configuration within the ion source optimizes the use of the ionizing electrons. The system is integrated under microcomputer control to allow automatic control and monitoring of the beam energy and composition and the mass and angle-dependent response of the instrument under test. The system is pumped by a combination of carbon vane and cryogenic sorption roughing pumps and ion and liquid helium operating pumps.

  17. On the calibration of a single channel cosmic ray particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrabi, A. H.; Alghamdi, A. S.; Alotaibi, R.; Almutari, M. M.; Garawi, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    Cosmic Ray (CR) variation measurements have been extensively conducted using different type of detectors sensing different components of CR and at different locations around the world. We have constructed and, operated a single channel muon detector in the central part of Saudi Arabia. The main goal of this detector is to record the intensity of cosmic rays on different time scales and investigate their correlations with environment parameters. This detector is expected to fill the gap between neutron monitors and muon telescopes that exist around the world. In this paper, the technical aspects of this detector will be briefly discussed. Calibration procedures conducted to characterize and improve its performance will be detailed. These include the effect of the detector geometry and the internal surface coating.

  18. Atomic effects of beta decay in astrophysics and in elementary particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zonghua

    The bound-state beta decay of Re-187 and its application in Astrophysics is studied. There existed an uncertainty in the ratio of rhop of bound-state to continuum beta decay of Re-187 in both theory and experiment. A more definite theoretical result of rhop of approximately 1 percent is obtained by using single-configuration and multi-configuration Hartree-Fock-Dirac approximations. The results obtained are close to those obtained by Williams, Fowler, and Koonin by a modified Thomas-Fermi model. The bound-state beta decay of Re-187 at high temperatures is also studied. A generalization of the Thomas-Fermi results of various energy contributions to the ground-state energy of a neutral atom is also presented. An analytical expression for the ratio of the electron-electron to electron-nuclear interaction is obtained by the corrected Thomas-Fermi result, the ratio obtained gives a better agreement with the Hartree-Fock numerical results.

  19. Design and calibration of a CO{sub 2}-laser nephelometer to measure the radiative properties of coal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, M.B.; D`sa, D.A.; Manickavasagam, S.; Menguec, M.P.

    1990-12-31

    In is paper, we will discuss the design and calibration of a CO{sub 2}-laser nephelometer for angular light scattering measurements to determine the effective radiative properties of pulverized-coal particles in a non-flame, planar system in-situ. A nephelometer is an instrument used for angular detection of scattered light incident on a cloud of particles. Its essential elements include a collimated light source and an arm which houses light collection optics and detectors. The arm can be rotated to record the angular scattered intensity distribution. A major problem when conducting experiments of this nature is that the intensity of the scattered light by pulverized-coal particles at angles other than the forward scattering direction can be as much as two to three orders of magnitude lower than the intensity at angles close to {theta} = O{sup o}. This effect is more pronounced for larger size parameters. In order to have sufficiently strong signals at a wide range of angles, a 50 watt CO{sub 2}-laser operating at 10.6 {mu}m is used in the experiments.

  20. Self-calibrating highly sensitive dynamic capacitance sensor: towards rapid sensing and counting of particles in laminar flow systems.

    PubMed

    Guha, S; Schmalz, K; Wenger, Ch; Herzel, F

    2015-05-01

    In this report we propose a sensor architecture and a corresponding read-out technique on silicon for the detection of dynamic capacitance change. This approach can be applied to rapid particle counting and single particle sensing in a fluidic system. The sensing principle is based on capacitance variation of an interdigitated electrode (IDE) structure embedded in an oscillator circuit. The capacitance scaling of the IDE results in frequency modulation of the oscillator. A demodulator architecture is employed to provide a read-out of the frequency modulation caused by the capacitance change. A self-calibrating technique is employed at the read-out amplifier stage. The capacitance variation of the IDE due to particle flow causing frequency modulation and the corresponding demodulator read-out has been analytically modelled. Experimental verification of the established model and the functionality of the sensor chip were shown using a modulating capacitor independent of fluidic integration. The initial results show that the sensor is capable of detecting frequency changes of the order of 100 parts per million (PPM), which translates to a shift of 1.43 MHz at 14.3 GHz operating frequency. It is also shown that a capacitance change every 3 μs can be accurately detected. PMID:25793229

  1. Charged-particle channels in the {beta}-decay of {sup 11}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, R.; Ponsaers, J.; Duppen, P. van; Andreyev, A.; Buchmann, L.; Capel, P.; Kanungo, R.; Kirchner, T.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, J.; Ruprecht, G.; Walden, P.; Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Riisager, K.; Huyse, M.; Mattoon, C.; Sarazin, F.; Mukha, I.

    2007-11-30

    We measured the {beta}-decay of the halo-nucleus {sup 11}Li, with particular attention to the deuteron- and triton-emission channels. We employed a post-accelerated beam of {sup 11}Li ions, and the implantation technique in a finely-segmented silicon detector. The channels of interest were identified through the time and space correlations between the implantation events and the parent and daughter decays. We obtained the branching ratios, as well as the spectra of the emitted ions.

  2. A computerized low-level alpha and beta particle detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Hjellming, T. ); McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports that at Arizona State University's Radiation Measurements Facility, a microprocessor simultaneously controls a commercial gas-flow proportional counter and a prototype low background anticoincidence beta scintillation counter. This fully automatic system supports multiple count scheduling, routine quality assurance and operational checks, on-line diagnostic routines, and detector high voltage control. An operator may execute MS-DOS programs using the microcomputer, while count data is being acquired asynchronously on special hardware interface cards. Data analysis and output is available in both graphic and tabular formats.

  3. An Updated Calibration of the ROSAT PSPC Particle Background for the Analysis of Diffuse and Extended Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, P. P.; Snowden, S. L.; Briel, U. G.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.

    1993-11-01

    In order to permit quantitative studies of the cosmic diffuse X-ray background (DXRB) and of extended X-ray sources, we present updated calibrations of the particle-induced background of the Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPCs) on board the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT). We present new parameterizations of the temporal, spectral, and spatial distributions of the particle-induced events following closely the analysis discussed in Snowden et al. (1992). The ROSAT Guest Observer (GO) may find a step-by-step method for applying these parameterizations to a GO observation in § 3.4. Except for a variable contamination which is present in channels ≤ 18 and a change in our understanding of the externally produced components, the current parameterizations are quite similar to the previous results. We have used the spectral information available on the variable contamination to formulate a method for determining the level of this contamination in a given observation. The PSPC rejection efficiency for particle background events in the pulse-height range 18 ≤ CH ≤ 249 is 99.90%, with a typical count rate of 4 × 10-6 counts s-1 arcmin-2 keV-1. During typical conditions, the count rate of residual events is well correlated with the Master Veto count rate. The spectrum in the pulse-height range 18 ≤ CH ≤ 249 is well described by a power law, a flat component, and an Al Kα line at 1.5 keV. The spatial distribution of counts with pulse heights ≥ 18 is uniform over the field of view except for a small radial gradient and shadowing of the Al Kα line and part of the flat continuum by the window support structure. During an astronomical observation in low-gain mode (after 1991 October 11), the particle background can also be monitored by the count rate in channels 260 ≤ CH ≤ 370, since in most cases all these events are produced by particles. We have used a 54 ks observation of the Ursa Major region to verify the accuracy of our model. We have also

  4. Beta Androstenediol Mitigates the Damage of 1 GeV/n Fe Ion Particle Radiation to the Hematopoietic System

    SciTech Connect

    Loria R.; Guida P.; Loria, R.; Beckman, M.; Contaifer, D.; Tamariz, F.; Gibb, D.; Thompson, L.; Guida, P.

    2010-09-07

    Space exploration is associated with exposure to 1-3 Gy solar particle radiation and galactic cosmic radiation that could increase cancer rates. Effective nontoxic countermeasures to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure are highly desirable but currently not available. The aim was to determine whether a single subcutaneous injection of androstenediol ({Delta}(5) androsten-3{beta}, 17{beta}-diol [AED]) could mitigate and restore the mouse hematopoetic system from the radiation-mediated injury of 3 Gy whole-body high LET (56)Fe(26+) exposure. The findings show that postradiation AED treatment has an overall positive and significant beneficial effect to restore the levels of hematopoeitic elements (p < 0.001). Androstenediol treatment significantly increased monocyte levels at days 4, 7, and 14 and, similarly, increased red blood cell, hemoglobin, and platelet counts. Flow cytometry analysis 14 days after radiation and AED treatment demonstrated an increase (p < 0.05) in bone marrow cells counts. Ex vivo osteoclastogenesis studies show that AED treatment is necessary and advantageous for the development and restoration of osteoclastogenesis after radiation exposure. These findings clearly show that androstenediol functions as a countermeasure to remedy hematopoeitic injury mediated by high LET iron ion radiation. Presently, no other agent has been shown to have such properties.

  5. A primary standard for the measurement of alpha and beta particle surface emission rate from large area reference sources.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D B; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Babu, D A R

    2016-01-01

    A large area windowless gas flow multi wire proportional counting system for the calibration of large area reference sources has been developed as a primary standard at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). The counting system consists of a multi wire proportional counter (MWPC), vacuum system, gas flow system and pulse processing units. The MWPC detector assembly consists of a vacuum tight aluminum enclosure, multi wire grid and sliding source tray. Various detector characteristics like operating characteristics curve, Fe-55 spectrum for beta discriminator threshold setting and dead time of the measurement system were studied and determined in order to achieve an optimized detection capability. The surface emission rates of different source strengths were measured and their relative combined standard uncertainties were determined. Large Area Sources Comparison Exercise (LASCE) was organized by International Committee on Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM) working group and coordinated by National Institute for Ionising Radiation Metrology (ENEA), Italy, to demonstrate equivalence of surface emission rate measurements at the international platform. BARC participated in the programme and the results of LASCE are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26457924

  6. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plates for energetic protons, deuterons, and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Charles; Canfield, Michael; Graeper, Gavin; Lombardo, Andrew; Stillman, Collin; Fiksel, Gennady; Stoeckl, Christian; Sinenian, Nareg

    2010-11-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer (TPIS) has been designed and built to study energetic ions accelerated from the rear surface of targets irradiated by ultra-intense laser light from the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The device uses a permanent magnet and a pair of electrostatic deflector plates to produce parallel magnetic and electric fields, which cause ions of a given charge-to-mass ratio to be deflected onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. The position of the ion along the parabola can be used to determine its energy. Fujifilm imaging plates (IP) are placed in the rear of the device and are used to detect the incident ions. The energy dispersion of the spectrometer has been calibrated using monoenergetic ion beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV pelletron accelerator. The IP sensitivity has been measured for protons and deuterons with energies between 0.6 MeV and 3.4 MeV, and for alpha particles with energies between 1.5 MeV and 5.1 MeV.

  7. Requirements regarding dose rate and exposure time for killing of tumour cells in beta particle radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Veronika; Stenerlöw, Bo; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify combinations of dose rate and exposure time that have the potential to provide curative treatment with targeted radionuclide therapy applying low dose rate beta irradiation. Methods Five tumour cell lines, U-373MG and U-118MG gliomas, HT-29 colon carcinoma, A-431 cervical squamous carcinoma and SKBR-3 breast cancer, were used. An experimental model with 105 tumour cells in each sample was irradiated with low dose rate beta particles. The criterion for successful treatment was absence of recovery of cells during a follow-up period of 3 months. The initial dose rates were in the range 0.1–0.8 Gy/h, and the cells were continuously exposed for 1, 3 or 7 days. These combinations covered dose rates and doses achievable in targeted radionuclide therapy. Results Continuous irradiation with dose rates of 0.2–0.3 and 0.4–0.6 Gy/h for 7 and 3 days, respectively, could kill all cells in each tumour cell sample. These treatments gave total radiation doses of 30–40 Gy. However, when exposed for just 24 h with about 0.8 Gy/h, only the SKBR-3 cells were successfully treated; all the other cell types recovered. There were large cell type-dependent variations in the growth delay patterns for the cultures that recovered. The U-118MG cells were most resistant and the U-373MG and SKBR-3 cells most sensitive to the treatments. The HT-29 and A-431 cells were intermediate. Conclusion The results serve as a guideline for the combinations of dose rate and exposure time necessary to kill tumour cells when applying low dose rate beta irradiation. The shift from recovery to “cure” fell within a narrow range of dose rate and exposure time combinations. PMID:16718515

  8. Circular permutation as a tool to reduce surface entropy triggers crystallization of the signal recognition particle receptor beta subunit.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas U; Walczak, Rudolf; Blobel, Günter

    2004-10-01

    The production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a difficult obstacle on the road to high-resolution structural characterization of proteins. This is primarily a result of the empirical nature of the process. Although crystallization is not predictable, factors inhibiting it are well established. First, crystal formation is always entropically unfavorable. Reducing the entropic cost of crystallizing a given protein is thus desirable. It is common practice to map boundaries and remove unstructured regions surrounding the folded protein domain. However, a problem arises when flexible regions are not at the boundaries but within a domain. Such regions cannot be deleted without adding new restraints to the domain. We encountered this problem during an attempt to crystallize the beta subunit of the eukaryotic signal recognition particle (SRbeta), bearing a long and flexible internal loop. Native SRbeta did not crystallize. However, after circularly permuting the protein by connecting the spatially close N and C termini with a short heptapeptide linker GGGSGGG and removing 26 highly flexible loop residues within the domain, we obtained diffraction-quality crystals. This protein-engineering method is simple and should be applicable to other proteins, especially because N and C termini of protein domains are often close in space. The success of this method profits from prior knowledge of the domain fold, which is becoming increasingly common in today's postgenomic era. PMID:15340174

  9. The dynamics of low-beta plasma clouds as simulated by a three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, T.; Miller, R. H.; Buneman, O.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D electromagnetic and relativistic particle simulation code is used to investigate the dynamics of low-beta plasma clouds moving perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field in vacuum and in a background plasma. The simulations show the formation of the space charge sheaths at the sides of the cloud with the associated polarization electric field which facilitate the cross-field propagation, as well as the sheaths at the front and rear end of the cloud caused by the larger ion Larmor radius, which allows ions to move ahead and lag behind the electrons as they gyrate. It is found that, in a background plasma, electron and ion sheaths expand along the magnetic field at the same rate, whereas in vacuum the electron sheath expands much faster than the ion sheath. Sheath clouds are accelerated up to relativistic energies, which indicates that artificial plasma clouds released in the ionosphere or magnetosphere may generate optical emissions as energetic sheath electrons scatter in the upper atmosphere.

  10. PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF CONTINUOUSLY DRIVEN MIRROR AND ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITIES IN HIGH BETA ASTROPHYSICAL AND HELIOSPHERIC PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2015-02-10

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ∼ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p {sub ∥} and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ∼ 0.3 (B) in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ∼ 0.1 (B), the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes.

  11. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Continuously Driven Mirror and Ion Cyclotron Instabilities in High Beta Astrophysical and Heliospheric Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ~ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p ∥ and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ~ 0.3 langBrang in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ~ 0.1 langBrang, the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes.

  12. Near-bottom suspended matter concentration on the Continental Shelf during storms: estimates based on in situ observations of light transmission and a particle size dependent transmissometer calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Butman, B.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory calibration of Sea Tech and Montedoro-Whitney beam transmissometers shows a linear relation between light attenuation coefficient (cp) and suspended matter concentration (SMC) for natural sediments and for glass beads. However the proportionality constant between cp and SMC depends on the particle diameter and particle type. Thus, to measure SMC, observations of light attenuation must be used with a time-variable calibration when suspended particle characteristics change with time. Because of this variable calibration, time series of light attenuation alone may not directly reflect SMC and must be interpreted with care. The near-bottom concentration of suspended matter during winter storms on the U.S. East Coast Continental Shelf is estimated from light transmission measurements made 2 m above the bottom and from the size distribution of suspended material collected simultaneously in sediment traps 3 m above the bottom. The average concentrations during six storms between December 1979 and February 1980 in the Middle Atlantic Bight ranged from 2 to 4 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 7 mg l1) and 8 to 12 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 22 mg l1) on the south flank of Georges Bank. ?? 1987.

  13. Utilization of wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to ZnS(Ag) and plastic scintillator for simultaneous detection of alpha/beta particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifergan, Y.; Dadon, S.; Israelashvili, I.; Osovizky, A.; Gonen, E.; Yehuda-Zada, Y.; Smadja, D.; Knafo, Y.; Ginzburg, D.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y.; Mazor, T.

    2015-06-01

    Low level radioactive surface contamination measurements require lightweight, large area and high efficiency detector. In most existing scintillation detectors there is a tradeoff between effective area and scintillation light collection. By using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers the scintillation light may be collected efficiently also in a large area detector. In this study, WLS fibers were coupled to a beta sensitive plastic scintillator layer and to a alpha sensitive silver-activated zinc sulfide ZnS(Ag) layer for detecting both alpha and beta particles. The WLS fibers collect the scintillation light from the whole detector and transfer it to a single PMT. This first prototype unique configuration enables monitoring radioactive contaminated surfaces by both sides of the detector and provides high gamma rejection. In this paper, the detector structure, as well as the detector's measured linear response, will be described. The measured detection efficiency of 238Pu alpha particles (5.5 MeV) is ~63%. The measured detection efficiency for beta particles is ~89% for 90Sr-90Y (average energy of 195.8 keV, 934.8 keV), ~50% for 36Cl (average energy of 251.3 keV), and 35% for 137Cs (average energy of 156.8 keV).

  14. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak HBT'' (High Beta Tokamak)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Hua.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (n{sub e} {approx} 1 {minus} 5 {times} 10{sup 14} (cm{sup {minus}3}), T{sub e} {approx} 4 {minus} 10 (eV), B{sub t} {approx} 0.2 {minus} 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of C{sub II}(4267A, emitted by the C{sup +} ions) and C{sub III} (4647A, emitted by the C{sup ++} ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the H{sub {alpha}} emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time {tau}{sub p} is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time {tau}{sub E}; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy.

  15. Use of particle tracking to improve numerical model calibration and to analyze ground-water flow and contaminant migration, Massachusetts Military Reservation, western Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, J.P.; Walter, D.A.; Savoie, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    A steady-state, three-dimensional flow model coupled with a particle-tracking algorithm was developed to assess the complex interaction of hydrogeologic conditions affecting ground-water flow and contaminant transport --including aquifer heterogeneities, hydrologic boundaries such as ponds and streams, ground-water withdrawals, and aquifer recharge to characterize the migration of contaminants emanating from beneath the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The known extent of contaminant plumes were used to assess the effects of changes in model input parameters on model-calculated water-table and pond altitudes, streamflow, and water-particle pathlines. Although changes in selected simulated hyodrogeologic conditions resulted in minor changes in model-calculated water-table altitudes, pond altitudes, and streamflow, these changes had significant effects on the projection of model-calculated water-particle pathlines. Therefore model calibration based simply on water levels and streamflows may be inadequate for the prediction of contaminant migration. However, model calibration that includes the sensitivity of water-particle pathlines to changes in hydrogeologic conditions can provide a valuable tool for optimizing data collection, characterizing hyodrogeology, and remediating ground-water contamination.

  16. Assessment of 90Sr concentration in dental tissue using thin-layer beta-particle detectors and verification with numerical calculations.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, E A; Göksu, H Y; El-Faramawy, N A; Semiochkina, N

    2005-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of tooth enamel can be used as an individual biological dosimeter for external dose assessment. However, the presence of 90Sr in the tooth tissues makes the task of interpreting EPR tooth dosimetry more complicated. The determination of the dose contribution of incorporated 90Sr in calcified tissue to the total dose measured by EPR is one of the main aspects of correct interpretation of EPR tooth dosimetry. In this work, experimental and numerical calculations were performed to convert the measured beta-particle dose rate to 90Sr concentration in calcified tissue. The cumulative beta-particle dose was measured by exposing artificially contaminated dentin and enamel to thin-layer alpha-Al2O3:C detectors in two different exposure geometries. Numerical calculations were performed for experimental exposure conditions using calculations of electron transport and secondary photons [Monte Carlo n-Particle Transport code version 4C2 (MCNP)]. Numerical calculations were performed to optimize the sample size and exposure geometry. The applicability of two different exposure conditions to be used in routine analysis was tested. Comparison of the computational and experimental results demonstrated very good agreement. PMID:15799703

  17. Particle Fabrication Using Inkjet Printing onto Hydrophobic Surfaces for Optimization and Calibration of Trace Contraband Detection Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Greg; Najarro, Marcela; Wight, Scott; Walker, Marlon; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Windsor, Eric; Barr, Tim; Staymates, Matthew; Urbas, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed to fabricate patterned arrays of micrometer-sized monodisperse solid particles of ammonium nitrate on hydrophobic silicon surfaces using inkjet printing. The method relies on dispensing one or more microdrops of a concentrated aqueous ammonium nitrate solution from a drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printer at specific locations on a silicon substrate rendered hydrophobic by a perfluorodecytrichlorosilane monolayer coating. The deposited liquid droplets form into the shape of a spherical shaped cap; during the evaporation process, a deposited liquid droplet maintains this geometry until it forms a solid micrometer sized particle. Arrays of solid particles are obtained by sequential translation of the printer stage. The use of DOD inkjet printing for fabrication of discrete particle arrays allows for precise control of particle characteristics (mass, diameter and height), as well as the particle number and spatial distribution on the substrate. The final mass of an individual particle is precisely determined by using gravimetric measurement of the average mass of solution ejected per microdrop. The primary application of this method is fabrication of test materials for the evaluation of spatially-resolved optical and mass spectrometry based sensors used for detecting particle residues of contraband materials, such as explosives or narcotics. PMID:26610515

  18. Particle Fabrication Using Inkjet Printing onto Hydrophobic Surfaces for Optimization and Calibration of Trace Contraband Detection Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Greg; Najarro, Marcela; Wight, Scott; Walker, Marlon; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Windsor, Eric; Barr, Tim; Staymates, Matthew; Urbas, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed to fabricate patterned arrays of micrometer-sized monodisperse solid particles of ammonium nitrate on hydrophobic silicon surfaces using inkjet printing. The method relies on dispensing one or more microdrops of a concentrated aqueous ammonium nitrate solution from a drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printer at specific locations on a silicon substrate rendered hydrophobic by a perfluorodecytrichlorosilane monolayer coating. The deposited liquid droplets form into the shape of a spherical shaped cap; during the evaporation process, a deposited liquid droplet maintains this geometry until it forms a solid micrometer sized particle. Arrays of solid particles are obtained by sequential translation of the printer stage. The use of DOD inkjet printing for fabrication of discrete particle arrays allows for precise control of particle characteristics (mass, diameter and height), as well as the particle number and spatial distribution on the substrate. The final mass of an individual particle is precisely determined by using gravimetric measurement of the average mass of solution ejected per microdrop. The primary application of this method is fabrication of test materials for the evaluation of spatially-resolved optical and mass spectrometry based sensors used for detecting particle residues of contraband materials, such as explosives or narcotics. PMID:26610515

  19. Design and calibration of a rocket-borne electron spectrometer for investigation of particle ionization in the nighttime midlatitude E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, H. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    An explanation was developed for the formation, near midnight at midlatitudes, of a broad electron density layer extending approximately from 120 to 180 km and usually referred to as the intermediate E layer. The responsible mechanism is believed to be the converging vertical ion drifts resulting from winds of the solar semidiurnal tide. Numerical solutions of the continuity equation appropriate to the intermediate layer is described for particular models of ion drift, diffusion coefficents, and ionization production. Analysis of rocket observations of the layer show that the ionization rate is highly correlated with the planetary geomagnetic index, K sub p. Particle flux measurements support the idea that energetic electrons are the principal source of this ionization. A semiconductor spectrometer experiment for investigation of the particle flux, spectrum, and angular properties was designed and successfully flown on a Nike Apache rocket. A detailed description of the theory, design, and calibration of the experiment and some preliminary results presented.

  20. Particle and nuclear physics parameters—how do they affect the tracks of double beta events in a germanium detector, and their separation from gamma events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.; Krivosheina, I. V.; Titkova, I. V.

    2006-01-01

    The sizes of tracks of events of neutrinoless double beta decay in a germanium detector depend on particle physics and nuclear physics parameters such as neutrino mass, right-handed current parameters, etc., and nuclear matrix elements. The knowledge of this dependence is of importance, since the key to probe the existence of 0 νββ decay beyond observation of a signal at the Q value of the process, Qββ, is the discrimination of ββ events from background γ events (or other events), in almost any double beta decay experiment (see [H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, I.V. Krivosheina, A. Dietz, et al., Phys. Lett. B 586 (2004) 198; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, A. Dietz, I.V. Krivosheina, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 522 (2004) 371]). In this Letter for the first time Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-accompanied (2 νββ) and neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) events, and of various kinds of background processes such as multiple and other γ interactions are reported for a Ge detector. The time history of the evolution of the individual events is followed and a systematic study has been performed of the sizes of the events (volumes in the detector inside which the energy of the event is released which determine the observed signals). Effects of the angular correlations of the two electrons in ββ decay, which again depend on the above nuclear and (for 0 νββ decay) particle physics parameters, are taken into account and have been calculated for this purpose for 76Ge for the first time on basis of the experimental half-life and of realistic nuclear matrix elements. A brief outlook is given on the potential of future experiments with respect to determination of the particle physics parameters , < λ >, < η >.

  1. Monitoring of event-based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport in field and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Egner, Marius; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to mobilization of suspended particles which typically occurs during floods. Since the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants such as PAHs, PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. Online turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) would then also allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics if once calibrated against TSS and total pollutant concentrations for a given catchment. In this study, distinct flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting sub-catchments of the River Neckar in Southwest Germany (Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar itself and investigated for the total amount of PAHs and TSS in water; turbidity (NTU) and grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined as well. Laboratory experiments were performed with natural river bed sediments from different locations (Ammer) to investigate PAH concentrations, TSS and turbidity during sedimentation of suspended particles under controlled conditions (yielding smaller and smaller suspended particles and TSS with time). Laboratory and field results agreed very well and showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the field samples and up to 8000 NTU in lab experiments. This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on turbidity measurements and TSS vs. PAHs relationships - even for high turbidity values observed during flood events (>2000 NTU). Total PAH concentrations on suspended solids were independent of grain size of suspended particles. This implies that for the rivers investigated the sorption capacity of particles did not change significantly during the observed events. PMID:24858216

  2. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  3. Measurement of $\\beta_s$ at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, Louise; /Oxford U.

    2011-02-01

    The latest results for the measurement of the CP violating phase {beta}{sub s} in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi}{phi} decays, from 5.2 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity of CDF data are presented. For the first time, this measurement includes the contribution of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi}K{sup +}K{sup -} or B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi}f{sub 0} events to the signal sample, where the f{sub 0} and non-resonant K{sup +}K{sup -} are S-wave states. Additional improvements to the analysis include more than doubling the signal sample, improved selection and particle ID, and fully calibrated flavour tagging for the full dataset. Additionally, the world's most precise single measurements of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime, {tau}{sub s}, and width difference, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} are given.

  4. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 42; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Calibration and Validation for the L4_C Beta-Release Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima (Editor); Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch Cal/Val Phase of SMAP there are two objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements according to the Cal/Val timeline. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product specifically for the beta release. The beta-release version of the SMAP L4_C algorithms utilizes a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily NEE and component carbon fluxes, particularly vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (<10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape FT controls on GPP and Reco (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and underlying freeze/thaw and soil moisture constraints to these processes, 2) documenting primary connections between terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, and 3) improving understanding of terrestrial carbon sink activity in northern ecosystems.

  5. Beta decay of neutron-rich Co: Probing single-particle states at and above the N=40 subshell closure

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, W. F.; Bruyneel, B.; Franchoo, S.; Huyse, M.; Kruglov, K.; Kudryavtsev, Y.; Raabe, R.; Reusen, I.; Duppen, P. van; Roosbroeck, J. van; Vermeeren, L.; Weissman, L.; Woehr, A.; Koester, U.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Thirolf, P.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-09-02

    Neutron-rich Co nuclei with A=66-70 were produced by the laser-ionization isotope-separation on-line method. The {beta} decay from these nuclei has been studied. A case example is given by reporting on the observed decay scheme of {sup 68}Co. The half life of the ground-state decay of this nucleus was measured to be 0.21(3) seconds. In addition, a new {beta} decaying isomer half life of 1.16(25) seconds was discovered. The level scheme of {sup 68}Ni has been significantly extended, and an interpretation of the observed levels is made by assuming that the N=40 gap has the characteristics of a shell closure.

  6. Recent analysis of magnetic field and beta particle measurements of the Starfish nuclear burst plasma expansion and collapse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyal, P.

    2004-12-01

    Five spacecraft located 100 to 1000 kilometers around the Starfish nuclear burst measured the expansion and collapse of the plasma bubble produced in the geomagnetic field and early time injection into the inner Van Allen radiation belt. The bubble evolved into an elongated shape 2400 km along the magnetic field lines and 700 km across in 1.2 seconds and required approximately 15 seconds to collapse. After the magnetic bubble reached its maximum size instabilities and fluting permitted the beta emitting fission fragments to continue to expand. This process injected a flux measuring 2.5x1010 beta/cm2sec into the most intense region of the artificial belt mapped by the Injun I spacecraft 10 hours later.

  7. BETA GAUGE OPERATION MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides description and operating instructions for a redesigned Beta Gauge for measuring particles from vehicle exhaust. The improvements and a new control system including a control unit which is radically different from the prior unit, are described. Complete Beta ...

  8. Monitoring of event based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: Calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles which is typically enhanced during events such as floods, snow melts etc. As the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants in rivers such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. On-line turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) then allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics. In this study, pronounced flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting catchments in Southwest Germany (Rivers Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar. Samples were analyzed for turbidity, the total amount of PAH and total suspended solids (TSS) in water. Additionally, the grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined. Discharge and turbidity were measured on-line at gauging stations in three of the catchments. Results showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the flood samples (i.e. independent on grain size). This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on the turbidity measurements and TSS versus PAH relationships - even for very high turbidity or TSS values (> 2000 NTU or mg l-1, respectively). From these linear regressions concentrations of PAHs on suspended particles were obtained which varied by catchment. The values comprise a robust measure of the average sediment quality in a river network and may be correlated to the degree of urbanization represented by the number of inhabitants per total flux of suspended particles. Based on long-term on-line turbidity measurements mass flow rates of particle bound pollutants over time could be calculated. Results showed that by far the largest amount

  9. Beta particle detection efficiency of the radiation sensor made from a mixture of polyaniline and titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, M.; Miyata, H.; Katsumata, M.; Matsuda, K.; Ueno, T.; Ito, D.; Suzuki, T.

    2016-08-01

    We developed a new real-time radiation sensor using an organic semiconductor and measured its β-particle detection sensitivity. This sensor is fabricated by simply combining a p-type semiconductor, polyaniline (Pani), with an n-type semiconductor, TiO2, and processing the compound. Since Pani and TiO2 are both inexpensive materials, the sensor can be fabricated at a lower cost than inorganic semiconductor sensors. The signal of each fabricated sensor was measured by a charge sensitive ADC for the irradiation of β-particles. The response signal data of the ADC for each irradiation was measured to calculate the detection efficiency of the detector. The maximum detection efficiency measured as β-particle sensitivity of the sensor was 1%. This β-particle sensitivity is higher than that reported of Pani sensors in the past.

  10. New apparatus for direct counting of. beta. particles from two-dimensional gels and an application to changes in protein synthesis due to cell density

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.L.; Puck, T.T.; Shera, E.B.

    1987-07-01

    A new method is described for scanning two-dimensional gels by the direct counting of ..beta.. particles instead of autoradiography. The methodology is described; results are compared with autoradiographic results; and data are presented demonstrating changed patterns of protein synthesis accompanying changes in cell density. The method is rapid and permits identification of differences in protein abundance of approximately 10% for a substantial fraction of the more prominent proteins. A modulation effect of more than 5 standard deviations, accompanying contact inhibition of cell growth, is shown to occur for an appreciable number of these proteins. The method promises to be applicable to a variety of biochemical and genetic experiments designed to delineate changes in protein synthesis accompanying changes in genome, molecular environment, history, and state of differentiation of the cell populations studied. 13 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Status and calibration results of Liulin-5 charged particle telescope designed for radiation measurements in a human phantom onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, J.; Koleva, R.; Shurshakov, V.; Benghin, V.; Maltchev, St.; Kanchev, N.; Petrov, V.; Yarmanova, E.; Chernykh, I.

    This is a report on the status of the particle telescope Liulin-5 developed for investigation of the radiation environment dynamics within the Russian spherical tissue-equivalent phantom on the International Space Station (ISS). Liulin-5 experiment will be a part of the international project MATROSHKA-R on ISS and is planned to start in 2007. Its aim is a long-term investigation of the depth-dose distribution in the phantom, mounted in the Russian Segment of ISS. The instrument is capable of simultaneously measuring energy deposition spectra, linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, flux and dose rates for electrons, protons and heavy charged particles at different depths of the phantom's radial channel. Dose equivalent rate will be calculated from the absorbed dose rate multiplied by quality factor Q(LET). We present the inter-calibration results of the Liulin-5 instrument exposure to heavy ions, at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan that was done as part of the ICHIBAN project. The inter-comparison with the radiation dosimeters and spectrometers resulted in definition of the sensitive volumes of the instrument's silicon detectors as well as estimations of the LET range of the Liulin-5 instrument.

  12. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T.J.

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of {sup 31}Cl, {sup 27}P and {sup 28}P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas {Delta}E-gas {Delta}E-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in {sup 31}Cl and {sub 27}P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of {sup 31}Cl were shown to be from the decay of {sup 25}Si. In {sup 27}P, two proton groups at 459 {+-} 14 keV and 610 {+-} 11 keV, with intensities of 7 {+-} 3% and 92 {+-} 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the {beta}-decay of {sup 28}P, at 1,444 {+-} 12 keV with a 1.7 {+-} 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 {+-} 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of {sup 17}Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar were resolved.

  13. Effects of 17Beta-estradiol on cognitive performance of ovariectomized female rats exposed to 56Fe particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On exploratory class missions to other planets astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (HZE particles) that are not experienced in low earth orbit. While it is likely that the crew will consist of both male and female astronauts, there has been little research on the effects of ...

  14. Optical Calibration of SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneira, J.; Peeters, S.; Sinclair, J.

    2015-04-01

    SNO is being upgraded to SNO+, which has as its main goal the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. The upgrade is defined by filling with a novel scintillator mixture containing 130Te. With a lower energy threshold than SNO, SNO+ will be sensitive to other exciting new physics. Here we are describing new optical calibration system that meets new, more stringent radiopurity requirements has been developed.

  15. Calibration Techniques of the XENON1T Dark Matter Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, Jacques; Xenon Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The XENON1T experiment will probe new parameter spaces in direct dark matter searches. The successful operation of such a detector requires several calibration techniques to accurately reconstruct the position and energies of events within the active volume. 220Rn is introduced into the detector itself, through re-circulation of gaseous Xe, for use as an internal calibration sources. The decay of 220Rn and its daughters provides both high-energy alpha particles as well as a low-energy beta spectrum that can be used to calibrate the detector. Mono-energetic 2.5 MeV neutrons, allow for the in-situ calibration of the charge yield of nuclear recoil events within the detector, using double scatter events to reconstruct the deposited energy at the first scatter. Accurately positioned external Compton sources allow to determine the performance of fiducialization, as well as an insitu calibration of the charge yield of electronic recoils. This talk will present the calibration systems of the XENON1T detector.

  16. Chemical imaging of catalyst deactivation during the conversion of renewables at the single particle level: etherification of biomass-based polyols with alkenes over H-Beta zeolites.

    PubMed

    Parvulescu, Andrei N; Mores, Davide; Stavitski, Eli; Teodorescu, Cristian M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Gebbink, Robertus J M Klein; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2010-08-01

    The etherification of biomass-based alcohols with various linear alpha-olefins under solvent-free conditions was followed in a space- and time-resolved manner on 9 microm large H-Beta zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. This allowed us to visualize the interaction with the substrate and distribution of the coke products into the catalyst at the level of an individual zeolite crystal during the etherification process. The spectroscopic information obtained on the micrometer-scale zeolite was in line with the results obtained with bulk characterization techniques and further confirmed by the catalytic results obtained both for micrometer-scale and nanoscale zeolites. This allowed us to explain the influence of the substrate type (glycerol, glycols, and alkenes) and zeolite properties (Si/Al ratio and particle size) on the etherification activity. The etherification of the biomass-based alcohols takes place mainly on the external surface of the zeolite particles. The gradual blockage of the external surface of the zeolite results in a partial or total loss of etherification activity. The deactivation could be attributed to olefin oligomerization. The high conversions obtained in the etherification of 1,2-propylene glycol with long linear alkenes (up to 80%) and the pronounced deactivation of the zeolite observed in the etherification of glycerol with long linear alkenes (max. 20% conversion) were explained by the spectroscopic measurements and is due to differences in the adsorption, i.e., in the center of the zeolite particle for glycerol and on the external surface in the case of glycols. PMID:20662520

  17. Status and calibration results of Liulin-5 charged particle telescope designed for radiation measurements in a human phantom onboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, J.; Koleva, R.; Todorova, G.; Maltchev, St.; Kanchev, N.; Petrov, V.; Shurshakov, V.; Benghin, V.; Yarmanova, E.; Tchhernykh, I.

    Described is the current status of particle telescope Liulin-5 developed for investigation of the radiation environment dynamics within the Russian spherical tissue-equivalent phantom on ISS Liulin-5 experiment will be a part of the international project MATROSHKA-R on ISS The aim of Liulin-5 experiment is long term investigation of the depth - dose distribution inside the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom mounted in the Russian Segment of ISS Energy deposition spectra LET spectra flux and absorbed dose rates for protons and the biologically-relevant heavy ion components of the cosmic radiation will be measured simultaneously with near real time resolution at different depths of the phantom s radial channel Dose equivalent rates at these depths will be calculated from the absorbed dose rates multiplied by Q LET The doses in intermediate points will be determined by interpolation In 2005 acceptance tests of the engineering and flight models were carried out The qualification tests of the flight model are expected by the June 2006 Presented are the calibration results of Liulin-5 exposure to heavy ions obtained in ICHIBAN project for intercomparison of the response of space radiation dosimeters and spectrometers to heavy ion beams at the HIMAC - NIRS Japan Liulin-5 is planned to be flown on the ISS in 2006 year

  18. Field evaluation and calibration of a small axial passive air sampler for gaseous and particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated PAHs.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Roger; Arnoldsson, Kristina; Lejon, Christian; Hägglund, Lars; Wingfors, Håkan

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated analogues (OPAHs) are ubiquitous air pollutants known to cause adverse health effects. PAH air levels are commonly monitored by active sampling but passive sampling has become popular because of its lower cost and simplicity, which facilitate long-term sampling and increased spatial coverage. However, passive samplers are less suitable for short-term sampling and are in general less accurate than active samplers because they require reliable sampling rate (Rs) measurements for individual analytes under diverse environmental conditions. In this study a small passive sampler designed to sample both particle-bound and gaseous compounds was evaluated and calibrated for PAHs and OPAHs in a traffic environment by co-deployment with active samplers for two weeks. Despite the relatively low average air concentrations of PM10 (20 μg/m(3)), PM2.5 (5 μg/m(3)), total PAHs (4.2 ng/m(3)), and OPAHs (2.3 ng/m(3)) at the site, detectable quantities (on average 24 times above blank values) of the full range of PAHs and OPAHs were captured, with low variability (average RSD of 16%). This was accomplished by using a Tenax(®) TA-modified glass fiber substrate that is compatible with highly sensitive thermal desorption GC-MS analysis, which made it possible to achieve detection limits per sample in the pg range. Experiments with inverted samplers revealed that the relative contribution of gravitational settling to the sampling of particles carrying PAHs and OPAHs was around 3.5 times larger than other deposition mechanisms. Average Rs values for individual OPAHs and PAHs were 0.046 ± 0.03 m(3)/day and 0.12 ± 0.07 m(3)/day, respectively, with no appreciable difference between the values for particle-associated and gaseous compounds. Furthermore, the Rs values were competitive with other currently used passive samplers if normalized for substrate area. Overall, the new sampler's performance, simplicity and

  19. Low-energy beta spectroscopy using pin diodes to monitor tritium surface contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Doyle, B.L.

    1994-06-01

    We show that tritium betas emitted from a surface can be counted using a pin photodiode as a solid state charged particle detector. Furthermore, we show that the range of tritium betas through air is sufficient to allow measurement of tritium on samples in air by this method. These two findings make possible a new method to survey tritium surface contamination which has advantages over existing methods. We have built and tested several prototype instruments which use this method to measure tritium surface contamination, including a compact portable unit. The design of these instruments and results from tests and calibrations are described. Potential applications of this new method to monitor tritium are discussed.

  20. Calibration effects on orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madrid, G. A.; Winn, F. B.; Zielenbach, J. W.; Yip, K. B.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of charged particle and tropospheric calibrations on the orbit determination (OD) process are analyzed. The calibration process consisted of correcting the Doppler observables for the media effects. Calibrated and uncalibrated Doppler data sets were used to obtain OD results for past missions as well as Mariner Mars 1971. Comparisons of these Doppler reductions show the significance of the calibrations. For the MM'71 mission, the media calibrations proved themselves effective in diminishing the overall B-plane error and reducing the Doppler residual signatures.

  1. Beta androstenediol mitigates the damage of 1 GeV/n Fe ion particle radiation to the hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Loria, Roger; Beckman, Mathew; Contaifer, Daniel; Tamariz, Francisco; Gibb, David; Thompson, Laura; Guida, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Space exploration is associated with exposure to 1-3 Gy solar particle radiation and galactic cosmic radiation that could increase cancer rates. Effective nontoxic countermeasures to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure are highly desirable but currently not available. The aim was to determine whether a single subcutaneous injection of androstenediol (Δ(5) androsten-3β, 17β-diol [AED]) could mitigate and restore the mouse hematopoetic system from the radiation-mediated injury of 3 Gy whole-body high LET (56)Fe(26+) exposure. The findings show that postradiation AED treatment has an overall positive and significant beneficial effect to restore the levels of hematopoeitic elements (p<0.001). Androstenediol treatment significantly increased monocyte levels at days 4, 7, and 14 and, similarly, increased red blood cell, hemoglobin, and platelet counts. Flow cytometry analysis 14 days after radiation and AED treatment demonstrated an increase (p<0.05) in bone marrow cells counts. Ex vivo osteoclastogenesis studies show that AED treatment is necessary and advantageous for the development and restoration of osteoclastogenesis after radiation exposure. These findings clearly show that androstenediol functions as a countermeasure to remedy hematopoeitic injury mediated by high LET iron ion radiation. Presently, no other agent has been shown to have such properties. PMID:21790310

  2. Developments for a measurement of the beta -- nu correlation and determination of the recoil charge-state distribution in 6He beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ran

    The beta-nu of a pure Gamow-Teller beta decay such as the 6He decay is sensitive to tensor-type weak currents predicted by theories beyond the Standard Model. An experiment is developed at University of Washington aiming at measuring the coefficient a_{beta-nu} of 6He decays to the 0.1% level and looking for its deviation from the Standard-Model prediction -1/3 using laser-trapped 6He atoms. The beta particle is detected by a scintillator and a multi-wire proportional chamber, and the recoil ion is detected by a microchannel plate with delay-line anodes for position readouts. a_{beta-nu} is extracted by fitting the measured time-of-flight spectrum of the recoil ions to templates generated by Monte Carlo simulations. This dissertation describes the developments of this experiment for the intermediate goal of a 1% level a_{beta-nu} measurement, such as the detector design, Monte Carlo simulation software, and data analysis frame work. Particularly, detector calibrations are described in detail. The analysis of a 2% level proof-of-principle run in October 2015 is presented as well. Shake-off probabilities for decays of trapped 6He atoms matter for the high-precision a_{beta-nu} measurement. The charge state distribution of recoil ions is obtained by analyzing their time-of-flight distribution using the same experimental setups for the a_{beta-nu} measurement. An analysis approach that is independent of the beta-nu correlation is developed. The measured upper limit of the double shake-off probability is 2x10. {-4} at 90% confidence level. This result is 100 times lower than the most recent calculation by Schulhoff and Drake. This disagreement is significant for the a_{beta-nu} measurement and needs to be addressed by improved atomic theory calculations.

  3. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  4. An alternative calibration method for counting P-32 reactor monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, T.J.; Vehar, D.W.

    2011-07-01

    Radioactivation of sulfur is a common technique used to measure fast neutron fluences in test and research reactors. Elemental sulfur can be pressed into pellets and used as monitors. The {sup 32}S(n, p) {sup 32}P reaction has a practical threshold of about 3 MeV and its cross section and associated uncertainties are well characterized [1]. The product {sup 32P} emits a beta particle with a maximum energy of 1710 keV [2]. This energetic beta particle allows pellets to be counted intact. ASTM Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates and Fast-Neutron Fluences by Radioactivation of Sulfur-32 (E265) [3] details a method of calibration for counting systems and subsequent analysis of results. This method requires irradiation of sulfur monitors in a fast-neutron field whose spectrum and intensity are well known. The resultant decay-corrected count rate is then correlated to the known fast neutron fluence. The Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) at Sandia has traditionally performed calibration irradiations of sulfur pellets using the {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission neutron source at the National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST) [4] as a transfer standard. However, decay has reduced the intensity of NIST's source; thus lowering the practical upper limits of available fluence. As of May 2010, neutron emission rates have decayed to approximately 3 e8 n/s. In practice, this degradation of capabilities precludes calibrations at the highest fluence levels produced at test reactors and limits the useful range of count rates that can be measured. Furthermore, the reduced availability of replacement {sup 252}Cf threatens the long-term viability of the NIST {sup 252}Cf facility for sulfur pellet calibrations. In lieu of correlating count rate to neutron fluence in a reference field the total quantity of {sup 32}P produced in a pellet can be determined by absolute counting methods. This offers an attractive alternative to extended {sup 252}Cf exposures because it

  5. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  6. Model Calibration and Optics Correction Using Orbit Response Matrix in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.A.; Prebys, E.; Petrenko, A.V.; Kopp, S.E.; McAteer, M.J.; /Texas U.

    2012-05-01

    We have calibrated the lattice model and measured the beta and dispersion functions in Fermilab's fast-ramping Booster synchrotron using the Linear Optics from Closed Orbit (LOCO) method. We used the calibrated model to implement ramped coupling, dispersion, and beta-beating corrections throughout the acceleration cycle, reducing horizontal beta beating from its initial magnitude of {approx}30% to {approx}10%, and essentially eliminating vertical beta-beating and transverse coupling.

  7. Detection of alpha radiation in a beta radiation field

    DOEpatents

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Reese, Robert P.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting alpha particles in the presence of high activities of beta particles utilizing an alpha spectrometer. The apparatus of the present invention utilizes a magnetic field applied around the sample in an alpha spectrometer to deflect the beta particles from the sample prior to reaching the detector, thus permitting detection of low concentrations of alpha particles. In the method of the invention, the strength of magnetic field required to adequately deflect the beta particles and permit alpha particle detection is given by an algorithm that controls the field strength as a function of sample beta energy and the distance of the sample to the detector.

  8. Effects of the tissue-air interface in calculations of beta-particle skin dose at a depth of 70 microns.

    PubMed

    Crawford, O H; Turner, J E; Hamm, R N; Ashley, J C

    1991-11-01

    The effects that the tissue-air interface has on the basal-layer dose at a depth of 70 microns from beta emitters on the skin surface are studied using Monte Carlo calculations. The dose is decreased at small lateral distances from a point source but is increased at large distances. PMID:1752748

  9. Special-geometry proportional counters and techniques for detection of low-levels of X-rays and beta-particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The use and sensitivity of the multiwire proportional counter to detect Kr-85 in ambient air are examined. Data also cover monitoring beta and X-ray emitting radio nuclides at low activity levels. Results show the counter to have excellent properties for monitoring Kr-85 down to 0.0004 pCi cu/cm.

  10. Determining orbital particle parameters of impacts into germanium using morphology analysis and calibration data from hypervelocity impact experiments in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Klaus G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the work that is done at the Lehrstuhl fur Raumfahrttechnik (lrt) at the Technische Universitat Munchen to examine particle impacts into germanium surfaces which were flown on board the LDEF satellite. Besides the description of the processing of the samples, a brief overview of the particle launchers at our institute is given together with descriptions of impact morphology of high- and hypervelocity particles into germanium. Since germanium is a brittle, almost glass-like material, the impact morphology may also be interesting for anyone dealing with materials such as optics and solar cells. The main focus of our investigations is to learn about the impacting particle's properties, for example mass, velocity and direction. This is done by examining the morphology, various geometry parameters, crater obliqueness and crater volume.

  11. Use of particle tracking to improve numerical model calibration and to analyze ground-water flow and contaminant migration, Massachusetts Military Reservation, western Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Walter, Donald A.; Savoie, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    A steady-state, three-dimensional flow model coupled with a particle-tracking algorithm was developed to assess the complex interaction of hydrogeologic conditions affecting ground-water flow and contaminant transport--including aquifer heterogeneities, hydrologic boundaries such as ponds and streams, ground-water withdrawals, and aquifer recharge to characterize the migration of contaminants emanating from beneath the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The known extent of contaminant plumes were used to assess the effects of changes in model input parameters on model-calculated water-table and pond altitudes, streamflow, and water-particle pathlines. Although changes in selected simulated hydrogeologic conditions resulted in minor changes in model-calculated water-table altitudes, pond altitudes, and streamflow, these changes had significant effects on the projection of model-calculated water-particle pathlines.

  12. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1.1BETA, MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-09-01

    Version 01 MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. This MCNP6.1.1Beta is a follow-on to the MCNP6.1 production version which itself was the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product. This MCNP6.1.1 beta has been released in order to provide the radiation transport community with the latest feature developmentsmore » and bug fixes in the code. MCNP6.1.1 has taken input from a group of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Radiation Transport Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5). They have combined their code development efforts to produce this next evolution of MCNP. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude of particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams.« less

  13. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1.1BETA, MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    Version 01 MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. This MCNP6.1.1Beta is a follow-on to the MCNP6.1 production version which itself was the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product. This MCNP6.1.1 beta has been released in order to provide the radiation transport community with the latest feature developments and bug fixes in the code. MCNP6.1.1 has taken input from a group of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Radiation Transport Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5). They have combined their code development efforts to produce this next evolution of MCNP. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude of particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams.

  14. A measurement of the beta spectrum of 63Ni using a new type of cryogenic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaistkell, R. J.; Angrave, L. C.; Booth, N. E.; Hahn, A. D.; Salmon, G. L.; Swift, A. M.

    1996-02-01

    A precision measurement of the beta spectrum of 63Ni has been performed using a new type of cryogenic particle detector. This is the first nuclear physics experiment using this technique, and we discuss the principles of the method, its advantages and its shortcomings. Careful studies of detector stability, calibration, pulse pile-up and systematics have made it possible to collect large numbers of events (∼ 10 8) over long periods (∼ 28 days). The measurement is consistent with no 17 keV/c 2 neutrino admixture, giving a preferred value of (-0.05 ± 0.31)%.

  15. Neutrons, gamma rays, and beta particles interactions with IIaO films flown on Astro I and Astro II and comparison with IIaO flown on the get-away-special STS-7

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, E.C. Jr.; Peters, K.; Boone, K.

    1995-09-01

    The current requirements for the Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, sends rocket satellites and in the near future will involve flights in the shuttle to the upper reaches of the Earth`s atmosphere where they will be subjected to the atomic particles and electromagnetic radiation produced by the Sun and other cosmic radiation. It is therefore appropriate to examine the effect of neutrons, gamma rays, beta particles, and X-rays on the film currently being used by the Laboratory for current and future research requirements. It is also hoped by examining these particles in their effect that the authors will have simulated the space environment of the rockets, satellites, and shuttles. Several samples of the IIaO film were exposed to a neutron howitzer with a source energy of approximately 106 neutrons/steradians. They exposed several samples of the film to a 10 second blast of neutrons in both metal and plastic containers which exhibited higher density readings which indicated the possibility of some secondary nuclear interactions between neutrons and the aluminum container. The plastic container showed some variations at the higher densities. Exposure of the samples of IIaO film to a neutron beam of approximately 10 neutrons per steradians for eight minutes produces approximately a 13% difference in the density readings of the dark density grids. It is not noticeable that at the lighter density grid the neutrons have minimal effects, but on a whole the trend of the eight minute exposed IIaO film density grids at the darker end had a 7.1% difference than the control. Further analysis is anticipated by increasing the exposure time. Two sets of film were exposed to a beta source in a plastic container. The beta source was placed at the bottom so that the cone of rays striking the film would be conical for a period of seven days. It was observed in the films, designated 4a and 4b, a dramatic increase in the grid densities had occurred.

  16. Optical Calibration For Jefferson Lab HKS Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    L. Yuan; L. Tang

    2005-11-04

    In order to accept very forward angle scattering particles, Jefferson Lab HKS experiment uses an on-target zero degree dipole magnet. The usual spectrometer optics calibration procedure has to be modified due to this on-target field. This paper describes a new method to calibrate HKS spectrometer system. The simulation of the calibration procedure shows the required resolution can be achieved from initially inaccurate optical description.

  17. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  18. Studies of polarization bremsstrahlung and ordinary bremsstrahlung from 89Sr beta particles in metallic targets in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    Studies of polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) and ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) produced by the 89Sr beta emitter in Al, Ti, Sn and Pb targets were undertaken at photon energies of 1-100 keV. The experimental results are compared with the Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (EBH) theory and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (Fmod BH) theory for OB and with the Avdonina and Pratt (Fmod BH + PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS). These results are in agreement with the Fmod BH + PB theory up to 13 keV, 16 keV, 22 keV and 28 keV energies for Al, Ti, Sn and Pb targets, respectively; Fmod BH theory is more accurate at higher energies.

  19. Beta Decay Study of Neutron-rich Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, John; Rajabali, Mustafa; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Within the ``island of inversion'' around the N = 20 shell gap, isotopes of magnesium, and aluminum deviate from the expected closed-shell structure. Particles promoted across the N = 20 shell gap result in a lower energy deformed ground state configuration rather than the expected spherical configuration. An experiment was conducted at TRIUMF laboratory in the summer of 2015 to study the decay of ``island of inversion'' isotopes 33 , 34 , 35Mg and the structure of the respective daughter nuclei. The isotopes of interest were produced by a proton beam from TRIUMF's 500 MeV cyclotron impacting on a UCx target. The magnesium decays populated states along the decay chain in Al, Si, P, and S isotopes. The new GRIFFIN spectrometer in the ISAC-I facility was used to detect the gamma rays. Two sets of scintillators, one for detecting the beta particles (SCEPTAR) and the other for detecting beta-delayed neutrons (DESCANT), were also used in conjunction with GRIFFIN. The GRIFFIN data were energy calibrated and partially analyzed for this project. New algorithms were developed for the analysis. Preliminary results for new transitions detected in 34Mg as well as the half lives obtained will be presented in their current form. This research was supported by the Tennessee Tech research office.

  20. A new, passive dosemeter for gamma, beta and neutron radiations.

    PubMed

    Jones, L A; Stokes, R P

    2011-03-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) provides personal radiation dosimetry to the UK Ministry of Defence. Dstl has recently developed a dosemeter that is based on a combination of thermoluminescent and etched-track detectors. The Dstl Combined Dosemeter is capable of assessing doses due to photons, beta particles and neutrons. This paper presents the laboratory type testing results for the Combined Dosemeter, and also describes the procedure for calibrating the dosemeter for use in workplace neutron fields. The Combined Dosemeter meets the type test requirements that are relevant to its intended applications, and gives neutron doses that are within 50% of the true dose in the workplaces in which it is used, even when the wearer has the potential to be exposed to a variety of neutron spectra (e.g. on board nuclear-powered submarines). PMID:21346288

  1. Response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeter to beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munish; Gupta, Anil; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimate of the response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters (DRDs) to various beta sources was performed. It has been established that the ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters do not respond to beta particles having energy (Emax)<1 MeV and same was verified using (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (204)Tl beta sources. However, for beta particles having energy >1 MeV, the DRDs exhibit measureable response and the values are ~8%, ~14% and ~27% per mSv for natural uranium, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh beta sources respectively. As the energy of the beta particles increases, the response also increases. The response of DRDs to beta particles having energy>1 MeV arises due to the fact that the thickness of the chamber walls is less than the maximum range of beta particles. This may also be one of the reasons for disparity between doses measured with passive/legal dosimeters (TLDs) and DRDs in those situations in which radiation workers are exposed to mixed field of gamma photons and beta particles especially at uranium processing plants, nuclear (power and research) reactors, waste management facilities and fuel reprocessing plants etc. The paper provides the reason (technical) for disparity between the doses recorded by TLDs and DRDs in mixed field of photons and beta particles. PMID:23978508

  2. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  3. Muon Energy Calibration of the MINOS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Paul S.

    2004-09-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to search for conclusive evidence of neutrino oscillations and to measure the oscillation parameters precisely. MINOS comprises two iron tracking calorimeters located at Fermilab and Soudan. The Calibration Detector at CERN is a third MINOS detector used as part of the detector response calibration programme. A correct energy calibration between these detectors is crucial for the accurate measurement of oscillation parameters. This thesis presents a calibration developed to produce a uniform response within a detector using cosmic muons. Reconstruction of tracks in cosmic ray data is discussed. This data is utilized to calculate calibration constants for each readout channel of the Calibration Detector. These constants have an average statistical error of 1.8%. The consistency of the constants is demonstrated both within a single run and between runs separated by a few days. Results are presented from applying the calibration to test beam particles measured by the Calibration Detector. The responses are calibrated to within 1.8% systematic error. The potential impact of the calibration on the measurement of oscillation parameters by MINOS is also investigated. Applying the calibration reduces the errors in the measured parameters by {approx} 10%, which is equivalent to increasing the amount of data by 20%.

  4. Cherenkov Source for PMT Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ at UC Berkeley Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    My research is focused on building a deployable source for PMT calibrations in the SNO+ detector. I work for the SNO+ group at UC Berkeley headed by Gabriel Orebi Gann. SNO+ is an addition to the SNO project, and its main goal is to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be monitored by over 9500 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In order to characterize the PMTs, several calibration sources are being constructed. One of which, the Cherenkov Source, will provide a well-understood source of non-isotropic light for calibrating the detector response. My goal is to design and construct multiple aspects of the Cherenkov Source. However, there are multiple questions that arose with its design. How do we keep the scintillation light inside the Cherenkov source so it does not contaminate calibration? How do we properly build the Cherenkov source: a hollow acrylic sphere with a neck? Can we maintain a clean source throughout these processes? These are some of the problems I have been working on, and will continue to work on, until the deployment of the source. Additionally, I have worked to accurately simulate the physics inside the source, mainly the energy deposition of alphas.

  5. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by 90Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter 90Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (FmodBH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (FmodBH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of FmodBH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the FmodBH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  6. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by {sup 90}Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-08-28

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter {sup 90}Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of F{sub mod}BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the F{sub mod}BH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  7. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  8. Beta systems error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric backscatter coefficient, beta, measured with an airborne CO Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) system operating in a continuous wave, focussed model is discussed. The Single Particle Mode (SPM) algorithm, was developed from concept through analysis of an extensive amount of data obtained with the system on board a NASA aircraft. The SPM algorithm is intended to be employed in situations where one particle at a time appears in the sensitive volume of the LDV. In addition to giving the backscatter coefficient, the SPM algorithm also produces as intermediate results the aerosol density and the aerosol backscatter cross section distribution. A second method, which measures only the atmospheric backscatter coefficient, is called the Volume Mode (VM) and was simultaneously employed. The results of these two methods differed by slightly less than an order of magnitude. The measurement uncertainties or other errors in the results of the two methods are examined.

  9. RESONANCE BROADENING AND HEATING OF CHARGED PARTICLES IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Parrish, Ian J.; Quataert, Eliot; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2012-10-20

    The heating, acceleration, and pitch-angle scattering of charged particles by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are important in a wide range of astrophysical environments, including the solar wind, accreting black holes, and galaxy clusters. We simulate the interaction of high-gyrofrequency test particles with fully dynamical simulations of subsonic MHD turbulence, focusing on the parameter regime with {beta} {approx} 1, where {beta} is the ratio of gas to magnetic pressure. We use the simulation results to calibrate analytical expressions for test particle velocity-space diffusion coefficients and provide simple fits that can be used in other work. The test particle velocity diffusion in our simulations is due to a combination of two processes: interactions between particles and magnetic compressions in the turbulence (as in linear transit-time damping; TTD) and what we refer to as Fermi Type-B (FTB) interactions, in which charged particles moving on field lines may be thought of as beads sliding along moving wires. We show that test particle heating rates are consistent with a TTD resonance that is broadened according to a decorrelation prescription that is Gaussian in time (but inconsistent with Lorentzian broadening due to an exponential decorrelation function, a prescription widely used in the literature). TTD dominates the heating for v{sub s} >> v{sub A} (e.g., electrons), where v{sub s} is the thermal speed of species s and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, while FTB dominates for v{sub s} << v{sub A} (e.g., minor ions). Proton heating rates for {beta} {approx} 1 are comparable to the turbulent cascade rate. Finally, we show that velocity diffusion of collisionless, large gyrofrequency particles due to large-scale MHD turbulence does not produce a power-law distribution function.

  10. Chemical Imaging of Catalyst Deactivation during the Conversion of Renewables at the Single Particle Level: The Etherification of Biomass-based Polyols with Alkenes over H-Beta Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    A Parvulescu; D Mores; E Stavitski; C Teodorescu; P Bruijnicx; R Klein Gebbing; B Weckhuysen

    2011-12-31

    The etherification of biomass-based alcohols with various linear {alpha}-olefins under solvent-free conditions was followed in a space- and time-resolved manner on 9 {micro}m large H-Beta zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. This allowed us to visualize the interaction with the substrate and distribution of the coke products into the catalyst at the level of an individual zeolite crystal during the etherification process. The spectroscopic information obtained on the micrometer-scale zeolite was in line with the results obtained with bulk characterization techniques and further confirmed by the catalytic results obtained both for micrometer-scale and nanoscale zeolites. This allowed us to explain the influence of the substrate type (glycerol, glycols, and alkenes) and zeolite properties (Si/Al ratio and particle size) on the etherification activity. The etherification of the biomass-based alcohols takes place mainly on the external surface of the zeolite particles. The gradual blockage of the external surface of the zeolite results in a partial or total loss of etherification activity. The deactivation could be attributed to olefin oligomerization. The high conversions obtained in the etherification of 1,2-propylene glycol with long linear alkenes (up to 80%) and the pronounced deactivation of the zeolite observed in the etherification of glycerol with long linear alkenes (max. 20% conversion) were explained by the spectroscopic measurements and is due to differences in the adsorption, i.e., in the center of the zeolite particle for glycerol and on the external surface in the case of glycols.

  11. Transfer standard for beta decay radionuclides in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Klaus; Beinlich, Uwe; Fritz, Eberhard

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of the activity of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals prior to the administration to patients is normally achieved via the use of radionuclide calibrators. An accurate measurement of the activity of pure beta-emitters is complex. Calibration problems can be solved by combining a primary calibration with a 90Y reference solution and a 90Sr/90Y transfer standard with a solid source, simulating geometric effects caused by high energetic beta radiation. The recent development of a 90Sr/90Y transfer standard for this purpose is reported. PMID:14987695

  12. Calibrations of the SNO+ PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, Freija

    2013-04-01

    SNO+, the successor to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), is currently in the final phase of the hardware upgrade and commissioning. It is located at about 6000 m.w.e. in SNOLab, the world's deepest operating underground laboratory. By replacing SNO's heavy water with a liquid scintillator target (LAB), a much lower energy threshold can be achieved. This creates a new multipurpose neutrino detector with the potential to address a diverse set of physics goals. In a pure-scintillator phase, SNO+ will study low energy solar neutrinos, including those from the pep and CNO cycles. Loading the liquid scintillator with a double beta decay isotope, like neodymium, will then enable the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. SNO+ also aims at detecting reactor, geo- and supernova neutrinos. For all physics goals, an accurate understanding and calibration of the PMT response is essential. After a review of the general SNO+ setup and physics goals, the SNO+ PMT calibration will be presented in detail.

  13. Study of the Beta-delayed multiple particle break-up of the 2.43 MeV state in Be-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga Flores, Miguel; Borge, M. J. G.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Jonson, B.; Nyman, G.; Prezado, Y.; Riisager, K.

    The aim of this work is to study the β -delayed multiparticle break-up of the 5/2- state in 9 Be at 2.43 MeV excitation energy. This process is relevant as it has been proposed recently that this level plays a role in the α(αn,γ)9 Be reaction. This state breaks-up in 2α+n, and sequential as well as direct ("democratic") decay have previously been considered. In our work energy and direction of the two emitted α particles has been measured, while those of the neutron have been reconstructed. The sequential decay is considered using the R-matrix formalism. For the democratic decay the hyper-spherical harmonics functions are used. The different decay processes are compared with the data using the Monte-Carlo method. Our preliminary results indicate that the data is better described when democratic decay is assumed.

  14. Fast ion beta limit measurements by collimated neutron detection in MST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecchi, William; Anderson, Jay; Bonofiglo, Phillip; Kim, Jungha; Sears, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Fast ion orbits in the reversed field pinch (RFP) are well ordered and classically confined despite magnetic field stochasticity generated by multiple tearing modes. Classical TRANSP modeling of a 1MW tangentially injected hydrogen neutral beam in MST deuterium plasmas predicts a core-localized fast ion density that can be up to 25% of the electron density and a fast ion beta of many times the local thermal beta. However, neutral particle analysis of an NBI-driven mode (presumably driven by a fast ion pressure gradient) shows mode-induced transport of core-localized fast ions and a saturated fast ion density. The TRANSP modeling is presumed valid until the onset of the beam-driven mode and gives an initial estimate of the volume-averaged fast ion beta of 1-2% (local core value up to 10%). A collimated neutron detector for fusion product profile measurements will be used to determine the spatial distribution of fast ions, allowing for a first measurement of the critical fast-ion pressure gradient required for mode destabilization. Testing/calibration data and initial fast-ion profiles will be presented. Characterization of both the local and global fast ion beta will be done for deuterium beam injection into deuterium plasmas for comparison to TRANSP predictions. Work supported by US DOE.

  15. Modeling Study of a Proposed Field Calibration Source Using K-40 and High-Z Targets for Sodium Iodide Detectors.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeremy; Marianno, Craig; Kallenbach, Gene; Trevino, Jose

    2016-06-01

    Calibration sources based on the primordial isotope potassium-40 (K) have reduced controls on the source's activity due to its terrestrial ubiquity and very low specific activity. Potassium-40's beta emissions and 1,460.8 keV gamma ray can be used to induce K-shell fluorescence x rays in high-Z metals between 60 and 80 keV. A gamma ray calibration source that uses potassium chloride salt and a high-Z metal to create a two-point calibration for a sodium iodide field gamma spectroscopy instrument is thus proposed. The calibration source was designed in collaboration with the Sandia National Laboratory using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code. Two methods of x-ray production were explored. First, a thin high-Z layer (HZL) was interposed between the detector and the potassium chloride-urethane source matrix. Second, bismuth metal powder was homogeneously mixed with a urethane binding agent to form a potassium chloride-bismuth matrix (KBM). The bismuth-based source was selected as the development model because it is inexpensive, nontoxic, and outperforms the high-Z layer method in simulation. Based on the MCNPX studies, sealing a mixture of bismuth powder and potassium chloride into a thin plastic case could provide a light, inexpensive field calibration source. PMID:27115223

  16. Turnip yellow mosaic virus forms infectious particles without the native beta-annulus structure and flexible coat protein N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua D; Barbar, Elisar; Dreher, Theo W

    2012-01-20

    Structural studies have implicated the TYMV N-terminal amino acids of the coat protein (CP) in both static (virion stabilization) and dynamic (RNA encapsidation and disencapsidation) roles. We have deleted residues 2-5, 2-10 and 2-26 from the N-terminus and expressed the mutant CPs in E. coli to assess assembly in the absence of genomic RNA and in plant infections to assess infectivity and virion properties. In E. coli, the deletion constructs formed virus-like particles, but in decreased yield. All mutants were infectious in Chinese cabbage, producing normal symptoms but with a slight delay and decreased viral yields. Virions were progressively less stable with increasing deletion size and also more accessible to small molecules. These results show that the N-terminal 26 amino acids are not essential for viral processes in vivo, although removal of these residues decreases stability and increases porosity, both important factors for virion integrity and survival outside the host. PMID:22078163

  17. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  18. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  19. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiple p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.

  20. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiplemore » p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.« less

  1. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because…

  2. Improving self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßlin, Torsten A.; Junklewitz, Henrik; Winderling, Lars; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore, better schemes, in sense of minimal square error, can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise, the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that nonparametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.

  3. Beta-dosimetry studies at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes three beta-dosimetry studies made recently at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first study was to determine the beta-gamma exposure rates at the Los Alamos Godiva IV Critical Assembly. The beta spectra from the assembly were evaluated using absorption curves and the beta-gamma dose-rate ratios were determined at various distances from the assembly. A comparison was made of the doses determined using two types of TLD personnel dosimeters and a film badge. The readings of an Eberline RO-7 instrument and the dose rates determined by TLDs were compared. Shielding provided by various metals, gloves, and clothing were measured. The second study was to determine the beta energy response of the Eberline RO-7 instrument based on measurements made with the PTB beta sources. This study required additional calibration points for the PTB sources which were made using extrapolation chamber measurements. The third study resulted in two techniques to determine the beta energy (E/sub max/) from the readings of this-window portable survey instruments. Both techniques are based on the readings obtained using aluminium filters. One technique is for field application, requires one filter, and provides a quick estimate of the beta energy in three energy groups: < 0.5 MeV, 0.5 MeV to 1.5 MeV and > 1.5 MeV. The second technique is more complex requiring measurements with two or three filters, but gives the beta energy and the approximate shape of the beta spectrum. 9 references, 6 figures.

  4. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 4; 1.2 - 35 microns Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns, constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars- beta Peg, alpha Boo, beta And, beta Gem, and alpha Hya-augment our already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for alpha Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  5. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. 4; 1.2-35um Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns, constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars, Beta Peg, Delta Boo, Beta And, Beta Gem, and Delta Hya, augment our already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for a Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  6. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 4; 1.2-35 micrometer Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell, G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    Five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns are presented. The spectra were constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars (beta Peg, alpha Boo, beta And, beta Gem, and alpha Hya) augment the author's already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for alpha Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  7. Cereal beta-glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal beta-glucans occur predominantly in oats and barley, but can be found in other cereals. Beta-glucan structure is a mixture of single beta-1,3-linkages and consecutive beta-1,4-linkages, and cellotriosyl and cellotetraosyl units typically make up 90-95% of entire molecule. Lichenase can hydr...

  8. Implicit Spacecraft Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an implicit algorithm for spacecraft onboard instrument calibration, particularly to onboard gyro calibration. This work is an extension of previous work that was done where an explicit gyro calibration algorithm was applied to the AQUA spacecraft gyros. The algorithm presented in this paper was tested using simulated data and real data that were downloaded from the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft. The calibration tests gave very good results. A comparison between the use of the implicit calibration algorithm used here with the explicit algorithm used for AQUA spacecraft indicates that both provide an excellent estimation of the gyro calibration parameters with similar accuracies.

  9. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, Oliviero

    2016-05-01

    After more than 3/4 of century from its proposal, Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (NLDBD) is still missing observation and continues to represent the only practical method for investigating the Dirac/Majorana nature of neutrinos. In case neutrinos would be Majorana particles, NLDBD would provide unique informations on their properties (absolute mass scale and Majorana phases). Boosted by the discovery of neutrino oscillations, a number of experiments with improved sensitivity have been proposed in the past decade. Some of them have recently started operation and others are ready to start. They will push the experimental sensitivity on the decay halflife beyond 1026 year, starting to analyze the region of the inverted mass hierarchy. The status and perspectives of the ongoing experimental effort are reviewed. Uncertainties coming from the calculation othe decay nuclear matrix elements (NME) as well as the recently suggested possibility of a relevant quenching of the axial coupling constant are also discussed.

  10. Simultaneous beta/gamma digital spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.

    A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) built in our laboratory. The DPP board was designed to digitally capture the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfer valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimum crosstalk. The spectrometer proved to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

  11. Searches for neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenheuer, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a lepton number violating process whose observation would also establish that neutrinos are their own anti-particles. There are many experimental efforts with a variety of techniques. Some (EXO, Kamland-Zen, GERDA phase I and CANDLES) started take data in 2011 and EXO has reported the first measurement of the half life for the double beta decay with two neutrinos of 136Xe. The sensitivities of the different proposals are reviewed.

  12. Beta scattering and beta back-scattering from a thin target

    SciTech Connect

    Bafandeh, H.R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical technique is presented to determine the distribution of transmitted and back scattered beta particles as a function of angle of incident radiation on a target. Scatterers used consisted of metallic foils of various thicknesses and atomic number, such as Al, Zn, Fe, Ag, and Zr. Three pure beta-emitting radionuclides, [sup 32]P, [sup 204]Tl, and [sup 147]Pm characterized by end-point energies of 1.71 Mev, 0.769 Mev, and 0.225 Mev, respectively, were prepared as individual sources and used in the experimental work. A scintillation detector used in conjunction with the target scatterer and a specially designed fixture that allowed rotation about its vertical rotation axis provided the proper geometry and shielding for this experiment. Finally, the author attempted to compare experimental results with computer calculations and derived an algebraic equation to predict the intensity of beta particle back-scattered radiation as a function of energy of the source material, the scattering angle, scatterer thickness, and the material of the target scatterer. Unlike the case of heavy charged particles such as alpha particles, the effects of beta particle back scattering on dose calculations cannot be ignored. Scattering effects also have important implications with respect to the measurement of beta-emitting radionuclides and the measurements of beta radiation dose.

  13. Automated Camera Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Siqi; Cheng, Yang; Willson, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Automated Camera Calibration (ACAL) is a computer program that automates the generation of calibration data for camera models used in machine vision systems. Machine vision camera models describe the mapping between points in three-dimensional (3D) space in front of the camera and the corresponding points in two-dimensional (2D) space in the camera s image. Calibrating a camera model requires a set of calibration data containing known 3D-to-2D point correspondences for the given camera system. Generating calibration data typically involves taking images of a calibration target where the 3D locations of the target s fiducial marks are known, and then measuring the 2D locations of the fiducial marks in the images. ACAL automates the analysis of calibration target images and greatly speeds the overall calibration process.

  14. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  15. Beta optimization in the context of reactor relevant tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1990-08-01

    In a reactor relevant tokamak the appropriate definition of {beta}, the ratio of the particle and magnetic field pressures, is {beta}* {equivalent to} (2 < p{sup 2} >{sup {1/2}} /B{sup 2}), which exceeds the conventional definition by a factor dependent on the pressure peaking factor, PPF. A simple scaling is obtained which relates the two definitions, {beta}*/{beta}{approx equal}0.9 {plus} 0.15 PPF. Stability properties are determined in terms of {beta}* in a circular and dee-shaped tokamak. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  16. SUMS calibration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Calibration was performed on the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS). The results of the calibration and the as run test procedures are presented. The output data is described, and engineering data conversion factors, tables and curves, and calibration on instrument gauges are included. Static calibration results which include: instrument sensitive versus external pressure for N2 and O2, data from each scan of calibration, data plots from N2 and O2, and sensitivity of SUMS at inlet for N2 and O2, and ratios of 14/28 for nitrogen and 16/32 for oxygen are given.

  17. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  18. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  19. beta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    beta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( beta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 85 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asses

  20. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  1. DOE Radiological Calibrations Intercomparison Program: Results of fiscal year 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the FY 1987 results of the radiological calibrations intercomparison program. The intercomparison operation is discussed, and the equipment is described, particularly the instrument set, the beta source set, and relevant calculations. Solutions to problems and improvements in the program are suggested, and conclusions are then introduced. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-31

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating solar radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer’s response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument’s responsivity.

  3. GIADA: extended calibration activity: . the Electrostatic Micromanipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator), one of the scientific instruments onboard Rosetta/ESA space mission, is devoted to study dynamical properties of dust particles ejected by the short period comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In preparation for the scientific phase of the mission, we are performing laboratory calibration activities on the GIADA Proto Flight Model (PFM), housed in a clean room in our laboratory. Aim of the calibration activity is to characterize the response curve of the GIADA measurement sub-systems. These curves are then correlated with the calibration curves obtained for the GIADA payload onboard the Rosetta S/C. The calibration activity involves two of three sub-systems constituting GIADA: Grain Detection System (GDS) and Impact Sensor (IS). To get reliable calibration curves, a statistically relevant number of grains have to be dropped or shot into the GIADA instrument. Particle composition, structure, size, optical properties and porosity have been selected in order to obtain realistic cometary dust analogues. For each selected type of grain, we estimated that at least one hundred of shots are needed to obtain a calibration curve. In order to manipulate such a large number of particles, we have designed and developed an innovative electrostatic system able to capture, manipulate and shoot particles with sizes in the range 20 - 500 μm. The electrostatic Micromanipulator (EM) is installed on a manual handling system composed by X-Y-Z micrometric slides with a 360o rotational stage along Z, and mounted on a optical bench. In the present work, we display the tests on EM using ten different materials with dimension in the range 50 - 500 μm: the experimental results are in compliance with the requirements.

  4. The Science of Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the many issues involved in calibrating astronomical data, covering the full electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays, and considering both ground-based and space-based missions. These issues include the science drivers for absolute and relative calibration, the physics behind calibration and the mechanisms used to transfer it from the laboratory to an astronomical source, the need for networks of calibrated astronomical standards, and some of the challenges faced by large surveys and missions.

  5. LWIR polarimeter calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumer, Robert V.; Miller, Miranda A.; Howe, James D.; Stevens, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    Performance reported efforts to calibrate a MWIR imaging polarimeter met with moderate success. Recent efforts to calibrate a LWIR sensor using a different technique have been much more fruitful. For our sensor, which is based on a rotating retarder, we have improved system calibration substantially be including nonuniformity correction at all measurement positions of the retarder in our polarization data analysis. This technique can account for effects such as spurious optical reflections within a camera system that had been masquerading as false polarization in our previous data analysis methodology. Our techniques will be described and our calibration results will be quantified. Data from field-testing will be presented.

  6. Energy calibration via correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Limousin, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The main task of an energy calibration is to find a relation between pulse-height values and the corresponding energies. Doing this for each pulse-height channel individually requires an elaborated input spectrum with an excellent counting statistics and a sophisticated data analysis. This work presents an easy to handle energy calibration process which can operate reliably on calibration measurements with low counting statistics. The method uses a parameter based model for the energy calibration and concludes on the optimal parameters of the model by finding the best correlation between the measured pulse-height spectrum and multiple synthetic pulse-height spectra which are constructed with different sets of calibration parameters. A CdTe-based semiconductor detector and the line emissions of an 241Am source were used to test the performance of the correlation method in terms of systematic calibration errors for different counting statistics. Up to energies of 60 keV systematic errors were measured to be less than ~ 0.1 keV. Energy calibration via correlation can be applied to any kind of calibration spectra and shows a robust behavior at low counting statistics. It enables a fast and accurate calibration that can be used to monitor the spectroscopic properties of a detector system in near realtime.

  7. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Keyes, C.; Kaiser, M.

    2007-12-01

    The COS calibration pipeline (CALCOS) includes three main components: basic calibration, wavelength calibration, and spectral extraction. Calibration of modes using the far ultraviolet (FUV) and near ultraviolet (NUV) detectors share a common structure, although the individual reference files differ and there are some additional steps for the FUV channel. The pipeline is designed to calibrate data acquired in either ACCUM or time-tag mode. The basic calibration includes pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. Wavelength calibration can be done either by using separate lamp exposures or by taking several short lamp exposures concurrently with a science exposure. For time-tag data, the latter mode ("tagflash") will allow better correction of potential drift of the spectrum on the detector. One-dimensional spectra will be extracted and saved in a FITS binary table. Separate columns will be used for the flux-calibrated spectrum, error estimate, and the associated wavelengths. CALCOS is written in Python, with some functions in C. It is similar in style to other HST pipeline code in that it uses an association table to specify which files to be included, and the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to use are specified by header keywords. Currently, in conjunction with the Instrument Definition Team (led by J. Green), the ground-based reference files are being refined, delivered, and tested with the pipeline.

  8. Laser interferometer calibration station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolmi, R. W.; Krupski, S. J.

    1981-10-01

    The laser interferometer is a versatile tool, used for calibration over both long and short distances. It is considered traceable to the National Bureau of Standards. The system developed under this project was to be capable of providing for the calibration of many types of small linear measurement devices. The logistics of the original concept of one location for calibration of all mics, calipers, etc. at a large manufacturing facility proved unworkable. The equipment was instead used for the calibration of the large machines used to manufacture cannon tubes.

  9. Observations of high-beta toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halle, J. H.; Kellman, A. G.; Post, R. S.; Prager, S. C.; Strait, E. J.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    1981-05-01

    A range of MHD stable high-beta plasmas is attained both in the kinetic regime with beta equal to 33% (nine times the fluid ballooning limit) and near the single-fluid regime with beta equal to 8% (twice the theoretical limit). It is found that MHD theory is inadequate and that kinetic effects are apparently more powerful than is generally assumed. It is pointed out that since a reactor (with trapped particles, large-gyroradii ions from neutral beams) may be no more fluid-like than the octupole experiments, their designs should perhaps not necessarily be constrained by the MHD ballooning instability beta limit. Diamagnetic current measurements are found to agree roughly with single-fluid results in the fluid-like case but to depart sharply in the kinetic regime.

  10. Beta scaling of transport in microturbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.

    2005-07-15

    A systematic study of the beta ({beta}) scaling and spatial structure of thermal and particle transport in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations is presented. Here, {beta} is the ratio of the plasma kinetic pressure to the magnetic pressure. Results show that the nonlinear self-consistent temperature profiles exhibit a (statistically) time-stationary flattening in the vicinity of rational surfaces with a concomitant drop in the electrostatic components of the thermal diffusivity. Simultaneously, the increased magnetic fluctuation amplitude at these surfaces enhances the steady-state electromagnetic (flutter) component of the electron thermal diffusivity. The electromagnetic components of the ion transport coefficients remain close to zero, as expected on theoretical grounds. Only a weak dependence of ion energy transport on {beta} is observed, consistent with recent tokamak experiments [C. C. Petty et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2514 (2004)].

  11. Calibrated cylindrical Mach probe in a plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Dandurand, D.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Lukin, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    A simple cylindrical Mach probe is described along with an independent calibration procedure in a magnetized plasma wind tunnel. A particle orbit calculation corroborates our model. The probe operates in the weakly magnetized regime in which probe dimension and ion orbit are of the same scale. Analytical and simulation models are favorably compared with experimental calibration.

  12. Dust particle velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielman, L. O.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

  13. Calibration and optimization of proportional counter modules using Garfield

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kiwhan; Brockwell, Michael I; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Green, J Andrew; Hogan, Gary E; Makela, Mark F; Mariam, Fesseha G; Morris, Christopher L

    2010-01-01

    Prototypes of radiation detector arrays used for charged-particle radiography require iniliol calibration to correlate the distribution of electron arrival time to the particle track locations. This step is crucial to obtaining the spatial resolution necessary to separate particle tracks traversing the individual proportional counters in the arrays. Our past attempts to use cosmic rays alone for the initial calibration have fallen short of obtaining the desired resolution due to the insufficient cosmic ray flux to provide the necessary number of particle tracks. A theoretical relation between electron drift time and radial drift distance is obtained with Garfield, a CERN gas detector simulation program. This relation is then used as an effective starting point for the initial calibration and results in a shorter calibration period and improved spatial resolution of the detectors.

  14. Calibration facility safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    A set of requirements is presented to insure the highest practical standard of safety for the Apollo 17 Calibration Facility in terms of identifying all critical or catastrophic type hazard areas. Plans for either counteracting or eliminating these areas are presented. All functional operations in calibrating the ultraviolet spectrometer and the testing of its components are described.

  15. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  16. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  17. Gamma camera calibration and validation for quantitative SPECT imaging with (177)Lu.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, M; Cazzato, M; Cozzella, M L; Cox, M; D'Andrea, M; Fazio, A; Fenwick, A; Iaccarino, G; Johansson, L; Strigari, L; Ungania, S; De Felice, P

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years (177)Lu has received considerable attention from the clinical nuclear medicine community thanks to its wide range of applications in molecular radiotherapy, especially in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In addition to short-range beta particles, (177)Lu emits low energy gamma radiation of 113keV and 208keV that allows gamma camera quantitative imaging. Despite quantitative cancer imaging in molecular radiotherapy having been proven to be a key instrument for the assessment of therapeutic response, at present no general clinically accepted quantitative imaging protocol exists and absolute quantification studies are usually based on individual initiatives. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an approach to gamma camera calibration for absolute quantification in tomographic imaging with (177)Lu. We assessed the gamma camera calibration factors for a Philips IRIX and Philips AXIS gamma camera system using various reference geometries, both in air and in water. Images were corrected for the major effects that contribute to image degradation, i.e. attenuation, scatter and dead- time. We validated our method in non-reference geometry using an anthropomorphic torso phantom provided with the liver cavity uniformly filled with (177)LuCl3. Our results showed that calibration factors depend on the particular reference condition. In general, acquisitions performed with the IRIX gamma camera provided good results at 208keV, with agreement within 5% for all geometries. The use of a Jaszczak 16mL hollow sphere in water provided calibration factors capable of recovering the activity in anthropomorphic geometry within 1% for the 208keV peak, for both gamma cameras. The point source provided the poorest results, most likely because scatter and attenuation correction are not incorporated in the calibration factor. However, for both gamma cameras all geometries provided calibration factors capable of recovering the activity in

  18. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  19. Self-calibration performance in stereoscopic PIV acquired in a transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-04-01

    Three stereoscopic PIV experiments have been examined to test the effectiveness of self-calibration under varied circumstances. Measurements taken in a streamwise plane yielded a robust self-calibration that returned common results regardless of the specific calibration procedure, but measurements in the crossplane exhibited substantial velocity bias errors whose nature was sensitive to the particulars of the self-calibration approach. Self-calibration is complicated by thick laser sheets and large stereoscopic camera angles and further exacerbated by small particle image diameters and high particle seeding density. Despite the different answers obtained by varied self-calibrations, each implementation locked onto an apparently valid solution with small residual disparity and converged adjustment of the calibration plane. Therefore, the convergence of self-calibration on a solution with small disparity is not sufficient to indicate negligible velocity error due to the stereo calibration.

  20. Comparison of Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Calibration Using Earth Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1999-01-01

    Routine backscatter, beta, measurements by an airborne or space-based lidar from designated earth surfaces with known and fairly uniform beta properties can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities. This can in turn be used to obtain accurate atmospheric aerosol and cloud beta measurements on large spatial scales. This is important because achieving a precise calibration factor for large pulsed lidars then need not rest solely on using a standard hard target procedure. Furthermore, calibration from designated earth surfaces would provide an inflight performance evaluation of the lidar. Hence, with active remote sensing using lasers with high resolution data, calibration of a space-based lidar using earth's surfaces will be extremely useful. The calibration methodology using the earth's surface initially requires measuring beta of various earth surfaces simulated in the laboratory using a focused continuous wave (CW) CO2 Doppler lidar and then use these beta measurements as standards for the earth surface signal from airborne or space-based lidars. Since beta from the earth's surface may be retrieved at different angles of incidence, beta would also need to be measured at various angles of incidences of the different surfaces. In general, Earth-surface reflectance measurements have been made in the infrared, but the use of lidars to characterize them and in turn use of the Earth's surface to calibrate lidars has not been made. The feasibility of this calibration methodology is demonstrated through a comparison of these laboratory measurements with actual earth surface beta retrieved from the same lidar during the NASA/Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on NASA's DC8 aircraft from 13 - 26 September, 1995. For the selected earth surface from the airborne lidar data, an average beta for the surface was established and the statistics of lidar efficiency was determined. This was compared with the actual lidar efficiency

  1. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  2. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  3. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Kaiser, M. E.; Keyes, C. D.; Ake, T. B.; Aloisi, A.; Friedman, S. D.; Oliveira, C. M.; Shaw, B.; Sahnow, D. J.; Penton, S. V.; Froning, C. S.; Beland, S.; Osterman, S.; Green, J.; COS/STIS STScI Team; IDT, COS

    2008-05-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, COS, (Green, J, et al., 2000, Proc SPIE, 4013) will be installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the next servicing mission. This will be the most sensitive ultraviolet spectrograph ever flown aboard HST. The program (CALCOS) for pipeline calibration of HST/COS data has been developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute. As with other HST pipelines, CALCOS uses an association table to list the data files to be included, and it employs header keywords to specify the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to be used. COS includes both a cross delay line detector for the far ultraviolet (FUV) and a MAMA detector for the near ultraviolet (NUV). CALCOS uses a common structure for both channels, but the specific calibration steps differ. The calibration steps include pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. A 1-D spectrum will be extracted and flux calibrated. Data will normally be taken in TIME-TAG mode, recording the time and location of each detected photon, although ACCUM mode will also be supported. The wavelength calibration uses an on-board spectral line lamp. To enable precise wavelength calibration, default operations will simultaneously record the science target and lamp spectrum by executing brief (tag-flash) lamp exposures at least once per external target exposure.

  4. Gemini facility calibration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay-Howat, Suzanne K.; Harris, John W.; Gostick, David C.; Laidlaw, Ken; Kidd, Norrie; Strachan, Mel; Wilson, Ken

    2000-08-01

    High-quality, efficient calibration instruments is a pre- requisite for the modern observatory. Each of the Gemini telescopes will be equipped with identical facility calibration units (GCALs) designed to provide wavelength and flat-field calibrations for the suite of instruments. The broad range of instrumentation planned for the telescopes heavily constrains the design of GCAL. Short calibration exposures are required over wavelengths from 0.3micrometers to 5micrometers , field sizes up to 7 arcminutes and spectral resolution from R-5 to 50,000. The output from GCAL must mimic the f-16 beam of the telescope and provide a uniform illumination of the focal plane. The calibration units are mounted on the Gemini Instrument Support Structure, two meters from the focal pane, necessitating the use of large optical components. We will discuss the opto-mechanical design of the Gemini calibration unit, with reference to those feature which allow these stringent requirements to be met. A novel reflector/diffuser unit replaces the integration sphere more normally found in calibration systems. The efficiency of this system is an order of magnitude greater than for an integration sphere. A system of two off-axis mirrors reproduces the telescope pupil and provides the 7 foot focal plane. The results of laboratory test of the uniformity and throughput of the GCAL will be presented.

  5. What can we learn from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments?

    SciTech Connect

    Bahcall, John N.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pena-Garay, Carlos

    2004-04-08

    We assess how well next generation neutrinoless double beta decay and normal neutrino beta decay experiments can answer four fundamental questions. 1) If neutrinoless double beta decay searches do not detect a signal, and if the spectrum is known to be inverted hierarchy, can we conclude that neutrinos are Dirac particles? 2) If neutrinoless double beta decay searches are negative and a next generation ordinary beta decay experiment detects the neutrino mass scale, can we conclude that neutrinos are Dirac particles? 3) If neutrinoless double beta decay is observed with a large neutrino mass element, what is the total mass in neutrinos? 4) If neutrinoless double beta decay is observed but next generation beta decay searches for a neutrino mass only set a mass upper limit, can we establish whether the mass hierarchy is normal or inverted? We base our answers on the expected performance of next generation neutrinoless double beta decay experiments and on simulations of the accuracy of calculations of nuclear matrix elements.

  6. Multigamma-ray calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Massey, T.N.

    1983-05-01

    We have calibrated a self-consistent set of multigamma-ray standards using the automated multi-spectrometry ..gamma..-ray counting facility at LLNL's Nuclear Chemistry Division. Pure sources of long-lived activity were produced by mass separation and/or chemical purification. The sources were counted individually and in combination on several different calibrated spectrometer systems. These systems utilize various detectors ranging from small (x-ray) detectors to large volume high-purity Ge detectors. This has allowed the use of the most ideal individual detector-efficiency characteristics for the determination of the relative ..gamma..-ray intensities. Precise energy measurements, reported earlier (Meyer, 1976) have been performed by an independent method. Both the energy and ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities determined compare well with independently established values such as the recent ICRM intercomparison of /sup 152/Eu. We discuss our investigations aimed at resolving the shape of the efficiency response function up to 10 MeV for large volume Ge(Li) and high-purity Ge detectors. Recent results on the ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities per decay for /sup 149/Gd and /sup 168/Tm multigamma-ray sources are discussed. For /sup 168/Tm, we deduce a 0.01% ..beta../sup -/ branch to the 87.73-keV level in /sup 168/Yb rather than the previous value which was a factor of 200 greater. In addition, we describe current cooperative efforts aimed at establishing a consistent set of data for short-lived fission products. Included are recent measurements on the bromine fission products with ..gamma.. rays up to 7 MeV.

  7. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  8. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  9. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-06-15

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency.

  10. Airdata Measurement and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This memorandum provides a brief introduction to airdata measurement and calibration. Readers will learn about typical test objectives, quantities to measure, and flight maneuvers and operations for calibration. The memorandum informs readers about tower-flyby, trailing cone, pacer, radar-tracking, and dynamic airdata calibration maneuvers. Readers will also begin to understand how some data analysis considerations and special airdata cases, including high-angle-of-attack flight, high-speed flight, and nonobtrusive sensors are handled. This memorandum is not intended to be all inclusive; this paper contains extensive reference and bibliography sections.