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Sample records for beta-adrenergic antagonists

  1. Direct intra-accumbal infusion of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist abolishes WIN 55,212-2-induced aversion

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Franky; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    The cannabinoid system is known to interact with a variety of neuromodulators in the central nervous system and impacts diverse behaviors. Previous studies have demonstrated that limbic norepinephrine is a critical determinant in the behavioral expression of cannabinoid-induced aversion. The present study was carried out to define the adrenergic receptor subtype involved in mediating cannabinoid-induced behavioral responses. An acute microinjection of the β1-adrenergic receptor blocker, betaxolol, directly into the nucleus accumbens (Acb), was able to prevent WIN 55,212-2-induced aversion, but not lithium-induced aversion, as measured in a place conditioning paradigm. These results suggest that noradrenergic transmission in the Acb is important for cannabinoid-induced aversion and that beta-adrenergic antagonists may be effective in counteracting negative side effects of cannabinoid-based agents. PMID:21693171

  2. Propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, retards response to MSH in skin of Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, G L; Greenberg, N

    1987-01-01

    Lacking sympathetic innervation, the skin of A. carolinensis, an iguanid lizard, darkens within minutes in response to circulating melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) or beta adrenergic agonists such as epinephrine (EPI). This change is produced by dispersion of melanin from a perinculear position within dermal melanophores into superficial dendritic processes. These melanophores possess alpha-2 and beta-2 adrenergic as well as MSH receptors except in a patch of skin behind the eye, the eyespot, which lacks alpha receptors. Activation of beta or MSH receptors leads to stimulation of adenyl cyclase whereas alpha stimulation inhibits the enzyme to override the others. In a series of trials, injection of saline or propranolol was followed after 30 minutes by saline, EPI, or MSH. Propranolol inhibited chromatophore response to EPI. It also, unexpectedly, retarded the response to MSH, increasing latency to eyespot formation and body color change as well as the duration of darkening for both. Alteration of MSH response by a beta blocker could be explained by linkage of both adrenergic receptors and the MSH receptor to a common adenyl cyclase molecule to form a functional unit in the membrane of the melanophore. PMID:3671516

  3. Beta-adrenergic antagonists during general anesthesia reduced postoperative pain: a systematic review and a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Härkänen, Lasse; Halonen, Jari; Selander, Tuomas; Kokki, Hannu

    2015-12-01

    We have performed a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis investigating the effect of beta-adrenergic antagonist on perioperative pain in randomized clinical trials (RCTs). The search included the CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE databases (from inception to 10 February 2015). From the retrieved full texts, we hand-searched the references and PubMed related citations. A total of 11 RCTs consisting data of 701 adult patients were eligible for this systematic review. Esmolol was evaluated in ten trials and propranolol in one. Esmolol decreased the need for rescue analgesics by 32-50%; p < 0.05 (n = 7) and the proportion of patients needing rescue analgesia from 100 to 65%; p < 0.005 (n = 1), and propranolol decreased the need for rescue analgesics by 72%; p < 0.001 (n = 1). The time to the first rescue analgesics was longer (p < 0.05) and pain ratings were lower (p < 0.05) in patients with beta-adrenergic antagonists. However, in two opioid-controlled studies, one in knee arthroscopy and another in tubal ligation patients, the proportion of patients needing rescue analgesia was two-times higher in esmolol-treated patients: 52-57 vs. 23-34%, p < 0.05. Adverse effects were rarely reported, and as reported were mostly cardiovascular alterations. In conclusion, intra-operative beta-adrenergic antagonists' administration may decrease postoperative pain and analgesic consumption when given as an adjuvant to general anesthesia. PMID:26160590

  4. (-)(125I)-iodopindolol, a new highly selective radioiodinated beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist: measurement of beta-receptors on intact rat astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Barovsky, K.; Brooker, G.

    1980-01-01

    (-)-Pindolol, one of the most potent beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, was radioiodinated using chloramine-T oxidation of carrier-free Na 125I and separated from unreacted pindolol to yield 2200 Ci/mmole (-)-(125I)-iodopindolol ((-)-(125I)-IPin). Mass and ultraviolet spectra confirmed that the iodination occurred on the indole ring, presumably at the 3 position. The binding of radiolabeled (-)-(125I)-IPin to beta-adrenergic receptors has been studied using intact C6 rat astrocytoma cells (2B subclone) grown in monolayer cultures. Binding of (-)(125IPin was saturable with time and concentration. Using 13 pM (-)-(125I)IPin, binding equilibrium was reached in 90 min at 21-22 degrees C. The reverse rate constant was 0.026 min-1 at 21/sup 0/C. Specific binding (expressed as 1 microM(-)-propranolol displaceable counts) of (-)-(125I)-IPin was 95% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of (-)-(125I)-I)Pin binding revealed approximately 4300 receptors/cell and a dissociation constant of 30 pM. This was in excellent agreement with the kinetically determined dissociation constant of 35 pM. Displacement by propranolol and isoproterenol showed that (-)-(125I)-IPin binding sites were pharmacologically and stereospecifically selective. These results indicate that (-)-(125I)-IPin, a pure (-)-stereoisomer, high specific activity radioligand, selectively binds to beta-adrenergic receptors in whole cells with a high percentage of specific binding and should therefore be useful in the study and measurement of cellular beta-adrenergic receptors.

  5. [Beta-adrenergic receptor blocker poisoning].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara

    2007-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor blocking drugs are used in the treatment of hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, cardiac dysrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, migraine headache, thyrotoxicosis, and glaucoma. beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agents are competitive antagonist at beta(1), beta(2), or both types of adrenergic receptors. Overdoses of beta-adrenergic receptor blockers are uncommon, but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review article discusses the properties of beta-adrenergic receptor blockers, presents the doses of these drugs causing toxicity and doses, after ingestion of which, referral to an emergency department is recommended. Clinical presentation of overdose (the cardiovascular, neurologic manifestations, pulmonary and other complications), diagnosis, and treatment (gastrointestinal decontamination; the usage of atropine, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, glucagon, insulin; indications for cardiac pacing, extracorporeal procedures of drug removal, etc.) are analyzed. In addition, this article focuses on clinical course and prognosis of beta-blocker overdose. PMID:17768375

  6. Improving survival rates in two models of spontaneous postoperative metastasis in mice by combined administration of a beta-adrenergic antagonist and a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Ariella; Avraham, Roi; Rosenne, Ella; Benish, Marganit; Zmora, Oded; Shemer, Shaily; Meiboom, Hadas; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2010-03-01

    Clinical practice does not consider perioperative paracrine and neuroendocrine stress responses as risk factors for cancer recurrence, although recent animal studies provided supportive evidence. Suggested mechanisms include the effects of stress-hormones on tumor cells and on host physiology. In this study, in mice undergoing primary tumor excision, we tested the survival-enhancing potential of perioperative blockade of catecholamines and prostaglandins, and studied potential mediating mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were inoculated intrafootpad with syngeneic B16F10.9-melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma, and the paw was amputated when a developing tumor exceeded 100 microl. The clinically used beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, and/or the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor etodolac, were administered once before amputation, and recurrence-free survival was monitored. In different studies, NK cytotoxicity, leukocytes' molecular functional markers, and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion by tumor cells were studied in the context of surgery and drug treatments. The findings indicated that the combination of propranolol and etodolac, but neither drug alone, significantly and markedly improved survival rates in both tumor models, and was as effective as established immunostimulatory agents (IL-12 and polyinosinic-polycytiylic acid). Surgery markedly reduced NK cytotoxicity and NK cell expression of Fas ligand and CD11a, reduced all circulating lymphocyte-subtype concentrations, and increased corticosterone levels. Propranolol and etodolac administration counteracted these perturbations. B16 and 3LL secreted vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro, but secretion was not affected by catecholamine agonists, prostaglandins, corticosterone, propranolol, or etodolac. Overall, propranolol and etodolac administration, which could be applied perioperatively in most cancer patients with minimal risk and low cost, has counteracted several immunologic and endocrinologic

  7. [The beta-adrenergic receptor].

    PubMed

    Bicho, M P; Manso, C F

    1992-12-01

    The Authors review the constitution and mechanism of action of the beta adrenergic receptor. It is part of a large family which includes visual pigments, muscarinic, serotonergic, olfactive and substance K receptors. Catecholamines given an electron to the receptor. It goes then successively to the alpha submit of Gs protein ant to adenylyl cyclase. The process of activation consists in a successive transfer of one electron. PMID:1337834

  8. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptors in the Insular Cortex are Differentially Involved in Aversive vs. Incidental Context Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Maria Isabel; Sabath, Elizabeth; Nunez-Jaramillo, Luis; Puron-Sierra, Liliana

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine the effects of [beta]-adrenergic antagonism in the IC before or after inhibitory avoidance (IA) training or context pre-exposure in a latent inhibition protocol. Pretraining intra-IC infusion of the [beta]-adrenergic antagonist propranolol disrupted subsequent IA retention and impaired latent inhibition…

  9. Effects of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist Propranolol on dyskinesia and L-DOPA-induced striatal DA efflux in the hemi-parkinsonian rat.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Nirmal; Lindenbach, David; Barnum, Christopher J; George, Jessica A; Surrena, Margaret A; Bishop, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) replacement therapy with L-DOPA continues to be the primary treatment of Parkinson's disease; however, long-term therapy is accompanied by L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID). Several experimental and clinical studies have established that Propranolol, a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, reduces LID without affecting L-DOPA's efficacy. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-dyskinetic profile of Propranolol against a panel of DA replacement strategies, as well as elucidate the underlying neurochemical mechanisms. Results indicated that Propranolol, in a dose-dependent manner, reduced LID, without affecting motor performance. Propranolol failed to alter dyskinesia produced by the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297 (0.08 mg/kg, sc), or the D2 receptor agonist, Quinpirole (0.05 mg/kg, sc). These findings suggested a pre-synaptic mechanism for Propranolol's anti-dyskinetic effects, possibly through modulating L-DOPA-mediated DA efflux. To evaluate this possibility, microdialysis studies were carried out in the DA-lesioned striatum of dyskinetic rats and results indicated that co-administration of Propranolol (20 mg/kg, ip) was able to attenuate L-DOPA- (6 mg/kg, sc) induced DA efflux. Therefore, Propranolol's anti-dyskinetic properties appear to be mediated via attenuation of L-DOPA-induced extraphysiological efflux of DA. PMID:25866285

  10. Homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Michel, B

    1987-01-01

    Hepatocytes from hypothyroid rats have a marked beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Preincubation of these hepatocytes with isoprenaline induced a time-dependent and concentration-dependent desensitization of the beta-adrenergic responsiveness without altering that to glucagon (homologous desensitization). The desensitization was evidenced both in the cyclic AMP accumulation and in the stimulation of ureagenesis induced by the beta-adrenergic agonists. Under the same conditions, preincubation with glucagon induced no desensitization. Propranolol was also unable to induce desensitization, but blocked that induced by isoprenaline. Pertussis-toxin treatment did not alter the homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization induced by isoprenaline. PMID:2825633

  11. DNA synthesis in mouse brown adipose tissue is under. beta. -adrenergic control

    SciTech Connect

    Rehnmark, S.; Nedergaard, J. )

    1989-02-01

    The rate of DNA synthesis in mouse brown adipose tissue was followed with injections of ({sup 3}H)thymidine. Cold exposure led to a large increase in the rate of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation, reaching a maximum after 8 days, after which the activity abruptly ceased. A series of norepinephrine injections was in itself able to increase ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation. When norepinephrine was injected in combination with the {alpha}-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine or with the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, the stimulation was fully blocked by propranolol. It is suggested that stimulation of DNA synthesis in brown adipose tissue is a {beta}-adrenergically mediated process and that the tissue is an interesting model for studies of physiological control of DNA synthesis.

  12. Species differences in the localization and number of CNS beta adrenergic receptors: Rat versus guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Booze, R.M.; Crisostomo, E.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1989-06-01

    The localization and number of beta adrenergic receptors were directly compared in the brains of rats and guinea pigs. The time course of association and saturability of (125I)cyanopindolol (CYP) binding to slide-mounted tissue sections was similar in rats (Kd = 17 pM) and guinea pigs (Kd = 20 pM). The beta-1 and beta-2 receptor subtypes were examined through the use of highly selective unlabeled receptor antagonists, ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and ICI 89,406 (70 nM). Dramatic species differences between rats and guinea pigs were observed in the neuroanatomical regional localization of the beta adrenergic receptor subtypes. For example, in the thalamus prominent beta-1 and beta-2 receptor populations were identified in the rat; however, the entire thalamus of the guinea pig had few, if any, beta adrenergic receptors of either subtype. Hippocampal area CA1 had high levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptors in both rats and guinea pigs but was accompanied by a widespread distribution of beta-2 adrenergic receptors only in rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analyses of 25 selected neuroanatomical regions (1) confirmed the qualitative differences in CNS beta adrenergic receptor localization, (2) determined that guinea pigs had significantly lower levels of beta adrenergic receptors than rats and (3) indicated a differential pattern of receptor subtypes between the two species. Knowledge of species differences in receptor patterns may be useful in designing effective experiments as well as in exploring the relationships between receptor and innervation patterns. Collectively, these data suggest caution be used in extrapolation of the relationships of neurotransmitters and receptors from studies of a single species.

  13. Pharmacological Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Attenuates Neutrophil Recruitment by a Mechanism Dependent on Nicotinic Receptor and the Spleen.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rangel L; Castanheira, Fernanda V; Figueiredo, Jozi G; Bassi, Gabriel S; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Kanashiro, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effect of beta-adrenergic receptor activation on neutrophil migration in experimental peritonitis elucidating the neuroimmune components involved such as nicotinic receptors and the spleen. Mice pre-treated with mecamylamine (nicotinic antagonist) and propranolol (beta-adrenergic antagonist) or splenectomized animals were treated with isoproterenol (beta-adrenergic agonist) prior to intraperitoneal injection of carrageenan. After 4 h, the infiltrating neutrophils and the local cytokine/chemokine levels were evaluated in the peritoneal lavage. The effect of isoproterenol on neutrophil chemotaxis was investigated in a Boyden chamber. Isoproterenol inhibited neutrophil trafficking, reducing the cytokine/chemokine release and neutrophil chemotaxis. Surprisingly, the isoproterenol effect on neutrophil migration was totally reverted by splenectomy and mecamylamine pre-treatment. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of nicotine on neutrophil migration was abrogated only by splenectomy but not by propranolol pre-treatment. Collectively, our data show that beta-adrenergic receptor activation regulates the acute neutrophil recruitment via splenic nicotinic receptor. PMID:27262431

  14. Effects of halothane on the human beta-adrenergic receptor of lymphocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, J.; Nivoche, Y.; Nimier, M.; Rocchiccioli, C.; Luscombe, F.; Henzel, D.; Loiseau, A.; Desmonts, J.M.

    1987-12-01

    The effects of halothane on beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist interaction were studied using the membranes of human lymphocytes as a model. Membrane preparations of lymphocytes were obtained from blood samples withdrawn from seven healthy young volunteers. Beta-receptor studies were performed using (-)/sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol (/sup 125/ICP) binding. Non-specific binding was determined in the presence of (-)isoproterenol. Beta-receptor density (Bmax) and the dissociation constant (KD) for /sup 125/ICP were determined from saturation curves. Beta-receptor affinity for agonists evaluated by the IC50 (the concentration of isoproterenol required to inhibit 50% of specific /sup 125/ICP binding) and the dissociation constant (KL) for isoproterenol was established from competition curves. The effect of halothane 1%, in an air oxygen mixture (oxygen fraction: 0.3) administered by tonometry during ligand membrane incubation, on beta-adrenergic receptor, was compared to that of control experiments not exposed to halothane. Halothane produced a moderate but significant decrease of Bmax (-10%) and a significant increase in non-specific binding (+30%), while KD, IC50, and KL were unchanged. The authors conclude that halothane, in vitro, decreases beta-adrenergic receptor density. This effect could be mediated by an alteration of the receptor in the membrane due to action of halothane on the lipid phase of the membrane.

  15. A sensitive equilibrium binding assay for soluble beta-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Witkin, K.M.; Harden, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    An equilibrium binding assay has been developed for digitonin-solubilized beta-adrenergic receptors using 125 I-pindolol (IPIN) as a radioligand. Up to 50% of the beta-adrenergic receptors from rat lung membranes could be solubilized using 1% digitonin. Following incubation of soluble fractions with IPIN at 25 degree, protein associated radioactivity was identified by column chromatography using Sephadex G-50. The solubilized receptors bound IPIN with properties similar but not identical to those of the membrane bound receptor. The Kd determined for IPIN binding to soluble receptors was 113 pM while the Kd for membrane associated receptors was 36 pM. The rate constant for association (k1) of IPIN was 0.15x10(9) M-1 for soluble receptors and 2.2x10(9) M-1 min-1 for lung membrane receptors. The rate constant for dissociation (k2) was 0.025 min-1 for soluble receptors and 0.048 min-1 for membrane receptors. Agonists and antagonist of beta-adrenergic receptors inhibited in a stereoselective manner the binding of IPIN to both soluble and membrane bound receptors. The affinities of individual drugs determined for soluble receptors were similar to those determined for membrane receptors. Not only could digitonin-solubilized receptors be identified in soluble preparations from rat lung, but also from rat cerebral cortex and liver, and from L6 muscle, C6 rat glioma, and 1321N1 astrocytoma cell membranes.

  16. Non-co-ordinate development of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase in chick heart.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R W; Galper, J B; Neer, E J; Smith, T W

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the properties of beta-adrenergic receptors and of their interaction with adenylate cyclase in the chick myocardium during embryogenesis. Between 4.5 and 7.5 days in ovo the number of receptors determined by (-)-[3H]dihydroalprenolol ([3H]DHA) binding is constant at approx. 0.36 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. By day 9 the density decreases significantly to 0.22 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. At day 12.5--13.5 the number was 0.14--0.18 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. This number did not change further up to day 16. The same results were obtained with guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) added to the assay mixtures. There was no significant change in receptor affinity for the antagonist [3H]DHA between days 5.5 and 13. Despite the decrease in numbers of beta-adrenergic receptors, there was no change in basal, p[NH]ppG-, isoprenaline- or isoprenaline-plus-p[NH]ppG-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity between days 3 and 12 of development. We conclude that beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase are not co-ordinately regulated during early embryonic development of the chick heart. Some of the beta-adrenergic receptors present very early in the ontogeny of cardiac tissue appear not to be coupled to adenylate cyclase since their loss is not reflected in decreased activation of the enzyme. PMID:6289805

  17. beta. -Adrenergic stimulation of brown adipocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Geloeen, A.; Collet, A.J.; Guay, G.; Bukowiecki, L.J. Laboratoire de Thermoregulation et Metabolisme Energetique, Lyon )

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of brown adipose tissue (BAT) growth were studied by quantitative photonic radioautography using tritiated thymidine to follow mitotic activity. To identify the nature of the adrenergic pathways mediating brown adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, the effects of cold exposure (4 days at 4{degree}C) on BAT growth were compared with those induced by treating rats at 25{degree}C with norepinephrine (a mixed agonist), isoproterenol (a {beta}-agonist), and phenylephrine (an {alpha}-agonist). Norepinephrine mimicked the effects of cold exposure, not only on the mitotic activity, but also on the distribution of the labeling among the various cellular types. Isoproterenol entirely reproduced the effects of norepinephrine both on the labeling index and on the cellular type labeling frequency. These results demonstrate that norepinephrine triggers a coordinated proliferation of brown adipocytes and endothelial cells in warm-exposed rats that is similar to that observed after cold exposure. They also suggest that cold exposure stimulates BAT growth by increasing the release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerves and that the neurohormone activates mitoses in BAT precursor cells via {beta}-adrenergic pathways.

  18. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors in dispersed rat testicular interstitial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Poyet, P.; Labrie, F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that beta-adrenergic agents stimulate steroidogenesis and cyclic AMP formation in mouse Leydig cells in culture. To obtain information about the possible presence and the characteristics of a beta-adrenergic receptor in rat testicular interstitial cells, the potent beta-adrenergic antagonist (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol (CYP) was used as ligand. Interstitial cells prepared by collagenase dispersion from rat testis were incubated with the ligand for 2 h at room temperature. (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol binds to a single class of high affinity sites at an apparent KD value of 15 pM. A number of sites of 6,600 sites/cell is measured when 0.1 microM (-) propranolol is used to determine non-specific binding. The order of potency of a series of agonists competing for (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol binding is consistent with the interaction of a beta 2-subtype receptor: zinterol greater than (-) isoproterenol greater than (-) epinephrine = salbutamol much greater than (-) norepinephrine. In addition, it was observed that the potency of a large series of specific beta 1 and beta 2 synthetic compounds for displacing (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol in rat interstitial cells is similar to the potency observed for these compounds in a typical beta 2-adrenergic tissue, the rat lung. For example, the potency of zinterol, a specific beta 2-adrenergic agonist, is 10 times higher in interstitial cells and lung than in rat heart, a typical beta 1-adrenergic tissue. Inversely, practolol, a typical beta 1-antagonist, is about 50 times more potent in rat heart than in interstitial cells and lung.

  19. The turkey erythrocyte beta-adrenergic receptor couples to both adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C via distinct G-protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    James, S R; Vaziri, C; Walker, T R; Milligan, G; Downes, C P

    1994-01-01

    By contrast with mammalian beta-adrenergic receptors, the avian isoform elicits two distinct effector responses, activation of adenylate cyclase and polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) leading to the accumulation of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol phosphates. We have investigated the mechanisms of beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in turkey erythrocytes. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase by the beta-adrenergic-receptor agonist isoprenaline exhibits a 30-fold lower EC50 than that for PLC activation, which may indicate a marked receptor reserve for the former effector. Similar Ki values were obtained for the inhibition of both responses by four beta-adrenergic antagonists, arguing that a single receptor population is responsible for both effects. Antibodies raised against G-protein peptide sequences were used to show that the identity of the G-protein mediating the PLC response was an avian homologue of G11, the level of expression of which was very similar to that of the stimulatory G-protein of adenylate cyclase, Gs. Thus a single population of beta-adrenergic receptors apparently interacts with distinct G-proteins to activate different effectors. The stoichiometries of the receptor-G-protein-effector interactions are therefore similar for both second-messenger responses and the data are discussed in terms of the different efficacies observed for each response. Images Figure 4 PMID:7998968

  20. Characterization of a beta-adrenergically inhibited K+ current in rat cardiac ventricular cells.

    PubMed Central

    Scamps, F

    1996-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties and beta-adrenergic regulation of a non-inactivating K+ current were studied using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique (22 +/- 2 degrees C) in adult rat ventricular cells. 2. In the presence of 4-aminopyridine, an inhibitor of the rapidly inactivating current, the depolarization-activated current consisted only of a slowly decaying outward current (IK). The presence of a non-inactivating current (ISS) was revealed when analysing inactivation curves. 3. IK and ISS were both sensitive to 50 mM tetraethylammonium and 10 mM 4-aminopyridine inhibition. IK was totally blocked by 100 microM clofilium, while ISS was not inhibited but rather enhanced by this class III anti-arrhythmic agent. 4. Unlike IK, ISS was only slightly decreased by depolarizing prepulses and it did not show time-dependent inactivation when measured during 500 ms depolarizations. 5. ISS was decreased by the beta-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline (1 microM). Forskolin (10 microM) mimicked the effects of isoprenaline. The non-specific beta-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol (3 microM), and a specific beta 1-adrenergic antagonist, CGP 20712A (0.3 microM), both prevented the effects of isoprenaline. Cell perfusion with 100 microM PKI6-22, a peptide inhibitor of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, reduced or abolished the effects of isoprenaline. 6. The dose-response curve for the inhibition of ISS by isoprenaline was positioned to the left of that for the calcium current. The threshold dose and the dose giving 50% of the maximal effect were, respectively, 0.1 and 0.21 nM for ISS and 1 and 4.3 nM for ICa. 7. In view of the high sensitivity of ISS to isoprenaline, its possible physiological effect was evaluated on action potential duration during beta-adrenergic stimulation. At 1 nM, a concentration that did not increase ICa, isoprenaline induced a significant prolongation of action potential duration as a consequence of ISS inhibition. With 1 microM isoprenaline

  1. Beta-adrenergic Blockade at Memory Encoding, but Not Retrieval, Decreases the Subjective Sense of Recollection.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Lackovic, Sandra F; Tobe, Russell H; Leventhal, Bennett L; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Humans remember emotional events not only better but also exhibit a qualitatively distinct recollective experience-that is, emotion intensifies the subjective vividness of the memory, the sense of reliving the event, and confidence in the accuracy of the memory [Phelps, E. A., & Sharot, T. How (and why) emotion enhances the subjective sense of recollection. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17, 147-152, 2008]. Although it has been demonstrated that activation of the beta-adrenergic system, linked to increases in stress hormone levels and physiological arousal, mediates enhanced emotional memory accuracy, the mechanism underlying the increased subjective sense of recollection is unknown. Behavioral evidence suggests that increased arousal associated with emotional events, either at encoding or retrieval, underlies their increased subjective sense of recollection. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject design, we showed that reducing arousal at encoding through oral intake of 80-mg of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol decreases the subjective sense of recollection for both negative and neutral stimuli 24 hr later. In contrast, administration of propranolol before memory retrieval did not alter the subjective sense of recollection. These results suggest that the neurohormonal changes underlying increased arousal at the time of memory formation, rather than the time of memory retrieval, modulate the subjective sense of recollection. PMID:26942318

  2. Acute stress reduces intraparenchymal lung natural killer cells via beta-adrenergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kanemi, O; Zhang, X; Sakamoto, Y; Ebina, M; Nagatomi, R

    2005-01-01

    There are lines of evidence that natural killer (NK) cells are sensitive to physical and psychological stress. Alterations in the immune system including NK cells are known to differ among tissues and organs. The effect of stress on the lung immune system, however, has not been well documented in spite of the fact that the lungs always confront viral or bacterial attacks as well as tumour cell metastasis. In this study, we intended to investigate the effect of restraint stress on lung lymphocytes including NK cells. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 2 h restraint stress. The concentration of plasma epinephrine significantly rose immediately after the release from restraint as compared to home-cage control mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the numbers of most lymphocyte subsets including NK cells were decreased in the lungs and blood but not in the spleen, immediately after restraint stress. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the number of NK cells was decreased in the intraparenchymal region of the lungs, while the number of alveolar macrophages did not change. The decrease in the number of NK cells in the lungs and blood was reversed by the administration of propranolol, a nonselective beta adrenergic antagonist. Taken together, our findings suggest that acute stress reduces the number of intraparenchymal lung NK cells via activation of beta adrenergic receptors. PMID:15606610

  3. beta. -adrenergic ((/sup 3/H) CGP-12177) receptors are elevated in slices of soleus muscle from CHF 147 dystrophic hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Watson-Wright, W.M.; Wilkinson, M.

    1987-03-23

    The authors utilized a muscle slice technique to compare the ontogeny of cell surface ..beta..-adrenergic receptor binding in soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of male Golden Syrian (GS) and Canadian Hybrid Farms 147 (CHF 147) dystrophic hamsters. Binding of the ..beta..-adrenergic antagonist, (/sup 3/H) CGP-12177 (CGP), to GS muscle slices was reversible, saturable, stereospecific and of high affinity. Bmax was higher in the soleus (2.57+/-.12 fmol/mg wet wt) than in the EDL (1.61+/-.17 fmol/mg wet wt) of adult animals while affinities were similar (0.35+/-.06 and 0.24+/-.04 nM respectively). No differences in binding characteristics were seen in EDL of GS compared to CHF 147 animals. In soleus slices from GS hamsters, Bmax was highest at 16 days of age (5.72+/-0.26 fmol/mg), decreased between 16 and 29 days and remained constant until 300 days (2.51+/-0.52 fmol/mg). In dystrophic soleus slices, Bmax was also higher at 16 days than at any other age but receptor number decreased gradually, remaining higher than in GS until 90 days of age (p<0.05). The failure of ..beta..-adrenergic receptor number to decrease at a normal rate may be implicated in the pathogenesis of hamster polymyopathy. 21 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  4. The emerging pharmacogenomics of the beta-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew R G; Bristow, Michael R

    2004-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic signaling mechanisms are of central importance to cardiovascular health and disease. Modulation of these pathways represents an important pharmacologic approach to the treatment of heart failure and hypertension. Advances in molecular genetics have identified genetic polymorphisms in the human beta-adrenergic receptor genes; some of this variation predicts changes in protein sequence/structure, and potentially changes in function, of the b-adrenergic receptors. This article reviews the current state of knowledge and understanding of the genetic variation present in the three human beta-adrenergic receptor genes. Already, variation in these genes has been associated with observed differences in several cardiovascular phenotypes. This work has led to the demonstration of functional differences in activity between receptors with certain known polymorphisms and "wild-type" receptors. An understanding of these polymorphisms is key to the development of studies of how differences in drug response/effects may be mediated by these polymorphisms. Such studies are anticipated to provide a foundation for the development of novel pharmacologic approaches where selection of and dosing of cardiovascular therapy is tailored to individuals on the basis of each patient's specific genetic makeup. PMID:15591842

  5. Beta adrenergic blockade reduces utilitarian judgement.

    PubMed

    Terbeck, Sylvia; Sylvia, Terbeck; Kahane, Guy; Guy, Kahane; McTavish, Sarah; Sarah, McTavish; Savulescu, Julian; Julian, Savulescu; Levy, Neil; Neil, Levy; Hewstone, Miles; Miles, Hewstone; Cowen, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    Noradrenergic pathways are involved in mediating the central and peripheral effects of physiological arousal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in moral decision-making. We studied the effects in healthy volunteers of propranolol (a noradrenergic beta-adrenoceptor antagonist) on moral judgement in a set of moral dilemmas pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Propranolol (40 mg orally) significantly reduced heart rate, but had no effect on self-reported mood. Importantly, propranolol made participants more likely to judge harmful actions as morally unacceptable, but only in dilemmas where harms were 'up close and personal'. In addition, longer response times for such personal dilemmas were only found for the placebo group. Finally, judgments in personal dilemmas by the propranolol group were more decisive. These findings indicate that noradrenergic pathways play a role in responses to moral dilemmas, in line with recent work implicating emotion in moral decision-making. However, contrary to current theorising, these findings also suggest that aversion to harming is not driven by emotional arousal. Our findings are also of significant practical interest given that propranolol is a widely used drug in different settings, and is currently being considered as a potential treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder in military and rescue service personnel. PMID:23085134

  6. Beta adrenergic blockade reduces utilitarian judgement

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, Terbeck; Guy, Kahane; Sarah, McTavish; Julian, Savulescu; Neil, Levy; Miles, Hewstone; Cowen, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Noradrenergic pathways are involved in mediating the central and peripheral effects of physiological arousal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in moral decision-making. We studied the effects in healthy volunteers of propranolol (a noradrenergic beta-adrenoceptor antagonist) on moral judgement in a set of moral dilemmas pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Propranolol (40 mg orally) significantly reduced heart rate, but had no effect on self-reported mood. Importantly, propranolol made participants more likely to judge harmful actions as morally unacceptable, but only in dilemmas where harms were ‘up close and personal’. In addition, longer response times for such personal dilemmas were only found for the placebo group. Finally, judgments in personal dilemmas by the propranolol group were more decisive. These findings indicate that noradrenergic pathways play a role in responses to moral dilemmas, in line with recent work implicating emotion in moral decision-making. However, contrary to current theorising, these findings also suggest that aversion to harming is not driven by emotional arousal. Our findings are also of significant practical interest given that propranolol is a widely used drug in different settings, and is currently being considered as a potential treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder in military and rescue service personnel. PMID:23085134

  7. Interactions of. beta. -adrenergic receptors with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors were investigated with radioligand binding assays using the agonists (/sup 3/H)hydroxybenzyl-isoproterenol (/sup 3/H-HBI) and (/sup 3/H)epinephrine (/sup 3/H-EPI), and the antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol (/sup 125/I-IPIN). Membranes prepared from L6 myoblasts bound (/sup 3/H)HBI, (/sup 3/H)EPI, and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 222 +/- 23, 111 +/- 7, and 325 +/- 37 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 3/H)EPI was inhibited allosterically by guanine nucleotides. Membranes prepared from wild-type S49 lymphoma cells bound (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 48.9 +/- 7.1 and 196 +/- 29 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI was inhibited allosterically by GTP. Similar results were obtained with membranes prepared from the adenylate cyclase deficient variant of S49 lymphoma cells (cyc-), which does not contain a functional stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub s/), but does contain a functional inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub i/). Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI to membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells was inhibited by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin. These results suggest that ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells interact with N/sub i/ to form a ternary complex composed of agonist, receptor, and N/sub i/.

  8. Dihydrotestosterone decreases beta-adrenergic receptor binding in the fetal rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Moawad, A.H.; River, L.P.; River, J.M.

    1988-07-01

    Tritium-labeled dihydroalprenolol was used to quantify the beta-adrenergic receptor sites in day 30 fetal rabbit lung tissue. Each of the fetuses of New Zealand White rabbits on day 28 of gestation was injected with dihydrotestosterone (2.0 micrograms) in one horn of the uterus and 10% ethanol in normal saline (the solvent) in the contralateral one. The animals were sacrificed 48 hours later and the fetal lung tissue was assayed. Dihydrotestosterone decreased the beta-adrenergic receptor site number in the treatment group compared with the control group (86 versus 111 fmol/mg protein, p less than 0.05 by paired t-test). In the presence of dihydrotestosterone, beta-adrenergic receptor binding is inhibited in the preterm fetal rabbit. This effect may be implicated in the beta-adrenergic mediation of phospholipid synthesis and/or release by fetal alveolar cells.

  9. beta. -adrenergic relaxation of smooth muscle: differences between cells and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Scheid, C.R.

    1987-09-01

    The present studies were carried out in an attempt to resolve the controversy about the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation in smooth muscle. Previous studies on isolated smooth muscle cells from the toad stomach had suggested that at least some of the actions of ..beta..-adrenergic agents, including a stimulatory effect on /sup 45/Ca efflux, were dependent on the presence of a normal transmembrane Na/sup +/ gradient. Studies by other investigators using tissues derived from mammalian sources had suggested that the relaxing effect of ..beta..-adrenergic agents was Na/sup +/ independent. Uncertainty remained as to whether these discrepancies reflected differences between cells and tissues or differences between species. Thus, in the present studies, the authors utilized both tissues and cells from the same source, the stomach muscle of the toad Bufo marinus, and assessed the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation. They found that elimination of a normal Na/sup +/ gradient abolished ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation of isolated cells. In tissues, however, similar manipulations had no effect on relaxation. The reasons for this discrepancy are unclear but do not appear to be attributable to changes in smooth muscle function following enzymatic dispersion. Thus the controversy concerning the mechanisms of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation may reflect inherent differences between tissues and cells.

  10. Beta-adrenergic receptors of lymphocytes in children with allergic respiratory diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Bittera, I.; Gyurkovits, K.; Falkay, G.; Eck, E.; Koltai, M.

    1988-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic receptor binding sites on peripheral lymphocytes in children with bronchial asthma (n = 16) and seasonal allergic rhinitis (n = 8) were examined in comparison with normal controls (n = 18) by means of /sup 124/I-cyanopindolol. The number of beta-adrenergic receptors was significantly lower in the asthmatic group (858 +/- 460/lymphocyte) than in the controls (1564 +/- 983/lymphocyte). The value (1891 +/- 1502/lymphocyte in children with allergic rhinitis was slightly higher than that in healthy controls. Of the 24 patients suffering from allergic diseases of the lower or upper airways, the bronchial histamine provocation test was performed in 21; 16 gave positive results, while 5 were negative. No difference in beta-adrenergic receptor count was found between the histamine-positive and negative patients. Neither was there any correlation between the number of beta-adrenergic receptors and the high (16/24) and low (8/24) serum IgE concentrations found in allergic patients. The significant decrease in beta-adrenergic receptor count in asthmatic children lends support to Szentivanyi's concept. Further qualitative and quantitative analysis of lymphocyte beta-adrenergic receptors may provide an individual approach to the treatment of bronchial asthma with beta-sympathomimetic drugs.

  11. Modulation of. beta. -adrenergic response in rat brain astrocytes by serum and hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.K.; Morrison, R.S.; de Vellis, J.

    1985-01-01

    Purified astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat cerebrum respond to isoproterenol, a ..beta..-adrenergic agonist, with a transient rise in cAMP production. This astroglial property was regulated by serum, a chemically defined medium (serum-free medium plus hydrocortisone, putrescine, prostaglandin F/sub 2/, insulin, and fibroblast growth factor) and epidermal growth factor. Compared to astrocytes grown in serum-supplemented medium, astrocytes grown in the chemically defined medium were nonresponsive to isoproterenol stimulation, and this difference did not appear to be due to selection of a subpopulation of cells by either medium. The data suggest that a decreased ..beta..-adrenergic receptor number and an increased degradation of cAMP may account for the reduced response to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation. The nonresponsive state of astrocytes in the defined medium was reversible when the medium was replaced with serum-supplemented medium. An active substance(s) in serum was responsible for restoring the responsiveness of astrocytes. Each of the five components of the defined medium had little effect by itself; however, together they acted synergistically to desensitize astrocytes to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation. On the other hand, epidermal growth factor, a potent mitogen for astrocytes, was very competent by itself in reducing the cAMP response of astrocytes to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation. Thus purified astrocytes grown in the chemically defined medium appear to be a good model for the study of hormonal interactions and of serum factors which may modulate the ..beta..-adrenergic response.

  12. Beta-adrenergic blockade and atrio--ventricular conduction impairment.

    PubMed

    Giudicelli, J F; Lhoste, F; Boissier, J R

    1975-04-01

    Atrio--ventricular conduction and its modifications induced by six Beta-adrenergic blocking agents have been investigated in the dog. Premature atrial stimuli (St2) were applied at variable intervals following regular stimuli (St1) ensuring atrial pacing; atrial (AERP), nodoventricular (NERP) and global (GERP) effective refractory periods as well as global functional refractory period (GFRP) were determined before and after administration of each of the six drugs. When Beta-blockade was produced with d,1-propranolol which hwas membrane stabilizing effects (MSE) but no intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) or with sotalol, which has neither MSE nor ISA, all parameters were significantly increased. When Beta-blockade was achieved with pindolol or practolol, which have only a poor Beta-adrenolytic potency and no ISA. Alprenolol showed intermediate effects. Thus, it appears that Beta-blockade and not MSE, is responsible for the onset of A-V conduction impairment but that ISA, probably through a metabolic mechanism, affords protection against this impairment. On the other hand, measurement of ventricular effective refractory period (VERP) has shown that at the Purkinje-free junction, it is MSE which is mainly involved in conduction impairment. PMID:238853

  13. Amiloride interacts with renal. cap alpha. - and. beta. -adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M.J.; Mullen, M.D.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have used radioligand binding techniques to assess whether amiloride and certain analogues of amiloride (ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil) can bind to adrenergic receptors in the kidney. They found that amiloride could compete for (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine (..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors), (/sup 3/H)prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors), and (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol (..beta..-adrenergic receptors) binding in rat renal cortical membranes with inhibitor constants of 13.6 /plus minus/ 5.7, 24.4 /plus minus/ 7.4, and 8.36 /plus minus/ 13.5 ..mu..M, respectively. Ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil were from 2- to 25-fold more potent than amiloride in competing for radioligand binding sites in studies with these membranes. In addition, amiloride and the two analogues competed for (/sup 3/H)prazosin sites on intact Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and amiloride blocked epinephrine-stimulated prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production in these cells. They conclude that amiloride competes for binding to several classes of renal adrenergic receptors with a rank order of potency of ..cap alpha../sub 2/ > ..cap alpha../sub 1/ > ..beta... Binding to, and antagonism of, adrenergic receptors occurs at concentrations of amiloride that are lower than previously observed nonspecific interactions of this agent.

  14. Ontogeny of alpha- and beta-adrenergic anorexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lora-Vilchis, M C; Chambert, G; Rodriguez-Zendejas, A M; Soto-Mora, L M; Russek, M; Epstein, A N

    1988-12-01

    The anorectic action of alpha- (phenylephrine) and beta- (isoproterenol) adrenergic agonists was studied in mildly deprived neonatal, weanling, prepubescent, and adult rats. Intraperitoneal phenylephrine produced a reduction of food intake at all ages but with reduced potency and with a maximum of 50% in neonates. Contrary to intramuscular epinephrine that has no effect on feeding at any age, intramuscular phenylephrine was as effective as intraperitoneal in neonates, probably because it is not as rapidly destroyed in tissues as epinephrine. However, in weanlings and adults intramuscular phenylephrine was much less anorectic than intraperitoneal, suggesting that this effect is exerted via the liver. Isoproterenol did not reduce milk intake at any age before adulthood. Lactate had no effect on milk intake before the age of 40 days. Thus catecholamine anorexia is a purely alpha-adrenergic effect in young rats and appears before the metabolic effect of lactate. beta-Adrenergic anorexia, on the other hand, can be obtained only after puberty, suggesting that the mechanism mediating it matures after the preparatory action of the sexual hormones. PMID:2849323

  15. Beta-adrenergic stimulation of brown adipocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Géloën, A; Collet, A J; Guay, G; Bukowiecki, L J

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of brown adipose tissue (BAT) growth were studied by quantitative photonic radioautography using tritiated thymidine to follow mitotic activity. To identify the nature of the adrenergic pathways mediating brown adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, the effects of cold exposure (4 days at 4 degrees C) on BAT growth were compared with those induced by treating rats at 25 degrees C with norepinephrine (a mixed agonist), isoproterenol (a beta-agonist), and phenylephrine (an alpha-agonist). The drugs were continuously administrated via osmotic minipumps (0.375 mumol/h during 4 days) implanted subcutaneously. Cold exposure markedly enhanced the mitotic activity in brown adipocyte precursor cells (interstitial cells and preadipocytes) and endothelial cells forming the numerous capillaries. Norepinephrine mimicked the effects of cold exposure, not only on the mitotic activity, but also on the distribution of the labeling among the various cellular types. Isoproterenol entirely reproduced the effects of norepinephrine both on the labeling index and on the cellular type labeling frequency. In contrast, phenylephrine did not stimulate cell division. These results demonstrate that norepinephrine triggers a coordinated proliferation of brown adipocytes and endothelial cells in warm-exposed rats that is similar to that observed after cold exposure. They also suggest that cold exposure stimulates BAT growth by increasing the release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerves and that the neurohormone activates mitoses in BAT precursor cells via beta-adrenergic pathways. PMID:2892422

  16. Noninvasive monitoring of beta-adrenergic tone during isoproterenol infusions.

    PubMed

    Easley, R B; Rodbard, D

    1977-12-01

    Sphygmo-Recording is a simple, noninvasive technique for analysis of pulse wave contour and timing which has been used to evaluate the change in cardiac dynamics during isoproterenol infusion. The QKd interval, i.e., the time interval between the onset of the QRS complex and the onset of the Korotkoff sound at the brachial artery when the sphygomomanometer cuff is at diastolic pressure, is normally 205 +/- 15 msec. Continuous intravenous infusion of isoproterenol at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.03 microgram/kg/min into 12 euthyroid normotensive adult volunteers for 10-min intervals resulted in decreases of 55, 79, and 89 msec in QKd and increases of heart rate of 14, 27, and 43 beats/min, respectively. The corresponding changes in dP/dt, i.e., slope of the pulse wave upstroke at the brachial artery determined noninvasively from the same records, were 0.65, 1.47, and 2.26 mm Hg/msec. These results confirm previous studies which indicate that the chronotropic response of normal subjects to isoproterenol infusion is comparable to that previously reported in patients with the putative "hyperdynamic beta-adrenergic state." PMID:200395

  17. Expression of mammalian beta-adrenergic receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bahouth, S.W.; Malbon, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    Xenopus laevis oocytes are a useful transcription and expression system for DNA and RNA, respectively. Total cellular RNA was extracted from mouse lymphoma S49 cells and poly(A)/sup +/mRNA prepared by affinity chromatography of RNA on oligo(dT) cellulose. The membranes of S49 cells contain beta-adrenergic receptors that display pharmacological characteristics of beta/sub 2/-subtype. Xenopus laevis oocytes were injected with 50 ng of mRNA/oocyte. Expression of beta-adrenergic receptors in oocytes incubated for 30 hr after microinjection was assessed in membranes by radioligand binding using (/sup 3/H) dihydroalprenolol. The injected oocytes displayed 0.34 fmol receptor/oocyte as compared to 0.02 fmol receptor/oocyte in the control oocytes. The affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors in injected oocytes for this radioligand was 2 nM, a value similar to the affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors for DHA in S49 cell membranes. The potency of beta-adrenergic agonists in competing for DHA binding to oocytes membranes was isoproterenol > epinephrine > norepineprine, indicating that the expressed beta-adrenergic receptors were of the beta/sub 2/-subtype. The K/sub I/ of these agonists for the beta-adrenergic receptor in oocyte membranes was 0.03, 0.15 and 1.2 ..mu..M, respectively. The role of post-translational modification in dictating receptor subtype is analyzed using mRNA of beta/sub 1/- as well as beta/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors.

  18. The mechanism of beta-adrenergic preconditioning: roles for adenosine and ROS during triggering and mediation.

    PubMed

    Salie, Ruduwaan; Moolman, Johannes A; Lochner, Amanda

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of beta-adrenergic preconditioning (BPC). The roles of adenosine and its receptor subtypes, the generation of oxygen free radicals (ROS) and activation of the K(ATP) channels as well as the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI(3)K)/PKB/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathways during the triggering and mediation phases were evaluated. Using the isolated working rat heart, BPC was elicited by administration of denopamine (beta1 adrenergic receptor agonist, 10(-7) M), isoproterenol (beta1/beta2 adrenergic receptor agonist, 10(-7) M) or formoterol (beta2 adrenergic receptor agonist, 10(-9) M) for 5 min followed by 5 min washout. Index ischaemia was 35 min regional ischaemia and infarct size determined using the tetrazolium method. The role of adenosine was studied using adenosine deaminase and selective antagonists as well as the PI(3)K and ERK inhibitors, wortmannin and PD98,059, bracketing the triggering and mediating phases. Involvement of ROS, PKC, the mitochondrial K(ATP) channels, release of endogenous opioids and bradykinin was studied by administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), bisindolylmaleimide, the K(ATP) channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD), naloxone or HOE140, respectively. Activation of PKB/Akt and ERKp44/p42 during triggering and reperfusion was determined by Western blot. Preconditioning with all three beta-adrenergic receptor agonists caused a reduction in infarct size and an improvement in postischaemic function. BPC preconditioning with isoproterenol, denopamine or formoterol was abolished by the adenosine A3 receptor antagonist MRS1191 during both the triggering and mediation phases. Isoproterenol-induced preconditioning (beta1/beta2 PC) was attenuated by MRS1754, an adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist, during the triggering phase and abolished during reperfusion. The mediation phase of beta1/beta2 PC was also abolished by ZM241385, an adenosine A(2

  19. Effects of ovarian hormones on beta-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors in rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Klangkalya, B.; Chan, A.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo effects of estrogen and progesterone on muscarinic and ..beta..-adrenergic receptors of cardiac tissue were studied in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The binding assay for muscarinic receptors was performed under a nonequilibrium condition; whereas the binding assay for ..beta..-adrenergic receptors, under an equilibrium condition. Estrogenic compounds and progesterone were found to have no effect on the binding of the radioligand, (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol, to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in vitro. However, progestins but not estrogenic compounds inhibited the binding of the radioligand, (/sup 3/H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate, to muscarinic receptors in vitro, with progesterone as the most potent inhibitor. Progesterone was found to decrease the apparent affinity of muscarinic receptors for (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB in vitro. Daily treatment of OVX rats with estradiol benzoate or progesterone for 4 days had no effect on the muscarinic or ..beta..-adrenergic receptors with respect to the binding affinity and receptor density. However, administrations of these hormones together for 4 days caused an increase in the receptor density of muscarinic receptors without a significant effect on their apparent binding affinity; also these hormones induced a decrease in the binding affinity and an increase in the receptor density of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors.

  20. Targeting of Beta Adrenergic Receptors Results in Therapeutic Efficacy against Models of Hemangioendothelioma and Angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Jessica M.; Amaya, Clarissa; Rains, Steven; Diaz, Dolores; Pham, Robert; Battiste, James; Modiano, Jaime F.; Kokta, Victor; Boucheron, Laura E.; Mitchell, Dianne C.; Bryan, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of the beta-adrenergic receptors has recently shown remarkable efficacy in the treatment of benign vascular tumors such as infantile hemangiomas. As infantile hemangiomas are reported to express high levels of beta adrenergic receptors, we examined the expression of these receptors on more aggressive vascular tumors such as hemangioendotheliomas and angiosarcomas, revealing beta 1, 2, and 3 receptors were indeed present and therefore aggressive vascular tumors may similarly show increased susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of beta blockade. Using a panel of hemangioendothelioma and angiosarcoma cell lines, we demonstrate that beta adrenergic inhibition blocks cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Beta blockade is selective for vascular tumor cells over normal endothelial cells and synergistically effective when combined with standard chemotherapeutic or cytotoxic agents. We demonstrate that inhibition of beta adrenergic signaling induces large scale changes in the global gene expression patterns of vascular tumors, including alterations in the expression of established cell cycle and apoptotic regulators. Using in vivo tumor models we demonstrate that beta blockade shows remarkable efficacy as a single agent in reducing the growth of angiosarcoma tumors. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the selective cytotoxicity and tumor suppressive ability of beta adrenergic inhibition on malignant vascular tumors and have laid the groundwork for a promising treatment of angiosarcomas in humans. PMID:23555867

  1. Beta-adrenergic agonists increase lung liquid clearance in anesthetized sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Berthiaume, Y; Staub, N C; Matthay, M A

    1987-01-01

    We did experiments to determine whether beta-adrenergic agonists increase lung liquid clearance in anesthetized ventilated adult sheep and, if so, whether the increase is mediated by beta receptors and what mechanism is involved. We instilled 100 ml of autologous serum either alone or with a beta-adrenergic agonist (terbutaline, 10(-5) M, or epinephrine, 5.5 X 10(-6) M) into one lower lobe. After 4 h both terbutaline and epinephrine increased lung liquid clearance. The increase in lung liquid clearance was inhibited when propranolol (a beta blocker) or amiloride (a sodium channel blocker) was added to the terbutaline. Increased clearance was not explained by changes in pulmonary hemodynamics, pulmonary blood flow, or lung lymph flow. We conclude that beta-adrenergic agonists increase lung liquid clearance in anesthetized intact adult sheep. This increase is mediated through beta receptors and probably depends on increased active transport of sodium across the alveolar barrier. Images PMID:2879851

  2. Localization of beta-adrenergic receptors on differentiated cells of the central nervous system in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ventimiglia, R; Greene, M I; Geller, H M

    1987-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons and cortical protoplasmic (type 1) astrocytes in dissociated cultures of rat brain express binding sites for antibodies specific for epitopes related to the beta-adrenergic receptor. Undifferentiated glial progenitor cells of the rat optic nerve do not detectably bind these antibodies, but both of the progeny [oligodendroglia and process-bearing (type 2) astrocytes] express immunologically identified beta-adrenergic receptors. Levels of receptor expression are variable: not all cells of each type express receptors nor is expression uniform on a given cell. The data suggest that cells of the central nervous system express beta-adrenergic receptors but that levels of expression may be determined by the differentiated state of the cells. Images PMID:3037533

  3. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  4. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase activity in rat brown fat

    SciTech Connect

    Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E.; Scarpace, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Catecholamines stimulate thermogenesis in rat brown fat through a mechanism which involves binding to the beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR), stimulation of adenylate cyclase (AC) and culminating with uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration from ATP synthesis. The authors characterized BAR, AC and cytochrome (cyt) c oxidase in CDF (F-344) interscapular brown fat. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 125/)Iodopindolol binding yields a straight line consistent with a single class of antagonist binding sites with 41.8 +/- 12.0 fmol BAR/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 118 +/- 15 pM. Binding was both specific and stereospecific. Competition with 1-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 6.7 nM) was 15 times more potent than d-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 103 nM). Competition with isoproterenol (K/sub d/ = 79 nM) was 10 times more potent than epinephrine (K/sub d/ = 820 nM) which was 35 times more potent than norepinephrine (K/sub d/ = 2.9 x 10/sup -5/ M) suggesting predominate beta/sub 2/-type BAR. Cyt c oxidase activity was assessed in brown fat mitochrondrial preparations. The ratio of BAR to cyt c activity was 959 +/- 275 nmol BAR/mol cyc c/min. Isoproterenol (0.1 mM) stimulated AC activity was 24 times GTP (0.1 mM) stimulated AC (98.5 vs 40.7 pmol cAMP/min/mg). NaF-stimulated AC was nine times basal activity (90.5 vs 11.3 pmol cAMP/min/mg). These data demonstrate the presence of a beta-/sub 2/-type BAR coupled to adenylate cyclase in rat brown fat.

  5. Robust experiment design for estimating myocardial {beta} adrenergic receptor concentration using PET

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, Cristian; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr.; Ernsberger, Paul; Saidel, Gerald M.

    2007-01-15

    Myocardial {beta} adrenergic receptor ({beta}-AR) concentration can substantially decrease in congestive heart failure and significantly increase in chronic volume overload, such as in severe aortic valve regurgitation. Positron emission tomography (PET) with an appropriate ligand-receptor model can be used for noninvasive estimation of myocardial {beta}-AR concentration in vivo. An optimal design of the experiment protocol, however, is needed for sufficiently precise estimates of {beta}-AR concentration in a heterogeneous population. Standard methods of optimal design do not account for a heterogeneous population with a wide range of {beta}-AR concentrations and other physiological parameters and consequently are inadequate. To address this, we have developed a methodology to design a robust two-injection protocol that provides reliable estimates of myocardial {beta}-AR concentration in normal and pathologic states. A two-injection protocol of the high affinity {beta}-AR antagonist [{sup 18}F]-(S)-fluorocarazolol was designed based on a computer-generated (or synthetic) population incorporating a wide range of {beta}-AR concentrations. Timing and dosage of the ligand injections were optimally designed with minimax criterion to provide the least bad {beta}-AR estimates for the worst case in the synthetic population. This robust experiment design for PET was applied to experiments with pigs before and after {beta}-AR upregulation by chemical sympathectomy. Estimates of {beta}-AR concentration were found by minimizing the difference between the model-predicted and experimental PET data. With this robust protocol, estimates of {beta}-AR concentration showed high precision in both normal and pathologic states. The increase in {beta}-AR concentration after sympathectomy predicted noninvasively with PET is consistent with the increase shown by in vitro assays in pig myocardium. A robust experiment protocol was designed for PET that yields reliable estimates of {beta

  6. Beta Adrenergic Blocking Medications for Aggressive or Self-Injurious Mentally Retarded Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruedrich, Stephen L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Literature is reviewed and a case report is presented concerning blockers of the beta-adrenergic function of the sympathetic nervous system, postulated to have efficacy in treatment of aggressive or self-injurious syndromes in persons with mental retardation. Concerns are raised regarding endorsement of beta-blocking medications before they have…

  7. beta-Adrenergic and cholinergic receptors in hypertension-induced hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Vatner, D.E.; Kirby, D.A.; Homcy, C.J.; Vatner, S.F.

    1985-05-01

    Perinephritic hypertension was produced in dogs by wrapping one kidney with silk and removing the contralateral kidney 1 week later. Mean arterial pressure rose from 104 +/- 3 to 156 +/- 11 mm Hg, while left ventricular free wall weight, normalized for body weight, was increased by 49%. Muscarinic, cholinergic receptor density measured with (/sup 3/H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate, fell in hypertensive left ventricles (181 +/- 19 fmol/mg, n = 6; p less than 0.01) as compared with that found in normal left ventricles (272 +/- 16 fmol/mg, n = 8), while receptor affinity was not changed. The beta-adrenergic receptor density, measured by binding studies with (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol, rose in the hypertensive left ventricles (108 +/- 10 fmol/mg, n = 7; p less than 0.01) as compared with that found in normal left ventricles (68.6 +/- 5.2 fmol/mg, n = 15), while beta-adrenergic receptor affinity decreased in the hypertensive left ventricles (10.4 +/- 1.2 nM) compared with that found in the normal left ventricles (5.0 +/- 0.7 nM). Plasma norepinephrine levels were similar in the two groups, but myocardial norepinephrine levels were depressed (p less than 0.05) in dogs with hypertension. Moderate left ventricular hypertrophy induced by long-term aortic banding in dogs resulted in elevations in beta-adrenergic receptor density (115 +/- 14 fmol/mg) and decreases in affinity (10.4 +/- 2.2 nM) similar to those observed in the dogs with left ventricular hypertrophy induced by hypertension. Thus, these results suggest that perinephritic hypertension in the dog induces divergent effects on cholinergic and beta-adrenergic receptor density. The increased beta-adrenergic receptor density and decreased affinity may be a characteristic of left ventricular hypertrophy rather than hypertension.

  8. Thyroid-hormone modulation of the number of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat fat-cell membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Giudicelli, Y

    1978-01-01

    Adipocytes from thyroidectomized rats contain 3 times less [3H]dihydroalprenolol-binding sites (beta-adrenergic receptors) than adipocytes from euthyroid animals. This alteration is not solely due to cell-size differences, but also to a thyroidectomy-induced defect in beta-adrenergic receptor density per adipocyte surface area, a defect that is furthermore corrected by tri-iodothyronine treatment. PMID:218550

  9. The avian beta-adrenergic receptor: primary structure and membrane topology.

    PubMed Central

    Yarden, Y; Rodriguez, H; Wong, S K; Brandt, D R; May, D C; Burnier, J; Harkins, R N; Chen, E Y; Ramachandran, J; Ullrich, A

    1986-01-01

    Partial amino acid sequence information allowed the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the turkey erythrocyte beta-adrenergic receptor. Antisera raised against synthetic peptides encoded by the cDNA crossreacted with the purified receptor and appropriate tryptic fragments, confirming the identity of the cDNA. The receptor is composed of 483 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 54 kDa. Its sequence suggests that it is arranged predominantly in seven membrane-spanning sequences and a long cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal domain. The extracellular amino-terminal domain contains a consensus sequence for N-glycosylation. The beta-adrenergic receptor displays overall structural similarity and weak sequence homology with rhodopsin. Because both proteins act by regulating GTP-binding proteins, a compact structure based on seven membrane-spanning regions may be a general model for receptors that act on G proteins. Images PMID:3018746

  10. Modification by Beta-Adrenergic Blockade of the Circulatory Responses to Acute Hypoxia in Man*

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David W.; Kontos, Hermes A.; Raper, A. Jarrell; Patterson, John L.

    1967-01-01

    In 17 healthy men, beta-adrenergic blockade reduced significantly the tachycardia and the elevation of cardiac output associated with inhalation of 7.5% oxygen for 7 to 10 minutes. Hypoxia did not increase plasma concentrations of epinephrine or norepinephrine in six subjects. Furthermore, blockade of alpha and beta receptors in the forearm did not modify the vasodilation in the forearm induced by hypoxia, providing pharmacologic evidence that hypoxia of the degree and duration used was not associated with an increase in the concentrations of circulating catecholamines in man. Part of the increase in cardiac output and heart rate during acute hypoxia in man is produced by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors, probably by cardiac sympathetic nerves. The mechanism of the vasodilation in the forearm during hypoxia remains uncertain. PMID:4381183

  11. Cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors and coronary hemodynamics in the conscious dog during hypoxic hypoxia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, H. H.; Stone, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanisms by which acute hypoxia (10% and 5% oxygen) mediates changes in coronary blood flow and cardiac function were investigated in the conscious dog. When the dogs breathed hypoxic gas mixtures through a tracheostomy, both arterial and coronary sinus oxygen tensions were significantly decreased. With 5% oxygen, there were significant increases in heart rate (25%), maximum left ventricular dP/dt (39%), left circumflex coronary artery blood flow (163%), and left ventricular oxygen consumption (52%), which were attenuated by beta-adrenergic blockage with propranolol. When electrical pacing was used to keep the ventricular rate constant during hypoxia, there was no significant difference in coronary blood flow before and after beta blockade. Beta-adrenergic receptor activity in the myocardium participates in the integrated response to hypoxia although it may not cause active vasodilation of the coronary vessels.

  12. Beta-adrenergic receptor density and adenylate cyclase activity in lead-exposed rat brain after cessation of lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huoy-Rou; Tsao, Der-An; Yu, Hsin-Su; Ho, Chi-Kung

    2005-01-01

    To understanding the reversible or irreversible harm to the beta-adrenergic system in the brain of lead-exposed rats, this study sets up an animal model to estimate the change in the sympathetic nervous system of brain after lead exposure was withdrawn. We address the following topics in this study: (a) the relationship between withdrawal time of lead exposure and brain beta-adrenergic receptor, blood lead level, and brain lead level in lead-exposed rats after lead exposure was stopped; and (b) the relationship between lead level and beta-adrenergic receptor and cyclic AMP (c-AMP) in brain. Wistar rats were chronically fed with 2% lead acetate and water for 2 months. Radioligand binding was assayed by a method that fulfilled strict criteria of beta-adrenergic receptor using the ligand [125I]iodocyanopindolol. The levels of lead were determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The c-AMP level was determined by radioimmunoassay. The results showed a close relationship between decreasing lead levels and increasing numbers of brain beta-adrenergic receptors and brain adenylate cyclase activity after lead exposure was withdrawn. The effect of lead exposure on the beta-adrenergic system of the brain is a partly reversible condition. PMID:15502967

  13. Identification and characterization of a novel family of Drosophila beta-adrenergic-like octopamine G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Maqueira, Braudel; Chatwin, Heather; Evans, Peter D

    2005-07-01

    Insect octopamine receptors carry out many functional roles traditionally associated with vertebrate adrenergic receptors. These include control of carbohydrate metabolism, modulation of muscular tension, modulation of sensory inputs and modulation of memory and learning. The activation of octopamine receptors mediating many of these actions leads to increases in the levels of cyclic AMP. However, to date none of the insect octopamine receptors that have been cloned have been convincingly shown to be capable of directly mediating selective and significant increases in cyclic AMP levels. Here we report on the identification and characterization of a novel, neuronally expressed family of three Drosophila G-protein coupled receptors that are selectively coupled to increases in intracellular cyclic AMP levels by octopamine. This group of receptors, DmOct beta1R (CG6919), DmOct beta2R (CG6989) and DmOct beta3R (CG7078) shows homology to vertebrate beta-adrenergic receptors. When expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells all three receptors show a strong preference for octopamine over tyramine for the accumulation of cyclic AMP but show unique pharmacological profiles when tested with a range of synthetic agonists and antagonists. Thus, the pharmacological profile of individual insect tissue responses to octopamine might vary with the combination and the degree of expression of the individual octopamine receptors present. PMID:15998303

  14. The role of beta-adrenergic receptors in the cutaneous water evaporation mechanism in the heat-acclimated pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Ophir, E; Arieli, Y; Raber, P; Marder, J

    2000-01-01

    The effects of selective and non-selective beta-adrenergic agents on cutaneous water evaporation (CWE) were studied in hand-reared rock pigeons (Columba livia). CWE was measured by the vapor diffusive resistance method, using a transient porometer. Intramuscular and subcutaneous injections of a non-selective beta-adrenergic antagonist (propranolol) or a selective beta(2)-adrenergic antagonist (ICI-118551) to heat-acclimated (HAc) pigeons at ambient temperature (T(a)) of 24 degrees C resulted in intensive CWE. The CWE values that were triggered by propranolol and ICI-118551 (18.59+/-0.73 and 16.48+/-0.70 mg cm(-2) h(-1), respectively) were close to those induced by heat exposure (17.62+/-1.40 mg cm(-2) h(-1)). Subcutaneous administration of propranolol produced local response. Intramuscular injection of salbutamol (selective beta(2)-adrenergic agonist) to HAc pigeons drastically diminished CWE induced by either propranolol, metoprolol or heat exposure. Such manipulations also enhanced panting at relatively low T(a)s (42 degrees C). The inhibition of beta(1)-adrenergic receptors by metoprolol increased CWE, while inhibition by atenolol produced no change from basal values. This difference may be attributed to their distinctive nature in penetrating the blood-brain barrier. Our findings indicate a regulatory pathway for CWE consisting of both beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We suggest that the beta(1)-adrenergic effect is restricted mainly to the CNS, while the beta(2)-adrenergic effect takes place at the effector level. We postulate this level to be either the cutaneous microvasculature or the epidermal layer. PMID:10779732

  15. Phorbol ester-induced inhibition of. beta. -adrenergic - and vasopressin-mediated responses in an established smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    A-10 cells which are derived from embryonic rat thoracic aorta contain a high density of vasopressin receptors and relatively fewer ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. The effects of vasopressin binding to these cells are two-fold: a) inhibition of isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation, and; b) stimulation of phosphatidyl inositol turnover. Incubation of these cells with phorbol dibutyrate leads to an attenuation of the responses mediated by ..beta..-adrenergic agonist as well as vasopressin. This effect of phorbol ester is concentration- and time-dependent and can be observed as early as five minutes. The inactive phorbol ester (4 ..cap alpha.. phorbol 12,13-didecanoate) is ineffective in inhibiting ..beta..-adrenergic agonist and vasopressin-mediated responses. Since present evidence indicates that the enzyme protein kinase C (PK-C) is involved in both short-term and long-term regulatory processes such as secretion, smooth muscle contraction and cell growth, these data suggest that both ..beta..-adrenergic and vasopressin receptors and/or some mediator(s) of ..beta..-adrenergic and/or vasopressin responses may be phosphorylated by protein kinase C resulting in an attenuated response of these two hormones.

  16. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  17. Suspected postprandial hypoglycemia is associated with beta-adrenergic hypersensitivity and emotional distress.

    PubMed

    Berlin, I; Grimaldi, A; Landault, C; Cesselin, F; Puech, A J

    1994-11-01

    Suspected postprandial (reactive or idiopathic) hypoglycemia is characterized by predominantly adrenergic symptoms appearing after meals rich in carbohydrates and by their rare association with low blood glucose level (< 2.77 mmol/L). We studied heart rate, blood pressure, plasma insulin, C-peptide, and catecholamine responses during a 5-h oral glucose tolerance test in eight patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia and eight age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated beta-adrenergic sensitivity by using the isoproterenol sensitivity test. Psychological profile was assessed by the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90R) self-report symptom inventory. Patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia had higher beta-adrenergic sensitivity (defined as the dose of isoproterenol required to increase the resting heart rate by 25 beats/min) than controls (mean +/- SEM, 0.8 +/- 0.13 vs. 1.86 +/- 0.25 microgram isoproterenol; P = 0.002). After administration of glucose (75 g) blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, plasma epinephrine, and plasma norepinephrine responses were identical in the two groups, but plasma insulin was higher in the patients (group effect, P = 0.02; group by time interaction, P = 0.0001). Both heart rate and systolic blood pressure were significantly higher (but remained in the normal range) after glucose administration in patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia than in controls (group by time interactions, P = 0.004 and 0.0007, respectively). After glucose intake, seven patients had symptoms (palpitations, headache, tremor, generalized sweating, hunger, dizziness, sweating of the palms, flush, nausea, and fatigue), whereas in the control group, one subject reported flush and another palpitations, tremor, and hunger. Analysis of the SCL-90R questionnaire revealed that patients had emotional distress and significantly higher anxiety, somatization, depression, and obsessive-compulsive scores than controls. We may

  18. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  19. Modeling beta-adrenergic control of cardiac myocyte contractility in silico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Brunton, Laurence L.; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic signaling pathway regulates cardiac myocyte contractility through a combination of feedforward and feedback mechanisms. We used systems analysis to investigate how the components and topology of this signaling network permit neurohormonal control of excitation-contraction coupling in the rat ventricular myocyte. A kinetic model integrating beta-adrenergic signaling with excitation-contraction coupling was formulated, and each subsystem was validated with independent biochemical and physiological measurements. Model analysis was used to investigate quantitatively the effects of specific molecular perturbations. 3-Fold overexpression of adenylyl cyclase in the model allowed an 85% higher rate of cyclic AMP synthesis than an equivalent overexpression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, and manipulating the affinity of Gs alpha for adenylyl cyclase was a more potent regulator of cyclic AMP production. The model predicted that less than 40% of adenylyl cyclase molecules may be stimulated under maximal receptor activation, and an experimental protocol is suggested for validating this prediction. The model also predicted that the endogenous heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor may enhance basal cyclic AMP buffering by 68% and increasing the apparent Hill coefficient of protein kinase A activation from 1.0 to 2.0. Finally, phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel and phospholamban were found sufficient to predict the dominant changes in myocyte contractility, including a 2.6x increase in systolic calcium (inotropy) and a 28% decrease in calcium half-relaxation time (lusitropy). By performing systems analysis, the consequences of molecular perturbations in the beta-adrenergic signaling network may be understood within the context of integrative cellular physiology.

  20. beta-adrenergic effects on carbohydrate metabolism in the unweighted rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of unweighting on the response of the soleus-muscle carbohydrate metabolism to a beta-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol) was investigated in rats that were subjected to three days of tail-cast suspension. It was found that isoproterenol promoted glycogen degradation in soleus from suspended rats to a higher degree than in weighted soleus from control rats, and had no effect in unweighted digitorum longus. However, isoproterenol did not have a greater inhibitory effect on the net uptake of tritium-labeled 2-deoxy-glucose by the unweighted soleus and that isoproterenol inhibited hexose phosphorylation less in the unweighted than in the control muscle.

  1. Role of arachidonic acid metabolites in the action of a beta adrenergic agonist on human monocyte phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Borda, E S; Tenenbaum, A; Sales, M E; Rumi, L; Sterin-Borda, L

    1998-02-01

    The mechanisms by which beta adrenergic stimulation regulates phagocytosis of Candida albicans by human peripheral monocytes (HPM) are characterized. Isoproterenol (ISO) inhibits phagocytosis in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was blunted by propranolol, inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase and verapamil, pointing to a participation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites and calcium in the phenomenon. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) also exerted the same inhibitory effect on phagocytosis. ISO interacts with beta adrenergic receptors of HPM increasing PGE2 and cAMP. We conclude that the mechanisms by which beta adrenergic stimulation regulates phagocytosis of Candida albicans by HPM appear to be secondary to beta adrenoceptor-mediated hydrolysis of AA accompanied by an increase in PGE2 generation and cAMP production. Both PGE2 and cAMP could act as mediators of the inhibitory action of beta agonists on the HPM-phagocytosis process. PMID:9578144

  2. Distribution of beta-adrenergic receptors in failing human myocardium. Implications for mechanisms of down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphree, S.S.; Saffitz, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The density of beta-adrenergic receptors is reduced in crude membranes prepared from failing human myocardium. We used quantitative autoradiography of radioligand binding sites in intact tissue slices to determine whether the total tissue content of receptors is reduced and to characterize the transmural distribution of receptors in cardiac myocytes and the coronary vasculature in hearts obtained from nine cardiac transplant patients with severe congestive failure. Binding of (125Iodo)cyanopindolol to transmural slices of human myocardium was rapid, saturable, stereoselective, and displaceable by agonists and antagonists with an appropriate rank order of potency. Binding isotherms in four normal and nine failing ventricles showed a significant reduction in the total tissue content of beta-receptors in failing myocardium (38.3 +/- 2.0 fmol/mg protein) compared with normal tissue (52.4 +/- 1.7 fmol/mg protein, p = 0.038). In the normal ventricles, the greatest receptor density was observed autoradiographically in myocytic regions of the subendocardium. Receptor density of the coronary arterioles was approximately 70% of that in adjacent myocytic regions. The density of binding sites in both myocytic regions and arterioles was diminished in all regions of the failing ventricles, but down-regulation was due primarily to a selective reduction of beta-receptors of subendocardial myocytes (63 +/- 5% of subepicardial receptor density vs. 115 +/- 6% in controls, p less than 0.0001). These observations indicate that down-regulation occurs nonuniformly in the transmural distribution and thus is likely not related simply to elevated circulating catecholamine levels.

  3. Acute {beta}-adrenergic stimulation does not alter mitochondrial protein synthesis or markers of mitochondrial biogenesis in adult men.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew M; Richards, Jennifer C; Hickey, Matthew S; Moore, Daniel R; Phillips, Stuart M; Bell, Christopher; Miller, Benjamin F

    2010-01-01

    Exercise-induced expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is dramatically inhibited in mice pretreated with a beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) antagonist, suggesting that beta-ARs play an important role in the regulation of skeletal muscle PGC-1alpha expression, and potentially, mitochondrial biogenesis. Accordingly, we hypothesized that acute beta-AR stimulation would induce transcriptional pathways involved in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in humans. Whole body protein turnover (WBPT), myofibrillar protein synthesis (MyPS), skeletal muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis (MiPS), and mitochondrial biogenic signaling were determined in samples of vastus lateralis obtained on two separate occasions in 10 young adult males following 1 h of continuous intravenous administration of saline (CON) or a nonspecific beta-AR agonist [isoproterenol (ISO): 12 ng.kg fat free mass(-1).min(-1)], combined with coinfusion of [1,2](13)C-leucine. beta-AR stimulation induced appreciable increases in heart rate and systolic blood pressure (both P < 0.001) but did not affect mitochondrial biogenic signaling (no change in PGC-1alpha, TFAM, NRF-1, NRF-2, COX, or NADHox expression via RT-PCR; P > 0.05). Additionally, MiPS [CON: 0.099 +/- 0.028, ISO: 0.074 +/- 0.046 (mean +/- SD); P > 0.05] and MyPS (CON: 0.059 +/- 0.008, ISO: 0.055 +/- 0.009; P > 0.05), as well as measures of WBPT were unaffected. On the basis of this investigation, we conclude that acute intravenous beta-AR stimulation does not increase mitochondrial protein synthesis or biogenesis signals in skeletal muscle. PMID:19907002

  4. Age-associated changes in beta-adrenergic modulation on rat cardiac excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, R P; Spurgeon, H A; O'Connor, F; Lakatta, E G

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the ability of beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR) stimulation to increase cardiac contractility declines with aging. In the present study, the control mechanisms of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, including calcium current (ICa), cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai2+) transient and contraction in response to beta AR stimulation were investigated in ventricular myocytes isolated from rat hearts of a broad age range (2, 6-8, and 24 mo). While the baseline contractile performance and the Cai2+ transient did not differ markedly among cells from hearts of all age groups, the responses of the Cai2+ transient and contraction to beta-adrenergic stimulation by norepinephrine (NE) diminished with aging: the threshold concentration and the ED50 increased in rank order with aging; the maximum responses of contraction and Cai2+ transient decreased with aging. Furthermore, the efficacy of beta AR stimulation to increase ICa was significantly reduced with aging, and the diminished responses of the contraction and Cai2+ transient amplitudes to NE were proportional to the reductions in the ICa response. These findings suggest that the observed age-associated reduction in beta AR modulation of the cardiac contraction is, in part at least, due to a deficit in modulation of Cai2+, particularly the activity of L-type calcium channels. PMID:7962551

  5. Variability in Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population in Cultured Chicken Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations into expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) in chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture were initiated because several beta-adrenergic receptor agonists are known to increase skeletal muscle protein deposition in avian and mammalian species. During initial attempts to study the bAR population on the surface of chicken skeletal muscle cells, we observed a high degree of variability that was later found to be the result of using different batches of horse serum in the cell culture media. The separation between total binding and nonspecific binding in cells grown in two serum samples was approximately two-fold The number of nuclei within multinucleated myotubes was not significantly different in cells grown in the two serum samples. To investigate whether these two sera had an effect on coupling efficiency between bAR population and cAMP production, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was also assessed. Despite the two-fold difference in receptor population, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was not significantly different. Because of the possible link between bAR population and muscle protein, we also determined if the quantity of the major skeletal muscle protein, myosin, was affected by conditions that so drastically affected the bAR population. The quantity of myosin heavy chain was not significantly different.

  6. alpha. - and. beta. -adrenergic receptors in proximal tubules of rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Fortin, T.L.; Kelvie, S.L. )

    1987-11-01

    Proximal tubules were isolated from the rat kidney by collagenase digestion of the cortical tissue followed by Percoll gradient centrifugation. Microscopic and hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity studies proved the purity of the preparation. ({sup 3}H)Prazosin, ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine, and ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol were used to identify and quantitate respectively the {alpha}{sub 1}-, {alpha}{sub 2}- and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Proximal tubular (F{sub 4}) particulate fraction was compared against other cortical nephron segment (F{sub 1},F{sub 2}) fractions and the total collagenase-digested cortex particulate suspension (F{sub t}). Proximal tubules were enriched in {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors compared with. The fractions enriched in glomeruli and distal tubular segments had relatively low concentrations of {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities in the different fractions corroborated well with the pattern suggested by the ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol binding studies. The results suggest that whole-cortex preparation radioligand binding studies may reflect proximal tubular {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor changes quite well. They may, however, miss or give erroneous impressions about {beta}-adrenergic receptor changes occurring in different cortical nephron segments.

  7. Elevated level of. beta. -adrenergic receptors in hepatocytes from regenerating rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Sandnes, D.; Sand, T.E.; Sager, G.; Broenstad, G.O.; Refsnes, M.R.; Gladhaug, I.P.; Jacobsen, S.; Christoffersen, T.

    1986-01-01

    Hepatocytes from regenerating rat liver show an enhanced epinephrine-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP response, which may be involved in triggering of the cell proliferation. We have determined adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase activity in hepatocytes isolated at various time points after partial hepatectomy. The number of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors, measured by binding of (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol ((/sup 125/I)CYP) to a particulate fraction prepared from isolated hepatocytes, increased rapidly after partial hepatectomy as compared with sham-operated or untreated controls. The maximal increase, which was observed at 48 h, was between 5- and 6-fold (from approx.1800 to approx.10,500 sites per cell). Thereafter, the number of ..beta..- adrenergic receptors decreased gradually. Competition experiments indicated ..beta../sub 2/-type receptors. Parallelism was found between the change in the number of ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors and the isoproterenol-responsive adenylate cyclase activity. The number of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors, determined by binding of (/sup 3/H)prazosin, was transiently lowered by about 35% at 18-24 h. with no significant change in K/sub d/. Although the results of this study do not exclude the possibility of post-receptor events, they suggest that the increased number of..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors is a major factor responsible for the enhanced catecholamine-responsive adenylate cyclase activity in regenerating liver.

  8. Severe hyperkalemia as a complication of timolol, a topically applied beta-adrenergic antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, E.R.

    1986-06-01

    Severe hyperkalemia occurred in a patient with radiation pneumonitis and glaucoma shortly after beginning prednisone therapy. There was no evidence of renal failure, diabetes, acidosis, increased potassium intake, or significant tissue trauma. Medications having adverse effects on potassium metabolism were considered, and the patient's use of timolol maleate eyedrops was discontinued. His serum potassium level normalized despite continuation of the prednisone therapy. He became hyperkalemic on rechallenge with timolol and normokalemic following its withdrawal. This case indicates that the potential for beta-blocker-induced hyperkalemia exists even with topical appreciation.

  9. Reconsolidation of Appetitive Memories for Both Natural and Drug Reinforcement Is Dependent on [beta]-Adrenergic Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton, Amy L.; Lee, Jonathan L. C.; Everitt, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the neurochemical mechanisms of memory reconsolidation and, in particular, the functional requirement for intracellular mechanisms initiated by [beta]-adrenergic signaling. We show that propranolol, given in conjunction with a memory reactivation session, can specifically disrupt the conditioned reinforcing properties of a…

  10. Participation of beta-adrenergic activity in modulation of GLUT4 expression during fasting and refeeding in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through in vitro studies, several factors have been reported as modulators of GLUT4 gene expression. However, the role(s) of each potential GLUT4 modulator is not completely understood in the in vivo setting. The present study has investigated the hypothesis that beta-adrenergic stimulation particip...

  11. beta. -adrenergic receptor binding characteristics and responsiveness in cultured Wistar-Kyoto rat arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jazayeri, A.; Meyer, W.J. III

    1988-01-01

    The tone of arterial blood vessels is regulated by the catecholamines through their receptors on arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMC). ..beta..-/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors of ASMC mediate vasodilation through agonist mediated c-AMP production. Previous reports have described these receptors on freshly isolated blood vessels. This study demonstrates the presence of ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors on cultured rat ASMC and that these receptors are functional. ..beta..-adrenergic receptor binding was measured using (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding to the membrane of cultured ASMC from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. The ASMC ..beta..-adrenergic receptors have a Kd of 0.56 +/- 0.16 nM and a Bmax of 57.2 +/- 21.7 fmol/mg protein. Competition binding studies revealed a much greater affinity of these receptors for epinephrine than norepinephrine, indicating the preponderance of a ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype. Isoproterenol stimulation of cultured ASMC resulted in a 14 +/- 7 fold increase in intracellular c-AMP content of these cells indicating these receptors are functional. ..beta..-adrenergic receptors of cultured ASMC provide an excellent system in which the association between hypertension and observed ..beta..-adrenergic receptor differences can be further explored.

  12. Milrinone enhances cytosolic calcium transient and contraction in rat cardiac myocytes during beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, S; Ferroni, C; Spurgeon, H A; Capogrossi, M C

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism that underlies the absence of a positive inotropic effect of milrinone on rat myocardium. The twitch characteristics of enzymatically dissociated left ventricular myocytes from the adult rat and guinea pig were assessed by edge tracking during field stimulation. In some rat myocytes loaded with the ester derivative of the Ca2+ probe Indo-1 we simultaneously measured changes in cell length and in the associated cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai) transient. Our results show that in guinea pig myocytes bathed in 0.5 mM [Ca2+] and field stimulated at 1 Hz, milrinone (10 microM) had a positive inotropic effect. In contrast milrinone had no effect on the contractile properties of rat myocytes studied under similar conditions and field stimulated at 0.2 Hz. In rat myocytes bathed in 0.5 mM [Ca2+] and stimulated at 0.2 Hz isoproterenol (1 nM) increased the amplitude and shortened the duration of the contraction and of the associated Cai transient; these effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation were further enhanced by the addition of milrinone (10 microM) in the presence of isoproterenol. Under conditions of higher cell Ca2+ loading achieved by raising bathing [Ca2+] to 1 mM and isoproterenol to 3 nM the positive inotropic effect of milrinone (10 microM) in rat myocytes saturated when spontaneous oscillatory Ca2+ release appeared in the diastolic intervals between electrically stimulated twitches. Our results suggest that an enhancement in the baseline beta-adrenergic stimulation is required for milrinone to exercise a positive inotropic action on rat myocardial tissue. PMID:2576017

  13. Effect of alpha and beta adrenergic blockade on epinephrine induced pulmonary insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berk, J L; Hagen, J F; Koo, R

    1976-04-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that epinephrine causes significant pulmonary A-V shunting. This study reports the effect of alpha and beta adrenergic blockade on this shunting. Sixty-three anesthetized mongrel dogs were ventilated with a mechanical respirator. Measurements of (1) the pulmonary shunt, (2) cardiac output, (3) mean pulmonary artery, pulmonary capillary wedge and systemic pressures, and (4) pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances were obtained at 5, 15 and 30 minute intervals during the first hour and hourly for 5 hours. Fifteen dogs received no treatment. All others received epinephrine hydrochloride, 2 mug/kg/min for 5 hours. Ten received epinephrine only. Ten were pretreated with propranolol hydrochloride, 250 mug/kg, 12 with phenoxybenzamine, 1 mg/kg, and 16 with phenoxybenzamine and propranolol. Propranolol significantly decreased the epinephrine induced pulmonary shunt at all times and was the most effective drug. Phenoxybenzamine decreased the early shunting, but less than propranolol, and did not decrease the late shunting. Blockade with propranolol and phenoxybenzamine was less effective than propranolol alone. Based on the observed hemodynamic changes it was suggested that beta blockade is effective in reducing epinephrine induced pulmonary insufficiency by favorably altering the flow and distribution of pulmonary blood flow which in turn decreases epinephrine induced ventilation-perfusion inequalities and capillary hypertension both of which result in shunting. Conversely phenoxybenzamine has an unfavorable effect on the pulmonary flow. These studies support previous work in animals and man which showed that beta adrenergic stimulation is important in the pathogenesis of pulmonary insufficiency. Because the amounts of epinephrine used produce blood levels observed in critical illness, these studies add support to a relationship between the increased catecholamine stimulation of critical illness and the associated and often unexplained

  14. Beta-adrenergic blockade and lipoprotein lipase activity in rat tissues after acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Paulin, A; Lalonde, J; Deshaies, Y

    1991-10-01

    The present experiments were aimed at evaluating the acute effects of exercise on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in untrained rats. The activity of LPL was measured in postheparin plasma (PHP) before and at various times after a 1-h run on a treadmill (22 m/min, O degrees grade). LPL in PHP was 50% below pre-exercise levels immediately and 3 h after the run but was increased 65% over resting levels 24 h postexercise. To further characterize the very early fall in LPL activity in response to exercise and to assess the possible involvement therein of the beta-adrenergic pathway, LPL in heart, vastus lateralis muscle (VLM), and white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues was determined at rest and immediately after exercise in rats that were treated or not with nadolol (25 mg.kg-1.day-1 for 30 days). Immediately after 1 h of exercise, there was a reduction in total enzyme activity in WAT (40% below resting levels), BAT (-58%), VLM (-53%), and heart (-30%). Exercise reduced serum triacylglycerol levels (-64%) and doubled those of nonesterified fatty acids. beta-Adrenergic blockade did not affect any of these variables. Both exercise and nadolol lowered serum cholesterol levels by approximately 20%, but the effects were not additive. These results show that the global intravascular pool of LPL undergoes divergent, time-dependent alterations in response to a single bout of moderate exercise. The acute downregulation of postheparin plasma LPL immediately after exercise reflected a fall in the total enzyme pool of all tissues studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1681747

  15. Regulation of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01

    The technique of quantitative autoradiography has been used to localize changes in the densities of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. Previously reported increases in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex were confirmed. The anatomical resolution of autoradiography made it possible to detect changes in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex and in a number of other brain regions. The density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors increased from 30 to 50% depending on the region of the cortex being examined. The increase in the somatomotor cortex was greater than that in the frontal or occipital cortex. The increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex was not as widespread as that of beta 1-adrenergic receptors and occurred primarily in frontal cortex, where the density of receptors increased by 40%. The densities of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in a number of forebrain, thalamic, and midbrain structures. Selective changes in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors were observed in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the amygdala. The density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in the caudate-putamen, the substantia nigra, and the lateral and central nuclei of the thalamus, whereas the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors did not change in these regions. The densities of both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors increased in the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus, and the dorsal lateral geniculate.

  16. Species differences in myocardial beta-adrenergic receptor regulation in response to hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Crozatier, B; Su, J B; Corsin, A; Bouanani N el-H

    1991-11-01

    The coupling between myocardial beta-adrenergic receptors, adenylate cyclase activity, and the in vivo cardiac response to catecholamines is controversial in hyperthyroidism. The possibility of species differences in beta-adrenoceptor regulation after thyroxine treatment was studied in dogs and in rats. In dogs instrumented with a left ventricular (LV) pressure micromanometer, hyperthyroidism was induced by L-thyroxine (0.5 mg/kg/day i.v. for 10 days). After hyperthyroidism, heart rate was increased to 167 +/- 10 beats/min (control, 107 +/- 8 beats/min; p less than 0.005) with an increase of peak LV dP/dt from 4,243 +/- 471 to 6,105 +/- 862 mm Hg/sec (p less than 0.01). LV response to injection of increasing doses of isoproterenol and dobutamine was not significantly different before and after induction of the hyperthyroid state, as shown by the unchanged slopes of the LV peak dP/dt versus the log of the dose of isoproterenol and dobutamine. Bmax of beta-receptors measured in crude membranes using 3H-CGP 12177 and in homogenates using 125I-cyanopindolol was not increased in hyperthyroid animals as compared with a control group. Basal adenylate cyclase activity was not different in control and hyperthyroid dogs (32 +/- 3 versus 29 +/- 3 pmol/mg/min), and maximal adenylate cyclase activity response to isoproterenol was similar in control and hyperthyroid dogs. In contrast, in rats subjected to hyperthyroidism (0.5 mg/kg/day i.p. L-thyroxine for 10 days), Bmax of adrenoceptors measured using the same methods was significantly increased as compared with control (+72.5% using 3H-CGP 12177 and +41% using 125I-cyanopindolol, but adenylate cyclase activity was not increased in hyperthyroid rats. We conclude that both adenylate cyclase activity and LV response to catecholamines are not increased by thyroxine-induced hyperthyroidism in dogs and that, in contrast with rats, beta-adrenergic density is not increased in hyperthyroid dogs. This indicates a species difference in

  17. Antibodies with beta-adrenergic activity from chronic chagasic patients modulate the QT interval and M cell action potential duration

    PubMed Central

    Medei, Emiliano Horacio; Nascimento, José H.M.; Pedrosa, Roberto C.; Barcellos, Luciane; Masuda, Masako O.; Sicouri, Serge; Elizari, Marcelo V.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate whether the sera from chronic chagasic patients (CChPs) with beta-1 adrenergic activity (Ab-β) can modulate ventricular repolarization. Beta-adrenergic activity has been described in CChP. It increases the L-type calcium current and heart rate in isolated hearts, but its effects on ventricular repolarization has not been described. Methods and results In isolated rabbit hearts, under pacing condition, QT interval was measured under Ab-β perfusion. Beta-adrenergic activity was also tested in guinea pig ventricular M cells. Furthermore, the immunoglobulin fraction (IgG-β) of the Ab-β was tested on Ito, ICa, and Iks currents in rat, rabbit, and guinea pig myocytes, respectively. Beta-adrenergic activity shortened the QT interval. This effect was abolished in the presence of propranolol. In addition, sera from CChP without beta-adrenergic activity (Ab-β) did not modulate QT interval. The M cell action potential duration (APD) was reversibly shortened by Ab-β. Atenolol inhibited this effect of Ab-β, and Ab- did not modulate the AP of M cells. Ito was not modulated by isoproterenol nor by IgG-β. However, IgG-β increased ICa and IKs. Conclusion The shortening of the QT interval and APD in M cells and the increase of IKs and ICa induced by IgG-β contribute to repolarization changes that may trigger malignant ventricular arrhythmias observed in patients with chronic chagasic or idiopathic cardiomyopathy. PMID:18515284

  18. Non-invasive assessment of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy on and off beta adrenergic blocking drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Alvares, R F; Goodwin, J F

    1982-01-01

    Beta adrenergic blocking drugs in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy provide symptomatic relief but their effect on long-term prognosis is uncertain. Thirty patients were studied non-invasively by simultaneous recordings of echocardiogram, apex-cardiogram, phonocardiogram, and electrocardiogram in order to assess diastolic abnormalities on and off oral beta adrenergic blocking drugs. While on treatment these patients had a mean dose of propranolol 200 mg/day. The treatment was stopped for one week and then non-invasive assessment was repeated. The following diastolic time intervals were studied: isovolumic relaxation period (A2-mitral valve opening); rapid relaxation period (A2-O point of the apexcardiogram), and the period from mitral valve opening to the O point of the apexcardiogram (Mo-O) when most of the filling of the left ventricle occurs. The prolongation of the rapid relaxation period reflects a reduced rate of fall of the left ventricular pressure when the pressure differential does not change between A2 and the O point of the apexcardiogram, and in this study this period was prolonged in 19, shortened in eight, and remained the same in three patients after beta blockade. The Mo-O point was prolonged in 22, shortened in seven, and was unchanged in one patient after beta adrenergic blocking drugs. All these results were independent of heart rate. In conclusion the response of diastolic time intervals to beta blocking drugs in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was variable but there was a significant number of patients in whom the time available for filling of the left ventricle was prolonged, suggesting better filling possibly because of improved distensibility of the left ventricle after beta adrenergic blocking drugs. PMID:6125160

  19. Alkaline phosphatase relieves desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Rebar, R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes results in 40-65% decrease in agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and correlates with increased phosphorylation of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. To assess the role of phosphorylation in desensitization, membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized turkey erythrocytes were incubated with alkaline phosphatase for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C, pH = 8.0. In both cases alkaline phosphatase treatment significantly reduced desensitization of agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 40-60%. Similar results were obtained following alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized duck erythrocytes. In addition, alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from duck erythrocytes desensitized with phorbol 12-mystrate 13-acetate returned adenylate cyclase activity to near control values. In all experiments inclusion of 20 mM NaPO/sub 4/ to inhibit alkaline phosphatase during treatment of membranes blocked the enzyme's effect on agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes.

  20. Muscarinic cholinergic inhibition of beta-adrenergic stimulation of phospholamban phosphorylation and CaS transport in guinea pig ventricles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemann, J.P.; Watanabe, A.M.

    1985-10-25

    The effects of muscarinic cholinergic stimulation on beta-adrenergic induced increases in phospholamban phosphorylation and CaS transport were studied in intact myocardium. Isolated guinea pig ventricles were perfused via the coronary arteries with TSPi, after which membrane vesicles were isolated from individual hearts. Isoproterenol produced reversible increases in TSP incorporation into phospholamban. Associated with the increases in TSP incorporation were increases in the initial rate of phosphate-facilitated CaS uptake measured in aliquots of the same membrane vesicles isolated from the perfused hearts. The increases in TSP incorporation and calcium transport were significantly attenuated by the simultaneous administration of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine also attenuated increases in phospholamban phosphorylation and CaS uptake produced by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine and forskolin. The contractile effects of all agents which increased cAMP levels (increased contractility and a reduction in the t1/2 of relaxation) were also attenuated by acetylcholine. The inhibitory effects of acetylcholine were associated with attenuation of the increases in cAMP levels produced by isoproterenol and isobutylmethylxanthine but not by forskolin. Acetylcholine also increased the rate of reversal of the functional and biochemical effects of isoproterenol by propranolol without affecting cAMP levels. These results suggest that cholinergic agonists inhibit the functional effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation in part by inhibition of phospholamban phosphorylation. This inhibition may be mediated by two potential mechanisms: inhibition of beta-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of dephosphorylation.

  1. Molecular and biological interaction between major histocompatibility complex class I antigens and luteinizing hormone receptors or beta-adrenergic receptors triggers cellular response in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Solano, A R; Cremaschi, G; Sánchez, M L; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L; Podestá, E J

    1988-01-01

    Purified IgG from BALB/c mouse anti-C3H serum exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects in C3H mouse atria and induces testosterone synthesis in C3H mouse Leydig cells. The effect depends on IgG concentration and can be abolished by beta-adrenergic-receptor and luteinizing hormone-receptor antagonists. IgG interferes with the binding of dihydroalprenolol and luteinizing hormone. Monoclonal antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I antigens were active on the Leydig cells of C3H and BALB/c mice. There was a parallelism between the effect of each individual monoclonal antibody with specificity for a particular haplotype and the response of the target cell from the strains carrying such haplotypes. These antibodies could precipitate the soluble luteinizing hormone-receptor complex. The results suggested that bound hormone triggers the association of major histocompatibility class I antigen with the receptor, thereby activating the respective target cells. PMID:2839829

  2. Glucocorticoids and beta-adrenergic-receptor agonists: their combined effect on fetal rabbit lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ekelund, L; Enhorning, G

    1985-08-15

    In a previous study on pregnant rabbits (Am J Obstet Gynecol 1983; 147:437) we found that a prolonged infusion of the beta 2-adrenergic-receptor agonist terbutaline would first cause a release of fetal pulmonary surfactant, so that more was available in the airways. However, the airway fluid then contained less surfactant, indicating a depletion of stores. Since terbutaline is often used in high doses as a tocolytic agent, surfactant depletion could be a serious side effect. With further studies on rabbits, we wanted to test the hypothesis that with an accelerated surfactant synthesis, achieved with glucocorticoids, the increased release, evoked with the terbutaline, would never cause a depletion of the surfactant stores. Our results supported this hypothesis. Betamethasone, administered to the pregnant doe on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh days of gestation, 0.1 mg/kg, increased compliance of the fetal lungs, and more phospholipid phosphorus could be lavaged from the airways. These effects were further increased when, following steroid administration, the doe was infused with terbutaline. Depletion of the surfactant stores was never seen when betamethasone was given prior to the beta-adrenergic-receptor agonist. PMID:3839627

  3. [The association between beta-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms and personality traits].

    PubMed

    Numajiri, Maki; Aoki, Jun; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Kasai, Shinya; Ogai, Yasukazu; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Iwahashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-08-01

    The relationship between the polymorphisms (SNPs) of the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) gene and personality assessed by TCI (Temperament and Character Inventory), was studied among 192 healthy Japanese subjects (121 male subjects and 71 female subjects). In this study, the statistical analyses were performed overall and separately for each sex. As a result, it was shown that there were significant relationships between SD (self-directedness) and 49Ser/Gly (rs1801252) in ADRB1, P (persistence) and 389Arg/Gly (rs1801253) in ADRB1, and ST (self-transcendence) and 27Gln/Glu (rs1042714) in ADRB2 overall. Among the male subjects, there were further significant relationships between ST and 49Ser/Gly in ADRB1, NS (novelty-seeking), HA (harm avoidance) and P and 389Arg/Gly in ADRB1, and P and 64Arg/Trp(rsrs4994) in ADRB3. Among the female subjects, there were also significant relationships between SD and 49Ser/Gly in ADRB1, and C (cooperativeness) and 389Arg/Gly in ADRB1. Thus it was shown that there were correlations between beta-AR gene polymorphisms and several subscales of TCI. PMID:23012891

  4. Vitamin E and selenium regulate balance between beta-adrenergic and muscarinic responses in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Doelman, C J; Kramer, K; Timmerman, H; Bast, A

    1988-06-20

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide on the beta-adrenergic and muscarinic responses of the rat trachea muscle were studied in vitro, after feeding rats, for 6 weeks, either a diet deficient in vitamin E and selenium or a control diet. In the control situation after incubation with 1 mM hydrogen peroxide for 30 min, a reduction of the maximal response to methacholine of 39% occurred whereas no pD2 shift could be demonstrated. Moreover, no response to isoprenaline after precontraction with 3 x 10(-7) M methacholine was left. In the deficient situation, we found a reduction to 64% of the response to methacholine after incubation with 1 mM hydrogen peroxide. Again isoprenaline became inactive, i.e. no relaxation with isoprenaline was observed after precontraction with 3 x 10(-7) M methacholine. We therefore conclude that vitamin E and selenium protect against oxidative stress in lung tissue and thus regulate the (patho-) physiological balance between adrenergic and muscarinic responses. PMID:2838338

  5. Influence of the beta-adrenergic receptor concentration on functional coupling to the adenylate cyclase system.

    PubMed Central

    Severne, Y; Coppens, D; Bottari, S; Riviere, M; Kram, R; Vauquelin, G

    1984-01-01

    Only part of the beta-adrenergic receptors can undergo functional coupling to the adenylate cyclase regulatory unit. This receptor subpopulation shows an increased affinity for agonists in the presence of Mg2+ and undergoes rapid "inactivation" (locking-in of the agonist) by the alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide in the presence of agonists. Several experimental conditions, known to modify the total receptor concentration without alteration of the other components of the adenylate cyclase system, do not affect the percentage of receptors that can undergo functional coupling: (i) homologous regulation of beta 1 receptors in rat brain by noradrenaline (through antidepressive drug or reserpine injections); (ii) up- and down-regulation of the beta 2 receptors in Friend erythroleukemia cells by, respectively, sodium butyrate and cinnarizine treatment; and (iii) dithiothreitol-mediated inactivation of receptors in turkey erythrocytes, Friend erythroleukemia cells, and rat brain. Our findings argue against a stoichiometric limitation in the number of regulatory components, genetically different receptor subpopulations, bound guanine nucleotides, or reduced accessibility of part of the receptors to the agonists as the cause for functional receptor heterogeneity. Differences in either the receptor conformation or its membrane microenvironment are more plausible explanations. PMID:6087337

  6. Peptide YY antagonizes beta-adrenergic-stimulated release of insulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley, G.H. Jr.; Lluis, F.; Gomex, G.; Ishizuka, J.; Holland, B.; Thompson, J.C. )

    1988-04-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are peptides of 36 amino acids that share structural homologies with pancreatic polypeptide (PP). PP is predominantly found in the endocrine pancreas. PYY is primarily found in mucosal endocrine cells of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum, whereas NPY is found in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Previous studies indicate that these peptides can interact with the autonomic nervous system. The objective of the present experiments was to study the effect of PYY on neurally stimulated insulin release in conscious dogs. Intravenous administration of PYY (100, 200, and 400 pmol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1} {center dot}h{sup {minus}1}) reduced 2-DG-stimulated insulin release in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.05) without affecting plasma glucose levels. Administration of NPY, but not PP, reduced 2-DG-stimulated release of insulin. The inhibitory action of PYY on 2-DG-stimulated insulin release persisted in the presence of atropine or phentolamine treatment; however, hexamethonium alone or phentolamine plus propranolol treatment blocked the inhibitory action of PYY. Release of insulin stimulated by the {beta}-agonist isoproterenol was also inhibited by PYY. These results indicate that PYY can inhibit autonomic neurotransmission by a mechanism that may involve ganglionic or postganglionic inhibition of {beta}-adrenergic stimulation. The findings suggest a role for PYY and NPY in the autonomic regulation of insulin release.

  7. Pinpointing beta adrenergic receptor in ageing pathophysiology: victim or executioner? Evidence from crime scenes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a key role in cellular communication, allowing human cells to sense external cues or to talk each other through hormones or neurotransmitters. Research in this field has been recently awarded with the Nobel Prize in chemistry to Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka, for their pioneering work on beta adrenergic receptors (βARs), a prototype GPCR. Such receptors, and β2AR in particular, which is extensively distributed throughout the body, are involved in a number of pathophysiological processes. Moreover, a large amount of studies has demonstrated their participation in ageing process. Reciprocally, age-related changes in regulation of receptor responses have been observed in numerous tissues and include modifications of βAR responses. Impaired sympathetic nervous system function has been indeed evoked as at least a partial explanation for several modifications that occur with ageing. This article represents an updated presentation of the current knowledge in the field, summarizing in a systematic way the major findings of research on ageing in several organs and tissues (crime scenes) expressing βARs: heart, vessels, skeletal muscle, respiratory system, brain, immune system, pancreatic islets, liver, kidney and bone. PMID:23497413

  8. Single delayed rectifier channels in frog atrial cells. Effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Duchatelle-Gourdon, I; Hartzell, H C

    1990-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique with two pipettes was used to record single delayed K+ channels (cell-attached electrode) and to control the potential and the composition of the intracellular compartment (whole-cell electrode). With 30 microM cAMP in the cell and physiological potassium concentrations inside and outside the patch, a channel carrying an outward current was characterized. Its open probability was very low and the channel was recorded in only 5% of patches under control conditions. Increasing intracellular cAMP increased the probability of finding a channel in a patch 10-fold. The channel had the characteristics expected of a delayed rectifier channel. The time-course of its ensemble average resembled the whole-cell current in the same cell. The current-voltage relationship exhibited inward rectification, with a slope conductance of 20 pS in the linear portion and a reversal potential close to EK. Both the open- and the closed-time distributions were described by the sum of two exponentials, suggesting a complicated gating scheme involving two closed states and two open states. The beta-adrenergic stimulation did not change the conductance of the channel, but increased its probability of opening. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 PMID:2160847

  9. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade on ventilation and gas exchange during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Dodd, S; Powers, S; O'Malley, N; Brooks, E; Sommers, H

    1988-08-01

    Controversy exists concerning the effects of acute beta-adrenergic blockade on ventilation during exercise. Hence, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of acute beta blockade on ventilation and gas exchange during incremental exercise. Nine male subjects underwent incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer (30 W.min-1) to exhaustion, with one trial being performed 60 min after the subject ingested propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal 1 mg.kg-1 BW) while the second test served as control. The treatment order was counterbalanced to preclude any ordering effect on the results, and 1 week separated the tests. Ventilation and gas exchange were monitored by open circuit techniques. No difference (p greater than 0.05) existed in VE, % Hb sat, VCO2, ventilatory threshold, and VE/VCO2 between treatments at the same exercise stage. VO2max was lowered from 3.82 to 3.26 l.min-1 (p less than 0.05) and HRmax was reduced from 190 to 150 bpm (p less than 0.05) as a result of beta blockade. These data suggested that acute beta blockade had no effect on exercise ventilation, but decreased HRmax at comparable work rates. In addition, VO2max and exercise time to exhaustion were hindered, probably due to beta blockade limitation of HRmax, and, thus, oxygen transport. PMID:3178619

  10. Food restriction prevents an age-associated increase in rat liver beta-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dax, E.M.; Ingram, D.K.; Partilla, J.S.; Gregerman, R.I.

    1989-05-01

    In male Wistar rats fed ad libitum (24% protein, 4.5 Kcal/gm), the (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol binding capacity of the beta-adrenergic receptors in liver of 24-month-old animals is 3-4 times greater than that of 6-month-old counterparts. In rats fed the same diet, on alternate days from weaning, the receptor capacity did not increase significantly between 6 and 24 months (10.20 +/- 0.55 vs 9.20 +/- 0.72 fmol/mg) or between 24 and 30 months. This was not due to acute dietary deprivation, as rats food-restricted for only 2 weeks, at 23.5 months of age, also showed elevated receptor capacities compared to 6-month-old ad libitum fed animals. Moreover, intermittent feeding produced no significant effects among 6-month-old animals, whether restricted since weaning or for two weeks prior to sacrifice. Many biochemical parameters that decrease with aging in rats fed ad libitum are prevented by dietary restriction. Our results demonstrate that a reproducible biochemical process that increases with aging is also prevented with dietary restriction. The age-related, liver beta-receptor increase may be a potentially reliable marker for studying biochemical perturbations that modify life span.

  11. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7 nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX, {alpha}7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol ({beta}-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE{sub 2} and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not {alpha}-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis.

  12. Regulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts by sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Poksay, K.S.; Nakada, M.T.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts contain beta-adrenergic receptors (BAR), predominantly of the B/sub 1/ subtype. Incubation of these cells with 2-10 mM sodium butyrate (SB) for 24-48 hr results in a switch in the BAR subtype from B/sub 1/ to B/sub 2/ and promotes a 1.5 to 2.5 fold increase in total BAR number. Other short chain acids were not as effective as SB in promoting changes in BAR. BAR were assayed in membranes prepared from the 3T3-L1 cells using the radiolabeled antagonist (/sup 125/I)-cyanopindolol and the B/sub 2/ selective antagonist ICI 118.551. BAR subtype switch was confirmed functionally by measuring cellular cAMP accumulation in response to agonists. The structure and amount of the alpha subunits of the guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ were determined by ADP-ribosylation using /sup 32/P-NAD and either cholera toxin or pertussis toxin for labeling of the respective subunits. Preincubation of cells with 5 mM SB for 48 hr resulted in a 2-3 fold increase in the labeling of the alpha subunits of both N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A protein of M/sub r/ = 44,000 showed enhanced labeling by cholera toxin following SB treatment of the cells. These data indicate SB concomitantly regulates expression of BAR subtype and components of the adenylate cyclase in 3T3-L1 cells.

  13. Beta-adrenergic blockade restores glucose's antiketogenic activity after exercise in carbohydrate-depleted athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, J H; Irving, G; Koeslag, J H; Lochner, J D; Sandell, R C; Wilkinson, C

    1987-01-01

    1. The development of post-exercise ketosis is not abolished by the ingestion of glucose immediately after exercise, despite inducing high insulin/glucagon ratios in the peripheral (and therefore by implication in the portal) blood. 2. To investigate the possibility of autonomic control of the liver influencing its sensitivity to the major counter-regulatory hormones, we administered 50 g glucose, either on its own, or together with 0.5 mg prazosine, 40 mg propranolol, or 15 mg propantheline, to forty-seven 48 h carbohydrate-starved athletes who had just run 25 km. 3. The blood 3-hydroxybutyrate concentration rose from 0.30 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- S.E. of mean) to 0.52 +/- 0.08 mmol/l with exercise, and then to 1.32 +/- 0.40 mmol/l at 6 h after exercise in subjects who had ingested only glucose after exercise. 4. The effects of prazosine and propantheline on the blood ketone body concentration at 2 h after exercise was not statistically significant. Propranolol, on the other hand, significantly lowered the blood 3-hydroxybutyrate concentration (compared with controls) to 0.09 +/- 0.03 mmol/l at 3 h (P less than 0.01), and 0.35 +/- 0.08 mmol/l at 6 h (P less than 0.01) after exercise. 5. The plasma insulin, glucagon, glucose and free fatty acid concentrations were unaffected by propranolol, indicating that the antiketogenesis was the result of a direct effect on ketone body metabolism. 6. Since beta-adrenergic blockade has not previously been shown to have antiketogenic activity, except in somatostatin-induced hyperketonaemia, it is concluded that its effectiveness in post-exercise ketosis can probably be ascribed to a functional hepatic insulin and glucagon deficiency. PMID:3316599

  14. Gender comparison of contractile performance and beta-adrenergic response in isolated rat cardiac trabeculae.

    PubMed

    Monasky, Michelle M; Varian, Kenneth D; Janssen, Paul M L

    2008-03-01

    It is known that gender can affect susceptibility to development of various cardiomyopathies. However, it is unclear whether basic mechanical contractile function of the myocardium differs between genders, whether they respond differently to stressors, or both. To test for a possible gender factor, contractile parameters of healthy, isolated myocardium were investigated under near physiological conditions. Right ventricular ultra-thin trabeculae from young adult LBN-f1 rats were electrically stimulated to isometrically contract at 37 degrees C. No differences were found in developed force or kinetic parameters. In each muscle, the force-frequency relationship was measured at 4, 6, and 8 Hz, encompassing most of the in vivo range. Again, no differences were observed in force-frequency behavior; developed force rose from 21.6 +/- 4.0 at 4 Hz to 30.3 +/- 5.8 mN/mm(2) at 8 Hz in females and from 23.4 +/- 3.4 to 29.8 +/- 3.4 mN/mm(2 )in males. The response to beta-adrenergic stimulation was similar; at 1 microM isoproterenol, developed force increased to 34.5 +/- 6.2 mN/mm(2) in females and 32.3 +/- 3.2 mN/mm(2) in males (female vs. male, not significant). We conclude that basic mechanical performance of healthy isolated myocardium under physiological conditions is not different between males and females, and a different response to stress must underlie gender-based differences in cardiac performance. PMID:18030479

  15. Localization of beta-adrenergic receptors in transmural slices of myocardium with quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Murphree, S.S.; Saffitz, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Alterations in the density of myocardial ..beta..-adrenergic receptors (..beta..AR) induced by ischemia may be important in the pathophysiology of acute ischemic heart disease. Conventional binding assays in tissue homogenates lack the anatomic resolution required for cell-specific analysis of early alterations in receptor density induced by ischemia. Accordingly, the authors have developed methods for localization of ..beta..AR in transmural slices of feline left ventricle with quantitative autoradiography. Frozen sections were incubated with /sup 125/I-iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) +/- Z-propranolol for 60 min at 37/sup 0/. Non-specifically bound radioactivity was removed by rinsing the sections for 60 min at 22/sup 0/. At saturating concentrations of ICYP, > 90% specific binding was achieved. Specific binding was rapid, saturable, of high affinity and proportional to section thickness (B/sub max/ = 26.5 +/- 6.4 fmol/mg tissue protein; K/sub d/ = 10.0 +/- 2.1 pM; N = 14). Agonist binding showed the rank order of potency expected for ..beta..AR (IC/sub 50/ = 0.12 ..mu..M, isoproterenol; .18 ..mu..M, norepinephrine; .54 ..mu..M, epinephrine) and demonstrated stereo-selectivity (IC/sub 50/ = .013 ..mu..M, Z-isoproterenol; 9.5 ..mu..M, d-isoproterenol). Quantitative autoradiography with both film and emulsion methods will permit regional analysis of ..beta..AR density in large transmural sections as well as cell-specific analysis at the microscopic level.

  16. Effects of cholinergic and beta-adrenergic blockade on orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sather, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses during a graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol were compared before and after atropine and propranolol administration to test the hypothesis that both sympathetic and parasympathetic control of cardio-acceleration are associated with syncopal predisposition to orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. Eleven men were categorized into two groups having high (HT, N = 6) or low (LT, N = 5) tolerance based on their total time before the onset of presyncopal symptoms. HT and LT groups were similar in physical characteristics, fitness, and baseline cardiovascular measurements. Atropine treatment had no effect on LBNP tolerance or mean arterial pressure at presyncope, despite an atropine-induced increase in heart rate. Propranolol treatment reduced (p<0.05) LBNP tolerance in both groups. Diminished LBNP tolerance after propranolol administration was associated with reductions in cardiac output, whereas increase in systemic peripheral resistance from baseline to presyncope was unaffected by propranolol. Reduction in cardiac output and LBNP tolerance after beta blockade reflected a chronotropic effect because lower LBNP tolerance for the HT (-50%) and LT (-39%) groups was associated with dramatic reductions (p <0.05) in the magnitude of LBNP-induced tachycardia without significant effects on stroke volume at presyncope. Absence of an atropine-induced difference in cardiac output and systemic peripheral resistance between HT and LT groups failed to support the notion that cardiac vagal withdrawal represents a predominant mechanism that could account for differences in orthostatic tolerance. Because a reduction in LBNP tolerance in both HT and LT groups after propranolol treatment was most closely associated with reduced tachycardia, the data suggest that a primary autonomically mediated mechanism for maintenance of mean arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects is beta adrenergic-induced tachycardia.

  17. Effects of cholinergic and beta-adrenergic blockade on orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A; Sather, T M

    2000-12-01

    Cardiovascular responses during a graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol were compared before and after atropine and propranolol administration to test the hypothesis that both sympathetic and parasympathetic control of cardio-acceleration are associated with syncopal predisposition to orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. Eleven men were categorized into two groups having high (HT, N = 6) or low (LT, N = 5) tolerance based on their total time before the onset of presyncopal symptoms. HT and LT groups were similar in physical characteristics, fitness, and baseline cardiovascular measurements. Atropine treatment had no effect on LBNP tolerance or mean arterial pressure at presyncope, despite an atropine-induced increase in heart rate. Propranolol treatment reduced (p<0.05) LBNP tolerance in both groups. Diminished LBNP tolerance after propranolol administration was associated with reductions in cardiac output, whereas increase in systemic peripheral resistance from baseline to presyncope was unaffected by propranolol. Reduction in cardiac output and LBNP tolerance after beta blockade reflected a chronotropic effect because lower LBNP tolerance for the HT (-50%) and LT (-39%) groups was associated with dramatic reductions (p <0.05) in the magnitude of LBNP-induced tachycardia without significant effects on stroke volume at presyncope. Absence of an atropine-induced difference in cardiac output and systemic peripheral resistance between HT and LT groups failed to support the notion that cardiac vagal withdrawal represents a predominant mechanism that could account for differences in orthostatic tolerance. Because a reduction in LBNP tolerance in both HT and LT groups after propranolol treatment was most closely associated with reduced tachycardia, the data suggest that a primary autonomically mediated mechanism for maintenance of mean arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects is beta adrenergic-induced tachycardia. PMID:11324988

  18. Specific beta-adrenergic receptor binding of carazolol measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Berridge, M.S.; Nelson, A.D.; Zheng, L.

    1994-10-01

    Carazolol is a promising high-affinity beta-adrenergic receptor ligand for the noninvasive determination of beta receptor status using PET> Earlier investigations demonstrated specific receptor binding of carazolol in mice. These PET studies with S(-)-[2{double_prime}-{sup 11}C]carazolol in pigs were performed to explore the utility of the tracer for PET receptor studies. Tracer uptake in the heart and lung was measured by PET as a function of time. Receptors were blocked with propranolol and different doses of ICI 118,551 to estimate specific binding. Fluorine-18-1{double_prime}-Fluorocarazolol and the less active R-enantiomer of [{sup 11}C]-carazolol were also studied. Specific receptor binding was 75% of the total uptake in the heart, preventable and displaceable by propranolol. Dose-dependent competition showed that carazolol binds in vivo to {beta}{sub 1} and to {beta}{sub 2} subtypes. Uptake of the labeled R(=) enantiomer of carazolol was not receptor-specific. Carazolol labeled with {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F is a strong candidate for use in receptor estimation with PET. The in vivo observations were consistent with its known high affinity and slow receptor dissociation rate. Its high specific receptor uptake and low metabolism allow existing kinetic models to be applied for receptor measurements. The {sup 11}C label is convenient for repeated administrations, though {sup 13}F allowed the long observation periods necessary for measurement of the receptor dissociation rate. If needed, nonspecific uptake can be estimated without pharmacologic intervention by using the labeled R enantiomer. 32 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of /sup 125/I-pindolol binding in Fischer 344 rat brain: changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density with aging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Zahniser, N.R.

    1988-05-01

    Age-related changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density in Fischer 344 rat brain were examined using in vitro /sup 125/I-pindolol (IPIN) binding and quantitative autoradiographic analysis. Localized protein concentrations were determined using a new quantitative histological technique, and these were used to normalize the densities of receptors. Saturation binding studies in brain sections revealed 40-50% decreases in beta-adrenergic receptor density in the thalamus of 23-25-month-old and the cerebellum and brainstem of both 18-19-month-old and 23-25-month-old compared to 4-6-month-old rats. The loss of cerebellar beta-adrenergic receptors may be correlated with reports of deficits in sensitivity to beta-adrenergic-mediated transmission in the cerebellum of aged rats. No changes in specific IPIN binding with age were observed in rat cortex or hippocampus. In all areas examined no age-related differences were observed in receptor affinity. No changes in protein concentration were found in any of the areas examined in the different aged animals. These results demonstrate a region-specific loss of beta-adrenergic receptors with age in the brain of Fischer 344 rats.

  20. Blunted cardiac beta-adrenergic response as an early indication of cardiac dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Shuai; Zhang, Xiaoying; Li, Jing; Ai, Xiaojie; Zhang, Li; Yu, Daohai; Ge, Shuping; Peng, Yizhi; Chen, Xiongwen

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine whether altered beta-adrenergic responses contribute to early cardiac dysfunction in mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Methods and results Replacement fibrosis in mdx hearts gradually increased with age, suggesting a gradual loss of cardiomyocytes. Echocardiography and intra-left ventricular haemodynamic measurements detected baseline cardiac dysfunction in mdx mice at ≥8 months. However, a reduction of cardiac beta-adrenergic response to isoproterenol (ISO) was already present in mdx mice at 4 months. Ventricular myocytes (VMs) isolated from 4- and 8-month-old mdx mice had greater baseline contractile function {fractional shortening, [Ca2+]i, and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content} and ICa-L than age-matched control VMs and than myocytes isolated from 2-month-old mdx mice. ISO increased myocyte function in the VMs of 4- and 8-month-old mdx mice to the same level as in age-matched control VMs. In the VMs of 12-month-old mdx mice, ISO failed to increase myocyte function to the level in VMs of 12-month-old control mice and could not further increaseICa-L. No differences were observed in the expression of Cav1.2α1c, Cav1.2β1, Cav1.2β2, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA), and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In contrast, total ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) and basal phosphorylation of RyR2, phospholamban, and Cav1.2α1c were found to be increased in hearts of 4-month-old mdx mice; baseline protein kinase A activity was also increased. After ISO treatment, phosphorylation levels were the same in mdx and control hearts. VMs of 4-month-old mdx mice had reduced beta1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) density and beta-adrenergic sensitivity. Conclusion In young mdx mice, the myocyte increases its contractile function to compensate for myocyte loss. However, these myocytes with enhanced baseline function have reduced potential for stimulation, decreased β1-AR density/sensitivity, leading

  1. Inhaled corticosteroids as combination therapy with beta-adrenergic agonists in airways disease: present and future.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan; Caramori, Gaetano; Adcock, Ian M

    2009-09-01

    Inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy in combination with long-acting beta-adrenergic agonists represents the most important treatment for chronic airways diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ICS therapy forms the basis for treatment of asthma of all severities, improving asthma control, lung function and preventing exacerbations of disease. Use of ICS has also been established in the treatment of COPD, particularly symptomatic patients, who experience useful gains in quality of life, likely from an improvement in symptoms such as breathlessness and in reduction in exacerbations, and an attenuation of the yearly rate of deterioration in lung function. The addition of long-acting beta-agonist (LABA) therapy with ICS increases the efficacy of ICS effects in moderate-to-severe asthma. Thus, a 800 mug daily dose of the ICS budesonide reduced severe exacerbation rates by 49% compared to a low dose of 200 mug daily, and addition of the LABA formoterol to budesonide (800 mug) led to a 63% reduction. In COPD, the effects of ICS are less prominent but there are beneficial effects on the decline in FEV(1) and the rate of exacerbations. A reduction in the rate of decline in FEV(1) of 16 ml/year with a 25% reduction in exacerbation rate has been reported with the salmeterol and fluticasone combination. A non-significant 17.5% reduction in all-cause mortality rate with ICS and LABA is reported. Chronic inflammation is a feature of both asthma and COPD, although there are site and characteristic differences. ICS targets this inflammation although this effect of ICS is less effective in patients with severe asthma and with COPD; however, addition of LABA may potentiate the anti-inflammatory effects of ICS. An important consideration is the presence of corticosteroid insensitivity in these patients. Currently available ICS have variably potent binding activities to specific glucocorticoid receptors, leading to inhibition of gene expression by

  2. Association between Selective Beta-adrenergic Drugs and Blood Pressure Elevation: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Database.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Selective beta-adrenergic drugs are used clinically to treat various diseases. Because of imperfect receptor selectivity, beta-adrenergic drugs cause some adverse drug events by stimulating other adrenergic receptors. To examine the association between selective beta-adrenergic drugs and blood pressure elevation, we reviewed the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Reports (JADERs) submitted to the Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. We used the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) Preferred Terms extracted from Standardized MedDRA queries for hypertension to identify events related to blood pressure elevation. Spontaneous adverse event reports from April 2004 through May 2015 in JADERs, a data mining algorithm, and the reporting odds ratio (ROR) were used for quantitative signal detection, and assessed by the case/non-case method. Safety signals are considered significant if the ROR estimates and lower bound of the 95% confidence interval (CI) exceed 1. A total of 2021 reports were included in this study. Among the nine drugs examined, significant signals were found, based on the 95%CI for salbutamol (ROR: 9.94, 95%CI: 3.09-31.93) and mirabegron (ROR: 7.52, 95%CI: 4.89-11.55). The results of this study indicate that some selective beta-adrenergic drugs are associated with blood pressure elevation. Considering the frequency of their indications, attention should be paid to their use in elderly patients to avoid adverse events. PMID:27374969

  3. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Activation during Distinct Patterns of Stimulation Critically Modulates the PKA-Dependence of LTP in the Mouse Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelinas, Jennifer N.; Tenorio, Gustavo; Lemon, Neal; Abel, Ted; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of Beta-adrenergic receptors (Beta-ARs) enhances hippocampal memory consolidation and long-term potentiation (LTP), a likely mechanism for memory storage. One signaling pathway linked to Beta-AR activation is the cAMP-PKA pathway. PKA is critical for the consolidation of hippocampal long-term memory and for the expression of some forms…

  4. Retrieval-induced forgetting under psychosocial stress: no reduction by delayed stress and beta-adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Dreifus, Laura; Engler, Harald; Kissler, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is the phenomenon that 'retrieval-practice', the repeated retrieval of a subset of initially learned material, can impair the recall of episodically related memories. Previous studies showed that RIF is eliminated when retrieval-practice is carried out under psycho-social stress, anxiety, or in negative mood. However, pharmacological manipulation by hydrocortisone did not eliminate the effect. This study investigated the effect of beta-adrenergic blockade on stress-induced modulations of RIF, addressing possible interactive effects of the glucocorticoid and sympatho-adrenomedullary systems. Participants learned categorized word lists and then received either 60 mg propranolol or a placebo. After 90 min they were exposed to the TSST. A third group did not receive any medication and performed a non-stressful control task with the same timing as the other two groups. Finally, all participants underwent retrieval-practice and final recall. Both TSST groups exhibited a stress-induced increase in cortisol-levels, and the placebo group also exhibited large increases in markers of sympathetic nervous system activity and more psychological distress at the time of retrieval-practice. Although, overall recall was poorer under stress, an overall RIF effect emerged irrespective of group and showed no clear modulation by stress with or without beta-adrenergic blockade. In previous demonstrations of RIF elimination by negative emotion, state induction and retrieval-practice followed very briefly after initial learning. Given that both the previous study of hydrocortisone effects on RIF and the present study used longer delays between learning and retrieval-practice, the possibility that stress effects on retrieval-practice eliminate RIF only relatively briefly after learning is discussed. PMID:24486967

  5. Maternal defense is modulated by beta adrenergic receptors in lateral septum in mice.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Melissa-Ann L; Lee, Grace; Gammie, Stephen C

    2011-06-01

    Maternal defense (offspring protection) is a critical and highly conserved component of maternal care in mammalian systems that involves dramatic shifts in a female's behavioral response to social cues. Numerous changes occur in neuronal signaling and connectivity in the postpartum female, including decreases in norepinephrine (NE) signaling in subregions of the CNS. In this study using a strain of mice selected for maternal defense, we examined whether possible changes in NE signaling in the lateral septum (LS) could facilitate expression of maternal aggression. In separate studies that utilized a repeated measures design, mice were tested for maternal defense following intra-LS injections of either the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (10 μg or 30 μg) or vehicle (Experiment 1), the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol (2 μg) or vehicle (Experiment 2), or the β1-receptor antagonist, atenolol (Experiment 3). Mice were also evaluated for light-dark performance and pup retrieval. Thirty micrograms of the agonist isoproterenol significantly decreased number of attacks and time aggressive relative to vehicle without affecting pup retrieval or light-dark box performance. In contrast, the antagonist propranolol significantly increased maternal aggression (lowered latency to attack and increased total attack time) without altering light-dark box test. The β1-specific antagonist, atenolol, significantly decreased latency to attack (1 μg vs. vehicle) without altering other measures. Although the findings were identified in a unique strain of mice, the results of these studies support the hypothesis that changes in NE signaling in LS during the postpartum period contribute to the expression of offspring protection. PMID:21480688

  6. Effects of two beta-adrenergic agonists on finishing performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Reyes, L; Torres-Rodríguez, V; Meraz-Murillo, F J; Pérez-Linares, C; Figueroa-Saavedra, F; Robinson, P H

    2006-12-01

    The impact of using 2 beta-adrenergic agonists in feedlot cattle fed finishing diets was evaluated using 54 steers (45 crossbred Charolais and 9 Brangus) initially weighing 424 +/- 26.6 kg in a randomized complete block design with 3 treatments and 6 blocks (i.e., 18 pens with 3 steers per pen). Response variables were feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality. Treatments were 1) control (no supplement added); 2) zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 60 mg.steer(-1).d(-1)); and 3) ractopamine hydrochloride (RH; 300 mg.steer(-1).d(-1)). The beta-agonists were added to the diets during the final 33 d of the experiment. The groups of steers fed ZH or RH improved (P < 0.01) ADG by 26 or 24%, respectively, compared with control steers. Steers supplemented with RH consumed less (P = 0.03) DM (8.37 kg) than control steers (8.51 kg), whereas intake was similar (P = 0.37) for ZH and control steers. Addition of either beta-agonist to the diet considerably improved (P < 0.01) the G:F (ZH, 0.253 and RH, 0.248 vs. control, 0.185). Hot carcass weight and carcass yield were enhanced (P < 0.05) with both beta-agonists. The LM area was increased (P = 0.026) by ZH (75.2 cm(2)), but that of RH (72.2 cm(2)) was similar (P = 0.132) to the control steers (66.8 cm(2)). Meat from the ZH- (P = 0.0007) and RH- (P = 0.0267) supplemented steers had greater shear force values than control steers (ZH = 5.11; RH = 4.83; control = 4.39 kg/cm(2)). Variables related to meat color indicated that both beta-agonists led to a similar redness of the LM area related to the control group. In general, feedlot performance was greatly enhanced by beta-adrenergic agonists, and meat tenderness from treated animals was classified as intermediate. Furthermore, meat color was not altered by beta-agonist supplementation. PMID:17093218

  7. Beta-Adrenergic Blockade Does not Prevent Polycythemia or Decrease in Plasma Volume in Men at 4300 m Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, R. F.; Selland, M. A.; McCullough, R. G.; Dahms, T. E.; Wolfel, E. E.; Butterfield, G. E.; Reeves, J. T.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    When humans ascend to high altitude (ALT) their plasma volume (PV) and total blood volume (BV) decrease during the first few days. With continued residence over several weeks, the hypoxia-induced stimulation of erythropoietin increases red cell production which tends to restore BV. Because hypoxia also activates the beta-adrenergic system, which stimulates red blood cell production, we investigated the effect of adrenergic beta-receptor inhibition with propranolol on fluid volumes and the polycythemic response in 11 healthy unacclimatized men (21-33 years old exposed to an ALT of 4300 m (barometric pressure 460 Torr) for 3 weeks on Pikes Peak, Colorado. PV was determined by the Evans blue dye method (PV(sub EB)), BV by the carbon monoxide method (BV(sub CO)), red cell volume (RCV)was calculated from hematocrit (Hct) and BV(sub CO), and serum erythropoietin concentration ([EPO]) and reticulocyte count, were also determined. All determinations were made at sea level and after 9-11 (ALT-10) and 9-20 (ALT-20) days at ALT. At sea level and ALT, six men received propranolol (pro, 240 mg/day), and five received a placebo (pla). Effective beta-blockade did not modify the mean (SE) maximal values of [EPO] [pla: 24.9 (3.5) vs pro: 24.5 (1.5) mU/ml] or reticulocyte count [pla: 2.7 (0.7) vs pro: 2.2 (0.5)%]; nor changes in PV(sub EB)[pla: -15.8 (3.8) vs pro: -19.9 (2.8)%], RCV(sub CO) [pla: +7.0 (6.7) vs pro: +10.1 (6.1)%], or BV(sub CO) [pla: -7.3 (2.3) vs pro: -7.1 (3.9)%]. In the absence of weight loss, a redistribution of body water with no net loss is implied. Hence, activation of the beta-adrenergic system did not appear to affect the hypovolemic or polycythemic responses that occurred during 3 weeks at 4300 m ALT in these subjects.

  8. Comparison of. beta. -adrenergic receptors between different strains of rat with different susceptibility to hypertension: a survey of binding characteristics, responsiveness and corticosteroid induced modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jazayeri, A.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this research was two fold: the first objective was to measure ..beta..-adrenergic receptor characteristics (Bmax and Kd) and responsiveness (isoproterenol induced c-AMP production) between different strains of rat with different susceptibility to hypertension. The second objective of this research was to determine if ..beta..-adrenergic receptors of arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMC) can be modulated by corticosteroids. These studies were done under controlled conditions using ASMC grown in culture from the rat aorta. (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol (DHA) was used to measure ..beta..-adrenergic receptor binding characteristics (Kd and Bmax). Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-DHA binding revealed one class of binding sites with affinity in the range of 100 pM. (/sup 3/H)-DHA binding comparison between Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) revealed that the Bmax for SHR was significantly lower than WKY. However, isoproterenol stimulated c-AMP production by SHR, is significantly higher than WKY. Fischer 344 rats, showed similar Bmax, Kd, and responsiveness as WKY rats. Dahl-sensitive and Dahl-resistant rats had equal Bmax and Kd measured by (/sup 3/H)-DHA binding.

  9. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate CAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of CAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of CAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of CAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of CAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  10. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  11. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Cureri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of cAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of cAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  12. Uterine contractility: vaginal administration of the beta-adrenergic agonist, terbutaline. Evidence of direct vagina-to-uterus transport.

    PubMed

    Bulletti, C; de Ziegler, D; de Moustier, B; Polli, V; Bolelli, G; Franceschetti, F; Flamigni, C

    2001-09-01

    Spontaneous uterine contractility during the menstrual cycle is required for menstruation, gamete transport, and, most likely, embryo nidation. Abnormal uterine contractility has been linked to dysmenorrhea, a condition associated with painful uterine cramping. Based on previous studies with progesterone, we have postulated the existence of a portal system that is responsible for some degree of direct vagina-to-uterus transport of administered compounds (i.e., the "first uterine pass effect"). It is possible that treatment with uterorelaxing substances, particularly beta-adrenergic agonists, may alleviate the uterine discomfort that accompanies dysmenorrhea. However, side effects encountered with oral administration of beta-agonists limit their utility. Alternatively, vaginal delivery of beta-agonists could solve this dilemma by enhancing their efficacy and reducing side effects. Therefore, in the current study we used hysterectomy specimens and an in vitro uterine perfusion system to test the vagina-to-uterus transport of [3H]terbutaline, a well-known beta-agonist. With the use of autoradiographic and scintillation counting techniques, our results clearly show progressive diffusion of labeled terbutaline from the rim of vaginal tissue through the uterus during the first 12 hours of perfusion. This indicates that uterine targeting of terbutaline can be accomplished through vaginal administration, suggesting a new therapeutic modality in women's health care. PMID:11594537

  13. Indirect immunofluorescence localization of beta-adrenergic receptors and G-proteins in human A431 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H Y; Berrios, M; Malbon, C C

    1989-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies directed against (i) rodent lung beta 2-adrenergic receptor, (ii) a synthetic fragment of an extracellular domain of the receptor, and (iii) human placenta G-protein beta-subunits, were used to localize these antigens in situ in intact and permeabilized human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Antibodies directed against beta 2-adrenergic receptors showed a punctate immunofluorescence staining throughout the cell surface of fixed intact cells. Punctate staining was also observed in clones of Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with an expression vector harbouring the gene for the hamster beta 2-adrenergic receptor. The immunofluorescence observed with anti-receptor antibodies paralleled the level of receptor expression. In contrast, the beta-subunits common to G-proteins were not stained in fixed intact cells, presumably reflecting their intracellular localization. In detergent-permeabilized fixed cells, strong punctate staining of G beta-subunits was observed throughout the cytoplasm. This is the first indirect immunofluorescence localization of beta-adrenergic receptors and G-proteins. Punctate immunofluorescence staining suggests that both antigens are distributed in clusters. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. p528-a Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:2556996

  14. Developmental Changes is Expression of Beta-Adrenergic Receptors in Cultures of C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Vaughn, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists have been reported to modulate growth in several mammalian and avian species, and bAR agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through this receptor. Because of the importance of bAR regulation on muscle protein metabolism in muscle cells, the objectives of this study were to determine the developmental expression pattern of the bAR population in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, and to analyze changes in both the quantity and isoform expression of the major muscle protein, myosin. The number of bAR in mononucleated C2C12 cells was approximately 8,000 bAR per cell, which is comparable with the population reported in several other nonmuscle cell types. However, the bar population increased after myoblast fusion to greater than 50,000 bAR per muscle cell equivalent. The reasons for this apparent over-expression of bAR in C2C12 cells is not known. The quantity of myosin also increased after C2C12 myoblast fusion, but the quantity of myosin was less than that reported in primary muscle cell cultures. Finally, at least five different isoforms of myosin heavy chain could be resolved in C2C12 cells, and three of these exhibited either increased or decreased developmental regulation relative to the others. Thus, C2C12 myoblasts undergo developmental regulation of bAR population and myosin heavy chain isoform expression.

  15. Road transportation affects blood hormone levels and lymphocyte glucocorticoid and beta-adrenergic receptor concentrations in calves.

    PubMed

    Odore, R; D'Angelo, A; Badino, P; Bellino, C; Pagliasso, S; Re, G

    2004-11-01

    The effect of transportation on blood cortisol and catecholamine levels, lymphocyte glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) concentrations was investigated in calves. Blood samples were collected from 24 six-month-old calves before departure (T(0)), on arrival (T(1)), and at 24 h (T(2)) and one week (T(3)) after arrival. Animals were loaded and transported about 950 km, from the Midy-Pyrenes region (Cahors, France) to the Piedmont region (Italy), over a total of 14 h. Serum cortisol levels and plasma catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline) were determined by radioimmunoassay. Lymphocyte GRs and beta-ARs were measured through binding assays. A significant (P < 0.05) increase in cortisol and catecholamine concentrations was observed immediately after transport. The increase in hormone levels at time T(1) was negatively correlated with lymphocyte GR and beta-AR concentrations. At times T(2) and T(3), blood cortisol and catecholamine levels and lymphocyte GRs and beta-ARs returned to normal. The results demonstrate the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the catecholaminergic system in long-term transported calves. However, these systems returned to normal within 24 h after the end of transport. PMID:15501147

  16. Effects of chronic beta-adrenergic blockade on the left ventricular and cardiocyte abnormalities of chronic canine mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, H; Spinale, F G; Nagatsu, M; Schmid, P G; Ishihara, K; DeFreyte, G; Cooper, G; Carabello, B A

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism by which beta blockade improves left ventricular dysfunction in various cardiomyopathies has been ascribed to improved contractile function of the myocardium or to improved beta-adrenergic responsiveness. In this study we tested two hypotheses: (a) that chronic beta blockade would improve the left ventricular dysfunction which develops in mitral regurgitation, and (b) that an important mechanism of this effect would be improved innate contractile function of the myocardium. Two groups of six dogs with chronic severe mitral regurgitation were studied. After 3 mo both groups had developed similar and significant left ventricular dysfunction. One group was then gradually beta-blocked while the second group continued to be observed without further intervention. In the group that remained unblocked, contractile function remained depressed. However, in the group that received chronic beta blockade, contractile function improved substantially. The contractility of cardiocytes isolated from the unblocked hearts and then studied in the absence of beta receptor stimulation was extremely depressed. However, contractility of cardiocytes isolated from the beta-blocked ventricles was virtually normal. Consistent with these data, myofibrillar density was much higher, 55 +/- 4% in the beta-blocked group vs. 39 +/- 2% (P < 0.01) in the unblocked group; thus, there were more contractile elements to generate force in the beta-blocked group. We conclude that chronic beta blockade improves left ventricular function in chronic experimental mitral regurgitation. This improvement was associated with an improvement in the innate contractile function of isolated cardiocytes, which in turn is associated with an increase in the number of contractile elements. Images PMID:7911128

  17. Cellular effects of beta-adrenergic and of cAMP stimulation on potassium transport in rat alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Saumon, G; Basset, G; Bouchonnet, F; Crone, C

    1989-07-01

    Alveolar fluid absorption is greatly enhanced by cAMP and by beta-adrenergic agonists via an increase in Na+ transport. Little is known about K+ homeostasis under these circumstances. We studied K+ transport across alveolar epithelium in isolated perfused rat lungs stimulated either by dibutyryl-cAMP or isoproterenol. K+ fluxes and the apparent permeability of 86Rb across the epithelium (alveoli to plasma) were interpreted according to a model involving two types of cells, B and L, distinguished by the location of Na+-K+-ATPases (basal and luminal). Water is considered to be absorbed by B cells in a solute-coupled process energized by a basolateral Na+-K+-ATPase that is stimulated by isoproterenol and cAMP. K+ transport out of the alveoli is due to the activity of a Na+-K+-ATPase located in the apical membrane of L cells. In the present study net transport rate of K+ was -0.5 +/- 0.15 nmol/s, n = 20 (out of alveoli) in control conditions. When the epithelium was stimulated by dibutyryl-cAMP (10(-4) mol/l) net absorption of K+ reversed to net 'secretion' into alveoli (3.2 +/- 0.31 nmol/s), fluid absorption was not stimulated. K+ 'secretion' was abolished by apical Ba2+, indicating it was due to opening of apical K+ channels. Basolateral ouabain reversed net K+ 'secretion' to net absorption indicating that K+ entry into alveoli was dependent on activity of B cell basolateral Na+-K+-ATPase (masking simultaneous K+ removal by apical L cell Na+-K+-pump). When larger concentrations of dibutyryl-cAMP (10(-3) mol/l) or when isoproterenol were used to stimulate the epithelium there was a tripling of fluid absorption.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2571117

  18. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells Treated with Forskolin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridge, K. Y.; Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted by in vivo administration of beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonists. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through the betaAR, and alterations in the population of betaAR could potentially change the ability of the cell to respond to the betaAR agonists. Since the intracellular chemical signal generated by the betaAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of functional betaAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 microM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the betaAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 microM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in betaAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 microM. This increase in PAR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of betaAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc

  19. Beta-Adrenergic Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Barisione, Giovanni; Baroffio, Michele; Crimi, Emanuele; Brusasco, Vito

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptoms-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. In this article, we first review the basic mechanisms by which the β2-adrenergic system contributes to the control of airway smooth muscle tone. Then, we go on describing the structural characteristics of β2-AR and the molecular basis of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and mechanisms of its desensitization/ dysfunction. In particular, phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A and β-adrenergic receptor kinase are examined in detail. Finally, we discuss the pivotal role of inhaled β2-AR agonists in the treatment of asthma and the concerns about their safety that have been recently raised.

  20. Memory Enhancement Induced by Post-Training Intrabasolateral Amygdala Infusions of [beta]-Adrenergic or Muscarinic Agonists Requires Activation of Dopamine Receptors: Involvement of Right, but Not Left, Basolateral Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaLumiere, Ryan T.; McGaugh, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the noradrenergic, dopaminergic, and cholinergic innervations of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) modulate memory consolidation. The current study investigated whether memory enhancement induced by post-training intra-BLA infusions of a [beta]-adrenergic or muscarinic cholinergic agonist requires concurrent activation…

  1. Sympathetic nerve activity in normal and cystic follicles from isolated bovine ovary: local effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on steroid secretion.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Alfonso H; Salvetti, Natalia R; Diaz, Ariel E; Dallard, Bibiana E; Ortega, Hugo H; Lara, Hernan E

    2011-01-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of abnormal estrous behavior and infertility in dairy cows. COD is mainly observed in high-yielding dairy cows during the first months post-partum, a period of high stress. We have previously reported that, in lower mammals, stress induces a cystic condition similar to the polycystic ovary syndrome in humans and that stress is a definitive component in the human pathology. To know if COD in cows is also associated with high sympathetic activity, we studied isolated small antral (5 mm), preovulatory (10 mm) and cystic follicles (25 mm). Cystic follicles which present an area 600 fold greater compared with preovulatory follicles has only 10 times less concentration of NE as compared with small antral and preovulatory follicles but they had 10 times more NE in follicular fluid, suggesting a high efflux of neurotransmitter from the cyst wall. This suggestion was reinforced by the high basal release of recently taken-up 3H-NE found in cystic follicles. While lower levels of beta-adrenergic receptor were found in cystic follicles, there was a heightened response to the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and to hCG, as measured by testosterone secretion. There was however an unexpected capacity of the ovary in vitro to produce cortisol and to secrete it in response to hCG but not to isoproterenol. These data suggest that, during COD, the bovine ovary is under high sympathetic nerve activity that in addition to an increased response to hCG in cortisol secretion could participate in COD development. PMID:21575217

  2. Cardiac-specific ablation of G-protein receptor kinase 2 redefines its roles in heart development and beta-adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Matkovich, Scot J; Diwan, Abhinav; Klanke, Justin L; Hammer, Daniel J; Marreez, Yehia; Odley, Amy M; Brunskill, Eric W; Koch, Walter J; Schwartz, Robert J; Dorn, Gerald W

    2006-10-27

    G-protein receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is 1 of 7 mammalian GRKs that phosphorylate ligand-bound 7-transmembrane receptors, causing receptor uncoupling from G proteins and potentially activating non-G-protein signaling pathways. GRK2 is unique among members of the GRK family in that its genetic ablation causes embryonic lethality. Cardiac abnormalities in GRK2 null embryos implicated GRK2 in cardiac development but prevented studies of the knockout phenotype in adult hearts. Here, we created GRK2-loxP-targeted mice and used Cre recombination to generate germline and cardiac-specific GRK2 knockouts. GRK2 deletion in the preimplantation embryo with EIIa-Cre (germline null) resulted in developmental retardation and embryonic lethality between embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E11.5. At E9.5, cardiac myocyte specification and cardiac looping were normal, but ventricular development was delayed. Cardiomyocyte-specific ablation of GRK2 in the embryo with Nkx2.5-driven Cre (cardiac-specific GRK2 knockout) produced viable mice with normal heart structure, function, and cardiac gene expression. Cardiac-specific GRK2 knockout mice exhibited enhanced inotropic sensitivity to the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol, with impairment of normal inotropic and lusitropic tachyphylaxis, and exhibited accelerated development of catecholamine toxicity with chronic isoproterenol treatment. These findings show that cardiomyocyte autonomous GRK2 is not essential for myocardial development after cardiac specification, suggesting that embryonic developmental abnormalities may be attributable to extracardiac effects of GRK2 ablation. In the adult heart, cardiac GRK2 is a major factor regulating inotropic and lusitropic tachyphylaxis to beta-adrenergic agonist, which likely contributes to its protective effects in catecholamine cardiomyopathy. PMID:17008600

  3. Sympathetic nerve activity in normal and cystic follicles from isolated bovine ovary: local effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on steroid secretion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of abnormal estrous behavior and infertility in dairy cows. COD is mainly observed in high-yielding dairy cows during the first months post-partum, a period of high stress. We have previously reported that, in lower mammals, stress induces a cystic condition similar to the polycystic ovary syndrome in humans and that stress is a definitive component in the human pathology. To know if COD in cows is also associated with high sympathetic activity, we studied isolated small antral (5mm), preovulatory (10mm) and cystic follicles (25mm). Cystic follicles which present an area 600 fold greater compared with preovulatory follicles has only 10 times less concentration of NE as compared with small antral and preovulatory follicles but they had 10 times more NE in follicular fluid, suggesting a high efflux of neurotransmitter from the cyst wall. This suggestion was reinforced by the high basal release of recently taken-up 3H-NE found in cystic follicles. While lower levels of beta-adrenergic receptor were found in cystic follicles, there was a heightened response to the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and to hCG, as measured by testosterone secretion. There was however an unexpected capacity of the ovary in vitro to produce cortisol and to secrete it in response to hCG but not to isoproterenol. These data suggest that, during COD, the bovine ovary is under high sympathetic nerve activity that in addition to an increased response to hCG in cortisol secretion could participate in COD development. PMID:21575217

  4. In vitro histamine H/sub 2/-antagonist activity of the novel compound HUK 978

    SciTech Connect

    Coombes, J.D.; Norris, D.B.; Rising, T.J.; Ross, B.C.; Steward, A.

    1985-11-04

    Histamine stimulated adenylate cyclase from guinea-pig fundic mucosa and /sup 3/H-tiotidine binding in guinea-pig cerebral cortex were used to assess the in-vitro histamine H/sub 2/-activity of the novel H/sub 2/-antagonist HUK 978. The results showed that HUK 978 was a more potent H/sub 2/-antagonist than either cimetidine or ranitidine. HUK 978 was also shown to be devoid of activity at the histamine H-/sub 1/-receptor, the muscarinic receptor and the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta..-adrenergic receptors.

  5. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content, L-type Ca2+ current and the Ca2+ transient in rat myocytes during beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M; Orchard, C H

    1997-01-01

    1. The effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on the relationship between the intracellular Ca2+ transient and the amplitude of the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) has been investigated in ventricular myocytes isolated from rat hearts. Intracellular [Ca2+] was monitored using fura-2 during field stimulation and while membrane potential was controlled using voltage clamp techniques. 2. The increase in the amplitude, and the rate of decline, of the Ca2+ transient produced by isoprenaline (1.0 mumol l-1) was not significantly different in myocytes generating action potentials and in those voltage clamped with pulses of constant duration and amplitude. 3. Under control conditions, the current-voltage (I-V) relationship for ICa was bell shaped. The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient also showed a bell-shaped voltage dependence. In the presence of isoprenaline, the amplitude of both ICa and the Ca2+ transient was greater at all test potentials and the I-V relationship maintained its bell-shaped voltage dependence. However, the size of the Ca2+ transient was no longer graded with changes in the amplitude of ICa: a small ICa could now elicit a maximal Ca2+ transient. 4. Rapid application of caffeine (10 mmol l-1) was used to elicit Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Isoprenaline increased the integral of the subsequent rise in cytoplasmic [Ca2+] to 175 +/- 13% of control. 5. Abbreviation of conditioning pulse duration in the presence of isoprenaline was used to reduce the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient to control levels. Under these conditions, the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient was again graded with the amplitude of ICa in the same way as under control conditions. 6. Nifedipine (2 mumol l-1) was also used to decrease Ca2+ transient amplitude in the presence of isoprenaline. In the presence of isoprenaline and nifedipine, the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient again showed a bell-shaped voltage dependence. 7. The SR Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (2.5 mumol l-1

  6. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  7. Exercise induced changes in lymphocyte beta adrenergic receptors correlate with peak exercise heart rates in healthy trained and sedentary human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, M.; Engelmeier, R.; Glisson, S.; Scanlon, P.

    1986-03-05

    Lymphocyte beta adrenergic receptors (lymph BAR) increase after maximal multistage treadmill exercise (TME) presumably by externalization from intracellular vesicles. Nine healthy subjects underwent symptom limited TME by the Bruce protocol. Heart rate was measured at the end of each 3 minute stage. Plasma norepinephrine (NE), plasma epinephrine (EPI) and lymph BAR were measured at rest and at peak exercise. Catecholamines were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Lymph BAR were measured by separating cells from 25cc of whole blood across a Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient and incubating membrane preparations with 7 dilutions of I/sup 125/ cyanopindolol in the presence or absence of 1..mu..M(-) propranolol in a total assay volume of 450 ..mu..l. BAR was standardized to Lowry-Peterson protein at rest and exercise. The relationship of maximum heart rate versus peak plasma NE, EPI and lymph BAR was analyzed by linear regression. The following conclusions were reached: (1) there is a significant correlation between exercise induced changes in lymph BAR and peak heart rate; (2) this relationship does not exist between peak plasma NE or EPI and peak heart rate.

  8. Molecular orbital studies on the mechanism of drug-receptor interaction. 2. beta-Adrenergic drugs. An approach to explain the role of the aromatic moiety.

    PubMed

    Petrongolo, C; Macchia, B; Macchia, F; Martinelli, A

    1977-12-01

    The role of the aromatic moiety of beta-adrenergic drugs in the interaction with the receptor was investigated using the quantum mechanical ab initio SCF-MO-LCAO method. The structure-activity relationship was essentially discussed by analyzing the electrostatic molecular potential of three compounds which constitute meaningful portions of isoproterenol, INPEA, and doberol, the first drug having a stimulating activity and the others a blocking one. The results obtained point out the different roles played in the drug-receptor interaction by the various regions of the drugs and they also show that the aromatic moiety influences both the affinity and the intrinsic activity of the drugs. Indeed, the spatial correspondence among zones with negative potentials, which are localized on the phenyl substitutents of isoproterenol and INPEA and on the phenyl ring of doberol, could contribute to the affinity. On the other hand, the intrinsic activity of isoproterenol might be associated both with the proton-donor tendency of one phenolic OH group and with the wide zone of negative potential which spreads on a large part of the aromati moiety. PMID:201757

  9. Chromosome mapping of the human arrestin (SAG), {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase 2 (ADRBK2) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, G.; Sallese, M.; Stornaiuolo, A.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of proteins play a major role in determining homologous desensitization of G-coupled receptors: {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase ({beta}ARK), which phosphorylates the agonist-occupied receptor and its functional cofactor, {beta}-arrestin. Both {beta}ARK and {beta}-arrestin are members of multigene families. The family of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases includes rhodopsin kinase, {beta}ARK1, {beta}ARK2, IT11-A (GRK4), GRK5, and GRK6. The arrestin/{beta}-arrestin gene family includes arrestin (also known as S-antigen), {beta}-arrestin 1, and {beta}-arrestin 2. Here we report the chromosome mapping of the human genes for arrestin (SAG), {beta}arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results confirmed the assignment of the gene coding for arrestin (SAG) to chromosome 2 and allowed us to refine its localization to band q37. The gene coding for {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2) was mapped to chromosome 17p13 and that coding for {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) to chromosome 22q11. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population and Cyclic AMP Production in Chicken and Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Strietzel, Catherine J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (PAR) and its coupling to Adenosine 3'5' Cyclic Monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the PAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture, were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the PAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability, of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the PAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  11. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  12. Incidence of sudden cardiac death associated with coronary artery occlusion in dogs with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy is reduced by chronic beta-adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Dellsperger, K C; Martins, J B; Clothier, J L; Marcus, M L

    1990-09-01

    Because beta-adrenergic blockade has as one of its many effects altered electrophysiological abnormalities after dogs with left ventricular hypertrophy have been subjected to coronary occlusion, we tested the hypothesis that metoprolol (200-400 mg/day) would reduce mortality rates in dogs with one-kidney, one clip left ventricular hypertrophy while a similar reduction in arterial pressure with enalapril (20-40 mg/day) would not. Dogs with left ventricular hypertrophy were given metoprolol or enalapril for 5-7 days before a 3-hour coronary occlusion. Infarct size and risk area were measured with triphenyltetrazolium chloride stain and barium angiography, respectively. For control (n = 15), left ventricular hypertrophy (n = 17), left ventricular hypertrophy plus metoprolol (n = 12), and left ventricular hypertrophy plus enalapril (n = 15) groups, mean arterial pressure, ratio of infarct size to risk area, and dogs experiencing sudden death were 110 +/- 4, 142 +/- 4, 121 +/- 7, and 120 +/- 3 mm Hg; 44 +/- 5%, 65 +/- 5%, 44 +/- 7%, and 30 +/- 4%; and 27%, 65%, 17%, and 53%, respectively. Thus, the excessive increase in early mortality occurring when dogs with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy undergo coronary occlusion is interrupted with beta-blockade, possibly via electrophysiological effects rather than by changes in arterial pressure or infarct size. PMID:1975521

  13. Interactive effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation and mechanical stretch on low-frequency oscillations of ventricular action potential duration in humans.

    PubMed

    Pueyo, Esther; Orini, Michele; Rodríguez, José F; Taggart, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Ventricular repolarization dynamics are crucial to arrhythmogenesis. Low-frequency oscillations of repolarization have recently been reported in humans and the magnitude of these oscillations proposed to be a strong predictor of sudden cardiac death. Available evidence suggests a role of the sympathetic nervous system. We have used biophysically detailed models integrating ventricular electrophysiology, calcium dynamics, mechanics and β-adrenergic signaling to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The main results were: (1) Phasic beta-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS) at a Mayer wave frequency between 0.03 and 0.15Hz resulted in a gradual decrease of action potential (AP) duration (APD) with concomitant small APD oscillations. (2) After 3-4minutes of phasic β-AS, the mean APD adapted and oscillations of APD became apparent. (3) Phasic changes in haemodynamic loading at the same Mayer wave frequency (a known accompaniment of enhanced sympathetic nerve activity), simulated as variations in the sarcomere length, also induced APD oscillations. (4) The effect of phasic β-AS and haemodynamic loading on the magnitude of APD oscillations was synergistic. (5) The presence of calcium overload and reduced repolarization reserve further enhanced the magnitude of APD oscillations and was accompanied by afterdepolarizations and/or spontaneous APs. In conclusion, low-frequency oscillations of repolarization recently reported in humans were induced by phasic β-AS and phasic mechanical loading, which acted synergistically, and were greatly enhanced by disease-associated conditions, leading to arrhythmogenic events. PMID:27178727

  14. Beta-adrenergic modulation of the release of atrial natriuretic factor from rat cardiac atria in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.; Imada, T.; Takayanagi, B.; Inagami, T.

    1986-03-01

    Several stimulatory factors for the release of atrial natriuretic factor, such as atrial stretch, atrial pacing and vasopressin, have been reported. We studied the effects of the adrenergic nervous system on the release of ANF using an in vitro perfusion system. Right and left atria from Sprague-Dawley rats were quartered and perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution gassed with 95% CO/sub 2//5% O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C. Perfusate factions were collected every 2 minutes. Fractions were collected 20 minutes before and for 2 hours during the administration of test agents. ANF was measured by radioimmunoassay. Within 10 minutes of exposure to 10/sup -6/M isoproterenol, ANF secretion fell to less than 50% of its baseline level. However, beta agonists showed a stimulatory effect of 4-5 fold. Carbachol, in a concentration of 10/sup -2/M was used to demonstrate the viability of the atria exposed to isoproterenol, and produced a stimulation of ANF release of 4-6 times the basal level. The adrenergic nervous system can modulate ANF release in vitro. Further studies are being performed with selective beta agonists and antagonists to elucidate these results.

  15. Demonstration of. beta. -adrenergic receptors and catecholamine-mediated effects on cell proliferation in embryonic palatal tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of catecholamines to modulate cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis in other systems, and modulate adenylate cyclase activity in the developing palate during the period of cellular differentiation, made it of interest to determine their involvement in palatal ontogenesis. Catecholamines exert their physiologic effects via interaction with distinct membrane-bound receptors, one class being the B-adrenergic receptors which are coupled to stimulation of adenylate cyclase and the generation of cAMP. A direct radioligand binding technique utilizing the B-adrenergic antagonist (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol ((/sup 3/H)-DHA) was employed in the identification of B-adrenergic receptors in the developing murine secondary palate. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-DHA in embryonic (day 13) palatal tissue homogenates was saturable and of high affinity. The functionality of B-adrenergic receptor binding sites was assessed from the ability of embryonic palate mesenchmyal cells in vitro to respond to catecholamines with elevations of cAMP. Embryonic palate mesenchymal cells responded to various B-adrenergic catecholamine agonists with significant, dose-dependent accumulations of intracellular cAMP. Embryonic (day 13) maxillary tissue homogenates were analyzed for the presence of catecholamines by high performance liquid chromatography and radioenzymatic assay. Since normal palatal and craniofacial morphogenesis depends on proper temporal and spatial patterns of growth, the effect of B-adrenergic catecholamines on embryonic palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was investigated.

  16. The second Lilly Prize Lecture, University of Newcastle, July 1977. beta-Adrenergic receptor blockade in hypertension, past, present and future.

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, B N

    1978-01-01

    All beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs that have been described share the common property of being competitive inhibitors. They differ in their associated properties, the presence or absence of cardioselectivity, membrane stabilizing activity, and partial agonist activity. Recently some beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs have been reported which also possess alpha-adrenoceptor blocking activity. The associated properties have been used as a basis for classifying beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs (Fitzgerald, 1969, 1972). The presence or absence of cardioselectivity is most useful for dividing beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs. The non-selective drugs (Division I) can be further divided according to the presence or absence of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) and membrane stabilizing activity (Fitzgerald's groups I-IV). Group I possess both membrane activity and ISA, e.g. alprenolol, oxprenolol, group II just membrane action, e.g. propanolol, group III ISA but no membrane action, e.g. pindolol. Fitzgerald placed pindolol in group I but should be placed in group III as it possesses a high degree of beta-adrenoceptor blocking potency in relation to its membrane activity (Prichard, 1974). Finally drugs in group IV have neither ISA nor membrane action, e.g. sotalol, timolol. The cardioselective drugs (Division II) can be similarly sub-divided into groups I-IV according to the presence or absence of ISA or membrane action (Fitzgerald grouped all these together as group V). Lastly there are new beta-adrenergic receptor blocking drugs which in addition have alpha- adrenergic receptor blocking properties (Division III). PMID:26370

  17. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population and Coupling Efficiency in Chicken and Rat Skeleton Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Strietzel, Catherine J.

    1999-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the bAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the bAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. Thus, in chicken muscle cells an enhanced level of contraction reduced the coupling efficiency of bAR for cyclic AMP production by approximately 55% compared to controls. In contrast, the bAR population in rat muscle cells was increased by approximately 25% by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was also increased by almost two-fold. Thus, in rat muscle cells an enhanced level of contraction increased the coupling efficiency of bAR for cyclic AMP production by approximately 50% compared to controls. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in both rat muscle cells and chicken muscle cells were not affected by electrical stimulation.

  18. Beta Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation Suppresses Cell Migration in Association with Cell Cycle Transition in Osteoblasts-Live Imaging Analyses Based on FUCCI System.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Sakie; Ezura, Yoichi; Izu, Yayoi; Shirakawa, Jumpei; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Harada, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    Osteoporosis affects over 20 million patients in the United States. Among those, disuse osteoporosis is serious as it is induced by bed-ridden conditions in patients suffering from aging-associated diseases including cardiovascular, neurological, and malignant neoplastic diseases. Although the phenomenon that loss of mechanical stress such as bed-ridden condition reduces bone mass is clear, molecular bases for the disuse osteoporosis are still incompletely understood. In disuse osteoporosis model, bone loss is interfered by inhibitors of sympathetic tone and adrenergic receptors that suppress bone formation. However, how beta adrenergic stimulation affects osteoblastic migration and associated proliferation is not known. Here we introduced a live imaging system, fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI), in osteoblast biology and examined isoproterenol regulation of cell cycle transition and cell migration in osteoblasts. Isoproterenol treatment suppresses the levels of first entry peak of quiescent osteoblastic cells into cell cycle phase by shifting from G1 /G0 to S/G2 /M and also suppresses the levels of second major peak population that enters into S/G2 /M. The isoproterenol regulation of osteoblastic cell cycle transition is associated with isoproterenol suppression on the velocity of migration. This isoproterenol regulation of migration velocity is cell cycle phase specific as it suppresses migration velocity of osteoblasts in G1 phase but not in G1 /S nor in G2 /M phase. Finally, these observations on isoproterenol regulation of osteoblastic migration and cell cycle transition are opposite to the PTH actions in osteoblasts. In summary, we discovered that sympathetic tone regulates osteoblastic migration in association with cell cycle transition by using FUCCI system. PMID:26192605

  19. An arachidonate metabolite is involved in the conversion from alpha 1- to beta-adrenergic glycogenolysis in isolated rat liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ishac, E J; Kunos, G

    1986-01-01

    In vitro incubation of isolated rat liver cells in a serum-free buffer leads to the suppression of the glycogenolytic effect of phenylephrine and the simultaneous emergence of a glycogenolytic response to isoproterenol within 4 hr. This time-dependent conversion of the adrenergic receptor response from alpha 1 to beta type is prevented by the presence in the incubation medium of 0.5% fatty-acid-free, but not regular, bovine serum albumin. A 20-min exposure of freshly isolated liver cells to arachidonic acid (10 micrograms/ml), but not to stearic or palmitic acid, causes an acute shift in the receptor response from alpha 1 to mixed alpha 1/beta type, similar in direction to that seen after prolonged incubation of the cells. This effect of arachidonic acid is prevented by 0.2 microM ibuprofen but not by the same concentration of nordihydroguaiaretic acid. Ibuprofen (1 microM) or indomethacin (1 microM) also inhibits the time-dependent shift in the receptor response. Actinomycin D inhibits the change in receptor response that is caused by prolonged incubation but not the change that is caused by exogenous arachidonic acid. It is proposed that the time-dependent conversion from alpha 1- to beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated glycogenolysis in isolated rat liver cells is related to a parallel increase in the phospholipase-mediated release of arachidonic acid and the subsequent formation of a key cyclooxygenase metabolite. A protein factor appears to be involved in the regulation of the release of arachidonic acid but not in the action of its metabolite. A possible mechanism by which this metabolite may regulate inverse changes in the coupling of alpha 1- and beta-receptors to postreceptor pathways is discussed. PMID:3001725

  20. Beta Adrenergic Receptors in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sivamani, Raja K.; Lam, Susanne T.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Beta2 adrenergic receptors were identified in keratinocytes more than 30 years ago, but their function in the epidermis continues to be elucidated. Abnormalities in their expression, signaling pathway, or in the generation of endogenous catecholamine agonists by keratinocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous diseases such as atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and psoriasis. New studies also indicate that the beta2AR also modulates keratinocyte migration, and thus can function to regulate wound re-epithelialization. This review focuses on the function of these receptors in keratinocytes and their contribution to cutaneous physiology and disease. PMID:17903623

  1. The sites of phosphorylation by protein kinase C and an intact SH2 domain are required for the enhanced response to beta-adrenergic agonists in cells overexpressing c-src.

    PubMed

    Moyers, J S; Bouton, A H; Parsons, S J

    1993-04-01

    Previously we demonstrated that C3H10T1/2 murine fibroblasts overexpressing avian c-src exhibit elevated levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in response to beta-adrenergic agonists compared with that in control cells and that this enhanced response requires c-src kinase activity (W. A. Bushman, L. K. Wilson, D. K. Luttrell, J. S. Moyers, and S. J. Parsons, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:7462-7466, 1990). However, it is not yet known which components of the beta-adrenergic receptor pathway, if any, interact with pp60c-src. It has recently been shown that immune complexes of pp60c-src phosphorylate recombinant G alpha proteins in vitro to stoichiometric levels, resulting in alterations of GTP binding and GTPase activity (W. P. Hausdorff, J. A. Pitcher, D. K. Luttrell, M. E. Linder, H. Kurose, S. J. Parsons, M. G. Caron, and R. J. Lefkowitz, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:5720-5724, 1992), raising the possibility that the Gs alpha protein may be an in vivo target for the interaction with pp60c-src. To further characterize the involvement of pp60c-src in the beta-adrenergic signalling pathway, we have overexpressed, in 10T1/2 cells, pp60c-src containing mutations in several domains which are believed to be important for signalling processes. In this study we show that the sites of phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) (Ser-12 and Ser-48) as well as the SH2 region of pp60c-src are required for the enhanced response of c-src overexpressors to beta-agonist stimulation. Mutation at the site of myristylation (Gly-2) results in a decrease in the enhanced response, while mutation at the site of phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Ser-17) has no effect. Two-dimensional phosphotryptic analyses indicate that phosphorylation on Ser-12 and Ser-48 in unstimulated cells is associated with the ability of overexpressed pp60c-src to potentiate beta-adrenergic signalling. Cells overexpressing wild-type c-src also exhibit enhanced cAMP accumulation upon treatment with cholera

  2. Beta-adrenergic stimulation of cFOS via protein kinase A is mediated by cAMP regulatory element binding protein (CREB)-dependent and tissue-specific CREB-independent mechanisms in corticotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Boutillier, A L; Barthel, F; Roberts, J L; Loeffler, J P

    1992-11-25

    Catecholamines stimulate proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene expression in corticotrope cells, but the molecular mechanisms of these effects are not known. While beta-adrenergic receptors stimulate the protein kinase A (PKA) system, the POMC promoter does not have classical cAMP-response elements (CREs). Therefore, we investigated the induction of the c-fos protooncogen, previously shown to increase POMC transcription in AtT20 cells. In this corticotrope-derived cell line, we show that activation of beta-receptors with isoprenaline (Iso) induces a transient rise in c-fos mRNA levels. Gel mobility shift assays with a labeled AP1 consensus sequence (TGACTCA) showed induction of specific binding activity after Iso treatment. Cotransfection experiments with dominant inhibitory PKA mutants and reporter genes containing c-fos promoter sequences showed that c-fos induction by Iso is entirely dependent on a functional PKA activity. Furthermore, we show that beta-receptor induction of c-fos in corticotrophs is mediated by at least two distinct cAMP-responsive sequences. cAMP regulatory element binding (CREB)-dependent induction is observed on the CRE located at -60 bp on the c-fos promoter. A region located in the vicinity of the dyad symetry element (-290) is also found to mediate tissue-specific cAMP induction. Transcriptional activation by this site, although sensitive to PKA antagonism, is not blocked by CREB mutants. PMID:1331087

  3. Drug-induced regulation of 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca sup 2+ channel antagonist binding sites in the brain and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Ramkumar, V.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of drugs to regulate the voltage-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} channels were assessed by determining the bind of ({sup 3}H)dihydropyridine Ca{sup 2+} channel antagonists in the heart and brain following administration of these drugs to rats and mice. Mice and rats implanted with morphine pellets for 3 days showed an increase in dihydropyridine binding sites in the brain, compared to non-treated or placebo treated controls. No increase in dihydropyridine binding sites was observed in the heart. The significance of the increase in binding to physical dependence on morphine is implied from the findings that pretreatment with Ca{sup 2+} channel antagonist drugs led to an attenuation of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs in both dependent rats and mice. Administration of other drugs, known to depress the CNS, was undertaken to determine whether the changes observed with morphine was a nonspecific response of the brain to depressant drugs. Prolonged administration of reserpine to rats resulted in no changes in dihydropyridine binding sites in the brain, even though the {beta}-adrenergic receptors in this tissue are upregulated. However, reserpine decreased the density of ({sup 3}H)nimodipine binding sites in the heart of this is accompanied by concomitant increases in {beta}-adrenergic receptors.

  4. Human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptors. I. Functional exploration and pharmacological definition with selected alpha-2 agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Galitzky, J.; Mauriege, P.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1989-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate more fully the pharmacological characteristics of the human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Biological assays were performed on intact isolated fat cells while radioligand binding studies were carried out with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine in membranes. These pharmacological studies brought: (1) a critical definition of the limits of the experimental conditions required for the exploration of alpha-2 adrenergic responsiveness on human fat cells and membranes; (2) an improvement in the pharmacological definition of the human fat cell postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Among alpha-2 agonists, UK-14,304 was the most potent and the relative order of potency was: UK-14,304 greater than p-aminoclonidine greater than clonidine = B-HT 920 greater than rilmenidine. For alpha-2 antagonists, the potency order was: yohimbine greater than idazoxan greater than SK F-86,466 much greater than benextramine; (3) a description of the impact of benextramine (irreversible alpha-1/alpha-2 antagonist) on human fat cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and on human fat cell function; the drug inactivates the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors with a minor impact on beta adrenergic receptors and without noticeable alterations of fat cell function as assessed by preservation of beta adrenergic and Al-adenosine receptor-mediated lipolytic responses; and (4) a definition of the relationship existing between alpha-2 adrenergic receptor occupancy, inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and antilipolysis with full and partial agonists. The existence of a receptor reserve must be taken into account when evaluating alpha-2 adrenergic receptor distribution and regulation of human fat cells.

  5. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  6. Pentobarbital anesthesia alters pulmonary vascular response to neural antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, D P; Goll, H M; Chen, B B; Fehr, D M; Clougherty, P W; Murray, P A

    1989-05-01

    We investigated the effects of pentobarbital sodium anesthesia on vasoregulation of the pulmonary circulation. Our specific objectives were to 1) assess the net effect of pentobarbital on the base-line pulmonary vascular pressure-to-cardiac index (P/Q) relationship compared with that measured in conscious dogs, and 2) determine whether autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the intact P/Q relationship is altered during pentobarbital. P/Q plots were constructed by graded constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava, which produced stepwise decreases in Q. Pentobarbital (30 mg/kg iv) had no net effect on the base-line P/Q relationship. In contrast, changes in the conscious intact P/Q relationship in response to ANS antagonists were markedly altered during pentobarbital. Sympathetic alpha-adrenergic receptor block with prazosin caused active pulmonary vasodilation (P less than 0.01) in conscious dogs but caused vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) during pentobarbital. Sympathetic beta-adrenergic receptor block with propranolol caused active pulmonary vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) in both groups, but the magnitude of the vasoconstriction was attenuated (P less than 0.05) during pentobarbital at most levels of Q. Finally, cholinergic receptor block with atropine resulted in active pulmonary vasodilation (P less than 0.01) in conscious dogs, whereas vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) was observed during pentobarbital. Thus, although pentobarbital had no net effect on the base-line P/Q relationship measured in conscious dogs, ANS regulation of the intact pulmonary vascular P/Q relationship was altered during pentobarbital anesthesia. PMID:2566280

  7. Beta adrenergic modulation of spontaneous microcontractions and electrical field-stimulated contractions in isolated strips of rat urinary bladder from normal animals and animals with partial bladder outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, J I; Rouget, C; Palea, S; Granato, C; Korstanje, C

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous microcontractions and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractions in isolated rat bladder strips from normal and from 6 weeks partial bladder outflow obstruction (pBOO) animals were studied to identify the potential site of action for the β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist mirabegron in detrusor overactivity in rats. For this, effects of the β-AR agonist isoprenaline and mirabegron were tested in presence or absence of selective antagonists for β-AR subtypes, namely CGP-20712A for β1-AR, ICI-118,551 for β2-AR, and L-748,337 for β3-AR. In detrusor strips from both normal and obstructed animals, EFS-induced contractions were weakly affected by isoprenaline and even less so by mirabegron. In contrast, microcontraction activity was more potently reduced by isoprenaline (pIC50 7.3; Emax ±85 %), whereas mirabegron showed a small effect. In pBOO strips, concentration response curves for isoprenaline and mirabegron at inhibition of EFS and spontaneous microcontractions were similar to those in normal strips. Isoprenaline-induced inhibition of microcontractions and EFS was antagonized by the β1-AR antagonist, but not by the β2- and β3-AR antagonists. In the context of β3-AR-mediated bladder functions for mirabegron in other experiments, the current data question a role for effects at spontaneous microcontractions, or neurogenic detrusor stimulation in the mode of action for mirabegron in vivo, since functional bladder effects for mirabegron are reported to occur at much lower concentrations. PMID:26047780

  8. Analysis of hydrophobic interactions of antagonists with the beta2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Novoseletsky, V N; Pyrkov, T V; Efremov, R G

    2010-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors mediate a wide variety of physiological responses, including vasodilatation and vasoconstriction, heart rate modulation, and others. Beta-adrenergic antagonists ('beta-blockers') thus constitute a widely used class of drugs in cardiovascular medicine as well as in management of anxiety, migraine, and glaucoma. The importance of the hydrophobic effect has been evidenced for a wide range of beta-blocker properties. To better understand the role of the hydrophobic effect in recognition of beta-blockers by their receptor, we carried out a molecular docking study combined with an original approach to estimate receptor-ligand hydrophobic interactions. The proposed method is based on automatic detection of molecular fragments in ligands and the analysis of their interactions with receptors separately. A series of beta-blockers, based on phenylethanolamines and phenoxypropanolamines, were docked to the beta2-adrenoceptor binding site in the crystal structure. Hydrophobic complementarity between the ligand and the receptor was calculated using the PLATINUM web-server (http://model.nmr.ru/platinum). Based on the analysis of the hydrophobic match for molecular fragments of beta-blockers, we have developed a new scoring function which efficiently predicts dissociation constant (pKd) with strong correlations (r(2) approximately 0.8) with experimental data. PMID:20373213

  9. Exposure to cAMP and beta-adrenergic stimulation recruits Ca(V)3 T-type channels in rat chromaffin cells through Epac cAMP-receptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Novara, M; Baldelli, P; Cavallari, D; Carabelli, V; Giancippoli, A; Carbone, E

    2004-07-15

    T-type channels are expressed weakly or not at all in adult rat chromaffin cells (RCCs) and there is contrasting evidence as to whether they play a functional role in catecholamine secretion. Here we show that 3-5 days after application of pCPT-cAMP, most RCCs grown in serum-free medium expressed a high density of low-voltage-activated T-type channels without altering the expression and characteristics of high-voltage-activated channels. The density of cAMP-recruited T-type channels increased with time and displayed the typical biophysical and pharmacological properties of low-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels: (1) steep voltage-dependent activation from -50 mV in 10 mm Ca(2+), (2) slow deactivation but fast and complete inactivation, (3) full inactivation following short conditioning prepulses to -30 mV, (4) effective block of Ca(2+) influx with 50 microM Ni(2+), (5) comparable permeability to Ca(2+) and Ba(2+), and (6) insensitivity to common Ca(2+) channel antagonists. The action of exogenous pCPT-cAMP (200 microM) was prevented by the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin and mimicked in most cells by exposure to forskolin and 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (IBMX) or isoprenaline. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89 (0.3 microM) and the competitive antagonist of cAMP binding to PKA, Rp-cAMPS, had weak or no effect on the action of pCPT-cAMP. In line with this, the selective Epac agonist 8CPT-2Me-cAMP nicely mimicked the action of pCPT-cAMP and isoprenaline, suggesting the existence of a dominant Epac-dependent recruitment of T-type channels in RCCs that may originate from the activation of beta-adrenoceptors. Stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors occurs autocrinally in RCCs and thus, the neosynthesis of low-voltage-activated channels may represent a new form of 'chromaffin cell plasticity', which contributes, by lowering the threshold of action potential firing, to increasing cell excitability and secretory activity during sustained sympathetic stimulation and

  10. ACTH Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome - especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia - as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  11. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  12. Calcium channel antagonist and beta-blocker overdose: antidotes and adjunct therapies.

    PubMed

    Graudins, Andis; Lee, Hwee Min; Druda, Dino

    2016-03-01

    Management of cardiovascular instability resulting from calcium channel antagonist (CCB) or beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist (BB) poisoning follows similar principles. Significant myocardial depression, bradycardia and hypotension result in both cases. CCBs can also produce vasodilatory shock. Additionally, CCBs, such as verapamil and diltiazem, are commonly ingested in sustained-release formulations. This can also be the case for some BBs. Peak toxicity can be delayed by several hours. Provision of early gastrointestinal decontamination with activated charcoal and whole-bowel irrigation might mitigate this. Treatment of shock requires a multimodal approach to inotropic therapy that can be guided by echocardiographic or invasive haemodynamic assessment of myocardial function. High-dose insulin euglycaemia is commonly recommended as a first-line treatment in these poisonings, to improve myocardial contractility, and should be instituted early when myocardial dysfunction is suspected. Catecholamine infusions are complementary to this therapy for both inotropic and chronotropic support. Catecholamine vasopressors and vasopressin are used in the treatment of vasodilatory shock. Optimizing serum calcium concentration can confer some benefit to improving myocardial function and vascular tone after CCB poisoning. High-dose glucagon infusions have provided moderate chronotropic and inotropic benefits in BB poisoning. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors and levosimendan have positive inotropic effects but also produce peripheral vasodilation, which can limit blood pressure improvement. In cases of severe cardiogenic shock and/or cardiac arrest post-poisoning, extracorporeal cardiac assist devices have resulted in successful recovery. Other treatments used in refractory hypotension include intravenous lipid emulsion for lipophilic CCB and BB poisoning and methylene blue for refractory vasodilatory shock. PMID:26344579

  13. [Metabolism of beta-adrenergic substances. Therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Brès, J; Clauzel, A M; Pistre, M C; Rachmat, H; Bressolle, F

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of the main beta-adrenoceptor stimulants which are not catechol derivatives involves conjugation with glucuronic or sulphuric acids in several animal species and conjugation with sulphuric acid in man. These drugs are not metabolized by MAO like isoproterenol or by COMT like the catechol derivatives: isoproterenol, trimetoquinol, hexoprenaline and rimiterol. Sulphate conjugation, in man, increases with the number of hydroxy groups. For salbutamol, pirbuterol, terbutaline and fenoterol, about 30%, 30%, 15% and 10% are respectively present in plasma as the unchanged active compound. Clenbuterol, a new specific beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulant, is a 4-amino-3,5 dichloro-benzene derivative and cannot be conjugated. It is cleared from the body mainly by the renal route (43% of the administered dose) and has eight minor metabolites, identical in several animal species and in man. Tulobuterol with no hydroxy substitute does not undergo conjugation, but is metabolized to 4-hydroxy tulobuterol. This metabolite is shown to be eight times more potent than tulobuterol. Metabolism depends greatly upon the route of administration: intravenous, subcutaneous, oral, by aerosol or instillation into the bronchial tree. Conjugation or COMT inactivation can take place in the gut wall (terbutaline), in lungs (isoproterenol, terbutaline, rimiterol) or by hepatic first-pass. These processes decrease the amount of drug reaching the blood and the receptor sites. Metabolism in the lung is important for ibuterol (terbutaline diisobutyrate), which is more lipophilic than terbutaline and spreads throughout tissues where it is hydrolyzed to active terbutaline. Biotransformations are determined by environmental or genetic factors and by the associated therapy and can change dramatically from one patient to another (interindividual variability) or for the same patient by multiple dosing (intra-individual variability). These differences in the rates of the metabolism can explain, partly, the differences observed in the response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulants by responder or non-responder patients. Decision about a therapeutic dosage regiment involves the choice of the drug, of the route of administration and of the dose. This choice is made on the basis of the dose/response relationship. In the kinetic approach, pharmacokinetic data obtained after a single dose facilitate the development of an appropriate dosage regimen. PMID:2865990

  14. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  15. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  16. Spiropiperidine CCR5 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, David M; Gabriel, Stephen D; Makra, Ferenc; Filonova, Lubov; Gleason, Shelley; Brotherton-Pleiss, Christine; Setti, Lina Q; Trejo-Martin, Alejandra; Lee, Eun Kyung; Sankuratri, Surya; Ji, Changhua; Derosier, Andre; Dioszegi, Marianna; Heilek, Gabrielle; Jekle, Andreas; Berry, Pamela; Weller, Paul; Mau, Cheng-I

    2009-09-15

    A novel series of CCR5 antagonists has been identified, utilizing leads from high-throughput screening which were further modified based on insights from competitor molecules. Lead optimization was pursued by balancing opposing trends of metabolic stability and potency. Selective and potent analogs with good pharmacokinetic properties were successfully developed. PMID:19674898

  17. Xanthines as Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The natural plant alkaloids caffeine and theophylline were the first adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists described in the literature. They exhibit micromolar affinities and are non-selective. A large number of derivatives and analogs have subsequently been synthesized and evaluated as AR antagonists. Very potent antagonists have thus been developed with selectivity for each of the four AR subtypes. PMID:20859796

  18. Selective orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lebold, Terry P; Bonaventure, Pascal; Shireman, Brock T

    2013-09-01

    The orexin, or hypocretin, neuropeptides (orexin-A and orexin-B) are produced on neurons in the hypothalamus which project to key areas of the brain that control sleep-wake states, modulation of food intake, panic, anxiety, emotion, reward and addictive behaviors. These neuropeptides exert their effects on a pair of G-protein coupled receptors termed the orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptors. Emerging biology suggests the involvement of these receptors in psychiatric disorders as they are thought to play a key role in the regulation of multiple systems. This review is intended to highlight key selective OX1 or OX2 small-molecule antagonists. PMID:23891187

  19. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  20. [Vitamin K antagonists overdose].

    PubMed

    Groszek, Barbara; Piszczek, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, anticoagulant therapy belongs to the most commonly used forms of pharmacotherapy in modern medicine. The most important representatives of anticoagulants are heparins (unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin) and coumarin derivatives (vitamin K antagonists--VKA). Next to the many advantages of traditional oral anticoagulants may also have disadvantages. In Poland most often used two VKA: acenocoumarol and warfarin. The aim of the work is the analysis of the causes of the occurrence of bleeding disorders and symptoms of overdose VKA in patients to be hospitalized. In the years 2012 to 2014 were hospitalized 62 patients with overdose VKA (40 women and 22 men). The average age of patients was 75.3 years) and clotting disturbances and/or bleeding. At the time of the admission in all patients a significant increase in the value of the INR was stated, in 22 patients INR result was " no clot detected", on the remaining value of the INR were in the range of 7 to 13.1. On 51 patients observed different severe symptoms of bleeding (hematuria, bleeding from mucous membranes of the nose or gums ecchymoses on the extremities, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract--as in 5 patients has led to significant anemia and transfusion of concentrated red blood cells. Up on 33 patients kidney function disorder were found--exacerbated chronic renal failure and urinary tract infection. 8 diagnosed inflammatory changes in the airways. On 13 patients, it was found a significant degree of neuropsychiatric disorders (dementia, cognitive impairment), which made impossible the understanding the sense of treatment and cooperation with the patient. In 6 patients the symptoms of overdose were probably dependent on the interaction with the congestants at the same time (change the preparation of anticoagulant, NSAIDs, antibiotics). In 2 cases, the overdose was a suicide attempt in nature. In addition to the above mentioned disorders, on two of those patients diagnosed

  1. Sexually antagonistic genes: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Rice, W R

    1992-06-01

    When selection differs between the sexes, a mutation beneficial to one sex may be harmful to the other (sexually antagonistic). Because the sexes share a common gene pool, selection in one sex can interfere with the other's adaptive evolution. Theory predicts that sexually antagonistic mutations should accumulate in tight linkage with a new sex-determining gene, even when the harm to benefit ratio is high. Genetic markers and artificial selection were used to make a pair of autosomal genes segregate like a new pair of sex-determining genes in a Drosophila melanogaster model system. A 29-generation study provides experimental evidence that sexually antagonistic genes may be common in nature and will accumulate in response to a new sex-determining gene. PMID:1604317

  2. Immediate post-defeat infusions of the noradrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol impair the consolidation of conditioned defeat in male Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Gray, Cloe Luckett; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L; Solomon, Matia B; Norvelle, Alisa; Parent, Marise B; Huhman, Kim L

    2015-12-01

    Social defeat occurs when an animal is attacked and subjugated by an aggressive conspecific. Following social defeat, male Syrian hamsters fail to display species-typical territorial aggression and instead exhibit submissive or defensive behaviors even when in the presence of a non-aggressive intruder. We have termed this phenomenon conditioned defeat (CD). The mechanisms underlying CD are not fully understood, but data from our lab suggest that at least some of the mechanisms are similar to those that mediate classical fear conditioning. The goal of the present experiment was to test the hypothesis that noradrenergic signaling promotes the consolidation of CD, as in classical fear conditioning, by determining whether CD is disrupted by post-training blockade of noradrenergic activity. In Experiment 1, we determined whether systemic infusions of the noradrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol (0, 1.0, 10, or 20mg/kg) given immediately after a 15 min defeat by a resident aggressor would impair CD tested 48 h later. Hamsters that were given immediate post-training infusions of propranolol (1.0, but not 10 or 20mg/kg) showed significantly less submissive behavior than did those given vehicle infusions supporting the hypothesis that there is noradrenergic modulation of the consolidation of a social defeat experience. In Experiment 2, we demonstrated that propranolol (1.0mg/kg) given immediately, but not 4 or 24h, after defeat impaired CD tested 48 h after defeat indicating that the window within which the memory for social defeat is susceptible to beta-adrenergic modulation is temporary. In Experiment 3, we examined whether central blockade of noradrenergic receptors could recapitulate the effect of systemic injections by giving an intracerebroventricular infusion of propranolol immediately after defeat and examining the effect on CD 24h later. Centrally administered propranolol (20 μg/3 μl but not 2 μg/3 μl) was also effective in dose-dependently reducing

  3. Beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity, autonomic balance and serotonergic activity in practitioners of Transcendental Meditation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the acute autonomic effects of the Transcendental Meditation Program (TM) and resolve the conflict arising from discrepant neurochemical and psychophysiological data. Three experimental investigations were performed. The first examined beta{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors (AR's) on peripheral blood lymphocytes, via (I{sup 125})iodocyanopindolol binding, in 10 male mediating and 10 age matched non-meditating control subjects, to test the hypothesis that the long-term practice of TM and the TM Sidhi Program (TMSP) reduces end organ sensitivity to adrenergic agonists. The second investigated respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an indirect measure of cardiac Parasympathetic Nervous System tone), and skin resistance (a measure of Sympathetic Nervous System tone) during periods of spontaneous respiratory apneusis, a phenomenon occurring during TM that is known to mark the subjective experience of transcending. The third was within subject investigation of the acute effects of the TMSP on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) activity. Platelet 5-HT was assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, plasma prolactin (PL) and lutenizing hormone (LH) by radioimmunoassay, tryptophan by spectrofluorimetry, and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, a modulator of 5-HT uptake) by radial immunodiffusion assay.

  4. BETA-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES THAT MEDIATE RACTOPAMINE STIMULATION OF LIPOLYSIS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The RR stereoisomer of ractopamine exhibits the highest beta-AR affinity and signaling response of the four ractopamine stereoisomers. The RR isomer exhibits selective activation of the porcine beta-2 AR. Our objective was to determine the beta-AR subtypes that mediate the lipolytic response to ra...

  5. Regulation of cardiac sodium-calcium exchanger by beta-adrenergic agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, J; Shuba, Y M; Morad, M

    1996-01-01

    Na+-Ca2+ exchanger and Ca2+ channel are two major sarcolemmal Ca2+-transporting proteins of cardiac myocytes. Although the Ca2+ channel is effectively regulated by protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation, no enzymatic regulation of the exchanger protein has been identified as yet. Here we report that in frog ventricular myocytes, isoproterenol down-regulates the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, independent of intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potential, by activation of the beta-receptor/adenylate-cyclase/cAMP-dependent cascade, resulting in suppression of transmembrane Ca2+ transport via the exchanger and providing for the well-documented contracture-suppressant effect of the hormone on frog heart. The beta-blocker propranolol blocks the isoproterenol effect, whereas forskolin, cAMP, and theophylline mimic it. In the frog heart where contractile Ca2+ is transported primarily by the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, the beta-agonists' simultaneous enhancement of Ca2+ current, ICa, and suppression of Na+-Ca2+ exchanger current, INa-Ca would enable the myocyte to develop force rapidly at the onset of depolarization (enhancement of ICa) and to decrease Ca2+ influx (suppression of INa-Ca) later in the action potential. This unique adrenergically induced shift in the Ca2+ influx pathways may have evolved in response to paucity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase/phospholamban complex and absence of significant intracellular Ca2+ release pools in the frog heart. PMID:8643609

  6. NMR determination of isosorbide dinitrate and beta-adrenergic blocking agents in tablets.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, S N; Rossi, M T; Pizzorno, M T; Albonico, S M

    1982-10-01

    An NMR spectroscopic method for the determination of isosorbide dinitrate, alone or together with alprenolol or propranolol, is described. Spectra are determined in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 containing maleic acid or 1,4-dinitrobenzene as internal standards. Both synthetic mixtures and commercial formulations were assayed, and the results were compared using compendial procedures. PMID:6128401

  7. Phosphorylation of Src by phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated EGFR transactivation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Lewis J; Alexander, Kevin M; Mohan, Maradumane L; Bowman, Amber L; Mangmool, Supachoke; Xiao, Kunhong; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Rockman, Howard A

    2016-10-01

    β2-Adrenergic receptors (β2AR) transactivate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) through formation of a β2AR-EGFR complex that requires activation of Src to mediate signaling. Here, we show that both lipid and protein kinase activities of the bifunctional phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) enzyme are required for β2AR-stimulated EGFR transactivation. Mechanistically, the generation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-tris-phosphate (PIP3) by the lipid kinase function stabilizes β2AR-EGFR complexes while the protein kinase activity of PI3K regulates Src activation by direct phosphorylation. The protein kinase activity of PI3K phosphorylates serine residue 70 on Src to enhance its activity and induce EGFR transactivation following βAR stimulation. This newly identified function for PI3K, whereby Src is a substrate for the protein kinase activity of PI3K, is of importance since Src plays a key role in pathological and physiological signaling. PMID:27169346

  8. Rapid stress-induced transcriptomic changes in the brain depend on beta-adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Roszkowski, Martin; Manuella, Francesca; von Ziegler, Lukas; Durán-Pacheco, Gonzalo; Moreau, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Isabelle M; Bohacek, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    Acute exposure to stressful experiences can rapidly increase anxiety and cause neuropsychiatric disorders. The effects of stress result in part from the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, which regulate gene expression in different brain regions. The fast neuroendocrine response to stress is largely mediated by norepinephrine (NE) and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), followed by a slower and more sustained release of corticosterone. While corticosterone is an important regulator of gene expression, it is not clear which stress-signals contribute to the rapid regulation of gene expression observed immediately after stress exposure. Here, we demonstrate in mice that 45 min after an acute swim stress challenge, large changes in gene expression occur across the transcriptome in the hippocampus, a region sensitive to the effects of stress. We identify multiple candidate genes that are rapidly and transiently altered in both males and females. Using a pharmacological approach, we show that most of these rapidly induced genes are regulated by NE through β-adrenergic receptor signaling. We find that CRH and corticosterone can also contribute to rapid changes in gene expression, although these effects appear to be restricted to fewer genes. These results newly reveal a widespread impact of NE on the transcriptome and identify novel genes associated with stress and adrenergic signaling. PMID:27026109

  9. Leukocyte beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity and depression severity in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Redwine, Laura S.; Hong, Suzi; Rutledge, Thomas; Wentworth, Bailey; Pung, Meredith; Ziegler, Michael G.; Maisel, Alan; Greenberg, Barry; Mills, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clinical outcomes are worse for patients with heart failure (HF) and elevated depression symptoms. Depression related sympatho-immune dysregulation may be one mechanism leading to poorer HF prognosis. Sympathetically mediated adrenergic activity is known to regulate immune activity via β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). However, studies show conflicting relationships between leukocyte β-AR sensitivity and depression symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine in patients with HF the relationship of leukocyte β-AR sensitivity with two diverse measures of depression, self-report questionnaire versus clinical diagnostic interview. Methods Patients with HF (N=73, mean age = 56.3, S.D. = 13.0) completed the Beck Depression Inventory −1A (BDI) and a modified Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID). Leukocyte β-AR sensitivity was determined from isoproterenol stimulated cyclic AMP levels; plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine were also assessed. Results Patients with major depression determined by SCID had significantly higher β-AR sensitivity than non-depressed (F(6, 72) = 9.27, p = .003, η2 = .12). Meanwhile, the BDI revealed a more complex relationship. Minimal, mild, and moderate-to-severe depression symptom groups had significant differences in β-AR sensitivity (F(7, 72) = 7.03, p = .002, η2 = .18), with mild symptoms appearing to correspond with reduced β-AR sensitivity and moderate-to-severe symptoms with higher β-AR sensitivity. Conclusions By deconstructing depression measurements a greater depth of information may be garnered to potentially reveal subtypes of depression symptoms and their relation to β-AR sensitivity in HF. PMID:25373889

  10. The Use of Beta-Adrenergic Blockade in Preventing Trauma-Induced Hepatomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Robert E.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Dasu, Mohan R.; Barrow, Laura N.; Herndon, David N.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that hepatomegaly in burned children can be attenuated or reversed by blocking lipolysis and reducing free fatty acids delivered to the liver. Summary Background Data: Accelerated lipolysis in severely burned children has been shown to play an important role in the accumulation of hepatic TGs. Severely burned children who survive 10 days or more after injury commonly have enlarged livers often twice or more normal size for their sex, age, and weight. Methods: Ninety-eight children, 2 to 18 years of age, with burns covering more than 40% of their body surface and who received either propranolol (β-adrenergic blockade) or placebo were studied. Liver weights were measured by ultrasonic scanning. Body composition changes were identified by dual-image x-ray absorptiometry and validated by whole-body potassium-40 scintillation counting. Discarded abdominal cutaneous adipose tissue was collected before and after propranolol or placebo for microarray analysis. Results: In 80% of severely burned children studied not receiving propranolol, liver sizes increased by 100% or more while 86% of burned children receiving propranolol showed a decrease or no change in liver size over the same period of time after injury. Gene expression patterns of adipose tissue after propranolol treatment showed that all of the identified genes related to lipid metabolism were down-regulated. Conclusions: Data reported here support the hypothesis that β-adrenergic blockade can reduce delivery of fatty acids to the liver and hepatic congestion commonly found in severely burned children by inhibiting lipolysis and reducing hepatic blood flow. PMID:16371745

  11. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  12. Increased beta-adrenergic responsiveness induced by 14 days exposure to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Polet, J. L.; Engelke, K. A.; Hoffler, G. W.; Lane, L. D.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1995-01-01

    Increased sensitivity of end-organ responses to neuroendocrine stimuli as a result of prolonged exposure to the relative inactivity of microgravity has recently been hypothesized. This notion is based on the inverse relationship between circulating norepinephrine and beta-adrenoreceptor sensitivity. The beta-adrenoreceptor activity is reduced in individuals who have elevated plasma norepinephrine as a result of regular exposure to upright posture and physical exercise. In contrast, adrenoreceptor hypersensitivity has been reported in patients with dysautonomias in which circulating catecholamines are absent or reduced. Taken together, these studies and the observation that circulating plasma norepinephrine has been reduced during spaceflight and in groundbased simulations of microgravity prompt the suggestion that adrenoreceptor hypersensitivity may be a consequence of the adaptation to spaceflight. We conducted an experiment designed to measure cardiovascular responses to adrenoreceptor agonists in human subjects before and after prolonged exposure to 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT) to test the hypothesis that adaptation to microgravity increases adrenoreceptor responsiveness, and that this adaptation is associated with reduced levels of circulating norepinephrine.

  13. Reconstitution of beta-adrenergic receptor with components of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Hekman, M; Feder, D; Keenan, A K; Gal, A; Klein, H W; Pfeuffer, T; Levitzki, A; Helmreich, E J

    1984-01-01

    Beta 1-Adrenergic receptor proteins were extracted from turkey erythrocyte membranes with lauroyl sucrose and digitonin and purified by affinity chromatography on a column of alprenolol agarose Affi-gel 10 or 15. The 5000-fold purified receptor is able to couple functionally with the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (GS) from either turkey or duck erythrocytes. Functional coupling was achieved by three different approaches. (i) Purified beta-receptor polypeptides were coupled in phospholipid (asolectin) vesicles with GS from a crude cholate or lauroyl sucrose extract of turkey erythrocyte membranes. The detergent was removed and vesicles were formed with SM-2 beads. (ii) Purified beta-receptor was reconstituted with pure, homogeneous GS in asolectin vesicles. (iii) Purified beta-receptors were either coupled in asolectin vesicles with a mixture of pure, homogeneous Gpp(NH)p-activated GS and a lauroyl sucrose extract of turkey erythrocyte membranes, or with pure, homogeneous Gpp(NH)p-activated GS alone. The decay of activity was measured on addition of GTP and hormone. In (ii) and (iii), the detergent was removed and vesicles were formed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 columns. In each of the three different experimental conditions, the beta-receptor was activated with l-isoproterenol and activation was blocked with d,l-propranolol. Activated GS were measured separately by means of their capacity to activate a crude Lubrol PX-solubilized adenylate cyclase preparation from rabbit myocardial membrane. The kinetics of GS activation by purified beta-receptors occupied by l-isoproterenol was first order and activation was linearly dependent on receptor concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. PMID:6098472

  14. Immuno cross-reactivity suggests that catecholamine biosynthesis enzymes and beta adrenergic receptors may be related

    SciTech Connect

    Shorr, R.G.L.; Minnich, M.D.; Varrichio, A.; Strohsacker, M.W.; Gotlib, L.; Kruse, L.I.; DeWolf, W.E. Jr.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Turkey red blood cell (RBC), Beta/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors (Bar) were prepared to electrophoretic homogeneity and denatured protein used to prepare rabbit anti-Bar antibodies. Anti-Bar activity was confirmed by immuno-adsorption of (/sup 125/I) cyanopindolol (CYP) labeled Bar. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) was purified from bovine adrenal medullae chromaffin vesicles by ion exchange, size exclusion and concanavalin-A-Sepharose chromatography. Final DBH specific activities were 42 +/- 4 U/mg protein. Homogeneity was confirmed by non-denaturing PAGE. Bar was compared to DBH by anti-Bar antibody cross-reactivity. DBH and Bar were recognized by anti-Bar antibodies on immunoblotting. No interactions were observed with preimmune controls. Similar results were obtained with glycosylated and deglycosylated DBH suggesting that the antibodies recognize DBH amino acid sequence and not associated carbohydrate. Cross-reactive antibodies were purified by affinity chromatography using immobilized DBH and shown to immuno-adsorb (/sup 125/I)CYP labeled Bar. These results suggest that the catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme DBH and Bar may be related in structure.

  15. Endothelin receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Janet J; Davenport, Anthony P

    2015-03-01

    All three members of the endothelin (ET) family of peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, are expressed in the human kidney, with ET-1 being the predominant isoform. ET-1 and ET-2 bind to two G-protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB, whereas at physiological concentrations ET-3 has little affinity for the ET(A) receptor. The human kidney is unusual among the peripheral organs in expressing a high density of ET(B). The renal vascular endothelium only expresses the ET(B) subtype and ET-1 acts in an autocrine or paracrine manner to release vasodilators. Endothelial ETB in kidney, as well as liver and lungs, also has a critical role in scavenging ET-1 from the plasma. The third major function is ET-1 activation of ET(B) in in the nephron to reduce salt and water re-absorption. In contrast, ET(A) predominate on smooth muscle, causing vasoconstriction and mediating many of the pathophysiological actions of ET-1. The role of the two receptors has been delineated using highly selective ET(A) (BQ123, TAK-044) and ET(B) (BQ788) peptide antagonists. Nonpeptide antagonists, bosentan, macitentan, and ambrisentan, that are either mixed ET(A)/ET(B) antagonists or display ET(A) selectivity, have been approved for clinical use but to date are limited to pulmonary hypertension. Ambrisentan is in clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. This review summarizes ET-receptor antagonism in the human kidney, and considers the relative merits of selective versus nonselective antagonism in renal disease. PMID:25966344

  16. Tachykinin antagonists and the airways.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Kips, J C; Peleman, R A; Pauwels, R A

    1995-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence for the presence of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) in human airway nerves. Studies on autopsy tissue, on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on sputum suggest that SP may be present in increased amounts in the asthmatic airway. Substance P and NKA are potent bronchoconstrictors of human airways, asthmatics being more sensitive than normal persons. The major enzyme responsible for the degradation of the tachykinins, the neutral endopeptidase, is present in the airways and is involved in the breakdown of exogenously administered SP and NKA, both in normal and asthmatic persons. Other, less well documented airway effects of SP and NKA include mucus secretion, vasodilation and plasma extravasation, as well as the chemoattraction and stimulation of various cells presumed to be involved in asthmatic airway inflammation. NK2 receptors and, to a lesser extent, NK1 receptors have been shown to be involved in bronchoconstriction, whereas NK1 receptors were found to be involved in mucus secretion, microvascular leakage and vasodilatation, and in most of the effects on inflammatory cells. The first clinical trial with FK224, a peptide NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonist, and CP99994, a nonpeptide NK1 receptor antagonist, are negative. However, FK224 failed to block the bronchoconstrictor effect of NKA in asthmatics and the dose of CP99994, needed to antagonize tachykinin effects in man, remains to be determined. PMID:7543746

  17. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Melani, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of COPD pharmacological treatment. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are a major class of inhaled bronchodilators. Some LAMA/device systems with different characteristics and dosing schedules are currently approved for maintenance therapy of COPD and a range of other products are being developed. They improve lung function and patient-reported outcomes and reduce acute bronchial exacerbations with good safety. LAMAs are used either alone or associated with long-acting β₂-agonists, eventually in fixed dose combinations. Long-acting β₂-agonist/LAMA combinations assure additional benefits over the individual components alone. The reader will obtain a view of the safety and efficacy of the different LAMA/device systems in COPD patients. PMID:26109098

  18. A new alcohol antagonist: Phaclofen

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, A.M. ); Harris, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the GABA{sub B} receptor antagonist, phaclofen to alter behavioral effects of ethanol was evaluated by loss of righting reflex (sleep time), motor incoordination (bar holding), spontaneous locomotion (open field activity) and hypothermia. Pretreatment with phaclofen significantly decreased the effects of ethanol on motor incoordination, locomotor activity and hypothermia. However, phaclofen had no effect on either pentobarbital- or diazepam-induced motor incoordination. Phaclofen slightly increased the ED{sub 50} for loss of the righting reflex but did not alter either the duration of reflex loss produced by ethanol or blood ethanol levels at awakening. Our results suggest phaclofen is rapidly inactivated resulting in difficulty in observing antagonism of long duration ethanol effects. These findings suggest that the GABA{sub B} system may play a role in mediating several important actions of ethanol.

  19. Client Perceptions of Two Antagonist Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reports results of a questionnaire administered to participants in an antagonist drug outpatient clinic and an antagonist drug work-release program to obtain awareness of acceptance of the program participants. Naltrexone patients recommended an alternative method of administering the drug and changing the money system to award deserving inmates…

  20. Benzodiazepinone Derivatives as CRTH2 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiwen Jim; Cheng, Alan C; Tang, H Lucy; Medina, Julio C

    2011-07-14

    Multiple CRTH2 antagonists are currently evaluated in human clinical trials for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). During our lead optimization for CRTH2 antagonists, an observation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond in ortho-phenylsulfonamido benzophenone derivatives led to the design and synthesis of conformationally constrained benzodiazepinones as potent CRTH2 antagonists. The benzodiazepinones are 2 orders of magnitude more potent than the original flexible bisaryl ethers in our binding assay. Selected benzodiazepinones, such as compound 6, were also potent in the human eosinophil shape change assay. Analysis of the rigid conformations of these benzodiazepinones and ortho-phenylsulfonamido benzophenones provided an explanation for the structure-activity relationship and revealed the possible bound conformations to CRTH2, which may be useful for building a pharmacophore model of CRTH2 antagonists. PMID:24900341

  1. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks. PMID:27326708

  2. Tannins as Gibberellin Antagonists 1

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Mary Ritzel; Geissman, T. A.; Phinney, Bernard O.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen chemically defined hydrolyzable tannins and six impure mixtures of either condensed or hydrolyzable tannins were found to inhibit the gibberellin-induced growth of light-grown dwarf pea seedlings. The highest ratio of tannins to gibberellic acid tested (1000: 1 by weight) inhibited from 80 to 95% of the induced growth for all tannins tested except for two monogalloyl glucose tannins which inhibited only 50% of the induced growth. The lowest ratio tested (10: 1) inhibited the induced growth by less than 25% except for the case of terchebin where 50% inhibition was found. The inhibition of gibberellin-induced growth was found to be completely reversed by increasing the amount of gibberellin in three cases tested. Tannins alone did not inhibit endogenous growth of either dwarf or nondwarf pea seedlings. Eight compounds related to tannins, including coumarin, trans-cinnamic acid, and a number of phenolic compounds were also tested as gibberellin antagonists. Most of these compounds showed some inhibition of gibberellin-induced growth, but less than that of the tannins. At the highest ratio (1000: 1) the greatest inhibition was 55%; at the lowest ratio (10: 1) no more than 17% was observed. These compounds did not inhibit endogenous growth, and the inhibition of gibberellin-induced growth could be reversed by increasing the amount of gibberellin in two cases tested. Six chemically defined tannins were found to inhibit hypocotyl growth induced by gibberellic acid in cucumber seedlings. Growth induced by indoleacetic acid in the same test was not inhibited. The highest ratio of tannin to promotor tested gave strong inhibition of gibberellic acid-induced growth, but actually enhanced the growth induced by indoleacetic acid. This difference in action suggests a specificity between the tannins and gibberellic acid. PMID:16657953

  3. Tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunyu; Westaway, Susan M; Speake, Jason D; Bishop, Michael J; Goetz, Aaron S; Carballo, Luz Helena; Hu, Mike; Epperly, Andrea H

    2011-01-15

    Opioid receptors play an important role in both behavioral and homeostatic functions. We herein report tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists. SAR studies led to the identification of the potent antagonist 2v, endowed with 1.58nM (K(i)) functional activity against the μ opioid receptor. DMPK data suggest that novel tetrahydroquinoline analogs may be advantageous in peripheral applications. PMID:21193310

  4. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Channick, Richard N; Sitbon, Olivier; Barst, Robyn J; Manes, Alessandra; Rubin, Lewis J

    2004-06-16

    Endothelin receptor antagonism has emerged as an important therapeutic strategy in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Laboratory and clinical investigations have clearly shown that endothelin (ET)-1 is overexpressed in several forms of pulmonary vascular disease and likely plays a significant pathogenetic role in the development and progression of pulmonary vasculopathy. Oral endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise capacity, functional status, and clinical outcome in several randomized placebo-controlled trials. Bosentan, a dual-receptor antagonist, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for class III and IV patients with PAH, based on two phase III trials. In addition to its efficacy as sole therapy, bosentan may have a role as part of a combination of drugs such as a prostanoid or sildenafil. The selective endothelin receptor-A antagonists sitaxsentan and ambrisentan are currently undergoing investigation. PMID:15194180

  5. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wan-Ting; Dai, Ming-Xiang; Xue, Fang-Zheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonistic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all of the agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all of the agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups and that agents in the same group collaborate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203080 and 61473051) and the Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing City (Grant No. CSTC 2011BB0081).

  6. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs used to treat the acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as ulcer and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Although such drugs, especially ranitidine and famotidine, are still widely used, their effects on semen quality, and hence on male infertility, is still unclear. This MiniReview systematically addresses and summarizes the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, nizatidine and famotidine) on semen quality, particularly, on sperm function. Cimetidine appears to have adverse effects on semen quality. While the effects of ranitidine and nizatidine on semen quality are still controversial, famotidine does not appear to change semen quality. Therefore, additional studies will be required to clarify whether histamine-2 receptor-independent effects of these drugs play a role in semen quality as well as further clinical studies including direct comparison of the histamine-2 receptor antagonists. PMID:26176290

  7. Azines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lazewska, Dorota; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, when the histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was cloned, it has constituted an interesting target for drug development. Pharmacological studies suggest the potential utility of histamine H4R antagonists/inverse agonists in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, e.g. allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, colitis, or pruritus. The first H4R ligands were non-selective compounds, but intensive chemical and pharmacological work has led to the discovery of highly potent and selective H4R antagonists (e.g. JNJ7777120, CZC-13788, PF-2988403, A-940894, A-987306). The first compound (UR-63325) has finally entered into clinical studies for the treatment of allergic respiratory diseases (completing the phase I ascending dose trial) and has been found to be safe and well tolerated. The number of scientific publications and patent applications in the H4 field is increasing annually. Among the diverse chemical structures of the H4R antagonists described a 2-aminopyrimidine scaffold is repeatedly found. This review looked at recent advances in the search for H4R antagonists as reflected in patent applications/patents and peer-reviewed publications over the last two years. The work concerns azines (mono-, di-, triazines) and their fused analogues. The chemistry and pharmacology has been described. PMID:22202103

  8. Oxazolidinones as novel human CCR8 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian; Wang, Yonghui; Wang, Feng; Kerns, Jeffery K; Vinader, Victoria M; Hancock, Ashley P; Lindon, Matthew J; Stevenson, Graeme I; Morrow, Dwight M; Rao, Parvathi; Nguyen, Cuc; Barrett, Victoria J; Browning, Chris; Hartmann, Guido; Andrew, David P; Sarau, Henry M; Foley, James J; Jurewicz, Anthony J; Fornwald, James A; Harker, Andy J; Moore, Michael L; Rivero, Ralph A; Belmonte, Kristen E; Connor, Helen E

    2007-03-15

    High-throughput screening of the corporate compound collection led to the discovery of a novel series of N-substituted-5-aryl-oxazolidinones as potent human CCR8 antagonists. The synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and optimization of the series that led to the identification of SB-649701 (1a), are described. PMID:17267215

  9. Discovery of novel and potent CRTH2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinji; Terasaka, Tadashi; Zenkoh, Tatsuya; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Hisashi; Nagata, Hiroshi; Imamura, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Miki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2012-01-15

    High throughput screening of our chemical library for CRTH2 antagonists provided a lead compound 1a. Initial optimization of the lead led to the discovery of a novel, potent and orally bioavailable CRTH2 antagonist 17. PMID:22178554

  10. Vasopressin receptor antagonists: Characteristics and clinical role.

    PubMed

    Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Berl, Tomas

    2016-03-01

    Hyponatremia, the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients is associated with increased risk of mortality even when mild and apparently asymptomatic. Likewise morbidity manifested as attention deficits, gait disturbances, falls, fractures, and osteoporosis is more prevalent in hyponatremic subjects. Hyponatremia also generates a significant financial burden. Therefore, it is important to explore approaches that effectively and safely treat hyponatremia. Currently available strategies are physiologically sound and affordable but lack evidence from clinical trials and are limited by variable efficacy, slow response, and/or poor compliance. The recent emergence of vasopressin receptor antagonists provides a class of drugs that target the primary pathophysiological mechanism, namely vasopressin mediated impairment of free water excretion. This review summarizes the historical development, pharmacology, clinical trials supporting efficacy and safety, shortcomings, as well as practical suggestions for the use of vasopressin receptor antagonists. PMID:27156765

  11. Fluorescent Human EP3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, Miriam; Schwed, J Stephan; Kuczka, Karina; Meyer Dos Santos, Sascha; Harder, Sebastian; Nüsing, Rolf M; Paulke, Alexander; Stark, Holger

    2012-09-13

    Exchange of the lipophilc part of ortho-substituted cinnamic acid lead structures with different small molecule fluorophoric moieties via a dimethylene spacer resulted in hEP3R ligands with affinities in the nanomolar concentration range. Synthesized compounds emit fluorescence in the blue, green, and red range of light and have been tested concerning their potential as a pharmacological tool. hEP3Rs were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy on HT-29 cells, on murine kidney tissues, and on human brain tissues and functionally were characterized as antagonists on human platelets. Inhibition of PGE2 and collagen-induced platelet aggregation was measured after preincubation with novel hEP3R ligands. The pyryllium-labeled ligand 8 has been shown as one of the most promising structures, displaying a useful fluorescence and highly affine hEP3R antagonists. PMID:24900547

  12. Preclinical pharmacology of alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Martin, D J

    1999-01-01

    The implication of a single adrenoceptor subtype in the contractility of prostatic and urethral smooth muscle cells led to the concept that drugs with selectivity for this subtype may exhibit functional uroselectivity. Comparison of the affinities of the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists revealed that few compounds show selectivity for one of the three cloned alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes (alpha1a/A, alpha1b/B, alpha1d/D) whereas most of them had a similar affinity for the three subtypes. Moreover, data supporting a relationship between selectivity for the alpha1a/A-adrenoceptor subtype and functional uroselectivity are still lacking and recent data challenged the relevance of the selectivity for a given cloned alpha1-adrenoceptor subtype in predicting functional uroselectivity. In vivo data showed that alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists without adrenoceptor subtype selectivity, like alfuzosin or to a minor extent doxazosin, showed functional uroselectivity whereas prazosin and terazosin were not shown to be uroselective. Compounds considered to be selective for the alpha1a/A-adrenoceptor, like tamsulosin or 5-Me-urapidil, did not show functional uroselectivity since they modified urethral and blood pressures in a manner which was not correlated to their selectivity for the cloned alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. Meanwhile, the identification in prostatic tissue, of a new sub-family of alpha1-adrenoceptors with low affinity for prazosin and denominated alpha1L gave rise to numerous studies. However, its functional role as well as the affinity of the known antagonists for this receptor subtype remains to be clarified. In conclusion, the existing alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists have different pharmacological profiles in vivo which are yet not predictable from their receptor pharmacology based on the actual state of knowledge of the alpha1-adrenoceptor classification. PMID:10393471

  13. Broad-Scale Phosphoprotein Profiling of Beta Adrenergic Receptor (β-AR) Signaling Reveals Novel Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation Events

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej J.; Singh, Harvir; Chan, Steven M.; Utz, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) are model G-protein coupled receptors that mediate signal transduction in the sympathetic nervous system. Despite the widespread clinical use of agents that target β-ARs, the signaling pathways that operate downstream of β-AR stimulation have not yet been completely elucidated. Here, we utilized a lysate microarray approach to obtain a broad-scale perspective of phosphoprotein signaling downstream of β-AR. We monitored the time course of phosphorylation states of 54 proteins after β-AR activation mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. In response to stimulation with the non-selective β-AR agonist isoproterenol, we observed previously described phosphorylation events such as ERK1/2(T202/Y204) and CREB(S133), but also novel phosphorylation events such as Cdc2(Y15) and Pyk2(Y402). All of these events were mediated through cAMP and PKA as they were reproduced by stimulation with the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and were blocked by treatment with H89, a PKA inhibitor. In addition, we also observed a number of novel isoproterenol-induced protein dephosphorylation events in target substrates of the PI3K/AKT pathway: GSK3β(S9), 4E-BP1(S65), and p70s6k(T389). These dephosphorylations were dependent on cAMP, but were independent of PKA and correlated with reduced PI3K/AKT activity. Isoproterenol stimulation also led to a cAMP-dependent dephosphorylation of PP1α(T320), a modification known to correlate with enhanced activity of this phosphatase. Dephosphorylation of PP1α coincided with the secondary decline in phosphorylation of some PKA-phosphorylated substrates, suggesting that PP1α may act in a feedback loop to return these phosphorylations to baseline. In summary, lysate microarrays are a powerful tool to profile phosphoprotein signaling and have provided a broad-scale perspective of how β-AR signaling can regulate key pathways involved in cell growth and metabolism. PMID:24340001

  14. BETA ADRENERGIC CONTROL OF MACROMOLECULE SYNTHESIS IN NEONATAL RAT HEART, KIDNEY AND LUNG: RELATIONSHIP TO SYMPATHETIC NEURONAL DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sympathetic nervous system has been hypothesized to coordinate the timing of cellular development in peripheral tissues. n the current study, we evaluated the relationships among the ontogeny of sympathetic projections to peripheral organs, the patterns of macromolecule synth...

  15. The impact of social status on the erythrocyte beta-adrenergic response in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J B; Gilmour, K M

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine whether chronic increases in circulating cortisol concentrations, resulting from the occupation of subordinate status in rainbow trout social hierarchies, resulted in an enhancement of the erythrocyte adrenergic response. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were confined in fork length matched pairs for 6 h, 18 h, 48 h or 5-7 days, and social status was assigned through observations of behaviour. Erythrocyte adrenergic responsiveness, determined in vitro as changes in water content following incubation with the beta-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol, was significantly greater in subordinate than dominant fish at 48 h of social interactions but not after 5-7 days, nor when assessed as changes in extracellular pH (pHe). However, the activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger (beta-NHE), assessed in vitro as the pHe change following incubation with the permeable cyclic AMP analogue 8-bromo-cyclic AMP, was significantly lower in subordinate fish. The number of erythrocyte membrane-bound adrenergic receptors (Bmax) was significantly higher in subordinate than dominant fish at 48 h, but had decreased by 5-7 days to a value that was not significantly different from that for dominant fish. The apparent dissociation constant (KD) of these receptors was not significantly impacted by either social status or interaction time. Finally, the relative expressions of beta-3b adrenergic receptor (AR) and beta-NHE mRNA were determined using real-time PCR and were found to be minimally affected by social rank. Relative to a control group, beta-3b AR mRNA was significantly up-regulated in both dominant and subordinate trout at all time periods, whereas the expression of beta-NHE was in general significantly down-regulated. Unlike the situation in rainbow trout treated with exogenous cortisol, elevations in circulating cortisol resulting from low social status did not "pre-adapt" the erythrocyte adrenergic response, but rather may have served to offset the potentially adverse effects elicited by plasma catecholamines, which were elevated during social hierarchy formation. PMID:16403476

  16. [Clinical and instrumental characteristics of idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dynamics of echocardiographic indices as affected by beta-adrenergic blockaders].

    PubMed

    Barats, S S; Kheĭnonen, I M; Klets, F Kh; Serebrennikov, V A; Lipchenko, A A

    1983-10-01

    Clinical investigation of 31 patients with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortal stenosis (IHSS) and idiopathic hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (IHNCMP) comprised electro- and phonocardiography, roentgenologic examination and echocardiography. The disease was latent in 3 patients, and ischemic heart disease or rheumatic heart lesion had been diagnosed prior to echocardiography in 26. Asymmetrical hypertrophy and hypokinesia of the upper third of the ventricular septum, narrowed left-ventricular cavity and septum-wise systolic movement of the anterior mitral cusp were findings common to all IHSS patients. The ventricular septum/left-ventricular posterior wall thickness ratio was elevated (1.42 +/- 0.06). In IHNCMP patients, this ratio was within normal range. The results of an acute pharmacologic test with 10 mg intravenous obsidan given to 10 IHSS patients suggested that the obstruction of left-ventricular outflow pathway was somewhat reduced. Prolonged (2 months to 3 years) obsidan treatment was given to 25 patients and was associated with positive effect in terms of improved subjective manifestations of the disease. However, echocardiographic patterns only showed moderate improvement in 9 of the 13 patients who had completed 1-3 years' treatment course. PMID:6139501

  17. "Silent" Priming of Translation-Dependent LTP by [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptors Involves Phosphorylation and Recruitment of AMPA Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenorio, Gustavo; Connor, Steven A.; Guevremont, Diane; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Williams, Joanna; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2010-01-01

    The capacity for long-term changes in synaptic efficacy can be altered by prior synaptic activity, a process known as "metaplasticity." Activation of receptors for modulatory neurotransmitters can trigger downstream signaling cascades that persist beyond initial receptor activation and may thus have metaplastic effects. Because activation of…

  18. Enhanced Noradrenergic Activity Potentiates Fear Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation by Differentially Recruiting alpha1- and beta-Adrenergic Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazarini, Lucas; Stern, Cristina A. Jark; Carobrez, Antonio P.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.

    2013-01-01

    Consolidation and reconsolidation are phases of memory stabilization that diverge slightly. Noradrenaline is known to influence both processes, but the relative contribution of alpha1- and beta-adrenoceptors is unclear. The present study sought to investigate this matter by comparing their recruitment to consolidate and/or reconsolidate a…

  19. Corticosterone Time-Dependently Modulates [beta]-Adrenergic Effects on Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Zhenwei; Krugers, Harm J.; Joels, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Previous experiments in the hippocampal CA1 area have shown that corticosterone can facilitate long-term potentiation (LTP) in a rapid non-genomic fashion, while the same hormone suppresses LTP that is induced several hours after hormone application. Here, we elaborated on this finding by examining whether corticosterone exerts opposite effects on…

  20. Post-Retrieval [beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Blockade: Effects on Extinction and Reconsolidation of Cocaine-Cue Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricks-Gleason, Ashley N.; Marshall, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Contexts and discrete cues associated with drug-taking are often responsible for relapse among addicts. Animal models have shown that interference with the reconsolidation of drug-cue memories can reduce seeking of drugs or drug-paired stimuli. One such model is conditioned place preference (CPP) in which an animal is trained to associate a…

  1. Modulation of the delayed rectifier potassium current in frog cardiomyocytes by beta-adrenergic agonists and magnesium.

    PubMed Central

    Duchatelle-Gourdon, I; Hartzell, H C; Lagrutta, A A

    1989-01-01

    1. The regulation of IK and ICa were studied in single cells isolated from bull-frog atrium using the whole-cell configuration of the patch clamp and a perfused patch pipette. 2. IK was increased approximately 50-100% and ICa was increased approximately 6-10 times by 1 microM-isoprenaline, 5 microM-forskolin, or internal perfusion with 30 microM-cyclic AMP. The effects of cyclic AMP and isoprenaline were not additive. The shape of the concentration-response curves and the EC50 values for the effects of cyclic AMP on ICa and on IK were very similar (2.3 microM for IK and 1.7 microM for ICa). 3. Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP had a similar effect on IK regardless of whether ICa was blocked with Cd2+ or not. Increasing ICa with dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel agonists had no effect on IK amplitude. 4. Isoprenaline or cyclic AMP caused an increase in the fully-activated IK and also shifted the activation curves to more negative potentials in most cells. The shift in the activation curve was reversible and was also observed when ICa was blocked with Cd2+. The rate of activation of IK was increased and the rate of deactivation of IK was slowed by isoprenaline. 5. After breaking the membrane patch and initiating whole-cell recording, IK ran down with time in about 50% of the cells examined when the intracellular solution contained 1 mM [Mg2+]. In contrast, when the solution contained 0.3 mM [Mg2+], rundown was almost never observed. Internal perfusion with increasing concentrations of [Mg2+] caused reversible decreases in the maximum amplitude of IK and shifted the IK activation curve slightly to more negative potentials, but had negligible effects upon the shape or the curvature of the fully activated current-voltage relationship. PMID:2561787

  2. Beta-adrenergic control of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation in hepatocytes from juvenile, adult and adrenalectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Cao, D; Alvarez Chiva, V; Mato, J M

    1983-01-01

    Changes in isoprenaline-sensitive phospholipid methyltransferase were studied in hepatocytes isolated from juvenile, mature and adrenalectomized rats. Isoprenaline produced greater stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation in juvenile and mature adrenalectomized rats than in mature animals. Similarly, isoprenaline stimulated phospholipid methyltransferase in juvenile and mature adrenalectomized rats but had no effect in mature animals. Isoprenaline-mediated activation of phospholipid methyltransferase in adrenalectomized rats was time- and dose-dependent. In hepatocytes isolated from adrenalectomized rats incubated with [Me-3H]methionine or [3H]-ethanolamine the addition of isoprenaline increased the amount of radioactivity incorporated into phosphatidylcholine. The activation by isoprenaline of phospholipid methyltransferase was abolished by the beta-blocker propranolol and by insulin. These results indicate that rat liver the occupation of functional beta-receptors causes a stimulation of phospholipid methylation. It is suggested that, as reported previously, cyclic AMP activates phospholipid methyltransferase. PMID:6320796

  3. Modification of cellular immune functions in humans by endurance exercise training during beta-adrenergic blockade with atenolol or propranolol.

    PubMed

    Watson, R R; Moriguchi, S; Jackson, J C; Werner, L; Wilmore, J H; Freund, B J

    1986-02-01

    Young, healthy, previously inactive men were trained aerobically 40 to 50 min X d-1, 5 d X wk-1 for 15 wk. They were randomly assigned to one of three medication groups: placebo, propranolol (160 mg X d-1), or atenolol (100 mg X d-1). All subjects lost weight and decreased relative body fat as a result of training. Following training, submaximal steady-state heart rates were reduced in all groups. Maximal oxygen uptake and maximal treadmill times were also increased in all groups. The VO2max of the placebo increased 18.4%. While that of the atenolol group increased 19.4%, the propranolol group went up 17.0%. After training the maximal heart rate did not change in the placebo group, while treatment with propranolol and atenolol reduced at 24.6 and 21.9%, respectively. Training caused a significant decrease in the natural killer cell activity in all three groups. The placebo group had 38.8% +/- 3.8 (SD) before and 29.3 +/- 3.2% lysis of target cells by natural killer cells after physical conditioning, which was significantly lower (P less than 0.01). The groups treated with propranolol and atenolol were also similarly decreased. The use of propranolol or atenolol had no additional significant effect on natural killer cell activity. T-cell mitogenesis stimulated with a mitogen significantly increased with conditioning. The groups given atenolol or propranolol tended to increase somewhat more than the placebo group, although this difference was not statistically significant. There was no significant change in the percentage of total lymphocytes isolated due to training or beta-blockade.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3485757

  4. Beta-adrenergic receptor mediated inflammation control by monocytes is associated with blood pressure and risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suzi; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Cheng, Tiefu; Redwine, Laura; Pruitt, Christopher; Mills, Paul J; Ziegler, Michael G; Green, J Michael; Shaikh, Farah; Wilson, Kathleen

    2015-11-01

    Overwhelming data indicate that individuals with even mildly elevated blood pressure (BP) are at great risk for developing clinical hypertension and future cardiovascular disease (CVD). There remains a lack of consensus regarding treatment strategies for mildly elevated BP, termed prehypertension, and the knowledge of pathophysiology and mechanisms of its clinical outcomes remains limited. Our primary aim was to investigate βAR-mediated inflammation control (BARIC) responses of blood monocytes to isoproterenol (Iso) in relation to BP and CVD risk factors, including obesity, depressive mood, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol levels in the 64 prehypertensive compared to 84 individuals with normal BP. BARIC was determined by measuring the degree of inhibition in lipopolysaccharides-stimulated monocytic intracellular TNF production by ex vivo Iso treatment (10(-8)M). Depressive mood was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Fasting metabolic and lipid panels were assessed, and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-1β, IL-6 were measured in a subset to confirm proinflammatory state of prehypertensive participants. Prehypertensive participants were older, heavier, included more men, and presented higher levels of fasting glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and plasma TNF compared to normotensive participants (p's<.05). BARIC was significantly attenuated in the prehypertensive compared to normotensive group (p<.05). BARIC was negatively associated with systolic BP, diastolic BP, age, BMI, fasting glucose, triglycerides, total and low density cholesterol levels, and somatic depressive symptoms in all participants (p's<.0001 to .05). However, among the prehypertensive individuals BARIC was positively associated with SBP even after controlling for the covariates (age, gender, race, BMI, glucose and lipid panel, somatic BDI scores) (p<.05). This differing nature of the BARIC-SBP relationship between the two BP groups may be attributed to moderating factors such as cardiorespiratory fitness or depressive symptoms that could not be clearly deciphered in this current study. Nonetheless, our findings indicate the associations between inflammation dysregulation mediated by sympathoadrenal activation and BP that is observable even among individuals with normal to mildly elevated BP. BARIC may be a useful and sensitive indicator of elevated risk for vascular inflammatory disease that can be detected even at lower BP levels, especially given its associations with traditional CVD risk factors and the critical role of monocytes in atherogenic processes. PMID:26300225

  5. Medicinal chemistry of competitive kainate receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ann M; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-02-16

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1-5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure-activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  6. The Sexually Antagonistic Genes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Innocenti, Paolo; Morrow, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    When selective pressures differ between males and females, the genes experiencing these conflicting evolutionary forces are said to be sexually antagonistic. Although the phenotypic effect of these genes has been documented in both wild and laboratory populations, their identity, number, and location remains unknown. Here, by combining data on sex-specific fitness and genome-wide transcript abundance in a quantitative genetic framework, we identified a group of candidate genes experiencing sexually antagonistic selection in the adult, which correspond to 8% of Drosophila melanogaster genes. As predicted, the X chromosome is enriched for these genes, but surprisingly they represent only a small proportion of the total number of sex-biased transcripts, indicating that the latter is a poor predictor of sexual antagonism. Furthermore, the majority of genes whose expression profiles showed a significant relationship with either male or female adult fitness are also sexually antagonistic. These results provide a first insight into the genetic basis of intralocus sexual conflict and indicate that genetic variation for fitness is dominated and maintained by sexual antagonism, potentially neutralizing any indirect genetic benefits of sexual selection. PMID:20305719

  7. Calcium antagonists and their mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Nayler, Winifred G.; Dillon, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    1 The Ca2+ antagonists are a novel group of drugs useful in management of a variety of cardiac disorders. They differ from one another in terms of their chemistry, tissue specificity and selectivity. As a group, however, they share the common property of slowing Ca2+ entry through voltage-activated, ion-selective channels. Some of them exhibit other properties, including that of interfering with Na+ transport. At least one of them, diltiazem, has an intracellular action. 2 Specific high and low affinity binding sites have been identified for two of the major groups of Ca2+-antagonists, with the binding sites for verapamil and its derivatives being distinct from those which can be occupied by the dihydropyridines. The number (Bmax) and affinity (KD) of these binding sites changes under certain pathological conditions—including a reduction in ischaemia and in spontaneous hypertension, an increase in the latter, at present, only demonstrated for the dihydropyridine binding sites. 3 The sensitivity of a particular tissue to these drugs will depend upon a number of factors including the number of binding sites that are present, the contribution made by the Ca2+ entering through the voltage-activated channels to the functioning of the tissue, and properties which are peculiar to a particular type of Ca2+ antagonist, for example, whether, as in the case of verapamil, they exhibit use-dependence. PMID:3019374

  8. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  9. Management of calcium channel antagonist overdose.

    PubMed

    Salhanick, Steven D; Shannon, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are used primarily for the treatment of hypertension and tachyarrhythmias. Overdose of calcium channel antagonists can be lethal. Calcium channel antagonists act at the L-type calcium channels primarily in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decreases in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy and chronotropy. The L-type calcium channel is a complex structure and is thus affected by a large number of structurally diverse antagonists. In the setting of overdose, patients may experience vasodilatation and bradycardia leading to a shock state. Patients may also be hyperglycaemic and acidotic due to the blockade of L-type calcium channels in the pancreatic islet cells that affect insulin secretion. Aggressive therapy is warranted in the setting of toxicity. Gut decontamination with charcoal, or whole bowel irrigation or multiple-dose charcoal in the setting of extended-release products is indicated. Specific antidotes include calcium salts, glucagon and insulin. Calcium salts may be given in bolus doses or may be employed as a continuous infusion. Care should be exercised to avoid the administration of calcium in the setting of concomitant digoxin toxicity. Insulin administration has been used effectively to increase cardiac inotropy and survival. The likely mechanism involves a shift to carbohydrate metabolism in the setting of decreased availability of carbohydrates due to decreased insulin secretion secondary to blockade of calcium channels in pancreatic islet cells. Glucose should be administered as well to maintain euglycaemia. Supportive care including the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, adrenergic agents, cardiac pacing, balloon pump or extracorporeal bypass is frequently indicated if antidotal therapy is not effective. Careful evaluation of asymptomatic patients, including and electrocardiogram and a period of observation, is indicated. Patients ingesting a nonsustained

  10. Effect of age on upregulation of the cardiac adrenergic beta receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, N.; Houck, W.T.; Roberts, J.

    1990-03-01

    Radioligand binding studies were performed to determine whether upregulation of postjunctional beta receptors occurs in sympathectomized hearts of aged animals. Fischer 344 rats 6, 12, and 24 months of age (n = 10) were used in these experiments. To produce sympathectomy, rats were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA; 2 x 50 mg/kg iv) on days 1 and 8; the animals were decapitated on day 15. The depletion of norepinephrine in the heart was about 86% in each age group. 125I-Iodopindolol (IPIN), a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist, was employed to determine the affinity and total number of beta adrenergic receptors in the ventricles of the rat heart. The maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) was significantly elevated by 37%, 48%, and 50% in hearts from sympathectomized 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. These results indicate that beta receptor mechanisms in older hearts can respond to procedures that cause upregulation of the beta adrenergic receptors.

  11. Leptin regulates bone formation via the sympathetic nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Shu; Elefteriou, Florent; Levasseur, Regis; Liu, Xiuyun; Zhao, Liping; Parker, Keith L.; Armstrong, Dawna; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that leptin inhibits bone formation by an undefined mechanism. Here, we show that hypothalamic leptin-dependent antiosteogenic and anorexigenic networks differ, and that the peripheral mediators of leptin antiosteogenic function appear to be neuronal. Neuropeptides mediating leptin anorexigenic function do not affect bone formation. Leptin deficiency results in low sympathetic tone, and genetic or pharmacological ablation of adrenergic signaling leads to a leptin-resistant high bone mass. beta-adrenergic receptors on osteoblasts regulate their proliferation, and a beta-adrenergic agonist decreases bone mass in leptin-deficient and wild-type mice while a beta-adrenergic antagonist increases bone mass in wild-type and ovariectomized mice. None of these manipulations affects body weight. This study demonstrates a leptin-dependent neuronal regulation of bone formation with potential therapeutic implications for osteoporosis.

  12. Pharmacotherapy in the Developmental Disabilities: New Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper identifies and evaluates emerging developments in the behavioral pharmacotherapy of people with developmental disabilities, including such medications as the opiate antagonists, fenfluramine, beta adrenergic blockers, buspirone, antipsychotics, amantadine hydrochloride, and antilibidinal drugs. The need for more well-designed drug…

  13. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  14. Limited Efficacy of Propranolol on the Reconsolidation of Fear Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muravieva, Elizaveta V.; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol might be a novel, potential treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This hypothesis stemmed mainly from rodent studies showing that propranolol interferes with the reconsolidation of Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC). However, subsequent investigations…

  15. Classification of dopamine, serotonin, and dual antagonists by decision trees.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Choo, Hyunah; Cho, Yong Seo; Koh, Hun Yeong; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2006-04-15

    Dopamine antagonists (DA), serotonin antagonists (SA), and serotonin-dopamine dual antagonists (Dual) are being used as antipsychotics. A lot of dopamine and serotonin antagonists reveal non-selective binding affinity against these two receptors because the antagonists share structurally common features originated from conserved residues of binding site of the aminergic receptor family. Therefore, classification of dopamine and serotonin antagonists into their own receptors can be useful in the designing of selective antagonist for individual therapy of antipsychotic disorders. Data set containing 1135 dopamine antagonists (D2, D3, and D4), 1251 serotonin antagonists (5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C), and 386 serotonin-dopamine dual antagonists was collected from the MDDR database. Cerius2 descriptors were employed to develop a classification model for the 2772 compounds with antipsychotic activity. LDA (linear discriminant analysis), SIMCA (soft independent modeling of class analogy), RP (recursive partitioning), and ANN (artificial neural network) algorithms successfully classified the active class of each compound at the average 73.6% and predicted at the average 69.8%. The decision trees from RP, the best model, were generated to identify and interpret those descriptors that discriminate the active classes more easily. These classification models could be used as a virtual screening tool to predict the active class of new candidates. PMID:16387502

  16. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  17. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  18. Novel paramagnetic AT1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nichole P H; Taylor, Michelle K; Bottle, Steven E; Wright, Christine E; Ziogas, James; White, Jonathan M; Schiesser, Carl H; Jani, Nitya V

    2011-11-28

    Novel paramagnetic selective angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonists (sartans) bearing nitroxides (3, 4) have been prepared and their pharmacology evaluated in vitro as well as in vivo. Compounds 3, 4 proved to be effective sartans with pK(B) estimates in the range 6.2-9.1. In addition, the sodium salt (11) of 4 (R = Bu) is able to protect against vascular injury in hypertensive rats as determined by its ability to attenuate the development of intimal thickening caused by balloon injury of the carotid artery. PMID:21963998

  19. Pharmacodynamic properties of leukotriene receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, S

    1999-06-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are among the most important mediators of asthma; cysteine-containing LTs (cysteinyl-LTs, i.e. LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4) are very potent bronchoconstrictors and participate in the inflammatory component of asthma by inducing mucus hypersecretion, plasma extravasation, mucosal oedema and eosinophil recruitment. Therefore, compounds able to inhibit either the formation or the action of LTs are potential antiasthma drugs and, at present, the cysteinyl-LT receptor antagonists (LTRAs) appear to be the most promising. The receptors for cysteinyl-LTs, termed CysLT receptors, are heterogeneous; at least two different classes have so far been recognized, named CysLT1 (blocked by the so-called classical antagonists, such as FPL 55712, ICI 198,615, ICI 204,219, SK&F 104353, MK-476 and others) and CysLT2 (insensitive to the classical antagonists, but sensitive to BAY u9773). The authors' results indicate that even more receptor subclasses might exist in human airways, which discriminate between LTC4 and LTD4, both asthma mediators. Among the many LTRAs, zafirlukast (Accolate, ICI 204,219), montelukast (Singulair, MK-476) and pranlukast (Onon, ONO-1078) are available for clinical use. All the LTRAs are able to inhibit LTD4-induced bronchoconstriction in humans, albeit with different potencies. With respect to antigen challenge, all of them inhibit the early phase of response, whereas only the most recently developed and potent ones are effective in the late phase. LTRAs are effective in asthma triggered by exercise, cold or aspirin. Furthermore, although they are not bronchodilators per se, they increase basal forced expiratory volume in one second in patients with mild-to-moderate asthma, indicating that, in these individuals, constant cysteinyl-LT release contributes to maintaining increased bronchial tone. Finally, the effect of LTRAs is additive to that of beta-agonists and is potentiated by antihistamine compounds. In conclusion, the available results clearly

  20. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  1. Synthesis of actively adjustable springs by antagonistic redundant actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Byung-Ju; Freeman, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for active spring generation is presented based on antagonistic redundant actuation. Antagonistic properties are characterized using an effective system stiffness. 'Antagonistic stiffness' is generated by preloading a closed-chain (parallel) linkage system. Internal load distribution is investigated along with the necessary conditions for spring synthesis. The performance and stability of a proposed active spring are shown by simulation, and applications are discussed.

  2. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait. PMID:18560521

  3. Sexually Antagonistic Selection in Human Male Homosexuality

    PubMed Central

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling ‘Darwinian paradox’. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait. PMID:18560521

  4. Small molecule TSHR agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Gershengorn, M C

    2011-04-01

    TSH activates the TSH receptor (TSHR) thereby stimulating the function of thyroid follicular cells (thyrocytes) leading to biosynthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones. Because TSHR is involved in several thyroid pathologies, there is a strong rationale for the design of small molecule "drug-like" ligands. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH, Thyrogen(®)) has been used in the follow-up of patients with thyroid cancer to increase the sensitivity for detection of recurrence or metastasis. rhTSH is difficult to produce and must be administered by injection. A small molecule TSHR agonist could produce the same beneficial effects as rhTSH but with greater ease of oral administration. We developed a small molecule ligand that is a full agonist at TSHR. Importantly for its clinical potential, this agonist elevated serum thyroxine and stimulated thyroidal radioiodide uptake in mice after its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract following oral administration. Graves' disease (GD) is caused by persistent, unregulated stimulation of thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) that activate TSHR. We identified the first small molecule TSHR antagonists that inhibited TSH- and TSAb-stimulated signalling in primary cultures of human thyrocytes. Our results provide proof-of-principle for effectiveness of small molecule agonists and antagonists for TSHR. We suggest that these small molecule ligands are lead compounds for the development of higher potency ligands that can be used as probes of TSHR biology with therapeutic potential. PMID:21511239

  5. Antagonistic coevolution between quantitative and Mendelian traits.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Masato; Ellner, Stephen P

    2016-03-30

    Coevolution is relentlessly creating and maintaining biodiversity and therefore has been a central topic in evolutionary biology. Previous theoretical studies have mostly considered coevolution between genetically symmetric traits (i.e. coevolution between two continuous quantitative traits or two discrete Mendelian traits). However, recent empirical evidence indicates that coevolution can occur between genetically asymmetric traits (e.g. between quantitative and Mendelian traits). We examine consequences of antagonistic coevolution mediated by a quantitative predator trait and a Mendelian prey trait, such that predation is more intense with decreased phenotypic distance between their traits (phenotype matching). This antagonistic coevolution produces a complex pattern of bifurcations with bistability (initial state dependence) in a two-dimensional model for trait coevolution. Furthermore, with eco-evolutionary dynamics (so that the trait evolution affects predator-prey population dynamics), we find that coevolution can cause rich dynamics including anti-phase cycles, in-phase cycles, chaotic dynamics and deterministic predator extinction. Predator extinction is more likely to occur when the prey trait exhibits complete dominance rather than semidominance and when the predator trait evolves very rapidly. Our study illustrates how recognizing the genetic architectures of interacting ecological traits can be essential for understanding the population and evolutionary dynamics of coevolving species. PMID:27009218

  6. Bromoacetylated analogue of cyanopindolol: an irreversible antagonist at rat beta-adrenoceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kusiak, J.W.; Pitha, J.

    1987-07-06

    A high affinity, chemically reactive cyanopindolol derivative N/sup 8/-bromoacetyl-N/sup 1/-3'-(2-cyano-4-indolyloxy)-2'-hydroxypropyl-(Z)-1,8-diamino-p-menthane (Br-CYP) was synthesized and its interaction with ..beta..-adrenoceptors characterized. Studies with rat heart, lung, brain and red blood cell membranes indicated that the compound displaced /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol (/sup 3/H-DHA) from ..beta..-adrenoceptors with IC/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. The concentration of functional ..beta..-adrenoceptors in membranes was markedly reduced when membranes were preincubated with Br-CYP and then extensively washed prior to assay. (+/-)Alprenolol and (-)isoproterenol, but not (+)isoproterenol, when included in the preincubation prevented this reduction in binding sites by Br-CYP. Br-CYP was active in vivo when injected intraperitoneally into rats. A dose of 10 ..mu..g/kg reduced the concentration of binding sites in membranes from heart by 30%, lung by 36%, and RBC by 70%, but did not affect sites on brain membranes 16 hours after injection. Higher doses blocked virtually all the /sup 3/H-DHA binding sites in the peripheral organs studied. These results suggest that Br-CYP may be a useful compound for in vivo studies of the biochemistry and pharmacology of ..beta..-adrenergic systems. 27 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Corticospinal control of antagonistic muscles in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ethier, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent; Giguère, Dominic; Capaday, Charles

    2007-09-01

    We recently suggested that movement-related inter-joint muscle synergies are recruited by selected excitation and selected release from inhibition of cortical points. Here we asked whether a similar cortical mechanism operates in the functional linking of antagonistic muscles. To this end experiments were done on ketamine-anesthetized cats. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and intramuscular electromyographic recordings were used to find and characterize wrist, elbow and shoulder antagonistic motor cortical points. Simultaneous ICMS applied at two cortical points, each evoking activity in one of a pair of antagonistic muscles, produced co-contraction of antagonistic muscle pairs. However, we found an obvious asymmetry in the strength of reciprocal inhibition; it was always significantly stronger on physiological extensors than flexors. Following intravenous injection of a single bolus of strychnine, a cortical point at which only a physiological flexor was previously activated also elicited simultaneous activation of its antagonist. This demonstrates that antagonistic corticospinal neurons are closely grouped, or intermingled. To test whether releasing a cortical point from inhibition allows it to be functionally linked with an antagonistic cortical point, one of three GABA(A) receptor antagonists, bicuculline, gabazine or picrotoxin, was injected iontophoretically at one cortical point while stimulation was applied to an antagonistic cortical point. This coupling always resulted in co-contraction of the represented antagonistic muscles. Thus, antagonistic motor cortical points are linked by excitatory intracortical connections held in check by local GABAergic inhibition, with reciprocal inhibition occurring at the spinal level. Importantly, the asymmetry of cortically mediated reciprocal inhibition would appear significantly to bias muscle maps obtained by ICMS in favor of physiological flexors. PMID:17880397

  8. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  9. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  10. Microbial antagonists of Verticillium dahliae colonize cotton root system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt remains one of the most severe diseases affecting cotton production in Uzbekistan. We are investigating microbial antagonist to control this pathogen. To this end, we have identified several antagonists of Verticillium dahliae (Bacillus sp. 234, Bacillus sp. 3, Streptomyces roseofl...

  11. Pros and cons of vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Riva, Nicoletta; Ageno, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Anticoagulant treatment can be currently instituted with two different classes of drugs: the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and the newer, "novel" or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs). The NOACs have several practical advantages over VKAs, such as the rapid onset/offset of action, the lower potential for food and drug interactions, and the predictable anticoagulant response. However, the VKAs currently have a broader spectrum of indications, a standardized monitoring test, and established reversal strategies. The NOACs emerged as alternative options for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, there remain some populations for whom the VKAs remain the most appropriate anticoagulant drug. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of VKAs and NOACs. PMID:25703519

  12. Early gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist start improves follicular synchronization and pregnancy outcome as compared to the conventional antagonist protocol

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Woo; Hwang, Yu Im; Koo, Hwa Seon; Kang, Inn Soo; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether an early GnRH antagonist start leads to better follicular synchronization and an improved clinical pregnancy rate (CPR). Methods A retrospective cohort study. A total of 218 infertile women who underwent IVF between January 2011 and February 2013. The initial cohort (Cohort I) that underwent IVF between January 2011 and March 2012 included a total of 68 attempted IVF cycles. Thirty-four cycles were treated with the conventional GnRH antagonist protocol, and 34 cycles with an early GnRH antagonist start protocol. The second cohort (Cohort II) that underwent IVF between June 2012 and February 2013 included a total of 150 embryo-transfer (ET) cycles. Forty-three cycles were treated with the conventional GnRH antagonist protocol, 34 cycles with the modified early GnRH antagonist start protocol using highly purified human menopause gonadotropin and an addition of GnRH agonist to the luteal phase support, and 73 cycles with the GnRH agonist long protocol. Results The analysis of Cohort I showed that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was significantly higher in the early GnRH antagonist start cycles than in the conventional antagonist cycles (11.9 vs. 8.2, p=0.04). The analysis of Cohort II revealed higher but non-significant CPR/ET in the modified early GnRH antagonist start cycles (41.2%) than in the conventional antagonist cycles (30.2%), which was comparable to that of the GnRH agonist long protocol cycles (39.7%). Conclusion The modified early antagonist start protocol may improve the mature oocyte yield, possibly via enhanced follicular synchronization, while resulting in superior CPR as compared to the conventional antagonist protocol, which needs to be studied further in prospective randomized controlled trials. PMID:25599038

  13. Pharmacokinetic interactions with calcium channel antagonists (Part I).

    PubMed

    Schlanz, K D; Myre, S A; Bottorff, M B

    1991-11-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are a diverse class of drugs widely used in combination with other therapeutic agents. The potential exists for many clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions between these and other concurrently administered drugs. The mechanisms of calcium channel antagonist-induced changes in drug metabolism include altered hepatic blood flow and impaired hepatic enzyme metabolising activity. Increases in serum concentrations and/or reductions in clearance have been reported for several drugs used with a number of calcium channel antagonists. A number of reports and studies of calcium channel antagonist interactions have yielded contradictory results and the clinical significance of pharmacokinetic changes seen with these agents is ill-defined. The first part of this article deals with interactions between calcium antagonists and marker compounds, theophylline, midazolam, lithium, doxorubicin, oral hypoglycaemics and cardiac drugs. PMID:1773549

  14. Prostanoid receptor antagonists: development strategies and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, RL; Giembycz, MA; Woodward, DF

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the primary products of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)/prostaglandin synthase(s), which occurred between 1958 and 1976, was followed by a classification system for prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1, EP2 …) based mainly on the pharmacological actions of natural and synthetic agonists and a few antagonists. The design of potent selective antagonists was rapid for certain prostanoid receptors (EP1, TP), slow for others (FP, IP) and has yet to be achieved in certain cases (EP2). While some antagonists are structurally related to the natural agonist, most recent compounds are ‘non-prostanoid’ (often acyl-sulphonamides) and have emerged from high-throughput screening of compound libraries, made possible by the development of (functional) assays involving single recombinant prostanoid receptors. Selective antagonists have been crucial to defining the roles of PGD2 (acting on DP1 and DP2 receptors) and PGE2 (on EP1 and EP4 receptors) in various inflammatory conditions; there are clear opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The vast endeavour on TP (thromboxane) antagonists is considered in relation to their limited pharmaceutical success in the cardiovascular area. Correspondingly, the clinical utility of IP (prostacyclin) antagonists is assessed in relation to the cloud hanging over the long-term safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors. Aspirin apart, COX inhibitors broadly suppress all prostanoid pathways, while high selectivity has been a major goal in receptor antagonist development; more targeted therapy may require an intermediate position with defined antagonist selectivity profiles. This review is intended to provide overviews of each antagonist class (including prostamide antagonists), covering major development strategies and current and potential clinical usage. PMID:19624532

  15. Adrenergic Modulation of Pancreatic Glucagon Secretion in Man

    PubMed Central

    Gerich, John E.; Langlois, Maurice; Noacco, Claudio; Schneider, Victor; Forsham, Peter H.

    1974-01-01

    In order to characterize the influence of the adrenergic system on pancreatic glucagon secretion in man, changes in basal glucagon secretion during infusions of pure alpha and beta adrenergic agonists and their specific antagonists were studied. During infusion of isoproterenol (3 μg/min), a beta adrenergic agonist, plasma glucagon rose from a mean (±SE) basal level of 104±10 to 171±15 pg/ml, P < 0.0002. Concomitant infusion of propranolol (80 μg/min), a beta adrenergic antagonist, prevented the effects of isoproterenol, although propranolol itself had no effect on basal glucagon secretion. During infusion of methoxamine (0.5 mg/min), an alpha adrenergic agonist, plasma glucagon declined from a mean basal level of 122±15 to 75±17 pg/ml, P < 0.001. Infusion of phentolamine (0.5 mg/min), an alpha adrenergic antagonist, caused a rise in plasma glucagon from a mean basal level of 118±16 to 175±21 pg/ml, P < 0.0001. Concomitant infusion of methoxamine with phentolamine caused a reversal of the effects of phentolamine. The present studies thus confirm that catecholamines affect glucagon secretion in man and demonstrate that the pancreatic alpha cell possesses both alpha and beta adrenergic receptors. Beta adrenergic stimulation augments basal glucagon secretion, while alpha adrenergic stimulation diminishes basal glucagon secretion. Furthermore, since infusion of phentolamine, an alpha adrenergic antagonist, resulted in an elevation of basal plasma glucagon levels, there appears to be an inhibitory alpha adrenergic tone governing basal glucagon secretion. The above findings suggest that catecholamines may influence glucose homeostasis in man through their effects on both pancreatic alpha and beta cell function. Images PMID:4825234

  16. Cannabinoid withdrawal in mice: inverse agonist vs neutral antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Sherrica; Nikas, Spyros P.; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Vemuri, Kiran; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Järbe, Torbjörn U.C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Previous reports shows rimonabant's inverse properties may be a limiting factor for treating cannabinoid dependence. To overcome this limitation neutral antagonists were developed, to address mechanisms by which an inverse agonist and neutral antagonist elicit withdrawal. Objective Introduces an animal model to study cannabinoid dependence by incorporating traditional methodologies and profiling novel cannabinoid ligands with distinct pharmacological properties/modes of action by evaluating their pharmacological effects on CB1-receptor (CB1R) related physiological/behavioral endpoints. Methods The cannabinergic AM2389 was acutely characterized in the tetrad (locomotor activity, analgesia, inverted screen/catalepsy bar test and temperature); with some comparisons made to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Tolerance was measured in mice repeatedly administered AM2389. Antagonist-precipitated withdrawal was characterized in cannabinoid-adapted mice induced by either centrally acting antagonists, rimonabant and AM4113, or an antagonist with limited brain penetration, AM6545. Results In the tetrad, AM2389 was more potent and longer acting than THC, suggesting a novel approach for inducing dependence. Repeated administration of AM2389 led to tolerance by attenuating hypothermia that was induced by acute AM2389 administration. Antagonist-precipitated withdrawal signs were induced by rimonabant or AM4113, but not by AM6545. Antagonist-precipitated withdrawal was reversed by reinstating AM2389 or THC. Conclusions These findings suggest cannabinoid-precipitated withdrawal may not be ascribed to the inverse properties of rimonabant, but rather to rapid competition with the agonist at the CB1R. This withdrawal syndrome is likely centrally-mediated, since only the centrally acting CB1R antagonists elicited withdrawal, i.e., such responses were absent after the purported peripherally selective CB1R antagonist AM6545. PMID:25772338

  17. Nalmefene: radioimmunoassay for a new opioid antagonist.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R; Hsiao, J; Taaffe, W; Hahn, E; Tuttle, R

    1984-11-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed for the quantitation of a new opioid antagonist, nalmefene, in human plasma. The method employs a rabbit antiserum to an albumin conjugate of naltrexone-6-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime and [3H]naltrexone as the radioligand. Assay specificity was achieved by extraction of nalmefene from plasma at pH 9 into ether prior to RIA. The procedure has a limit of sensitivity of 0.2 ng/mL of nalmefene using a 0.5-mL sample of plasma for analysis. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation did not exceed 5.6 and 11%, respectively. The specificity of the RIA was established by demonstrating excellent agreement (r = 0.99) with a less sensitive and more time consuming HPLC procedure in the analysis of clinical plasma samples. The use of the RIA for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of nalmefene is illustrated with plasma concentration profiles of the drug in humans following intravenous and oral administration. PMID:6520774

  18. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, J; Hoeper, M M

    2008-02-01

    The endothelin (ET) system, especially ET-1 and the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Together with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, ET receptor antagonists have become mainstays in the current treatment of PAH. Three substances are currently available for the treatment of PAH. One of these substances, bosentan, blocks both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, whereas the two other compounds, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are more selective blockers of the ET(A) receptor. There is ongoing debate as to whether selective or nonselective ET receptor blockade is advantageous in the setting of PAH, although there is no clear evidence that receptor selectivity is relevant with regard to the clinical effects of these drugs. For the time being, other features, such as safety profiles and the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used in the treatment of PAH, may be more important than selectivity or nonselectivity when selecting treatments for individual patients. PMID:18238950

  19. Indole-like Trk receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tammiku-Taul, Jaana; Park, Rahel; Jaanson, Kaur; Luberg, Kristi; Dobchev, Dimitar A; Kananovich, Dzmitry; Noole, Artur; Mandel, Merle; Kaasik, Allen; Lopp, Margus; Timmusk, Tõnis; Karelson, Mati

    2016-10-01

    The virtual screening for new scaffolds for TrkA receptor antagonists resulted in potential low molecular weight drug candidates for the treatment of neuropathic pain and cancer. In particular, the compound (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-oxindole and its derivatives were assessed for their inhibitory activity against Trk receptors. The IC50 values were computationally predicted in combination of molecular and fragment-based QSAR. Thereafter, based on the structure-activity relationships (SAR), a series of new compounds were designed and synthesized. Among the final selection of 13 compounds, (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-N-methyl-2-oxindole-5-sulfonamide showed the best TrkA inhibitory activity using both biochemical and cellular assays and (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-oxindole-5-sulfonamide was the most potent inhibitor of TrkB and TrkC. PMID:27318978

  20. Antagonists for acute oral cadmium chloride intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Basinger, M.A.; Jones, M.M.; Holscher, M.A.; Vaughn, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    An examination has been carried out on the relative efficacy of a number of chelating agents when acting as antagonists for oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice. The compounds were administered orally after the oral administration of cadmium chloride at 1 mmol/kg. Of the compounds examined, several were useful in terms of enhancing survival, but by far the most effective in both enhancing survival and leaving minimal residual levels of cadmium in the liver and the kidney, was meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Several polyaminocarboxylic acids also enhanced survival. The most effective of these in reducing liver and kidney levels of cadmium were diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), and triethylenetetraminehexaacetic acid (TTHA). D-Penicillamine (DPA) was found to promote survival but also led to kidney cadmium levels higher than those found in the controls. Sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS) was as effective in promoting survival as DMSA but left levels of cadmium in the kidney and liver that were approximately four times greater than those found with DMSA.

  1. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles.

    PubMed

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks - the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  2. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    PubMed Central

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  3. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  4. Endothelin receptor antagonists in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Langleben, David

    2007-03-01

    The recognition that endothelin-1 contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to the development of clinically useful endothelin receptor antagonists that improve symptoms and functional capacity and alter the natural history of the disease in a beneficial way. The antagonists have varying degrees of selectivity for the two classes of endothelin receptor, termed ETA and ETB, and the varying degrees may translate into clinical differences. Endothelin receptor antagonists have become an integral part of therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the indications for their use are expanding. PMID:17338931

  5. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  6. The muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and atropine are competitive antagonists at 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Scopolamine is a high affinity muscarinic antagonist that is used for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used for the same purpose and are structurally related to scopolamine. To examine whether 5-HT3 receptors are affected by scopolamine we examined the effects of this drug on the electrophysiological and ligand binding properties of 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor-responses were reversibly inhibited by scopolamine with an IC50 of 2.09 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by Schild plot (pA2 = 5.02) and by competition with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists [(3)H]granisetron (Ki = 6.76 μM) and G-FL (Ki = 4.90 μM). The related molecule, atropine, similarly inhibited 5-HT evoked responses in oocytes with an IC50 of 1.74 μM, and competed with G-FL with a Ki of 7.94 μM. The reverse experiment revealed that granisetron also competitively bound to muscarinic receptors (Ki = 6.5 μM). In behavioural studies scopolamine is used to block muscarinic receptors and induce a cognitive deficit, and centrally administered concentrations can exceed the IC50 values found here. It is therefore possible that 5-HT3 receptors are also inhibited. Studies that utilise higher concentrations of scopolamine should be mindful of these potential off-target effects. PMID:27108935

  7. Single exposure of dopamine D1 antagonist prevents and D2 antagonist attenuates methylphenidate effect

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Witte, Lindsey J; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a readily prescribed drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and moreover is used illicitly by youths for its cognitive-enhancing effects and recreation. MPD exposure in rodents elicits increased locomotor activity. Repetitive MPD exposure leads to further augmentation of their locomotor activity. This behavioral response is referred to as behavioral sensitization. Behavioral sensitization is used as an experimental marker for a drug’s ability to elicit dependence. There is evidence that dopamine (DA) is a key player in the acute and chronic MPD effect; however, the role of DA in the effects elicited by MPD is still debated. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of D1 and/or D2 DA receptors in the acute and chronic effect of MPD on locomotor activity. The study lasted for 12 consecutive days. Seven groups of male Sprague Dawley® rats were used. A single D1 or D2 antagonist was given before and after acute and chronic MPD administration. Single injection of D1 DA antagonist was able to significantly attenuate the locomotor activity when given prior to the initial MPD exposure and after repetitive MPD exposure, while the D2 DA antagonist partially attenuated the locomotor activity only when given before the second MPD exposure. The results show the role, at least in part, of the D1 DA receptor in the mechanism of behavioral sensitization, whereas the D2 DA receptor only partially modulates the response to acute and chronic MPD. PMID:27186140

  8. Biomolecular recognition of antagonists by α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: Antagonistic mechanism and structure-activity relationships studies.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Ding, Fei

    2015-08-30

    As the key constituent of ligand-gated ion channels in the central nervous system, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and neurodegenerative diseases are strongly coupled in the human species. In recently years the developments of selective agonists by using nAChRs as the drug target have made a large progress, but the studies of selective antagonists are severely lacked. Currently these antagonists rest mainly on the extraction of partly natural products from some animals and plants; however, the production of these crude substances is quite restricted, and artificial synthesis of nAChR antagonists is still one of the completely new research fields. In the context of this manuscript, our primary objective was to comprehensively analyze the recognition patterns and the critical interaction descriptors between target α7 nAChR and a series of the novel compounds with potentially antagonistic activity by means of virtual screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, and meanwhile these recognition reactions were also compared with the biointeraction of α7 nAChR with a commercially natural antagonist - methyllycaconitine. The results suggested clearly that there are relatively obvious differences of molecular structures between synthetic antagonists and methyllycaconitine, while the two systems have similar recognition modes on the whole. The interaction energy and the crucially noncovalent forces of the α7 nAChR-antagonists are ascertained according to the method of Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area. Several amino acid residues, such as B/Tyr-93, B/Lys-143, B/Trp-147, B/Tyr-188, B/Tyr-195, A/Trp-55 and A/Leu-118 played a major role in the α7 nAChR-antagonist recognition processes, in particular, residues B/Tyr-93, B/Trp-147 and B/Tyr-188 are the most important. These outcomes tally satisfactorily with the discussions of amino acid mutations. Based on the explorations of three-dimensional quantitative structure

  9. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  10. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-10-01

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously. PMID:26292164