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Sample records for betacellulin gene transduction

  1. Neogenesis and proliferation of {beta}-cells induced by human betacellulin gene transduction via retrograde pancreatic duct injection of an adenovirus vector

    SciTech Connect

    Tokui, Yae . E-mail: ytokui@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kozawa, Junji; Yamagata, Kazuya; Zhang, Jun; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Okita, Kohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro |

    2006-12-01

    Betacellulin (BTC) has been shown to have a role in the differentiation and proliferation of {beta}-cells both in vitro and in vivo. We administered a human betacellulin (hBTC) adenovirus vector to male ICR mice via retrograde pancreatic duct injection. As a control, we administered a {beta}-galactosidase adenovirus vector. In the mice, hBTC protein was mainly overexpressed by pancreatic duct cells. On immunohistochemical analysis, we observed features of {beta}-cell neogenesis as newly formed insulin-positive cells in the duct cell lining or islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) closely associated with the ducts. The BrdU labeling index of {beta}-cells was also increased by the betacellulin vector compared with that of control mice. These results indicate that hBTC gene transduction into adult pancreatic duct cells promoted {beta}-cell differentiation (mainly from duct cells) and proliferation of pre-existing {beta}-cells, resulting in an increase of the {beta}-cell mass that improved glucose tolerance in diabetic mice.

  2. Gene therapy with Neurogenin3, Betacellulin and SOCS-1 Reverses Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongying; Buras, Eric; Lee, Jeongkyung; Liu, Ruya; Liu, Victoria; Espiritu, Christie; Ozer, Kerem; Thompson, Bonnie; Nally, Laura; Yuan, Guoyue; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chang, Benny; Samson, Susan; Yechoor, Vijay; Chan, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Islet transplantation for Type 1 diabetes is limited by a shortage of donor islets and requirement for immunosuppression. We approached this problem by inducing in vivo islet neogenesis in NOD diabetic mice, a model of autoimmune diabetes. We demonstrate that gene therapy with helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) carrying neurogenin3, an islet lineage-defining transcription factor and betacellulin, an islet growth factor, leads to the induction of periportal insulin-positive cell clusters in the liver, which are rapidly destroyed. To specifically accord protection to these ‘neo-islets’ from cytokine-mediated destruction, we overexpressed suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) gene, using a rat insulin promoter in combination with neurogenin3 and betacellulin. With this approach, about half of diabetic mice attained euglycemia sustained for over 4 months, regain glucose tolerance and appropriate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Histological analysis revealed periportal islet hormone-expressing ‘neo-islets’ in treated mouse livers. Despite evidence of persistent ‘insulitis’ with activated T-cells, these ‘neo-islets’ persist to maintain euglycemia. This therapy does not affect diabetogenicity of splenocytes, as they retain the ability to transfer diabetes. This study thus provides a proof-of-concept for engineering in vivo islet neogenesis with targeted resistance to cytokine-mediated destruction to provide a long-term reversal of diabetes in NOD mice. PMID:26172077

  3. Gene therapy with neurogenin3, betacellulin and SOCS1 reverses diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Buras, E; Lee, J; Liu, R; Liu, V; Espiritu, C; Ozer, K; Thompson, B; Nally, L; Yuan, G; Oka, K; Chang, B; Samson, S; Yechoor, V; Chan, L

    2015-11-01

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes is limited by a shortage of donor islets and requirement for immunosuppression. We approached this problem by inducing in vivo islet neogenesis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) diabetic mice, a model of autoimmune diabetes. We demonstrate that gene therapy with helper-dependent adenovirus carrying neurogenin3 (Ngn3), an islet lineage-defining transcription factor, and betacellulin (Btc), an islet growth factor, leads to the induction of periportal insulin-positive cell clusters in the liver, which are rapidly destroyed. To specifically accord protection to these 'neo-islets' from cytokine-mediated destruction, we overexpressed suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) gene, using a rat insulin promoter in combination with Ngn3 and Btc. With this approach, about half of diabetic mice attained euglycemia sustained for over 4 months, regain glucose tolerance and appropriate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Histological analysis revealed periportal islet hormone-expressing 'neo-islets' in treated mouse livers. Despite evidence of persistent 'insulitis' with activated T cells, these 'neo-islets' persist to maintain euglycemia. This therapy does not affect diabetogenicity of splenocytes, as they retain the ability to transfer diabetes. This study thus provides a proof-of-concept for engineering in vivo islet neogenesis with targeted resistance to cytokine-mediated destruction to provide a long-term reversal of diabetes in NOD mice. PMID:26172077

  4. Gene transfer: transduction.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages able to propagate on Pseudomonas strains are very common and can be easily isolated from natural environments or lysogenic strains. The development of transducing systems has allowed bacterial geneticists to perform chromosome analyses and mutation mapping. Moreover, these systems have also been proved to be a successful tool for molecular microbiologists to introduce a foreign gene or a mutation into the chromosome of a bacterial cell. This chapter provides a description of the phage methodology illustrated by Adams in 1959 and applicable to strain PAO1 derivatives. PMID:24818891

  5. Betacellulin Induces Increased Retinal Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Anand-Apte, Bela; Ebrahem, Quteba; Cutler, Alecia; Farage, Eric; Sugimoto, Masahiko; Hollyfield, Joe; Folkman, Judah

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic maculopathy, the leading cause of vision loss in patients with type 2 diabetes, is characterized by hyper-permeability of retinal blood vessels with subsequent formation of macular edema and hard exudates. The degree of hyperglycemia and duration of diabetes have been suggested to be good predictors of retinal complications. Intervention studies have determined that while intensive treatment of diabetes reduced the development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy it was associated with a two to three-fold increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. Thus we hypothesized the need to identify downstream glycemic targets, which induce retinal vascular permeability that could be targeted therapeutically without the additional risks associated with intensive treatment of the hyperglycemia. Betacellulin is a 32 kD member of the epidermal growth factor family with mitogenic properties for the retinal pigment epithelial cells. This led us to hypothesize a role for betacellulin in the retinal vascular complications associated with diabetes. Methods and Findings In this study, using a mouse model of diabetes, we demonstrate that diabetic mice have accentuated retinal vascular permeability with a concomitant increased expression of a cleaved soluble form of betacellulin (s-Btc) in the retina. Intravitreal injection of soluble betacellulin induced retinal vascular permeability in normoglycemic and hyperglycemic mice. Western blot analysis of retinas from patients with diabetic retinopathy showed an increase in the active soluble form of betacellulin. In addition, an increase in the levels of A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-10 which plays a role in the cleavage of betacellulin was seen in the retinas of diabetic mice and humans. Conclusions These results suggest that excessive amounts of betacellulin in the retina may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema. PMID:20976146

  6. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C.

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Changes in gene expression and signal transduction in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past three decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. This laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of normal osteoblasts (MC3T3-El) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips and loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated in microgravity and collected in microgravity. The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and signal transduction. Approximately one day after growth activation significant changes were observed in gene expression in 0-G flight samples. Immediate early growth genes/growth factors cox-2, c-myc, bcl2, TGF beta1, bFGF and PCNA showed a significant diminished mRNA induction in microgravity FCS activated cells when compared to ground and 1-G flight controls. Cox-1 was not detected in any of the samples. There were no significant differences in the expression of reference gene mRNA between the ground, 0-G and 1-G samples. The data suggest that quiescent osteoblasts are slower to enter the cell cycle in microgravity and that the lack of gravity itself may be a significant factor in bone loss in spaceflight. Preliminary data from our STS 76 flight experiment support our hypothesis that a basic biological response occurs at the tissue, cellular, and molecular level in 0-G. Here we examine ground-based and space flown data to help us understand the mechanism of bone loss in microgravity.

  8. Transduction-Like Gene Transfer in the Methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 × 10−5 (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10−3 (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae. PMID:10321998

  9. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  10. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  11. The SUMOylation Pathway Restricts Gene Transduction by Adeno-Associated Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Katharina; Chen, Qingxin; Beneke, Jürgen; Matula, Petr; Rohr, Karl; Kaderali, Lars; Beil, Nina; Erfle, Holger; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.; Müller, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses are members of the genus dependoviruses of the parvoviridae family. AAV vectors are considered promising vectors for gene therapy and genetic vaccination as they can be easily produced, are highly stable and non-pathogenic. Nevertheless, transduction of cells in vitro and in vivo by AAV in the absence of a helper virus is comparatively inefficient requiring high multiplicity of infection. Several bottlenecks for AAV transduction have previously been described, including release from endosomes, nuclear transport and conversion of the single stranded DNA into a double stranded molecule. We hypothesized that the bottlenecks in AAV transduction are, in part, due to the presence of host cell restriction factors acting directly or indirectly on the AAV-mediated gene transduction. In order to identify such factors we performed a whole genome siRNA screen which identified a number of putative genes interfering with AAV gene transduction. A number of factors, yielding the highest scores, were identified as members of the SUMOylation pathway. We identified Ubc9, the E2 conjugating enzyme as well as Sae1 and Sae2, enzymes responsible for activating E1, as factors involved in restricting AAV. The restriction effect, mediated by these factors, was validated and reproduced independently. Our data indicate that SUMOylation targets entry of AAV capsids and not downstream processes of uncoating, including DNA single strand conversion or DNA damage signaling. We suggest that transiently targeting SUMOylation will enhance application of AAV in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26625259

  12. Phage Transduction.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages mediate horizontal gene transfer through a mechanism known as transduction. Phage transduction carried out in the laboratory involves a bacterial donor and a recipient, both of which are susceptible to infection by the phage of interest. Phage is propagated in the donor, concentrated, and exposed transiently to recipient at different multiplicity of infection ratios. Transductants are selected for the desired phenotype by culture on selective medium. Here we describe transduction of ermB conferring resistance to erythromycin by the C. difficile phage ϕC2. PMID:27507341

  13. Transduction of certain genes by an autonomously replicating Bacillus thuringiensis phage.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, T M; Aronson, A I

    1991-01-01

    A derivative of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD1 (HD1-9) released transducing phage (TP21) from late exponential cultures. Three of seven markers tested were transduced into Bacillus cereus, but only two of these (cysC and trpB/F) were transduced at a frequency of more than 100 times the reversion rates. A limited transduction capacity was given further support in that few chromosomal markers were carried in the HD1-9 lysate, as demonstrated by Southern hybridization. Restriction fragments from the phage DNA and from total B. thuringiensis DNA hybridized to an insertion sequence (IS231-like) probe, which may provide a region of homology for transduction. All of the B. cereus transductants contained the phage as a 44-kb plasmid, and each could transduce both the cys and trp genes to other B. cereus auxotrophs, albeit at lower frequencies than those for the B. thuringiensis transducing phage. In some cases, especially for cys, the transduced gene was integrated into the chromosome of the recipient, whereas the trp gene in many cases appeared to be lost with curing of the 44-kb plasmid. In addition, some B. cereus transductants lost prototrophy but retained a 44-kb plasmid, consistent with the presence of TP21 helper phage. These phage may mediate the subsequent transduction from B. cereus phototrophs. TP21 replicates as a plasmid and, at least under the conditions studied, selectively transfers markers to B. cereus. Images PMID:2059027

  14. Recombinant human betacellulin. Molecular structure, biological activities, and receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Shintani, A; Nakata, M; Shing, Y; Folkman, J; Igarashi, K; Sasada, R

    1994-04-01

    Soluble forms of human betacellulin (BTC) were purified to homogeneity from the conditioned medium of mouse A9 cells transfected with the BTC precursor cDNA. Three types of soluble BTC, designated BTC-1a, BTC-1b and BTC-2, were resolved by cation-exchange and size-exclusion column chromatography. Physicochemical analysis has revealed that BTC-1a represents the glycosylated, intact molecule composed of 80 amino acid residues (Asp32 to Tyr111 of the precursor molecule). BTC-1b appears to be a truncated molecule lacking 12 amino acid residues from the amino terminus of BTC-1a. BTC-2 was found to be a 50-amino acid molecule (Arg62 to Tyr111) that corresponds to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) structural unit. The biological activities of these BTC molecules were essentially identical as judged by their mitogenicity on Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts. BTC and EGF were equipotent in stimulating Balb/c 3T3 cell proliferation and rat mesangial cell Ca2+ mobilization as well as in inhibiting the growth of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. BTC and EGF antagonized each other with similar dose dependence for binding to A431 cells, indicating that these factors bind the same receptor molecules with equivalent avidity. The Kd value of EGF receptor (EGFR) and BTC is 0.5 nM as determined on Balb/c 3T3 cells. In addition, human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-453 cells, which express multiple members of the EGFR family, were found to possess 2.7 x 10(3) BTC binding sites/cell, and the binding was readily quenched by EGF. These results suggest that the primary receptor for BTC is EGFR. PMID:8144591

  15. Signal transduction pathways that regulate CAB gene expression. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.

    1993-12-31

    We have completed the initial genetic and phenotypic characterization of several classes of new mutants that affect CAB gene expression. The doc mutants (for dark overexpression of cab) are characterized by elevated levels of CAB gene expression in the dark; however, unlike the previously isolated de-etiolated mutants (also isolated in my lab), the doc mutants still appear etiolated. The doc alleles define 3 loci, each of which maps to a separate chromosome. The details of the mutant isolation scheme and the genetic and phenotypic description of these new mutants are described. The second class of mutants, the gun mutants (for genomes uncoupled) show accumulation of CAB mRNA in the absence of chloroplast gene expression and development. Thus, the normally tightly coordinated expression between the chloroplast and nuclear genes that encode chloroplast-destined proteins has been uncoupled. We have shown that the Arabidopsis HY3 locus encodes the type B phytochrome apoprotein gene and have characterized the phenotypes of null hy3 alleles to ascertain a role for this phytochrome in Arabidopsis development. We have also isolated and characterized a number of alleles of the phytochrome A gene.

  16. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  17. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  18. Transplantation of betacellulin-transduced islets improves glucose intolerance in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mi-Young; Bae, Ui-Jin; Jang, Kyu Yun; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease caused by permanent destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells and requires lifelong exogenous insulin therapy. Recently, islet transplantation has been developed, and although there have been significant advances, this approach is not widely used clinically due to the poor survival rate of the engrafted islets. We hypothesized that improving survival of engrafted islets through ex vivo genetic engineering could be a novel strategy for successful islet transplantation. We transduced islets with adenoviruses expressing betacellulin, an epidermal growth factor receptor ligand, which promotes β-cell growth and differentiation, and transplanted these islets under the renal capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Transplantation with betacellulin-transduced islets resulted in prolonged normoglycemia and improved glucose tolerance compared with those of control virus-transduced islets. In addition, increased microvascular density was evident in the implanted islets, concomitant with increased endothelial von Willebrand factor immunoreactivity. Finally, cultured islets transduced with betacellulin displayed increased proliferation, reduced apoptosis and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the presence of cytokines. These experiments suggest that transplantation with betacellulin-transduced islets extends islet survival and preserves functional islet mass, leading to a therapeutic benefit in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24875130

  19. Retrovirus-mediated transduction of a cytosine deaminase gene preserves the stemness of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Sung; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoi; Jung, Jin Hwa; Park, JoonSeong; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as attractive cellular vehicles to deliver therapeutic genes for ex-vivo therapy of diverse diseases; this is, in part, because they have the capability to migrate into tumor or lesion sites. Previously, we showed that MSCs could be utilized to deliver a bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene to brain tumors. Here we assessed whether transduction with a retroviral vector encoding CD gene altered the stem cell property of MSCs. MSCs were transduced at passage 1 and cultivated up to passage 11. We found that proliferation and differentiation potentials, chromosomal stability and surface antigenicity of MSCs were not altered by retroviral transduction. The results indicate that retroviral vectors can be safely utilized for delivery of suicide genes to MSCs for ex-vivo therapy. We also found that a single retroviral transduction was sufficient for sustainable expression up to passage 10. The persistent expression of the transduced gene indicates that transduced MSCs provide a tractable and manageable approach for potential use in allogeneic transplantation. PMID:23429359

  20. Dissecting Human Gene Functions Regulating Islet Development With Targeted Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Pauerstein, Philip T.; Sugiyama, Takuya; Stanley, Susan E.; McLean, Graeme W.; Wang, Jing; Martín, Martín G.

    2015-01-01

    During pancreas development, endocrine precursors and their progeny differentiate, migrate, and cluster to form nascent islets. The transcription factor Neurogenin 3 (Neurog3) is required for islet development in mice, but its role in these dynamic morphogenetic steps has been inferred from fixed tissues. Moreover, little is known about the molecular genetic functions of NEUROG3 in human islet development. We developed methods for gene transduction by viral microinjection in the epithelium of cultured Neurog3-null mutant fetal pancreas, permitting genetic complementation in a developmentally relevant context. In addition, we developed methods for quantitative assessment of live-cell phenotypes in single developing islet cells. Delivery of wild-type NEUROG3 rescued islet differentiation, morphogenesis, and live cell deformation, whereas the patient-derived NEUROG3R107S allele partially restored indicators of islet development. NEUROG3P39X, a previously unreported patient allele, failed to restore islet differentiation or morphogenesis and was indistinguishable from negative controls, suggesting that it is a null mutation. Our systems also permitted genetic suppression analysis and revealed that targets of NEUROG3, including NEUROD1 and RFX6, can partially restore islet development in Neurog3-null mutant mouse pancreata. Thus, advances described here permitted unprecedented assessment of gene functions in regulating crucial dynamic aspects of islet development in the fetal pancreas. PMID:25901096

  1. Tackling Obstacles for Gene Therapy Targeting Neurons: Disrupting Perineural Nets with Hyaluronidase Improves Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wanisch, Klaus; Kovac, Stjepana; Schorge, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has been proposed for many diseases in the nervous system. In most cases for successful treatment, therapeutic vectors must be able to transduce mature neurons. However, both in vivo, and in vitro, where preliminary characterisation of viral particles takes place, transduction of neurons is typically inefficient. One possible explanation is that the extracellular matrix (ECM), forming dense perineural nets (PNNs) around neurons, physically blocks access to the cell surface. We asked whether co-administration of lentiviral vectors with an enzyme that disrupts the ECM could improve transduction efficiency. Using hyaluronidase, an enzyme which degrades hyaluronic acid, a high molecular weight molecule of the ECM with mainly a scaffolding function, we show that in vitro in mixed primary cortical cultures, and also in vivo in rat cortex, hyaluronidase co-administration increased the percentage of transduced mature, NeuN-positive neurons. Moreover, hyaluronidase was effective at doses that showed no toxicity in vitro based on propidium iodide staining of treated cultures. Our data suggest that limited efficacy of neuronal transduction is partly due to PNNs surrounding neurons, and further that co-applying hyaluronidase may benefit applications where efficient transduction of neurons in vitro or in vivo is required. PMID:23301052

  2. Exercise-Induced Signal Transduction and Gene Regulation In Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wackerhage, Henning; Woods, Niall M.

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adapts to various forms of exercise depending on the force, speed and duration characteristics of the contraction pattern. The stresses and signals associated with each contraction pattern are likely to specifically activate a network of signal transduction pathways that integrate this information. These pathways include the calcineurin, Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein kinase C (PKC), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), insulin signalling and developmental pathways. Activated signal transduction pathways activate or increase the expression of transcription factors via various mechanisms. Skeletal muscle genes are usually regulated by combinatorial control exerted by several transcription factors and possibly other mechanisms. In addition, adaptations such as an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis or the activation of satellite cell proliferation involve distinct regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24748841

  3. Expression and functional analyses of the Arabidopsis QUA1 gene in light signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Zhaojin, Chen; Chuanyu, Ding; Yuan, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Plants not only use light as an energy source for photosynthesis, but also have to monitor the light quality and quantity input to execute appropriate physiological and developmental responses, such as cell differentiation, structural and functional changes, as well as the formation of tissues and organs. The process is referred to as photomorphogenesis. Arabidopsis QUA1 (QUASIMODO1), which functions in pectin synthesis, is identified as a member of glycosyltransferases. Previously, the hypocotyl elongation of the qua1-1 mutant was shown to be inhibited under dark conditions. In this study, we used the qua1-1/cry1 and qua1-1/phyB double mutants as the materials to study the function of the QUA1 gene in light signal transduction. The results showed that QUA1 not only participated in hypocotyl elongation under dark conditions, but also in blue light, red light and far red light conditions. In qua1-1 mutant seedlings, both the cell length of hypocotyl and the light-regulated gene expression were affected. Compared with cry1 and phyB mutants, qua1-1/cry1 and qua1-1/phyB double mutants had the shorter hypocotyl. Light-regulated gene expression was also affected in the double mutants. These data indicated that QUA1 might participate in the light signal transduction regulated by CRY1 and PHYB. Hence, the QUA1 gene may play multiple roles in light signal transduction by regulating the cell elongation and light-regulated gene expression. PMID:27232492

  4. 'Advanced' generation lentiviruses as efficient vectors for cardiomyocyte gene transduction in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bonci, D; Cittadini, A; Latronico, M V G; Borello, U; Aycock, J K; Drusco, A; Innocenzi, A; Follenzi, A; Lavitrano, M; Monti, M G; Ross, J; Naldini, L; Peschle, C; Cossu, G; Condorelli, G

    2003-04-01

    Efficient gene transduction in cardiomyocytes is a task that can be accomplished only by viral vectors. Up to now, the most commonly used vectors for this purpose have been adenoviral-derived ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can transduce growth-arrested cells, such as hematopoietic stem cells. Moreover, a modified form of lentiviral vector (the 'advanced' generation), containing an mRNA-stabilizer sequence and a nuclear import sequence, has been shown to significantly improve gene transduction in growth-arrested cells as compared to the third-generation vector. Therefore, we tested whether the 'advanced' generation lentivirus is capable of infecting and transducing cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo, comparing efficacy in vitro against the third-generation of the same vector. Here we report that 'advanced' generation lentiviral vectors infected most (>80%) cardiomyocytes in culture, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence and FACS analyses: in contrast the percentage of cardiomyocytes infected by third-generation lentivirus was three- to four-fold lower. Moreover, 'advanced' generation lentivirus was also capable of infecting and inducing stable gene expression in adult myocardium in vivo. Thus, 'advanced' generation lentiviral vectors can be used for both in vitro and in vivo gene expression studies in the cardiomyocyte. PMID:12692591

  5. Gene transduction efficiency in cells of different species by HIV and EIAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Collins, M K L; Radcliffe, P A; Mitrophanous, K A; Takeuchi, Y

    2002-07-01

    The ability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- and equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV)-based vectors to transduce cell lines from a range of species was compared. Both vectors carried the vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) envelope protein and encoded an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene driven by a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) early promoter. Immunostaining for viral core proteins and VSV-G was used to demonstrate that the HIV and EIAV vector preparations contained similar numbers of virus particles. Various cell lines were transduced with these vectors and the transduction efficiency was estimated by measuring eGFP expression. Efficient transduction by both vectors was observed in human, hamster, pig, horse, cat and dog cell lines, although EIAV vector was about 10-fold less efficient in human, hamster and pig cells normalised to the total number of viral particles. This could be partly explained by the lower RNA genome levels per particle for EIAV as measured by real-time RT-PCR. Rodent cells appeared to be transduced inefficiently with both vectors, but when the CMV promoter was substituted with the EF1alpha promoter in the HIV vectors, the expression level increased leading to an increase in the measurable level of transduction. PMID:12085241

  6. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-12-17

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  7. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  8. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  9. Evaluation of signal transduction pathways after transient cutaneous adenoviral gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adenoviral vectors have provided effective methods for in vivo gene delivery in therapeutic applications. However, these vectors can induce immune responses that may severely affect the ability of vector re-application. There is limited information about the mechanisms and signal transduction pathways involved in adenoviral recognition. For optimization of cutaneous gene therapy it is necessary to investigate molecular mechanisms of virus recognition in epidermal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the signal transduction of the innate immunity after adenoviral DNA internalization in keratinocytes. Methods In vitro, keratinocytes were transfected with DNA, in the presence and absence of inhibitors for signalling molecules. In vivo, immunocompetent and athymic mice (n = 3 per group) were twice transduced with an Ad-vector. Results The results show an acute induction of type-I-interferon after in vitro transfection. Inhibition of PI3K, p38 MAPK, JNK and NFkappaB resulted in a decreased expression of type-I-interferon. In contrast to immunocompetent mice, athymic mice demonstrated a constant transgene expression and reduced inflammatory response in vivo. Conclusion The results suggest an induction of the innate immunity triggered by cytoplasm localised DNA which is mediated by PI3K-, p38 MAPK-, JNK-, NFkappaB-, JAK/STAT- and ERK1/2-dependent pathways. A stable transgene expression and a reduced inflammatory response in immunodeficient mice have been observed. These results provide potential for an effective adenoviral gene delivery into immunosupressed skin. PMID:21255430

  10. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianfeng; Zhao, Dong; Zhong, Zhirong; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2010-03-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  11. Analysis and manipulation of amphotericin biosynthetic genes by means of modified phage KC515 transduction techniques.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Maria; Byrne, Barry; Murphy, Barry; Breen, Ciaran; Lynch, Susan; Flood, Elizabeth; Finnan, Shirley; Caffrey, Patrick

    2004-12-01

    Amphotericin B is a medically important antifungal antibiotic that is produced by Streptomyces nodosus. Genetic manipulation of this organism has led to production of the first amphotericin analogues by engineered biosynthesis. Here, these studies were extended by sequencing the chromosomal regions flanking the amphotericin polyketide synthase genes, and by refining the phage KC515 transduction method for disruption and replacement of S. nodosus genes. A hybrid vector was constructed from KC515 DNA and the Escherichia coli plasmid pACYC177. This vector replicated as a plasmid in E. coli and the purified DNA yielded phage plaques on Streptomyces lividans after polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transfection of protoplasts. The left flank of the amphotericin gene cluster was found to include amphRI, RII, RIII and RIV genes that are similar to regulatory genes in other polyene biosynthetic gene clusters. One of these regulatory genes, amphRI, was found to have a homologue, amphRVI, located in the right flank at a distance of 127 kbp along the chromosome. However, disruption of amphRVI using the hybrid vector had no effect on the yield of amphotericin obtained from cultures grown on production medium. The hybrid vector was also used for precise deletion of the DNA coding for two modules of the AmphC polyketide synthase protein. Analysis by UV spectrophotometry revealed that the deletion mutant produced a novel pentaene, with reduced antifungal activity but apparently greater water-solubility than amphotericin B. This shows the potential for use of the new vector in engineering of this and other biosynthetic pathways in Streptomyces. PMID:15563836

  12. Systemic gene transfer reveals distinctive muscle transduction profile of tyrosine mutant AAV-1, -6, and -9 in neonatal dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H; Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Williams, Regina R; Zhang, Keqing; Smith, Bruce F; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating genetic disorders that affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle. An effective gene therapy for these diseases requires bodywide muscle delivery. Tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been considered as a class of highly potent gene transfer vectors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that systemic delivery of tyrosine mutant AAV can result in bodywide muscle transduction in newborn dogs. Three tyrosine mutant AAV vectors (Y445F/Y731F AAV-1, Y445F AAV-6, and Y731F AAV-9) were evaluated. These vectors expressed the alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under transcriptional regulation of either the muscle-specific Spc5-12 promoter or the ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Robust skeletal and cardiac muscle transduction was achieved with Y445F/Y731F AAV-1. However, Y731F AAV-9 only transduced skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, Y445F AAV-6 resulted in minimal muscle transduction. Serological study suggests that the preexisting neutralization antibody may underlie the limited transduction of Y445F AAV-6. In summary, we have identified Y445F/Y731F AAV-1 as a potentially excellent systemic gene transfer vehicle to target both skeletal muscle and the heart in neonatal puppies. Our findings have important implications in exploring systemic neonatal gene therapy in canine models of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25105153

  13. Transduction of the cellular src gene and 3' adjacent sequences in avian sarcoma virus PR2257.

    PubMed Central

    Geryk, J; Dezélée, P; Barnier, J V; Svoboda, J; Nehyba, J; Karakoz, I; Rynditch, A V; Yatsula, B A; Calothy, G

    1989-01-01

    When injected into chickens, a transformation-defective mutant of the Prague C strain of Rous sarcoma virus induced tumors at low incidence and after a long latency. One such tumor released a replication-defective virus designated PR2257. We molecularly cloned and sequenced the proviral DNA from quail fibroblasts transformed by PR2257. Comparison of PR2257 sequence with that of Prague C, cellular src, and 3' adjacent cellular DNA showed that the spliced version of the c-src gene and about 950 base pairs (bp) of 3'-flanking cellular DNA were transduced into PR2257. This transduction eliminated nearly all replicative genes, since the gag gene splice donor site was linked to the splice acceptor site of the src gene and, on the 3' side, recombination occurred in the end of env gene. Insertion of two extra cytosines 23 bp before and 19 bp after the c-src stop codon resulted in an extension of the coding portion up to 587 amino acids, divergence of sequences after Pro-525 and replacement of Tyr-527 by a valine residue. In addition, it appears that the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of PR2257 result from multiple recombinations between exogenous and endogenous virus genomes. Limited digestion of p66src encoded by PR2257 with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease yielded a V2 peptide (C-terminal moiety) with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kilodaltons, consistent with the 5.7-kilodalton increase expected from the DNA sequence. The structure of PR2257 suggests that the first step in the capture of c-src gene by avian lymphomatosis viruses is the trans splicing of the viral leader mRNA to exon 1 of c-src. Images PMID:2463376

  14. Real-time PCR monitoring of signal transduction related genes involved in water stress tolerance mechanism of sunflower.

    PubMed

    Roche, Jane; Hewezi, Tarek; Bouniols, Andrée; Gentzbittel, Laurent

    2009-02-01

    The study deals with the quantitative expression pattern of genes involved in signaling transduction pathways in response to water stress in leaves and embryos of a water stress tolerant genotype compared to a non-tolerant genotype using real-time quantitative PCR. The experiment was conducted in the field. The results showed a high quantitative up-regulation of genes belonging to protein kinase, phosphatase and transcription factor pathways (from two to 70 fold) only in leaves of the tolerant genotype compared to the non-tolerant genotype. Moreover, genes related to the protein kinase pathway were down-regulated in leaves of the non-tolerant genotype. On the contrary, in seeds, our study showed that the positive regulation of genes related to the signal transduction pathway observed in leaves of the tolerant genotype is turned off, suggesting different transcriptional control of signaling water stress in reproductive organs compared to vegetative organs. PMID:19054682

  15. Signal transduction pathways mediating parathyroid hormone regulation of osteoblastic gene expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, N. C.; Bloch, S. R.; Pearman, A. T.

    1994-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a central role in regulation of calcium metabolism. For example, excessive or inappropriate production of PTH or the related hormone, parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), accounts for the majority of the causes of hypercalcemia. Both hormones act through the same receptor on the osteoblast to elicit enhanced bone resorption by the osteoclast. Thus, the osteoblast mediates the effect of PTH in the resorption process. In this process, PTH causes a change in the function and phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing the process of bone resorption. In response to PTH, the osteoblast decreases collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin expression and increases production of osteocalcin, cytokines, and neutral proteases. Many of these changes have been shown to be due to effects on mRNA abundance through either transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, the signal transduction pathway for the hormone to cause these changes is not completely elucidated in any case. Binding of PTH and PTHrP to their common receptor has been shown to result in activation of protein kinases A and C and increases in intracellular calcium. The latter has not been implicated in any changes in mRNA of osteoblastic genes. On the other hand activation of PKA can mimic all the effects of PTH; protein kinase C may be involved in some responses. We will discuss possible mechanisms linking PKA and PKC activation to changes in gene expression, particularly at the nuclear level.

  16. Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Homeostasis and Pathophysiology--From Gene Expression, Signal Transduction to Cellular Communication.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    During embryogenesis, progenitor cells are specified and differentiated into mature cardiomyocytes. Soon after birth, the ability of cardiomyocytes to proliferate is strongly restrained, and thereafter, they grow in size without cell division. Under pathological conditions, cardiomyocytes show adaptive and maladaptive responses through complex intracellular signaling pathways and cross-talking networks of intercellular and inter-tissue communications, but ultimately, they become dysfunctional and undergo cell death or degeneration. Cardiovascular diseases remain the most prevalent, costly, disabling, and deadly medical conditions. To develop novel therapies for them, it is important to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that govern gene expression, signal transduction to cellular communication. In this review article for the 2014 SATO Memorial Award, an approach to uncover molecular and cellular pathophysiology is summarized, focusing on homeobox transcription factor Nkx2-5 in the transcriptional regulation of the cardiac gene program, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, in the regulation of postnatal cardiomyocyte growth, survival, and function, angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the development of pathological hypertrophy and remodeling, and mast cell infiltration in the pathogenesis of atrial remodeling and fibrillation. PMID:26538467

  17. The role of calcium in hypoxia-induced signal transduction and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Seta, Karen A; Yuan, Yong; Spicer, Zachary; Lu, Gang; Bedard, James; Ferguson, Tsuneo K; Pathrose, Peterson; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Kaufhold, Alexa; Millhorn, David E

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells require a constant supply of oxygen in order to maintain adequate energy production, which is essential for maintaining normal function and for ensuring cell survival. Sustained hypoxia can result in cell death. Sophisticated mechanisms have therefore evolved which allow cells to respond and adapt to hypoxia. Specialized oxygen-sensing cells have the ability to detect changes in oxygen tension and transduce this signal into organ system functions that enhance the delivery of oxygen to tissue in a wide variety of different organisms. An increase in intracellular calcium levels is a primary response of many cell types to hypoxia/ischemia. The response to hypoxia is complex and involves the regulation of multiple signaling pathways and coordinated expression of perhaps hundreds of genes. This review discusses the role of calcium in hypoxia-induced regulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression. An understanding of the molecular events initiated by changes in intracellular calcium will lead to the development of therapeutic approaches toward the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic diseases and tumors. PMID:15261489

  18. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taura, A; Taura, K; Koyama, Y; Yamamoto, N; Nakagawa, T; Ito, J; Ryan, A F

    2016-05-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. Although this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin-bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. Although γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 h after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1-43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs. PMID:26886463

  19. Gene transduction in mammalian cells using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus assisted by glycoprotein 64 of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tatsuya; Sugioka, Saki; Itagaki, Kohei; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), an alphabaculovirus, has been widely utilized for protein expression in not only insect cells but also mammalian cells. AcMNPV is closely related to Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), and nucleotide sequences of AcMNPV genes have high similarity with those of BmNPV. However, the transduction of BmNPV into mammalian cells has not been reported. In this study, we constructed a recombinant BmNPV (BmNPVΔbgp/AcGP64/EGFP) whose surface 64 kDa glycoprotein (BmGP64) was substituted with that from AcMNPV (AcGP64). BmNPVΔbgp/AcGP64/EGFP also carried an EGFP gene under the control of the CMV promoter. BmNPVΔbgp/AcGP64/EGFP successfully transduced HEK293T cells. In comparison, a control construct (BmNPVΔbgp/BmGP64/EGFP) which possessed BmGP64 instead of AcGP64 did not express EGFP in HEK293T cells. The transduction efficiency of BmNPVΔbgp/AcGP64/EGFP was lower than that of an AcMNPV based-BacMam GFP transduction control. This result indicates that AcGP64 facilitates BmNPV transduction into HEK293T cells. BmNPV can be prepared easily on a large scale because BmNPV can infect silkworm larvae without any special equipment, even though specific diet is needed for silkworm rearing. BmNPV gene transduction into mammalian cells can potentially be applied easily for gene delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:27562533

  20. Surmounting limited gene delivery into primary immune cell populations: Efficient cell type-specific adenoviral transduction by CAR.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Björn E; Brand, Anna; Karram, Khalad

    2015-06-01

    Ectopic gene expression studies in primary immune cells have been notoriously difficult to perform due to the limitations in conventional transfection and viral transduction methods. Although replication-defective adenoviruses provide an attractive alternative for gene delivery, their use has been hampered by the limited susceptibility of murine leukocytes to adenoviral infection, due to insufficient expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR). In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Heger et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: XXXX-XXXX] report the generation of transgenic mice that enable conditional Cre/loxP-mediated expression of human CAR. The authors demonstrate that this R26/CAG-CAR∆1(StopF) mouse strain facilitates the faithful monitoring of Cre activity in situ as well as the specific and efficient adenoviral transduction of primary immune cell populations in vitro. Further tweaking of the system towards more efficient gene transfer in vivo remains a future challenge. PMID:25903647

  1. Signal transduction and transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of iron-regulated genes in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Crosa, J H

    1997-09-01

    Iron is an essential element for nearly all living cells. Thus, the ability of bacteria to utilize iron is a crucial survival mechanism independent of the ecological niche in which the microorganism lives, because iron is scarce both in potential biological hosts, where it is bound by high-affinity iron-binding proteins, and in the environment, where it is present as part of insoluble complex hydroxides. Therefore, pathogens attempting to establish an infection and environmental microorganisms must all be able to utilize the otherwise unavailable iron. One of the strategies to perform this task is the possession of siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems that are capable of scavenging the hoarded iron. This metal is, however, a double-edged sword for the cell because it can catalyze the production of deadly free hydroxyl radicals, which are harmful to the cells. It is therefore imperative for the cell to control the concentration of iron at levels that permit key metabolic steps to occur without becoming a messenger of cell death. Early work identified a repressor, Fur, which as a complex with iron repressed the expression of most iron uptake systems as well as other iron-regulated genes when the iron concentration reached a certain level. However, later work demonstrated that this regulation by Fur was not the only answer under low-iron conditions, there was a need for activation of iron uptake genes as well as siderophore biosynthetic genes. Furthermore, it was also realized that in some instances the actual ferric iron-siderophore complex induced the transcription of the cognate receptor and transport genes. It became evident that control of the expression of iron-regulated genes was more complex than originally envisioned. In this review, I analyze the processes of signal transduction, transcriptional control, and posttranscriptional control of iron-regulated genes as reported for the ferric dicitrate system in Escherichia coli; the pyochelin, pyoverdin, and

  2. Inhibition of Intracellular Antiviral Defense Mechanisms Augments Lentiviral Transduction of Human Natural Killer Cells: Implications for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sutlu, Tolga; Nyström, Sanna; Gilljam, Mari; Stellan, Birgitta; Applequist, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically modified natural killer (NK) cells is a promising approach for cancer treatment. Yet, optimization of highly efficient and clinically applicable gene transfer protocols for NK cells still presents a challenge. In this study, we aimed at identifying conditions under which optimum lentiviral gene transfer to NK cells can be achieved. Our results demonstrate that stimulation of NK cells with interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 supports efficient transduction using a VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vector. Moreover, we have identified that inhibition of innate immune receptor signaling greatly enhances transduction efficiency. We were able to boost the efficiency of lentiviral genetic modification on average 3.8-fold using BX795, an inhibitor of the TBK1/IKKɛ complex acting downstream of RIG-I, MDA-5, and TLR3. We have also observed that the use of BX795 enhances lentiviral transduction efficiency in a number of human and mouse cell lines, indicating a broadly applicable, practical, and safe approach that has the potential of being applicable to various gene therapy protocols. PMID:22779406

  3. Factors determining the risk of inadvertent retroviral transduction of male germ cells after in utero gene transfer in sheep.

    PubMed

    Park, Paul J; Colletti, Evan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Wood, Josh A; Tellez, Joe; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Porada, Christopher

    2009-03-01

    The possibility of permanent genetic changes to the germline is central to the bioethics of in utero gene therapy (IUGT) because of the concern of inadvertent potentially deleterious alterations to the gene pool. Despite presumed protection of the male germline due to early germ cell (GC) compartmentalization, we reported that GCs within the developing ovine testes are transduced at low levels after retrovirus-mediated IUGT, thus underscoring the need for a thorough understanding of GC development in clinically predictive models to determine the optimal time to perform IUGT and avoid germline modification. In the present studies, we used the fetal sheep model to analyze GCs for phenotype, location, proliferation, and incidence of transduction after IUGT at various fetal ages to learn when during development the nascent germline is likely to be at greatest risk of retrovirus-mediated alteration. Our studies show that although GCs were transduced at all injection ages, the levels of transduction varied by nearly 700-fold as a function of the age at transfer. After remaining largely quiescent as they migrated to/settled within nascent sex cords, GCs began active cycling before cord closure was complete, suggesting this is likely the point at which they would be most susceptible to retroviral transduction.Furthermore, we observed that compartmentalization of GCs continued into early postnatal life, suggesting the male germline may be vulnerable to low-level inadvertent retroviral vector modification throughout fetal life, but that this risk can be minimized by performing IUGT later in gestation. PMID:19301473

  4. Factors Determining the Risk of Inadvertent Retroviral Transduction of Male Germ Cells After In Utero Gene Transfer in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul J.; Colletti, Evan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Wood, Josh A.; Tellez, Joe; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The possibility of permanent genetic changes to the germline is central to the bioethics of in utero gene therapy (IUGT) because of the concern of inadvertent potentially deleterious alterations to the gene pool. Despite presumed protection of the male germline due to early germ cell (GC) compartmentalization, we reported that GCs within the developing ovine testes are transduced at low levels after retrovirus-mediated IUGT, thus underscoring the need for a thorough understanding of GC development in clinically predictive models to determine the optimal time to perform IUGT and avoid germline modification. In the present studies, we used the fetal sheep model to analyze GCs for phenotype, location, proliferation, and incidence of transduction after IUGT at various fetal ages to learn when during development the nascent germline is likely to be at greatest risk of retrovirus-mediated alteration. Our studies show that although GCs were transduced at all injection ages, the levels of transduction varied by nearly 700-fold as a function of the age at transfer. After remaining largely quiescent as they migrated to/settled within nascent sex cords, GCs began active cycling before cord closure was complete, suggesting this is likely the point at which they would be most susceptible to retroviral transduction. Furthermore, we observed that compartmentalization of GCs continued into early postnatal life, suggesting the male germline may be vulnerable to low-level inadvertent retroviral vector modification throughout fetal life, but that this risk can be minimized by performing IUGT later in gestation. PMID:19301473

  5. Oxidative-Dependent Integration of Signal Transduction with Intercellular Gap Junctional Communication in the Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Trosko, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Research on oxidative stress focused primarily on determining how reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage cells by indiscriminate reactions with their macromolecular machinery, particularly lipids, proteins, and DNA. However, many chronic diseases are not always a consequence of tissue necrosis, DNA, or protein damage, but rather to altered gene expression. Gene expression is highly regulated by the coordination of cell signaling systems that maintain tissue homeostasis. Therefore, much research has shifted to the understanding of how ROS reversibly control gene expression through cell signaling mechanisms. However, most research has focused on redox regulation of signal transduction within a cell, but we introduce a more comprehensive-systems biology approach to understanding oxidative signaling that includes gap junctional intercellular communication, which plays a role in coordinating gene expression between cells of a tissue needed to maintain tissue homeostasis. We propose a hypothesis that gap junctions are critical in modulating the levels of second messengers, such as low molecular weight reactive oxygen, needed in the transduction of an external signal to the nucleus in the expression of genes. Thus, any comprehensive-systems biology approach to understanding oxidative signaling must also include gap junctions, in which aberrant gap junctions have been clearly implicated in many human diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 297–307. PMID:18834329

  6. METHODS FOR STUDYING BACTERIAL GENE TRANSFER IN SOIL BY CONJUGATION AND TRANSDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this document is to provide a series of protocols by which a trained technician can conduct studies on the transfer of genetic information by conjugation or transduction in soil, with emphasis on bacteria containing recombinant DNA. The level of the document is gea...

  7. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals signal transduction components required for the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to pathogens mediated by plant resistance (R) proteins requires different signaling transduction components and pathways. Our previous studies revealed that a potyvirus resistance gene in pepper, Pvr9, confers a hypersensitive response (HR) to pepper mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results show that the Pvr9-mediated HR against pepper mottle virus infection requires HSP90, SGT1, NDR1, but not EDS1. These results suggest that the Pvr9-mediated HR is possibly related to the SA pathway but not the ET, JA, ROS or NO pathways. PMID:27236305

  8. Molecular characterization of SIG1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene involved in negative regulation of G-protein-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Dignard, D; Harcus, D; Whiteway, M; Thomas, D Y

    1994-01-01

    Two recessive mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIG1 (suppressor of inhibitory G-protein) gene have been identified by their ability to suppress the signalling defect of dominant-negative variants of the mating response G-protein beta-subunit. The mutations and deletion of SIG1 enhance the sensitivity of the cells to pheromone and stimulate the basal transcription of a mating specific gene, FUS1, suggesting that Sig1p plays a negatively regulatory role in G beta gamma-mediated signal transduction. An additional function of Sig1p in vegetatively growing cells is suggested by the finding that the mutations and deletion of SIG1 cause temperature-sensitive growth defects. The SIG1 gene encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 65 kDa that contains at the amino-terminus two zinc finger-like sequence motifs. Epistasis experiments localize the action of Sig1p within the pheromone signalling pathway at a position at or shortly after the G-protein. We propose that Sig1p represents a novel negative regulator of G beta gamma-mediated signal transduction. Images PMID:8039500

  9. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many 'unknown' yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/. PMID:26657893

  10. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many ‘unknown’ yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/. PMID:26657893

  11. Regulatory mechanisms of betacellulin in CXCL8 production from lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Betacellulin (BTC), a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family, binds and activates ErbB1 and ErbB4 homodimers. BTC was expressed in tumors and involved in tumor growth progression. CXCL8 (interleukin-8) was involved in tumor cell proliferation via the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Materials and methods The present study was designed to investigate the possible interrelation between BTC and CXCL8 in human lung cancer cells (A549) and demonstrated the mechanisms of intracellular signals in the regulation of both functions. Bio-behaviors of A549 were assessed using Cell-IQ Alive Image Monitoring System. Results We found that BTC significantly increased the production of CXCL8 through the activation of the EGFR-PI3K/Akt-Erk signal pathway. BTC induced the resistance of human lung cancer cells to TNF-α/CHX-induced apoptosis. Treatments with PI3K inhibitors, Erk1/2 inhibitor, or Erlotinib significantly inhibited BTC-induced CXCL8 production and cell proliferation and movement. Conclusion Our data indicated that CXCL8 production from lung cancer cells could be initiated by an autocrine mechanism or external sources of BTC through the EGFR–PI3K–Akt–Erk pathway to the formation of inflammatory microenvironment. BTC may act as a potential target to monitor and improve the development of lung cancer inflammation. PMID:24629040

  12. CNS-restricted Transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Deletion with an Engineered AAV Vector.

    PubMed

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Rao, Lavanya; Corriher, Travis; Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping; Sullivan, Patrick; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is emerging as a promising approach to treat central nervous system disorders such as Spinal muscular atrophy, Batten, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease amongst others. A critical remaining challenge for central nervous system-targeted gene therapy, silencing or gene editing is to limit potential vector dose-related toxicity in off-target cells and organs. Here, we characterize a lab-derived AAV chimeric (AAV2g9), which displays favorable central nervous system attributes derived from both parental counterparts, AAV2 and AAV9. This synthetic AAV strain displays preferential, robust, and widespread neuronal transduction within the brain and decreased glial tropism. Importantly, we observed minimal systemic leakage, decreased sequestration and gene transfer in off-target organs with AAV2g9, when administered into the cerebrospinal fluid. A single intracranial injection of AAV2g9 vectors encoding guide RNAs targeting the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137 (encoding MIR137) in CRISPR/Cas9 knockin mice resulted in brain-specific gene deletion with no detectable events in the liver. This engineered AAV vector is a promising platform for treating neurological disorders through gene therapy, silencing or editing modalities. PMID:27434683

  13. Efficient Transduction of Corneal Stroma by Adeno-Associated Viral Serotype Vectors for Implications in Gene Therapy of Corneal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Ai, Jianzhong; Gessler, Dominic; Su, Qin; Tran, Karen; Zheng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Gao, Guangping

    2016-08-01

    Corneal disease is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for corneal diseases, but currently underdeveloped. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have emerged as a highly promising gene therapy platform. This study aims to identify rAAV vectors that can efficiently transduce corneal stroma for potential applications in studying pathophysiology of corneal diseases and therapeutic development. We characterized 14 rAAV serotypes expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), for cell specificity and transduction efficiency after either intrastromal injection or topical administration in mouse corneas in vivo. Our results show that intrastromal injections of rAAVrh.8, rAAVrh.10, rAAVrh.39, and rAAVrh.43 efficiently transduce mouse corneal stroma in vivo, and that topical administrations of rAAVrh.10 and rAAVrh.39 subsequent to epithelial scraping generate detectable transgene expression. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that transgene expression became detectable by 1 week postadministration, peaked at 2 weeks, and lasted for the duration of the study (i.e., 4 weeks). Both rAAVrh.10 and rAAVrh.39 transduced more than 50% of keratocytes, the major cell type in the corneal stroma, by intrastromal injection and 30% by topical administration. Histopathology indicated that rAAV transduction of cornea caused no morphological adverse effects. Overall, our findings suggest that some rAAV serotype vectors can efficiently transduce corneal stroma in vivo, constituting a potentially powerful and safe gene delivery platform for gene therapy of corneal diseases. PMID:27001051

  14. Optimization of Critical Hairpin Features Allows miRNA-based Gene Knockdown Upon Single-copy Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Myburgh, Renier; Cherpin, Ophélie; Schlaepfer, Erika; Rehrauer, Hubert; Speck, Roberto F; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Salmon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Gene knockdown using micro RNA (miRNA)-based vector constructs is likely to become a prominent gene therapy approach. It was the aim of this study to improve the efficiency of gene knockdown through optimizing the structure of miRNA mimics. Knockdown of two target genes was analyzed: CCR5 and green fluorescent protein. We describe here a novel and optimized miRNA mimic design called mirGE comprising a lower stem length of 13 base pairs (bp), positioning of the targeting strand on the 5′ side of the miRNA, together with nucleotide mismatches in upper stem positions 1 and 12 placed on the passenger strand. Our mirGE proved superior to miR-30 in four aspects: yield of targeting strand incorporation into RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC); incorporation into RISC of correct targeting strand; precision of cleavage by Drosha; and ratio of targeting strand over passenger strand. A triple mirGE hairpin cassette targeting CCR5 was constructed. It allowed CCR5 knockdown with an efficiency of over 90% upon single-copy transduction. Importantly, single-copy expression of this construct rendered transduced target cells, including primary human macrophages, resistant to infection with a CCR5-tropic strain of HIV. Our results provide new insights for a better knockdown efficiency of constructs containing miRNA. Our results also provide the proof-of-principle that cells can be rendered HIV resistant through single-copy vector transduction, rendering this approach more compatible with clinical applications. PMID:25350582

  15. Characterization and Expression of Genes Involved in the Ethylene Biosynthesis and Signal Transduction during Ripening of Mulberry Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changying; Zhao, Aichun; Zhu, Panpan; Li, Jun; Han, Leng; Wang, Xiling; Fan, Wei; Lü, Ruihua; Wang, Chuanhong; Li, Zhengang; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Although ethylene is well known as an essential regulator of fruit development, little work has examined the role ethylene plays in the development and maturation of mulberry (Morus L.) fruit. To study the mechanism of ethylene action during fruit development in this species, we measured the ethylene production, fruit firmness, and soluble solids content (SSC) during fruit development and harvest. By comparing the results with those from other climacteric fruit, we concluded that Morus fruit are probably climacteric. Genes associated with the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Morus were characterized from M. notabilis Genome Database, including four ethylene receptor genes, a EIN2-like gene, a CTR1-like gene, four EIN3-like genes, and a RTE1-like gene. The expression patterns of these genes were analyzed in the fruit of M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. During fruit development, transcript levels of MaETR2, MaERS, MaEIN4, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were lower at the early stages and higher after 26 days after full bloom (DAF), while MaETR1, MaEIL1, MaEIL2, and MaEIL3 remained constant. In ripening fruit, the transcripts of MaACO1 and MaACS3 increased, while MaACS1 and MaACO2 decreased after harvest. The transcripts of MaACO1, MaACO2, and MaACS3 were inhibited by ethylene, and 1-MCP (1–methylcyclopropene) upregulated MaACS3. The transcripts of the MaETR-like genes, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were inhibited by ethylene and 1-MCP, suggesting that ethylene may accelerate the decline of MaETRs transcripts. No significant changes in the expression of MaEIN2, MaEIL1, and MaEIL3 were observed during ripening or in response to ethylene, while the expressions of MaEIL2 and MaEIL4 increased rapidly after 24 h after harvest (HAH) and were upregulated by ethylene. The present study provides insights into ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction in Morus plants and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms underlying Morus fruit development and ripening. PMID

  16. Characterization and expression of genes involved in the ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction during ripening of mulberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changying; Zhao, Aichun; Zhu, Panpan; Li, Jun; Han, Leng; Wang, Xiling; Fan, Wei; Lü, Ruihua; Wang, Chuanhong; Li, Zhengang; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Although ethylene is well known as an essential regulator of fruit development, little work has examined the role ethylene plays in the development and maturation of mulberry (Morus L.) fruit. To study the mechanism of ethylene action during fruit development in this species, we measured the ethylene production, fruit firmness, and soluble solids content (SSC) during fruit development and harvest. By comparing the results with those from other climacteric fruit, we concluded that Morus fruit are probably climacteric. Genes associated with the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Morus were characterized from M. notabilis Genome Database, including four ethylene receptor genes, a EIN2-like gene, a CTR1-like gene, four EIN3-like genes, and a RTE1-like gene. The expression patterns of these genes were analyzed in the fruit of M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. During fruit development, transcript levels of MaETR2, MaERS, MaEIN4, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were lower at the early stages and higher after 26 days after full bloom (DAF), while MaETR1, MaEIL1, MaEIL2, and MaEIL3 remained constant. In ripening fruit, the transcripts of MaACO1 and MaACS3 increased, while MaACS1 and MaACO2 decreased after harvest. The transcripts of MaACO1, MaACO2, and MaACS3 were inhibited by ethylene, and 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene) upregulated MaACS3. The transcripts of the MaETR-like genes, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were inhibited by ethylene and 1-MCP, suggesting that ethylene may accelerate the decline of MaETRs transcripts. No significant changes in the expression of MaEIN2, MaEIL1, and MaEIL3 were observed during ripening or in response to ethylene, while the expressions of MaEIL2 and MaEIL4 increased rapidly after 24 h after harvest (HAH) and were upregulated by ethylene. The present study provides insights into ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction in Morus plants and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms underlying Morus fruit development and ripening. PMID

  17. Extracellular matrix-dependent tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelial cells requires both physical and biochemical signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Roskelley, C.D.; Desprez, P.Y.; Bissell, M.J. )

    1994-12-20

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) profoundly influences the growth and differentiation of the mammary gland epithelium, both in culture and in vivo. Utilizing a clonal population of mouse mammary epithelial cells that absolutely requires an exogenous ECM for function, we developed a rapid assay to study signal transduction by ECM. Two components of the cellular response to a basement membrane overlay that result in the expression of the milk protein [beta]-casein were defined. The first component of this response involves a rounding and clustering of the cells that can be physically mimicked by plating the cells on a nonadhesive substratum. The second component is biochemical in nature, and it is associated with [beta][sub 1] integrin clustering and increased tyrosine phosphorylation. The second component is initiated in a morphology-independent manner, but the proper translation of this biochemical signal into a functional response requires cell rounding and cell clustering. Thus, physical and biochemical signal transduction events contribute to the ECM-dependent regulation of tissue-specific gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cells. 44 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Fetal Brain-directed AAV Gene Therapy Results in Rapid, Robust, and Persistent Transduction of Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Marie Reine; Donsante, Anthony; Zerfas, Patricia; Kaler, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Fetal brain-directed gene addition represents an under-appreciated tool for investigating novel therapeutic approaches in animal models of central nervous system diseases with early prenatal onset. Choroid plexuses (CPs) are specialized neuroectoderm-derived structures that project into the brain's ventricles, produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and regulate CSF biochemical composition. Targeting the CP may be advantageous for adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene therapy for central nervous system disorders due to its immunoprivileged location and slow rate of epithelial turnover. Yet the capacity of AAV vectors to transduce CP has not been delineated precisely. We performed intracerebroventricular injections of recombinant AAV serotype 5-green fluorescent protein (rAAV5-GFP) or rAAV9-GFP in embryonic day 15 (E15) embryos of CD-1 and C57BL/6 pregnant mice and quantified the percentages of GFP expression in CP epithelia (CPE) from lateral and fourth ventricles on E17, postnatal day 2 (P2), and P22. AAV5 was selective for CPE and showed significantly higher transduction efficiency in C57BL/6 mice (P = 0.0128). AAV9 transduced neurons and glial cells in both the mouse strains, in addition to CPE. We documented GFP expression in CPE on E17, within just 48 hours of rAAV administration to the fetal lateral ventricle, and expression by both the serotypes persisted at P130. Our results indicate that prenatal administration of rAAV5 and rAAV9 enables rapid, robust, and sustained transduction of mouse CPE and buttress the rationale for experimental therapeutics targeting the CP.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e101; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.27; published online 25 June 2013. PMID:23799375

  19. Activation of gene expression by metal-responsive signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Timothy K; Saydam, Nurten; Steiner, Florian; Schaffner, Walter; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2002-01-01

    Metallothioneins are small, cysteine-rich, metal-binding proteins that play important roles in maintaining intracellular metal homeostasis and in transition metal detoxification. MTF-1 (metal transcription factor-1) plays a central role in regulating the metal-inducible, transcriptional activation of metallothionein. Here we report that the phosphorylation of MTF-1 plays a critical role in the activation of MTF-1/metal-responsive element-mediated transcription. Inhibitor studies indicate that signal transduction cascades, including those mediated by protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase, and casein kinase II, are essential for zinc- and cadmium-inducible transcription. In addition, calcium signaling is also involved in regulating transcription. In contrast, cAMP-dependent protein kinase may not be directly involved in the metal response. Contrary to what has been reported for other transcription factors, the inhibition of transcriptional activation does not impair the binding of MTF-1 to DNA, suggesting that phosphorylation is not regulating DNA binding. Elevated phosphorylation of MTF-1 is observed under conditions of protein kinase C inhibition, suggesting that dephosphorylation of this transcription factor mediates its activation. PMID:12426137

  20. Chromium stress response effect on signal transduction and expression of signaling genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Ngoc-Nam; Huang, Tsai-Lien; Chi, Wen-Chang; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chen, Chi-Chien; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a non-essential metal for normal plants and is toxic to plants at high concentrations. However, signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms of its action on cell function and gene expression remain elusive. In this study, we found that Cr(VI) induced endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Ca(2+) accumulation and activated NADPH oxidase and calcium-dependent protein kinase. We investigated global transcriptional changes in rice roots by microarray analysis. Gene expression profiling indicated activation of abscisic acid-, ethylene- and jasmonic acid-mediated signaling and inactivation of gibberellic acid-related pathways in Cr(VI) stress-treated rice roots. Genes encoding signaling components such as the protein kinases domain of unknown function 26, receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, LRK10-like kinase type 2 and protein phosphatase 2C, as well as transcription factors WRKY and apetala2/ethylene response factor were predominant during Cr(VI) stress. Genes involved in vesicle trafficking were subjected to functional characterization. Pretreating rice roots with a vesicle trafficking inhibitor, brefeldin A, effectively reduced Cr(VI)-induced ROS production. Suppression of the vesicle trafficking gene, Exo70, by virus-induced gene silencing strategies revealed that vesicle trafficking is required for mediation of Cr(VI)-induced ROS production. Taken together, these findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms in signaling pathways and transcriptional regulation in response to Cr stress in plants. PMID:24033343

  1. Signal transduction controls heterogeneous NF-κB dynamics and target gene expression through cytokine-specific refractory states

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Antony; Boddington, Christopher; Downton, Polly; Rowe, William; Bagnall, James; Lam, Connie; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Schmidt, Lorraine; Harper, Claire V.; Spiller, David G.; Rand, David A.; Jackson, Dean A.; White, Michael R. H.; Paszek, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cells respond dynamically to pulsatile cytokine stimulation. Here we report that single, or well-spaced pulses of TNFα (>100 min apart) give a high probability of NF-κB activation. However, fewer cells respond to shorter pulse intervals (<100 min) suggesting a heterogeneous refractory state. This refractory state is established in the signal transduction network downstream of TNFR and upstream of IKK, and depends on the level of the NF-κB system negative feedback protein A20. If a second pulse within the refractory phase is IL-1β instead of TNFα, all of the cells respond. This suggests a mechanism by which two cytokines can synergistically activate an inflammatory response. Gene expression analyses show strong correlation between the cellular dynamic response and NF-κB-dependent target gene activation. These data suggest that refractory states in the NF-κB system constitute an inherent design motif of the inflammatory response and we suggest that this may avoid harmful homogenous cellular activation. PMID:27381163

  2. Multifaceted effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neurons: impact on neuronal firing rate, signal transduction and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Kuo, Wen Ping; Frühbeis, Carsten; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Zehendner, Christoph M; Luhmann, Heiko J; Pinto, Sheena; Toedling, Joern; Trotter, Jacqueline; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-09-26

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by almost every cell type. They exert versatile functions in intercellular communication important for many physiological and pathological processes. Recently, exosomes attracted interest with regard to their role in cell-cell communication in the nervous system. We have shown that exosomes released from oligodendrocytes upon stimulation with the neurotransmitter glutamate are internalized by neurons and enhance the neuronal stress tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that oligodendroglial exosomes also promote neuronal survival during oxygen-glucose deprivation, a model of cerebral ischaemia. We show the transfer from oligodendrocytes to neurons of superoxide dismutase and catalase, enzymes which are known to help cells to resist oxidative stress. Additionally, we identify various effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neuronal physiology. Electrophysiological analysis using in vitro multi-electrode arrays revealed an increased firing rate of neurons exposed to oligodendroglial exosomes. Moreover, gene expression analysis and phosphorylation arrays uncovered differentially expressed genes and altered signal transduction pathways in neurons after exosome treatment. Our study thus provides new insight into the broad spectrum of action of oligodendroglial exosomes and their effects on neuronal physiology. The exchange of extracellular vesicles between neural cells may exhibit remarkable potential to impact brain performance. PMID:25135971

  3. Multifaceted effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neurons: impact on neuronal firing rate, signal transduction and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Kuo, Wen Ping; Frühbeis, Carsten; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Zehendner, Christoph M.; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Pinto, Sheena; Toedling, Joern; Trotter, Jacqueline; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by almost every cell type. They exert versatile functions in intercellular communication important for many physiological and pathological processes. Recently, exosomes attracted interest with regard to their role in cell–cell communication in the nervous system. We have shown that exosomes released from oligodendrocytes upon stimulation with the neurotransmitter glutamate are internalized by neurons and enhance the neuronal stress tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that oligodendroglial exosomes also promote neuronal survival during oxygen–glucose deprivation, a model of cerebral ischaemia. We show the transfer from oligodendrocytes to neurons of superoxide dismutase and catalase, enzymes which are known to help cells to resist oxidative stress. Additionally, we identify various effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neuronal physiology. Electrophysiological analysis using in vitro multi-electrode arrays revealed an increased firing rate of neurons exposed to oligodendroglial exosomes. Moreover, gene expression analysis and phosphorylation arrays uncovered differentially expressed genes and altered signal transduction pathways in neurons after exosome treatment. Our study thus provides new insight into the broad spectrum of action of oligodendroglial exosomes and their effects on neuronal physiology. The exchange of extracellular vesicles between neural cells may exhibit remarkable potential to impact brain performance. PMID:25135971

  4. Oxygen Deficiency Responsive Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii through a Copper-Sensing Signal Transduction Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Jeanette M.; Eriksson, Mats; Moseley, Jeffrey L.; Merchant, Sabeeha

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates Cpx1, Cyc6, and Crd1, encoding, respectively, coproporphyrinogen oxidase, cytochrome c6, and a novel di-iron enzyme when transferred to oxygen-deficient growth conditions. This response is physiologically relevant because C. reinhardtii experiences these growth conditions routinely, and furthermore, one of the target genes, Crd1, is functionally required for normal growth under oxygen-depleted conditions. The same genes are activated also in response to copper-deficiency through copper-response elements that function as target sites for a transcriptional activator. The core of the copper-response element, GTAC, is required also for the hypoxic response, as is a trans-acting locus, CRR1. Mercuric ions, which antagonize the copper-deficiency response, also antagonize the oxygen-deficiency response of these target genes. Taken together, these observations suggest that the oxygen- and copper-deficiency responses share signal transduction components. Nevertheless, whereas the copper-response element is sufficient for the nutritional copper response, the oxygen-deficiency response requires, in addition, a second cis-element, indicating that the response to oxygen depletion is not identical to the nutritional copper response. The distinction between the two responses is also supported by comparative analysis of the response of the target genes, Cyc6, Cpx1, and Crd1, to copper versus oxygen deficiency. A Crr1-independent pathway for Hyd1 expression in oxygen-depleted C. reinhardtii demonstrates the existence of multiple oxygen/redox-responsive circuits in this model organism. PMID:11842150

  5. Reversal of Diabetes Through Gene Therapy of Diabetic Rats by Hepatic Insulin Expression via Lentiviral Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Matthias; Terbish, Taivankhuu; Jörns, Anne; Naujok, Ortwin; Wedekind, Dirk; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    Due to shortage of donor tissue a cure for type 1 diabetes by pancreas organ or islet transplantation is an option only for very few patients. Gene therapy is an alternative approach to cure the disease. Insulin generation in non-endocrine cells through genetic engineering is a promising therapeutic concept to achieve insulin independence in patients with diabetes. In the present study furin-cleavable human insulin was expressed in the liver of autoimmune-diabetic IDDM rats (LEW.1AR1/Ztm-iddm) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats after portal vein injection of INS-lentivirus. Within 5–7 days after the virus injection of 7 × 109 INS-lentiviral particles the blood glucose concentrations were normalized in the treated animals. This glucose lowering effect remained stable for the 1 year observation period. Human C-peptide as a marker for hepatic release of human insulin was in the range of 50–100 pmol/ml serum. Immunofluorescence staining of liver tissue was positive for insulin showing no signs of transdifferentiation into pancreatic β-cells. This study shows that the diabetic state can be efficiently reversed by insulin release from non-endocrine cells through a somatic gene therapy approach. PMID:22354377

  6. Lentivirus-mediated TGF-β3, CTGF and TIMP1 gene transduction as a gene therapy for intervertebral disc degeneration in an in vivo rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YONG; YU, TAO; MA, XUE-XIAO; XIANG, HONG-FEI; HU, YOU-GU; CHEN, BO-HUA

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) gene transduction, using a lentiviral vector, on rabbit intervertebral disc degeneration in vivo, with the intention of investigating their potential use in gene therapy. A model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration was created by needle puncture into the annulus fibrosus of 15 New Zealand white rabbits. Empty lentivirus or recombinant lentiviral plasmid lenti-TGFβ3-P2A-CTGF-T2A-TIMP1 was injected into degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs (representing the control and experimental groups, respectively), whilst untreated degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs served as the puncture group. After 16 and 20 weeks, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted and the changes in intensity on micrographs of degenerative intervertebral discs were measured. The mRNA levels of aggrecan and type II collagen in nucleus pulposus tissue were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression levels of type II collagen and aggrecan were determined by western blot analysis. MRI results indicated that intervertebral disc degeneration was ameliorated in the experimental group when compared with the control and the puncture group. Furthermore, the expression levels of type II collagen and aggrecan in the puncture and control groups were significantly lower than in the experimental group (P<0.05). In conclusion, lenti-TGFβ3-P2A-CTGF-T2A-TIMP1 co-transduction can promote synthesis of aggrecan and type II collagen in degenerative intervertebral discs, thereby delaying intervertebral disc degeneration. These results indicate the potential of gene therapy in treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:27073456

  7. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs. PMID:17105733

  8. Systematic identification of genes and transduction pathways involved in radio-adaptive response

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Honglu

    2015-05-22

    Low doses of radiation have been shown to protect against the biological effects of later exposure to toxic levels of radiation. In this study, we propose to identify the molecular mechanisms of this adaptive response by systematically identifying the genes that play a role in radio-protection. In the original proposal, a human cell line that is well-documented to exhibit the radio-adaptive effect was to be used. In this revised study plan, we will use a mouse model, C57BL/6, which has also been well investigated for radio-adaptation. The goal of the proposed study is to enhance our understanding of cellular responses to low doses of radiation exposure at the molecular level.

  9. Gene microarray analysis reveals a novel hypoxia signal transduction pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Scandurro, A B; Weldon, C W; Figueroa, Y G; Alam, J; Beckman, B S

    2001-07-01

    The molecular details of hypoxia-induced cellular responses have been difficult to identify since there is as yet no known oxygen receptor. We used cDNA microarray technology to extend our studies pertaining to these molecular details in human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep3B) cells that produce erythropoietin (Epo) in response to hypoxia. Of approximately 1200 genes in the array, those associated with integrin-linked kinase (ILK), fibronectin precursor and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) were markedly stimulated after exposure of Hep3B cells to low oxygen (1%) for 6 h. Epo, HIF-1, and von Hippel-Lindau cDNAs were measured in parallel as markers of low oxygen responses in Hep3B cells. ILK is a serine, threonine protein kinase that interacts with the cytoplasmic domains of integrin beta1 and beta3. This interaction localizes ILK to focal adhesion plaques. ILK is stimulated by cell-fibronectin interaction as well as insulin. It is regulated in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase dependent manner and can phosphorylate protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) and GSK-3beta. As a result of these and other activities ILK has been shown to affect anchorage-independent cell survival, cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis in nude mice. ILK has also been implicated in the Wnt pathway and as a critical target in PTEN-dependent tumor therapies. To our knowledge this is the first report implicating the ILK pathway in low oxygen responses. Other genes identified as a result of the microarray analysis not previously known to change as a result of low oxygen treatment were elongation factor-1alpha, glycyl-tRNA synthetase, and laminin receptor protein-1. These findings were all corroborated by RT-PCR assays and in some instances Western blot analysis. PMID:11408933

  10. Ex vivo intracoronary gene transfer of adeno-associated virus 2 leads to superior transduction over serotypes 8 and 9 in rat heart transplants.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Jokinen, Janne J; Syrjälä, Simo O; Keränen, Mikko A I; Krebs, Rainer; Tuuminen, Raimo; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Anisimov, Andrey; Soronen, Jarkko; Pajusola, Katri; Alitalo, Kari; Nykänen, Antti I; Lemström, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Heart transplant gene therapy requires vectors with long-lasting gene expression, high cardiotropism, and minimal pathological effects. Here, we examined transduction properties of ex vivo intracoronary delivery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2, 8, and 9 in rat syngenic and allogenic heart transplants. Adult Dark Agouti (DA) rat hearts were intracoronarily perfused ex vivo with AAV2, AAV8, or AAV9 encoding firefly luciferase and transplanted heterotopically into the abdomen of syngenic DA or allogenic Wistar-Furth (WF) recipients. Serial in vivo bioluminescent imaging of syngraft and allograft recipients was performed for 6 months and 4 weeks, respectively. Grafts were removed for PCR-, RT-PCR, and luminometer analysis. In vivo bioluminescent imaging of recipients showed that AAV9 induced a prominent and stable luciferase activity in the abdomen, when compared with AAV2 and AAV8. However, ex vivo analyses revealed that intracoronary perfusion with AAV2 resulted in the highest heart transplant transduction levels in syngrafts and allografts. Ex vivo intracoronary delivery of AAV2 resulted in efficient transgene expression in heart transplants, whereas intracoronary AAV9 escapes into adjacent tissues. In terms of cardiac transduction, these results suggest AAV2 as a potential vector for gene therapy in preclinical heart transplants studies, and highlight the importance of delivery route in gene transfer studies. PMID:24102821

  11. Distinct UV-B and UV-A/blue light signal transduction pathways induce chalcone synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis cells.

    PubMed Central

    Christie, J M; Jenkins, G I

    1996-01-01

    UV and blue light control the expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes in a range of higher plants. To investigate the signal transduction processes involved in the induction of chalcone synthase (CHS) gene expression by UV-B and UV-A/blue light, we examined the effects of specific agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components in mammalian systems in a photomixotrophic Arabidopsis cell suspension culture. CHS expression is induced specifically by these wavelengths in the cell culture, in a manner similar to that in mature Arabidopsis leaf tissue. Both the UV-B and UV-A/blue phototransduction processes involve calcium, although the elevation of cytosolic calcium is insufficient on its own to stimulate CHS expression. The UV-A/blue light induction of CHS expression does not appear to involve calmodulin, whereas the UV-B response does; this difference indicates that the signal transduction pathways are, at least in part, distinct. We provide evidence that both pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation and require protein synthesis. The UV-B and UV-A/blue light signaling pathways are therefore different from the phytochrome signal transduction pathway regulating CHS expression in other species. PMID:8837509

  12. Epidermal growth factor and Ras regulate gene expression in GH4 pituitary cells by separate, antagonistic signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, C A; Gutierrez-Hartmann, A

    1995-01-01

    regions on the proximal rPRL promoter. One region maps between -255 and -212, near the Ras response element, and a second maps between -125 and -54. The latter region appears to involve footprint 2, a previously identified repressor site on the rPRL promoter. Neither footprint 1 nor 3, known GHF-1 binding sites, appears to be crucial to RGF-mediated rPRL promoter activation. The results of these studies indicate that in GH4 neuroendocrine cells, rPRL gene regulation by EGF is mediated by a signal transduction pathway that is separate and antagonistic to the Ras pathway. Hence, the functional role of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway in mediating transcriptional responses to EGF and other receptor tyrosine kinase may differ in highly specialized cell types. PMID:8524243

  13. The Nontoxic Cell Cycle Modulator Indirubin Augments Transduction of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors and Zinc-Finger Nuclease-Mediated Gene Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shamim H.; Bobis-Wozowicz, Sylwia; Chatterjee, Debanjana; Gellhaus, Katharina; Pars, Kaweh; Heilbronn, Regine; Jacobs, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Parameters that regulate or affect the cell cycle or the DNA repair choice between non-homologous end-joining and homology-directed repair (HDR) are excellent targets to enhance therapeutic gene targeting. Here, we have evaluated the impact of five cell-cycle modulating drugs on targeted genome engineering mediated by DNA double-strand break (DSB)-inducing nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). For a side-by-side comparison, we have established four reporter cell lines by integrating a mutated EGFP gene into either three transformed human cell lines or primary umbilical cord–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs). After treatment with different cytostatic drugs, cells were transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors that encode a nuclease or a repair donor to rescue EGFP expression through DSB-induced HDR. We show that transient cell-cycle arrest increased AAV transduction and AAV-mediated HDR up to six-fold in human cell lines and ten-fold in UC-MSCs, respectively. Targeted gene correction was observed in up to 34% of transduced cells. Both the absolute and the relative gene-targeting frequencies were dependent on the cell type, the cytostatic drug, the vector dose, and the nuclease. Treatment of cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor indirubin-3′-monoxime was especially promising as this compound combined high stimulatory effects with minimal cytotoxicity. In conclusion, indirubin-3′-monoxime significantly improved AAV transduction and the efficiency of AAV/ZFN-mediated gene targeting and may thus represent a promising compound to enhance DSB-mediated genome engineering in human stem cells, such as UC-MSCs, which hold great promise for future clinical applications. PMID:23072634

  14. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  15. The ARG1-LIKE2 Gene of Arabidopsis Functions in a Gravity Signal Transduction Pathway That Is Genetically Distinct from the PGM Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM. PMID:12970478

  16. In vitro generation of glucose-responsive insulin producing cells using lentiviral based pdx-1 gene transduction of mouse (C57BL/6) mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Saman; Alijani, Najva; Kadivar, Mehdi

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of this type of recombinant lentivirus to generate glucose-responsive insulin producing cells in vitro. All steps of cloning were confirmed using restriction digests. After the transduction, mesenchymal stem cells gradually began to change their morphology and showed differentiation into islet like structures. RT-PCR results confirmed the expression of insulin1, insulin2 and pdx-1 in differentiated cells. Dithizone staining of mouse MSCs showed the concentration of glucose in islet like structures. ELISA analysis validated the insulin secretion of islet like structures which in the high-glucose medium (25mmol/l) was 7.44 fold higher than that secreted in the low-glucose medium (5mmol/l). Our results demonstrated that mouse mesenchymal stem cells can be differentiated into effective glucose-responsive insulin producing cells through our new recombinant lentiviral transduction of pdx-1 gene in vitro. This new lentiviral vector could be suggested as an effective candidate for using in gene therapy of type-1 diabetes. PMID:23831626

  17. Early trypsin activity is part of the signal transduction system that activates transcription of the late trypsin gene in the midgut of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Barillas-Mury, C V; Noriega, F G; Wells, M A

    1995-02-01

    Trypsin activity during the first hours after feeding is essential to induce late trypsin gene expression. These results are consistent with the idea that free amino acids or other products released during digestion might be the initial signal for transcriptional activation of late trypsin. Besides early trypsin, some other factor(s) have to be translated for induction of late trypsin. This is the first case in which the proteolytic activity of a digestive enzyme is part of the signal transduction system which regulates expression of a second gene. The presence of two trypsins allows the mosquito to assess the quality of the meal and adjust the levels of late trypsin for a particular meal with remarkable flexibility. PMID:7711754

  18. Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae infection affects the expression of genes involved in cellular signal transduction and iron metabolism in the kidney of the brown trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Sarker, Subhodeep; Menanteau-Ledouble, Simon; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-06-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is an enigmatic endoparasite which causes proliferative kidney disease in various species of salmonids in Europe and North America. The life cycle of the European strain of T. bryosalmonae generally completes in an invertebrate host freshwater bryozoan and vertebrate host brown trout (Salmo trutta) Linnaeus, 1758. Little is known about the gene expression in the kidney of brown trout during the developmental stages of T. bryosalmonae. In the present study, quantitative real-time PCR was applied to quantify the target genes of interest in the kidney of brown trout at different time points of T. bryosalmonae development. PCR primers specific for target genes were designed and optimized, and their gene expression levels were quantified in the cDNA kidney samples using SYBR Green Supermix. Expression of Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta, integral membrane protein 2B, NADH dehydrogenase 1 beta subcomplex subunit 6, and 26S protease regulatory subunit S10B were upregulated significantly in infected brown trout, while the expression of the ferritin M middle subunit was downregulated significantly. These results suggest that host genes involved in cellular signal transduction, proteasomal activities, including membrane transporters and cellular iron storage, are differentially upregulated or downregulated in the kidney of brown trout during parasite development. The gene expression pattern of infected renal tissue may support the development of intraluminal sporogonic stages of T. bryosalmonae in the renal tubular lumen of brown trout which may facilitate the release of viable parasite spores to transmit to the invertebrate host bryozoan. PMID:25786607

  19. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, K.; Kastury, K.; Druck, T.

    1994-07-15

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding {open_quotes}adapter{close_quotes} proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  20. GhCAX3 Gene, a Novel Ca2+/H+ Exchanger from Cotton, Confers Regulation of Cold Response and ABA Induced Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    He, Liangrong; Zhang, Wenwen; He, Xin; Zhang, Xianlong; Yang, Xiyan; Zhu, Longfu

    2013-01-01

    As a second messenger, Ca2+ plays a major role in cold induced transduction via stimulus-specific increases in [Ca2+]cyt, which is called calcium signature. During this process, CAXs (Ca2+/H+ exchangers) play critical role. For the first time, a putative Ca2+/H+ exchanger GhCAX3 gene from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. ‘YZ-1′) was isolated and characterized. It was highly expressed in all tissues of cotton except roots and fibers. This gene may act as a regulator in cotton’s response to abiotic stresses as it could be up-regulated by Ca2+, NaCl, ABA and cold stress. Similar to other CAXs, it was proved that GhCAX3 also had Ca2+ transport activity and the N-terminal regulatory region (NRR) through yeast complementation assay. Over-expression of GhCAX3 in tobacco showed less sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling stages, and the phenotypic difference between wild type (WT) and transgenic plants was more significant when the NRR was truncated. Furthermore, GhCAX3 conferred cold tolerance in yeast as well as in tobacco seedlings based on physiological and molecular studies. However, transgenic plant seeds showed more sensitivity to cold stress compared to WT during seed germination, especially when expressed in N-terminal truncated version. Finally, the extent of sensitivity in transgenic lines was more severe than that in WT line under sodium tungstate treatment (an ABA repressor), indicating that ABA could alleviate cold sensitivity of GhCAX3 seeds, especially in short of its NRR. Meanwhile, we also found that overexpression of GhCAX3 could enhance some cold and ABA responsive marker genes. Taken together, these results suggested that GhCAX3 plays important roles in the cross-talk of ABA and cold signal transduction, and compared to full-length of GhCAX3, the absence of NRR could enhance the tolerance or sensitivity to cold stress, depending on seedling’s developmental stages. PMID:23776653

  1. Sentra, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Maltsev, N.; Marland, E.; Yu, G. X.; Bhatnagar, S.; Lusk, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-01-01

    Sentra (http://www-wit.mcs.anl.gov/sentra) is a database of signal transduction proteins with the emphasis on microbial signal transduction. The database was updated to include classes of signal transduction systems modulated by either phosphorylation or methylation reactions such as PAS proteins and serine/threonine kinases, as well as the classical two-component histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Currently, Sentra contains signal transduction proteins from 43 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes as well as sequences from SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL. Signal transduction proteins are annotated with information describing conserved domains, paralogous and orthologous sequences, and conserved chromosomal gene clusters. The newly developed user interface supports flexible search capabilities and extensive visualization of the data.

  2. Multilineage transduction of resident lung cells in vivo by AAV2/8 for α1-antitrypsin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Julia G; Takahashi, Ayuko; Higgins, Michelle I; Porter, Emily L; Suki, Bela; Balazs, Alejandro; Wilson, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery has long represented an appealing potential treatment approach for monogenic diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) but has proven challenging to achieve in practice. Alternate pseudotyping of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is producing vectors with increasingly heterogeneous tropic specificity, giving researchers the ability to target numerous end-organs affected by disease. Herein, we describe sustained pulmonary transgene expression for at least 52 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation of AAV2/8 and characterize the multiple cell types transduced within the lung utilizing this approach. We demonstrate that lung-directed AAV2/8 is able to achieve therapeutic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels within the lung epithelial lining fluid and that AAT gene delivery ameliorates the severity of experimental emphysema in mice. We find that AAV2/8 efficiently transduces hepatocytes in vivo after intratracheal administration, a finding that may have significance for AAV-based human gene therapy studies. These results support direct transgene delivery to the lung as a potential alternative approach to achieve the goal of developing a gene therapy for AATD. PMID:27408904

  3. Sensitive Tumorigenic Potential Evaluation of Adult Human Multipotent Neural Cells Immortalized by hTERT Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Eun; Kim, Sung Soo; Song, Hye Jin; Pyeon, Hee Jang; Kang, Kyeongjin; Hong, Seung-Cheol; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and therapeutic genes are emerging as a new therapeutic approach to treat various neurodegenerative diseases with few effective treatment options. However, potential formation of tumors by stem cells has hampered their clinical application. Moreover, adequate preclinical platforms to precisely test tumorigenic potential of stem cells are controversial. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of various animal models for in vivo stem cell tumorigenicity testing to identify the most sensitive platform. Then, tumorigenic potential of adult human multipotent neural cells (ahMNCs) immortalized by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene was examined as a stem cell model with therapeutic genes. When human glioblastoma (GBM) cells were injected into adult (4–6-week-old) Balb/c-nu, adult NOD/SCID, adult NOG, or neonate (1–2-week-old) NOG mice, the neonate NOG mice showed significantly faster tumorigenesis than that of the other groups regardless of intracranial or subcutaneous injection route. Two kinds of ahMNCs (682TL and 779TL) were primary cultured from surgical samples of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Although the ahMNCs were immortalized by lentiviral hTERT gene delivery (hTERT-682TL and hTERT-779TL), they did not form any detectable masses, even in the most sensitive neonate NOG mouse platform. Moreover, the hTERT-ahMNCs had no gross chromosomal abnormalities on a karyotype analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that neonate NOG mice could be a sensitive animal platform to test tumorigenic potential of stem cell therapeutics and that ahMNCs could be a genetically stable stem cell source with little tumorigenic activity to develop regenerative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27391353

  4. Sensitive Tumorigenic Potential Evaluation of Adult Human Multipotent Neural Cells Immortalized by hTERT Gene Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kee Hang; Nam, Hyun; Jeong, Da Eun; Kim, Sung Soo; Song, Hye Jin; Pyeon, Hee Jang; Kang, Kyeongjin; Hong, Seung-Cheol; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and therapeutic genes are emerging as a new therapeutic approach to treat various neurodegenerative diseases with few effective treatment options. However, potential formation of tumors by stem cells has hampered their clinical application. Moreover, adequate preclinical platforms to precisely test tumorigenic potential of stem cells are controversial. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of various animal models for in vivo stem cell tumorigenicity testing to identify the most sensitive platform. Then, tumorigenic potential of adult human multipotent neural cells (ahMNCs) immortalized by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene was examined as a stem cell model with therapeutic genes. When human glioblastoma (GBM) cells were injected into adult (4-6-week-old) Balb/c-nu, adult NOD/SCID, adult NOG, or neonate (1-2-week-old) NOG mice, the neonate NOG mice showed significantly faster tumorigenesis than that of the other groups regardless of intracranial or subcutaneous injection route. Two kinds of ahMNCs (682TL and 779TL) were primary cultured from surgical samples of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Although the ahMNCs were immortalized by lentiviral hTERT gene delivery (hTERT-682TL and hTERT-779TL), they did not form any detectable masses, even in the most sensitive neonate NOG mouse platform. Moreover, the hTERT-ahMNCs had no gross chromosomal abnormalities on a karyotype analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that neonate NOG mice could be a sensitive animal platform to test tumorigenic potential of stem cell therapeutics and that ahMNCs could be a genetically stable stem cell source with little tumorigenic activity to develop regenerative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27391353

  5. Direct exposure of mouse ovaries and oocytes to high doses of an adenovirus gene therapy vector fails to lead to germ cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J W

    2001-04-01

    The risk of insertion of adenovirus gene therapy DNA into female germ cells during the course of somatic gene therapy was stringently tested in the mouse by injecting up to 10(10) infectious particles directly into the ovary and by incubating naked oocytes in a solution of 2 x 10(8) particles/ml for 1 h prior to in vitro fertilization (IVF). The vector used was a recombinant adenovirus carrying the bacterial lacZ gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter (Adbeta-gal). Ovaries were stained for LacZ activity, or immunochemically for LacZ, 5-7 days after injection. Although very large amounts of LacZ activity and protein were detected, all positive staining was in the thecal portion of the ovary, with no staining seen in oocytes. In another series of experiments, mice with injected ovaries were mated, and preimplantation embryos or fetuses were analyzed either for LacZ expression or by PCR for lacZ DNA. None of 202 preimplantation embryos stained positively for LacZ and none of 58 fetuses were positive for DNA by PCR analysis. Finally, more than 1400 eggs were fertilized after exposure to the vector prior to IVF and stained as morulae for LacZ activity. Fewer than 2% of the embryos stained positively for LacZ, and experiments indicated that the staining was due to incomplete washing of the eggs prior to IVF. These data provide strong evidence that adenoviruses cannot infect oocytes and that the risk of female germ-line transduction with such vectors is very low. PMID:11319918

  6. Transcriptional regulation of Bacillus subtilis glucose starvation-inducible genes: control of gsiA by the ComP-ComA signal transduction system.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, J P; Bukusoglu, G; Sonenshein, A L

    1992-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis glucose starvation-inducible transcription units, gsiA and gsiB, were characterized by DNA sequencing, transcriptional mapping, mutational analysis, and expression in response to changes in environmental conditions. The gsiA operon was shown to consist of two genes, gsiAA and gsiAB, predicted to encode 44.9- and 4.8-kDa polypeptides, respectively. The gsiB locus contains a single cistron which encodes a protein of unusual structure; most of its amino acids are arranged in five highly conserved, tandemly repeated units of 20 amino acids. The 5' ends of gsiA and gsiB mRNAs were located by primer extension analysis; their locations suggest that both are transcribed by RNA polymerase containing sigma A. Expression of both gsiA and gsiB was induced by starvation for glucose or phosphate or by addition of decoyinine, but only gsiA was induced by exhaustion of nutrient broth or by amino acid starvation. Regulation of gsiA expression was shown to be dependent upon the two-component signal transduction system ComP-ComA, which also controls expression of genetic competence genes. Mutations in mecA bypassed the dependency of gsiA expression on ComA. Disruption of gsiA relieved glucose repression of sporulation but did not otherwise interfere with sporulation, development of competence, motility, or glucose starvation survival. We propose that gsiA and gsiB are members of an adaptive pathway of genes whose products are involved in responses to nutrient deprivation other than sporulation. Images PMID:1378051

  7. Generalized Transduction of Small Yersinia enterocolitica Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Hertwig, Stefan; Popp, Andreas; Freytag, Barbara; Lurz, Rudi; Appel, Bernd

    1999-01-01

    To study phage-mediated gene transfer in Yersinia, the ability of Yersinia phages to transduce naturally occurring plasmids was investigated. The transduction experiments were performed with a temperate phage isolated from a pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strain and phage mixtures isolated from sewage. Small plasmids (4.3 and 5.8 kb) were transduced at a frequency of 10−5 to 10−7/PFU. However, we could not detect the transduction of any indigenous virulence plasmid (ca. 72 kb) in pathogenic Yersinia strains. Transductants obtained by infection with the temperate phage were lysogenic and harbored the phage genome in their chromosomes. PMID:10473387

  8. Quantitative, noninvasive, in vivo longitudinal monitoring of gene expression in the brain by co-AAV transduction with a PET reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sea Young; Gay-Antaki, Carlos; Ponde, Datta E; Poptani, Harish; Vite, Charles H; Wolfe, John H

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of vector transgene expression would be particularly valuable for repetitive monitoring of therapy in the brain, where invasive tissue sampling is contraindicated. We evaluated adeno-associated virus vector expression of a dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) mutant (D2R80A) by positron emission tomography in the brains of mice and cats. D2R80A is inactivated for intracellular signaling and binds subphysiologic amounts of the radioactive [18F]-fallypride analog of dopamine. The [18F]-fallypride signal bound to D2R80A in the injection site was normalized to the signal from endogenous D2R in the striatum and showed stable levels of expression within individual animals. A separate adeno-associated virus type 1 vector with identical gene expression control elements, expressing green fluorescent protein or a therapeutic gene, was coinjected with the D2R80A vector at equal doses into specific sites. Both transgenes had similar levels of gene expression by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and quantitative PCR assays, demonstrating that D2R80A is a faithful surrogate measure for expression of a gene of interest. This dual vector approach allows the D2R80A gene to be used with any therapeutic gene and to be injected into a single site for monitoring while the therapeutic gene can be distributed more widely as needed in each disease. PMID:26015960

  9. Phosphorylation in halobacterial signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, J; Tolliday, N; Schmitt, C; Schuster, S C; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    Regulated phosphorylation of proteins has been shown to be a hallmark of signal transduction mechanisms in both Eubacteria and Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also the underlying mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in Archaea, the third branch of the living world. Cloning and sequencing of the region upstream of the cheA gene, known to be required for chemo- and phototaxis in Halobacterium salinarium, has identified cheY and cheB analogs which appear to form part of an operon which also includes cheA and the following open reading frame of 585 nucleotides. The CheY and CheB proteins have 31.3 and 37.5% sequence identity compared with the known signal transduction proteins CheY and CheB from Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical activities of both CheA and CheY were investigated following their expression in E.coli, isolation and renaturation. Wild-type CheA could be phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and Mg2+, whereas the mutant CheA(H44Q) remained unlabeled. Phosphorylated CheA was dephosphorylated rapidly by the addition of wild-type CheY. The mutant CheY(D53A) had no effect on phosphorylated CheA. The mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in the Archaeon H.salinarium, therefore, is similar to the two-component signaling system known from chemotaxis in the eubacterium E.coli. Images PMID:7556066

  10. Fiber-mutant technique can augment gene transduction efficacy and anti-tumor effects against established murine melanoma by cytokine-gene therapy using adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yuka; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kanehira, Makiko; Nishino, Naoko; Takahashi, Koichi; Mizuno, Nobuyasu; Hayakawa, Takao; Mayumi, Tadanori

    2002-03-01

    Melanoma cells are relatively resistant to adenovirus vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer due to the low expression of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), which acts as a primitive Ad-receptor. Therefore, extremely high doses of Ad are required for effective gene therapy against melanoma. In the present study, we investigated whether fiber-mutant Ad containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence in the fiber knob could promote gene delivery and anti-tumor effects in the murine B16 BL6 tumor model. B16 BL6 cells (in vitro) and tumors (in vivo) infected with RGD fiber-mutant Ad containing a tumor necrosis factor alpha gene (Ad-RGD-TNFalpha) produced more TNFalpha than those infected with conventional Ad-TNFalpha. In addition, Ad-RGD-TNFalpha required about one-tenth the dosage of Ad-TNFalpha for induction of equal therapeutic effects upon intratumoral injection into established B16 BL6 tumors. Furthermore, the combination of both TNFalpha- and interleukin 12-expressing RGD fiber-mutant Ads exhibited more effective tumor regression than the Ad expressing each alone. These results suggested that the fiber-mutant for altering Ad-tropism is a very potent technology for advancing gene therapy for melanoma. PMID:11809531

  11. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes the expression of osteoblastic genes and activates the WNT signal transduction pathway in bone marrow stromal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RI; YUAN, ZHI; LIU, JIERONG; LIU, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to induce osteoblastic differentiation and alkaline phosphatase activity in bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it has remained elusive whether this effect is mediated by CGRP receptors directly or whether other signaling pathways are involved. The present study assessed the possible involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the activation of CGRP signaling during the differentiation of BMSCs. First, the differentiation of BMSCs was induced in vitro and the expression of CGRP receptors was examined by western blot analysis. The effects of exogenous CGRP and LiCl, a stimulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, on the osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs were assessed; furthermore, the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was assessed using quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. The results revealed that CGRP receptors were expressed throughout the differentiation of BMSCs, at days 7 and 14. Incubation with CGRP and LiCl led to the upregulation of the expression of osteoblastic genes associated with the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, including the mRNA of c-myc, cyclin D1, Lef1, Tcf7 and β-catenin as well as β-catenin protein. However, the upregulation of these genes and β-catenin protein was inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonist or secreted frizzled-related protein, an antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results of the present study therefore suggested that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in CGRP- and LiCl-promoted osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:27082317

  12. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes the expression of osteoblastic genes and activates the WNT signal transduction pathway in bone marrow stromal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ri; Yuan, Zhi; Liu, Jierong; Liu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to induce osteoblastic differentiation and alkaline phosphatase activity in bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it has remained elusive whether this effect is mediated by CGRP receptors directly or whether other signaling pathways are involved. The present study assessed the possible involvement of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway in the activation of CGRP signaling during the differentiation of BMSCs. First, the differentiation of BMSCs was induced in vitro and the expression of CGRP receptors was examined by western blot analysis. The effects of exogenous CGRP and LiCl, a stimulator of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway, on the osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs were assessed; furthermore, the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway was assessed using quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. The results revealed that CGRP receptors were expressed throughout the differentiation of BMSCs, at days 7 and 14. Incubation with CGRP and LiCl led to the upregulation of the expression of osteoblastic genes associated with the Wnt/β‑catenin pathway, including the mRNA of c‑myc, cyclin D1, Lef1, Tcf7 and β‑catenin as well as β‑catenin protein. However, the upregulation of these genes and β‑catenin protein was inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonist or secreted frizzled‑related protein, an antagonist of the Wnt/β‑catenin pathway. The results of the present study therefore suggested that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in CGRP‑ and LiCl-promoted osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:27082317

  13. The Relationship Between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in 5-HT2A Signal Transduction-Related Genes and the Response Efficacy to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatments in Chinese Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng-Fen; Yu, Xue; He, Cha-Ye; Kou, Shao-Jie; Cao, Su-Xia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possible relationship between six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs6311 and rs6305 of 5-HT2A, rs5443 of Gβ3, rs2230739 of ACDY9, rs1549870 of PDE1A and rs255163 of CREB1, which are all related with 5-HT2A the signal transduction pathway) and the response efficacy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatments in major depressive disorder (MDD) Chinese. Methods: This study included 194 depressed patients to investigate the influence of 6 polymorphisms in 5-HT2A signal transduction-related genes on the efficacy of SSRIs assessed over 1 year. The efficacies of SSRIs on 194 MDD patients were evaluated in an 8-week open-trial study. Over 1 year, a follow-up study was completed for 174 of them to observe the long-term efficacy of SSRIs. The optimal-scaling regression analysis was used for testing the relationship between the different genotypes of five SNPs and the efficacy in MDD. Results: It showed that the patients with rs5443TT and rs2230739GG have a relatively good efficacy in response to short-term SSRIs. We also found that good efficacy appeared in depressed patients with rs2230739GG in response to long-term SSRIs. Conclusions: It suggested that different genotypes of rs5443 and rs2230739 might influence the signal transduction pathways of second message and affect therapeutic efficacy. PMID:22480177

  14. Central leptin gene delivery evokes persistent leptin signal transduction in young and aged-obese rats but physiological responses become attenuated over time in aged-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, P J; Matheny, M; Zhang, Y; Tümer, N; Frase, C D; Shek, E W; Hong, B; Prima, V; Zolotukhin, S

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if long-term leptin treatment desensitizes leptin signal transduction and the subsequent downstream anorexic and thermogenic responses in normal and leptin-resistant age-related obese rats. To this end, we administered, i.c.v., recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding rat leptin cDNA (rAAV-leptin) or control virus into young and aged-obese rats and after 9 or 46 days, examined food intake, oxygen consumption, body weight, serum leptin, STAT3 phosphorylation, hypothalamic NPY and POMC mRNAs, and UCP1 expression and protein level in brown adipose tissue (BAT). In young rats, rAAV-leptin depleted body fat and both anorexic and thermogenic mechanisms contributed to this effect. Moreover, leptin signal transduction was not desensitized, and there were persistent physiological responses. Similarly, in the aged-obese rats, there was unabated leptin signal transduction, however, both the anorexic and thermogenic responses completely attenuated sometime after day 9. This attenuation, downstream of the leptin receptor, may be contributing to the leptin-resistance and age-related weight gain in these aged-obese rats. Finally, in young rats, although the initial responses to rAAV-leptin were dominated by anorexic responses, by 46 days, the predominant response was thermogenic rather than anorexic, suggesting that energy expenditure may be an important component of long-term weight maintenance. PMID:11955525

  15. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  16. Protein Regulation in Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Yaffe, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYCells must respond to a diverse, complex, and ever-changing mix of signals, using a fairly limited set of parts. Changes in protein level, protein localization, protein activity, and protein-protein interactions are critical aspects of signal transduction, allowing cells to respond highly specifically to a nearly limitless set of cues and also to vary the sensitivity, duration, and dynamics of the response. Signal-dependent changes in levels of gene expression and protein synthesis play an important role in regulation of protein levels, whereas posttranslational modifications of proteins regulate their degradation, localization, and functional interactions. Protein ubiquitylation, for example, can direct proteins to the proteasome for degradation or provide a signal that regulates their interactions and/or location within the cell. Similarly, protein phosphorylation by specific kinases is a key mechanism for augmenting protein activity and relaying signals to other proteins that possess domains that recognize the phosphorylated residues. PMID:27252361

  17. Peptide-mediated interference with baculovirus transduction.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Anna R; Närvänen, Ale; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2008-03-20

    Baculovirus represents a multifunctional platform with potential for biomedical applications including disease therapies. The importance of F3, a tumor-homing peptide, in baculovirus transduction was previously recognized by the ability of F3 to augment viral binding and gene delivery to human cancer cells following display on the viral envelope. Here, F3 was utilized as a molecular tool to expand understanding of the poorly characterized baculovirus-mammalian cell interactions. Baculovirus-mediated transduction of HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells was strongly inhibited by coincubating the virus with synthetic F3 or following incorporation of F3 into viral nucleocapsid by genetic engineering, the former suggesting direct interaction of the soluble peptide with the virus particles. Since internalization and nuclear accumulation of the virus were significantly inhibited or delayed, but the kinetics of viral binding, initial uptake, and endosomal release were unaffected, F3 likely interferes with cytoplasmic trafficking and subsequent nuclear transport of the virus. A polyclonal antibody raised against nucleolin, the internalizing receptor of F3, failed to inhibit cellular binding, but considerably reduced viral transduction efficiency, proposing the involvement of nucleolin in baculovirus entry. Together, these results render the F3 peptide a tool for elucidating the mechanism and molecular details conferring to baculovirus-mediated gene transduction in mammalian cells. PMID:18294718

  18. Gravitational Effects on Signal Transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms by which individual cells perceive gravity and how these cells transduce and respond to gravitational stimuli is critical for the development of long-term manned space flight experiments. We now propose to use a well-characterized model erythroid cell system and to investigate gravitational perturbations of its erythropoietin (Epo) signaling pathway and gene regulation. Cells will be grown at 1-G and in simulated microgravity in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor (RWV). Cell growth and differentiation, the Epo-receptor, the protein kinase C pathway to the c-myc gene, and the protein phosphatase pathway to the c-myb gene will be studied and evaluated as reporters of gravitational stimuli. The results of these experiments will have impact on the problems of 1) gravitational sensing by individual cells, and 2) the anemia of space flight. This ground-based study also will serve as a Space Station Development Study in gravitational effects on intracellular signal transduction.

  19. Transduction of an immortalized olfactory ensheathing glia cell line with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene: Evaluation of its neuroregenerative capacity as a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Plaza, N; Simón, D; Sierra, J; Moreno-Flores, M T

    2016-01-26

    Olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) cells are known to foster axonal regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) neurons. Several lines of reversibly immortalized human OEG (ihOEG) have been previously established that enabled to develop models for their validation in vitro and in vivo. In this work, a constitutively GFP-expressing ihOEG cell line was obtained, and named Ts14-GFP. Ts14-GFP neuroregenerative ability was similar to that found for the parental line Ts14 and it can be assayed using in vivo transplantation experimental paradigms, after spinal cord or optic nerve damage. Additionally, we have engineered a low-regenerative ihOEG line, hTL2, using lentiviral transduction of the large T antigen from SV40 virus, denominated from now on Ts12. Ts12 can be used as a low regeneration control in these experiments. PMID:26655478

  20. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  1. Identification of the amino acids essential for LytSR-mediated signal transduction in Staphylococcus aureus and their roles in biofilm-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, McKenzie K.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K.; Moormeier, Derek E.; Endres, Jennifer L.; Sadykov, Marat R.; Biswas, Indranil; Bayles, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have demonstrated that expression of the Staphylococcus aureus lrgAB operon is specifically expressed within tower structures during biofilm development. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying this spatial control of lrgAB expression, we carried out a detailed analysis of the LytSR two-component system. Specifically, a conserved aspartic acid (Asp53) of the LytR response regulator was shown to be the target of phosphorylation, which resulted in enhanced binding to the lrgAB promoter and activation of transcription. In addition, we identified His390 of the LytS histidine kinase as the site of autophosphorylation and Asn394 as a critical amino acid involved in phosphatase activity. Interestingly, LytS-independent activation of LytR was observed during planktonic growth, with acetyl phosphate acting as a phosphodonor to LytR. In contrast, mutations disrupting the function of LytS prevented tower-specific lrgAB expression, providing insight into the physiologic environment within these structures. In addition, over activation of LytR led to increased lrgAB promoter activity during planktonic and biofilm growth and a change in biofilm morphology. Overall, the results of this study are the first to define the LytSR signal transduction pathway, as well as determine the metabolic context within biofilm tower structures that triggers these signaling events. PMID:25491472

  2. Effects of Zhichan powder on signal transduction and apoptosis-associated gene expression in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajun; Ma, Jinshu; Qiu, Yafei; Yi, Shihong; Liu, Yongmao; Zhou, Qingwei; Zhang, Pengguo; Wan, Quan; Kuang, Ye

    2012-09-25

    Previous studies have shown that Zhichan powder elevated immunity and suppressed oxidation in mice. Rat models of Parkinson's disease were induced by stereotaxically injecting 6-hydroxydopamine into the substantia nigra. The rat models were intragastrically treated with Zhichan powder, which is composed of milkvetch root, ginseng, bunge swallowwort root, himalayan teasel root, Magnolia officinalis, Ligustrum lucidum Ait. and szechwan lovage rhizome. Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas, caspase-8, cytochrome C, Bax, caspase-3, and p53 significantly increased, but Bcl-2 expression significantly decreased in the substantia nigra of rats with Parkinson's disease. Following Zhichan powder administration, mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas, caspase-8, cytochrome C, Bax, caspase-3, and p53 diminished, but Bcl-2 expression increased in the rat substantia nigra. These results indicate that Zhichan powder regulates signal transduction protein expression, inhibits apoptosis, and exerts therapeutic effects on Parkinson's disease. PMID:25558224

  3. Development of Th17-associated interstitial kidney inflammation in lupus-prone mice lacking the gene encoding Signal Transduction and Activator of Transcription-1 (STAT-1)

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Gloria; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse; Ajami, Bahareh; Haddon, David J.; Chu, Alvina D.; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Haynes, Winston A.; Diep, Vivian; Steinman, Larry; Faix, James; Utz, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling is a central pathogenic pathway in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and therapeutics targeting IFN-I signaling are in development. Multiple proteins with overlapping function participate in IFN signaling, but the signaling events downstream of receptor engagement are unclear. We employed highly-multiplexed assays to characterize autoantibody production, cytokine/chemokine profiles, and Signal Transduction and Activators of Transcription (STAT) phosphorylation to investigate the individual roles of IFNAR2, IRF9 and STAT1 in MRL/lpr (lpr) mice. Surprisingly, we found that Stat1−/−, but not Irf9−/− or Ifnar2−/− mice, developed interstitial nephritis characterized by infiltration with RORγT+ lymphocytes, macrophages and eosinophils. Despite pronounced interstitial kidney disease and abnormal kidney function, Stat1−/− mice had decreased proteinuria, glomerulonephritis and autoantibody production. Phospho-specific flow cytometry (phosphoflow) revealed shunting of STAT phosphorylation from STAT1 to STAT3/4. In summary, we describe unique contributions of STAT1 to pathology in different kidney compartments, and provide novel insight into tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) a poorly understood complication that predicts end-stage kidney disease in SLE patients. PMID:26636548

  4. Retrovirus transduction: Segregation of the viral transforming function and the Herpes Simplex virus tk gene in infectious friend spleen focus-forming virus thymidine kinase vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, A.L.; Bernstein, A.

    1983-12-01

    A series of deletions and insertions utilizing the herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) were constructed in the murine retrovirus Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV). In all cases, the coding region for the SFFV-specific glycoprotein (gp55), which is implicated in erythroleukemic transformation, was left intact. These SFFV-TK and SFFV deletion vectors were analyzed for expression of tk and gp55 after DNA-mediated gene transfer. In addition, virus rescued by cotranfection of these vectors with Moloney murine leukemia virus was analyzed for infectious TK-transducing virus, gp55 expression, and erythroleukemia-inducing ability. The experiments demonstrated that deletions or insertions within the intron for the gp55 env gene can interfere with expression of gp55 after both DNA-mediated gene transfer and virus infection. In contrast, the gene transfer efficiency of the tk gene was unaffected in the SFFV-TK vectors, and high-titer infectious TK virus could be recovered. Revertant viruses capable of inducing erythroleukemia and expressing gp55 were generated after cotranfection of the SFFV-TK vectors with murine leukemia virus. The revertant viruses lost both tk sequences and the ability to transduce TK/sup -/ fibroblasts to a TK/sup +/ phenotype. These experiments demonstrate that segregation of the TK and erythroleukemia functions can occur in retrovirus vectors which initially carry both markers.

  5. Generalized Transduction in CAULOBACTER CRESCENTUS

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Bert; Johnson, Reid C.

    1977-01-01

    Two closely related bacteriophage, ϕCr30 and ϕCr35, are the first bacteriophage shown to mediate generalized transduction in Caulobacter crescentus. Unlike most other transducing phage, they are virulent and do not form any sort of lysogenic relationship with their host. However, they are rather inefficient at adsorption, so that transductants have a good chance of survival. The phage particles have a head 80 nm in diameter and a contractile tail 140 nm in length. Procedures for growth and transduction with ϕCr30 are relatively simple; thus, it will be of great value for the genetic analysis of C. crescentus. PMID:17248770

  6. Replication-competent retroviral vectors encoding alkaline phosphatase reveal spatial restriction of viral gene expression/transduction in the chick embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, D M; Cepko, C L

    1993-01-01

    Replication-competent avian retroviruses, capable of transducing and expressing up to 2 kb of nonviral sequences, are now available to effect widespread gene transfer in chicken (chick) embryos (S. H. Hughes, J. J. Greenhouse, C. J. Petropoulos, and P. Sutrave, J. Virol. 61:3004-3012, 1987). We have constructed novel avian retroviral vectors that encode human placental alkaline phosphatase as a marker whose expression can be histochemically monitored. These vectors have been tested for expression by introducing them into the embryonic chick nervous system. They have revealed that the expression of retrovirally transduced genes can be spatially and temporally limited without the need for tissue-specific promoters. By varying the site and time of infection, targeted gene transfer can be confined to selected populations of neural cells over the course of several days, a time window that is sufficient for many key developmental processes. The capability of differentially infecting specific target populations may avoid confounding variables such as detrimental effects of a transduced gene on processes unrelated to the cells or tissue of interest. These vectors and methods thus should be useful in studies of the effect of transduced genes on the development of various organs and tissues during avian embryogenesis. In addition, the vectors will facilitate studies aimed at an understanding of viral infection and expression patterns. Images PMID:8455633

  7. Pheromone Transduction in Moths

    PubMed Central

    Stengl, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Calling female moths attract their mates late at night with intermittent release of a species-specific sex-pheromone blend. Mean frequency of pheromone filaments encodes distance to the calling female. In their zig-zagging upwind search male moths encounter turbulent pheromone blend filaments at highly variable concentrations and frequencies. The male moth antennae are delicately designed to detect and distinguish even traces of these sex pheromones amongst the abundance of other odors. Its olfactory receptor neurons sense even single pheromone molecules and track intermittent pheromone filaments of highly variable frequencies up to about 30 Hz over a wide concentration range. In the hawkmoth Manduca sexta brief, weak pheromone stimuli as encountered during flight are detected via a metabotropic PLCβ-dependent signal transduction cascade which leads to transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Strong or long pheromone stimuli, which are possibly perceived in direct contact with the female, activate receptor-guanylyl cyclases causing long-term adaptation. In addition, depending on endogenous rhythms of the moth's physiological state, hormones such as the stress hormone octopamine modulate second messenger levels in sensory neurons. High octopamine levels during the activity phase maximize temporal resolution cAMP-dependently as a prerequisite to mate location. Thus, I suggest that sliding adjustment of odor response threshold and kinetics is based upon relative concentration ratios of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide levels which gate different ion channels synergistically. In addition, I propose a new hypothesis for the cyclic nucleotide-dependent ion channel formed by insect olfactory receptor/coreceptor complexes. Instead of being employed for an ionotropic mechanism of odor detection it is proposed to control subthreshold membrane potential oscillation of sensory neurons, as a basis for temporal encoding of odors. PMID:21228914

  8. phyA dominates in transduction of red-light signals to rapidly responding genes at the initiation of Arabidopsis seedling de-etiolation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contrary to expectations based on the visible phenotypic behavior of seedlings undergoing de-etiolation in response to continuous red light (Rc), previous gene expression profiling showed that one or more of the five-membered phytochrome (phy) family of Arabidopsis, other than phyB, is predominantly...

  9. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  10. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-02-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  11. RCY1, an Arabidopsis thaliana RPP8/HRT family resistance gene, conferring resistance to cucumber mosaic virus requires salicylic acid, ethylene and a novel signal transduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideki; Miller, Jennifer; Nozaki, Yukine; Takeda, Megumi; Shah, Jyoti; Hase, Shu; Ikegami, Masato; Ehara, Yoshio; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2002-12-01

    The dominant locus, RCY1, in the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype C24 confers resistance to the yellow strain of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Y). The RCY1 locus was mapped to a 150-kb region on chromosome 5. Sequence comparison of this region from C24 and a CMV-Y-susceptible C24 mutant predicts that the RCY1 gene encodes a 104-kDa CC-NBS-LRR-type protein. The RCY1 gene from C24, when expressed in the susceptible ecotype Wassilewskija (Ws), restricted the systemic spread of virus. RCY1 is allelic to the resistance genes RPP8 from the ecotype Landsberg erecta and HRT from the ecotype Dijon-17, which confer resistance to Peronospora parasitica biotype Emco5 and turnip crinkle virus (TCV), respectively. Examination of RCY1 plants defective in salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene signaling revealed a requirement for SA and ethylene signaling in mounting a resistance response to CMV-Y. The RCY1 nahG etr1 double mutants exhibited an intermediate level of susceptibility to CMV-Y, compared to the resistant ecotype C24 and the susceptible ecotypes Columbia and Nossen. This suggests that in addition to SA and ethylene, a novel signaling mechanism is associated with the induction of resistance in CMV-Y-infected C24 plants. Moreover, our results suggest that the signaling pathways downstream of the RPP8, HRT, and RCY1 have evolved independently. PMID:12472683

  12. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene unc-89, required fpr muscle M-line assembly, encodes a giant modular protein composed of Ig and signal transduction domains

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene unc-89 result in nematodes having disorganized muscle structure in which thick filaments are not organized into A-bands, and there are no M-lines. Beginning with a partial cDNA from the C. elegans sequencing project, we have cloned and sequenced the unc-89 gene. An unc-89 allele, st515, was found to contain an 84-bp deletion and a 10-bp duplication, resulting in an in- frame stop codon within predicted unc-89 coding sequence. Analysis of the complete coding sequence for unc-89 predicts a novel 6,632 amino acid polypeptide consisting of sequence motifs which have been implicated in protein-protein interactions. UNC-89 begins with 67 residues of unique sequences, SH3, dbl/CDC24, and PH domains, 7 immunoglobulins (Ig) domains, a putative KSP-containing multiphosphorylation domain, and ends with 46 Ig domains. A polyclonal antiserum raised to a portion of unc-89 encoded sequence reacts to a twitchin-sized polypeptide from wild type, but truncated polypeptides from st515 and from the amber allele e2338. By immunofluorescent microscopy, this antiserum localizes to the middle of A-bands, consistent with UNC-89 being a structural component of the M-line. Previous studies indicate that myofilament lattice assembly begins with positional cues laid down in the basement membrane and muscle cell membrane. We propose that the intracellular protein UNC-89 responds to these signals, localizes, and then participates in assembling an M-line. PMID:8603916

  13. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Morey, Kevin J; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A; Smith, J Jeff; Webb, Colleen T; Hellinga, Homme W; Medford, June I

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparently linear pathways, thereby establishing networks that integrate multiple signals. We show that sequence conservation and cross talk can extend across kingdoms and can be exploited to produce a synthetic plant signal transduction system. In response to HK cross talk, heterologously expressed bacterial response regulators, PhoB and OmpR, translocate to the nucleus on HK activation. Using this discovery, combined with modification of PhoB (PhoB-VP64), we produced a key component of a eukaryotic synthetic signal transduction pathway. In response to exogenous cytokinin, PhoB-VP64 translocates to the nucleus, binds a synthetic PlantPho promoter, and activates gene expression. These results show that conserved-signaling components can be used across kingdoms and adapted to produce synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. PMID:19455134

  14. Beyond microarrays: Finding key transcription factors controlling signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kel, Alexdander; Voss, Nico; Jauregui, Ruy; Kel-Margoulis, Olga; Wingender, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    Background Massive gene expression changes in different cellular states measured by microarrays, in fact, reflect just an "echo" of real molecular processes in the cells. Transcription factors constitute a class of the regulatory molecules that typically require posttranscriptional modifications or ligand binding in order to exert their function. Therefore, such important functional changes of transcription factors are not directly visible in the microarray experiments. Results We developed a novel approach to find key transcription factors that may explain concerted expression changes of specific components of the signal transduction network. The approach aims at revealing evidence of positive feedback loops in the signal transduction circuits through activation of pathway-specific transcription factors. We demonstrate that promoters of genes encoding components of many known signal transduction pathways are enriched by binding sites of those transcription factors that are endpoints of the considered pathways. Application of the approach to the microarray gene expression data on TNF-alpha stimulated primary human endothelial cells helped to reveal novel key transcription factors potentially involved in the regulation of the signal transduction pathways of the cells. Conclusion We developed a novel computational approach for revealing key transcription factors by knowledge-based analysis of gene expression data with the help of databases on gene regulatory networks (TRANSFAC® and TRANSPATH®). The corresponding software and databases are available at . PMID:17118134

  15. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Wu, Carol P.; Chao, Yu-Chan; Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  16. Gene expression of insulin signal-transduction pathway intermediates is lower in rats fed a beef tallow diet than in rats fed a safflower oil diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y B; Nakajima, R; Matsuo, T; Inoue, T; Sekine, T; Komuro, M; Tamura, T; Tokuyama, K; Suzuki, M

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of dietary fatty acid composition on the insulin signaling pathway, we measured the gene expression of the earliest steps in the insulin action pathway in skeletal muscle of rats fed a safflower oil diet or a beef tallow diet. Rats were meal-fed an isoenergetic diet based on either safflower oil or beef tallow for 8 weeks. Both diets provided 45%, 35%, and 20% of energy as fat, carbohydrate, and protein, respectively. Insulin resistance, assessed from the diurnal rhythm of plasma glucose and insulin and the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), developed in rats fed a beef tallow diet. Body fat content was greater in rats fed a beef tallow diet versus a safflower oil diet. The level of insulin receptor mRNA, relative expression of the insulin receptor mRNA isoforms, and receptor protein were not affected by the composition of dietary fatty acids. The abundance of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase mRNA and protein was significantly lower in rats fed a beef tallow diet versus a safflower oil diet. We conclude that long-term feeding of a high-fat diet with saturated fatty acids induces decrease in IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase mRNA and protein levels, causing insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:8781294

  17. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  18. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  19. Molecular basis of mechanosensory transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Walker, Richard G.

    2001-09-01

    Mechanotransduction - a cell's conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal - reveals vital features of an organism's environment. From hair cells and skin mechanoreceptors in vertebrates, to bristle receptors in flies and touch receptors in worms, mechanically sensitive cells are essential in the life of an organism. The scarcity of these cells and the uniqueness of their transduction mechanisms have conspired to slow molecular characterization of the ensembles that carry out mechanotransduction. But recent progress in both invertebrates and vertebrates is beginning to reveal the identities of proteins essential for transduction.

  20. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of "teaching signal transduction." The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to reflect on the…

  1. Signal transduction pathways involved in mechanotransduction in bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liedert, Astrid . E-mail: astrid.liedert@uni-ulm.de; Kaspar, Daniela; Blakytny, Robert; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2006-10-13

    Several in vivo and in vitro studies with different loading regimens showed that mechanical stimuli have an influence on proliferation and differentiation of bone cells. Prerequisite for this influence is the transduction of mechanical signals into the cell, a phenomenon that is termed mechanotransduction, which is essential for the maintenance of skeletal homeostasis in adults. Mechanoreceptors, such as the integrins, cadherins, and stretch-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels, together with various signal transduction pathways, are involved in the mechanotransduction process that ultimately regulates gene expression in the nucleus. Mechanotransduction itself is considered to be regulated by hormones, the extracellular matrix of the osteoblastic cells and the mode of the mechanical stimulus.

  2. Signal transduction by the growth hormone receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.J.; Rowlinson, S.W.; Clarkson, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    It has been proposed that dimerization of identical receptor subunits by growth hormone (GH) is the mechanism of signal transduction across the cell membrane. We present here data with analogs of porcine GH (pGH), with GH receptors (GHR) mutated in the dimerization domain and with monoclonal antibodies to the GHR which indicate that dimerization is necessary but not sufficient for transduction. We also report nuclear uptake of GH both in vivo and in vitro, along with nuclear localization of the receptor and GH-binding protein (GHBP). This suggests that GH acts directly at the nucleus, and one possible target for this action is a rapid increase in transcription of C/EBP delta seen in 3T3-F442A cells in response to GH. This tyrosine kinase-dependent event may be an archetype for induction of other immediate early gene transcription factors which then interact to determine the programming of the subsequent transcriptional response to GH. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Neuropilins are positive regulators of Hedgehog signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hillman, R Tyler; Feng, Brian Y; Ni, Jun; Woo, Wei-Meng; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G; Teruel, Mary N; Oro, Anthony E; Chen, James K; Scott, Matthew P

    2011-11-15

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is essential for vertebrate embryogenesis, and excessive Hh target gene activation can cause cancer in humans. Here we show that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) and Nrp2, transmembrane proteins with roles in axon guidance and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, are important positive regulators of Hh signal transduction. Nrps are expressed at times and locations of active Hh signal transduction during mouse development. Using cell lines lacking key Hh pathway components, we show that Nrps mediate Hh transduction between activated Smoothened (Smo) protein and the negative regulator Suppressor of Fused (SuFu). Nrp1 transcription is induced by Hh signaling, and Nrp1 overexpression increases maximal Hh target gene activation, indicating the existence of a positive feedback circuit. The regulation of Hh signal transduction by Nrps is conserved between mammals and bony fish, as we show that morpholinos targeting the Nrp zebrafish ortholog nrp1a produce a specific and highly penetrant Hh pathway loss-of-function phenotype. These findings enhance our knowledge of Hh pathway regulation and provide evidence for a conserved nexus between Nrps and this important developmental signaling system. PMID:22051878

  4. Generalized transduction: new aspects of the events in the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velimirov, B.; Chiura, H. X.; Kogure, K.

    2003-04-01

    Virus mediated transfer of genetic elements among bacteria in nature has become a major research topic in the last decade. Along with conjugation and transformation, transduction is a well-known mechanism resulting in horizontal gene transfer in procaryotic organisms. In the case of generalized transduction, all regions of the procaryotic chromosome or other genetic elements in the donor cell are transferred with nearly the same frequency to the recipient. The injection of this DNA induces the generation of stable transductants. Both virulent and temperate phages have the capability to induce general transduction.Within the frame of a study on intergeneric phage-mediated gene transfer between marine bacteria and enteric bacteria, namely an auxotrophic mutant of Escherichia coli (AB1157) we used virus like particles (VLPs) from an oligotrophic marine environment (Mediterranean Sea, West coast of Corsica) and obtained gene transfer frequencies ranging between 10-2 to 10-6 per viral particle. Consequently we had to assume that an important fraction of the VLPs obtained via ultrafiltration (Minitan Ultrafiltration System, Millipore, USA. 30 kDA cut-off filter) from surface seawater have the capability to induce general transduction. In the process of this investigation we made a number of new observations which were not compatible with the concept of general transduction. The obtained transductants were able to produce new VLPs, which had again the capability to induce transduction. In an attempt to characterize these particles we show that their appearance in the experiment was neither related to plaque formation nor to cell lysis and we discuss the concept of transduction in the light of new experimental evidence concerning transducing particles. Furthermore, a preliminary numerical model allowing an estimation of the transduction events, taking place in the water column within a year is presented.

  5. Construction of Novel Bacillus thuringiensis Strains with Different Insecticidal Activities by Transduction and Transformation.

    PubMed

    Lecadet, M M; Chaufaux, J; Ribier, J; Lereclus, D

    1992-03-01

    The shuttle vector pHT3101 and its derivative pHT408, bearing a copy of a cryIA(a) delta-endotoxin gene, were transferred into several Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies through phage CP-54Ber-mediated transduction, with frequencies ranging from 5 x 10 to 2 x 10 transductant per CFU, depending on the strain and on the plasmid. In Cry and Cry native recipients, the introduction of the cryIA(a) gene resulted in the formation of large bipyramidal crystals that were active against the insect Plutella xylostella (order Lepidoptera). In both cases, high levels of gene expression were observed. Transductants displaying a dual specificity were constructed by using as recipients the new isolates LM63 and LM79, which have larvicidal activity against insects of the order Coleoptera. It was not possible, however, to introduce pHT7911 into B. thuringiensis subsp. entomocidus, aizawai, or israelensis by transduction. However, electrotransformation was successful, and transformants expressing the toxin gene cryIIIA, carried by pHT7911, were obtained. Again, high levels of expression of the cloned gene were observed. The results indicate that CP-54Ber-mediated transduction is a useful procedure for introducing cloned crystal protein genes into various B. thuringiensis recipients and thereby creating strains with new combinations of genes. Finally it was also shown that pHT3101 is a very good expression vector for the cloned delta-endotoxin genes in the different recipients. PMID:16348674

  6. Retroviral Transduction of T Cells and T Cell Precursors.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Amie; Alberola-Ila, José

    2016-01-01

    Transduction of lymphoid progenitors with retroviral or lentiviral vectors is a powerful experimental strategy to tease out the role of a gene or pathway in T cell development via gain-of-function or loss-of-function strategies. Here we discuss different approaches to use this powerful technology, and present some protocols that we use to transduce murine HSCs, thymocytes, and lymphoid cell lines with these viral vectors. PMID:26294401

  7. Retinal transduction profiles by high-capacity viral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puppo, Agostina; Cesi, Giulia; Marrocco, Elena; Piccolo, Pasquale; Jacca, Sarah; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.; Parks, Robin J.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Colloca, Stefano; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Philip; Donofrio, Gaetano; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is safe and effective in humans. However, the limited cargo capacity of AAV prevents their use for therapy of those inherited retinopathies (IRs) due to mutations in large (>5kb) genes. Viral vectors derived from Adenovirus (Ad), Lentivirus (LV) and Herpesvirus (HV) can package large DNA sequences but do not target efficiently retinal photoreceptors (PRs) where the majority of genes responsible for IRs are expressed. Here, we have evaluated the mouse retinal transduction profiles of vectors derived from 16 different Ad serotypes, 7 LV pseudotypes, and from a bovine HV. Most of the vectors tested transduced efficiently the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We found that LV-GP64 tends to transduce more PRs than the canonical LV-VSVG albeit this was restricted to a narrow region. We observed more extensive PR transduction with HdAd1, 2 and 5/F35++ than with LV, although none of them outperformed the canonical HdAd5 or matched the extension of PR transduction achieved with AAV2/8. PMID:24989814

  8. TMC function in hair cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jeffrey R; Pan, Bifeng; Koussa, Mounir A; Asai, Yukako

    2014-05-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins 1 and 2 are necessary for hair cell mechanotransduction but their precise function is controversial. A growing body of evidence supports a direct role for TMC1 and TMC2 as components of the transduction complex. However, a number of important questions remain and alternate hypotheses have been proposed. Here we present an historical overview of the identification and cloning of Tmc genes, a discussion of mutations in TMC1 that cause deafness in mice and humans and a brief review of other members of the Tmc gene superfamily. We also examine expression of Tmc mRNAs and localization of the protein products. The review focuses on potential functions of TMC proteins and the evidence from Beethoven mice that suggests a direct role for TMC1 in hair cell mechanotransduction. Data that support alternate interpretations are also considered. The article concludes with a discussion of outstanding questions and future directions for TMC research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:24423408

  9. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of “teaching signal transduction.” The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to reflect on the development and delivery of their teaching activities in this area. This was achieved by combining open seminars with restricted access workshops and discussion events. The results suggest ways in which systems biology, information and communication technology, Web-based investigations, and high standard illustrations might be more effectively and efficiently incorporated into modern cell biology courses. PMID:17012185

  10. Retroviral vectors for the transduction of autoregulated, bidirectional expression cassettes.

    PubMed

    Unsinger, J; Kröger, A; Hauser, H; Wirth, D

    2001-11-01

    Regulated transgene expression is increasingly used in research but is also needed for certain therapies. Regulatory systems are usually composed of two expression units, one bearing the gene of interest under control of a regulatable promoter and the other, a constitutively expressed transactivator that modulates the activity of the regulatable promoter. Because the cotransfer of two independent elements is not efficient in primary cells, single transduction step vectors conferring regulatable gene expression cassettes would be helpful. We have developed retroviral vectors containing an autoregulatory bidirectional expression cassette that encodes all components necessary for regulated expression of a gene of interest. The influence of the orientation of the reporter gene with respect to the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) and the effect of transcriptionally inactive LTRs were investigated using mouse leukemia virus (MLV) and self-inactivating (SIN)-based retroviral vectors. Strict regulation was observed when the reporter was inserted in antisense orientation with respect to the LTR, whereas a sense arrangement of the reporter resulted in a loss of regulation capacity. Expression and regulation of the antisense-orientated reporter gene were homogenous in infected cell pools and investigated cell clones. Long-term observations of infected cells over a period of 30 passages revealed stable expression and regulation. These autoregulated, bidirectional retroviral vectors combine the advantages of single-step transduction with strict regulation of the gene of interest in the infected target cells. PMID:11708885

  11. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  12. Effects of Ex Vivo Transduction of Mesencephalic Reaggregates with Bcl-2 on Grafted Dopamine Neuron Survival

    PubMed Central

    Sortwell, Caryl E.; Bowers, William J.; Counts, Scott E.; Pitzer, Mark R.; Fleming, Matthew F.; McGuire, Susan O.; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A.; Federoff, Howard J.; Collier, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Survival rates of dopamine (DA) neurons grafted to the denervated striatum are extremely poor (5-20%). Gene transfer of survival promoting factors, such as the anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2, to mesencephalic DA neurons prior to transplantation (ex vivo transduction) offers a novel approach to increase graft survival. However, specific criteria to assess the efficacy of various vectors must be adhered to in order to reasonably predict successful gene transfer with appropriate timing and levels of protein expression. Cell culture results utilizing three different herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors to deliver the reporter ß-galactosidase gene (lacZ) indicate that transduction of mesencephalic cells with a helper virus-free HSV amplicon (HF HSVTH9lac) that harbors the 9-kb tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter to drive lacZ gene expression elicits the transduction of the highest percentage (≈50%) of TH-immunoreactive (THir) neurons without significant cytotoxic effects. This transduction efficiency and limited cytotoxicity was superior to that observed following transduction with helper virus-containing HSV (HC HSVlac) and helper virus-free HSV amplicons (HF HSVlac) expressing lacZ under the transcriptional control of the HSV immediate-early 4/5 gene promoter. Subsequently, we assessed the ability of HSV-TH9lac and the bcl-2 expressing HSV-TH9bcl-2 amplicon to transduce mesencephalic reaggregates. Although an increase in bcl-2 and ß-galactosidase protein was induced by transduction, amplicon-mediated overexpression of bcl-2 did not lead to an increase in grafted THir neuron number. Even with highly efficient viral vector-mediated transduction, our results demonstrate that ex vivo gene transfer of bcl-2 to mesencephalic reaggregates is ineffective in increasing grafted DA neuron survival. PMID:17196186

  13. Pantropic retroviruses as a transduction tool for sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Core, Amanda B; Reyna, Arlene E; Conaway, Evan A; Bradham, Cynthia A

    2012-04-01

    Sea urchins are an important model for experiments at the intersection of development and systems biology, and technical innovations that enhance the utility of this model are of great value. This study explores pantropic retroviruses as a transduction tool for sea urchin embryos, and demonstrates that pantropic retroviruses infect sea urchin embryos with high efficiency and genomically integrate at a copy number of one per cell. We successfully used a self-inactivation strategy to both insert a sea urchin-specific enhancer and disrupt the endogenous viral enhancer. The resulting self-inactivating viruses drive global and persistent gene expression, consistent with genomic integration during the first cell cycle. Together, these data provide substantial proof of principle for transduction technology in sea urchin embryos. PMID:22431628

  14. Limits on information transduction through amplitude and frequency regulation of transcription factor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways often transmit multiple signals through a single shared transcription factor (TF) and encode signal information by differentially regulating TF dynamics. However, signal information will be lost unless it can be reliably decoded by downstream genes. To understand the limits on dynamic information transduction, we apply information theory to quantify how much gene expression information the yeast TF Msn2 can transduce to target genes in the amplitude or frequency of its activation dynamics. We find that although the amount of information transmitted by Msn2 to single target genes is limited, information transduction can be increased by modulating promoter cis-elements or by integrating information from multiple genes. By correcting for extrinsic noise, we estimate an upper bound on information transduction. Overall, we find that information transduction through amplitude and frequency regulation of Msn2 is limited to error-free transduction of signal identity, but not signal intensity information. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06559.001 PMID:25985085

  15. Optimization of the transductional efficiency of lentiviral vectors: effect of sera and polycations.

    PubMed

    Denning, Warren; Das, Suvendu; Guo, Siqi; Xu, Jun; Kappes, John C; Hel, Zdenek

    2013-03-01

    Lentiviral vectors are widely used as effective gene-delivery vehicles. Optimization of the conditions for efficient lentiviral transduction is of a high importance for a variety of research applications. Presence of positively charged polycations reduces the electrostatic repulsion forces between a negatively charged cell and an approaching enveloped lentiviral particle resulting in an increase in the transduction efficiency. Although a variety of polycations are commonly used to enhance the transduction with retroviruses, the relative effect of various types of polycations on the efficiency of transduction and on the potential bias in the determination of titer of lentiviral vectors is not fully understood. Here, we present data suggesting that DEAE-dextran provides superior results in enhancing lentiviral transduction of most tested cell lines and primary cell cultures. Specific type and source of serum affects the efficiency of transduction of target cell populations. Non-specific binding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-containing membrane aggregates in the presence of DEAE-dextran does not significantly affect the determination of the titer of EGFP-expressing lentiviral vectors. In conclusion, various polycations and types of sera should be tested when optimizing lentiviral transduction of target cell populations. PMID:22407723

  16. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  17. EDITORIAL: Special section on signal transduction Special section on signal transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    This special section of Physical Biology focuses on multiple aspects of signal transduction, broadly defined as the study of the mechanisms by which cells communicate with their environment. Mechanisms of cell communication involve detection of incoming signals, which can be chemical, mechanical or electromagnetic, relaying these signals to intracellular processes, such as cytoskeletal networks or gene expression systems, and, ultimately, converting these signals to responses such as cell differentiation or death. Given the multiscale nature of signal transduction systems, they must be studied at multiple levels, from the identities and structures of molecules comprising signal detection and interpretation networks, to the systems-level properties of these networks. The 11 papers in this special section illustrate some of the most exciting aspects of signal transduction research. The first two papers, by Marie-Anne Félix [1] and by Efrat Oron and Natalia Ivanova [2], focus on cell-cell interactions in developing tissues, using vulval patterning in worm and cell fate specification in mammalian embryos as prime examples of emergent cell behaviors. Next come two papers from the groups of Julio Saez-Rodriguez [3] and Kevin Janes [4]. These papers discuss how the causal relationships between multiple components of signaling systems can be inferred using multivariable statistical analysis of empirical data. An authoritative review by Zarnitsyna and Zhu [5] presents a detailed discussion of the sequence of signaling events involved in T-cell triggering. Once the structure and components of the signaling systems are determined, they can be modeled using approaches that have been successful in other physical sciences. As two examples of such approaches, reviews by Rubinstein [6] and Kholodenko [7], present reaction-diffusion models of cell polarization and thermodynamics-based models of gene regulation. An important class of models takes the form of enzymatic networks

  18. Transduction of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements between strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Scharn, Caitlyn R; Tenover, Fred C; Goering, Richard V

    2013-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a well-known public health concern. However, the means by which methicillin resistance genes are transferred among staphylococci in nature remains unknown. Older scientific literature suggests transduction as a means of mecA transfer, but the optimal conditions are reported to require plasmids and potentially a lysogenic phage. These reports preceded discovery of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. We undertook studies to confirm and clarify the conditions promoting transduction of SCCmec in S. aureus populations using well-characterized donor and recipient strains primarily of the USA300 lineage. Both bacteriophages 80α and 29 were capable of transducing SCCmec type IV and SCCmec type I to recipient strains of S. aureus. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and mec-associated dru typing were used to confirm the identity of the transductants. Transfer of mecA via transduction occurred at low frequency and required extended selection times for mecA gene expression and the presence of a penicillinase plasmid in the recipient. However, interference with the process by clavulanic acid and the necessity of lysogeny with 11 in the recipient or the presence of a small (4-kb) tetracycline resistance plasmid, as previously reported, were not confirmed. SCCmec transduction was occasionally associated with substantial deletions or truncation of SCCmec and the arginine catabolic metabolic element in USA300 recipients. Overall, these data clarify the conditions required for SCCmec transduction and document that rearrangements may occur during the process. PMID:23939891

  19. Developing a synthetic signal transduction system in plants.

    PubMed

    Morey, Kevin J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Albrecht, Kirk D; Bowen, Tessa A; Troupe, Jared F; Havens, Keira L; Medford, June I

    2011-01-01

    -localized chemotactic receptor Trg. PBPs like RBP have been computationally redesigned to bind small ligands, such as the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). A fusion between the chemotactic receptor Trg and the HK, PhoR, enables signal transduction via PhoB, which undergoes nuclear translocation in response to phosphorylation, resulting in transcriptional activation of an output gene under control of a synthetic plant promoter. Collectively, these components produce a novel ligand-responsive signal transduction system in plants and provide a means to engineer a eukaryotic synthetic signaling system. PMID:21601104

  20. Transduction patterns of pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang-Fong; Azzouz, Mimoun; Walmsley, Lucy E; Askham, Zoe; Wilkes, Fraser J; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-primate-based lentiviral vector based on the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) for efficient gene transfer to the central and peripheral nervous systems. Previously we have demonstrated that pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with the rabies virus glycoprotein confers retrograde axonal transport to these vectors. In the present study we have successfully produced high-titer EIAV vectors pseudotyped with envelope glycoproteins from Rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) serotypes (Indiana and Chandipura strains); rabies virus [various Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth ERA strains and challenge virus standard (CVS)]; Lyssavirus Mokola virus, a rabies-related virus; and Arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). These vectors were delivered to the striatum or spinal cord of adult rats or muscle of neonatal mice by direct injection. We report that the lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with envelopes from the VSV Indiana strain, wild-type ERA, and CVS strains resulted in strong transduction in the striatum, while Mokola- and LCMV-pseudotyped vectors exhibited moderate and weak transduction, respectively. Furthermore ERA- and CVS-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors demonstrated retrograde transport and expression in distal neurons after injection in brain, spinal cord, and muscle. The differences in transduction efficiencies and retrograde transport conferred by these envelope glycoproteins present novel opportunities in designing therapeutic strategies for different neurological diseases. PMID:14741783

  1. Notch2 transduction by feline leukemia virus in a naturally infected cat.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Kuse, Kyohei; Ochi, Haruyo; Anai, Yukari; Hisasue, Masaharu; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2014-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) induces neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases in cats. The transduction of cellular genes by FeLV is sometimes observed and associated with neoplastic diseases including lymphoma and sarcoma. Here, we report the first natural case of feline Notch2 transduction by FeLV in an infected cat with multicentric lymphoma and hypercalcemia. We cloned recombinant FeLVs harboring Notch2 in the env gene. Notch2 was able to activate expression of a reporter gene, similar to what was previously reported in cats with experimental FeLV-induced thymic lymphoma. Our findings suggest that the transduction of Notch2 strongly correlates with FeLV-induced lymphoma. PMID:24317268

  2. Signal transduction by the Wnt family of ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, T C

    1998-01-01

    The Wnt genes encode a large family of secreted polypeptides that mediate cell-cell communication in diverse developmental processes. The loss or inappropriate activation of Wnt expression has been shown to alter cell fate, morphogenesis and mitogenesis. Recent progress has identified Wnt receptors and components of an intracellular signalling pathway that mediate Wnt-dependent transcription. This review will highlight this 'core' Wnt signal-transduction pathway, but also aims to reveal the potential diversity of Wnt signalling targets. Particular attention will be paid to the overlap between developmental biology and oncogenesis, since recent progress shows Wnt signalling forms a paradigm for an interdisciplinary approach. PMID:9425102

  3. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  4. Gravitational sensory transduction chain in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.; Lebert, M.

    Earlier hypotheses have assumed that gravitactic orientation in flagellates, such as the photosynthetic unicell Euglena gracilis, is brought about by passive alignment of the cells in the water column by being tail heavy. A recent experiment on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 40) comparing immobilized cells with mobile cells demonstrated that the passive buoy effect can account for approximately 20% of the orientation of the cells in a gravity field. The cells show either positive or negative gravitaxis depending on other external or internal factors. Shortly after inoculation, the tendency of young cells to swim downward in the water column can be readily reverted by adding micromolar concentrations of some heavy metal ions including copper, cadmium or lead. The negative gravitaxis of older cells is converted into a positive one by stress factors such as increasing salinity or exposure to excessive visible or UV radiation. The mechanism for this switch seems to involve reactive oxygen species since the gravitactic sign change was suppressed when oxygen was removed by flushing the cell suspension with nitrogen. Also, the addition of radical scavengers (Trolox, ascorbic acid or potassium cyanide) abolished or reduced the gravitactic sign change. Addition of hydrogen peroxide induced a gravitactic sign change in the absence of external stress factors. The primary reception for the gravity vector seems to involve mechanosensitive ion channels which specifically gate calcium ions inward. We have identified several gene sequences for putative mechanosensory channels in Euglena and have applied RNAi to identify which of these channels are involved in graviperception. The influx of Ca 2+ activates calmodulin (CaM) which has been shown to be involved in the sensory transduction chain of graviorientation. It is known that an adenylyl cyclase is bound to the flagellar membrane in Euglena which is activated by CaM. This enzyme produces cAMP which has also been shown to be the key

  5. Interferons, Signal Transduction Pathways, and the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Nallar, Shreeram C.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines participates in the development of innate and acquired immune defenses against various pathogens and pathogenic stimuli. Discovered originally as a proteinaceous substance secreted from virus-infected cells that afforded immunity to neighboring cells from virus infection, these cytokines are now implicated in various human pathologies, including control of tumor development, cell differentiation, and autoimmunity. It is now believed that the IFN system (IFN genes and the genes induced by them, and the factors that regulate these processes) is a generalized alarm of cellular stress, including DNA damage. IFNs exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Our knowledge of the IFN-regulated processes in the CNS is far from being clear. In this article, we reviewed the current understanding of IFN signal transduction pathways and gene products that might have potential relevance to diseases of the CNS. PMID:25084173

  6. Meeting report: Signal transduction meets systems biology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the 21st century, systems-wide analyses of biological processes are getting more and more realistic. Especially for the in depth analysis of signal transduction pathways and networks, various approaches of systems biology are now successfully used. The EU FP7 large integrated project SYBILLA (Systems Biology of T-cell Activation in Health and Disease) coordinates such an endeavor. By using a combination of experimental data sets and computational modelling, the consortium strives for gaining a detailed and mechanistic understanding of signal transduction processes that govern T-cell activation. In order to foster the interaction between systems biologists and experimentally working groups, SYBILLA co-organized the 15th meeting “Signal Transduction: Receptors, Mediators and Genes” together with the Signal Transduction Society (STS). Thus, the annual STS conference, held from November 7 to 9, 2011 in Weimar, Germany, provided an interdisciplinary forum for research on signal transduction with a major focus on systems biology addressing signalling events in T-cells. Here we report on a selection of ongoing projects of SYBILLA and how they were discussed at this interdisciplinary conference. PMID:22546078

  7. Probing visual transduction in a plant cell

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Rainer; Hegemann, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Light scattering studies of vertebrate rod cells have greatly aided our understanding of the visual transduction process. This technique has now been successfully applied to study visual transduction in a unicellular alga. Flash-induced light scattering changes have been recorded which are repeatable, graded with photon exposure, and adaptive. They appear on a timescale of 15-1,000 ms and correlate kinetically with flash-induced movement responses. The responsible photoreceptor is a rhodopsin. Evidence is provided for the ability of the organism to count single photons. PMID:19431775

  8. Pathway to the piezoelectronic transduction logic device.

    PubMed

    Solomon, P M; Bryce, B A; Kuroda, M A; Keech, R; Shetty, S; Shaw, T M; Copel, M; Hung, L-W; Schrott, A G; Armstrong, C; Gordon, M S; Reuter, K B; Theis, T N; Haensch, W; Rossnagel, S M; Miyazoe, H; Elmegreen, B G; Liu, X-H; Trolier-McKinstry, S; Martyna, G J; Newns, D M

    2015-04-01

    The piezoelectronic transistor (PET) has been proposed as a transduction device not subject to the voltage limits of field-effect transistors. The PET transduces voltage to stress, activating a facile insulator-metal transition, thereby achieving multigigahertz switching speeds, as predicted by modeling, at lower power than the comparable generation field effect transistor (FET). Here, the fabrication and measurement of the first physical PET devices are reported, showing both on/off switching and cycling. The results demonstrate the realization of a stress-based transduction principle, representing the early steps on a developmental pathway to PET technology with potential to contribute to the IT industry. PMID:25793915

  9. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  10. Fluorescence polarization assays in signal transduction discovery.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, J Richard; Daijo, Janet; Gaudet, Elizabeth A

    2003-05-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) has become widely employed for high throughput screening used in pharmaceutical drug discovery. Assays of important signal transduction targets are now adapted to FP. In this review we examine assays for cyclic adenosine monophosphate, phosphodiesterases, and protein kinases and phosphatases using FP competitive immunoassays and a direct enzymatic method called IMAP. PMID:12678698

  11. The Physiology of Mechanoelectrical Transduction Channels in Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Fettiplace, Robert; Kim, Kyunghee X.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about the mechanotransducer (MT) channels mediating transduction in hair cells of the vertrbrate inner ear. With the use of isolated preparations, it is experimentally feasible to deliver precise mechanical stimuli to individual cells and record the ensuing transducer currents. This approach has shown that small (1–100 nm) deflections of the hair-cell stereociliary bundle are transmitted via interciliary tip links to open MT channels at the tops of the stereocilia. These channels are cation-permeable with a high selectivity for Ca2+; two channels are thought to be localized at the lower end of the tip link, each with a large single-channel conductance that increases from the low- to high-frequency end of the cochlea. Ca2+ influx through open channels regulates their resting open probability, which may contribute to setting the hair cell resting potential in vivo. Ca2+ also controls transducer fast adaptation and force generation by the hair bundle, the two coupled processes increasing in speed from cochlear apex to base. The molecular intricacy of the stereocilary bundle and the transduction apparatus is reflected by the large number of single-gene mutations that are linked to sensorineural deafness, especially those in Usher syndrome. Studies of such mutants have led to the discovery of many of the molecules of the transduction complex, including the tip link and its attachments to the stereociliary core. However, the MT channel protein is still not firmly identified, nor is it known whether the channel is activated by force delivered through accessory proteins or by deformation of the lipid bilayer. PMID:24987009

  12. An Efficient Large-Scale Retroviral Transduction Method Involving Preloading the Vector into a RetroNectin-Coated Bag with Low-Temperature Shaking

    PubMed Central

    Dodo, Katsuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Saito, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Tahara, Kenichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, transduction efficiency can be hampered by inhibitory molecules derived from the culture fluid of virus producer cell lines. To remove these inhibitory molecules to enable better gene transduction, we had previously developed a transduction method using a fibronectin fragment-coated vessel (i.e., the RetroNectin-bound virus transduction method). In the present study, we developed a method that combined RetroNectin-bound virus transduction with low-temperature shaking and applied this method in manufacturing autologous retroviral-engineered T cells for adoptive transfer gene therapy in a large-scale closed system. Retroviral vector was preloaded into a RetroNectin-coated bag and incubated at 4°C for 16 h on a reciprocating shaker at 50 rounds per minute. After the supernatant was removed, activated T cells were added to the bag. The bag transduction method has the advantage of increasing transduction efficiency, as simply flipping over the bag during gene transduction facilitates more efficient utilization of the retroviral vector adsorbed on the top and bottom surfaces of the bag. Finally, we performed validation runs of endoribonuclease MazF-modified CD4+ T cell manufacturing for HIV-1 gene therapy and T cell receptor-modified T cell manufacturing for MAGE-A4 antigen-expressing cancer gene therapy and achieved over 200-fold (≥1010) and 100-fold (≥5×109) expansion, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the large-scale closed transduction system is highly efficient for retroviral vector-based T cell manufacturing for adoptive transfer gene therapy, and this technology is expected to be amenable to automation and improve current clinical gene therapy protocols. PMID:24454964

  13. Transduction, Tropism, and Biodistribution of AAV Vectors in the Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Riveros, Paola Perez; Quinn, Kathrina; Handelman, Beverly; Chiorini, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The lacrimal gland (LG) delivers defensive and metabolic factors to the ocular surface. These functions may be disrupted in several diseases, and for most of them there is no cure. The aim of this study is to investigate conditions and limitations for using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors as gene transfer agents to LG. Methods. Eight-week-old Balb/c mice were used to investigate route, gene expression, and time course of AAV gene vector transfer to LG. AAV vectors encoding firefly luciferase were administered to the LG and luciferase expression was evaluated in vivo by immunohistochemistry. Ocular surface and neutralizing antibodies were also evaluated. Results. The present work revealed that AAV vectors are able to delivery DNA to the LGs of mice. Direct injection had the highest level of transduction, and topical ocular drops the lowest. Overall, the AAV strain with highest transduction activity as measured by both luminescence and immunohistochemistry was AAV9, followed by AAV 5w8 and AAV5. Transduction was not different between sexes, could be detected as soon as 24 hours after injection, and lasted for at least 30 days (study termination). No tissue damage was observed when compared with controls. All vectors with detectable LG transduction induced neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions. LG gene delivery by AAV vectors appears to be both safe and well tolerated. The choice of vector influences both the overall transduction activity, as well as the spread of vector to other organs. This work supports the use of AAV-mediated gene therapy for dry eye. PMID:22110082

  14. Efficient transduction of pigtailed macaque hematopoietic repopulating cells with HIV-based lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Trobridge, Grant D.; Beard, Brian C.; Gooch, Christina; Wohlfahrt, Martin; Olsen, Philip; Fletcher, James; Malik, Punam

    2008-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are attractive for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy because they do not require mitosis for nuclear entry, they efficiently transduce hematopoietic repopulating cells, and self-inactivating (SIN) designs can be produced at high titer. Experiments to evaluate HIV-derived lentiviral vectors in nonhuman primates prior to clinical trials have been hampered by low transduction frequencies due in part to host restriction by TRIM5α. We have established conditions for efficient transduction of pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) long-term repopulating cells using VSV-G–pseudotyped HIV-based lentiviral vectors. Stable, long-term, high-level gene marking was observed in 3 macaques using relatively low MOIs (5-10) in a 48-hour ex vivo transduction protocol. All animals studied had rapid neutrophil engraftment with a median of 10.3 days to a count greater than 0.5 × 109/L (500/μL). Expression was detected in all lineages, with long-term marking levels in granulocytes at approximately 20% to 30%, and in lymphocytes at approximately 12% to 23%. All animals had polyclonal engraftment as determined by analysis of vector integration sites. These data suggest that lentiviral vectors should be highly effective for HSC gene therapy, particularly for diseases in which maintaining the engraftment potential of stem cells using short-term ex vivo transduction protocols is critical. PMID:18388180

  15. Abscisic acid perception and signaling transduction in strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunli; Jia, Haifeng; Chai, Yemao; Shen, Yuanyue

    2011-01-01

    On basis of fruit differential respiration and ethylene effects, climacteric and non-climacteric fruits have been classically defined. Over the past decades, the molecular mechanisms of climacteric fruit ripening were abundantly described and found to focus on ethylene perception and signaling transduction. In contrast, until our most recent breakthroughs, much progress has been made toward understanding the signaling perception and transduction mechanisms for abscisic acid (ABA) in strawberry, a model for non-climacteric fruit ripening. Our reports not only have provided several lines of strong evidences for ABA-regulated ripening of strawberry fruit, but also have demonstrated that homology proteins of Arabidopsis ABA receptors, including PYR/PYL/RCAR and ABAR/CHLH, act as positive regulators of ripening in response to ABA. These receptors also trigger a set of ABA downstream signaling components, and determine significant changes in the expression levels of both sugar and pigment metabolism-related genes that are closely associated with ripening. Soluble sugars, especially sucrose, may act as a signal molecular to trigger ABA accumulation through an enzymatic action of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (FaNCED1). This mini-review offers an overview of these processes and also outlines the possible, molecular mechanisms for ABA in the regulation of strawberry fruit ripening through the ABA receptors. PMID:22095148

  16. Extensive transduction of nonrepetitive DNA mediated by L1 retrotransposition in cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tubio, Jose M. C.; Martincorena, Inigo; Cooke, Susanna L.; Tojo, Marta; Gundem, Gunes; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P.; Zamora, Jorge; Raine, Keiran; Menzies, Andrew; Roman-Garcia, Pablo; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Shlien, Adam; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Knappskog, Stian; Van Loo, Peter; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Davies, Helen R.; Marshall, John; Wedge, David C.; Teague, Jon W.; Butler, Adam P.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Alexandrov, Ludmil; Behjati, Sam; Yates, Lucy R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Martin, Sancha; McLaren, Stuart; O'Meara, Sarah; Anderson, Elizabeth; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Foster, Christopher; Warren, Anne Y.; Whitaker, Hayley; Brewer, Daniel; Eeles, Rosalind; Cooper, Colin; Neal, David; Lynch, Andy G.; Visakorpi, Tapio; Isaacs, William B.; Veer, Laura van't; Caldas, Carlos; Desmedt, Christine; Sotiriou, Christos; Aparicio, Sam; Foekens, John A.; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Thomas, Gilles; Myklebost, Ola; Span, Paul N.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L.; Van de Vijver, Marc; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Van den Eynden, Gert G.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Janes, Sam M.; Bova, G. Steven; Stratton, Michael R.; McDermott, Ultan; Campbell, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear element–1 (L1) retrotransposons are mobile repetitive elements that are abundant in the human genome. L1 elements propagate through RNA intermediates. In the germ line, neighboring, nonrepetitive sequences are occasionally mobilized by the L1 machinery, a process called 3′ transduction. Because 3′ transductions are potentially mutagenic, we explored the extent to which they occur somatically during tumorigenesis. Studying cancer genomes from 244 patients, we found that tumors from 53% of the patients had somatic retrotranspositions, of which 24% were 3′ transductions. Fingerprinting of donor L1s revealed that a handful of source L1 elements in a tumor can spawn from tens to hundreds of 3′ transductions, which can themselves seed further retrotranspositions. The activity of individual L1 elements fluctuated during tumor evolution and correlated with L1 promoter hypomethylation. The 3′ transductions disseminated genes, exons, and regulatory elements to new locations, most often to heterochromatic regions of the genome. PMID:25082706

  17. Cationic Liposomes Enhance the Rate of Transduction by a Recombinant Retroviral Vector In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Colin D.; Lukacs, Katalin V.; Box, Gary; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Collins, Mary K. L.

    1998-01-01

    Cationic liposomes enhanced the rate of transduction of target cells with retroviral vectors. The greatest effect was seen with the formulation DC-Chol/DOPE, which gave a 20-fold increase in initial transduction rate. This allowed an efficiency of transduction after brief exposure of target cells to virus plus liposome that could be achieved only after extensive exposure to virus alone. Enhancement with DC-Chol/DOPE was optimal when stable virion-liposome complexes were preformed. The transduction rate for complexed virus, as for virus used alone or with the polycation Polybrene, showed first-order dependence on virus concentration. Cationic liposomes, but not Polybrene, were able to mediate envelope-independent transduction, but optimal efficiency required envelope-receptor interaction. When virus complexed with DC-Chol/DOPE was used to transduce human mesothelioma xenografts, transduction was enhanced four- to fivefold compared to that for virus alone. Since the efficacy of gene therapy is dependent on the number of cells modified, which is in turn dependent upon the balance between transduction and biological clearance of the vector, the ability of cationic liposomes to form stable complexes with retroviral vectors and enhance their rate of infection is likely to be important for in vivo application. PMID:9573249

  18. Targeting Signaling Transduction Pathways in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbosh, Phillip H; McConkey, David J; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2015-12-01

    Systemic therapy for urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder has largely revolved around cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. However, several recent clinical trials have explored the roles of targeted therapies which specifically inhibit signal transduction pathways. Simultaneously, a rationale for such therapies has come to the forefront of management of this disease because an overabundance of signaling pathways are genetically deranged as a result of point mutation or copy number alteration (CNA) as identified by several recent next generation sequencing (NGS) studies. Importantly, these derangements are found in all stages of disease, and therefore targeted therapies hold promise as a next step in the evolution of the medical management of both localized and metastatic UCC. We review the rationale for and progress in studying inhibition of signal transduction as a means of treatment of UCC. PMID:26472299

  19. Advances in Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    McCubrey, James A.; Steelman, Linda S.; Chappell, William H.; Sun, Lin; Davis, Nicole M.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Libra, Massimo; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Malaponte, Grazia; Mazzarino, Maria C.; Fagone, Paolo; Donia, Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Polesel, Jerry; Talamini, Renato; Bäsecke, Jörg; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Milella, Michele; Tafuri, Agostino; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Laidler, Piotr; D'Assoro, Antonio B.; Drobot, Lyudmyla; Umezawa, Kazuo; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Demidenko, Zoya N.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, significant advances have occurred in both our understanding of the complexity of signal transduction pathways as well as the isolation of specific inhibitors which target key components in those pathways. Furthermore critical information is being accrued regarding how genetic mutations can affect the sensitivity of various types of patients to targeted therapy. Finally, genetic mechanisms responsible for the development of resistance after targeted therapy are being discovered which may allow the creation of alternative therapies to overcome resistance. This review will discuss some of the highlights over the past few years on the roles of key signaling pathways in various diseases, the targeting of signal transduction pathways and the genetic mechanisms governing sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapies. PMID:23455493

  20. Signal transduction in T lymphocytes in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1997-01-01

    More than 120 experiments conducted in space in the last 15 years have shown that dramatic changes are occurring in several types of single cells during their exposure to microgravity. One focus of today's research on cells in space is on signal transduction, especially those steps involving the cytoskeleton and cell-cell interactions. Signal transduction is often altered in microgravity as well as in hypergravity. This leads to changes in cell proliferation, genetic expression and differentiation. Interesting examples are leukocytes, HeLa cells, epidermoid cells and osteoblastic cells. Signalling pathways were studied in T lymphocytes in microgravity by several investigators after the discovery that mitogenic activation in vitro is virtually nil at 0g. T cells are a good model to study signal transduction because three extracellular signals (mitogen, IL-1 and IL-2) are required for full activation, and two classical pathways (via proteins G and PKC) are activated within the cell. In addition, low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins (Ras and Rap) are interacting with the cytoskeleton. The data at 0g support the notion that the expression of IL-2 receptor is inhibited at 0g, while mitogen binding and the transmission of IL-1 by accessory cells occur normally. In addition, alterations of the cytoskeleton suggest that the interaction with Rap proteins is disturbed. Data obtained with phorbol esters indicate that the function of PKC is changed in microgravity. Similar conclusions are drawn from the results with epidermoid cells A431.

  1. Protein transduction method for cerebrovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoyuki; Ono, Shigeki; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Arimitsu, Seiji; Onoda, Keisuke; Tokunaga, Koji; Sugiu, Kenji; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Matsui, Hideki; Date, Isao

    2009-02-01

    Many studies have shown that a motif of 11 consecutive arginines (11R) is one of the most effective protein transduction domains (PTD) for introducing proteins into the cell membrane. By conjugating this "11R", all sorts of proteins can effectively and harmlessly be transferred into any kind of cell. We therefore examined the transduction efficiency of 11R in cerebral arteries and obtained results showing that 11R fused enhanced green fluorescent protein (11R-EGFP) immediately and effectively penetrated all layers of the rat basilar artery (BA), especially the tunica media. This method provides a revolutionary approach to cerebral arteries and ours is the first study to demonstrate the successful transductionof a PTD fused protein into the cerebral arteries. In this review, we present an outline of our studies and other key studies related to cerebral vasospasm and 11R, problems to be overcome, and predictions regarding future use of the 11R protein transduction method for cerebral vasospasm (CV). PMID:19247417

  2. Genetic analysis of gravity signal transduction in roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Baldwin, Katherine

    To grow downward into the soil, roots use gravity as a guide. Specialized cells, named stato-cytes, enable this directional growth response by perceiving gravity. Located in the columella region of the cap, these cells sense a reorientation of the root within the gravity field through the sedimentation of, and/or tension/pressure exerted by, dense amyloplasts. This process trig-gers a gravity signal transduction pathway that leads to a fast alkalinization of the cytoplasm and a change in the distribution of the plasma membrane-associated auxin-efflux carrier PIN3. The latter protein is uniformly distributed within the plasma membrane on all sides of the cell in vertically oriented roots. However, it quickly accumulates at the bottom side upon gravis-timulation. This process correlates with a preferential transport of auxin to the bottom side of the root cap, resulting in a lateral gradient across the tip. This gradient is then transported to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cellular elongation, resulting in downward curvature. We isolated mutations that affect gravity signal transduction at a step that pre-cedes cytoplasmic alkalinization and/or PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport across the cap. arg1 and arl2 mutations identify a common genetic pathway that is needed for all three gravity-induced processes in the cap statocytes, indicating these genes function early in the pathway. On the other hand, adk1 affects gravity-induced PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport, but it does not interfere with cytoplasmic alkalinization. ARG1 and ARL2 encode J-domain proteins that are associated with membranes of the vesicular trafficking path-way whereas ADK1 encodes adenosine kinase, an enzyme that converts adenosine derived from nucleic acid metabolism and the AdoMet cycle into AMP, thereby alleviating feedback inhibi-tion of this important methyl-donor cycle. Because mutations in ARG1 (and ARL2) do not completely eliminate

  3. Determinants of specificity in two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Maintaining the faithful flow of information through signal transduction pathways is critical to the survival and proliferation of organisms. This problem is particularly challenging as many signaling proteins are part of large, paralogous families that are highly similar at the sequence and structural levels, increasing the risk of unwanted cross-talk. To detect environmental signals and process information, bacteria rely heavily on two-component signaling systems comprised of sensor histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators. Although most species encode dozens of these signaling pathways, there is relatively little cross-talk, indicating that individual pathways are well insulated and highly specific. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that enforce this specificity. Further, we highlight recent studies that have revealed how these mechanisms evolve to accommodate the introduction of new pathways by gene duplication. PMID:23352354

  4. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  5. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  6. PRDM Proteins: Molecular Mechanisms in Signal Transduction and Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Di Zazzo, Erika; De Rosa, Caterina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing) protein family members are characterized by the presence of a PR domain and a variable number of Zn-finger repeats. Experimental evidence has shown that the PRDM proteins play an important role in gene expression regulation, modifying the chromatin structure either directly, through the intrinsic methyltransferase activity, or indirectly through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. PRDM proteins have a dual action: they mediate the effect induced by different cell signals like steroid hormones and control the expression of growth factors. PRDM proteins therefore have a pivotal role in the transduction of signals that control cell proliferation and differentiation and consequently neoplastic transformation. In this review, we describe pathways in which PRDM proteins are involved and the molecular mechanism of their transcriptional regulation. PMID:24832654

  7. PRDM Proteins: Molecular Mechanisms in Signal Transduction and Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Di Zazzo, Erika; De Rosa, Caterina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing) protein family members are characterized by the presence of a PR domain and a variable number of Zn-finger repeats. Experimental evidence has shown that the PRDM proteins play an important role in gene expression regulation, modifying the chromatin structure either directly, through the intrinsic methyltransferase activity, or indirectly through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. PRDM proteins have a dual action: they mediate the effect induced by different cell signals like steroid hormones and control the expression of growth factors. PRDM proteins therefore have a pivotal role in the transduction of signals that control cell proliferation and differentiation and consequently neoplastic transformation. In this review, we describe pathways in which PRDM proteins are involved and the molecular mechanism of their transcriptional regulation. PMID:24832654

  8. The MiST2 database: a comprehensive genomics resource on microbial signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2010-01-01

    The MiST2 database (http://mistdb.com) identifies and catalogs the repertoire of signal transduction proteins in microbial genomes. Signal transduction systems regulate the majority of cellular activities including the metabolism, development, host-recognition, biofilm production, virulence, and antibiotic resistance of human pathogens. Thus, knowledge of the proteins and interactions that comprise these communication networks is an essential component to furthering biomedical discovery. These are identified by searching protein sequences for specific domain profiles that implicate a protein in signal transduction. Compared to the previous version of the database, MiST2 contains a host of new features and improvements including the following: draft genomes; extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor protein identification; enhanced classification of signaling proteins; novel, high-quality domain models for identifying histidine kinases and response regulators; neighboring two-component genes; gene cart; better search capabilities; enhanced taxonomy browser; advanced genome browser; and a modern, biologist-friendly web interface. MiST2 currently contains 966 complete and 157 draft bacterial and archaeal genomes, which collectively contain more than 245 000 signal transduction proteins. The majority (66%) of these are one-component systems, followed by two-component proteins (26%), chemotaxis (6%), and finally ECF factors (2%). PMID:19900966

  9. Signal transduction mechanisms in plants: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Thompson, G. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an overview on recent advances in some of the basic signalling mechanisms that participate in a wide variety of stimulus-response pathways. The mechanisms include calcium-based signalling, G-protein-mediated-signalling and signalling involving inositol phospholipids, with discussion on the role of protein kinases and phosphatases interspersed. As a further defining feature, the article highlights recent exciting findings on three extracellular components that have not been given coverage in previous reviews of signal transduction in plants, extracellular calmodulin, extracellular ATP, and integrin-like receptors, all of which affect plant growth and development.

  10. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7-742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals.

  11. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7-742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals. PMID:26899944

  12. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7–742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals. PMID:26899944

  13. Whole body skeletal muscle transduction in neonatal dogs with AAV-9.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy of muscular dystrophy requires systemic gene delivery to all muscles in the body. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been shown to lead to body-wide muscle transduction after a single intravascular injection. Proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Before initiating clinical trials, it is important to validate these promising results in large animal models. More than a dozen canine muscular dystrophy models have been developed. Here, we outline a protocol for performing systemic AAV gene transfer in neonatal dogs. Implementing this technique in dystrophic dogs will accelerate translational muscular dystrophy research. PMID:21194038

  14. Defining Specificity Determinants of cGMP Mediated Gustatory Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heidi K.; Luo, Linjiao; O’Halloran, Damien; Guo, Dagang; Huang, Xin-Yun; Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.; Hobert, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a key secondary messenger used in signal transduction in various types of sensory neurons. The importance of cGMP in the ASE gustatory receptor neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was deduced by the observation that multiple receptor-type guanylyl cyclases (rGCs), encoded by the gcy genes, and two presently known cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel subunits, encoded by the tax-2 and tax-4 genes, are essential for ASE-mediated gustatory behavior. We describe here specific mechanistic features of cGMP-mediated signal transduction in the ASE neurons. First, we assess the specificity of the sensory functions of individual rGC proteins. We have previously shown that multiple rGC proteins are expressed in a left/right asymmetric manner in the functionally lateralized ASE neurons and are required to sense distinct salt cues. Through domain swap experiments among three different rGC proteins, we show here that the specificity of individual rGC proteins lies in their extracellular domains and not in their intracellular, signal-transducing domains. Furthermore, we find that rGC proteins are also sufficient to confer salt sensory responses to other neurons. Both findings support the hypothesis that rGC proteins are salt receptor proteins. Second, we identify a novel, likely downstream effector of the rGC proteins in gustatory signal transduction, a previously uncharacterized cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channel, encoded by the che-6 locus. che-6 mutants show defects in gustatory sensory transduction that are similar to defects observed in animals lacking the tax-2 and tax-4 CNG channels. In contrast, thermosensory signal transduction, which also requires tax-2 and tax-4, does not require che-6, but requires another CNG, cng-3. We propose that CHE-6 may form together with two other CNG subunits, TAX-2 and TAX-4, a gustatory neuron-specific heteromeric CNG channel complex. PMID:23695300

  15. Studying Cellular Signal Transduction with OMIC Technologies.

    PubMed

    Landry, Benjamin D; Clarke, David C; Lee, Michael J

    2015-10-23

    In the gulf between genotype and phenotype exists proteins and, in particular, protein signal transduction systems. These systems use a relatively limited parts list to respond to a much longer list of extracellular, environmental, and/or mechanical cues with rapidity and specificity. Most signaling networks function in a highly non-linear and often contextual manner. Furthermore, these processes occur dynamically across space and time. Because of these complexities, systems and "OMIC" approaches are essential for the study of signal transduction. One challenge in using OMIC-scale approaches to study signaling is that the "signal" can take different forms in different situations. Signals are encoded in diverse ways such as protein-protein interactions, enzyme activities, localizations, or post-translational modifications to proteins. Furthermore, in some cases, signals may be encoded only in the dynamics, duration, or rates of change of these features. Accordingly, systems-level analyses of signaling may need to integrate multiple experimental and/or computational approaches. As the field has progressed, the non-triviality of integrating experimental and computational analyses has become apparent. Successful use of OMIC methods to study signaling will require the "right" experiments and the "right" modeling approaches, and it is critical to consider both in the design phase of the project. In this review, we discuss common OMIC and modeling approaches for studying signaling, emphasizing the philosophical and practical considerations for effectively merging these two types of approaches to maximize the probability of obtaining reliable and novel insights into signaling biology. PMID:26244521

  16. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  17. Automated modelling of signal transduction networks

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Background Intracellular signal transduction is achieved by networks of proteins and small molecules that transmit information from the cell surface to the nucleus, where they ultimately effect transcriptional changes. Understanding the mechanisms cells use to accomplish this important process requires a detailed molecular description of the networks involved. Results We have developed a computational approach for generating static models of signal transduction networks which utilizes protein-interaction maps generated from large-scale two-hybrid screens and expression profiles from DNA microarrays. Networks are determined entirely by integrating protein-protein interaction data with microarray expression data, without prior knowledge of any pathway intermediates. In effect, this is equivalent to extracting subnetworks of the protein interaction dataset whose members have the most correlated expression profiles. Conclusion We show that our technique accurately reconstructs MAP Kinase signaling networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This approach should enhance our ability to model signaling networks and to discover new components of known networks. More generally, it provides a method for synthesizing molecular data, either individual transcript abundance measurements or pairwise protein interactions, into higher level structures, such as pathways and networks. PMID:12413400

  18. Global Transcription Profiling Reveals Multiple Sugar Signal Transduction Mechanisms in ArabidopsisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Price, John; Laxmi, Ashverya; St. Martin, Steven K.; Jang, Jyan-Chyun

    2004-01-01

    Complex and interconnected signaling networks allow organisms to control cell division, growth, differentiation, or programmed cell death in response to metabolic and environmental cues. In plants, it is known that sugar and nitrogen are critical nutrient signals; however, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying nutrient signal transduction is very limited. To begin unraveling complex sugar signaling networks in plants, DNA microarray analysis was used to determine the effects of glucose and inorganic nitrogen source on gene expression on a global scale in Arabidopsis thaliana. In whole seedling tissue, glucose is a more potent signal in regulating transcription than inorganic nitrogen. In fact, other than genes associated with nitrate assimilation, glucose had a greater effect in regulating nitrogen metabolic genes than nitrogen itself. Glucose also regulated a broader range of genes, including genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism, signal transduction, and metabolite transport. In addition, a large number of stress responsive genes were also induced by glucose, indicating a role of sugar in environmental responses. Cluster analysis revealed significant interaction between glucose and nitrogen in regulating gene expression because glucose can modulate the effects of nitrogen and vise versa. Intriguingly, cycloheximide treatment appeared to disrupt glucose induction more than glucose repression, suggesting that de novo protein synthesis is an intermediary event required before most glucose induction can occur. Cross talk between sugar and ethylene signaling may take place on the transcriptional level because several ethylene biosynthetic and signal transduction genes are repressed by glucose, and the repression is largely unaffected by cycloheximide. Collectively, our global expression data strongly support the idea that glucose and inorganic nitrogen act as both metabolites and signaling molecules. PMID:15273295

  19. Role of Glycolytic Intermediates in Global Regulation and Signal Transduction. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, J.C.

    2000-05-08

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of glycolytic intermediates in regulation of cell physiology. It is known that many glycolytic intermediates are involved in regulation of enzyme activities at the kinetic level. However, little is known regarding the role of these metabolites in global regulation and signal transduction. This project aims to investigate the role of glycolytic intermediates in the regulation of gene expression.

  20. Signal Transduction to the Permeability Transition Pore

    PubMed Central

    Rasola, Andrea; Sciacovelli, Marco; Pantic, Boris; Bernardi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The permeability transition pore (PTP) is an inner mitochondrial membrane channel that has been thoroughly characterized functionally, yet remains an elusive molecular entity. The best characterized PTP-regulatory component, cyclophilin (CyP) D, is a matrix protein that favors pore opening. CyP inhibitors, CyPD null animals, and in situ PTP readouts have established the role of PTP as an effector mechanism of cell death, and the growing definition of PTP signaling mechanisms. This review briefly covers the functional features of the PTP and the role played by its dysregulation in disease pathogenesis. Recent progress on PTP modulation by kinase/phosphatase signal transduction is discussed, with specific emphasis on hexokinase and on the Akt-ERK-GSK3 axis, which might modulate the PTP through CyPD phosphorylation. PMID:20153328

  1. Postentry Processing of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Type 1 and Transduction of the Ferret Lung Are Altered by a Factor in Airway Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ziying; Sun, Xingshen; Evans, Idil A.; Tyler, Scott R.; Song, Yi; Liu, Xiaoming; Sui, Hongshu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We recently created a cystic fibrosis ferret model that acquires neonatal lung infection. To develop lung gene therapies for this model, we evaluated recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene transfer to the neonatal ferret lung. Unlike in vitro ferret airway epithelial (FAE) cells, in vivo infection of the ferret lung with rAAV1 required proteasome inhibitors to achieve efficient airway transduction. We hypothesized that differences in transduction between these two systems were because of an in vivo secreted factor that alter the transduction biology of rAAV1. Indeed, treatment of rAAV1 with ferret airway secretory fluid (ASF) strongly inhibited rAAV1, but not rAAV2, transduction of primary FAE and HeLa cells. Properties of the ASF inhibitory factor included a strong affinity for the AAV1 capsid, heat-stability, negative charge, and sensitivity to endoproteinase Glu-C. ASF-treated rAAV1 dramatically inhibited apical transduction of FAE ALI cultures (512-fold), while only reducing viral entry by 55-fold, suggesting that postentry processing of virus was influenced by the inhibitor factor. Proteasome inhibitors rescued transduction in the presence of ASF (∼1600-fold) without effecting virus internalization, while proteasome inhibitors only enhanced transduction 45-fold in the absence of ASF. These findings demonstrate that a factor in lung secretions can influence intracellular processing of rAAV1 in a proteasome-dependent fashion. PMID:23948055

  2. Bleached pigment activates transduction in salamander cones

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have used suction electrode recording together with rapid steps into 0.5 mM IBMX solution to investigate changes in guanylyl cyclase velocity produced by pigment bleaching in isolated cones of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. Both backgrounds and bleaches accelerate the time course of current increase during steps into IBMX. We interpret this as evidence that the velocity of the guanylyl cyclase is increased in background light or after bleaching. Our results indicate that cyclase velocity increases nearly linearly with increasing percent pigment bleached but nonlinearly (and may saturate) with increasing back-ground intensity. In cones (as previously demonstrated for rods), light-activated pigment and bleached pigment appear to have somewhat different effects on the transduction cascade. The effect of bleaching on cyclase rate is maintained for at least 15-20 min after the light is removed, much longer than is required after a bleach for circulating current and sensitivity to stabilize in an isolated cone. The effect on the cyclase rate can be completely reversed by treatment with liposomes containing 11-cis retinal. The effects of bleaching can also be partially reversed by beta-ionone, an analogue of the chromophore 11- cis-retinal which does not form a covalent attachment to opsin. Perfusion of a bleached cone with beta-ionone produces a rapid increase in circulating current and sensitivity, which rapidly reverses when the beta-ionone is removed. Perfusion with beta-ionone also causes a partial reversal of the bleach-induced acceleration of cyclase velocity. We conclude that bleaching produces an "equivalent background" excitation of the transduction cascade in cones, perhaps by a mechanism similar to that in rods. PMID:8786347

  3. Striatal Signal Transduction and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Philibin, Scott D.; Hernandez, Adan; Self, David W.; Bibb, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug addiction. PMID

  4. Calcium and signal transduction in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Reddy, A. S.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental and hormonal signals control diverse physiological processes in plants. The mechanisms by which plant cells perceive and transduce these signals are poorly understood. Understanding biochemical and molecular events involved in signal transduction pathways has become one of the most active areas of plant research. Research during the last 15 years has established that Ca2+ acts as a messenger in transducing external signals. The evidence in support of Ca2+ as a messenger is unequivocal and fulfills all the requirements of a messenger. The role of Ca2+ becomes even more important because it is the only messenger known so far in plants. Since our last review on the Ca2+ messenger system in 1987, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating various aspects of Ca(2+) -signaling pathways in plants. These include demonstration of signal-induced changes in cytosolic Ca2+, calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins, identification of different Ca2+ channels, characterization of Ca(2+) -dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) both at the biochemical and molecular levels, evidence for the presence of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, and increased evidence in support of the role of inositol phospholipids in the Ca(2+) -signaling system. Despite the progress in Ca2+ research in plants, it is still in its infancy and much more needs to be done to understand the precise mechanisms by which Ca2+ regulates a wide variety of physiological processes. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of these recent developments in Ca2+ research as it relates to signal transduction in plants.

  5. Expansion of Signal Transduction Pathways in Fungi by Extensive Genome Duplication.

    PubMed

    Corrochano, Luis M; Kuo, Alan; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Polaino, Silvia; Salamov, Asaf; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M; Grimwood, Jane; Álvarez, M Isabel; Avalos, Javier; Bauer, Diane; Benito, Ernesto P; Benoit, Isabelle; Burger, Gertraud; Camino, Lola P; Cánovas, David; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Domínguez, Angel; Eliáš, Marek; Eslava, Arturo P; Glaser, Fabian; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Heitman, Joseph; Henrissat, Bernard; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Lang, B Franz; Lavín, José L; Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Wenjun; Lindquist, Erika; López-García, Sergio; Luque, Eva M; Marcos, Ana T; Martin, Joel; McCluskey, Kevin; Medina, Humberto R; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Muñoz-Torres, Elisa; Oguiza, José A; Ohm, Robin A; Olmedo, María; Orejas, Margarita; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa; Sanz, Catalina; Schackwitz, Wendy; Shahriari, Mahdi; Shelest, Ekaterina; Silva-Franco, Fátima; Soanes, Darren; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tagua, Víctor G; Talbot, Nicholas J; Thon, Michael R; Tice, Hope; de Vries, Ronald P; Wiebenga, Ad; Yadav, Jagjit S; Braun, Edward L; Baker, Scott E; Garre, Victoriano; Schmutz, Jeremy; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Idnurm, Alexander; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Gabaldón, Toni; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2016-06-20

    Plants and fungi use light and other signals to regulate development, growth, and metabolism. The fruiting bodies of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus are single cells that react to environmental cues, including light, but the mechanisms are largely unknown [1]. The related fungus Mucor circinelloides is an opportunistic human pathogen that changes its mode of growth upon receipt of signals from the environment to facilitate pathogenesis [2]. Understanding how these organisms respond to environmental cues should provide insights into the mechanisms of sensory perception and signal transduction by a single eukaryotic cell, and their role in pathogenesis. We sequenced the genomes of P. blakesleeanus and M. circinelloides and show that they have been shaped by an extensive genome duplication or, most likely, a whole-genome duplication (WGD), which is rarely observed in fungi [3-6]. We show that the genome duplication has expanded gene families, including those involved in signal transduction, and that duplicated genes have specialized, as evidenced by differences in their regulation by light. The transcriptional response to light varies with the developmental stage and is still observed in a photoreceptor mutant of P. blakesleeanus. A phototropic mutant of P. blakesleeanus with a heterozygous mutation in the photoreceptor gene madA demonstrates that photosensor dosage is important for the magnitude of signal transduction. We conclude that the genome duplication provided the means to improve signal transduction for enhanced perception of environmental signals. Our results will help to understand the role of genome dynamics in the evolution of sensory perception in eukaryotes. PMID:27238284

  6. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  7. Separate TRP channels mediate amplification and transduction in drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Brendan P.; Baker, Allison E.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2015-12-01

    Auditory receptor cells rely on mechanically-gated channels to transform sound stimuli into neural activity. Several TRP channels have been implicated in Drosophila auditory transduction, but mechanistic studies have been hampered by the inability to record subthreshold signals from receptor neurons. We developed a non-invasive method for measuring these signals by recording from a central neuron that is electrically coupled to a genetically-defined population of auditory receptors. We find that the TRPN family member NompC, which is necessary for the active amplification of motion by the auditory organ, is not required for transduction. Instead, NompC sensitizes the transduction complex to movement and precisely regulates the static forces on the complex. In contrast, the TRPV channels Nanchung and Inactive are required for responses to sound, suggesting they are components of the transduction complex. Thus, transduction and active amplification are genetically separable processes in Drosophila hearing.

  8. Surface modification via strain-promoted click reaction facilitates targeted lentiviral transduction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yanjie; Oum, Yoon Hyeun; Carrico, Isaac S

    2016-01-01

    As a result of their ability to integrate into the genome of both dividing and non-dividing cells, lentiviruses have emerged as a promising vector for gene delivery. Targeted gene transduction of specific cells and tissues by lentiviral vectors has been a major goal, which has proven difficult to achieve. We report a novel targeting protocol that relies on the chemoselective attachment of cancer specific ligands to unnatural glycans on lentiviral surfaces. This strategy exhibits minimal perturbation on virus physiology and demonstrates remarkable flexibility. It allows for targeting but can be more broadly useful with applications such as vector purification and immunomodulation. PMID:26499046

  9. Resting lymphocyte transduction with measles virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors relies on CD46 and SLAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qi; Schneider, Irene C.; Gallet, Manuela; Kneissl, Sabrina; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-05-10

    The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) were recently shown to mediate transduction of resting lymphocytes by lentiviral vectors. MV vaccine strains use CD46 or signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as receptor for cell entry. A panel of H protein mutants derived from vaccine strain or wild-type MVs that lost or gained CD46 or SLAM receptor usage were investigated for their ability to mediate gene transfer into unstimulated T lymphocytes. The results demonstrate that CD46 is sufficient for efficient vector particle association with unstimulated lymphocytes. For stable gene transfer into these cells, however, both MV receptors were found to be essential.

  10. Inner Limiting Membrane Barriers to AAV-mediated Retinal Transduction From the Vitreous

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Caporale, Natalia; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral gene therapy has shown great promise in treating retinal disorders, with three promising clinical trials in progress. Numerous adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes can infect various cells of the retina when administered subretinally, but the retinal detachment accompanying this injection induces changes that negatively impact the microenvironment and survival of retinal neurons. Intravitreal administration could circumvent this problem, but only AAV2 can infect retinal cells from the vitreous, and transduction is limited to the inner retina. We therefore sought to investigate and reduce barriers to transduction from the vitreous. We fluorescently labeled several AAV serotype capsids and followed their retinal distribution after intravitreal injection. AAV2, 8, and 9 accumulate at the vitreoretinal junction. AAV1 and 5 show no accumulation, indicating a lack of appropriate receptors at the inner limiting membrane (ILM). Importantly, mild digestion of the ILM with a nonspecific protease enabled substantially enhanced transduction of multiple retinal cell types from the vitreous, with AAV5 mediating particularly remarkable expression in all retinal layers. This protease treatment has no effect on retinal function as shown by electroretinogram (ERG) and visual cortex cell population responses. These findings may help avoid limitations, risks, and damage associated with subretinal injections currently necessary for clinical gene therapy. PMID:19672248

  11. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  12. FIST: a sensory domain for diverse signal transduction pathways in prokaryotes and ubiquitin signaling in eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Borziak, Kirill; Jouline, Igor B

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Sensory domains that are conserved among Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya are important detectors of common signals detected by living cells. Due to their high sequence divergence, sensory domains are difficult to identify. We systematically look for novel sensory domains using sensitive profile-based searches initi-ated with regions of signal transduction proteins where no known domains can be identified by current domain models. Results: Using profile searches followed by multiple sequence alignment, structure prediction, and domain architecture analysis, we have identified a novel sensory domain termed FIST, which is present in signal transduction proteins from Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya. Remote similarity to a known ligand-binding fold and chromosomal proximity of FIST-encoding genes to those coding for proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and transport suggest that FIST domains bind small ligands, such as amino acids.

  13. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: A stochastic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation.

  14. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: a stochastic study.

    PubMed

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation. PMID:24730880

  15. Self-Complementary Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors Improve Transduction Efficiency of Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gruenert, Anja K.; Czugala, Marta; Mueller, Chris; Schmeer, Marco; Schleef, Martin; Kruse, Friedrich E.; Fuchsluger, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of a donor cornea to restore vision is the most frequently performed transplantation in the world. Corneal endothelial cells (CEC) are crucial for the outcome of a graft as they maintain corneal transparency and avoid graft failure due to corneal opaqueness. Given the characteristic of being a monolayer and in direct contact with culture medium during cultivation in eye banks, CEC are specifically suitable for gene therapeutic approaches prior to transplantation. Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2) vectors represent a promising tool for gene therapy of CEC. However, high vector titers are needed to achieve sufficient gene expression. One of the rate-limiting steps for transgene expression is the conversion of single-stranded (ss-) DNA vector genome into double-stranded (ds-) DNA. This step can be bypassed by using self-complementary (sc-) AAV2 vectors. Aim of this study was to compare for the first time transduction efficiencies of ss- and scAAV2 vectors in CEC. For this purpose AAV2 vectors containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) as transgene were used. Both in CEC and in donor corneas, transduction with scAAV2 resulted in significantly higher transgene expression compared to ssAAV2. The difference in transduction efficiency decreased with increasing vector titer. In most cases, only half the vector titer of scAAV2 was required for equal or higher gene expression rates than those of ssAAV2. In human donor corneas, GFP expression was 64.7±11.3% (scAAV) and 38.0±8.6% (ssAAV) (p<0.001), respectively. Furthermore, transduced cells maintained their viability and showed regular morphology. Working together with regulatory authorities, a translation of AAV2 vector-mediated gene therapy to achieve a temporary protection of corneal allografts during cultivation and transplantation could therefore become more realistic. PMID:27023329

  16. P2CS: a two-component system resource for prokaryotic signal transduction research

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Jourlin-Castelli, Cécile; Ansaldi, Mireille; Méjean, Vincent; Whitworth, David E

    2009-01-01

    Background With the escalation of high throughput prokaryotic genome sequencing, there is an ever-increasing need for databases that characterise, catalogue and present data relating to particular gene sets and genomes/metagenomes. Two-component system (TCS) signal transduction pathways are the dominant mechanisms by which micro-organisms sense and respond to external as well as internal environmental changes. These systems respond to a wide range of stimuli by triggering diverse physiological adjustments, including alterations in gene expression, enzymatic reactions, or protein-protein interactions. Description We present P2CS (Prokaryotic 2-Component Systems), an integrated and comprehensive database of TCS signal transduction proteins, which contains a compilation of the TCS genes within 755 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and 39 metagenomes. P2CS provides detailed annotation of each TCS gene including family classification, sequence features, functional domains, as well as genomic context visualization. To bypass the generic problem of gene underestimation during genome annotation, we also constituted and searched an ORFeome, which improves the recovery of TCS proteins compared to searches on the equivalent proteomes. Conclusion P2CS has been developed for computational analysis of the modular TCSs of prokaryotic genomes and metagenomes. It provides a complete overview of information on TCSs, including predicted candidate proteins and probable proteins, which need further curation/validation. The database can be browsed and queried with a user-friendly web interface at . PMID:19604365

  17. SAM68: Signal Transduction and RNA Metabolism in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frisone, Paola; Pradella, Davide; Di Matteo, Anna; Belloni, Elisa; Ghigna, Claudia; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in expression and/or activity of splicing factors as well as mutations in cis-acting splicing regulatory sequences contribute to cancer phenotypes. Genome-wide studies have revealed more than 15,000 tumor-associated splice variants derived from genes involved in almost every aspect of cancer cell biology, including proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle control, metabolism, apoptosis, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. In the past decades, several RNA binding proteins (RBPs) have been implicated in tumorigenesis. SAM68 (SRC associated in mitosis of 68 kDa) belongs to the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA metabolism) family of RBPs. SAM68 is involved in several steps of mRNA metabolism, from transcription to alternative splicing and then to nuclear export. Moreover, SAM68 participates in signaling pathways associated with cell response to stimuli, cell cycle transitions, and viral infections. Recent evidence has linked this RBP to the onset and progression of different tumors, highlighting misregulation of SAM68-regulated splicing events as a key step in neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Here we review recent studies on the role of SAM68 in splicing regulation and we discuss its contribution to aberrant pre-mRNA processing in cancer. PMID:26273626

  18. A microfluidic platform for regulating signal transduction in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Yu, Fuqu; Sun, Ren; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2004-11-01

    Recent progress in micro cell culture systems has lead to new approaches in cell biology studies. Using micro devices for cell culturing possesses distinctive advantages over traditional methods. Length scale matching facilitates manipulation and detection at the single cell level. Previously, we have demonstrated generation of various stimulations such as spatial chemical gradient, electric field, and shear stress to study the dynamic responses of individual cells. Dynamic stimulations and continuous monitoring in a microfluidic system can be useful in studying different aspects of cellular process. In this work, we present a microfluidic platform for regulating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) signal transduction in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Time-varying bio-chemical stimulants, such as interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor, are introduced into the microchannel to activate the NF-kB signaling pathway. The dynamic responses of individual cells are monitored with the expression of reporter gene, green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the NF-kB activity is successfully demonstrated. This work is supported by CMISE through NASA URETI program.

  19. Signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes are differentially regulated by dexamethasone.

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, H S; Reitamo, S; Ceska, M; Hurme, M

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that IL-8 gene expression is enhanced by various stimuli, which induce different signal transduction pathways. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pathway has been reported to be inhibited by glucocorticoids in monocytes. We have now examined the effect of dexamethasone on the LPS-induced and other signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes. Dexamethasone inhibited the production of IL-8 stimulated with a cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog or LPS. In contrast, dexamethasone had no significant effect on a phorbol ester (PMA)-stimulated IL-8 production. These results suggest that the signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes are differentially regulated by dexamethasone. PMID:1325308

  20. TRPA1 contributes to cold, mechanical, and chemical nociception but is not essential for hair-cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Kelvin Y; Allchorne, Andrew J; Vollrath, Melissa A; Christensen, Adam P; Zhang, Duan-Sun; Woolf, Clifford J; Corey, David P

    2006-04-20

    TRPA1, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels, is expressed by dorsal root ganglion neurons and by cells of the inner ear, where it has proposed roles in sensing sound, painful cold, and irritating chemicals. To test the in vivo roles of TRPA1, we generated a mouse in which the essential exons required for proper function of the Trpa1 gene were deleted. Knockout mice display behavioral deficits in response to mustard oil, to cold ( approximately 0 degrees C), and to punctate mechanical stimuli. These mice have a normal startle reflex to loud noise, a normal sense of balance, a normal auditory brainstem response, and normal transduction currents in vestibular hair cells. TRPA1 is apparently not essential for hair-cell transduction but contributes to the transduction of mechanical, cold, and chemical stimuli in nociceptor sensory neurons. PMID:16630838

  1. Comparison of Transduction Efficiency of Recombinant AAV Serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 8 in the Rat Nigrostriatal System

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Nikolaus R.; Lee, Jeng-Shin; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced delivery and expression of genes in specific neuronal systems is critical for the development of genetic models of neurodegenerative disease and potential gene therapy. Recent discovery of new recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) capsid serotypes has resulted in improved transduction efficiency, but expression levels, spread of transgene, and potential toxicity can differ depending on brain region and among species. We compared the transduction efficiency of titer-matched rAAV 2/1, 2/5 and 2/8 to the commonly used rAAV2/2 in the rat nigrostriatal system via expression of the reporter transgene, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Newer rAAV serotypes 2/1, 2/5 and 2/8 demonstrated marked increase in transduction and spread of EGFP expression in dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons and projections to the striatum and globus pallidus compared to rAAV2/2 at 2 weeks post injection. The number of nigral cells transduced was greatest for rAAV2/1, but for serotypes 2/5 and 2/8 was still 2 to 3-fold higher than that for 2/2. Enhanced transduction did not cause an increase in glial cell response or toxicity. New rAAV serotypes thus promise improved gene delivery to nigrostriatal system with the potential for better models and therapeutics for Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19250335

  2. AAV9 supports wide-scale transduction of the CNS and TDP-43 disease modeling in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Klein, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    AAV9 has emerged as an efficient adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype for gene transfer to the central nervous system. We have used this technique to study aspects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by administering AAV encoding the ALS-related gene transactive response DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) to neonatal rats. However, inducing the expression in adult subjects would be preferable to mimic the adult onset of symptoms in ALS. We expressed either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or TDP-43 in adult rats after an intravenous (i.v.) route of administration to attempt wide-scale transduction of the spinal cord for disease modeling. In order to optimize the gene transfer, we made comparisons of efficiency by age, gender, and across several AAV serotypes (AAV1, AAV8, AAV9, and AAV10). The data indicate more efficient neuronal transduction in neonates, with little evidence of glial transduction at either age, no gender-related differences in transduction, and that AAV9 was efficient in adults relative to the other serotypes tested. Based on these data, AAV9 TDP-43 was expressed at three vector doses in adult female rats yielding highly consistent, dose-dependent motor deficits. AAV9 can be delivered i.v. to adult rats to achieve consistent pathophysiological changes and a relevant adult-onset system for disease modeling. PMID:26445725

  3. Investigation of the Mechanoelectrical Transduction at Single Stereocilia by Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M. G.; Fink, S.; Löffler, K.; Koitschev, A.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2003-02-01

    The transduction of sound into an electrical signal in the inner ear is closely related to the mechanical properties of the hair bundles cytoskeleton and cross-linkage. In this study the effect of lateral cross-links on hair bundle mechanics and the transduction current response is demonstrated on the level of individual stereocilia. For experiments stereocilia of outer hair cells of postnatal rats (P3 - P8) were scanned with a sharp AFM tip at nanometerscale. Transduction currents were simultaneously recorded in the whole-cell-recording mode with patch clamp. AFM was used as a nanotool for local mechanical stimulation and force measurement at stereocilia whereas patch clamp serves as a detector for the electrical response of the cell. In a first experiment force transmission between adjacent stereocilia of the V- and W- shaped hair bundles of outer hair cells was investigated. Results showed that a force exerted to a single stereocilium declined to 36 % at the nearest adjacent stereocilium of the same row. This result supposes AFM to be convenient for local displacement of single stereocilia. For control, the local response of transduction channels was measured at single stereocilia of the same hair bundle. Measured transduction current amplitudes ranged from 9 to 49 pA supposing an opening of one to five transduction channels. Both, weak force transmission by lateral cross-links and small transduction current amplitudes indicate a weak mechanical interaction between individual stereocilia of the tallest row of stereocilia of outer hair cells from postnatal rats.

  4. Impact of Age at Administration, Lysosomal Storage, and Transgene Regulatory Elements on AAV2/8-Mediated Rat Liver Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Cotugno, Gabriella; Annunziata, Patrizia; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Karali, Marianthi; Banfi, Sandro; Auricchio, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Liver-directed gene transfer is being investigated for the treatment of systemic or liver-specific diseases. Recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) efficiently transduce liver cells allowing long term transgene expression after a single administration in animal models and in patients. We evaluated the impact on AAV2/8-mediated rat liver transduction of the following variables: i) age at vector administration, ii) presence of lysosomal storage in liver cells, and iii) regulatory elements included in the transgene expression cassette. We found that systemic administration of AAV2/8 to newborn rats results in vector genome dilution and reduced transduction efficacy when compared to adult injected animals, presumably due to hepatocyte proliferation. Accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in lysosomes does not impact on levels and distribution of AAV2/8-mediated liver transduction. Transgene expression occurs in hepatocytes but not in Kupffer or liver endothelial cells when the liver-specific thyroxine-binding-globulin promoter is used. However, extra-hepatic transduction is observed in the spleen and kidney of animals injected at birth. The use of target sequences for the hematopoietic-specific microRNA miR142-3p does not improve liver transduction efficacy neither reduce immune responses to the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase B. The inclusion of a variant of the Woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE-m) decreases AAV2/8-mediated liver transduction levels. As AAV2/8-mediated liver gene transfer is entering in the clinical arena, these data will provide relevant information to the design of efficient AAV2/8-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:22428010

  5. Confocal Scanner for Highly Sensitive Photonic Transduction of Nanomechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Zhu; Losby, Joseph E.; Sauer, Vincent T. K.; Westwood, Jocelyn N.; Freeman, Mark R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.

    2013-06-01

    We show that a simple confocal laser scanning system can be used to couple light through grating couplers into nanophotonic circuits. The coupling efficiency is better than 15% per coupler. Our technique avoids using multi-axis fibre stages and is especially advantageous when the nanophotonic circuit is kept in vacuum, e.g., for nanomechanical resonator displacement transduction. This was demonstrated by recording the resonant response of a nanomechanical doubly clamped beam embedded in a race-track optical cavity. The nanophotonic transduction offers an increase of two orders of magnitude in transduction responsivity compared with conventional free-space optical interferometry.

  6. Polymeric Microspheres as Protein Transduction Reagents*

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, David; Behrendt, Jonathan M.; Chimonides, Gwen F.; Torr, Elizabeth E.; Devitt, Andrew; Sutherland, Andrew J.; Hine, Anna V.

    2014-01-01

    Discovering the function of an unknown protein, particularly one with neither structural nor functional correlates, is a daunting task. Interaction analyses determine binding partners, whereas DNA transfection, either transient or stable, leads to intracellular expression, though not necessarily at physiologically relevant levels. In theory, direct intracellular protein delivery (protein transduction) provides a conceptually simpler alternative, but in practice the approach is problematic. Domains such as HIV TAT protein are valuable, but their effectiveness is protein specific. Similarly, the delivery of intact proteins via endocytic pathways (e.g. using liposomes) is problematic for functional analysis because of the potential for protein degradation in the endosomes/lysosomes. Consequently, recent reports that microspheres can deliver bio-cargoes into cells via a non-endocytic, energy-independent pathway offer an exciting and promising alternative for in vitro delivery of functional protein. In order for such promise to be fully exploited, microspheres are required that (i) are stably linked to proteins, (ii) can deliver those proteins with good efficiency, (iii) release functional protein once inside the cells, and (iv) permit concomitant tracking. Herein, we report the application of microspheres to successfully address all of these criteria simultaneously, for the first time. After cellular uptake, protein release was autocatalyzed by the reducing cytoplasmic environment. Outside of cells, the covalent microsphere–protein linkage was stable for ≥90 h at 37 °C. Using conservative methods of estimation, 74.3% ± 5.6% of cells were shown to take up these microspheres after 24 h of incubation, with the whole process of delivery and intracellular protein release occurring within 36 h. Intended for in vitro functional protein research, this approach will enable study of the consequences of protein delivery at physiologically relevant levels, without recourse

  7. The sensory transduction pathways in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is a useful model for investigating in molecular detail the behavioral response of cells to changes in their environment. Peritrichously flagellated bacteria such as coli and typhimurium swim by rotating helical flagella in a counterclockwise direction. If flagellar rotation is briefly reversed, the bacteria tumble and change the direction of swimming. The bacteria continuously sample the environment and use a temporal sensing mechanism to compare the present and immediate past environments. Bacteria respond to a broad range of stimuli including changes in temperature, oxygen concentration, pH and osmotic strength. Bacteria are attracted to potential sources of nutrition such as sugars and amino acids and are repelled by other chemicals. In the methylation-dependent pathways for sensory transduction and adaptation in E. coli and S. typhimurium, chemoeffectors bind to transducing proteins that span the plasma membrane. The transducing proteins are postulated to control the rate of autophosphorylation of the CheA protein, which in turn phosphorylates the CheY protein. The phospho-CheY protein binds to the switch on the flagellar motor and is the signal for clockwise rotation of the motor. Adaptation to an attractant is achieved by increasing methylation of the transducing protein until the attractant stimulus is cancelled. Responses to oxygen and certain sugars involve methylation-independent pathways in which adaption occurs without methylation of a transducing protein. Taxis toward oxygen is mediated by the electron transport system and changes in the proton motive force. Recent studies have shown that the methylation-independent pathway converges with the methylation-dependent pathway at or before the CheA protein.

  8. Polymeric microspheres as protein transduction reagents.

    PubMed

    Nagel, David; Behrendt, Jonathan M; Chimonides, Gwen F; Torr, Elizabeth E; Devitt, Andrew; Sutherland, Andrew J; Hine, Anna V

    2014-06-01

    Discovering the function of an unknown protein, particularly one with neither structural nor functional correlates, is a daunting task. Interaction analyses determine binding partners, whereas DNA transfection, either transient or stable, leads to intracellular expression, though not necessarily at physiologically relevant levels. In theory, direct intracellular protein delivery (protein transduction) provides a conceptually simpler alternative, but in practice the approach is problematic. Domains such as HIV TAT protein are valuable, but their effectiveness is protein specific. Similarly, the delivery of intact proteins via endocytic pathways (e.g. using liposomes) is problematic for functional analysis because of the potential for protein degradation in the endosomes/lysosomes. Consequently, recent reports that microspheres can deliver bio-cargoes into cells via a non-endocytic, energy-independent pathway offer an exciting and promising alternative for in vitro delivery of functional protein. In order for such promise to be fully exploited, microspheres are required that (i) are stably linked to proteins, (ii) can deliver those proteins with good efficiency, (iii) release functional protein once inside the cells, and (iv) permit concomitant tracking. Herein, we report the application of microspheres to successfully address all of these criteria simultaneously, for the first time. After cellular uptake, protein release was autocatalyzed by the reducing cytoplasmic environment. Outside of cells, the covalent microsphere-protein linkage was stable for ≥90 h at 37 °C. Using conservative methods of estimation, 74.3% ± 5.6% of cells were shown to take up these microspheres after 24 h of incubation, with the whole process of delivery and intracellular protein release occurring within 36 h. Intended for in vitro functional protein research, this approach will enable study of the consequences of protein delivery at physiologically relevant levels, without recourse to

  9. The transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Gregory A; Johnson, Richard D; Davenport, Paul W

    2002-01-01

    Background Intercostal muscles are richly innervated by mechanoreceptors. In vivo studies of cat intercostal muscle have shown that there are 3 populations of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors: primary muscle spindles (1°), secondary muscle spindles (2°) and Golgi tendon organs (GTO). The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors in response to controlled length and velocity displacements of the intercostal space. Mechanoreceptors, recorded from dorsal root fibers, were localized within an isolated intercostal muscle space (ICS). Changes in ICS displacement and the velocity of ICS displacement were independently controlled with an electromagnetic motor. ICS velocity (0.5 – 100 μm/msec to a displacement of 2,000 μm) and displacement (50–2,000 μm at a constant velocity of 10 μm/msec) parameters encompassed the full range of rib motion. Results Both 1° and 2° muscle spindles were found evenly distributed within the ICS. GTOs were localized along the rib borders. The 1° spindles had the greatest discharge frequency in response to displacement amplitude followed by the 2° afferents and GTOs. The 1° muscle spindles also possessed the greatest discharge frequency in response to graded velocity changes, 3.0 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. GTOs had a velocity response of 2.4 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1 followed by 2° muscle spindles at 0.6 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. Conclusion The results of this study provide a systematic description of the mechanosenitivity of the 3 types of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors. These mechanoreceptors have discharge properties that transduce the magnitude and velocity of intercostal muscle length. PMID:12392601

  10. Differential effects of ethanol on glial signal transduction initiated by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Kug; Lee, Heasuk; Jeong, Jaeyoon; Lim, Beongou; Suk, Kyoungho

    2005-10-15

    Although the pathogenic effects of alcohol abuse on brain are well established, its specific effects on the intracellular signal transduction pathways of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) are poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated how ethanol affects the glial signal transduction associated with inflammatory activation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), gangliosides, and interferon (IFN)-gamma induced the inflammatory activation of glia, which was differentially influenced by ethanol: 1) ethanol inhibited LPS- or gangliosides-induced, but not IFNgamma-induced, glial activation as demonstrated by the production of nitric oxide and the expression of inflammatory genes such as interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IP-10, and CD86; 2) nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB or JAK/STAT1 pathway was necessary for LPS- or IFNgamma-induced glial activation, respectively; 3) ethanol inhibited LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation; and 4) ethanol did not significantly affect IFNgamma-induced STAT1/IRF-1 activation. Based on these results, ethanol seems to inhibit selectively some parts of the glial signal transduction pathways that are associated with inflammatory activation, which may lead to the deregulation of CNS inflammatory responses. PMID:16175582

  11. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Lentivirus-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Giulia; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Chan, Mario; Meng, Cuixiang; Farley, Raymond; Brody, Steven L; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Alton, Eric W F W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in pulmonary gene therapy for cystic fibrosis is to provide long-term correction of the genetic defect. This may be achievable by targeting airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells with an integrating vector. Here, we evaluated the ability of a lentiviral vector, derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus and pseudotyped with F and HN envelope proteins from Sendai virus, to transduce progenitor basal cells of the mouse nasal airways. We first transduced basal cell-enriched cultures ex vivo and confirmed efficient transduction of cytokeratin-5 positive cells. We next asked whether progenitor cells could be transduced in vivo. We evaluated the transduction efficiency in mice pretreated by intranasal administration of polidocanol to expose the progenitor cell layer. Compared to control mice, polidocanol treated mice demonstrated a significant increase in the number of transduced basal cells at 3 and 14 days post vector administration. At 14 days, the epithelium of treated mice contained clusters (4 to 8 adjacent cells) of well differentiated ciliated, as well as basal cells suggesting a clonal expansion. These results indicate that our lentiviral vector can transduce progenitor basal cells in vivo, although transduction required denudation of the surface epithelium prior to vector administration. PMID:26471068

  12. Mechanoelectric transduction in ionic polymer-metal composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Rashi; Kim, Kwang J.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) to generate current on mechanical deformation, defined as mechanoelectric transduction, can be exploited for design and development of numerous sensors and energy harvesters. However, sensor application of IPMC is currently limited due to the lack of understanding of the transduction mechanism. This paper presents a physics-based mechanoelectric model that takes into account material properties, electrostatic phenomenon, and ion transport in the IPMC. Experimental verification of the model predictions is also reported.

  13. Optimized Lentiviral Transduction Protocols by Use of a Poloxamer Enhancer, Spinoculation, and scFv-Antibody Fusions to VSV-G.

    PubMed

    Anastasov, Nataša; Höfig, Ines; Mall, Sabine; Krackhardt, Angela M; Thirion, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) are widely used to successfully transduce cells for research and clinical applications. This optimized LV infection protocol includes a nontoxic poloxamer-based adjuvant combined with antibody-retargeted lentiviral particles. The novel poloxamer P338 demonstrates superior characteristics for enhancing lentiviral transduction over the best-in-class polybrene-assisted transduction. Poloxamer P338 exhibited dual benefits of low toxicity and high efficiency of lentiviral gene delivery into a range of different primary cell cultures. One of the major advantages of P338 is its availability in pharma grade and applicability as cell culture medium additive in clinical protocols. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) can be produced to high titers and mediate high transduction efficiencies in vitro. For clinical applications the need for optimized transduction protocols, especially for transduction of primary T and stem cells, is high. The successful use of retronectin, the second lentivirus enhancer available as GMP material, requires the application of specific coating protocols not applicable in all processes, and results in the need of a relatively high multiplicity of infection (MOI) to achieve effective transduction efficiencies for hematopoietic cells (e.g., CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells). Cell specificity of lentiviral vectors was successfully increased by displaying different ratios of scFv-fused VSV-G glycoproteins on the viral envelope. The system has been validated with human CD30+ lymphoma cells, resulting in preferential gene delivery to CD30+ cells, which was increased fourfold in mixed cell cultures, by presenting scFv antibody fragments binding to respective surface markers. A combination of spinoculation and poloxamer-based chemical adjuvant increases the transduction of primary T-cells by greater than twofold. The combination of poloxamer-based and scFv-retargeted LVs increased

  14. Transduction of envelope stress in Escherichia coli by the Cpx two-component system.

    PubMed Central

    Raivio, T L; Silhavy, T J

    1997-01-01

    Disruption of normal protein trafficking in the Escherichia coli cell envelope (inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane) can activate two parallel, but distinct, signal transduction pathways. This activation stimulates the expression of a number of genes whose products function to fold or degrade the mislocalized proteins. One of these signal transduction pathways is a two-component regulatory system comprised of the histidine kinase CpxA and the response regulator, CpxR. In this study we characterized gain-of-function Cpx* mutants in order to learn more about Cpx signal transduction. Sequencing demonstrated that the cpx* mutations cluster in either the periplasmic, the transmembrane, or the H-box domain of CpxA. Intriguingly, most of the periplasmic cpx* gain-of-function mutations cluster in the central region of this domain, and one encodes a deletion of 32 amino acids. Strains harboring these mutations are rendered insensitive to a normally activating signal. In vivo and in vitro characterization of maltose-binding-protein fusions between the wild-type CpxA and a representative cpx* mutant, CpxA101, showed that the mutant CpxA is altered in phosphotransfer reactions with CpxR. Specifically, while both CpxA and CpxA101 function as autokinases and CpxR kinases, CpxA101 is devoid of a CpxR-P phosphatase activity normally present in the wild-type protein. Taken together, the data support a model for Cpx-mediated signal transduction in which the kinase/phosphatase ratio is elevated by stress. Further, the sequence and phenotypes of periplasmic cpx* mutations suggest that interactions with a periplasmic signaling molecule may normally dictate a decreased kinase/phosphatase ratio under nonstress conditions. PMID:9401031

  15. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  16. Transmembrane signal transduction in bacterial chemotaxis involves ligand-dependent activation of phosphate group transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Borkovich, K A; Kaplan, N; Hess, J F; Simon, M I

    1989-01-01

    Signal transduction in Escherichia coli involves the interaction of transmembrane receptor proteins such as the aspartate receptor, Tar, and the products of four chemotaxis genes, cheA, cheY, cheW, and cheZ. It was previously shown that the cheA gene product is an autophosphorylating protein kinase that transfers phosphate to CheY, whereas the cheZ gene product acts as a specific CheY phosphatase. Here we report that the system can be reconstituted in vitro and receptor function can be coupled to CheY phosphorylation. Coupling requires the presence of the CheW protein, the appropriate form of the receptor, and the CheA and CheY proteins. Under these conditions the accumulation of CheY-phosphate is enhanced approximately 300-fold. This rate enhancement is seen in reactions using wild-type and "tumble" mutant receptors but not "smooth" mutant receptors. The increased accumulation of phosphoprotein was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of aspartate, using wild-type, but not tumble, receptors. These results provide evidence that the signal transduction pathway in bacterial chemotaxis involves receptor-mediated alteration of the levels of phosphorylated proteins. They suggest that CheW acts as the coupling factor between receptor and phosphorylation. The results also support the suggestion that CheY-phosphate is the tumble signal. Images PMID:2645576

  17. Long-Term Robust Myocardial Transduction of the Dog Heart from a Peripheral Vein by Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype-8

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiufang; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Lostal, William; Shin, Jin-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Molecular intervention using noninvasive myocardial gene transfer holds great promise for treating heart diseases. Robust cardiac transduction from peripheral vein injection has been achieved in rodents using adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype-9 (AAV-9). However, a similar approach has failed to transduce the heart in dogs, a commonly used large animal model for heart diseases. To develop an effective noninvasive method to deliver exogenous genes to the dog heart, we employed an AAV-8 vector that expresses human placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under the transcriptional regulation of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Vectors were delivered to three neonatal dogs at the doses of 1.35×1014, 7.14×1014, and 9.06×1014 viral genome particles/kg body weight via the jugular vein. Transduction efficiency and overall safety were evaluated at 1.5, 2.5, and 12 months postinjection. AAV delivery was well tolerated and dog growth was normal. Blood chemistry and internal organ histology were unremarkable. Widespread skeletal muscle transduction was observed in all dogs without T-cell infiltration. Encouragingly, whole heart myocardial transduction was achieved in two dogs that received higher doses and cardiac expression lasted for at least 1 year. In summary, peripheral vein AAV-8 injection may represent a simple heart gene transfer method in large mammals. Further optimization of this gene delivery strategy may open the door for a readily applicable gene therapy method to treat many heart diseases. PMID:23551085

  18. AAV-mediated transduction and targeting of retinal bipolar cells with improved mGluR6 promoters in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q; Ganjawala, T H; Ivanova, E; Cheng, J G; Troilo, D; Pan, Z-H

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been a powerful gene delivery vehicle to the retina for basic research and gene therapy. For many of these applications, achieving cell type-specific targeting and high transduction efficiency is desired. Recently, there has been increasing interest in AAV-mediated gene targeting to specific retinal bipolar cell types. A 200-bp enhancer in combination with a basal SV40 promoter has been commonly used to target transgenes into ON-type bipolar cells. In the current study, we searched for additional cis-regulatory elements in the mGluR6 gene for improving AAV-mediated transduction efficiency into retinal bipolar cells. Our results showed that the combination of the endogenous mGluR6 promoter with additional enhancers in the introns of the mGluR6 gene markedly enhanced AAV transduction efficiency as well as made the targeting more selective for rod bipolar cells in mice. Furthermore, the AAV vectors with the improved promoter could target to ON bipolar cells with robust transduction efficiency in the parafovea and the far peripheral retina of marmoset monkeys. The improved mGluR6 promoter constructs could provide a valuable tool for genetic manipulation in rod bipolar cells in mice and facilitate clinical applications for ON bipolar cell-based gene therapies. PMID:27115727

  19. Energy transduction in surface photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuchyi

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation is a detailed investigation of the fabrication, design, characterization, and understanding of physical principles of energy transduction in surface photonic crystals which are engineered for various applications. One-dimensional photonic crystals are engineered as optically tunable reflectance filters for lambda = 632.8 nm wavelength light by incorporating azobenzene liquid crystal dye molecules into the photonic crystal structure. Optical energy is transduced to accomplish mechanical work by exciting the dye molecules into different physical configurations, leading to changes in the optical properties of the dye molecules, namely their refractive index. This mechanism is used to tune the reflection resonance of the photonic crystal filter. The spectral and temporal optical tuning response of the photonic crystal filter due to excitation light at lambda = 532 nm is characterized. Modulation of the transmitted and reflected lambda = 632.8 nm light is achieved at microsecond time response. Two-dimensional photonic crystals are also investigated as reflectance filters for lambda = 532 nm wavelength light. Both optically tunable and static reflectance filters are studied. Again, azobenzene liquid crystal molecules are incorporated into the photonic crystal to achieve optical tuning of the reflectance wavelength. In this case, the lambda = 532 nm wavelength light is used for self-modulation. That is, the light serves both to optically tune the photonic crystal filter as well as to modulate its own reflection efficiency through the photonic crystal filter. Moreover, stacking of multiple photonic crystals into a single filter is studied for both static and optically tunable photonic crystal filters. It is shown that this approach improves the performance of the photonic crystal reflectance filter by increasing its optical density and its angular tolerance at the reflection wavelength of lambda = 532 nm. Additionally, surface photonic crystals are

  20. Reciprocity and gyrotropism in magnetic resonance transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, James

    2006-12-01

    We give formulas for transduction in magnetic resonance—i.e., the appearance of an emf due to Larmor precession of spins—based upon the modified Lorentz reciprocity principle for gyrotropic (also called “nonreciprocal”) media, i.e., in which a susceptibility tensor is carried to its transpose by reversal of an external static field [cf., R. F. Harrington and A. T. Villeneuve IRE Trans. Microwave Theory and Technique MTT6, 308 (1958)]. Prior applications of reciprocity to magnetic resonance, despite much success, have ignored the gyrotropism which necessarily arises due to nuclear and/or unpaired electronic spins. For detection with linearly polarized fields, oscillating at the Larmor frequency, the emf is written in terms of a volume integral containing a product of two factors which we define as the antenna patterns, i.e., (H1x±iH1y) , where, e.g., for a single transceive antenna, the H ’s are just the spatially dependent oscillatory magnetic field strengths, per the application of some reference current at the antenna terminals, with the negative sign obtaining for transmission, and the positive for reception. Similar expressions hold for separate transmit and receive antennas; expressions are also given for circular polarization of the fields. We then exhibit a receive-only array antenna of two elements for magnetic resonance imaging of protons, which, due an intensity artifact arising from stray reactive coupling of the elements, produces, despite its own bilateral symmetry, asymmetric proton NMR images of a symmetric cylindrical phantom containing aqueous saline solution [J. Tropp and T. Schirmer, J. Magn. Reson. 151, 146 (2001)]. Modification of this two-port antenna, to function in transmit-receive mode, allows us to demonstrate highly nonreciprocal behavior: that is, to record images (of cylindrical test phantoms containing aqueous saline solution) whose appearance dramatically changes, when the roles of transmission and reception are swapped

  1. Reciprocity and gyrotropism in magnetic resonance transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tropp, James

    2006-12-15

    We give formulas for transduction in magnetic resonance - i.e., the appearance of an emf due to Larmor precession of spins - based upon the modified Lorentz reciprocity principle for gyrotropic (also called 'nonreciprocal') media, i.e., in which a susceptibility tensor is carried to its transpose by reversal of an external static field [cf., R. F. Harrington and A. T. Villeneuve IRE Trans. Microwave Theory and Technique MTT6, 308 (1958)]. Prior applications of reciprocity to magnetic resonance, despite much success, have ignored the gyrotropism which necessarily arises due to nuclear and/or unpaired electronic spins. For detection with linearly polarized fields, oscillating at the Larmor frequency, the emf is written in terms of a volume integral containing a product of two factors which we define as the antenna patterns, i.e. (H{sub 1x}{+-}iH{sub 1y}), where, e.g., for a single transceive antenna, the H's are just the spatially dependent oscillatory magnetic field strengths, per the application of some reference current at the antenna terminals, with the negative sign obtaining for transmission, and the positive for reception. Similar expressions hold for separate transmit and receive antennas; expressions are also given for circular polarization of the fields. We then exhibit a receive-only array antenna of two elements for magnetic resonance imaging of protons, which, due an intensity artifact arising from stray reactive coupling of the elements, produces, despite its own bilateral symmetry, asymmetric proton NMR images of a symmetric cylindrical phantom containing aqueous saline solution [J. Tropp and T. Schirmer, J. Magn. Reson. 151, 146 (2001)]. Modification of this two-port antenna, to function in transmit-receive mode, allows us to demonstrate highly nonreciprocal behavior: that is, to record images (of cylindrical test phantoms containing aqueous saline solution) whose appearance dramatically changes, when the roles of transmission and reception are

  2. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M.

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  3. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  4. AAV8 capsid variable regions at the two-fold symmetry axis contribute to high liver transduction by mediating nuclear entry and capsid uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Bell, Christie L.; Wilson, James M.

    2014-04-15

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) is a promising vector for liver-directed gene therapy. Although efficient uncoating of viral capsids has been implicated in AAV8's robust liver transduction, much about the biology of AAV8 hepatotropism remains unclear. Our study investigated the structural basis of AAV8 liver transduction efficiency by constructing chimeric vector capsids containing sequences derived from AAV8 and AAV2 – a highly homologous yet poorly hepatotropic serotype. Engineered vectors containing capsid variable regions (VR) VII and IX from AAV8 in an AAV2 backbone mediated near AAV8-like transduction in mouse liver, with higher numbers of chimeric genomes detected in whole liver cells and isolated nuclei. Interestingly, chimeric capsids within liver nuclei also uncoated similarly to AAV8 by 6 weeks after administration, in contrast with AAV2, of which a significantly smaller proportion were uncoated. This study links specific AAV capsid regions to the transduction ability of a clinically relevant AAV serotype. - Highlights: • We construct chimeric vectors to identify determinants of AAV8 liver transduction. • An AAV2-based vector with 17 AAV8 residues exhibited high liver transduction in mice. • This vector also surpassed AAV2 in cell entry, nuclear entry and onset of expression. • Most chimeric vector particles were uncoated at 6 weeks, like AAV8 and unlike AAV2. • Chimera retained heparin binding and was antigenically distinct from AAV2 and AAV8.

  5. Syntaxin 5-Dependent Retrograde Transport to the trans-Golgi Network Is Required for Adeno-Associated Virus Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu E.; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular transport of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) is still incompletely understood. In particular, the trafficking steps preceding the release of incoming AAV particles from the endosomal system into the cytoplasm, allowing subsequent nuclear import and the initiation of gene expression, remain to be elucidated fully. Others and we previously showed that a significant proportion of viral particles are transported to the Golgi apparatus and that Golgi apparatus disruption caused by the drug brefeldin A efficiently blocks AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) transduction. However, because brefeldin A is known to exert pleiotropic effects on the entire endosomal system, the functional relevance of transport to the Golgi apparatus for AAV transduction remains to be established definitively. Here, we show that AAV2 trafficking toward the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the Golgi apparatus correlates with transduction efficiency and relies on a nonclassical retrograde transport pathway that is independent of the retromer complex, late endosomes, and recycling endosomes. AAV2 transduction is unaffected by the knockdown of syntaxins 6 and 16, which are two major effectors in the retrograde transport of both exogenous and endogenous cargo. On the other hand, inhibition of syntaxin 5 function by small interfering RNA silencing or treatment with cyclized Retro-2 strongly decreases AAV2 transduction and transport to the Golgi apparatus. This inhibition of transduction is observed with several AAV serotypes and a number of primary and immortalized cells. Together, our data strongly suggest that syntaxin 5-mediated retrograde transport to the Golgi apparatus is a broadly conserved feature of AAV trafficking that appears to be independent of the identity of the receptors used for viral attachment. IMPORTANCE Gene therapy constitutes a promising approach for the treatment of life-threatening conditions refractory to any other form of remedy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV

  6. Influence of two-component signal transduction systems of Lactobacillus casei BL23 on tolerance to stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    Lactobacillus casei BL23 carries 17 two-component signal transduction systems. Insertional mutations were introduced into each gene encoding the cognate response regulators, and their effects on growth under different conditions were assayed. Inactivation of systems TC01, TC06, and TC12 (LCABL_02080-LCABL_02090, LCABL_12050-LCABL_12060, and LCABL_19600-LCABL_19610, respectively) led to major growth defects under the conditions assayed. PMID:21183633

  7. [Progress of studies on acu-moxibustion stimulation-induced cellular transmembrane signal transduction of the target-organs].

    PubMed

    Yi, Shou-Xiang; Peng, Yan

    2009-10-01

    Abundant research results have shown that multiple levels and links of cellular transmembrane signal transduction pathways in the target organs were involved in the efficacy of acupuncture. For instance, 1) various extra-cellular growth factors for initiating signal transduction by activating tyrosine protein kinase and non-receptor tyrosine kinase, 2) G protein-coupled protein kinase-second signal messengers, 3) ligands acting on intra-nuclear receptors to activate transduction pathway of nuclear transcription factors of the target genes, have been demonstrated in the favorable regulating process of acupuncture and moxibustion in different pathological animal models. In the present paper, the authors review the progress of studies on the abovementioned mechanism of acu-moxibustion underlying improving some disorders as 1) pain, cerebral ischemia, and senile dementia, 2) inflammation and tumor, and 3) myocardial ischemia. Moreover, the authors also analyze the extant problems and make a prospect on the future studies about the cellular transmembrane signal transduction pathways involving the effects of acupuncture and moxibustion. PMID:20128298

  8. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  9. Nonreciprocal Radio Frequency Transduction in a Parametric Mechanical Artificial Lattice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingwei; Tian, Tian; Yin, Peiran; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Generating nonreciprocal radio frequency transduction plays important roles in a wide range of research and applications, and an aspiration is to integrate this functionality into microcircuits without introducing a magnetic field, which, however, remains challenging. By designing a 1D artificial lattice structure with a neighbor interaction engineered parametrically, we predicted a nonreciprocity transduction with a large unidirectionality. We then experimentally demonstrated the phenomenon on a nanoelectromechanical chip fabricated by conventional complementary metal-silicon processing. A unidirectionality with isolation as high as 24 dB is achieved, and several different transduction schemes are realized by programing the control voltage topology. Apart from being used as a radio frequency isolator, the system provides a way to build a practical on-chip programmable device for broad research and applications in the radio frequency domain. PMID:27419591

  10. Nonreciprocal Radio Frequency Transduction in a Parametric Mechanical Artificial Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingwei; Tian, Tian; Yin, Peiran; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Generating nonreciprocal radio frequency transduction plays important roles in a wide range of research and applications, and an aspiration is to integrate this functionality into microcircuits without introducing a magnetic field, which, however, remains challenging. By designing a 1D artificial lattice structure with a neighbor interaction engineered parametrically, we predicted a nonreciprocity transduction with a large unidirectionality. We then experimentally demonstrated the phenomenon on a nanoelectromechanical chip fabricated by conventional complementary metal-silicon processing. A unidirectionality with isolation as high as 24 dB is achieved, and several different transduction schemes are realized by programing the control voltage topology. Apart from being used as a radio frequency isolator, the system provides a way to build a practical on-chip programmable device for broad research and applications in the radio frequency domain.

  11. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lihong; Lim, C. W.; Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing

    2016-06-01

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media.

  12. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  13. Kinetics of lentiviral vector transduction in human CD34(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoya; Green, Rashidah; Ballantine, Josiah; Skala, Luke P; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F

    2016-02-01

    Unlike cell lines, human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are less efficiently transduced with HIV-1 vectors, potentially limiting this approach. To investigate which step (internalization, reverse transcription, nuclear transport, and integration) limits lentiviral transduction, we evaluated the kinetics of lentiviral transduction in human CD34(+) cells. We transduced HeLa and CD34(+) cells with self-inactivating HIV-1 vector at low and tenfold higher multiplicity of infection (MOI) and evaluated vector amounts at various time points based on the rationale that if a given step was not limiting, tenfold greater vector amounts would be obtained at the tenfold higher MOI. We observed slower internalization (>60 min), a peak in reverse transcription at 24 hours, and completion of integration at 3 days in CD34(+) cells. In HeLa cells, there were approximately tenfold greater amounts at high MOI at all time points. When compared with HeLa cells, CD34(+) cells exhibited larger differences in vector amounts between high and low MOIs at 2-6 hours and a smaller difference at 12 hours to 10 days, revealing a limitation in human CD34(+) cell transduction around 12 hours, which corresponds to reverse transcription. In serial measurements of reverse transcription at 24 hours, vector amounts did not decrease once detected among CD34(+) cells. When using an HSC expansion medium, we observed less limitation for starting reverse transcription and more efficient transduction among CD34(+) cells in vitro and in xenografted mice. These data suggest that it is the initiation of reverse transcription that limits lentiviral transduction of human CD34(+) cells. Our findings provide an avenue for optimizing human CD34(+) cell transduction. PMID:26499040

  14. Physical aspects of sensory transduction on seeing, hearing and smelling

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Tohru; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    What is the general principle of sensory transduction? Sensory transduction is defined as energy transformation from the external world to the internal world. The energy of the external world, such as thermal energy (heat), electro-magnetic energy (light), mechanical energy (sound) and the energy from molecules (chemicals), is converted into electrochemical events in the animal nervous system. The following five classes of special sense receptors are utilized for energy conversion: vision (photo); audition (sound); taste and smell (chemo); and tactile (mechano). There are also other special sense receptors, including thermo and noxious receptors. The focus of this study is on photoreceptors, sound-receptors and odorant-receptors because the transduction mechanisms of these receptors are explained biochemically and understood by a common physical principle; these biochemical models are well known in neuroscience. The following notable problems are inherent in these biochemical models: the cGMP ionophore model of the vertebrate photoreceptor cannot explain the fast photo-response (∼msec); the tip links connection model of stereocilia in the basilar membrane for opening the K+ channel on the tip of a hair has difficulty explaining the high frequency vibration of hair cells without a damping of the oscillation, and the odorant shape-specific receptor model for olfactory transduction has difficulty in discriminating the minute differences among similar fragrant smells of essential oils with different molecular shapes. These difficulties might arise from a lack of the physical sense when the transduction models were proposed. This article will reconsider these problems and propose rational models for visual, olfactory and auditory transduction. PMID:27493557

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-03-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  17. A Simple High Efficiency Intra-Islet Transduction Protocol Using Lentiviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Moreno, Carmen Maria; Herrera-Gomez, Irene de Gracia; Lopez-Noriega, Livia; Lorenzo, Petra Isabel; Cobo-Vuilleumier, Nadia; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Mellado-Gil, Jose Manuel; Parnaud, Geraldine; Bosco, Domenico; Gauthier, Benoit Raymond; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Successful normalization of blood glucose in patients transplanted with pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors established the proof-of-concept that Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is a curable disease. Nonetheless, major caveats to the widespread use of this cell therapy approach have been the shortage of islets combined with the low viability and functional rates subsequent to transplantation. Gene therapy targeted to enhance survival and performance prior to transplantation could offer a feasible approach to circumvent these issues and sustain a durable functional β-cell mass in vivo. However, efficient and safe delivery of nucleic acids to intact islet remains a challenging task. Here we describe a simple and easy-to-use lentiviral transduction protocol that allows the transduction of approximately 80 % of mouse and human islet cells while preserving islet architecture, metabolic function and glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion. Our protocol will facilitate to fully determine the potential of gene expression modulation of therapeutically promising targets in entire pancreatic islets for xenotransplantation purposes. PMID:26122098

  18. Identification of specific gravity sensitive signal transduction pathways in human A431 carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, P. J.; de Groot, R. P.; Kruijer, W.; de Laat, S. W.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) activates a well characterized signal transduction cascade in human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The influence of gravity on EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering and early gene expression as well as on actin polymerization and actin organization have been investigated. Different signalling pathways induced by the agents TPA, forskolin and A23187 that activate gene expression were tested for sensitivity to gravity. EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression were decreased in microgravity. However, constitutive β-2 microglobulin expression remained unaltered. Under simulated weightlessness conditions EGF- and TPA-induced c-fos expression was decreased, while forskolin- and A23187-induced c-fos expression was independent of the gravity conditions. These results suggest that gravity affects specific signalling pathways. Preliminary results indicate that EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering remained unaltered irrespective of the gravity conditions. Furthermore, the relative filamentous actin content of steady state A431 cells was enhanced under microgravity conditions and actin filament organization was altered. Under simulated weightlessness actin filament organization in steady state cells as well as in EGF-treated cells was altered as compared to the 1 G reference experiment. Interestingly the microtubule and keratin organization in untreated cells showed no difference with the normal gravity samples. This indicates that gravity may affect specific components of the signal transduction circuitry.

  19. Molecular Analysis of the Graviperception Signal Transduction in the Flagellate Euglena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, Donat; Daiker, Viktor; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis perceives and reacts to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that the orientation can be explained by passive orientation only to a small extend while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. Our current working hypothesis is based on the fact that the cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently exerts pressure onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. We recently succeeded in identifying these channels as gene products of the TRP family. RNAi of the corresponding gene abolished graviperception. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. The inwardly gated calcium binds to a specific calmodulin which is likewise an intrinsic element of the signal transduction chain. RNAi of the related mRNA also stopped graviperception. This calmodulin is thought to activate an adenylyl cyclase which generates cyclic AMP which in turn modulates the beating pattern of the flagellum.

  20. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  1. Mechanism and evolution of cytosolic Hedgehog signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher W.; Chuang, Pao-Tien

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is required for embryonic patterning and postnatal physiology in invertebrates and vertebrates. With the revelation that the primary cilium is crucial for mammalian Hh signaling, the prevailing view that Hh signal transduction mechanisms are conserved across species has been challenged. However, more recent progress on elucidating the function of core Hh pathway cytosolic regulators in Drosophila, zebrafish and mice has confirmed that the essential logic of Hh transduction is similar between species. Here, we review Hh signaling events at the membrane and in the cytosol, and focus on parallel and divergent functions of cytosolic Hh regulators in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:20530542

  2. Cavity optoelectromechanical system combining strong electrical actuation with ultrasensitive transduction

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, Terry G.; Lee, Kwan H.; Harris, Glen I.; Knittel, Joachim; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2010-08-15

    A cavity optoelectromechanical system is reported which combines the ultrasensitive transduction of cavity optomechanical systems with the electrical actuation of nanoelectromechanical systems. Ultrasensitive mechanical transduction is achieved via optomechanical coupling. Electrical gradient forces as large as 0.40 {mu}N are realized, facilitating strong actuation with ultralow dissipation. A scanning probe microscope is implemented, capable of characterizing the mechanical modes. The integration of electrical actuation into optomechanical devices is an enabling step toward the regime of quantum nonlinear dynamics and provides capabilities for quantum control of mechanical motion.

  3. The gravity persistent signal (gps) Mutants of Arabidopsis: Insights into Gravitropic Signal Transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, S.

    The gravitropic response of Arabidopsis stems is rapid with a visible within 30 min and vertical reorientation within 2 h. However, horizontal gravistimulation for 3 h at 4°C does not cause curvature. When the stems are subsequently placed in the vertical position at RT, they bend in response to the previous, horizontal gravistimulation. These results indicate that the gravity perception step can occur at 4°C, but that part of the response is sensitive to cold. At 4°C, starch-containing amyloplasts in the endodermis of the inflorescence stems sedimented normally but auxin transport was abolished indicating that the cold treatment affected early events of the signal transduction pathway that occur after amyloplast sedimentation but prior to auxin transport. The gps mutants of Arabidopsis are a unique group of mutants that respond abnormally after gravistimulation at 4°C. gps1 shows no response to the cold gravistimulation, gps2 bends the wrong way as compared to wild type and gps3 over responds, bending past the anticipated curvature. The mutants were selected from a T-DNA tagged population. Cloning strategies based on the tag have been employed to identify the genes disrupted. GPS1 was cloned using TAIL PCR and is At3g20130, a cytochrome P450, CYP705A22, of unknown function. GPS1p::GFP fusions are being used to determine temporal and spatial expression of GPS1. The mutation in gps3 appears to disrupt a non-coding region downstream of At1g43950 No function has yet been determined for this region, but it appears that the mutation disrupts transcription of a transcription factor homologous to the DNA binding domain of an auxin response factor (ARF) 9-like protein. The identity of GPS2 is as yet unknown. The gps mutants represent potentially three independent aspects of signal transduction in the gravitropic response: perception or retention of the gravity signal (gps1), determination of the polarity of the response (gps2), and the tissue specificity of the

  4. A CRISPR-Based Toolbox for Studying T Cell Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Shen; Weiss, Arthur; Wang, Haopeng

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful technology to perform genome editing in a variety of cell types. To facilitate the application of Cas9 in mapping T cell signaling pathways, we generated a toolbox for large-scale genetic screens in human Jurkat T cells. The toolbox has three different Jurkat cell lines expressing distinct Cas9 variants, including wild-type Cas9, dCas9-KRAB, and sunCas9. We demonstrated that the toolbox allows us to rapidly disrupt endogenous gene expression at the DNA level and to efficiently repress or activate gene expression at the transcriptional level. The toolbox, in combination with multiple currently existing genome-wide sgRNA libraries, will be useful to systematically investigate T cell signal transduction using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic screens. PMID:27057542

  5. Deciphering the impact of parameters influencing transgene expression kinetics after repeated cell transduction with integration-deficient retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Juliane W; Jaeschke, Nico M; Hoffmann, Dirk; Maetzig, Tobias; Ballmaier, Matthias; Godinho, Tamaryin; Cathomen, Toni; Schambach, Axel

    2015-05-01

    Lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors are state-of-the-art tools for transgene expression within target cells. The integration of these vectors can be deliberately suppressed to derive a transient gene expression system based on extrachromosomal circular episomes with intact coding regions. These episomes can be used to deliver DNA templates and to express RNA or protein. Importantly, transient gene transfer avoids the genotoxic side effects of integrating vectors. Restricting their applicability, episomes are rapidly lost upon dilution in dividing target cells. Addressing this limitation, we could establish comparably stable percentages of transgene-positive cells over prolonged time periods in proliferating cells by repeated transductions. Flow cytometry was applied for kinetic analyses to decipher the impact of individual parameters on the kinetics of fluoroprotein expression after episomal retransduction and to visualize sequential and simultaneous transfer of heterologous fluoroproteins. Expression windows could be exactly timed by the number of transduction steps. The kinetics of signal loss was affected by the cell proliferation rate. The transfer of genes encoding fluoroproteins with different half-lives revealed a major impact of protein stability on temporal signal distribution and accumulation, determining optimal retransduction intervals. In addition, sequential transductions proved broad applicability in different cell types and using different envelope pseudotypes without receptor overload. Stable percentages of cells coexpressing multiple transgenes could be generated upon repeated coadministration of different episomal vectors. Alternatively, defined patterns of transgene expression could be recapitulated by sequential transductions. Altogether, we established a methodology to control and adjust a temporally defined window of transgene expression using retroviral episomal vectors. Combined with the highly efficient cell entry of these vectors while

  6. Generation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Protein Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Csilla; Varga, Eszter; Polgar, Zsuzsanna; Klincumhom, Nuttha; Pirity, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cell reprogramming has generated enormous interest after the first report by Yamanaka and his coworkers in 2006 on the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts. Here we report the generation of stable iPSCs from mouse fibroblasts by recombinant protein transduction (Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc), a procedure designed to circumvent the risks caused by integration of exogenous sequences in the target cell genome associated with gene delivery systems. The recombinant proteins were fused in the frame to the glutathione-S-transferase tag for affinity purification and to the transactivator transcription-nuclear localization signal polypeptide to facilitate membrane penetration and nuclear localization. We performed the reprogramming procedure on embryonic fibroblasts from inbred (C57BL6) and outbred (ICR) mouse strains. The cells were treated with purified proteins four times, at 48-h intervals, and cultured on mitomycin C treated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells in complete embryonic stem cell (ESC) medium until colonies formed. The iPSCs generated from the outbred fibroblasts exhibited similar morphology and growth properties to ESCs and were sustained in an undifferentiated state for more than 20 passages. The cells were checked for pluripotency-related markers (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, cMyc, Nanog) by immunocytochemistry and by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. The protein iPSCs (piPSCs) formed embryoid bodies and subsequently differentiated towards all three germ layer lineages. Importantly, the piPSCs could incorporate into the blastocyst and led to variable degrees of chimerism in newborn mice. These data show that recombinant purified cell-penetrating proteins are capable of reprogramming MEFs to iPSCs. We also demonstrated that the cells of the generated cell line satisfied all the requirements of bona fide mouse ESCs: form round colonies with defined boundaries; have a tendency to attach together with

  7. Novel mechanisms of endothelial mechano-transduction

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jun-ichi; Berk, Bradford C

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a focal disease that develops preferentially where non-laminar, disturbed blood flow (d-flow) occurs such as branches, bifurcations, and curvatures of large arteries. Endothelial cells sense and respond differently to d-flow compared to steady laminar flow (s-flow). D-flow that occurs in so-called athero-prone areas activates pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling, and this results in endothelial dysfunction and leads to subsequent development of atherosclerosis. In contrast, s-flow as “athero-protective flow” promotes expression of many anti-inflammatory genes such as Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibits endothelial inflammation and athrogenesis. Here we will discuss that d-flow and s-flow induce pro- and anti-atherogenic events via flow type-specific “mechanotransduction” pathways. We will focus on five mechano-sensitive pathways: MEK5 (MAPK/ERK kinase 5)-ERK5-KLF2 signaling, ERK5-PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) signaling, and mechano-signaling pathways involving SUMOylation, protein kinase C-ζ, (PKCζ), and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK). We believe that clarifying regulation mechanisms between these two flow types will provide new insights into therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25301843

  8. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  9. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  10. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF RECEPTOR KINASE ACTION IN BRASSINOSTEROID SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development and require an active BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) and BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (BAK1) for hormone perception and signal transduction. To examine early events in BR signaling, we used co-immunoprecipita...