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Sample records for bhupendra singh vivek

  1. Observatories of Sawai Jai Singh II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Roehr, Susan N.

    Sawai Jai Singh II, Maharaja of Amber and Jaipur, constructed five observatories in the second quarter of the eighteenth century in the north Indian cities of Shahjahanabad (Delhi), Jaipur, Ujjain, Mathura, and Varanasi. Believing the accuracy of his naked-eye observations would improve with larger, more stable instruments, Jai Singh reengineered common brass instruments using stone construction methods. His applied ingenuity led to the invention of several outsize masonry instruments, the majority of which were used to determine the coordinates of celestial objects with reference to the local horizon. During Jai Singh's lifetime, the observatories were used to make observations in order to update existing ephemerides such as the Zīj-i Ulugh Begī. Jai Singh established communications with European astronomers through a number of Jesuits living and working in India. In addition to dispatching ambassadorial parties to Portugal, he invited French and Bavarian Jesuits to visit and make use of the observatories in Shahjahanabad and Jaipur. The observatories were abandoned after Jai Singh's death in 1743 CE. The Mathura observatory was disassembled completely before 1857. The instruments at the remaining observatories were restored extensively during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

  2. Plaque Production by Arboviruses in Singh's Aedes albopictus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yunker, C. E.; Cory, J.

    1975-01-01

    We report plaquing tests of 124 virus strains, mostly arboviruses of 21 serological groups, in Singh's line of Aedes albopictus cells. Thirty of these plaqued; all were arboviruses of six groups and were known or presumed to be mosquito borne. Failing to plaque were 86 strains of arboviruses, mostly tick borne, two strains of insect pathogens, and six animal viruses not classified as arboviruses. Among mosquito-borne agents, plaquing ability appeared related to serological classification. California group and most A-group viruses failed to plaque, but nearly all members of B and Bunyamwera groups readily plaqued. Within serological group B, 14 of 16 mosquito-borne agents plaqued, but none of 13 tick-borne or vector-unassociated viruses did so. Some implications of these results for recognition and classification of arboviruses are discussed. Images PMID:234160

  3. Neurovirology: neurotropic viruses and the brain. Interview with Sunit K Singh by Hannah Branch.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunit K

    2013-08-01

    Sunit K Singh speaks to Hannah Branch, Commissioning Editor Sunit K Singh obtained a Bachelor's degree from GB Pant University of Agriculture and Technology (India) followed by his Master's degree from the Central Institute of Fisheries Education (India). Upon the completion of his Master's degree, Singh moved to the University of Wuerzburg (Germany) to complete his PhD degree in the field of Molecular Infection Biology. Subsequently, he undertook his postdoctoral training at Yale University School of Medicine (CT, USA) and at the University of California Davis Medical Center (CA, USA). Singh has also been visiting faculty at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (NY, USA), Department of Pathology and Immunology, University of Geneva (Switzerland) and the Institute of Parasitology (Czech Republic). At present, he is a permanent member of faculty in the Section of Infectious Diseases and Immunobiology Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB; India) and is leading a research group in the area of neurovirology there. Singh has been an author of a number of papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and has been honored with several awards, including the Skinner Memorial Award, Young Scientist Award, Travel Grant Award and the NIH-Fogarty Fellowship. In addition, he is a valued editorial board member of several journals, including Future Microbiology. PMID:23902142

  4. Print and Electronic Resources: Usage Statistics at Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapoor, Kanta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to quantify the use of electronic journals in comparison with the print collections in the Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University Library. Design/methodology/approach: A detailed analysis was made of the use of lending services, the Xerox facility and usage of electronic journals such as Science Direct,…

  5. The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2008-01-01

    M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

  6. Applications of Singh-Rajput Mes in Recall Operations of Quantum Associative Memory for a Two- Qubit System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manu Pratap; Rajput, B. S.

    2016-03-01

    Recall operations of quantum associative memory (QuAM) have been conducted separately through evolutionary as well as non-evolutionary processes in terms of unitary and non- unitary operators respectively by separately choosing our recently derived maximally entangled states (Singh-Rajput MES) and Bell's MES as memory states for various queries and it has been shown that in each case the choices of Singh-Rajput MES as valid memory states are much more suitable than those of Bell's MES. it has been demonstrated that in both the types of recall processes the first and the fourth states of Singh-Rajput MES are most suitable choices as memory states for the queries `11' and `00' respectively while none of the Bell's MES is a suitable choice as valid memory state in these recall processes. It has been demonstrated that all the four states of Singh-Rajput MES are suitable choice as valid memory states for the queries `1?', `?1', `?0' and `0?' while none of the Bell's MES is suitable choice as the valid memory state for these queries also.

  7. Processes of Quantum Associative Memory (QuAM) Through New Maximally Entangled States (Singh-Rajput MES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manu Pratap; Rajput, B. S.

    2016-07-01

    Using Singh-Rajput MES as memory states in the evolutionary process of pattern storage and the non-evolutionary process of pattern recall (the two fundamental constituents of QuAM), the suitability and superiority of these MES over Bell's MES have been demonstrated in both these processes. It has been shown that, under the operations of all the possible memorization operators for a two-qubit system, the first two states of Singh-Rajput MES are useful for storing the pattern |11> and the last two of these MES are useful in storing the pattern |10> while Bell's MES are not much suitable as memory states in a valid memorization process. The recall operations have also been conducted by separately choosing Singh-Rajput MES and Bell's MES as memory states for possible various queries and it has been shown that in each case the choices of Singh-Rajput MES as valid memory states are much more suitable than those of Bell's MES.

  8. Processes of Quantum Associative Memory (QuAM) Through New Maximally Entangled States (Singh-Rajput MES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manu Pratap; Rajput, B. S.

    2016-02-01

    Using Singh-Rajput MES as memory states in the evolutionary process of pattern storage and the non-evolutionary process of pattern recall (the two fundamental constituents of QuAM), the suitability and superiority of these MES over Bell's MES have been demonstrated in both these processes. It has been shown that, under the operations of all the possible memorization operators for a two-qubit system, the first two states of Singh-Rajput MES are useful for storing the pattern |11> and the last two of these MES are useful in storing the pattern |10> while Bell's MES are not much suitable as memory states in a valid memorization process. The recall operations have also been conducted by separately choosing Singh-Rajput MES and Bell's MES as memory states for possible various queries and it has been shown that in each case the choices of Singh-Rajput MES as valid memory states are much more suitable than those of Bell's MES.

  9. Two new species of Cylicospirura Vevers, 1922 (Nematoda: Spirocercidae) from carnivores in southern Africa, with validation of the related genera Gastronodus Singh, 1934 and Skrjabinocercina Matschulsky, 1952.

    PubMed

    Junker, Kerstin; Lane, Emily P; McRee, Anna E; Foggin, Chris; van Dyk, D Schalk; Mutafchiev, Yasen

    2013-09-01

    Two new species of Cylicospirura Vevers, 1922 are described from carnivores from southern Africa. Cylicospirura crocutae Junker et Mutafchiev sp. n. from Crocuta crocuta (Erxleben) in Zimbabwe is distinguished from its congeners by combinations of characters, including the presence of four cephalic and four external labial papillae, while internal labial papillae were not distinct, the presence of groups of small accessory teeth between the six large tricuspid teeth, the fifth and the sixth pairs of the caudal papillae being equidistant from the cloaca, and a large ratio of length of the muscular oesophagus to that of the glandular oesophagus. Cylicospirura pardalis Junker et Mutafchiev sp. n. from Panthera pardus (Linnaeus) in the Republic of South Africa is characterized by having tricuspid teeth with large, claw-like, abaxial cusps, four cephalic and six internal labial papillae. Based on the number of caudal papillae and the position of the vulva, the subgenera Gastronodus Singh, 1934 and Skrjabinocercina Matschulsky, 1952 are re-elevated to generic rank. Amended diagnoses are proposed for the genera Cylicospirura, Gastronodus and Skrjabinocercina. Petrowospirura lyncis Matschulsky, 1952 is recognized as valid and, together with P. petrowi Sadykhov, 1957 and P. barusi Arya, 1979, is transferred to Cylicospirura as C. lyncis (Matschulsky, 1952) Junker et Mutafchiev comb. n., C. petrowi (Sadykhov, 1957) Junker et Mutafchiev comb. n. and C. barusi (Arya, 1979) Junker et Mutafchiev comb. n., respectively. PMID:24261135

  10. Demonstration of a very inexpensive, turbidimetric, real-time, RT-LAMP detection platform using shrimp Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) as a model.

    PubMed

    Arunrut, Narong; Suebsing, Rungkarn; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of pathogens under field laboratory conditions is necessary for effective control of veterinary pathogens. Here we describe a prototype, portable, pathogen detection device developed for single tube, real-time, reverse transcription, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) using Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) as a model. LSNV is an RNA virus and a component cause of growth retardation in black tiger shrimp. We chose its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene as the target for our tests. The basis for detection was measurement of turbidity arising from formation of a white, insoluble magnesium pyrophosphate precipitate byproduct upon amplification of the RdRp target sequence from 100 ng template RNA extracted from shrimp. The measurement device consisted of a heating block to maintain constant temperature in the RT-LAMP reaction for 8 Eppindorf sample tubes, a light-emitting diode (LED) light source providing red light emission at 650 nm wavelength to pass through sample tubes, a light dependent resistance (LDR) photo-detector and a software program to report turbidity events and could potentially be marketed for under US$3000. The device was connected to a computer to display real-time results in a variety of formats. The optimized protocol for LSNV detection consisted of incubation of the sample tubes at 65 °C for 1 h during which turbidity was continuously measured, and quantitative results could be obtained by reaction time measurement. The sensitivity of detection was comparable to that of conventional nested RT-PCR and there was no cross reaction with other common shrimp viruses. The device was used for quantitative measurement of relative copy numbers of LSNV RdRp in 8 shrimp tissues and they were found to be highest in the gills followed in order by the lymphoid organ and hemolymph (p ≤ 0.05). This platform can be easily adapted for detection of other pathogens under field laboratory settings. PMID:25255231

  11. Comment on 'A reinterpretation of the linear heat flow and heat production relationship for the exponential model of the heat production in the crust' by R.N. Singh & J.G. Negi.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    In their recent paper, Singh & Negi, (This journal, 57, 741-744) contend that if thd slope of the empirical linear relation between heat flow and heat production is interpreted as the decay-length of an exponential depth-distribution of sources, a discrepancy rises, whereas if it is interpreted as the depth of a step distribution, it does not. I should like to point out that their discrepancy follows from their arbitrary assumption of one of a range of physical possibilities unconstrained by the observations; with an equally valid alternate assumption (Lachenbruch 1970) the discrepancy disappears. In any case such discrepancies are probably minor compared to physical difficulties that arise from the step model, and to uncertainties introduced by other assumptions in any simple model.-Author

  12. Philosophizing cannot substitute for experimentation: comment on Hoffman, Singh & Prakash

    PubMed Central

    Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    The perception of 3D shape must be excluded from Hoffman et al., “interface theory” primarily because shape is characterized by its symmetries. When these symmetries are used as a priori constraints, 3D shapes are always recovered from 2D retinal images veridically. These facts make it clear that 3D shape perception is completely different from, as well as more important than, all other perceptions because the veridicality of our perception of 3D shapes (and 3D scenes) accounts for our successful adaptation to the natural environment. PMID:26384989

  13. The age of deep, steep continental subduction in the NW Himalaya: Relating zircon growth to metamorphic history. Comment on: “The onset of India-Asia continental collision: Early, steep subduction required by the timing of UHP metamorphism in the western Himalaya” by Mary L. Leech, S. Singh, A.K. Jain, Simon L. Klemperer and R.M. Manickavasagam, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 234 (2005) 83-97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2006-05-01

    Leech et al. [Mary L. Leech, S. Singh, A.K. Jain, Simon L. Klemperer and R.M. Manickavasagam, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 234 (2005) 83-97], present 3 clusters of ages for growth stages in zircon from quartzo-feldspathic gneisses hosting coesite-bearing eclogite from the Tso Morari Complex, NW India. These age clusters, from oldest to youngest, are interpreted to represent the age of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism, a subsequent eclogite facies overprint and a later amphibolite facies retrogression and require subduction of Indian crust to have started earlier than previously accepted. However, no petrographic evidence, such as inclusions in the zircons relating to particular metamorphic events, is presented to substantiate the proposed sequence of metamorphic stages. Previously published data from eclogites of the same area indicate that coesite-eclogite is not the first but at least the second eclogite facies stage. In addition, the newly proposed time interval between coesite-eclogite and the amphibolite facies overprint is longer than previously indicated by diffusion modelling of natural garnet-garnet couples in eclogite. Neither the age of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism nor the timing of initiation of subduction is reliably constrained by the presented data.

  14. New combination bronchodilators for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: current evidence and future perspectives Dave Singh

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Fixed dose combination (FDC) dual bronchodilators that co-administer a long acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) and a long acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) are a new class of inhaled treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This review focuses on the clinical evidence for the benefit of LABA/LAMA FDCs compared with monocomponent treatments, and also compared with active comparators that are widely used for the treatment of COPD, namely tiotropium and salmeterol-fluticasone. Novel FDC dual bronchodilators include QVA149 and umeclidinium/vilanterol (UMEC/VI). Long term clinical trials show that QVA149 and UMEC/VI are superior to monocomponent therapy in terms of trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), although the FEV1 improvement was limited to approximately 80–90% of the added monocomponent values. This suggests that the effect of combining a LABA and a LAMA is not fully additive. LABA/LAMA FDC were associated with the largest mean changes in symptoms and health status that were above the minimal clinically important difference, in contrast to the monocomponents. Furthermore, these LABA/LAMA FDCs demonstrated superiority over the active comparators tiotropium and salmeterol-fluticasone in terms of trough FEV1 and patient-reported outcomes. LABA/LAMA FDCs offer a simplified means of maximizing bronchodilation for COPD patients, with the improvements in lung function being mirrored by benefits in terms of symptoms and exacerbations. The use of LABA/LAMA FDCs in clinical practice is set to grow and further studies are needed to define their optimal place in treatment guidelines. PMID:25377687

  15. Raja Sawai Jai Singh II: An 18th Century Medieval Astronomer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanpied, William A.

    1975-01-01

    Offers a description of the instrumentation and methods utilized in this attempt at naked eye astronomy one century after the invention of the telescope. Also examines the motives which resulted in the implementation of an antiquated mode of observation. (Author/CP)

  16. Contribution to our knowledge of the whitefly genus Aleuroclava Singh (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in China, including Taiwan and Hong Kong, with descriptions of two new species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Rui; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Two new whitefly species, Aleuroclava sterculiae sp. nov., collected from Sterculia nobilis (Malvales: Sterculiaceae) of Qingxiu hill park (Guangxi, China), and Aleuroclava rosae sp. nov., collected from Stranvaesia sp. (Rosales: Rosaceae) of Maoer Mountain (Guangxi, China), are described with morphology, line illustrations, photographs and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. In addition, two other whitefly species, Aleuroclava lefroyi (Sundararaj & David) and Aleuroclava manii (David), are reported as new to the fauna of China, and are discussed. An identification key to Aleuroclava species known from Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong is provided. The specimens are deposited in the Insect Collection of Yangzhou University (YZU). PMID:27470767

  17. Surgeon General

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Conversation → Step it Up! Help Make Our Communities Walkable YouTube embedded video: https://www.youtube-nocookie. ... Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy to make our communities more walkable. Watch the video . See All Videos → ...

  18. Comment on "Atomic structure calculations and identification of EUV and SXR spectral lines in Sr XXX" by A. Goyal, I. Khatri, S. Aggarwal, A.K. Singh, M. Mohan [J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2015;161:157

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently, Goyal et al. [1] reported energies and lifetimes (τ) for the lowest 113 levels of the 2s22p5, 2s2p6, 2s22p43ℓ, 2s2p53ℓ and 2p63ℓ configurations of F-like Sr XXX. For the calculations they adopted the multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) and the flexible atomic code (FAC). Additionally, they also listed radiative rates (A- values), oscillator strengths (f- values) and line strengths (S- values) for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2), but only from the ground to the higher excited levels. However, there are two clear anomalies in their reported data. Firstly, the f-values listed from FAC in their Tables 3-6 are larger than from MCDF by a factor of two, for all transitions. This is because they have blindly listed the output from FAC without realising that, unlike MCDF, FAC lists ωf where ω is the statistical weight, and happens to be exactly 2 in the present case. Secondly, their lifetime for level 2 (2s22p51/2 o 2P) is incorrect. This is because the dominant contributing transition for this level is 1-2 M1 for which A=3.25×106 s-1, listed (correctly) in their Table 5, and this leads to τ=3.08×10-7 s, and not 1.54×10-7 s, as listed in their Table 1.

  19. Comment on “Structural, dielectric, optical and ferroelectric property of urea succinic acid crystals grown in aqueous solution containing maleic acid” by B.K. Singh et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Solids 71 (2010) 1774

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylczyński, Zbigniew

    2012-07-01

    The volume of elementary cell of the urea succinic acid (M-USA) growing from a solution containing 1 mol% maleic acid is 69% greater than that of urea succinic acid (USA) grown in the usual conditions. M-USA crystallises in the monoclinic system with a centre of symmetry, which excludes the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties. The results presented in the paper commented on are artefacts.

  20. Unlocking Shelves: Fostering a Culture of Reading and Inclusion through Open Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukunda, Usha; Vellanki, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    This article features a conversation between Usha Mukunda, who identifies herself as a librarian, and Vivek Vellanki, who is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in education. Mukunda has been successful in challenging the stereotypical image of the librarian as being serious, angry, and detached. Shortly after meeting her, one would likely be…

  1. Education Policy and the Pursuit of Equality: Perspectives from South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayed, Yusuf; Vellanki, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    1994 is an important year in South African history. It brought about significant socio-political changes in an attempt to undo the unjust practices perpetuated during the apartheid regime. The apartheid government had severely impacted all spheres and institutions of society, including education. In this interview, Vivek Vellanki asks Doctor Yusuf…

  2. Reply to comment by P.J. O'Brien on: “The onset of India-Asia continental collision: Early, steep subduction required by the timing of UHP metamorphism in the western Himalaya” by Mary L. Leech, S. Singh, A.K. Jain, Simon L. Klemperer and R.M. Manickavasagam, Earth Planetary Science Letters 234 (2005) 83-97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leech, Mary L.; Singh, Sandeep; Jain, A. K.; Klemperer, Simon L.; Manickavasagam, R. M.

    2006-05-01

    We thank O'Brien for directing our attention to his recent publication on modeling of diffusion in garnets, including one garnet from the Tso Morari Complex [1], and allowing us to show how our data and existing interpretation are consistent with his model. It seems O'Brien wants the timing of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism (UHPM) in the Tso Morari Complex to be the same as the well-established 46 Ma UHPM event in Kaghan over 500 km to the northwest (e.g., [2]), and is attempting to reinterpret our U-Pb zircon dating from the Tso Morari Complex to fit his notion. But rather than fight the age data, why not develop a model that fits the data? Guillot et al. [3] describe a warped geometry of the Indian subduction plane that places the Tso Morari Complex and Kaghan at different depths based on their ages of UHPM; this model allows for a 55-54 Ma UHP event in the Tso Morari Complex and a 46 Ma event in Kaghan [4].

  3. Physicochemical characterization of ezetimibe and its impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Katarzyna; Bańkowski, Krzysztof; Sidoryk, Katarzyna; Zagrodzka, Joanna; Łaszcz, Marta; Trzcińska, Kinga; Szyprowska, Anna; Cmoch, Piotr; Maruszak, Wioleta

    2011-04-01

    The physicochemical characterization of major degradation and process-related impurities associated with the synthesis of ezetimibe was performed. The possibility of forming the undesirable ( R, R, S) stereoisomer of ezetimibe has been mentioned in literature (Vinod KK, Suhail A, Bhupendra T, Nitin G US 2010/0010212 A1, Ind-Swift Laboratories Limited WO 2008/096372), but no study of its structure determination has been published yet. This paper discusses the structure elucidation of the ( R, R, S) stereoisomer as well as ezetimibe degradation product on the bases of NMR, IR and MS data. Other potential impurities of ezetimibe are also described. A selective and stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method with dual UV detection was developed for the determination of chemical and stereochemical purity of ezetimibe. The characterization of particle size and shape for ezetimibe and its stereoisomer is also described.

  4. Codes, Ciphers, and Cryptography--An Honors Colloquium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karls, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    At the suggestion of a colleague, I read "The Code Book", [32], by Simon Singh to get a basic introduction to the RSA encryption scheme. Inspired by Singh's book, I designed a Ball State University Honors Colloquium in Mathematics for both majors and non-majors, with material coming from "The Code Book" and many other sources. This course became…

  5. The New Leader of the Free World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    On January 20, 2009, Dr. Manmohan Singh, the prime minister of India, became the leader of the free world. The free world's attention was focused elsewhere: Senator Barack Obama, who on that day became President Barack Obama, quietly abdicated the role now taken up by Dr. Singh, having run an election campaign premised upon the ever-present but…

  6. Major geomagnetic storm due to solar activity (2006-2013).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Bhupendra Kumar

    Major geomagnetic storm due to solar activity (2006-2013). Bhupendra Kumar Tiwari Department of Physics, A.P.S.University, Rewa(M.P.) Email: - btiwtari70@yahoo.com mobile 09424981974 Abstract- The geospace environment is dominated by disturbances created by the sun, it is observed that coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare events are the causal link to solar activity that produces geomagnetic storm (GMS).CMEs are large scale magneto-plasma structures that erupt from the sun and propagate through the interplanetary medium with speeds ranging from only a few km/s to as large as 4000 km/s. When the interplanetary magnetic field associated with CMEs impinges upon the earth’s magnetosphere and reconnect occur geomagnetic storm. Based on the observation from SOHO/LASCO spacecraft for solar activity and WDC for geomagnetism Kyoto for geomagnetic storm events are characterized by the disturbance storm time (Dst) index during the period 2006-2013. We consider here only intense geomagnetic storm Dst <-100nT, are 12 during 2006-2013.Geomagnetic storm with maximum Dst< -155nT occurred on Dec15, 2006 associated with halo CME with Kp-index 8+ and also verify that halo CME is the main cause to produce large geomagnetic storms.

  7. 5 Diet Drugs: Which Ones Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159359.html 5 Diet Drugs: Which Ones Work? Side effects are one consideration, study says To use the sharing features ... been known about how they stack up against one another, said Dr. Siddharth Singh, the lead researcher ...

  8. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1998-05-01

    * Low-Cost Science Teaching Equipment for Visually Impaired Children, by. H.O. Gupta and Rakshpal Singh, p 610. * Synthesis of Exotic Soaps in the Chemistry Laboratory, by Otto Phanstiel IV, Eric Dueno, and Queenie Xianghong Wang, p 612.

  9. Methods in mind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Matt; Singh, Krish

    2013-05-01

    Our ability to image the structure of the human brain is well established, but the technique of magnetoencephalograpy is now providing insights into how the mind actually functions, as Matt Brookes and Krish Singh explain.

  10. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jamal A, Homa DH, O’Connor E, Babb SD, Caraballo RS, Singh T, et al. Current cigarette ... Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your Risk Factors Ethanolamine utilization in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ethanolamine is used as an energy source by phylogenetically diverse bacteria including pathogens, by the concerted action of proteins from the eut-operon. Previous studies have revealed the presence of eutBC genes encoding ethanolamine-ammonia lyase, a key enzyme that breaks ethanolamine into acetaldehyde and ammonia, in about 100 bacterial genomes including members of gamma-proteobacteria. However, ethanolamine utilization has not been reported for any member of the Vibrio genus. Our comparative genomics study reveals the presence of genes that are involved in ethanolamine utilization in several Vibrio species. Using Vibrio alginolyticus as a model system we demonstrate that ethanolamine is better utilized as a nitrogen source than as a carbon source. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Lakshminarayan Iyer and Dr. Vivek Anantharaman (nominated by Dr. L Aravind). PMID:23234435

  11. Association of ABO Blood Group and Rh factor with Periodontal Disease in a Population of Virajpet, Karnataka: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, S; Jain, Jithesh; Simon, Sequiera Peter; Battur, Hemanth; Supreetha, S; Haridas, Reshmi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was an association between periodontal diseases and ABO blood groups. Materials & Methods: An epidemiological study was was carried out on 220 subjects who were randomly selected from individuals referred for periodontal treatment or for other reasons regarding Oral health at Coorg Institute of Dental Sciences. Results: The findings of our study revealed that subject’s blood group O (65.8) and Rh positive (73.33%) had a greater propensity for periodontitis. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed blood groups and Rh factor can act as a determinant of periodontitis. How to cite this article: Vivek S, Jain J, Simon SP, Battur H, Supreetha S, Haridas R. Association of ABO Blood Group and Rh factor with Periodontal Disease in a Population of Virajpet, Karnataka: A Cross-Sectional Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):30-34. PMID:24155617

  12. In Defence of Modest Doxasticism About Delusions.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Lisa

    2012-04-01

    Here I reply to the main points raised by the commentators on the arguments put forward in my Delusions and Other Irrational Beliefs (OUP, 2009). My response is aimed at defending a modest doxastic account of clinical delusions, and is articulated in three sections. First, I consider the view that delusions are in-between perceptual and doxastic states, defended by Jacob Hohwy and Vivek Rajan, and the view that delusions are failed attempts at believing or not-quite-beliefs, proposed by Eric Schwitzgebel and Maura Tumulty. Then, I address the relationship between the doxastic account of delusions and the role, nature, and prospects of folk psychology, which is discussed by Dominic Murphy, Keith Frankish, and Maura Tumulty in their contributions. In the final remarks, I turn to the continuity thesis and suggest that, although there are important differences between clinical delusions and non-pathological beliefs, these differences cannot be characterised satisfactorily in epistemic terms. PMID:22485124

  13. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 5. The Next Particle

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-08

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 5. The Next Particle The "sparticle" - a super symmetric partner to all the known particles could be the answer to uniting all the known particles and their interactions under one grand theoretical pattern of activity. But how do researchers know where to look for such phenomena and how do they know if they find them? Simon Singh reviews the next particle that physicists would like to find if the current particle theories are to ring true.

  14. Comment on 'Further evidence for lightning at Venus'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Cloutier, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    In contradiction to the findings of Singh and Russell (1986), the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) electric-field data are not found to provide evidence for either lightning or volcanism at Venus. It is suggested that the noise considered by Singh and Russell to be clustered at low altitudes actually appears frequently at high altitudes. The frequent appearance of the broadband noise in the upper ionosphere indicates that this noise, like that attributed to lightning by Scarf et al. (1980), is actually generated within the ionosphere near the PVO by the solar wind interaction with the ionosphere.

  15. Three species of opisthomonorchiine monorchiids (Digenea) in Carangoides spp. (Perciformes: Carangidae) from off New Caledonia, with a description of Opisthomonorchis dinema n. sp.

    PubMed

    Bray, Rodney A; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2013-06-01

    Three opisthomonorchiinae species are described from fishes obtained at the Fish Market in Nouméa, New Caledonia. Opisthomonorchis dinema n. sp. from Carangoides dinema Bleeker differs from the other recognised species in the genus by the long recurved genital atrium, arcing anteriorly. Also described are Opisthomonorchis carangis Yamaguti, 1952 from Carangoides sp. and Pseudopisthomonorchis thapari (Varma & Singh, 1979) n. comb. for Opisthomonorchis thapari Varma & Singh, 1979 from Carangoides chrysophrys (Cuvier). The features distinguishing Opisthomonorchis Yamaguti, 1952 and Pseudopisthomonorchis Madhavi, 1974 are discussed. PMID:23673693

  16. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 5. The Next Particle

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 5. The Next Particle The "sparticle" - a super symmetric partner to all the known particles could be the answer to uniting all the known particles and their interactions under one grand theoretical pattern of activity. But how do researchers know where to look for such phenomena and how do they know if they find them? Simon Singh reviews the next particle that physicists would like to find if the current particle theories are to ring true.

  17. Life table analysis and development of Singhiella simplex (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae) under different constant temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Singh) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is a newly-invasive pest of ficus plants in the United States. Very little is known about its biology and life history. Here, we studied development and reproduction at 15, 20, 25, 27, 30 and 35°C. No immatures survived the 35°...

  18. COMPARISON OF PULMONARY RESPONSES TO AUTOMOBILE-GENERATED AND NIST STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMPARISON OF PULMONARY RESPONSES TO AUTOMOBILE-GENERATED AND NIST STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS IN MICE. P. Singh1, C.A.J. Dick2, J. Richards3, M.J. Daniels3, and M.I. Gilmour3. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC, 2UNC, Chapel Hill, NC and 3 USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, (ETD,...

  19. The Mathematics of "Star Trek"--An Honors Colloquium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karls, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    After the success of a course on cryptography for a general audience, based on Simon Singh's "The Code Book" [49], I decided to try again and create a mathematics course for a general audience based on "The Physics of Star Trek" by Lawrence Krauss [32]. This article looks at the challenges of designing a physics-based mathematics course "from…

  1. Natural enemies managing the invasion of the Fig whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), infesting a Ficus benjamina hedge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fig whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Singh) is a recent invasive species that has become a major pest in Florida feeding on Ficus shrubs and trees. A pilot study was conducted on a weeping fig, Ficus benjamina shrub hedge to determine the efficacy and compatibility of a biopesticide (PFR 97™=Isaria...

  2. Mechanisms of Modal and Amodal Interpolation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2007-01-01

    P. J. Kellman and T. F. Shipley (1992) and P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, and T. F. Shipley (2005) suggested that completion of partly occluded objects and illusory objects involve the same or similar mechanisms at critical stages of contour interpolation. B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and R. W. Fleming and B. L. Anderson (2007) presented a number of…

  3. Evaluation of Simulated Photochemical Partitioning of Oxidized Nitrogen in the Upper Troposphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional and global chemical transport models underpredict NOx (NO +NO2) in the upper troposphere where it is a precursor to the greenhouse gas ozone. The NOx bias has been shown in model evaluations using aircraft data (Singh et al., 2007) and to...

  4. Strategic Human Resource Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on strategic human resource (HR) development. "Strategic HR Orientation and Firm Performance in India" (Kuldeep Singh) reports findings from a study of Indian business executives that suggests there is a positive link between HR policies and practices and workforce motivation and loyalty and sustainable…

  5. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST ON PULMONARY RESPONSES DURING ALLERGIC SENSITIZATION TO AEROSOLIZED OVALBUMIN IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Diesel Exhaust on Pulmonary Responses During Allergic Sensitization to Aerosolized Ovalbumin in BALB/c Mice. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels1, D. Andrews1, E. Boykin1, W. P. Linak2 and M.I. Gilmour1. 1USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC. 2 USEPA, ORD, NRMRL, RTP, NC.

    Inhala...

  6. CYTOTOXICITY AND CELL SIGNALING IN MH-S CELLS: RELATIVE POTENCY OF DIESEL AND COAL COMBUSTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxicity and Cell Signaling in MH-S Cells: Relative Potency of Diesel and Coal Combustion Particles P. Singh1, Y. Kostetski2, M. Daniels1, T. Stevens3 and MI Gilmour 1USEPA, RTP, NC, 2National University of Singapore, Singapore, 3University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC<...

  7. Principles of Contour Information: Reply to Lim and Leek (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Manish; Feldman, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Lim and Leek (2012) presented a formalization of information along object contours, which they argued was an alternative to the approach taken in our article (Feldman & Singh, 2005). Here, we summarize the 2 approaches, showing that--notwithstanding Lim and Leek's (2012) critical rhetoric--their approach is substantially identical to ours, except…

  8. Topics in Culture Learning, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brislin, Richard W., Ed.; Hamnett, Michael P., Ed.

    The first section of this volume includes articles on cross-cultural teaching: "Mau Piailug's Navigation of Hokule'a from Hawaii to Tahiti," by David Lewis; "The New World Order and the Globalization of Social Science: Some Implications for Teaching Cross-Culturally," by Amarjit Singh; "Ponape: Cross-Cultural Contact, Formal Schooling, and Foreign…

  9. Adult Learning and the Future of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Madhu, Ed.

    This book contains 15 papers: "Introduction" (Madhu Singh); "Adult Learning and the Transformation of Work" (Paul Belanger); "Future of Work and Adult Learning" (Ettore Gelpi); "The Obligation of Education in the Face of Globalisation" (Nicole Arnaud); "Lifelong Learning and Vocational Education and Training: A Teacher's and Trade Union View"…

  10. Children with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Behavior Using Chin Movements to Operate Microswitches to Obtain Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Tota, Alessia; Antonucci, Massimo; Oliva, Doretta

    2006-01-01

    In these two studies, two children with multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior were assessed to see if they could use chin movements to operate microswitches to obtain environmental stimulation. In Study I, we applied an adapted version of a recently introduced electronic microswitch [Lancioni, G. E., O'Reilly, M. F., Singh, N. N.,…

  11. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  12. Age, Gender and Job Satisfaction among Elementary School Head Teachers in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazi, Safdar Rehman; Maringe, Felix

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore general job satisfaction of elementary school head teachers in Pakistan with respect to their age and gender. One hundred and eighty head teachers were sampled from government elementary schools of Toba Tek Singh, Punjab, Pakistan, to collect the relevant data using a modified version of the Minnesota…

  13. The Moderating Role of Adult Connections in High School Students' Sense of School Belonging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillery, Amy Dutton

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that students who had a strong sense of school belonging exhibited greater academic motivation and performance (E. Anderman, 2002; Faircloth & Hamm, 2005), had fewer emotional and behavioral difficulties (Furrer & Skinner, 2003; McMahon, Singh, Garner, & Benhorin; 2004), and were less likely to dropout of school…

  14. Evaluating outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Shane

    2015-12-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com blog post “Quantifying the success of public engagement” (22 October, http://ow.ly/TIWYJ), which discussed criticisms (made by science writer Simon Singh) of certain projects designed to boost interest in science.

  15. Two Boys with Multiple Disabilities Increasing Adaptive Responding and Curbing Dystonic/Spastic Behavior via a Microswitch-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    A recent study has shown that microswitch clusters (i.e., combinations of microswitches) and contingent stimulation could be used to increase adaptive responding and reduce dystonic/spastic behavior in two children with multiple disabilities [Lancioni, G. E., Singh, N. N., Oliva, D., Scalini, L., & Groeneweg, J. (2003). Microswitch clusters to…

  16. A Framework for Inclusion: Plurilingual Teachers in Day and Community Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruickshank, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Linguistic and cultural diversity is becoming a feature of the teaching profession in OECD countries with the increase in global migration and mobility (Reid, Collins & Singh, 2014). Plurilingual teachers, however, tend to experience marginalisation in terms of gaining employment and in their workplace experiences. Although there is a body of…

  17. Teaching with the Flow: Fixity and Fluidity in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennycook, Alastair

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I suggest that as educators we need to understand that the spaces and cultures our students inhabit are to be found not so much in predefinitions of cultural background or in studies of classrooms as cultural spaces as in the transcultural flows with which our students engage. Thus, my argument is not only that, as Singh and Doherty…

  18. Corrigendum.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Maltais, F., Singh, S., Donald, A., Crater, G., Church, A., Goh, A. et al. (2014) Effects of a combination of umeclidinium/vilanterol on exercise endurance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: two randomized, double-blind clinical trials. Ther Adv Respir Dis 8: 169-181. PMID:27255756

  19. Corrigendum.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Jenkins, C., Arulogun, O. S., Singh, A., Mande, A. T., Ajayi, E., Calys-Tagoe, B., . . . the SIREN Team (2016). Stroke Investigative Research and Education Network: Community engagement and outreach within phenomics core. Health Education & Behavior, 43(1 Suppl.), 82S-92S. (Original DOI: 10.1177/1090198116634082). PMID:27365255

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS (P.
    SinghI, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, D.L. Doerfler2 and M.I. Gilmour2, 1NCSU, Ra...

  1. Height, weight and body mass index of girls and boys in a rural school in Punjab India

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All the students at this Bhagat Puran Singh Memorial School in Punjab, India were educated about the importance of caloric intake and physical activity. Body weight and height were recorded once a month for 12 consecutive months for 632 students, age 8-23 years (7584 observations). For US and Euro...

  2. Editorial: Looking to the Future of Hydrologic Engineering

    EPA Science Inventory

    Being one of the more recent journals of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Journal of Hydrologic Engineering (JHE) has made significant strides under the forward-thinking leadership of previous editors (M. Levent Kavvas 1996-2004, and V. P. Singh, 2004-2012) si...

  3. Fictionalized Indian English Speech and the Representations of Ideology in Indian Novels in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muthiah, Kalaivahni

    2009-01-01

    I investigate the spoken dialogue of four Indian novels in English: Mulk Raj Anand's "Untouchable" (1935), Khushwant Singh's "Train to Pakistan" (1956), Rasipuram Krishnaswami Narayan's "The World of Nagaraj" (1990), and Rohinton Mistry's "Family Matters" (2002). Roger Fowler has said that literature, as a form of discourse, articulates ideology;…

  4. MUTAGENESIS OF L5178Y/TK(+/-)-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS BY THE CLASTOGEN ELLIPTICINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The antitumor drug ellipticine is clastogenic in CHO cells (Bhuyan et al., 1972) but is only weakly mutagenic at the hprt locus in CHO cells (DeMarini et al., 1983; Singh and Gupta, 1983a,b). In the present study, the mutagenic and clastogenic activities of ellipticine were evalu...

  5. MUTAGENICITY AND CLASTOGENICITY OF TENIPOSIDE (VM-26) IN L5178Y/TK(+/-)-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The antitumor drug teniposide (VM-26) is a potent inducer of DNA breaks (Long et al., Cancer Res., 45:3106, 1985), but it is only weakly mutagenic at the hprt locus in CHO cells (Singh and Gupta, Cancer Res., 43:577, 1983). In the present study, the mutagenic and clastogenic acti...

  6. Examining the Effects of Jyoti Meditation on Stress and the Moderating Role of Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Conley, Abigail H.; Young, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined whether Jyoti meditation (JM), a spiritually based meditation (Singh, 2012), influenced student counselors' (N = 60) level of stress and emotional intelligence (EI). Results from a randomized controlled trial and growth curve analysis provided a multilevel model in which JM reduced stress and EI moderated the effect.

  7. EFFECT OF THREE DIFFERENT SIZED FRACTIONS OF OUTDOOR PM ON INFLAMMATORY AND OXIDATIVE MARKERS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECT OF THREE DIFFERENT SIZED FRACTIONS OF OUTDOOR PM ON INFLAMMATORY MARKERS IN VIVO
    C A J Dick', P Singh2, P. Evansky3, S Becker3 and M I Gilmour3.
    'Center For Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 2NCSU, Raleigh, NC 'Experimental Toxicolog...

  8. Cosmopolitanism and Rural Education: A Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Carol

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, recent research into the global movement of teachers [C. Reid, J. Collins, and M. Singh. 2014. "Global Teachers, Australian Perspectives: Goodbye Mr Chips, Hello Ms Banerjee." Singapore: Springer] and their experiences in rural areas of Australia are discussed in order to make the case for a cosmopolitan education theory…

  9. They Can Still Act Chinese and Be Canadian at the Same Time: Reflections on Multiculturalism and the Alberta Art Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiserman, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores how Canadian identity remains a white identity through an examination of the ways in which cultural diversity in Canada has been promoted and controlled in law and in practice through Jakeet Singh's (2004) notion of "culture-blind multiculturalism." It then turns to one instance of this kind of myopic cultural reproduction…

  10. A Comparison of Challenging Behaviour in an Adult Group with Down's Syndrome and Dementia Compared with an Adult Down's Syndrome Group without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxley, Adam; Van-Schaik, Paul; Witts, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency and severity of challenging behaviour in adults with Down's syndrome with and without signs of dementia. Care staff were interviewed using the Aberrant Behaviour Checklist-Community version (M.G. Aman & N.N. Singh, Slosson, East Aurora, NY, 1994), to investigate the frequency and severity of challenging…

  11. Persistence of Early Emerging Aberrant Behavior in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Vanessa A.; O'Reilly, Mark; Itchon, Jonathan; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the persistence of early emerging aberrant behavior in 13 preschool children with developmental disabilities. The severity of aberrant behavior was assessed every 6 months over a 3-year period. Teachers completed the assessments using the Aberrant Behavior Checklist [Aman, M. G., & Singh, N. N. (1986). "Aberrant Behavior…

  12. From Village to the World: Books with Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Rikki

    2008-01-01

    The Pardada Pardadi Girls Vocational School (PPGVS) in India was established in 2000 by Virendera (Sam) Singh, a retired U.S. Dupont South Asia department head to address the issue of gender bias in India. According to the school's website, nearly half of India's population is illiterate: males outnumber females two-to-one in literacy and drop-out…

  13. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  14. Sleep Duration and Area-Level Deprivation in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Horn, Erin; Duncan, Glen E.; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Turkheimer, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: We used quantitative genetic models to assess whether area-level deprivation as indicated by the Singh Index predicts shorter sleep duration and modifies its underlying genetic and environmental contributions. Methods: Participants were 4,218 adult twin pairs (2,377 monozygotic and 1,841 dizygotic) from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants self-reported habitual sleep duration. The Singh Index was determined by linking geocoding addresses to 17 indicators at the census-tract level using data from Census of Washington State and Census Tract Cartographic Boundary Files from 2000 and 2010. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate genetic decomposition and quantitative genetic interaction models that assessed A (additive genetics), C (common environment), and E (unique environment) main effects of the Singh Index on sleep duration and allowed the magnitude of residual ACE variance components in sleep duration to vary with the Index. Results: The sample had a mean age of 38.2 y (standard deviation [SD] = 18), and was predominantly female (62%) and Caucasian (91%). Mean sleep duration was 7.38 h (SD = 1.20) and the mean Singh Index score was 0.00 (SD = 0.89). The heritability of sleep duration was 39% and the Singh Index was 12%. The uncontrolled phenotypic regression of sleep duration on the Singh Index showed a significant negative relationship between area-level deprivation and sleep length (b = −0.080, P < 0.001). Every 1 SD in Singh Index was associated with a ∼4.5 min change in sleep duration. For the quasi-causal bivariate model, there was a significant main effect of E (b0E = −0.063; standard error [SE] = 0.30; P < 0.05). Residual variance components unique to sleep duration were significant for both A (b0Au = 0.734; SE = 0.020; P < 0.001) and E (b0Eu = 0.934; SE = 0.013; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Area-level deprivation has a quasi-causal association with sleep duration, with greater deprivation being related to

  15. Studying Recombination with High-Throughput Sequencing: An Educational Primer for Use with “Fine-Scale Heterogeneity in Crossover Rate in the garnet-scalloped Region of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome”

    PubMed Central

    Heil, Caiti S. Smukowski; Noor, Mohamed A. F.

    2013-01-01

    An article by Singh and colleagues in this issue of GENETICS quantifies variation in recombination rate across a small region of the Drosophila melanogaster genome, providing an opportunity for instructors of genetics to introduce or reinforce important concepts such as recombination and recombination rate variation, genome sequencing, and sequence features of the genome. Additional background information, a detailed explanation of the methods used in this study, and discussion questions are provided. Related article in GENETICS: Singh, N. D., E. A. Stone, C. F. Aquadro, and A. G. Clark, 2013 Fine-scale heterogeneity in crossover rate in the garnet-scalloped region of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome. Genetics 194: 375–387. PMID:23733850

  16. India takes nuclear path to go green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagla, Pallava

    2009-11-01

    Manmohan Singh, the prime minister of India, last month announced a major new emphasis on nuclear power that could see the country generate as much as 470GW of power from nuclear reactors by 2050. Speaking at the opening of the International Conference on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy in New Dehli, Singh said that the programme would sharply reduce India's dependence on fossil fuels and be a "major contribution" to global efforts to combat climate change. "If we use the power of the atom wisely for the universal good, the possibilities are unbounded," he said. However, even with this capacity, nuclear power would still only account for 25% of India's energy mix, with the bulk of the rest coming from coal.

  17. Radiative effects and the missing energy paradox in the ideal two capacitors problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzúa, Gilberto A.; Jiménez, Omar; Maass, Fernando; Restuccia, Álvaro

    2016-05-01

    Starting from the Poynting theorem, which arises from the exact Maxwell equations, we establish the balance of energy for the radiating ideal two capacitors problem. This balance of energy results in a nonlinear differential equation governing the time evolution of the voltage V. Boykin, Hite and Singh, following an approach not based on first principles, were the first to obtain this nonlinear differential equation and proposed an exponentially decaying voltage as a unique solution for it. We claim that the space of solutions for this differential equation is much richer. In fact, besides the exponentially decaying solution just mentioned there exist solutions with a sudden death behavior. The radiative effect introduced by Boykin, Hite and Singh, complemented with our analysis based on the exact Maxwell equations and the characterization of the more general space of solution of the nonlinear differential equation, explain the missing energy paradox in the ideal two capacitors problem.

  18. 2016: Creating a Culture of Safety in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Kennedy Sheldon, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Nurses play vital roles in preventing errors and improving the quality of care for patients. However, in the breakthrough Institute of Medicine (IOM) reports, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System (IOM, 1999) and Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century (IOM, 2001), it was estimated that about 44,000-98,000 Americans die each year as a result of medical errors. Gibson and Singh's (2003) book, Wall of Silence: The Untold Story of the Medical Mistakes That Kill and Injure Millions of Americans, shared real-life stories of medical mistakes to help raise awareness and create a sense of urgency for the issues surrounding healthcare errors. Gibson and Singh (2003) also included aspects of the human side of errors-the perceptions of the healthcare providers regarding their errors and the responses of patients who had been harmed. 
. PMID:26991701

  19. Lipoid Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sunil; Malik, Sunita; Singh, Gurdarshan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A case report of a 6-year-old male child who reported with recurrent oral and skin ulcerations since childhood and was diagnosed as lipoid proteinosis manifesting with generalized thickening, hardening, and scarring of the skin and hoarseness of voice; is presented here. How to cite this article: Mittal HC, Yadav S, Malik S, Singh G. Lipoid Proteinosis. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):149-151. PMID:27365938

  20. CAM, free speech, and the British legal system: overstepping the mark?

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Lionel R

    2009-10-01

    The British Chiropractic Association recently won a libel case against the science writer and CAM 'skeptic' Dr Simon Singh for publishing an article in a British newspaper in which he accused them of promoting 'bogus' treatments. This has ignited a campaign in the UK to 'keep the libel laws out of science'. In this article, the tension between media freedom of expression and defamation law is examined, and possible ramifications for CAM in the UK explored. PMID:19848549

  1. News and Views: Where at a supermassive black hole do gamma-rays come from? Keep libel laws out of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    Radio observations of galaxy M87 at the time of a massive gamma-ray flare have established that the gamma-ray emission arises close to the central black hole, in the inner jet. Writer Simon Singh is being sued for libel by the British Chiropractic Association because he wrote a newspaper article about the evidence for the effectiveness of spinal manipulation as a treatment for childhood illnesses. Why should scientists care about this action, asks Sue Bowler?

  2. Lipoid Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Hitesh C; Yadav, Sunil; Malik, Sunita; Singh, Gurdarshan

    2016-01-01

    A case report of a 6-year-old male child who reported with recurrent oral and skin ulcerations since childhood and was diagnosed as lipoid proteinosis manifesting with generalized thickening, hardening, and scarring of the skin and hoarseness of voice; is presented here. How to cite this article: Mittal HC, Yadav S, Malik S, Singh G. Lipoid Proteinosis. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):149-151. PMID:27365938

  3. Are icons sense data?

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Brian P; Green, E J

    2015-12-01

    We argue that Hoffman, Singh, and Prakash (Psychon Bull Rev, this issue) have not made the case that "the language of space-time and physical objects is the wrong language for describing the true structure of the objective world." Further, we contend that, contrary to what Hoffman et al. claim, the perceptual icons posited by interface theory seem best taken to be sense data. PMID:26384993

  4. Scientific overview: CSCI - CITAC Annual General Meeting and Young Investigator's Forum 2012.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Ghadi; Ram, Véronique D; Wang, Xin; Wilcox, Jared T; Yoon, Ju-Yoon

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the Annual General Meeting of the Clinical Investigator Trainee Association of Canada - Association des cliniciens-chercheurs en formation du Canada (CITAC - ACCFC) and the Canadian Society of Clinician Investigators (CSCI) was held 19-21 September in Ottawa. Several globally-renowned scientists, including 2012 Friesen International Prize recipient, Dr. Marc Tessier-Lavigne, the CSCI/Royal College Henry Friesen Award recipient, Dr. Morley Hollenberg, and the recipient of the Joe Doupe Young Investigator Award, Dr. Phillip Awadalla, presented on a range of topics on research in basic and translational science in medicine. This year's CITAC Symposium featured presentations by Dr. Alain Beaudet, Dr. Michael Strong and Dr. Vivek Goel on the Role of Physician Scientists in Public Health and Policy, which was followed by a lively discussion on the role of basic science and clinical research in patient-oriented policy development. This scientific overview highlights the research presented by trainees at both the oral plenary and poster presentation sessions. As at previous meetings, research questions investigated by this year's trainees span multiple medical disciplines; from basic science to clinical research to medical education. Below is a summary of the presentations showcased at the Young Investigator's Forum. PMID:24088329

  5. On the relationship between visual magnitudes and gas and dust production rates in target comets to space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A. A.; Sanzovo, G. C.; Singh, P. D.; Misra, A.; Miguel Torres, R.; Boice, D. C.; Huebner, W. F.

    In this paper, we report the results of a cometary research, developed during the last 10 years by us, involving a criterious analysis of gas and dust production rates in comets directly associated to recent space missions. For the determination of the water release rates we use the framework of the semi-empirical model of observed visual magnitudes [Newburn Jr., R.L. A semi-empirical photometric theory of cometary gas and dust production. Application to P/Halley's production rates, ESA-SP 174, 3, 1981; de Almeida, A.A., Singh, P.D., Huebner, W.F. Water release rates, active areas, and minimum nuclear radius derived from visual magnitudes of comets - an application to Comet 46P/Wirtanen, Planet. Space Sci. 45, 681-692, 1997; Sanzovo, G.C., de Almeida, A.A., Misra, A. et al. Mass-loss rates, dust particle sizes, nuclear active areas and minimum nuclear radii of target comets for missions STARDUST and CONTOUR, MNRAS 326, 852-868, 2001.], which once obtained, were directly converted into gas production rates. In turn, the dust release rates were obtained using the photometric model for dust particles [Newburn Jr., R.L., Spinrad, H. Spectrophotometry of seventeen comets. II - the continuum, AJ 90, 2591-2608, 1985; de Freitas Pacheco, J.A., Landaberry, S.J.C., Singh, P.D. Spectrophotometric observations of the Comet Halley during the 1985-86 apparition, MNRAS 235, 457-464, 1988; Sanzovo, G.C., Singh, P.D., Huebner, W.F. Dust colors, dust release rates, and dust-to-gas ratios in the comae of six comets, A&AS 120, 301-311, 1996.]. We applied these models to seven target comets, chosen for space missions of "fly-by"/impact and rendezvous/landing.

  6. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 91

    SciTech Connect

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2013-10-15

    Experimental nuclear structure and decay data for all known A=91 nuclides (As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd) have been evaluated. This evaluation, covering data received by 1 September 2013, supersedes the 1998 evaluation by C. M. Baglin published in Nuclear Data Sheets86, 1 (1999) (15 December 1998 literature cutoff), and subsequent evaluations by C. M. Baglin added to the ENSDF database for Kr, Sr and Zr (29 December 2000 literature cutoff) and by B. Singh for {sup 91}Tc (6 November 2000 literature cutoff)

  7. Darwin and Mendel today: a comment on "Limits of imagination: the 150th Anniversary of Mendel's Laws, and why Mendel failed to see the importance of his discovery for Darwin's theory of evolution".

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng; Li, Xiuju

    2016-01-01

    We comment on a recent paper by Rama Singh, who concludes that Mendel deserved to be called the father of genetics, and Darwin would not have understood the significance of Mendel's paper had he read it. We argue that Darwin should have been regarded as the father of genetics not only because he was the first to formulate a unifying theory of heredity, variation, and development -- Pangenesis, but also because he clearly described almost all genetical phenomena of fundamental importance, including what he called "prepotency" and what we now call "dominance" or "Mendelian inheritance". The word "gene" evolved from Darwin's imagined "gemmules", instead of Mendel's so-called "factors". PMID:26651239

  8. Tonometry and Care of Tonometers

    PubMed Central

    S Choudhari, Nikhil; Deep Singh, Manav

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the only modifiable risk factor in the management of glaucoma. Hence, IOP and its appropriate measurement deserve our ongoing interest. Over the years, not only has our understanding of glaucoma changed but also has changed our approach to the measurement of the IOP. This review is an attempt to elucidate the commonly techniques of tonometry, and critically evaluate each of them, in current glaucoma practice. How to cite this article: Maheshwari R, Choudhari NS, Singh MD. Tonometry and Care of Tonometers. J Current Glau Prac 2012;6(3):124-130. PMID:26997768

  9. On the interpretation of measured ion streams in the wake of the Shuttle Orbiter in terms of plasma expansion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Hwang, K. S.; Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the flow vector and current density of ion streams between 11 and 18 m downstream in the near wake of the Shuttle Orbiter during the Spacelab 2 mission are compared with a one-dimensional, time-dependent plasma expansion model for wake filling. The model is based on the self-consistent plasma model of Singh et al. (1987) modified to simulate the one-dimensional expansion of counter-streaming plasmas. The results show good agreement between the model and the experimental results, suggesting that the measured streams can be interpreted in terms of collisionless plasma expansion.

  10. Modified 8×8 quantization table and Huffman encoding steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongning; Sun, Shuliang

    2014-10-01

    A new secure steganography, which is based on Huffman encoding and modified quantized discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients, is provided in this paper. Firstly, the cover image is segmented into 8×8 blocks and modified DCT transformation is applied on each block. Huffman encoding is applied to code the secret image before embedding. DCT coefficients are quantized by modified quantization table. Inverse DCT(IDCT) is conducted on each block. All the blocks are combined together and the steg image is finally achieved. The experiment shows that the proposed method is better than DCT and Mahender Singh's in PSNR and Capacity.

  11. Supergranulation, a convective phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-08-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection ,Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J., Srikanth, R., 2004, MNRAS, 347, 1279-12814) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J

  12. Supergranular Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Here the opacity is so large that heat flux transport is mainly by convection rather than by photon diffusion. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection , Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni

  13. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 21

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2015-07-15

    This evaluation of A = 21 has been updated from previous evaluations published in 2004Fi10, 1998En04, 1990En08, and 1978En02. Coverage includes properties of adopted levels and γ-rays, decay-scheme data (energies, intensities and placement of radiations), and cross reference entries. The following tables continue the tradition of showing the systematic relationships between levels in A = 21. Much of the new data in this evaluations were taken directly from the xundl database, compiled under the direction of Balraj Singh, McMaster University. The evaluator is particularly appreciative of the efforts of the xundl compilers.

  14. Ayurvedic heritage of J & K: a review of Sri Ranbira Cikitsa Sudha Sāra.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Singh, G; Kumar, N

    2001-01-01

    This work reviews the contents of an Ayurvedic treatise "Sri Ranbira Cikitsa Sudha Sāra" authored by Kaviraj Neel Kanth in the year 1931 of Vikrami, in 'Takari' script, the official script during the reign of his highness Maharaja Ranbir Singh of Jammu and Kashmir. A copy of the book is presently available with Raghunath Sanskrit Library, Jammu in torn condition. This is a humble effort by the authors for the exploration of hidden and old Ayurvedic literature of Jammu and Kashmir. PMID:12841189

  15. A Kinematic Model for Surface Irrigation: An Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Bernard; Singh, Vijay P.

    1982-06-01

    The kinematic model for surface irrigation, reported previously by Sherman and Singh (1978), is extended. Depending upon the duration of irrigation and time variability of infiltration, three cases are distinguished. Explicit solutions are obtained when infiltration is constant. When infiltration is varying in time, a numerical procedure is developed which is stable and has fast convergence. A rigorous theoretical justification is developed for computation of the depth of water at and the time history of the front wall of water advancing down an infiltrating plane or channel. A derivation is given of the continuity and momentum equations when there is lateral inflow and infiltration into the channel bed.

  16. A possible mechanism for the observed streaming of O(+) and H(+) ions at nearly equal speeds in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-07-01

    In recent years, O(+) and H(+) ions streaming away from the earth along geomagnetic field lines have been observed in the distant magnetotail region. In the present paper, it is suggested that the transverse acceleration of the ions occurs on auroral field lines at altitudes above the field-aligned potential drops, where ion beams and electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves have been simultaneously observed. It is pointed out that the preferential acceleration of O(+) relative to H(+) occurs through the interaction of O(+) ions with weak EHC waves, as suggested by Singh et al. (1983). A quantitative explanation is provided for the observed relationship between the energies of O(+) and H(+) ions.

  17. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 152

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.J.

    2013-11-15

    Detailed level schemes, decay schemes, and the experimental data on which they are based are presented for all nuclei with mass number A=152. The experimental data are evaluated; inconsistencies and discrepancies are noted; and adopted values for level and γ–ray energies, γ intensities, as well as for other nuclear properties are given. This evaluation replaces the A=152 evaluation published by Agda Artna–Cohen in Nuclear Data Sheets 79, 1 (1996) and the evaluation for 152Dy prepared by Balraj Singh and published in Nuclear Data Sheets 95, 995 (2002)

  18. Comment on ''Capacitance-voltage measurements in amorphous Schottky barriers''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, M. J.; Döhler, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    The band-bending potential profile V(x) in the space-charge region of an amorphous semiconductor moves regidly in the x direction, with increased bias, irrespective of the form of the density of localized states N(E). A recent paper by Singh and Cohen [J. Appl. Phys. 51, 413 (1980)] which suggest this is not true is incorrect in this point. This property leads to simplified schemes for the analysis of C-V measurements and field-effect conductance measurements.

  19. The X-Ray Spectra of Blazars: Analysis of the Complete EXOSAT Archive: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Barr, Paul; Giommi, Paolo; Maraschi, Laura; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Treves, Aldo

    1995-07-01

    In the paper "The X-Ray Spectra of Blazars: Analysis of the Complete EXOSAT Archive" by Rita M. Sambruna, Paul Barr, Paolo Giommi, Laura Maraschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, and Aldo Treves (ApJS, 95,371 [1994]), the section regarding the object PKS 1510-08 (Section 4.4.14) contains an erroneous quotation. K. P. Singh, A.R. Rao, and M.N. Vahia (ApJ, 365,455 [1990]) in fact detected: emission line only in the 1984 data, and not in the 1985 spectrum, as stated.

  20. Dilepton production as a useful probe of quark gluon plasma with temperature dependent chemical potential quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2016-07-01

    We extend the previous study of dilepton production using [S. Somorendro Singh and Y. Kumar, Can. J. Phys. 92 (2014) 31] based on a simple quasiparticle model of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this model, finite value of quark mass uses temperature dependent chemical potential the so-called Temperature Dependent Chemical Potential Quark Mass (TDCPQM). We calculate dilepton production in the relevant range of mass region. It is observed that the production rate is marginally enhanced from the earlier work. This is due to the effect of TDCPQM and its effect is highly significant in the production of dilepton.

  1. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.

    2015-07-01

    This evaluation of A = 21 has been updated from previous evaluations published in 2004Fi10, 1998En04, 1990En08, and 1978En02. Coverage includes properties of adopted levels and γ-rays, decay-scheme data (energies, intensities and placement of radiations), and cross reference entries. The following tables continue the tradition of showing the systematic relationships between levels in A = 21. Much of the new data in this evaluations were taken directly from the xundl database, compiled under the direction of Balraj Singh, McMaster University. The evaluator is particularly appreciative of the efforts of the xundl compilers.

  2. Barcelona 2002: law, ethics, and human rights. Using the law to improve access to treatments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Richard; Parmar, Sharan; Divan, Vivek; Berger, Jonathan

    2002-12-01

    The XIII International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa in July 2000 focused worldwide attention on the problem of accessing treatments in developing countries. In the interim, thanks to the work of activists - from demonstrations to court cases, and from acts of public courage by people living with HIV/AIDS to ongoing lobbying of politicians and trade negotiators - some very significant developments have occurred. But the reality is that the vast majority of people living with HIV/AIDS still lack access to affordable, quality medicines. This article, a summary of a paper presented at "Putting Third First: Vaccines, Access to Treatments and the Law," a satellite meeting held at Barcelona on 5 July 2002 and organized by the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, the AIDS Law Project, South Africa, and the Lawyers Collective HIV/AIDS Unit, India, explores three approaches for improving access. In the first part, Richard Elliott provides an overview of the state of the right to health as embodied in international human rights law; comments on the experience to date in litigating claims to the right to health; and identifies potential strategies activists can adopt to advance recognition of the right to health. In the second part, Sharan Parmar and Vivek Divan describe price-control and drug-financing mechanisms used by industrialized countries to increase the affordability of medicines; and discuss how some of these mechanisms could be adapted for use in developing countries. Finally, Jonathan Berger describes the use of litigation in the courts by the Treatment Action Campaign in South Africa. PMID:14743817

  3. Hierarchical resilience with lightweight threads.

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Kyle Bruce

    2011-10-01

    This paper proposes methodology for providing robustness and resilience for a highly threaded distributed- and shared-memory environment based on well-defined inputs and outputs to lightweight tasks. These inputs and outputs form a failure 'barrier', allowing tasks to be restarted or duplicated as necessary. These barriers must be expanded based on task behavior, such as communication between tasks, but do not prohibit any given behavior. One of the trends in high-performance computing codes seems to be a trend toward self-contained functions that mimic functional programming. Software designers are trending toward a model of software design where their core functions are specified in side-effect free or low-side-effect ways, wherein the inputs and outputs of the functions are well-defined. This provides the ability to copy the inputs to wherever they need to be - whether that's the other side of the PCI bus or the other side of the network - do work on that input using local memory, and then copy the outputs back (as needed). This design pattern is popular among new distributed threading environment designs. Such designs include the Barcelona STARS system, distributed OpenMP systems, the Habanero-C and Habanero-Java systems from Vivek Sarkar at Rice University, the HPX/ParalleX model from LSU, as well as our own Scalable Parallel Runtime effort (SPR) and the Trilinos stateless kernels. This design pattern is also shared by CUDA and several OpenMP extensions for GPU-type accelerators (e.g. the PGI OpenMP extensions).

  4. Does disorder destroy eg' pockets in Na0.3CoO2? A new ab initio method for disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlijn, Tom; Volja, Dimitri; Ku, Wei

    2009-03-01

    Hydrated Na0.3CoO2 shows interesting superconductivity[1], with evidence of a nodal order parameter[2]. One possible origin of the nodal structure is f-wave pairing[3] due to the six eg' pockets predicted by the local density approximation[4]. However, ARPES experiments[5] showed no sign of these hole pockets. In this talk, we will investigate a recent proposal[6] of destruction of the eg' pockets due to disorder. An affordable ab initio Wannier function based method will be presented that takes into account spatial distributions of disorder, beyond existing mean-field approximations (e.g. VCA, CPA). We also use our Wannier functions to analyse the crystal field splitting, the sign of which critically determines the role of correlation in DMFT. [3pt] [1] K. Takada et al, Nature 422, 53 (2003)[0pt] [2] Zheng G. et al, JPCM 18, L63 (2006)[0pt] [3] Kuroki K. et al, PRL 93, 077001-1 (2004)[0pt] [4] D. Singh, PRB 61, 13397 (2000)[0pt] [5] Hasan M.Z. et al, PRL 92, 246402 (2004)[0pt] [6] D. Singh et al PRL 97, 016404 (2006)

  5. Effect of ultrasound pre-treatment on the drying kinetics of brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Shekhar U; Tiwari, Brijesh K; O'Donnell, Colm P

    2015-03-01

    The effect of ultrasound pre-treatment on the drying kinetics of brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum under hot-air convective drying was investigated. Pretreatments were carried out at ultrasound intensity levels ranging from 7.00 to 75.78 Wcm(-2) for 10 min using an ultrasonic probe system. It was observed that ultrasound pre-treatments reduced the drying time required. The shortest drying times were obtained from samples pre-treated at 75.78 Wcm(-2). The fit quality of 6 thin-layer drying models was also evaluated using the determination of coefficient (R(2)), root means square error (RMSE), AIC (Akaike information criterion) and BIC (Bayesian information criterion). Drying kinetics were modelled using the Newton, Henderson and Pabis, Page, Wang and Singh, Midilli et al. and Weibull models. The Newton, Wang and Singh, and Midilli et al. models showed the best fit to the experimental drying data. Color of ultrasound pretreated dried seaweed samples were lighter compared to control samples. It was concluded that ultrasound pretreatment can be effectively used to reduce the energy cost and drying time for drying of A. nodosum. PMID:25454823

  6. Revision of Metahaliotrema Yamaguti, 1953 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae), with new and previously described species from the spotted scat Scatophagus argus (Linnaeus) (Perciformes: Scatophagidae) in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, Delane C; Nguyen, Ha Van; Ha, Ngo Duy; Heckmann, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    An emended diagnosis of Metahaliotrema Yamaguti, 1953 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae) is provided based on specimens of six species collected from the spotted scat Scatophagus argus (Linnaeus) (Scatophagidae) in Vietnam: M. scatophagi Yamaguti, 1953 (type-species); M. cf. yamagutii Mizelle & Price, 1964; M. mizellei Venkatanarasaiah, 1981; M. kulkarnii Venkatanarasaiah, 1981; M. ypsilocleithrum n. sp.; and M. similis n. sp. Methaliotrema filamentosum Venkatanarasaiah, 1981 from the whipfin silver-biddy Gerres filamentosus Cuvier (Gerreidae) is included as the only other valid member of the genus. Metahaliotrema arii Yamaguti, 1953 from an ariid catfish is considered incertae sedis within the Dactylogyridae; and Metahaliotrema srivastavai Singh & Agarwal, 1994 from a bagrid catfish is transferred to Chauhanellus Bychowsky & Nagibina, 1969 as Chauhanellus srivastavai (Singh & Agarwal, 1994) n. comb. Metahaliotrema geminatohamula Pan, Ding & Zhang, 1995 from spotted scat in China is determined to be a junior subjective synonym of M. scatophagi. The two new species and M. scatophagi, M. mizellei, and M. kulkarnii are described or redescribed based on specimens from Vietnam. PMID:27095662

  7. Drying characteristics of paddy in an integrated dryer.

    PubMed

    Manikantan, M R; Barnwal, P; Goyal, R K

    2014-04-01

    Drying characteristics of paddy (long grain variety PR-118 procured from PAU, Ludhiana) in an integrated dryer using single as well as combined heating source was studied at different air temperatures. The integrated dryer comprises three different air heating sources such as solar, biomass and electrical. Drying of paddy occurred in falling rate period. It was observed that duration of drying of paddy from 22 to 13 % moisture content (w.b.) was 5-9 h depending upon the source of energy used. In order to select a suitable drying curve, six thin layer-drying models (Newton, Page, Modified Page, Henderson and Pabis, Logarithmic and Wang and Singh) were fitted to the experimental moisture ratio data. Among the mathematical models investigated, Wang and Singh model best described the drying behaviour of paddy using solar, biomass and combined heating sources with highest coefficient of determination (r (2)) values and least chi-square, χ (2), mean bias error (MBE) and root mean square error (RMSE) values. However, Page model adequately described the drying behavior of paddy using electrical heating source. PMID:24741181

  8. Finite Element Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Corners Under Opening Bending Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, N.; Kwatra, N.; Kanwar, V. S.

    2013-03-01

    In the past few years, there has been growing use of finite element method for analysis of RCC structures to eliminate the expensive testing. However, validations of numerical models are instrumental towards making models reliable, which is, fundamental towards truly predictive prototyping. Keeping this in view, paper presents the results of numerical study of Reinforced Concrete Corners under opening moments using general-purpose finite element analysis software (ANSYS) and the comparison of results to the experimental results available in the literature [Singh and Kaushik, J Inst Eng (India), 84:201-209, 2003]. The Load deflection behaviour obtained is compared with the results corresponding to four different reinforcement detailing investigated experimentally [Singh and Kaushik, J Inst Eng (India), 84:201-209, 2003]. Details of the FE modeling of Reinforced Concrete Corners with four different reinforcement detailing have been presented. The best reinforcement detailing of Reinforced Concrete Corners on the basis of load deflection behaviour has been judged and advocated further on the basis of finite element analysis. The second phase of the study, investigates the effect of diameter of main steel, grade of concrete and spacing of shear reinforcement on load deformation behavior of the corners under opening bending moments.

  9. Spectroscopic study of ZnO doped CeO 2-PbO-B 2O 3 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Singh, Gurinder; Singh, D. P.

    2011-09-01

    Glass samples of compositions xZnO- xCeO 2-(30- x)PbO-(70- x)B 2O 3 with x varying from 2% to 10% mole fraction are prepared by the melt quench technique. The structural and optical analysis of glasses is carried out by XRD, FTIR, density and UV-visible spectroscopic measurement techniques. The FTIR spectral analysis indicates that with the addition of ZnO contents in glass network, structural units of BO 3 are transformed into BO 4. It has been observed in our previous work that band gap decreases from 2.89 to 2.30 eV for CeO 2-PbO-B 2O 3 glasses with cerium content varying from 0% to 10% [Gurinder Pal Singh, Davinder Paul Singh, Physica B 406(3) (2011) 640-644]. With the incorporation of zinc in CeO 2-PbO-B 2O 3 glasses, the optical band gap energy decreases further from 2.38 to 2.03 eV. This causes more compaction of the borate network, which results in an increase of density (3.39-4.02 g/cm 3). Transmittance shows that ZnO in glass samples acts as a reducing agent thathelps to convert Ce 4+→Ce 3+ ions.

  10. Characterization of a 21-Story Reinforced Building in the Valley of Mexico Using MEMS Accelerometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husker, A. L.; Dominguez, L. A.; Becerril, A.; Espejo, L.; Cochran, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Low cost MEMS accelerometers are becoming increasingly higher resolution making them useful in strong motion studies. Here we present a building response analysis in the lakebed zone of the Valley of Mexico. The Valley of Mexico represents one of the highest seismic risk locations in the world and incorporates Mexico City and part of Mexico State. More than 20 million people live there and it is the political and economic center of Mexico. In addition the valley has very high site effects with amplifications 100 - 500 times that of sites outside of the basin (Singh et al., 1988; Singh et al., 1995). We instrumented a 21-story building with MEMS accelerometers as part of the Quake Catcher Network or Red Atrapa Sismos as it is called in Mexico. The building known as the Centro Cultural de Tlateloco is located in an important historical and political area as well as a zone with some of the highest amplifications in the Valley of Mexico that had some of the worst destruction after the 1985 M8.1 Michoacan earthquake. During the earthquake most of the buildings that failed were between 7 - 18 stories tall. The peak accelerations near Tlateloco were at periods of 2 seconds. Since the earthquake the building has been retrofitted with N-S crossing supports to help withstand another earthquake. We present the measurements of frequencies and amplifications between floors for the length of the building.

  11. On the relationship between visual magnitudes and gas and dust production rates in target comets to space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A.; Sanzovo, G.; Singh, P.; Misra, A.; Torres, R. Miguel; Boice, D.; Huebner, W.

    at frequent intervals and published periodically in International Comet Quartely (ICQ). We use the semi -classical photometric model, described in details by Newburn (1981) and de Almeida, Singh &Huebner (1997) which with some modifications introduced by us, allowed the determination of the gas production rates from observed visual magnitudes measurements, mainly for short period comets (P < 20 years). These water release rates are then used in the determination of the total surface active areas, lower limits of nuclear radii estimates, when the whole sunlit hemisphere is active, and gas mass loss rates. Also we make a systematic and uniform analysis of continuum fluxes observed at optical wavelengths, with the purpose to study the behaviour of the dust. For this, we use the framework of the photometric model of dust particles developed by Newburn &Spinrad (1985, 1989), with contributions given by de Freitas Pacheco, Landaberrry &Singh (1988) and, more recently, by Sanzovo, Singh &Huebner (1996), Singh et al. (1997) and Sanzovo et al. (2001, 2002). This way, we determine the dust release rates and evaluate the effective dust particle sizes as well as their variations with heliocentric distance. Another important result from the above photometric models is the dust-to-gas mass ratio and its behaviour with the heliocentric distance. Whenever possible, the variations of dust release rates with the heliocentric distance were compared with the quantity AFRHO (in cm), defined as the product between the albedo of the dust particles, the fraction of the aperture filled by the dust, and the radius of the slit aperture projected on the comet. This parameter was introduced by A'Hearn et al. (1984) and is frequently used, since a gas release rate divided by AFRHO give essentially, the gas-to-dust ratio. In summary, in this oral communication we report the results of a cometary research, developed during the last 10 years by our group, involving a criterious analysis of gas and

  12. Determining the Probability Distribution of Hillslope Peak Discharge Using an Analytical Solution of Kinematic Wave Time of Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiamonte, Giorgio; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-04-01

    Hillslope hydrology is fundamental for understanding the flood phenomenon and for evaluating the time of concentration. The latter is a key variable for predicting peak discharge at the basin outlet and for designing urban infrastructure facilities. There have been a multitude of studies on the hydrologic response at the hillslope scale, and the time of concentration has been derived for different approaches. One approach for deriving hillslope response utilizes, in a distributed form, the differential equations of unsteady overland flow, specifically developed at the hydrodynamic scale, in order to account for the spatial heterogeneity of soil characteristics, topography, roughness and vegetation cover on the hillslope. Therefore, this approach seemingly mimics the complete hydraulics of flow. However, the very complex patterns generated by spatial heterogeneity can cause considerable error in the prediction even by very sophisticated models. Another approach that directly operates at the hillslope scale is by averaging over the hillslope the soil hydraulics, the topography, and the roughness characteristics. A physically-based lumped model of hillslope response was first proposed by Horton (1938), under the assumption that the flow regime is intermediate between laminar and turbulent regimes (transitional flow regime), by applying the mass conservation equation to the hillslope as a whole and by using the kinematic wave assumption for the friction slope (Singh, 1976, 1996). Robinson et al. (1995) and Robinson and Sivapalan (1996) generalized Horton's approach, suggesting an approximate solution of the overland flow equation that is valid for all flow regimes. Agnese et al. (2001) derived an analytical solution of a nonlinear storage model of hillslope response that is valid for all flow regimes, and the associated time of concentration. Recently, the well-known kinematic wave equation for computing the time of concentration for impervious surfaces has been

  13. Study of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering of Alizarin and Crystal Violet Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ram; Swarnkar, Raj Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) plays a vital role in analytical chemistry to characterize ultra trace quantity of organic compounds and biological samples. Two mechanisms have been considered to explain the SERS effect. The main contribution arises from a huge enhancement of the local electromagnetic field close to surface roughness of the metal structures, due to the excitation of a localized surface plasmon, while a further enhancement can be observed for molecules adsorbed onto specific sites when resonant charge transfer occurs. SERS signals have been observed from adsorbates on many metallic surfaces like Ag, Au, Ni, Cu etc. Additionally, metal oxide nanoparticles also show SERS signals It has now been established that SERS of analyte material is highly dependent on the type of substrate involved. Many types of nanostructures like nanofilms, nanorods, nanospheres etc. show highly efficient SERS signals. In particular, there are two routes available for the synthesis of these nanomaterials: the chemical route and the physical route. Chemical route involves many types of reducing agents and capping agents which can interfere in origin and measurement of these signals. The physical route avoids these anomalies and therefore it is suitable for the study of SERS phenomenon. Pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is an excellent top down technique to produce colloidal solution of nanoparticles with desired shape and size having surface free from chemical contamination, which is essential requirement for surface application of nanoparticles. The present work deals with the study of SERS of Crystal violet dye and Alizarin group dye on Cu@ Cu_2O and Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation. M. Fleishchmann, P. J. Hendra, and A. J. McQuillian Chem. Phys. Lett., 26, 163, 1974. U. Wenning, B. Pettinger, and H. Wetzel Chem. Phys. Lett., 70, 49, 1980. S. C. Singh, R. K. Swarnkar, P. Ankit, M. C. Chattopadhyaya, and R. Gopal AIP Conf. Proc

  14. Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E. P.

    2012-08-01

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements

  15. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E.

    2012-03-14

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their

  16. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements

  17. Theoretical study of magnetism and superconductivity in three-dimensional transition-metal-MgB2 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prabhakar P.; Joseph, P. Jiji Thomas

    2002-12-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of three-dimensional transition-metal-MgB2 alloys, Mg0.97TM0.03B2, (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent-potential approximation method in the atomic-sphere approximation. For unpolarized calculations, our results for Mg0.97TM0.03B2 alloys are similar to that of 3d impurities in other s and s-p metals. In particular, the local densities of states (DOS) associated with the 3d impurities are similar to our earlier work on 3d impurities in bulk Al (Singh P P 1991 Phys. Rev. B 43 3975; Singh P P 1991 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 3 3285). For spin-polarized calculations, we find only the alloys of V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co with MgB2 to be magnetic of all the 3d elements. We also find that Cr and Mn in MgB2 have a relatively large local magnetic moment of 2.43 and 2.87μB, respectively. We have used the unpolarized, self-consistent potentials of Mg0.97TM0.03B2 alloys, obtained within the coherent-potential approximation, to calculate the electron-phonon coupling constant λ using the Gaspari-Gyorffy formalism and the superconducting transition temperature Tc using the Allen-Dynes equation. We find that the calculated Tc is lowest for Mg0.97Cr0.03B2 and highest for Mg0.97Zn0.03B2, in qualitative agreement with experiment. The calculated trend in variation of Tc from Mn to Zn is also similar to the available experimental data. Our analysis of the variation in Tc, in terms of the DOS and the spectral function along the Γ to A direction, shows the variation to be an interplay between the total DOS at the Fermi energy and the creation/removal of states along the Γ to A direction (Singh P P 2002 Preprint cond-mat/0201093).

  18. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 192

    SciTech Connect

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2012-08-15

    Experimental structure and decay data for all nuclei with mass A=192 (Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At) have been evaluated. This evaluation, covering data received by 15 June 2012, supersedes the 1998 evaluation by C. M. Baglin (Nuclear Data Sheets84, 717 (1998), literature cutoff August 1998) and the subsequent inclusion in the ENSDF database of the new nuclide {sup 192}At (C. M. Baglin, literature cutoff 16 May 2006). It also incorporates the current evaluation of superdeformed-band information by B. Singh. Since the last publication, {sup 192}Ta, {sup 192}W and {sup 192}At have been observed, and an isomeric state has been identified in {sup 192}Re. The {epsilon} decay of {sup 192}Au has been studied using a multidetector array resulting in an extensively revised level scheme for {sup 192}Pt.

  19. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 1. The Electron

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-07

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 1. The Electron Just over a century ago, British physicist J.J. Thompson experimenting with electric currents and charged particles inside empty glass tubes, showed that atoms are divisible into indivisible elementary particles. But how could atoms be built up of these so called "corpuscles"? An exciting 30 year race ensued, to grasp the planetary model of the atom with its orbiting electrons, and the view inside the atom was born. Whilst the number of electrons around the nucleus of an atom determines their the chemistry of all elements, the power of electrons themselves have been harnessed for everyday use: electron beams for welding,cathode ray tubes and radiation therapy.

  20. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  1. 2540 km: bimagic baseline for neutrino oscillation parameters.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Amol; Goswami, Srubabati; Ray, Shamayita

    2010-12-31

    We show that a source-to-detector distance of 2540 km, motivated recently [S. K. Raut, R. S. Singh, and S. U. Sankar, arXiv:0908.3741] for a narrow band superbeam, offers multiple advantages for a low energy neutrino factory with a detector that can identify muon charge. At this baseline, for any neutrino hierarchy, the wrong-sign muon signal is almost independent of CP violation and θ(13) in certain energy ranges. This allows the identification of the hierarchy in a clean way. In addition, part of the muon spectrum is also sensitive to the CP violating phase and θ(13), so that the same setup can be used to probe these parameters as well. PMID:21231644

  2. Early-time plasma expansion characteristics of ionized clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    A series of Vlasov-Poisson simulations were conducted with barium and lithium gas mixtures expanding into an O(+) background plasma, with the values for the Ba(+)/Li(+) composition ratios and the cloud/background density ratios based on anticipated release values in the upcoming Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) experiment. The results obtained on the early-time expansion of high-density Ba(+), Li(+), and Ba(+)-Li(+) plasma clouds into low-density O(+) background plasma complement the H(+)-O(+) expansions of Gurevich et al. (1973) and Singh and Schunk (1982, 1983), and the characteristic features observed apply to the very-early-time expansion phase of the CRRES releases.

  3. Providencia vermicola sp. nov., isolated from infective juveniles of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Somvanshi, Vishal S; Lang, Elke; Sträubler, Bettina; Spröer, Cathrin; Schumann, Peter; Ganguly, Sudershan; Saxena, Anil K; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2006-03-01

    In the course of isolating bacteria from infective juveniles of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema thermophilum Ganguly & Singh, 2000, three isolates were obtained (OP1T, OP29 and VS3). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and riboprint patterns, these three strains were identical to each other but distinct from the type strains of the five recognized species of the genus Providencia. Based on biochemical and genomic analysis and supported by the low (<35 %) DNA-DNA relatedness between strain OP1T and the type strain of its phylogenetically closest relative, Providencia rettgeri (99.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), strain OP1T was considered to be sufficiently distinct from recognized Providencia species to warrant the description of a novel species. The name Providencia vermicola sp. nov. is proposed, with OP1T (= DSM 17385T = CIP 108829T) as the type strain. PMID:16514040

  4. Sex revolution and psychosocial disorder: a historical perspective on the delusion of medical neutrality.

    PubMed

    Trundle, Robert; Vossmeyer, Michael

    2003-01-01

    We augment A. Singh's "Regulation of Human Sexual Behavior, Sex Revolution and Emergence of AIDS: A Historical Perspective," Bull. Ind. Inst. Hist. Med. (1997), by clarifying why medicine is ignored despite unprecedented pathogenic norms of Western society. While these societal norms are well correlated to etiological findings on divorce and extramarital sex, the norms cannot be rooted properly in our psychobiological nature without committing a 'naturalistic fallacy'. Accepted axiomatically in the West, the fallacy specifies that what ought to be the case is not inferable from what is the case about our nature. Thus although natural norms implicit in medicine were implied historically by a natural theology shared by major religions, the latter are wrongly deemed unscientific and irrelevant by secular politics. Lying furtively behind political policies that induce psychosocial disorders and preventable disease, the fallacy's exclusion is as relevant as medicine to averting disease. PMID:17154115

  5. Esse est percipi & verum factum est.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan

    2015-12-01

    I go into the historical roots of the fundamental issues relating to the "interface theory of perception," concentrating on the sciences rather than on philosophy. The basic ideas have been around throughout historical time. In modern times--I concentrate on a period straddling 1900--they became perhaps "respectable," although interest has dwindled in the recent, post-World War II period. This has been due to an ill-conceived reliance on "physical reality" that has shaped the sciences and philosophy alike. An investigation of the historical development of these ideas serves to shed additional light on various topics treated in the target article (D.D.Hoffman, M.Singh and C.Prakash: The interface theory of perception (this issue)). PMID:26384990

  6. Determination of the stoichiometry, structure, and distribution in living cells of protein complexes from analysis of single-molecular-complexes FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneman, Michael R.; Patowary, S.; Roesch, M. T.; Singh, D. R.; Strogolov, V.; Oliver, J. A.; Raicu, V.

    2011-03-01

    Advances in two-photon microscopy with spectral resolution (TPM-SR) and the development of a simple theory of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for single molecular complexes recently lead to the development of a novel method for the determination of structure and localization in living cells of membrane protein complexes (Raicu et al., Nature Photon., 3, 2009). An appealing feature of this method is its ability to provide such important information while being unaffected by spurious signals originating from stochastic FRET (Singh and Raicu, Biophys. J., 98, 2010). We will present the results obtained from our recent studies of trimeric FRET calibration standards expressed in the cytoplasm of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, as well as a model G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the membrane of yeast. Emphasis will be placed on the measurement and analysis of single-molecular-complex FRET data for determination of the quaternary structure of some proteins (or the protein complex structure).

  7. Analytical Modeling for Mechanical Strength Prediction with Raman Spectroscopy and Fractured Surface Morphology of Novel Coconut Shell Powder Reinforced: Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Savita; Singh, Alok; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an analytical modeling and prediction of tensile and flexural strength of three dimensional micro-scaled novel coconut shell powder (CSP) reinforced epoxy polymer composites have been reported. The novel CSP has a specific mixing ratio of different coconut shell particle size. A comparison is made between obtained experimental strength and modified Guth model. The result shows a strong evidence for non-validation of modified Guth model for strength prediction. Consequently, a constitutive modeled equation named Singh model has been developed to predict the tensile and flexural strength of this novel CSP reinforced epoxy composite. Moreover, high resolution Raman spectrum shows that 40 % CSP reinforced epoxy composite has high dielectric constant to become an alternative material for capacitance whereas fractured surface morphology revealed that a strong bonding between novel CSP and epoxy polymer for the application as light weight composite materials in engineering.

  8. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  9. Acknowledgements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Singh, Tejinder

    2014-03-01

    tifrLogo Vishwa Mimansa An interpretative exposition of the Universe Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) 14th-19th December, 2011 GOA, India (The conference component of the ICTS Programme: Frontiers of Cosmology and Gravitation 1st-23rd December, 2011) The Silver Jubilee Meeting of the ICGC series organized jointly by International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, TIFR & Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG) Publication sponsor: Sir Dorabji Tata Trust and the Allied Trusts Editors: B S Sathyaprakash and Tejinder P Singh Assistant Editor: V Chellathurai Conference Co-sponsors: Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune Association of Friends of Astronomy, Goa Centre for AstroParticle Physics, SINP, Kolkata Department of Science, Technology and Environment, Goa Foundational Questions Institute, USA Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad Infosys Science Foundation, Bangalore Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai iagrgicts

  10. Failure of intertrochanteric fracture fixation with a dynamic hip screw in relation to pre-operative fracture stability and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Y; Han, C H; Park, J I; Kim, J Y

    2001-01-01

    We have reviewed 178 intertrochanteric fractures treated by dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation between March 1995 and December 1999 and followed for a minimum of 1 year. We used Singh's classification of the trabecular bone structure in the proximal femur as a measure of osteoporosis and also classified the fractures according to three different systems (Boyd-Griffin, Evans, AO). The postoperative radiographs were examined for loss of reduction, i.e. varus angulation >100, perforation of the femoral head, more than 20-mm extrusion of a lag screw or metal failure. We found 49 cases which showed radiographic failures. Two were stable fractures and 47 unstable fractures (Evans' classification). Unstable fractures with osteoporosis had a failure rate of more than 50%. In such cases DHS should not be the first choice for treatment. PMID:11820441

  11. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: Inclusion of inverse triad corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Karami, Asieh

    2016-06-01

    We consider the loop quantization of the (diagonal) Bianchi type IX cosmological model. We explore different quantization prescriptions that extend the work of Wilson-Ewing and Singh. In particular, we study two different ways of implementing the so-called inverse triad corrections. We construct the corresponding Hamiltonian constraint operators and show that the singularity is formally resolved. We find the effective equations associated with the different quantization prescriptions, and study the relation with the isotropic k = 1 model that, classically, is contained within the Bianchi IX model. Somewhat surprisingly, we find the most natural quantization does not reduce to the k = 1 model. We use geometrically defined scalar observables to explore the physical implications of each of these theories. This is the first part in a series of papers analyzing different aspects of the Bianchi IX model, with inverse corrections, within loop quantum cosmology (LQC).

  12. Signatures of Noncommutative Geometry in Muon Decay for Nonsymmetric Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dinesh; Mobed, Nader; Ouimet, Pierre-Philippe

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to identify potential signatures of noncommutative geometry within the decay spectrum of a muon in orbit near the event horizon of a microscopic Schwarzschild black hole. This possibility follows from a re-interpretation of Moffat’s nonsymmetric theory of gravity, first published in Phys. Rev. D 19:3554, 1979, where the antisymmetric part of the metric tensor manifests the hypothesized noncommutative geometric structure throughout the manifold. It is further shown that for a given sign convention, the predicted signatures counteract the effects of curvature-induced muon stabilization predicted by Singh and Mobed in Phys. Rev. D 79:024026, 2009. While it is unclear whether evidence for noncommutative geometry may become observable anytime soon, this approach at least provides a useful direction for future quantum gravity research based on the ideas presented here.

  13. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-07

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  14. Uptake and translocation of Cd[sup 109] by two aquatic ferns in relation to relative toxic response

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Viswanathan, P.N. ); Gupta, M.; Devi, S. )

    1993-12-01

    Considerable variations exist in the phytotoxic response of different plants to cadmium exposure and uptake as observed in experimental and field studies. Quantitative and qualitative variations in comparative anatomy, physiology and biochemistry could be responsible for selective toxicity. Variations in uptake, translocation, sequestration by cell wall, phytochelation or formation of inclusion bodies have been reported in phytotoxic response to cadmium. Earlier studies by Singh et al. (1991) with the aquatic fern Marsilea minuta Linn showed Cd[sup 2+] induced both ultrastructural lesions and metallothioneins at concentrations above 0.5 ppm. However, another aquatic fern, Ceratopteris thalictroides (L.) Brogn was even more sensitive to the basis of this variation, the comparative uptake and translocation of radioactive Cd[sup 109] by these plans was studied. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  15. B2 RNA and 7SK RNA, RNA polymerase III transcripts, have a cap-like structure at their 5' end.

    PubMed Central

    Shumyatsky, G P; Tillib, S V; Kramerov, D A

    1990-01-01

    We found that hydrolysates of poly(A)+ RNA from Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells which were transcribed by RNA polymerase III contained an unusual component designated as X. It was part of B2 RNA representing a transcript of B2 retroposon, typical of rodents. The component X possesses a cap-like structure, xppp5'G, where x has a non-nucleotide structure. About half of all B2 RNAs contained this group at the 5' end. Previously, Epstein et al. (1) detected a similar structure at the 5' end of small nuclear U6 RNA. Later, Singh and Reddy (2) showed methyl to be the blocking group in the component x of U6 RNA. Besides B2 RNA, we found 5' ends containing methyl groups in 7SK RNA. Images PMID:1700854

  16. Monogenoids from the gills of spiny eels (Teleostei: Mastacembelidae) in India and Iraq, proposal of Mastacembelocleidus gen. n., and status of the Indian species of Actinocleidus, Urocleidus and Haplocleidus (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae).

    PubMed

    Kritsky, Delane C; Pandey, K C; Agrawal, Nirupama; Abdullah, Shamall

    2004-12-01

    Mastacembelocleidus gen. n. (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae) is proposed to include two species collected and redescribed from spiny eels (Mastacembelidae) in India and Iraq: Mastacembelocleidus bam (Tripathi, 1959) comb. n. (syn. Ancyrocephalus bam Tripathi, 1959) from the gills of Macrognathus pancalus (new host record) and Macrognathus aculeatus (Synbranchiformes: Mastacembelidae) from Lucknow, India; and Mastacembelocleidus heteranchorus (Kulkami, 1969) comb. n. (syn. Urocleidus heteranchorus Kulkarni, 1969) from the gills of Mastacembelus armatus from Lucknow, India, and Mastacembelus mastacembelus (new host record) from the environs of Erbil, Iraq (new locality record). Urocleidus rhyncobdelli Jain, 1959, Haliotrema tandani Agrawal et Singh, 1982 and Urocleidus raipurensis Dubey, Gupta et Agarwal, 1992 are considered junior subjective synonyms of M. bam. PMID:15729940

  17. Nanotechnology in dentistry: Present and future

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Archana; Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Misuriya, Abhinav; Maroli, Sohani; Manjula, S; Singh, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on the molecular and atomic levels. It has the potential to bring enormous changes into the fields of medicine and dentistry. A day may soon come when nanodentistry will succeed in maintaining near-perfect oral health through the aid of nanorobotics, nanomaterials and biotechnology. However, as with all developments, it may also pose a risk for misuse. Time, economical and technical resources, and human needs will determine the direction this revolutionizing development may take. This article reviews the current status and the potential clinical applications of nanotechnology, nanaomedicine and nanodentistry. How to cite the article: Bhardwaj A, Bhardwaj A, Misuriya A, Maroli S, Manjula S, Singh AK. Nanotechnology in dentistry: Present and future. J Int Oral Health 2013;6(1):121-6. PMID:24653616

  18. Nuclear data sheets update for A = 78

    SciTech Connect

    Rab, S.

    1991-05-01

    The experimental nuclear data for mass 78 have been reviewed superseding the 1981 evaluation by Singh and Viggars (81Si13). Nuclear structure, decay and reaction properties of all the nine isobars (An, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, and Sr) of mass 78 are reviewed, and an adopted data set for each nucleus is prepared with proper J{pi} arguments for the levels. There is not much new information available for {sup 78}Zn, {sup 78}Ga, {sup 78}Ge, {sup 78}As and {sup 78}Br. New data are available on heavy ion reactions for {sup 78}Se,k {sup 78}Kr, {sup 78}Rb and {sup 78}Sr as well as on particle transfer studies for 78 Ge, {sup 78}Se and {sup 78}Kr. There are also new experimental data available in (n, {gamma}) studies for {sup 78}Se.

  19. No-signaling, perfect bipartite dichotomic correlations and local randomness

    SciTech Connect

    Seevinck, M. P.

    2011-03-28

    The no-signaling constraint on bi-partite correlations is reviewed. It is shown that in order to obtain non-trivial Bell-type inequalities that discern no-signaling correlations from more general ones, one must go beyond considering expectation values of products of observables only. A new set of nontrivial no-signaling inequalities is derived which have a remarkably close resemblance to the CHSH inequality, yet are fundamentally different. A set of inequalities by Roy and Singh and Avis et al., which is claimed to be useful for discerning no-signaling correlations, is shown to be trivially satisfied by any correlation whatsoever. Finally, using the set of newly derived no-signaling inequalities a result with potential cryptographic consequences is proven: if different parties use identical devices, then, once they have perfect correlations at spacelike separation between dichotomic observables, they know that because of no-signaling the local marginals cannot but be completely random.

  20. A New Framework for Adptive Sampling and Analysis During Long-Term Monitoring and Remedial Action Management

    SciTech Connect

    Minsker, Barbara

    2005-06-01

    Yonas Demissie, a research assistant supported by the project, has successfully created artificial data and assimilated it into coupled Modflow and artificial neural network models. His initial findings show that the neural networks help correct errors in the Modflow models. Abhishek Singh has used test cases from the literature to show that performing model calibration with an interactive genetic algorithm results in significantly improved parameter values. Meghna Babbar, the third research assistant supported by the project, has found similar results when applying an interactive genetic algorithms to long-term monitoring design. She has also developed new types of interactive genetic algorithms that significantly improve performance. Gayathri Gopalakrishnan, the last research assistant who is partially supported by the project, has shown that sampling branches of phytoremediation trees is an accurate approach to estimating soil and groundwater contaminations in areas surrounding the trees at the Argonne 317/319 site.

  1. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Stenflo, L.; Bingham, R.; Mendonça, J. T.; Mendonça

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is devoted to the memory of Professor Padma Kant Shukla, who passed away 26 January 2013 on his travel to New Delhi, India to receive the prestigious Hind Rattan (Jewel of India) award. Padma was born in Tulapur, Uttar Pradesh, India, 7 July 1950, where he grew up and got his education. He received a PhD degree in Physics at the Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India, in 1972, under the supervision of late Prof. R. N. Singh, and a second PhD degree in Theoretical Plasma Physics from Umeå University in Sweden in 1975, under the supervision of Prof. Lennart Stenflo. He worked at the Faculty of Physics & Astronomy, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany since January 1973, where he was a permanent faculty member and Professor of International Affairs, a position that was created for him to honour his international accomplishments and reputation.

  2. Management of Pigmented Gingiva in Child Patient: A New Era to the Pediatric Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parul; Jain, Eesha; Khurana, Heena; Badole, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gingival health in the form of size, shape, consistency and appearance are essential components responsible for an attractive smile as well as may cause unpleasant appearance. Melanin pigmentation often occurs in the gingiva as a result of an abnormal deposition of melanin which can compromise the confidence level from the age of childhood. The present article describes and discusses the two cases of gingival melanin pigmentation in 12 and 13 years of female patient and their early surgical intervention with successful follow-up of 9 and 6 months. Patients were instructed to prevent sun exposure, intake of hot foods or beverages like cold drinks, tea, coffee and brushing immediately after surgery. How to cite this article: Bahadure RN, Singh P, Jain E, Khurana H, Badole G. Management of Pigmented Gingiva in Child Patient: A New Era to the Pediatric Dentistry. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):197-200. PMID:25206222

  3. Management of pigmented gingiva in child patient: a new era to the pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Namdeoraoji Bahadure, Rakesh; Singh, Parul; Jain, Eesha; Khurana, Heena; Badole, Gautam

    2013-09-01

    Gingival health in the form of size, shape, consistency and appearance are essential components responsible for an attractive smile as well as may cause unpleasant appearance. Melanin pigmentation often occurs in the gingiva as a result of an abnormal deposition of melanin which can compromise the confidence level from the age of childhood. The present article describes and discusses the two cases of gingival melanin pigmentation in 12 and 13 years of female patient and their early surgical intervention with successful follow-up of 9 and 6 months. Patients were instructed to prevent sun exposure, intake of hot foods or beverages like cold drinks, tea, coffee and brushing immediately after surgery. How to cite this article: Bahadure RN, Singh P, Jain E, Khurana H, Badole G. Management of Pigmented Gingiva in Child Patient: A New Era to the Pediatric Dentistry. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):197-200. PMID:25206222

  4. Landscape level analysis of disturbance regimes in protected areas of Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, P. Hari; Reddy, C. Sudhakar; Singh, Randeep; Jha, C. S.

    2014-04-01

    There is an urgent need to identify the human influence on landscape as disturbance regimes was realized for prioritization of the protected areas. The present study has attempted to describe the landscape level assessment of fragmentation and disturbance index in protected areas of Rajasthan using remote sensing and GIS techniques. Geospatial analysis of disturbance regimes indicates 61.75% of the total PAs are under moderate disturbance index followed by 28.64% and 9.61% under low and high respectively. Among the 28 protected areas- National Chambal WLS, Jaisamand WLS, Kumbhalgarh WLS, Sawai Man Singh WLS, Kailadevi WLS and Bandh Baratha WLS are representing high level of disturbance. The present study has emphasized the moderate to low disturbance regimes in protected areas, which infer low biotic pressure and conservation effectiveness of PA network in Rajasthan. The spatial information generated on PAs is of valuable use for forest management and developing conservation strategies.

  5. Inertia in Friedmann Universes with variable and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.

    2015-09-01

    In light of the recent interest in dynamical dark energy models based on a cosmology with varying gravitational and cosmological parameters and , we present here a model of inertia in a type of Friedmann universe with ; being the dimensionless scale factor, that was recently studied by Singh et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 345:213, 2013). The proposed Machian model of inertia utilizes the curved space generalization of Sciama's law of inertial induction, which is based on the analogy between the retarded far fields of electrodynamics and those of gravitation, and expresses the total inertial force on an accelerating mass in terms of contributions from all matter in the observable Universe. We show that for a varying Friedmann model with , inertial induction alone can account for the total inertial force on the accelerating mass. We then compare this cosmological model with current observational constraints for the variation of.

  6. Management of stroke risk factors during the process of rehabilitation. Secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M

    1999-11-01

    Epidemiologic and prospective cohort studies have shown a strong correlation between risk factors and stroke morbidity and mortality. The reduction or control of risk factors, on the other hand, can reduce stroke morbidity and mortality. Rehabilitation professionals involved in comprehensive rehabilitation of stroke patients may include the management of risk factors in the scope of their practice and thus contribute to longer life expectancy and improved quality of life of these patients. Decreasing disability, improving quality of life, and prolonging life are chief goals of the rehabilitation process. This article reviews the rationale for risk management and stresses the value of aerobic and conditioning exercises and is intended to supplement the article on stroke prevention co-authored by Daryl Gress and Vineeta Singh. PMID:10573711

  7. Map showing depth to bedrock of the Tacoma and part of the Centralia 30' x 60' quadrangles, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan-Banks, Jane M.; Collins, Donley S.

    1994-01-01

    The heavily populated Puget Sound region in the State of Washington has experienced moderate to large earthquakes in the recent past (Nuttli, 1952; Mullineaux and others, 1967). Maps showing thickness of unconsolidated sedimentary deposits are useful aids in delineating areas where damage to engineered structures can result from increased shaking resulting from these earthquakes. Basins containing thick deposits of unconsolidated materials can amplify earthquakes waves and cause far more damage to structures than the same waves passing through bedrock (Singh and others, 1988; Algermissen and others, 1985). Configurations of deep sedimentary basins can also cause reflection and magnification of earthquake waves in ways still not fully understood and presently under investigation (Frankel and Vidale, 1992).

  8. A Method for Calculating Viscosity and Thermal Conductivity of a Helium-Xenon Gas Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    A method for calculating viscosity and thermal conductivity of a helium-xenon (He-Xe) gas mixture was employed, and results were compared to AiResearch (part of Honeywell) analytical data. The method of choice was that presented by Hirschfelder with Singh's third-order correction factor applied to thermal conductivity. Values for viscosity and thermal conductivity were calculated over a temperature range of 400 to 1200 K for He-Xe gas mixture molecular weights of 20.183, 39.94, and 83.8 kg/kmol. First-order values for both transport properties were in good agreement with AiResearch analytical data. Third-order-corrected thermal conductivity values were all greater than AiResearch data, but were considered to be a better approximation of thermal conductivity because higher-order effects of mass and temperature were taken into consideration. Viscosity, conductivity, and Prandtl number were then compared to experimental data presented by Taylor.

  9. Description and evaluation of the QUIC bio-slurry scheme: droplet evaporation and surface deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zajic, Dragan; Brown, Michael J; Nelson, Matthew A; Williams, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    The Quick Urban and Industrial Complex (QUIC) dispersion modeling system was developed with the goal of improving the transport and dispersion modeling capabilities within urban areas. The modeling system has the ability to rapidly obtain a detailed 3D flow field around building clusters and uses an urbanized Lagrangian random-walk approach to account for transport and dispersion (e.g., see Singh et al., 2008; Williams et al., 2009; and Gowardhan et al., 2009). In addition to wind-tunnel testing, the dispersion modeling system has been evaluated against full-scale urban tracer experiments performed in Salt Lake City, Oklahoma City, and New York City (Gowardhan et al., 2006; Gowardhan et al., 2009; Allwine et al., 2008) and the wind model output to measurements taken in downtown Oklahoma City.

  10. Preterm Birth: A Primary Etiological Factor for Delayed Oral Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Thayath, Muhamad Nishad; Singh, Shikha; Sinha, Anju

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preterm and low birthweight children comprise approximately 6% of all live births. It is now a well-known fact that premature children experience many oral complications associated with their preterm births. Prematurely born infants have a short prenatal development period and they are prone to many serious medical problems during the neonatal period, which may affect the development of oral tissues. Adverse perinatal factors, premature birth and exceptional early adaptation to extra-uterine life and functional activity may influence dental occlusal development and symmetry in the jaws. Thus, the goal of the present paper is to elucidate further the effect of preterm birth on the development of the dentition. How to cite this article: Zaidi I, Thayath MN, Singh S, Sinha A. Preterm Birth: A Primary Etiological Factor for Delayed Oral Growth and Development. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3): 215-219. PMID:26628856

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Electronic Apex Locators and Radiovisiography for Working Length Determination in Primary Teeth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neerja; Rathore, Monika S; Tandon, Shobha; Rajkumar, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two different varieties of electronic apex locators and radiovisiography (RVG) for working length determination in primary teeth. Materials and methods: A total of 30 primary teeth indicated for pulpectomy in children aged 3 to 8 years were randomly selected and subjected to working length determination using two varieties of electronic apex locators and RVG separately. The data were then subjected to statistical analysis. Results: A very strong correlation between electronic measurement methods and RVG length was observed. Conclusion: Radiovisiography and apex locators are equally effective in determining working length in primary teeth. How to cite this article: Abdullah A, Singh N, Rathore MS, Tandon S, Rajkumar B. Comparative Evaluation of Electronic Apex Locators and Radiovisiography for Working Length Determination in Primary Teeth in vivo. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):118-123. PMID:27365931

  12. Study of naturally occurring Precambrian native iron through high-pressure Mössbauer Spectroscopy up to 10 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Usha; Parthasarathy, G.

    2009-06-01

    We report here the Mössbauer spectroscopic studies on native iron sample obtained from Proterozoic Mica Schist of Chaibasa SinghBhum craton of Eastern India at ambient condition as well as under high pressure up to 10 GPa using Diamond Anvil Cell and 4:1 methanol -- ethanol mixture as hydrostatic pressure medium. The results were compared with the studies on metallic iron under high pressure [1,2] . A slight variation in isomer shift up to 5.6 GPa and onset of a new peak corresponding to BCC->HCP transformation at 9.1 GPa might indicate the magnitude of impact experienced by the sample before attaining the thermodynamical equilibrium. [1] Pipkorn D.N., Edge C.K., Debrunner P., De Pasquali G., Drickamer H.G. and Fraunfelder H. (1964) 135, 1604. [2] Chandra usha, Mudgal Prerana, Kumar Manoj, Rawat Rajeev, Parthasarathy, Dilawar Nita and Bandyopadhyay A.K. (2005), Hyper. Inter.163, 129.

  13. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". It's the most populous particle in the universe. Millions of these subatomic particles are passing through each one of us. With no charge and virtually no mass they can penetrate vast thicknesses of matter without any interaction - indeed the sun emits huge numbers that pass through earth at the speed of light. Neutrinos are similar to the more familiar electron, with one crucial difference: neutrinos do not carry electric charge. As a result they're extremely difficult to detect . But like HG Wells' invisible man they can give themselves away by bumping into things at high energy and detectors hidden in mines are exploiting this to observe these rare interactions.

  14. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 1. The Electron

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 1. The Electron Just over a century ago, British physicist J.J. Thompson experimenting with electric currents and charged particles inside empty glass tubes, showed that atoms are divisible into indivisible elementary particles. But how could atoms be built up of these so called "corpuscles"? An exciting 30 year race ensued, to grasp the planetary model of the atom with its orbiting electrons, and the view inside the atom was born. Whilst the number of electrons around the nucleus of an atom determines their the chemistry of all elements, the power of electrons themselves have been harnessed for everyday use: electron beams for welding,cathode ray tubes and radiation therapy.

  15. Research Burnout: a refined multidimensional scale.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra N; Dalal, Nikunj; Mishra, Sanjay

    2004-12-01

    In a prevailing academic climate where there are high expectations for faculty to publish and generate grants, the exploration of Research Burnout among higher education faculty has become increasingly important. Unfortunately, it is a topic that has not been well researched empirically. In 1997 Singh and Bush developed a unidimensional scale to measure Research Burnout. A closer inspection of the definition of this construct and the composition of its items suggests, however, that the construct may be multidimensional and analogous to Maslach's Psychological Burnout Scale. In this paper, we propose a refined, multidimensional Research Burnout scale and test its factorial validity using confirmatory factor analysis. The nomological validity of this refined scale is established by examining hypothesized relationships between Research Burnout and other constructs such as Intrinsic Motivation for doing research, Extrinsic Pressures to do research, and Knowledge Obsolescence. PMID:15762409

  16. Characterization of MeV Electron Generation using 527 nm Laser Pulses for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosejevs, Robert; Higginson, D. P.; Friesen, H.; Sorokovikova, A.; Jarrott, C. C.; Link, A.; Kemp, G. E.; Hey, D.; Ping, Y.; Bush, I.; Tiedje, H. F.; Mo, M. Z.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Westover, B.; Beg, F. N.; Akli, K. U.; Freeman, R. R.; van Woerkom, L. D.; Schumacher, D.; Chen, C.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P.; Doeppner, T.; Stephens, R. B.; Pasley, J.

    2011-10-01

    J WESTWOOD, J TAIT, A BEAUDRY, S SINGH, U of Alberta, and MH Key, LLNL. We investigate electron generation at intensities of relevance to Fast Ignition using second harmonic laser pulses, motivated by the need to understand the wavelength scaling of the processes and also the ability to obtain clean, prepulse free, target interaction conditions. 700fs duration pulses with peak intensities up to 5 x 1019 W cm-2 were employed at the TITAN laser facility at LLNL. Both planar and cone target geometries were studied using copper k-alpha imaging of tracer layers, Bremsstrahlung x-ray emission measurements of conversion efficiency and beam divergence and magnetic spectrometer measurements of escaping electrons to characterize the electron generation and propagation. Results of electron temperature and angular divergence will be presented.

  17. A Shape-Memory Alloy Thermal Conduction Switch for Use at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Raj

    2004-01-01

    The following summarizes the activities performed under NASA grant NAG10-323 from September 1, 2002 through September 30, 2004 at the. Univ ersity of Central Florida. A version of this has already been submitt ed for publication in the international journal Swart Materials and S tructures in December 2004. Additionally, a version of this has alrea dy appeared in print in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, American Institute of Physics, (2004) 50A 26-3; in an article entitled "A Shape Memory Alloy Based Cryogenic Thermal Conduction Switch" by V.B. Krish nan. J.D. Singh. T.R. Woodruff. W.U. Notardonato and R. Vaidyanathan (article is attached at the end of this report).

  18. Usefulness of the Modified NRCS-CN Method for the Assessment of Direct Runoff in a Mountain Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wałęga, Andrzej; Rutkowska, Agnieszka

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of modified methods, developed on the basis of NRCS-CN method, in determining the size of an effective rainfall (direct runoff). The analyses were performed for the mountain catchment of the Kamienica river, right-hand tributary of the Dunajec. The amount of direct runoff was calculated using the following methods: (1) Original NRCS-CN model, (2) Mishra- Singh model (MS model), (3) Sahu-Mishra-Eldho model (SME model), (4) Sahu 1-p model, (5) Sahu 3-p model, and (6) Q_base model. The study results indicated that the amount of direct runoff, determined on the basis of the original NRCS-CN method, may differ significantly from the actually observed values. The best results were achieved when the direct runoff was determined using the SME and Sahu 3-p model.

  19. Effects of differential rotation on the periods of small adiabatic oscillations of stars in binary systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V. P.; Sharma, M. K.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a method for computing the eigenfrequencies of small adiabatic oscillations of stellar models distorted by differential rotation and tidal forces. The method is based on the approach adopted by Mohan and Singh (1982) in conjunction with the averaging concept introduced by Kippenhahn and Thomas (1970). The angular velocity of rotation is assumed to be the function of the square of the distance of fluid element from the axis of rotation. Tidal distortions are assumed to be caused by a nearby point mass. Such studies have practical importance in astrophysics in determining the periods of small adiabatic oscillations of differentially rotating stars in binary systems. Comparison of results with observational data is also presented.

  20. Essentiality of Early Diagnosis of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Children and Review of its Clinical Presentation, Etiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhay Kumar; Saha, Sonali; Singh, Jaspal

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a common developmental condition resulting in enamel defects in first permanent molars and permanent incisors. It presents at eruption of these teeth. One to four molars, and often also the incisors, could be affected. Since first recognized, the condition has been puzzling and interpreted as a distinct phenomenon unlike other enamel disturbances. Early diagnosis is essential since, rapid breakdown of tooth structure may occur, giving rise to acute symptoms and complicated treatment. The purpose of this article is to review MIH and illustrate its diagnosis and clinical management in young children. How to cite this article: Garg N, Jain AK, Saha S, Singh J. Essentiality of Early Diagnosis of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Children and Review of its Clinical Presentation, Etiology and Management. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):190-196. PMID:25206166

  1. Effect of low dose gamma irradiation on plant and grain nutrition of wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Datta, Partha Sarathi

    2010-08-01

    We recently reported the use of low dose gamma irradiation to improve plant vigor, grain development and yield attributes of wheat ( Singh and Datta, 2010). Further, we report here the results of a field experiment conducted to assess the effect of gamma irradiation at 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1 kGy on flag leaf area, stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthetic rate and plant and grain nutritional quality. Gamma irradiation improved plant nutrition but did not improve the nutritional quality of grains particularly relating to micronutrients. Grain carotene, a precursor for vitamin A, was higher in irradiated grains. Low grain micronutrients seem to be caused by a limitation in the source to sink nutrient translocation rather than in the nutrient uptake capacity of the plant root.

  2. A taxonomic review of the genus Goffartia Hirschmann, 1952 (Rhabditida: Diplogastridae) with a note on the relationship of congeners.

    PubMed

    Tahseen, Qudsia; Mustaqim, Malka

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the descriptions and diagnoses of the species of the relatively rare and poorly-understood genus Goffartia Hirschmann, 1952. A comparative account of the salient morphological characters including stoma, amphids, pharynx, and the male accessory sex organs of the six species viz., G. africana (Micoletzky, 1915) Hirschmann, 1952; G. filicaudata (Andrássy, 1968) Sudhaus & Fürst von Lieven, 2003; G. heteroceri Hirschmann, 1952; G. praepilata Shoshin, 1989 and G. variabilis (Micoletzky, 1922) Hirschmann, 1952 and the recently described G. phalacra Singh, Yousuf, Kumar & Ahmad, 2014, has been given. This paper also discusses the variations among and the relationships between these congeners, and provides an identification key. PMID:26624431

  3. Possible Indian participation in a 10 metre optical telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    A special session on "Possible Indian participation in a 10 meter optical telescope" was organised at the XIX Annual Meeting of the Astronomical Society of India on 2 February 1999 at Bangalore. The following presentations were made in this session: Introductory remarks by S. N. Tandon, 10m GTC Project and possible Indian participation by K. P. Singh, Science with 10m telescope: Extragalactic studies by A. K. Kembhavi and Science with 10m telescope : Galactic studies by N. K. Rao. Also, a number of observational programmes with the 10 metre telescope were presented in the posters on display. After the presentations, a panel discussion was organised. The panelists were Gopal Krishna (NCRA), T. P. Prabhu (IIA), A. Ray (TIFR) and S. N. Tandon (IUCAA). Prof. B. V. Sreekantan (NIAS) presided over and summarized the panel discussion. The poster presentations and the summary of the panel discussion are being reproduced here in the following articles.

  4. Dental and Periodontal Health Status of Beta Thalassemia Major and Sickle Cell Anemic Patients: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaideep; Singh, Nitin; Kumar, Amit; Kedia, Neal Bharat; Agarwal, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to assess the dental and periodontal health status of beta thalassemia major and sickle cell anemic patients in Bilaspur, Chattishgarh, India. Materials & Methods: A total of 750 patients were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups I (n=250), II (n=250) and III (n=250), ranging from 3-15 years. After performing a thourough general examination, including their demographic data, intraoral examination was done using Decayed-Missing-Filled Teeth Index (DMFT Index), Plaque index (PI) and Gingival index (GI). Statistical analysis was done using statistical software SPSS 17.5 version. Chi square test & student t test was used for the comparison of study and control groups. The level of significance was set at P<0.05. Results: In the present study, it was found that, prevalence of dental caries and periodontal diseases was significantly more in beta thalassemic patients followed by sickle cell anemic patients than control group. However, when group I (beta thalassemia) was compared with group II (sickle cell anemia), results were found to highly significant (P<0.001) only for decayed missing filled tooth. Conclusion: Appropriate dental and periodontal care improves a patient's quality of life. Preventive dental care is must for thalassemic and Sickle cell disease patients. How to cite this article: Singh J, Singh N, Kumar A, Kedia NB, Agarwal A. Dental and Periodontal Health Status of Beta Thalassemia Major and Sickle Cell Anemic Patients: A Comparative Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):53-8. PMID:24324305

  5. Moisture characteristics over Indian region during Summer Monsoon using RegCM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardanan, Rajesh; Rajanayagam, Lorna; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai

    In this study, the spatial characteristics of the total Precipitable Water during monsoon season over Indian region, based on the sensitivity experiments performed by a regional climate model for an anomalously dry year. The present study uses a recent version (Version-III) of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3). RegCM3 has been integrated at 60 km horizontal resolution over the Indian domain. The planetary boundary layer scheme used is that of Holtslag, cumulus parameterization scheme Emanuel of MIT, SUBEX large scale precipitation scheme and BATS ocean flux parameterization scheme. The model is run from 1st May to 30th September. The first month is taken for the spin up. The next four months are taken to study the monsoon. The experiments are carried out by increasing the initial conditions of Sea Surface Temperature by steps of 0.1 degree ranging up to 1degree. The change in the Total Precipitable water and their spatial distribution are studied. The zonal and meridional moisture transports are also analysed. The features simulated by RegCM3 are compared with those of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Key words:- Peninsular India, model integration, Monsoon Rainfall Reference: K. C. chow, Yiming Liu, Johnny C. L. Chan and Yihui Ding, Int. J. Climatol. 26: 1339-1359 (2006) K. C. Chow, Hang-Wai Tong and Johnny C. L. Chan, Clim. Dyn. DOI 10.1007/s00382-007- 0301-6 G. P. Singh, Jai-Ho Oh, Jin-Young Kim and Ok-Yeon Kim; ", SOLA, Vol. 2, pp.29-32 (2006) Dash S. K., Shekhar M. S., Singh G. P. Theoretical and Applied Climatology 86(1-4): 161 (2006)

  6. Drying kinetics and mathematical modeling of hot air drying of coconut coir pith.

    PubMed

    Fernando, J A K M; Amarasinghe, A D U S

    2016-01-01

    Drying kinetics of coir pith was studied and the properties of compressed coir pith discs were analyzed. Coir pith particles were oven dried in the range of temperatures from 100 to 240 °C and the rehydration ability of compressed coir pith was evaluated by finding the volume expansion. The optimum drying temperature was found to be 140 °C. Hot air drying was carried out to examine the drying kinetics by allowing the coir pith particles to fluidize and circulate inside the drying chamber. Particle motion within the drying chamber closely resembled the particle motion in a flash dryer. The effective moisture diffusivity was found to increase from 1.18 × 10(-8) to 1.37 × 10(-8) m(2)/s with the increase of air velocity from 1.4 to 2.5 m/s respectively. Correlation analysis and residual plots were used to determine the adequacy of existing mathematical models for describing the drying behavior of coir pith. The empirical models, Wang and Singh model and Linear model, were found to be adequate for accurate prediction of drying behavior of coir pith. A new model was proposed by modifying the Wang and Singh model and considering the effect of air velocity. It gave the best correlation between observed and predicted moisture ratio with high value of coefficient of determination (R(2)) and lower values of root mean square error, reduced Chi square (χ(2)) and mean relative deviation (E%). PMID:27390647

  7. Core-Penetrating Rydberg Series of BaF: New Electronic States in the n* ≈ 4 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, Zygmunt J.; Field, Robert W.

    1996-09-01

    We report results of our studies of the electronic spectrum of the BaF molecule in the energy region of T0= 31 460-32 400 cm -1(3.88 < n* < 4.16). We have observed four new electronic states (all constants in cm -1): K2Π 1/2( T0= 31 996), 4.08 2Σ +( T0= 32 166.293(2), B0= 0.2333892(17)), 3.94 2Δ ( T1= 32 252.426(2), B1= 0.2294684(16), A1= 0.879(13)), and J2Π ( T0= 32 297.918(2), B0= 0.22952165(51), A0= 57.196(1)). In addition, the previously observed G2Σ +( T0= 30 969.715(2), B0= 0.2297411(13)) and H2Σ +( T0= 31 606.238(2), B0= 0.23031573(85)) states were rotationally analyzed for the first time. We verified by isotope analysis that the G2Σ +state, previously reported by J. Singh and H. Mohan [ Indian J. Pure Appl. Phys.11,918-922 (1973)], had been incorrectly assigned vibrationally. The I2Σ +state, which Singh and Mohan observed at low resolution, was absent from our spectra and we suspect that this state belongs to a species other than BaF. Electronic term values for the remaining seven not yet observed BaF core-penetrating Rydberg states below n* = 6 were predicted by interpolation of well-characterized Rydberg series. We suggest that the E″ state, assigned by Effantin et al.as a 2Π 1/2state [C. Effantin, A. Bernard, J. D'Incan, E. Andrianavalona, and R. F. Barrow, J. Mol. Spectrosc.145,456-457 (1991)] must be reassigned as a 2Δ state.

  8. Inferences on sediment provenance and source weathering using major, trace and Sr-Nd isotopic compositional variations in alluvial sediments from Sirhind, Punjab, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, D.; Amir, M.; Sinha, R.; Singh, A.; Balakrishnan, S.

    2013-12-01

    sediments show less radiogenic Sr and more radiogenic Nd (Higher Himalayan signature) whereas sediments deposited around the post-LGM show more radiogenic Sr and less radiogenic in Nd (Lesser Himalayan signature). These variations can be attributed to decreased monsoon precipitation and larger ice cover over the Higher Himalaya during LGM that reduced Higher Himalayan contribution to the post-LGM samples. Similarly, decreasing glacial cover during Holocene may have resulted in relatively more sediment contribution from the Higher Himalayas giving rise to lower 87Sr/86Sr and higher ɛNd values. The findings of this study are consistent with those from the down-stream (Ghaggar river) core sediments2 and Ganga-Yamuna interfluve sediments1. Sr-Nd compositions coupled with CIA values indicate a dominant control of climate on provenance and source weathering. 1Rahaman, W., S. K. Singh., R. Sinha., and S. K. Tondon (2009), Geology, 37, 559-526. 2Singh, A., D. Paul., S. K. Singh., and R. Sinha (2013), PAGES 4th meeting, Goa, India.

  9. Seismo-electromagnetic phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Biagi, Pier; Namorado Rosa, Rui; Salgueiro da Silva, Manuel; Caldeira, Bento; Heitor Reis, Artur; Borges, José Fernando; Tlemçani, Mouhaydine; Manso, Marco

    2010-05-01

    variations of EM properties of the crust/plate in relation with the strain field, and in space in relation with composition and temperature and stress fields. Further, the interplay between atmospheric (and solar) perturbations with crust perturbations will be monitored, to observe geomagnetic perturbations at different locations. Our study will be focused in the analyses of low magnitude earthquakes with M =< 4, these events are frequent in the WENP region, but have been almost completely disregarded in literature [5,6]. [1] J. Borges, A. J. S. Fitas, M. Bezzeghoud, and P. Teves-Costa, Tectonophysics 337, 373 (2001). [2] V. Chauhan, O.P. Singh, V. Kushwah, V. Singh, B. Singh, Journal of Geodynamics 48, 68 (2009). [3] L. Telesca, V. Lapenna, M. Macchiato, and K. Hattori, Earth and Planet. Science Lett. 268, 219 (2008). [4] P. F. Biagi, L. Castellana, T. Maggipinto, D. Loiacono, L. Schiavulli, T. Ligonzo, M. Fiore, E. Suciu, and A. Ermini, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. 9, 1551 (2009). [5] A. Rozhnoi , M.S. Solovieva, O.A. Molchanov, and M. Hayakawa, Phys. and Chem. of the Earth 29, 589-598 (2004). [6] K. Hattori, I. Takahashi, C. Yoshino, N. Isezaki, H. Iwasaki, M. Harada, K. Kawabata, E. Kopytenko, Y. Kopytenko, P. Maltsev, V. Korepanov, O. Molchanov, M. Hayakawa, Y. Noda, T. Nagao, S. Uyeda, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth 29, 481-494 (2004).

  10. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ira J.; Godinez, Guillermo L.; Singh, Baljit K.; McCaughey, Kelly M.; Alcantara, Raniel R.; Gururaja, Tarikere; Ho, Melissa S.; Nguyen, Henry N.; Friera, Annabelle M.; White, Kathy A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Hansen, Derek; Romero, Jason M.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Claypool, Mark D.; Li, Wei; Lang, Wayne; Yam, George C.; Gelman, Marina S.; Ding, Rongxian; Yung, Stephanie L.; Creger, Daniel P.; Chen, Yan; Singh, Rajinder; Smuder, Ashley J.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J.; Powers, Scott K.; Masuda, Esteban S.; Taylor, Vanessa C.; Payan, Donald G.; Kinoshita, Taisei; Kinsella, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is associated with the development of diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction, and respiratory muscle weakness is thought to contribute significantly to delayed weaning of patients. Therefore, therapeutic strategies for preventing these processes may have clinical benefit. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in CMV-mediated diaphragm wasting and weakness in rats. CMV-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction coincided with marked increases in STAT3 phosphorylation on both tyrosine 705 (Tyr705) and serine 727 (Ser727). STAT3 activation was accompanied by its translocation into mitochondria within diaphragm muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhibition of JAK signaling during CMV prevented phosphorylation of both target sites on STAT3, eliminated the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 within the mitochondria, and reversed the pathologic alterations in mitochondrial function, reduced oxidative stress in the diaphragm, and maintained normal diaphragm contractility. In addition, JAK inhibition during CMV blunted the activation of key proteolytic pathways in the diaphragm, as well as diaphragm atrophy. These findings implicate JAK/STAT3 signaling in the development of diaphragm muscle atrophy and dysfunction during CMV and suggest that the delayed extubation times associated with CMV can be prevented by inhibition of Janus kinase signaling.—Smith, I. J., Godinez, G. L., Singh, B. K., McCaughey, K. M., Alcantara, R. R., Gururaja, T., Ho, M. S., Nguyen, H. N., Friera, A. M., White, K. A., McLaughlin, J. R., Hansen, D., Romero, J. M., Baltgalvis, K. A., Claypool, M. D., Li, W., Lang, W., Yam, G. C., Gelman, M. S., Ding, R., Yung, S. L., Creger, D. P., Chen, Y., Singh, R., Smuder, A. J., Wiggs, M. P., Kwon, O.-S., Sollanek, K. J., Powers, S. K., Masuda, E. S., Taylor, V. C., Payan, D. G

  11. Association of Dermatoglyphic Peculiarities with Dental Caries in Preschool Children of Lucknow, India

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sabyasachi; Jagannath, GV; Singh, Sanjay; Saha, Sonali; Garg, Nishita

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Dermatoglyphics refers to study of the intricate dermal ridge configurations on the skin covering the palmar and plantar surfaces of hand and feet. The basis of considering dermatoglyphic patterns as genetic marker for dental caries is that the epithelium of finger buds as well as enamel has ectodermal origin, and both develop at the same time of intrauterine life. Aim: To assess the relationship between fingerprint patterns and dental caries among preschool children of Lucknow city. Study design: This study was of cross-sectional design. Materials and methods: The study group comprised 512 preschool children 2-6 years of age. The prevalence of caries was recorded using "Dentition status and treatment needs" (WHO basic oral health assessment form, 1997). They were divided into three groups as follows: Group I (dmft score = 0-2), group II (dmft score = 3-4) and group III (dmft score ≥5). The handprints of each child were taken using a stamp pad. The fingertip patterns were analyzed according to the classical method and were classified according to the topological method. The frequency of occurrence of type of dermatoglyphic pattern on fingertip of each digit was noted. Statistics: Chi-square test was used to test the significant difference in proportions. Means were compared using Student’s t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) or F-test. Results: Subjects belonging to groups II and III showed maximum occurrence of whorl pattern on all digits. Group I subjects had maximum occurrence of arch pattern. All the variables had statistically significant value, with a degree of divergence of specific dermatoglyphic patterns among all three groups. Conclusion: The dental caries susceptibility of an individual increased with incidence of whorl pattern and it decreased with incidence of arch pattern. How to cite this article: Singh E, Saha S, Jagannath GV, Singh S, Saha S, Garg N. Association of Dermatoglyphic Peculiarities with Dental Caries in

  12. Effects of warm Arabian Sea Surface Temperature on the Summer Monsoon over Peninsular Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardanan, Rajesh; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai; Rajanayagam, Lorna

    This study investigates the characteristics of circulation and precipitation during monsoon season over peninsular Indian region, based on the sensitivity experiments performed by a regional climate model for the year 2002. The present study uses a recent version (Version-III) of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3). The planetary boundary layer scheme used is that of Holtslag, cumulus parameterization scheme Emanuel of MIT, SUBEX large scale precipitation scheme and BATS ocean flux parameterization scheme. The model is run from 1st May to 30th September. The first month is taken for the spin up. The next four months are taken to study the monsoon. RegCM3 has been integrated at 60 km horizontal resolution over the Indian domain. The experiments are carried out by changing the initial conditions of Sea Surface Temperature by 0.1 degree steps ie. 0.1, 0.2 etc. to 1 degree maximum. The sensitivity experiments showed that the wind strength increases significantly to the northeastern and central parts of India. The change in wind strength is pronounced over the southern peninsula when the Sea Surface Temperature increased by 0.4 degree. The response in precipitation over the peninsular Indian region is also studied. The monsoon circulation features simulated by RegCM3 are compared with those of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and the simulated rainfall is validated against observations from the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) Key words:- Peninsular India, model integration, Monsoon Rainfall Reference: K. C. chow, Yiming Liu, Johnny C. L. Chan and Yihui Ding, Int. J. Climatol. 26: 1339-1359 (2006) K. C. Chow, Hang-Wai Tong and Johnny C. L. Chan, Clim. Dyn. DOI 10.1007/s00382-007- 0301-6 G. P. Singh, Jai-Ho Oh, Jin-Young Kim and Ok-Yeon Kim; ", SOLA, Vol. 2, pp.29-32 (2006) Dash S. K., Shekhar M. S., Singh G. P. Theoretical and Applied Climatology 86(1-4): 161 (2006)

  13. Application of an extension of the MAI method to the Acapulco City, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, M.; Aguirre, J.

    2001-12-01

    The site effects and the source parameters, are inverted from a Fourier displacement spectra of seismograms that are corrected by geometrical spreading and regional attenuation valid for south center of Mexico(Ordaz and Singh, 1992). We used Genetic Algorithms (GA) to perform the non-linear inversion, like in the MAI method (Moya et al., 2000) . The GA have proved to produce better results than other traditional methods which are frequently trapped in a local minimum. GA is a method that mimics the evolution laws in living creatures. The best individuals reproduce and develop themselves with every generation. In our case each individual correspond to one source and the genes correspond to the source parameters. As in nature, the best source remain and are improved with each iteration. We assume that the site effect at each station are the same independently of the earthquake, because of that we can search for the combination of sources that can produce the smaller standard deviation of the estimated site effects from the different Fourier displacement earthquake spectra. Then we use the obtained site effects to generate a Fourier displacement spectra of an earthquake scenario. With this, we are able to compute the response spectra by means of random vibration theory (Reinoso et al., 1990). We apply this method to four stations located in the Acapulco City, Mexico, that recorded four earthquakes with epicenter located in the Guerrero Subduction Zone. The site effect estimated for one of the stations, called ACAZ, shows a good agreement with the estimated by Chávez-García et al. (1994) using spectral ratios between the ACAZ station and a rock reference site. Also we compare the response spectra from other earthquake, obtained by the former method and the response spectra computed using the acceleration record. We find an acceptable correlation between them. Chávez-García, J. Cuenca y M. Cárdenas (1994), "Estudio complementario de efectos de sitio en Acapulco

  14. Numerical modelling of potential submarine landslides and generated tsunami in Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Nieto, E.; Mangeney, A.; Singh, S. C.; Chauhan, A.; Bouchut, F.; Castro Díaz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies suggests that tsunami risk along the SW coast of Sumatra could be due to co-seismic slip along a backthrust at the NE Margin of the Mentawai Island and associated landslides (Singh et al., 2010). Using a combination of high-resolution seismic reflection and bathymetry data, they observed deposits of large submarine landslides at the NE margin of Mentawai Island and suggest that the high wave that occurred in 1797 might have been enhanced by landslides, producing a large localised tsunami. Until now most of the work devoted to tsunami hazard assessment in the area of Sumatra Island focussed on megaearthquakes earthquakes generated tsunamis. Therefore, estimating the run up heights due to submarine landslides is essential for risk mitigation along the SW coast of Sumatra. A series of numerical scenarios are performed here to simulate potential submarine landslides and generated tsunamis in the area of Sumatra Island. The height and velocity of the water wave and the impact zones are calculated using a new numerical model solving the depth-averaged shallow water equations with high order finite volume methods. This model corresponds to the 2D extension of the model developed by Fernández-Nieto et al., 2008. The fluidized mass is modeled using a generalization of the Savage-Hutter model [Savage and Hutter, 1989] by including the role of buoyancy and fluid into the thin-layer equations with a Coulomb-type friction law. Our model takes into account the coupling between the fluid and the landslides and incorporates the rigorous description of topography effects that play a key role in the dynamics of landslides. We study the magnitude of variation of the wave expected depending on the location and volume released. These results shows that landslide generated tsunamis have to be taken into account for risk assessment in the area of Sumatra Island. E.D. Fernández-Nieto, F. Bouchut, D. Bresch, M.J. Castro, A. Mangeney, 2008. A new Savage-Hutter type model

  15. Raman scattering investigations of the interaction of a COV with pure and acid doped ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, S.; Oancea, A.; Focsa, C.; Chazallon, B.

    2009-04-01

    (183 K to 273 K). Information at the molecular level on the surface structure can be derived from accompanying changes observed in band shapes and vibrational mode frequencies. The influence of the presence of nitric acid on the molecular interactions with the trapped organic species in ice particles can be also spectroscopically characterized. (1) Gao et al., Science, 2004, 303, 516. (2) Journet et al., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2005, 109, 14112. (3)H. Singh, M. Kanakidou, P.J Crutzen & D.J Jacob, Nature, 1995, 378, 50. (4)H. Singh, Y. Chen, A. Staudt, D. Jacob, D. Blake, B. Heikes & J. Snow, Nature, 2001, 410, 1078. (5)F. Dominé & P.B Shepson, Science, 2002, 297, 1506

  16. Data on importance of hematopoietic cell derived Lipocalin 2 against gut inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saha, Piu; Singh, Vishal; Xiao, Xia; Yeoh, Beng San; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-09-01

    The data herein is related to the research article entitled "Microbiota-inducible innate immune siderophore binding protein Lipocalin 2 is critical for intestinal homeostasis" (Singh et al., 2016) [1]. In the present article, we monitored dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis development upon Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) neutralization, and examined the survival of Lcn2 deficient (Lcn2KO) mice and their WT littermates upon DSS challenge. To dissect the relative contribution of immune and non-immune cells-derived Lcn2 in mediating protection against gut inflammation, we generated respective bone marrow chimera and evaluated their susceptibility to IL-10 receptor neutralization-induced chronic colitis. Neutralization of Lcn2 in WT mice resulted in exacerbated DSS-induced colitis. Notably, mice lacking Lcn2 exhibited 100% mortality whereas only 20% mortality was observed in WT mice upon DSS challenge. Further, data from bone marrow chimera showed that immune cell-derived Lcn2 is the major contributor in conferring protection against colitis. PMID:27500193

  17. Sobre a atividade pós-periélica do cometa de órbita parabólica Yanaka (1988r)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A. A.; Sanzovo, G. C.; Boczko, R.

    2003-08-01

    Greenberg, Singh & de Almeida (ApJ, 414: L45-48, 1993) mostraram que a deficiência nas abundâncias observadas de C2 e CN no Cometa Yanaka (1988r) pode ser explicada em termos das propriedades dos seus componentes refratários orgânicos, além do fato que trata-se de um cometa dinamicamente novo, observado através de abertura de fenda pequena projetada muito próximo do núcleo. Neste trabalho, complementamos o estudo sobre a atividade deste cometa de órbita parabólica, através da determinação da lei de potência que exprime sua taxa de produção de H2O (o principal indicador de atividade) na fase pós-periélica, determinamos o raio nuclear efetivo mínimo com sua fração de área ativa e analisamos a emissão de partículas de poeira observadas no contínuo em 625,0 nm.

  18. The influence of cold rolling on the precipitation of delta phase in Inconel 718 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.C.; Xiao, F.R.; Yao, M.; Chen, Z.L.; Jiang, Z.Q.; Wang, S.G.

    1997-07-01

    The precipitation of intermetallic phases in Inconel 718 has been extensively studied. It has been found that the major intermetallic phases that precipitate in the austenite matrix are the metastable {gamma}{double_prime} (DO{sub 22} structure) and {gamma}{prime} (L1{sub 2} structure) phases and the equilibrium {delta} (DOa structure) phase. The {delta} phase can form during processing or during services. The precipitation of {delta} phase during aging has been studied in the solution treated Inconel 718. However, there are only a few studies on the precipitation of {delta} phase in cold rolled Inconel 718. R.P. Singh et al. found that more of the {delta} phase precipitated in the 50% cold rolled material compared to the 30% cold rolled material at lower temperatures, but they did not give information on the precipitation of {delta} phase in cold rolled Inconel 718 at higher temperature. The {delta} phase has a big influence on mechanical properties in Inconel 718. Therefore, it is necessary to measure the volume fraction of {delta} phase. Usually, the volume fraction of {delta} phase was measured by quantitative metallographic techniques and quantitative chemistry phase analysis. In the present work, the volume fraction of {delta} phase in cold rolled Inconel 718 at 910 C for different time is measured by X-ray diffraction techniques, and the influence of cold rolling on the morphology and the volume fraction of {delta} phase is investigated.

  19. Investigation on the forced response of a radial turbine under aerodynamic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chaochen; Huang, Zhi; Qi, Mingxu

    2016-04-01

    Rotor blades in a radial turbine with nozzle guide vanes typically experience harmonic aerodynamic excitations due to the rotor stator interaction. Dynamic stresses induced by the harmonic excitations can result in high cycle fatigue (HCF) of the blades. A reliable prediction method for forced response issue is essential to avoid the HCF problem. In this work, the forced response mechanisms were investigated based on a fluid structure interaction (FSI) method. Aerodynamic excitations were obtained by three-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with phase shifted periodic boundary conditions. The first two harmonic pressures were determined as the primary components of the excitation and applied to finite element (FE) model to conduct the computational structural dynamics (CSD) simulation. The computed results from the harmonic forced response analysis show good agreement with the predictions of Singh's advanced frequency evaluation (SAFE) diagram. Moreover, the mode superposition method used in FE simulation offers an efficient way to provide quantitative assessments of mode response levels and resonant strength.

  20. Triplet proximity effect in superconducting heterostructures with a half-metallic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, S.; Buzdin, A.

    2015-11-01

    We present the Usadel theory describing the superconducting proximity effect in heterostructures with a half-metallic layer. It is shown that the full spin polarization inside the half-metals gives rise to an additional component of the Green's function which results in the giant triplet spin-valve effect in superconductor (S)-ferromagnet (F)-half-metal (HM) trilayers and provides a natural explanation for the φ0-junction formation in the S/F/HM/F/S systems. In addition, we consider the exactly solvable model of the S/F/HM trilayers of atomic thickness and demonstrate that it reproduces the main features of the spin-valve effect found within the Usadel approach. Our results are shown to be in qualitative agreement with the recent experimental data on the spin-valve effect in MoGe /Ni /Cu /CrO2 hybrids [Singh et al., Phys. Rev. X 5, 021019 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.021019].

  1. Magnetism and transport properties of layered rare-earth cobaltates Ln0.3CoO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knížek, K.; Novák, P.; Jirák, Z.; Hejtmánek, J.; Maryško, M.; Buršík, J.

    2015-05-01

    The ab-initio (GGA+U) electronic structure calculations of layered cobaltates Ln0.3CoO2 (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) prepared by ionic exchange from Na0.90CoO2 precursors have been performed. The data are used for numerical modeling of Seebeck coefficient within Boltzmann transport theory using BoltzTraP program [G. K. H. Madsen and D. J. Singh, Comput. Phys. Commun. 175, 67 (2006)], as well as for determination of the crystal field split levels of rare-earth ions using a method based on a transformation of Bloch states into the basis of Wannier functions [P. Novák et al., Phys. Rev. B 87, 205139 (2013)]. An overall agreement with observed magnetism and transport properties is obtained. In particular, the high p-type thermopower is well reproduced in a broad temperature range, but instead of theoretical linear decrease down to the lowest temperatures, the real systems exhibit an anomalous change of Seebeck sign, which might be related to the change of bare metallic carriers into the polaronic ones.

  2. Effortless effort in bone regeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Nazirkar, Girish; Singh, Shailendra; Dole, Vinaykumar; Nikam, Akhilesh

    2014-06-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, the concept of osteoconduction in bony changes in the oral cavity showed a wide range of biomaterials and their osteoinductive potential that emerged gradually and has to a large extent improved the quality of the bone prior to the placement of an implant. Alveolar bone loss is a major concern after tooth extraction in patients and therefore atraumatic extraction procedures should be followed to avoid further bone loss. To overcome the alveolar bone loss and to augment support for placing dental implants, many bone regenerative substitutes are available such as allografts, autografts, xenografts, synthetic biomaterials and osteoactive agents. In light of the steady progress in bone grafting techniques and graft materials, it has become possible to improve the volume, width, and height of bone in deficient areas of the oral cavity. These advances in regenerative dentistry thus facilitate an easy and convenient placement of an implant in an ideal position and angulations resulting in superior esthetics and function. Bone grafting materials and their substitutes are the alternative filler materials, which facilitate to reduce additional surgical procedures, risks, chances of cross infection involved in placing autografts and allografts into the bony structures. This review literature highlights various biomaterials that are helpful in bone healing and thus create an anatomically favorable base for ideal implant placement. How to cite the article: Nazirkar G, Singh S, Dole V, Nikam A. Effortless effort in bone regeneration: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):120-4. PMID:25083047

  3. Effortless Effort in Bone Regeneration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nazirkar, Girish; Singh, Shailendra; Dole, Vinaykumar; Nikam, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, the concept of osteoconduction in bony changes in the oral cavity showed a wide range of biomaterials and their osteoinductive potential that emerged gradually and has to a large extent improved the quality of the bone prior to the placement of an implant. Alveolar bone loss is a major concern after tooth extraction in patients and therefore atraumatic extraction procedures should be followed to avoid further bone loss. To overcome the alveolar bone loss and to augment support for placing dental implants, many bone regenerative substitutes are available such as allografts, autografts, xenografts, synthetic biomaterials and osteoactive agents. In light of the steady progress in bone grafting techniques and graft materials, it has become possible to improve the volume, width, and height of bone in deficient areas of the oral cavity. These advances in regenerative dentistry thus facilitate an easy and convenient placement of an implant in an ideal position and angulations resulting in superior esthetics and function. Bone grafting materials and their substitutes are the alternative filler materials, which facilitate to reduce additional surgical procedures, risks, chances of cross infection involved in placing autografts and allografts into the bony structures. This review literature highlights various biomaterials that are helpful in bone healing and thus create an anatomically favorable base for ideal implant placement. How to cite the article: Nazirkar G, Singh S, Dole V, Nikam A. Effortless effort in bone regeneration: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):120-4. PMID:25083047

  4. A Study of Correlation of Various Growth Indicators with Chronological Age

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Navreet; Puri, Taruna; Gulati, Ritika; Kashyap, Rita

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of chronological age with cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, frontal sinus width and antegonial notch depth and a correlation, if any, among the three variables. Materials and methods: The samples were derived from lateral cephalometric radiographs of 80 subjects (40 males, 40 females; age range: 10 to 19 years). Cervical vertebral development was evaluated by the method of Hassel and Farman, frontal sinus width was measured by the method described by Ertürk and antegonial notch depth as described by Singer et al. The Pearson’s correlation coefficients were estimated to assess the relationship of chronological age with cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, frontal sinus width and antegonial notch depth. Results: The Pearson’s correlation coefficient were 0.855 (p < 0.001) between chronological age and cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, and 0.333 (p < 0.001) between chronological age and frontal sinus width. Conclusion: A highly significant positive correlation was found between chronological age and cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, and between chronological age and frontal sinus width. Nonsignificant correlation was found between chronological age and antegonial notch depth. How to cite this article: Singh S, Sandhu N, Puri T, Gulati R, Kashyap R. A Study of Correlation of Various Growth Indicators with Chronological Age. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3): 190-195. PMID:26628853

  5. Treatment of Oroantral Fistula in Pediatric Patient using Buccal Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Ruchi; Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, Virendra; Bhagol, Amrish

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Brief background: Oroantral communication (OAC) is the space created between the maxillary sinus and the oral cavity, which, if not treated, will progress to oroantral fistula (OAF). Several methods of surgical OAC repair have been described, but only a few have gained recognition. Materials and methods: A 13 years old male child patient with complaint of difficulty in drinking water and change in voice diagnosed as OAF managed with closure with buccal fat pad (BFP). Discussion: Oroantral fistula is an abnormal communication resulting most frequently from extraction of the upper posterior teeth. Many techniques have been proposed for the closure. The preferred technique may vary from one surgeon to another. Conclusion: The adequate availability of BFP in children, effortless mobilization excellent blood supply and minimal donor site morbidity make it a perfect flap for OAF closure in pediatric patient. How to cite this article: Agrawal A, Singhal R, Kumar P, Singh V, Bhagol A. Treatment of Oroantral Fistula in Pediatric Patient using Buccal Fat Pad. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):138-140. PMID:26379383

  6. Optimizing Available Phosphorus in Calcareous Soils Fertilized with Diammonium Phosphate and Phosphoric Acid Using Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P) retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA) required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were spiked with 0, 10, and 20 % CaCO3 for 15 days. Freundlich adsorption isotherms (P = aCb/a) were constructed, and theoretical doses of PA and DAP to develop a desired soil solution P level (i.e., 0.20 mg L−1) were calculated. It was observed that P adsorption in soil increased with CaCO3. Moreover, at all the levels of CaCO3, P adsorption from PA was lower compared to that from DAP in both the soils. Consequently, lesser quantity of PA was required to produce desired solution P, 0.2 mg L−1, compared to DAP. However, extrapolating the developed relationship between soil CaCO3 contents and quantity of fertilizer to other similar textured soils needs confirmation. PMID:24307878

  7. A New Framework for Adaptive Sampling and Analysis During Long- Term Monitoring and Remedial Action Management

    SciTech Connect

    Minsker, Barbara

    2003-06-01

    The Argonne team has gathered available data on monitoring wells and measured hydraulic heads from the Argonne 317/319 site and sent it to UIUC. Xiaodong Li, a research assistant supported by the project, has reviewed the data and is beginning to fit spatiotemporal statistical models to it. Another research assistant, Yonas Demissie, has gotten the site's Modflow model working and is developing a transport model that will be used to generate artificial data. Abhishek Singh, a third research assistant supported by the project, has performed a literature review on inverse modeling and is receiving training on the software that will be used in this project (D2K). He has also created two models of user preferences and successfully implemented them with an interactive genetic algorithm on test functions. Meghna Babbar, the fourth research assistant supported by the project, has created an interactive genetic algorithm code and initial user interface in D2K. Gayathri Gopalakrishnan, the last research assistant who is partially supported by the project, has collected and analyzed data from the phytoremediation systems at the 317/319 site. She has found good correlations between concentrations in the ground water and in branches of the trees, which indicates excellent promise for using the trees as cost-effective long-term monitoring of the contaminants.

  8. Clinical relevance of radiologic examination of the skeleton and bone density measurements in osteoporosis of old age

    SciTech Connect

    Kuester, W.; Seidl, G.; Linkesch, W.; Kotscher, E.; Kovarik, J.; Willvonseder, R.; Kovarik, J.; Willvonseder, R.; Dorda, W.

    1981-10-01

    For the diagnosis of primary osteoporosis, various semiquantitative radiologic methods were compared in 149 unselected patients, aged over 50 years. Crush fracture syndrome (CFS), lumbar spine index (LSI), and Singh Index (SI) were assessed by three radiologists and after reevaluation, the intra- and interobserver errors were calculated. The reliability of the subjective grading was improved by joint and repeated reading of the radiographs. Additionally, the peripheral trabecular bone content was measured by photon absorption densitometry (PAD). To test the value of the various semiquantitative methods. LSI, Si, and PAD have been compared with sex-matching before and after separation into age in decades in CFS-positive and CFS-negative patients. In an attempt to differentiate osteoporotics and non-osteoporotics by CFS, our results indicate that CFS-positive and CFS-negative males cannot be separated by LSI, Si, and PAD, whereas in females these methods can discriminate irrespective of the age in decades. However, in age related groups, only SI can discriminate significantly between CFS-positive and CFS-negative females. Correlation of the semiquantitative methods, regardless of the diagnosis of a CFS, revealed a significant correlation-between SI and PAD, but no correlation between LSI and SI, and LSI and PAD, respectively.

  9. A measure of scale-dependent asymmetry in turbulent boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guala, Michele; Singh, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of scale-dependent, streamwise velocity increments is investigated in turbulent boundary layer flows at laboratory and atmospheric Reynolds number, using the SAFL wind tunnel (Singh et al. Phys. of Fluids 2014) and the SLTEST data (Metzger et al. Phil. Trans Royal Soc. A 2007). The third order moments of velocity increments, or asymmetry index As(a,z), is computed for varying wall distance z and scale separation a, where it was observed to leave a robust, distinct signature in the form of a hump, independent of Reynolds number and located across the inertial subrange. The hump is observed for z + <5000, with a tendency to increase in amplitude, and shift towards smaller timescales, as the wall is approached. Comparing the two datasets, the hump vertical location, obeying to inner wall scaling, is regarded to as a genuine feature of the canonical turbulent boundary layer. The magnitude cumulant analysis of the scale-dependent velocity increments indicates that intermittency is also enhanced in the same flow region. The combination of asymmetry and intermittency is inferred to point at non-local energy transfer across a range of scales and may thus be used to quantify interactions between structural types in boundary layer flows.

  10. Common genetic influences on negative emotionality and a general psychopathology factor in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Lahey, Benjamin B; van Hulle, Carol; Waldman, Irwin; Krueger, Robert F; Rathouz, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Previous research using confirmatory factor analysis to model psychopathology comorbidity has supported the hypothesis of a broad general factor (i.e., a "bifactor"; Holzinger & Swineford, 1937) of psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults, with more specific higher order internalizing and externalizing factors reflecting additional shared variance in symptoms (Lahey et al., 2012; Lahey, van Hulle, Singh, Waldman, & Rathouz, 2011). The psychological nature of this general factor has not been explored, however. The current study tested a prediction, derived from the spectrum hypothesis of personality and psychopathology, that variance in a general psychopathology bifactor overlaps substantially-at both phenotypic and genetic levels-with the dispositional trait of negative emotionality. Data on psychopathology symptoms and dispositional traits were collected from both parents and youth in a representative sample of 1,569 twin pairs (ages 9-17 years) from Tennessee. Predictions based on the spectrum hypothesis were supported, with variance in negative emotionality and the general factor overlapping substantially at both phenotypic and etiologic levels. Furthermore, stronger correlations were found between negative emotionality and the general psychopathology factor than among other dispositions and other psychopathology factors. PMID:24364617

  11. Identification of a new species of Cercospora causing leaf spot disease in Capsicum assamicum in northeastern India.

    PubMed

    Meghvansi, Mukesh K; Khan, Mohammad Haneef; Gupta, Rajeev; Veer, Vijay

    2013-11-01

    Northeastern India is one of the most important biodiversity hotspots in the world. However, hot and humid climatic conditions of the region favor growth and development of foliar fungal phytopathogens such as cercosporoid fungi. The genus Cercospora is one of the largest genera of hyphomycetes. Species of Cercospora are known to cause leaf spot disease in several cultivated and non-cultivated plants leading to considerable losses. In this study, we describe a new species of Cercospora which was isolated from the leaves of Naga chilli (Capsicum assamicum Purkayastha & Singh) grown in northeastern India. Comparison of the detailed morphological characteristics along with the DNA sequences for four gene regions, namely actin, calmodulin, histone H3 and translation elongation factor-1α of this isolate, was made with those of some previously reported Cercospora species infecting Capsicum and other similar species of Cercospora from other hosts. The results suggested that our isolate represents an undescribed taxon and warrants the establishment of a new species, Cercospora tezpurensis sp. nov. PMID:23994144

  12. Relationship between the structure of taxol and other taxanes on induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene expression and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, C A; Berman, J W; Swindell, C S; Horwitz, S B

    1994-11-15

    Taxol is an antitumor drug with cytotoxic properties that correlate with its microtubule-stabilizing activities. It has been reported that taxol parallels lipopolysaccharide in its effects on the induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) gene expression in macrophages (C. Bogdan and A. Ding, J. Leukocyte Biol., 52: 119-121, 1992; C. L. Manthey, M. E. Brandes, P. Y. Perera, and S. Vogel, J. Immunol., 149: 2459-2465, 1992; J. M. Carboni, C. Singh, and M. A. Tepper, Natl. Cancer Inst. Monogr., 15: 95-101, 1993). Structure-activity studies using taxol and related taxanes have been done to determine the relationship between the effects of taxol on TNF-alpha gene expression and its cytotoxic and microtubule-stabilizing activities. Using Northern blot analysis, it was found that changes in the structure of taxol that did not alter cytotoxicity did prevent the induction of TNF-alpha gene expression. The data presented in this paper demonstrate that the effects of taxol on TNF-alpha gene expression are distinct from its known cytotoxic properties. PMID:7954398

  13. Mice transgenic for a soluble form of murine CTLA-4 show enhanced expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and defective antibody production in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ronchese, F; Hausmann, B; Hubele, S; Lane, P

    1994-03-01

    CD4+ T cell responses were analyzed in transgenic mice expressing a soluble form of murine CTLA-4, mCTLA4-H gamma 1, which blocks the interaction of the T cell activation molecules CD28 and CTLA-4 with their costimulatory ligands. Consistent with previous reports (Linsley, P. S., P. M. Wallace, J. Johnson, M. G. Gibson, J. L. Greene, J. A. Ledbetter, C. Singh, and M. A. Tepper. 1992. Science (Wash. DC). 257:792), T cell-dependent antibody production was profoundly inhibited in mCTLA4-H gamma 1 transgenic mice immunized with a protein antigen. Surprisingly, however, transgenic mice could generate quantitatively and qualitatively normal primary T cell responses, as measured by limiting dilution assays and lymphokine production. In addition, in vivo expansion of antigen-specific T cells after secondary or tertiary immunization was enhanced in mCTLA4-H gamma 1 transgenics as compared with normal mice. Although unable to deliver cognate help to B cells in vivo, T cells from mCTLA4-H gamma 1 transgenic mice were not anergic as they could help B cells to produce specific antibodies when adoptively transferred into nude hosts. Taken together, these data suggest that the engagement of CD28 and/or CTLA-4 may not be required for the induction of T cell responses, as is currently understood, but rather for the expression of T cell effector function such as the delivery of T cell help to B cells. PMID:8113677

  14. Manufacturing of Wearable Sensors for Human Health and Performance Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Azar

    2015-03-01

    Continuous monitoring of physiological and biological parameters is expected to improve performance and medical outcomes by assessing overall health status and alerting for life-saving interventions. Continuous monitoring of these parameters requires wearable devices with an appropriate form factor (lightweight, comfortable, low energy consuming and even single-use) to avoid disrupting daily activities thus ensuring operation relevance and user acceptance. Many previous efforts to implement remote and wearable sensors have suffered from high cost and poor performance, as well as low clinical and end-use acceptance. New manufacturing and system level design approaches are needed to make the performance and clinical benefits of these sensors possible while satisfying challenging economic, regulatory, clinical, and user-acceptance criteria. In this talk we will review several recent design and manufacturing efforts aimed at designing and building prototype wearable sensors. We will discuss unique opportunities and challenges provided by additive manufacturing, including 3D printing, to drive innovation through new designs, faster prototyping and manufacturing, distributed networks, and new ecosystems. We will also show alternative hybrid self-assembly based integration techniques for low cost large scale manufacturing of single use wearable devices. Coauthors: Prabhjot Singh and Jeffrey Ashe.

  15. Scanning Magnetoresistance Microscopy Studies of Small Magnetic and Electrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Gang

    2004-03-01

    Many physical objects generate microscopic magnetic-field images near their surfaces. Such images reveal important signatures of inherent electrical and magnetic processes within the objects. For example, the image of a magnetic thin film discloses its internal magnetic domain structure. Electrical currents inside an semiconductor chip generate surface magnetic field images, which not only contain information about the electrical current distribution, but also the frequencies with which various components on a chip operates. A type II superconductor also creates an image of threading magnetic flux lines, whose structure and dynamics are fundamental properties. We have developed a sensitive and high-resolution magnetic microscope that is capable of non-invasively imaging, characterizing, and investigating spatial magnetic field patterns. At the heart of the microscope is a miniaturized magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ) or giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor, capable to work at high speed, under ambient conditions, and over a wide bandwidth. This type of MR microscopy (MRM) offers many advantages over the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and others. It measures the absolute local magnetic field, and its sensor does not generate invasive field as a magnetic tip would. The MRM can also measure dynamic magnetic images in a time varying external field. We will present results obtained from a wide range of structures using MRM, including small magnetic structures and state-of-the-art integrated circuits. This work supported by NSF is a collaboration with B. Schrag, X.Y. Liu, and G. Singh.

  16. Seven tenths incorrect: heterogeneity and change in the waist-to-hip ratios of Playboy centerfold models and Miss America pageant winners.

    PubMed

    Freese, Jeremy; Meland, Sheri

    2002-05-01

    Drawing on an article by Singh (1993), many discussions of the evolutionary psychology of heterosexual male preferences have reported a remarkable consistency in the waist-to-hip ratios of Playboy centerfold models and Miss America pageant winners over time. We reexamine the measurement data on these American beauty icons and show that these reports are false in several ways. First, the variation in waist-to-hip ratios among these women is greater than reported. Second, the center of the distribution of waist-to-hip ratios is not 0.70, but less than this. Third, the average waist-to-hip ratio within both samples has changed over time in a manner that is statistically significant and can be regarded as mutually consistent. Taken together, the findings undermine some of the evidence given for the repeated suggestion that there is something special--evolutionarily hard-wired or otherwise--about a specific female waist-to-hip ratio of 0.70 as a preference of American heterosexual males. PMID:12476245

  17. Higher derivative massive spin-3 models in D =2 +1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmazi, D.; Mendonça, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    We find new higher derivative models describing a parity doublet of massive spin-3 modes in D =2 +1 dimensions. One of them is of fourth order in derivatives while the other one is of sixth order. They are complete, in the sense that they contain the auxiliary scalar field required to remove spurious degrees of freedom. Both of them are obtained through the master action technique starting with the usual (second-order) spin-3 Singh-Hagen model, which guarantees that they are ghost free. The fourth- and sixth-order terms are both invariant under (transverse) Weyl transformations, quite similarly to the fourth-order K -term of the "new massive gravity." The sixth-order term slightly differs from the product of the Schouten by the Einstein tensor, both of third order in derivatives. It is also possible to write down the fourth-order term as a product of a Schouten-like by an Einstein-like tensor (both of second order in derivatives) in close analogy with the K -term.

  18. On a Continuum Limit for Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose Antonio

    2008-03-06

    The use of non-regular representations of the Heisenberg-Weyl commutation relations has proved to be useful for studying conceptual and technical issues in quantum gravity. Of particular relevance is the study of Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC), symmetry reduced theory that is related to Loop Quantum Gravity, and that is based on a non-regular, polymeric representation. Recently, a soluble model was used by Ashtekar, Corichi and Singh to study the relation between Loop Quantum Cosmology and the standard Wheeler-DeWitt theory and, in particular, the passage to the limit in which the auxiliary parameter (interpreted as ''quantum geometry discreetness'') is sent to zero in hope to get rid of this 'regulator' that dictates the LQC dynamics at each 'scale'. In this note we outline the first steps toward reformulating this question within the program developed by the authors for studying the continuum limit of polymeric theories, which was successfully applied to simple systems such as a Simple Harmonic Oscillator.

  19. Universal conductivity in a two-dimensional superfluid-to-insulator quantum critical system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Liu, Longxiang; Deng, Youjin; Pollet, Lode; Prokof'ev, Nikolay

    2014-01-24

    We compute the universal conductivity of the (2+1)-dimensional XY universality class, which is realized for a superfluid-to-Mott insulator quantum phase transition at constant density. Based on large-scale Monte Carlo simulations of the classical (2+1)-dimensional J-current model and the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we can precisely determine the conductivity on the quantum critical plateau, σ(∞) = 0.359(4)σQ with σQ the conductivity quantum. The universal conductivity curve is the standard example with the lowest number of components where the bottoms-up AdS/CFT correspondence from string theory can be tested and made to use [R. C. Myers, S. Sachdev, and A. Singh, Phys. Rev. D 83, 066017 (2011)]. For the first time, the shape of the σ(iω(n)) - σ(∞) function in the Matsubara representation is accurate enough for a conclusive comparison and establishes the particlelike nature of charge transport. We find that the holographic gauge-gravity duality theory for transport properties can be made compatible with the data if temperature of the horizon of the black brane is different from the temperature of the conformal field theory. The requirements for measuring the universal conductivity in a cold gas experiment are also determined by our calculation. PMID:24484123

  20. Embedding loop quantum cosmology without piecewise linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    An important goal is to understand better the relation between full loop quantum gravity (LQG) and the simplified, reduced theory known as loop quantum cosmology (LQC), directly at the quantum level. Such a firmer understanding would increase confidence in the reduced theory as a tool for formulating predictions of the full theory, as well as permitting lessons from the reduced theory to guide further development in the full theory. This paper constructs an embedding of the usual state space of LQC into that of standard LQG, that is, LQG based on piecewise analytic paths. The embedding is well defined even prior to solving the diffeomorphism constraint, at no point is a graph fixed and at no point is the piecewise linear category used. This motivates for the first time a definition of operators in LQC corresponding to holonomies along non-piecewise linear paths, without changing the usual kinematics of LQC in any way. The new embedding intertwines all operators corresponding to such holonomies, and all elements in its image satisfy an operator equation which classically implies homogeneity and isotropy. The construction is made possible by a recent result proven by Fleischhack. Communicated by P Singh

  1. Where have all the flowers gone: deforestation in the Third World

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The papers in this issue (and in its companion issue) describe tropical forest destruction and analyze implications at several levels. The contributions are representative of the major regions of the tropical moist forests (TMFs) - Amazonia, Africa, and Indo-Malaysia - and reveal a process whose ramifications will affect all parts and components of the biosphere. The authors and titles of the 13 paprs are: Norman Myers, Deforestation in the Tropics: Who Gains, Who Loses; William M. Denevan, Swiddens and Cattle Versus Forest: The Imminent Demise of the Amazon Rain Forest Reexamined; Stephen G. Bunker, Impact of Deforestation on Peasant Communities in the Medio Amazonas of Brazil; Susanna B. Hecht, Deforestation in the Amazon Basin: Magnitude, Dynamics and Soil-Resource Effects; K. Twum-Barima, Forests of Ghana - A Diminishing Asset; J. Leroy Deval (English abstract), Man and Development in the Forests of Gabon; J. Leroy Deval, L'Homme et Le Developpement de La Foret du Gabon Dans Le Passe; Faustin Legault (English Translation), Reforestation in the Republic of Gabon; Faustin Legault, Le Reboisement en Republique Gabonaise; Peter S. Ashton, Forest Conditions in the Tropics of Asia and the Far East; Gurmit Singh K.S., Destroying Malaysian Forests; Kuswata Kartawinata, Environmental Consequences of Tree Removal from the Forest in Indonesia; and Robert Goodland, Indonesia's Environmental Progress in Economic Development.

  2. Cestodes (Caryophyllidea) of the stinging catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Siluriformes: Heteropneustidae) from Asia.

    PubMed

    Ash, Anirban; Scholz, Tomáš; Oros, Mikuláš; Levron, Céline; Kar, Pradip Kumar

    2011-10-01

    The stinging catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) (Siluriformes: Heteropneustidae) has been reported to harbor as many as 19 species of caryophyllidean tapeworms (Cestoda) of 11 genera in tropical Asia (Indomalayan zoogeographical region). However, a critical review of the species composition has shown that only 1 species, Lucknowia fossilisi Gupta, 1961 (Lytocestidae), is a specific parasite of H. fossilis. Three other species, Djombangia penetrans Bovien, 1926 (syn., Djombangia caballeroi Sahay and Sahay, 1977 ), Pseudocaryophyllaeus ritai Gupta and Singh, 1983 (syn. Pseudocaryophyllaeus lucknowensis Gupta and Sinha, 1984 ), and Pseudocaryophyllaeus tenuicollis (Bovien, 1926) Ash, Scholz, Oros and Kar, 2011 (syn. P. mackiewiczi Gupta and Parmar, 1982 ), were found only once. Lucknowia fossilisi is redescribed on the basis of new material collected in West Bengal and voucher specimens from Maharashtra, India. A total of 9 species of Capingentoides, Lucknowia, Lytocestus, Pseudoadenoscolex, Pseudocaryophyllaeus, Pseudoheteroinverta, and Sukhapatae are newly synonymized with L. fossilisi and previous synonymies of 9 other species, proposed by Hafeezulah (1993), are confirmed. Generic diagnosis of Lucknowia Gupta, 1961 is amended. In addition, 1 species of Pseudobatrachus and 2 species of the monotypic genera Pseudoneckinverta and Sudhaena are invalidated as nomina nuda. PMID:21561334

  3. Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoint) Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Gynelle C.

    2001-01-01

    Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoint) is a method for joining high temperature- resistant ceramic pieces together, establishing joints that are strong, and allowing joining to be done in the field. This new way of joining allows complex shapes to be formed by joining together geometrically simple shapes. The joining technology at NASA is one of the enabling technologies for the application of silicon-carbide-based ceramic and composite components in demanding and high-temperature applications. The technology is being developed and tested for high-temperature propulsion parts for aerospace use. Commercially, it can be used for joining ceramic pieces used for high temperature applications in the power-generating and chemical industries, as well as in the microelectronics industry. This innovation could yield big payoffs for not only the power-generating industry but also the Silicon Valley chipmakers. This technology, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center by Dr. Mrityunjay Singh, is a two-step process involving first using a paste to join together ceramic pieces and bonding them by heating the joint to 110 to 120 C for between 10 and 20 min. This makes the joint strong enough to be handled for the final joining. Then, a silicon-based substance is applied to the joint and heated to 1400 C for 10 to 15 min. The resulting joint is as strong as the original ceramic material and can withstand the same high temperatures.

  4. Genetic Circuit Architectures Underlying Cell Fate Choices for Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinner, Aaron

    2009-03-01

    Antigen stimulated B cells follow an unusual developmental trajectory that transiently passes through a germinal center state, which promotes receptor affinity maturation and immunoglobulin class switching, before terminally differentiating into antibody secreting plasma cells. It was found that graded expression of the transcription factor IRF-4 regulates cell fate, but the relationship between antigen receptor signaling, the network of interactions with IRF-4, and cell fate was not known. This talk describes models that link ligand-receptor avidity with cell fate. The models have been validated experimentally by directly varying the levels and kinetics of IRF-4 accumulation. Furthermore, signaling through the antigen receptor is demonstrated to control the expression of IRF-4 and in turn the frequency of B cells that undergo class switching before differentiating into plasma cells. These findings provide an explanation for experiments that measure B cell numbers in transgenic mice. The architecture of our regulatory circuit provides a general mechanism for quantitative variations in a signal to be translated into a binary cell-fate choice involving transient expression of one of the two developmental fates. In collaboration with Aryeh Warmflash, Ying Li, Roger Sciammas, and Harinder Singh, The University of Chicago.

  5. Determination of the drying and rehydration kinetics of freeze dried kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa) slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergün, Kadriye; Çalışkan, Gülşah; Dirim, Safiye Nur

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the drying and rehydration kinetics of freeze dried kiwi slices. Well-known thin layer drying models (Lewis, Page, Modified Page I, Henderson and Pabis, Modified Henderson and Pabis, Logarithmic, Midilli, Modified Midilli, Two-term, Two-term Exponential, Modified Two-term Exponential, and Wang and Singh) were fitted to the experimental data. A nonlinear regression analysis was used to evaluate the parameters of the selected models using statistical software SPSS 16.0. For the freeze drying process of the kiwi slices, the highest R2 value (0.997), and the lowest RMSE (0.018) as well as the χ2 (0.0004) values were obtained from the Two-term Exponential model. The effective moisture diffusivity (Deff) of the freeze dried kiwi slices was calculated with the Fick's diffusion model as 7.302 × 10-10 m2/s. The rehydration behavior was determined using distilled water at different solid-liquid ratios at room temperature (18 ± 1 °C) using Peleg's model. The kinetics of the total soluble solid loss was also determined.

  6. Clausius-Clapeyron Scaling of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) in Cloud-Resolving Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, J.; Romps, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work by Singh and O'Gorman has produced a theory for convective available potential energy (CAPE) in radiative-convective equilibrium. In this model, the atmosphere deviates from a moist adiabat—and, therefore, has positive CAPE—because entrainment causes evaporative cooling in cloud updrafts, thereby steepening their lapse rate. This has led to the proposal that CAPE increases with global warming because the strength of evaporative cooling scales according to the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relation. However, CAPE could also change due to changes in cloud buoyancy and changes in the entrainment rate, both of which could vary with global warming. To test the relative importance of changes in CAPE due to CC scaling of evaporative cooling, changes in cloud buoyancy, and changes in the entrainment rate, we subject a cloud-resolving model to a suite of natural (and unnatural) forcings. We find that CAPE changes are primarily driven by changes in the strength of evaporative cooling; the effect of changes in the entrainment rate and cloud buoyancy are comparatively small. This builds support for CC scaling of CAPE.

  7. The Effect of Nickel on the Strength of Hcp-Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. M.; Gleason, A. E.; Mao, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrostatic nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering coupled with non-hydrostatic radial x-ray diffraction measurements can be used to determine the shear strength of Fe-bearing materials at core pressures. Using the Singh et al. formalism (2006), the bulk shear strength (t) of a material is related to its shear modulus(G) and to the average differential strain () over all measured lattice planes (hkl) by t = 6G. We followed an existing framework (Gleason & Mao, 2013) and extend the strength determinations to investigate the effect of nickel on the strength of iron at high pressure. We collected radial X-ray diffraction data on Fe90Ni10 and Fe80Ni20 using a panoramic diamond anvil cell with an X-ray transparent gasket to 100 GPa. This data was combined with existing NRIXS data (Lin 2003) to calculate the strength of these compounds. From this we extrapolated the strength of these iron-nickel alloys to deep earth pressures to give a new constraint on the strength of the inner core. Gaining a better understanding of the strength of iron and its alloys at high pressures can shed light on the strength of the inner core and provide insight into the deformation processes operating in the most remote region of our planet.

  8. Microbial Decontamination of Dried Alaska Pollock Shreds Using Corona Discharge Plasma Jet: Effects on Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soee; Puligundla, Pradeep; Mok, Chulkyoon

    2016-04-01

    Nonthermal techniques for microbial decontamination are becoming more common for ensuring food safety. In this study, a corona discharge plasma jet (CDPJ) was used for inactivation of microbial contaminants of dried Alaska pollock shreds. Corona plasma jet was generated at a current strength of 1.5 A, and a span length of 25 mm was maintained between the electrode tip and the sample. Upon the CDPJ treatment (0 to 3 min) of dried shreds, microbial contaminants namely aerobic and marine bacteria, and Staphylococcus aureus were inactivated by 2.5, 1.5, and >1.0 log units, respectively. Also, a one-log reduction of molds and yeasts contaminants was observed. The inactivation patterns are fitted well to the pseudo-first-order kinetics or Singh-Heldman model. The CDPJ treatment did not exert statistically significant (P > 0.05) changes in physicochemical properties, namely color characteristics, volatile basic nitrogen, and peroxide value of dried fish shreds, with some exceptions, as compared to untreated controls. Furthermore, CDPJ treatment had no significant impact on the sensory characteristics of dried fish shreds. PMID:26953810

  9. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Aman; Singh, Vijay Pratap

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the most important steps is accurate impression making for fabrication of fixed partial denture. The two different putty-wash techniques that are commonly used are: (1) Putty-wash one-step technique, (2) putty-wash two-step technique. A uniform wash space is needed for an accurate impression. Nissan et al recommended the use of two-step technique for accurate impression making as there is uniform wash space for the light body material to polymerize. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts obtained from different putty-wash impression techniques using various spacer thickness. The critical factor that influences the accuracy of putty-wash impression techniques is the controlled wash bulk which is absent in one-step putty-wash impression technique and with polyethylene spacer was used. How to cite this article: Chugh A, Arora A, Singh VP. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):33-38. PMID:25206132

  10. Long term socio-ecological research across temporal and spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. J.; Haberl, H.

    2012-04-01

    Long term socio-ecological research across temporal and spatial scales Simron Jit Singh and Helmut Haberl Institute of Social Ecology, Vienna, Austria Understanding trajectories of change in coupled socio-ecological (or human-environment) systems requires monitoring and analysis at several spatial and temporal scales. Long-term ecosystem research (LTER) is a strand of research coupled with observation systems and infrastructures (LTER sites) aimed at understanding how global change affects ecosystems around the world. In recent years it has been increasingly recognized that sustainability concerns require extending this approach to long-term socio-ecological research, i.e. a more integrated perspective that focuses on interaction processes between society and ecosystems over longer time periods. Thus, Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research, abbreviated LTSER, aims at observing, analyzing, understanding and modelling of changes in coupled socio-ecological systems over long periods of time. Indeed, the magnitude of the problems we now face is an outcome of a much longer process, accelerated by industrialisation since the nineteenth century. The paper will provide an overview of a book (in press) on LTSER with particular emphasis on 'socio-ecological transitions' in terms of material, energy and land use dynamics across temporal and spatial scales.

  11. Computation of phonon dispersion in non-crystalline Mg-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    The computation of the phonon dispersion curves (PDC) and the related properties of three Mg-based metallic glasses, viz. Mg70Zn30, Mg84Ni16 and Mg85.5Cu14.5, are made using the well recognized model potential of Gajjar et al. The pseudo-alloy atom model is applied for the first time instead of the Vegard's law. The three theoretical approaches given by Hubbard-Beeby, Takeno-Goda and Bhatia-Singh are used in the present study to compute the PDC of the systems. Five local-field correction functions proposed by Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru-Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. are employed for the first time to see the effects of exchange and correlation. The thermodynamic and elastic properties are computed from the elastic limits of the PDC and found to be in qualitative agreement with the available theoretical or experimental data. The present findings for the PDC of Mg70Zn30 alloy are found in fair agreement with available theoretical and experimental data.

  12. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 2. The Quark

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-07

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 2. The Quark "Three Quarks for Master Mark! Sure he hasn't got much of a bark." James Joyce's Finnegans Wake left its mark on modern physics when physicist Murray Gell Mann proposed this name for a group of hypothetical subatomic particles that were revealed in 1960 as the fundamental units of matter. Basic particles it seems are made up of even more basic units called quarks that make up 99.9% of visible material in the universe.. But why do we know so little about them? Quarks have never been seen as free particles but instead, inextricably bound together by the Strong Force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together. This is the hardest of Nature's fundamental forces to crack, but recent theoretical advances, mean that the properties of the quark are at last being revealed.

  13. Half-Life and Magnetic Moment of the First Excited State in ^132I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, S.; Tanigaki, M.; Ouchi, H.; Sasaki, A.; Hoshino, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Sato, N.; Shimada, K.; Wakui, T.; Shinozuka, T.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2009-10-01

    The half-life and the magnetic moment of the first excited state in ^132I are reported. There have been a long time confusion on the half-life measurements of the first excited state in ^132I. Several groups performed the lifetime measurements, but the reported values range from 1 ns to 7 ns. The only reported value of the magnetic moment for this state was measured by Singh, but their result should be treated as unreliable because the time-integral perturbed angular correlation technique (TIPAC), which requires the life time data of this state, was used in their measurement. From this point of view, the half-life and the magnetic moment of this state were measured. ^132I was obtained as the radioactive beam of ^132Te and ^132Sb from the newly developed RF-IGISOL (Radio Frequency IGISOL system) at Tohoku University. The half-life for this state was determined to be 1.120 ± 0.015 ns by a conventional coincidence technique with a pair of BaF2 detectors. The TDPAC measurement for the ^132I implanted kinematically into nickel was performed with the help of a strong hyperfine field at iodine site in nickel, and the magnetic moment of this state was determined to be μ=+ (2.06 ± 0.18)μN. The configuration of this state based on the present results will be discussed.

  14. An exposure-response method for assessing the long term health effects of the bhopal gas disaster.

    PubMed

    Dhara, V R; Kriebel, D

    1993-12-01

    Approximately 200,000 persons were exposed to methyl isocyanate in the Bhopal Gas leak in Bhopal, India. 4037 deaths have resulted and 30 per cent of the population are estimated to be suffering from long-term health effects. Though inflammatory damage to the eyes and lungs is the main cause of morbidity, other systems are also reported to be affected. For a disaster of this magnitude, there is a relative paucity of medical information. Very little information has been published on the late recovery period, a phase in which the detection of chronic and long-term effects is vital. Early cross-sectional studies suffer from a number of defects in study design, including validity and precision of exposure and outcome variables, selection of study and control groups, etc. By using exposure concentrations derived from Singh's analytic dispersion model, this paper outlines a strategy for doing community epidemiology in Bhopal using exposure strata for sampling. Pulmonary dose can be estimated from exposure concentration, duration and activity during exposure. For respiratory end-points, a sample size of 100/stratum will ensure study power of 90 per cent. Using multiple linear regression, data from the study can be used to build a model for prediction of lung function parameters. Exposure-stratified sampling techniques may provide valid estimates of exposure-response without including the total exposed community. PMID:20958771

  15. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Singh, Balraj

    2016-07-01

    The experimental data are evaluated for known nuclides of mass number A = 42 (Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ar, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr). Detailed evaluated level properties and related information are presented, including adopted values of level and γ-ray energies, decay data (energies, intensities and placement of radiations), and other spectroscopic data. This work supersedes earlier full evaluations of A = 42 published by B. Singh, J.A. Cameron - Nucl.Data Sheets 92, 1 (2001) and P.M. Endt - Nucl. Phys. A521, 1 (1990); Errata and Addenda Nucl. Phys. A529, 763 (1991); Errata Nucl. Phys. A564, 609 (1993) (also P.M. Endt - Nucl. Phys. A633, 1 (1998) update). No excited states are known in 42Al, 42P, 42V and 42Cr, and structure information for 42Si and 42S is quite limited. There are no decay schemes available for the decay of 42Al, 42Si, 42P, 42V and 42Cr, while the decay schemes of 42Cl and 42Ti are incomplete in view of scarcity of data, and large gap between their Q-values and the highest energy levels populated in corresponding daughter nuclei. Structures of 42Ca, 42K, 42Sc and 42Ar nuclides remain the most extensively studied via many different nuclear reactions and decays.

  16. Giant photocontraction effects in obliquely-deposited chalcogenide glass thin-films*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, M.; Boolchand, P.; Rajagopalan, T.; Chopra, K. L.

    2006-03-01

    GexSe1-x thin-films at several obliqueness angles α (= 0, 20, 45, 60, 80) and compositions x ( = 0.15, 0.20, 0.23, 0.25 and 0.33) were vapor-deposited, and examined in Raman scattering and SEM measurements both in the pristine and illuminated state. The films, placed in an inert ambient, were exposed to Hg lamp radiation, and photo-contraction of the films established using a profilometer. Raman scattering of the pristine and exposed films were studied as a function of depth using a confocal microscope attachment. Our results show (i) Raman scattering of the normally deposited (α = 0) films in the pristine state are similar to those of corresponding bulk glasses, (ii) obliquely deposited films at x = 1/3 reveal Raman lineshapes that change qualitatively with α, suggestive of nanoscale phase separation of the films, while those at x = 0.23 show Raman lineshapes that are largely independent of α, (iii) the photocontraction effect maximizes in the 0.20< x < 0.25 range, confirming the earlier finding (ref1) (iv) light illumination partially undoes effects associated with nanoscale phase separation. Possible interpretation of these results in relation to origin of photocontraction effects will be presented. *Supported by NSF grant DMR 04-56472. 1.Bhanwar Singh, S. Rajagopalan, P. K. Bhat, D. K. Pandya and K. L. Chopra, Solid State Communications, Vol. 29, pp. 167-169 (1979)

  17. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  18. Cavity optomechanics -- beyond the ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    The coupling of coherent optical systems to micromechanical devices, combined with breakthroughs in nanofabrication and in ultracold science, has opened up the exciting new field of cavity optomechanics. Cooling of the vibrational motion of a broad range on oscillating cantilevers and mirrors near their ground state has been demonstrated, and the ground state of at least one such system has now been reached. Cavity optomechanics offers much promise in addressing fundamental physics questions and in applications such as the detection of feeble forces and fields, or the coherent control of AMO systems and of nanoscale electromechanical devices. However, these applications require taking cavity optomechanics ``beyond the ground state.'' This includes the generation and detection of squeezed and other non-classical states, the transfer of squeezing between electromagnetic fields and motional quadratures, and the development of measurement schemes for the characterization of nanomechanical structures. The talk will present recent ``beyond ground state'' developments in cavity optomechanics. We will show how the magnetic coupling between a mechanical membrane and a BEC - or between a mechanical tuning fork and a nanoscale cantilever - permits to control and monitor the center-of-mass position of the mechanical system, and will comment on the measurement back-action on the membrane motion. We will also discuss of state transfer between optical and microwave fields and micromechanical devices. Work done in collaboration with Dan Goldbaum, Greg Phelps, Keith Schwab, Swati Singh, Steve Steinke, Mehmet Tesgin, and Mukund Vengallatore and supported by ARO, DARPA, NSF, and ONR.

  19. Mixed fluvial systems of Messak Sandstone, a deposit of Nubian lithofacies, southwestern Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Messak Sandstone is a coarse to pebbly, tabular cross-bedded, Lower Cretaceous deposit of the widespread Nubian lithofacies. It was deposited at the northern edge of the Murzuq basin in southwestern Libya. Although the sedimentary record is predominantly one of braided fluvial systems, a common subfacies within the formation is interpreted to record the passage of straight-crested sand waves across laterally migrating point bars in sinuous rivers, similar to the pattern documented by Singh and Kumar on the modern Ganga and Yamuna Rivers. Because the sand waves were larger on the lower parts of the point bars, lateral migration created diagnostic thinning-upward, unidirectional cosets of tabular cross-beds as well as fining-upward, grain-size trends. Common, thick, interbedded claystones, deposited in associated paludal and lacustrine environments, and high variance in cross-bed dispersion patterns also suggest the local presence of sinuous fluvial systems within the overall braided regime. The Messak Sandstone contains some of the features that led Harms et al to propose an unconventional low-sinuosity fluvial environment for the Nubian lithofacies in Egypt, and the continuously high water levels of this model may explain channel-scale clay drapes and overturned cross-beds in the Messak. However, most of the Messak characteristics are incompatible with the low-sinuosity model, suggesting instead that the fluvial channels in the Murzuq basin alternated between braided and high-sinuosity patterns.

  20. Tracking and Monitoring Oil Slicks Using remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemas, V. V.

    2011-12-01

    Tracking and Monitoring Oil Slicks Using Remote Sensing Victor Klemas, Ph.D. , College of Earth, Ocean and Environment, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 Abstract Oil spills can harm marine life in the ocean, estuaries and wetlands. To limit the damage by a spill and facilitate cleanup efforts, emergency managers need information on spill location, size and extent, direction and speed of oil movement, wind, current, and wave information for predicting oil drift and dispersion. The main operational data requirements are fast turn-around time and frequent imaging to monitor the dynamics of the spill. Radar and multispectral remote sensors on satellites and aircraft meet most of these requirements by tracking the spilled oil at various resolutions, over wide areas and at frequent intervals. They also provide key inputs to drift prediction models and facilitate targeting of skimming and booming efforts. Satellite data are frequently supplemented by information provided by aircraft, ships and remotely controlled underwater robots. The Sea Princess tanker grounding off the coast of Wales and the explosion on the Deepwater Horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico provide two representative, yet different, scenarios for evaluating the effectiveness of remote sensors during oil spill emergencies. Session NH17: Remote Sensing of Natural Hazards Session Chair: Ramesh P. Singh Sponsor: Natural Hazards (NH)

  1. Magnetism and transport properties of layered rare-earth cobaltates Ln{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Knížek, K. Novák, P.; Jirák, Z.; Hejtmánek, J.; Maryško, M.; Buršík, J.

    2015-05-07

    The ab-initio (GGA+U) electronic structure calculations of layered cobaltates Ln{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2} (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) prepared by ionic exchange from Na{sub 0.90}CoO{sub 2} precursors have been performed. The data are used for numerical modeling of Seebeck coefficient within Boltzmann transport theory using BoltzTraP program [G. K. H. Madsen and D. J. Singh, Comput. Phys. Commun. 175, 67 (2006)], as well as for determination of the crystal field split levels of rare-earth ions using a method based on a transformation of Bloch states into the basis of Wannier functions [P. Novák et al., Phys. Rev. B 87, 205139 (2013)]. An overall agreement with observed magnetism and transport properties is obtained. In particular, the high p-type thermopower is well reproduced in a broad temperature range, but instead of theoretical linear decrease down to the lowest temperatures, the real systems exhibit an anomalous change of Seebeck sign, which might be related to the change of bare metallic carriers into the polaronic ones.

  2. The thin-layer drying characteristics of sewage sludge by the appropriate foaming pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Ling; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Huang, Jing; Wang, Li-Ke; Gou, Cheng-Liu; Yan, Jing-Wu; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As dewatered sludge is highly viscous and sticky, the combination of foaming pretreatment and drying process seems to be an alternative method to improve the drying performance of dewatered sludge. In this study, CaO addition followed by mechanical whipping was employed for foaming the dewatered sludge. It was found that the foams were stable and the diameters of bubbles mainly ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 mm. The drying experiments were carried out in a drying oven in the convective mode. The results indicated that foamed sludge at 0.70 g/cm(3) had the best drying performance at each level of temperature, which could save 35-45% drying time to reach 20% moisture content compared with the non-foamed sludge. The drying rate of foamed sludge at 0.70 g/cm(3) was improved with the increasing of drying temperature. The impact of sample thickness on drying rate was not obvious when the sample thickness increased from 2 to 8 mm. Different mathematical models were used for the simulation of foamed sludge drying curves. The Wang and Singh model represented the drying characteristics better than other models with coefficient of determination values over 0.99. PMID:24804660

  3. Drying kinetics of syrup of Parinari curatellifolia fruit and cereal based product, zvambwa.

    PubMed

    Benhura, Chakare; Kugara, Jameson; Muchuweti, Maud; Nyagura, Stella F; Matarise, Florence; Gombiro, Power E; Nyandoro, George

    2015-08-01

    Drying properties of syrup prepared from Parinari curatellifolia fruit and cereal based product, zvambwa prepared from the syrup and finger millet (Eleusine coracana) meal were studied using a convective tray drier at temperatures ranging from 30 to 80 °C and air velocity of 0.72 m/s. Nine mathematical models namely Henderson and Pabis, Lewis, Midilli et al., Modified Page, Page, Two Term, Weibull, Modified Page Equation (II) and Wang and Singh were fitted to data for thin layer drying of the products using non-linear regression analysis. Thin layer drying processes for the syrup and zvambwa were best described by the Modified Page model. Effective moisture diffusivities for drying of syrup were higher than those for drying of zvambwa. The activation energies for drying of syrup and zvambwa were 21.0 ± 2.0 kJ/mol and19.0 ± 2.0 kJ/mol respectively. PMID:26243916

  4. Scientific overview: CSCI-CITAC Annual General Meeting and Young Investigators' Forum 2014.

    PubMed

    Keow, Jonathan; Zhao, Eric; Samuel, Nardin; Dey, Ayan; Schneider, Raphael; Chen, Michael; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Society of Clinician Investigators (CSCI) and Clinical Investigator Trainee Association of Canada/Association des cliniciens-chercheurs en formation du Canada (CITAC/ACCFC) annual general meeting (AGM) was held in Toronto during November 21-24, 2015 for the first time in conjunction with the University of Toronto Clinician-Investigator Program Research Day. The overall theme for this year's meeting was the role of mentorship in career development, with presentations from Dr. Chaim Bell (University of Toronto), Dr. Shurjeel Choudhri (Bayer Healthcare), Dr. Ken Croitoru (University of Toronto), Dr. Astrid Guttman (University of Toronto), Dr. Prabhat Jha (University of Toronto) and Dr. Sheila Singh (McMaster University). The keynote speakers of the 2014 AGM included Dr. Qutayba Hamid, who was presented with the Distinguished Scientist Award, Dr. Ravi Retnakaran, who was presented with the Joe Doupe Award, and Dr. Lorne Babiuk, who was the CSCI-RCPSC Henry Friesen Award winner. The highlight of the conference was, once again, the outstanding scientific presentations from the numerous clinician investigator (CI) trainees from across the country who presented at the Young Investigators' Forum. Their research topics spanned the diverse fields of science and medicine, ranging from basic science to cutting-edge translational research, and their work has been summarized in this review. Over 120 abstracts were presented at this year's meeting. This work was presented during two poster sessions, with the six most outstanding submitted abstracts presented in the form of oral presentations during the President's Forum. PMID:26278424

  5. Plasmodium knowlesi: the emerging zoonotic malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Antinori, Spinello; Galimberti, Laura; Milazzo, Laura; Corbellino, Mario

    2013-02-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi was initially identified in the 30s as a natural Plasmodium of Macaca fascicularis monkey also capable of experimentally infecting humans. It gained a relative notoriety in the mid-30s as an alternative to Plasmodium vivax in the treatment of the general paralysis of the insane (neurosyphilis). In 1965 the first natural human infection was described in a US military surveyor coming back from the Pahang jungle of the Malaysian peninsula. P. knowlesi was again brought to the attention of the medical community when in 2004, Balbir Singh and his co-workers reported that about 58% of malaria cases observed in the Kapit district of the Malaysian Borneo were actually caused by P. knowlesi. In the following years several reports showed that P. knowlesi is much more widespread than initially thought with cases reported across Southeast Asia. This infection should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of any febrile travellers coming back from a recent travel to forested areas of Southeast Asia. P. knowlesi can cause severe malaria with a rate of 6-9% and with a case fatality rate of 3%. Respiratory distress, acute renal failure, shock and hyperbilirubinemia are the most frequently observed complications of severe P. knowlesi malaria. Chloroquine is considered the treatment of choice of uncomplicated malaria caused by P. knowlesi. PMID:23088834

  6. Principles of contour information: Reply to Lim and Leek (2012).

    PubMed

    Singh, Manish; Feldman, Jacob

    2012-07-01

    Lim and Leek (2012) presented a formalization of information along object contours, which they argued was an alternative to the approach taken in our article (Feldman & Singh, 2005). Here, we summarize the 2 approaches, showing that--notwithstanding Lim and Leek's (2012) critical rhetoric--their approach is substantially identical to ours, except for the technical details of the formalism. Following the logic of our article point by point, Lim and Leek (a) defined probabilistic expectations about the geometry of smooth contours (which they based on differential contour geometry, while we used a discrete approximation--the only essential difference in their approach), (b) assumed that information along the contour was proportional to the negative logarithm of probability, following standard information theory, and then (c) extended this formulation to closed contours. We analyze what they described as errors in our approach, all of which rest on mathematical misunderstandings or bizarre misreadings of our article. We also show that their extension to 3-dimensional surfaces and their "modified minima rule" contain fatal deficiencies. PMID:22775501

  7. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of High Field Polars (FUSE 00)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The following work has been accomplished: 1) The emission lines of O VI1 and He II were used to produce Doppler tomograms of the plasma emission. 2) An improved interstellar absorption model is being developed for the CIAO spectral fitting program, Sherpa. Use of the earlier version of this model showed it to be inadequate for its purpose. Once this model is working, we intend to complete our analysis of V884 Her and those of other FUSE programs. In addition to the above work, this grant has helped support the following related work: 1) The publication of the paper "Periodicities in the X-ray intensity variations of TV Columbae: an Intermediate Polar" by Rana, V. R., Singh, K. P., Schlegel, E. M., & Barrett, P. 2004, AJ, 126,489, and 2) FUSE data of a possible nova-like variable Ret 1 has been analyzed and shown to contain a hot (37000 deg) white dwarf (WD 0334-6400). The FUV spectrum shows strong absorption lines of C III.

  8. [The verge and the abyss: tiotropium (Spiriva) in COPD].

    PubMed

    Segel, Michael J; Ben-Dov, Issahar

    2011-01-01

    Tiotropium, a Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilator, has many beneficial effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Among them are: a bronchodilator effect which is additive to that of beta-adrenergic agonists, that persists long-term without tolerance; reduction of dyspnea; improved exercise tolerance; enhanced response to rehabilitation; improved quality of life; and reduced frequency of exacerbations and hospital admissions. Therefore, tiotropium is widely used, and has been added to the Health Basket by the Israel Ministry of Health. In March 2008, the manufacturer informed the US Food and Drug Administration (FDAI that ongoing safety monitoring had identified a possible increased risk of stroke in patients who take this medicine. In September 2008, Singh and colleagues published a meta-analysis suggesting an increased risk of cardiovascular events in COPD patients treated with tiotropium, although there was no difference in overall mortality. A month later, the UPLIFT investigators published a 4 year placebo-controlled trial of tiotropium involving 5993 patients, in which there were slightly less cardiovascular events in the treatment group, and a trend to reduced overall mortality. The authors review the benefits and safety data, and conclude that while the benefits of tiotropium in COPD are clear, the evidence of an adverse effect on cardiovascular mortality is not sufficiently convincing. Hence, the balance of evidence supports continued use of tiotropium, especially in severe COPD. PMID:21449160

  9. Dependence of magnetic field and electronic transport of Mn4 Single-molecule magnet in a Single-Electron Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Alvar; Singh, Simranjeet; Haque, Firoze; Del Barco, Enrique; Nguyen, Tu; Christou, George

    2012-02-01

    Dependence of magnetic field and electronic transport of Mn4 Single-molecule magnet in a Single-Electron Transistor A. Rodriguez, S. Singh, F. Haque and E. del Barco Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 USA T. Nguyen and G. Christou Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 USA Abstract We have performed single-electron transport measurements on a series of Mn-based low-nuclearity single-molecule magnets (SMM) observing Coulomb blockade. SMMs with well isolated and low ground spin states, i.e. S = 9/2 (Mn4) and S = 6 (Mn3) were chosen for these studies, such that the ground spin multiplet does not mix with levels of other excited spin states for the magnetic fields (H = 0-8 T) employed in the experiments. Different functionalization groups were employed to change the mechanical, geometrical and transport characteristics of the molecules when deposited from liquid solution on the transistors. Electromigration-broken three-terminal single-electron transistors were used. Results obtained at temperatures down to 240 mK and in the presence of high magnetic fields will be shown.

  10. Nonlinear instability and intermittent nature of magnetic reconnection in solar chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Hillier, Andrew; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-10-01

    The recent observations of Singh et al. (2012, ApJ, 759, 33) have shown multiple plasma ejections and the intermittent nature of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere, highlighting the need for fast reconnection to occur in highly collisional plasma. However, the physical process through which fast magnetic reconnection occurs in partially ionized plasma, like the solar chromosphere, is still poorly understood. It has been shown that for sufficiently high magnetic Reynolds numbers, Sweet-Parker current sheets can become unstable leading to tearing mode instability and plasmoid formation, but when dealing with a partially ionized plasma the strength of coupling between the ions and neutrals plays a fundamental role in determining the dynamics of the system. We propose that as the reconnecting current sheet thins and the tearing instability develops, plasmoid formation passes through strongly, intermediately, and weakly coupled (or decoupled) regimes, with the time scale for the tearing mode instability depending on the frictional coupling between ions and neutrals. We present calculations for the relevant time scales for fractal tearing in all three regimes. We show that as a result of the tearing mode instability and the subsequent non-linear instability due to the plasmoid-dominated reconnection, the Sweet-Parker current sheet tends to have a fractal-like structure, and when the chromospheric magnetic field is sufficiently strong the tearing instability can reach down to kinetic scales, which are hypothesized to be necessary for fast reconnection.

  11. Group theoretical Laws and Geometrical Phase for Paraxial Self-focusing and Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantu, Subbarao; Uma, R.

    1998-11-01

    Group theoretical laws are formulated for the dynamics of paraxial self-focusing and soliton dynamics. The close similarity in the dynamical formulation of the theory of paraxial self-focusing of cylindrical laser beams of circular as well as elliptical cross-sections and paraxial solitons is exploited to state the group theoretical laws for the dynamics which in their limited form are known as ABCD laws in optics using our recent formulation of one of these phenomena^1. The dynamics of the laser beam is in terms of its evolution in the direction propagation while the soliton dynamics is along the actual time axis. (Conceiving soliton dynamics similar to a planar beam in the x-t plane, it can be analyzed using the paraxial approximation.) The group governing the dynamics is shown to be the Lorentz group, which gets reduced to the rotation group in the absorption-less case. Geometrical phase is evaluated for all these beams and solitons using our recent formulation of the geometric phase in projective space^2. 1. D. Subbarao, R. Uma and H. Singh, Phys. Plasmas, 5, Aug. (1998). 2. D.Subbarao Opt. Lett. 20, 2162 (1995) The authors acknowledge the financial support of CSIR(India) under the project 03(0815)/97/EMR-II for this work.

  12. Yoga therapy for promoting emotional sensitivity in University students

    PubMed Central

    Ganpat, Tikhe Sham; Dash, Sasmita; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Students need emotional intelligence (EI) for their better academic excellence. There are three important psychological dimensions of EI: Emotional sensitivity (ES), emotional maturity (EM) and emotional competency (EC), which motivate students to recognize truthfully, interpret honestly and handle tactfully the dynamics of their behavioral pattern. Objective: The study was designed to assess ES in the students undergoing yoga therapy program in the form of yoga instructor's course (YIC) module. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty four YIC students with 25.77 ± 4.85 years of mean age participated in this study of 21 days duration (a single group pre-post design). The ES data was collected before (pre) and after (post) YIC module using Emotional Quotient test developed by Dr Dalip Singh and Dr N K Chadha. Statistical Analysis: Means, standard deviations, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for analyzing the data with the help of SPSS 16. Results: The data analysis showed 3.63% significant increase (P < 0.01) in ES. Conclusion: The present study suggests that YIC module can result in improvement of ES among university students, thus paving the way for their academic success. Additional well-designed studies are needed before a strong recommendation can be made. PMID:25013838

  13. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 2. The Quark

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 2. The Quark "Three Quarks for Master Mark! Sure he hasn't got much of a bark." James Joyce's Finnegans Wake left its mark on modern physics when physicist Murray Gell Mann proposed this name for a group of hypothetical subatomic particles that were revealed in 1960 as the fundamental units of matter. Basic particles it seems are made up of even more basic units called quarks that make up 99.9% of visible material in the universe.. But why do we know so little about them? Quarks have never been seen as free particles but instead, inextricably bound together by the Strong Force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together. This is the hardest of Nature's fundamental forces to crack, but recent theoretical advances, mean that the properties of the quark are at last being revealed.

  14. Getting involved in research.

    PubMed

    Banner, Davina; Grant, Lyle G

    2011-01-01

    The need for quality nursing research to promote evidence-based practice and optimize patient care is well recognized. This is particularly pertinent in cardiovascular nursing, where cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide (World Health Organization, 2007). Across the spectrum of academic, clinical, and health care administration nursing roles, research remains fundamental to bridging theory, practice, and education (LoBiondo-Wood, Haber, Cameron, & Singh, 2009). Despite recognition of the importance of nursing research, the gap between research and practice continues to be an ongoing issue (Funk, Tornquist, & Champagne, 1995; Pettengill, Gillies, & Clark, 1994; Rizzuto, Bostrom, Suterm, & Chenitz, 1994; Rolfe, 1998). Nurses are appropriately situated to contribute to research that improves clinical outcomes and health service delivery. However, the majority of nurses in clinical practice do not have a significant research component structured into their nursing role. In this research column, the authors outline the importance of nurses being engaged in research and present some different levels of involvement that nurses may assume. A continuum of nursing research involvement includes asking researchable questions, being a savvy consumer of research evidence, finding your own level of research involvement, and aspiring to lead. PMID:21361237

  15. Society Matters: The Executive Council of the Astronomical Society of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    The Executive Council of the Astronomical Society of India is elected every three years. The members of the Executive Council for the current triennium (1997 - 2000) are : President : Dr. Ram Sagar, Uttar Pradesh State Observatory Vice President : Dr. Gopal Krishna, National Centre for Radio Astrophysics Immediate Past President : Dr. K. Kasturirangan, ISRO Headquarters Secretary : Dr. Dipankar Bhattacharya, Raman Research Institute Treasurer : Dr. G.C. Kilambi, Department of Astronomy Osmania University Joint Secretary : Dr. G.M. Ballabh, Department of Astronomy Osmania University Editor of the Bulletin : Dr. Vinod Krishan, Indian Institute of Astrophysics Councillors : Dr. Ashok Ambastha, Udaipur Solar Observatory Shri Piyush Pandey, M.P. Birla Planetarium Society Matters : Dr. A.V. Raveendran, Indian Institute of Astrophysics Dr. Somak Raychaudury, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics The dates of the 20th ASI Meeting have now been fixed. The meeting will take place at the D.D.U. Gorakhpur University from 15th to 18th November, 2000. The first circular will be mailed shortly to the members and will also be posted on the Society's web page. Further information can be had from Prof. Maheshwar Misra, Head, Department of Physics, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur - 273009. The Scientific Organising Committee will be chaired by Prof. K. P. Singh, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai - 400 005

  16. The global financial crisis and the Great Recession of 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Dore, Mohammed H I; Singh, Rajiv G

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a re-examination of the global financial crisis that began in and was accompanied by the most severe recession since the Great Depression. It builds on our earlier paper (Dore and Singh, 2009) and expands its scope. It is divided into parts. The first part deals with the ideological backdrop in which this crisis occurred, namely the belief in the rationality and stability of all markets including the capital markets, called the 'efficient market hypothesis.' The second part is a survey of the role of income distribution and its relations to aggregate spending and the growing role played by credit in the circular flow of income. The third part examines some features of the business cycle expansion phase of to . The fourth part is a brief report on a nonlinear Vector Error Correction model spanning the period to and how this expansion came to an end. The fifth part is a brief comparison of the Great Recession with the Great Depression. Finally in the sixth part, the international impact of the Great Recession is considered briefly, followed by some conclusions. PMID:20587304

  17. Radionuclide and contaminant immobilization in the fluidized bed steam reforming waste products

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brown, Christopher F.; Jantzen, Carol; Pierce, Eric M.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process and resulting waste form. The first section of the chapter gives an overview of the potential need for FBSR processing in nuclear waste remediation followed by an overview of the engineering involved in the process itself. This is followed by a description of waste form production at a chemical level followed by a section describing different process streams that have undergone the FBSR process. The third section describes the resulting mineral product in terms of phases that are present and the ability of the waste form to encapsulate hazardous and radioactive wastes from several sources. Following this description is a presentation of the physical properties of the granular and monolith waste form product including and contaminant release mechanisms. The last section gives a brief summary of this chapter and includes a section on the strengths associated with this waste form and the needs for additional data and remaining questions yet to be answered. The reader is directed elsewhere for more information on other waste forms such as Cast Stone (Lockrem, 2005), Ceramicrete (Singh et al., 1997, Wagh et al., 1999) and geopolymers (Kyritsis et al., 2009; Russell et al., 2006).

  18. Moffatt-drift-driven large-scale dynamo due to fluctuations with non-zero correlation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant K.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theory of large-scale dynamo action in a turbulent flow that has stochastic, zero-mean fluctuations of the $\\alpha$ parameter. Particularly interesting is the possibility of the growth of the mean magnetic field due to Moffatt drift, which is expected to be finite in a statistically anisotropic turbulence. We extend the Kraichnan-Moffatt model to explore effects of finite memory of $\\alpha$ fluctuations, in a spirit similar to that of Sridhar & Singh (2014), hereafter SS14. Using the first-order smoothing approximation, we derive a linear integro-differential equation governing the dynamics of the large-scale magnetic field, which is non-perturbative in the $\\alpha$-correlation time $\\tau_{\\alpha}$. We recover earlier results in the exactly solvable white-noise (WN) limit where the Moffatt drift does not contribute to the dynamo growth/decay. To study finite memory effects, we reduce the integro-differential equation to a partial differential equation by assuming that the $\\tau_{\\alpha}$ be small but nonzero and the large-scale magnetic field is slowly varying. We derive the dispersion relation and provide explicit expression for the growth rate as a function of four independent parameters. When $\\tau_{\\alpha}\

  19. High-wavenumber solar f-mode strengthening prior to active region formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant; Raichur, Harsha; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic strengthening of the local solar surface mode, i.e. the f-mode, 1-2 days prior to the emergence of an active region (AR) in the same (corotating) location while no indication can yet be seen in the magnetograms. Our study is motivated by earlier numerical findings of Singh et al. (2014) which showed that, in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field that is concentrated a few scale heights below the surface, the f-mode fans out in the diagnostic kΩ diagram at high wavenumbers. Here we explore this possibility using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and show for four ARs 11130, 11158, 11768, and 12051, that at large latitudinal wavenumbers (corresponding to horizontal scales of around 3000 km), the f-mode displays strengthening about two days prior to AR formation and thus provides a new precursor for AR formation. The idea that the f-mode is perturbed days before any visible magnetic activity occurs on the surface can be important in constraining dynamo models aimed at understanding the global magnetic activity of the Sun.

  20. Biodynamic performance of hyaluronic acid versus synovial fluid of the knee in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Corvelli, Michael; Che, Bernadette; Saeui, Christopher; Singh, Anirudha; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural biomaterial present in healthy joints but depleted in osteoarthritis (OA), has been employed clinically to provide symptomatic relief of joint pain. Joint movement combined with a reduced joint lubrication in osteoarthritic knees can result in increased wear and tear, chondrocyte apoptosis, and inflammation, leading to cascading cartilage deterioration. Therefore, development of an appropriate cartilage model that can be evaluated for its friction properties with potential lubricants in different conditions is necessary, which can closely resemble a mechanically induced OA cartilage. Additionally, a comparison of different models with and without endogenous lubricating surface zone proteins, such as PRG4 promotes a well-rounded understanding of cartilage lubrication. In this study, we present our findings on the lubricating effects of HA on different articular cartilage model surfaces in comparison to synovial fluid, a physiological lubricating biomaterial. The mechanical testings data demonstrated that HA reduced average static and kinetic friction coefficient values of the cartilage samples by 75% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, HA mimicked the friction characteristics of freshly harvested natural synovial fluid throughout all tested and modeled OA conditions with no statistically significant difference. These characteristics led us to exclusively identify HA as an effective boundary layer lubricant in the technology that we develop to treat OA (Singh et al., 2014). PMID:25858258

  1. A novel dehydration technique for carrot slices implementing ultrasound and vacuum drying methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Tao

    2016-05-01

    A novel drying technique using a combination of ultrasound and vacuum dehydration was developed to shorten the drying time and improve the quality of carrot slices. Carrot slices were dried with ultrasonic vacuum (USV) drying and vacuum drying at 65 °C and 75 °C. The drying rate was significantly influenced by the drying techniques and temperatures. Compared with vacuum drying, USV drying resulted in a 41-53% decrease in the drying time. The drying time for the USV and vacuum drying techniques at 75 °C was determined to be 140 and 340 min for carrot slices, respectively. The rehydration potential, nutritional value (retention of β-carotene and ascorbic acid), color, and textural properties of USV-dried carrot slices are predominately better compared to vacuum-dried carrot slices. Moreover, lower energy consumption was used in the USV technique. The drying data (time versus moisture ratio) were successfully fitted to Wang and Singh model. PMID:26703199

  2. Mitochondria in health and disease - 3rd annual conference of society for mitochondrial research and medicine - 19-20 December 2013 - Bengaluru, India.

    PubMed

    Durhuus, Jon Ambæk; Desler, Claus; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of mitochondria was long considered to be production of cellular energy. However, as the understanding of mitochondria in disease is ever expanding, so is their additional function for a healthy organism. Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to a range of pathologies, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, premature aging, diabetes and muscular diseases. Mitochondrial diseases can be hard to diagnose and treat and, therefore, interdisciplinary research and communication are important. The Third Annual Conference of Society for Mitochondrial Research and Medicine - India (SMRM) was titled "Mitochondria in Health and Disease". The conference was organized by Gayathri N, K Thangaraj, and KK Singh and was held at the National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences (NIMHANS) in Bangalore, India, from the 19th to 20th of December 2013. The meeting featured internationally renowned speakers within the field of mitochondrial research and medicine with the goal of bridging the gap between basic and clinical researchers. This review summarizes key outcomes of the conference. PMID:25446394

  3. An in situ method for observing wax crystallization under pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Sarah E.; Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Steer, Tyrone N.; Stetzer, Mackenzie R.; Kautsky, Sacha P.; Merz, Hugh; Idziak, Stefan H. J.; Sirota, Eric B.

    2003-03-01

    As the phenomenon of wax deposition in crude oil pipelines is of great relevance to the petroleum industry, there has been considerable work on both real and model oil pipeline systems in an effort to gain insight into the deposition process itself. In an effort to develop a truly in situ means of characterizing the formation and evolution of the wax gel layers deposited in model pipeline systems, we have performed x-ray diffraction measurements of wax crystallization in wax-oil mixtures under flow. We conducted a time dependent investigation of the nucleation and growth of wax crystals and the evolution of the resulting wax gel deposit in mixtures of paraffin wax and dodecane under pipe flow through a standard x-ray quartz capillary of diameter 1mm. Our results were compared with those of larger scale, pressure drop experiments[1]. 1. Singh, P., et al., Formation and Aging of Incipient Thin Film Wax-Oil Gels. American Institute of Chemical Engineers Journal, 2000. 46(5): p. 1059-1074.

  4. Variability of Atmospheric Properties during 2000 -2009 over Major Cities in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ritu; Singh, Rachita

    An elevated amount of greenhouse gases, total ozone column and significant changes in me-teorological parameters were found to be associated with forest fires in Canada (Singh and Chaturvedi, 2008 COSPAR). In the present paper, we have carried out detailed analysis of multi sensor data for the period 2000 -2009 over major Canadian cities (Vancouver, Calgary, Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, Windsor, St. Johns, Fort McMurray, Yellowknife) and have stud-ied variability of atmospheric properties (aerosol optical depth, angstrom coefficient, carbon monoxide, ozone) using MODIS, AIRS and OMI AURA. A low optical depth (less than 0.3) is observed over most of the cities, higher aerosols optical depth more than 0.3 is found over Windsor and Toronto, that may be influenced by the nearby US cities. During summer months, due to forest fires, the aerosols optical depth and elevated greenhouse gases are observed over the cities close to forests in British Columbia. We have carried out HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis to study the influence of air mass and its effect on the atmospheric parameters. The low and high variability of atmospheric properties during 2000 -2009 will be discussed in view of the dust transport over Canada, anthropogenic activities and cold air mass from the northern sides.

  5. Bis[(1S)-1 4-azanediyl-1-(9-deazaadenin-9-yl)-1 4-dideoxy-5-methylsulfanyl-D-ribitol] tetrakis(hydrochloride) monohydrate: structure DFT energy and ligand docking results of a potent methylthioadenosine phosphorylase inhibitor found in different

    SciTech Connect

    G Gainsford; G Evans; K Johnston; M Seth

    2011-12-31

    The title compound, abbreviated as 5'ThiomethylImmA, is a potent inhibitor of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase [Singh et al. (2004). Biochemistry, 43, 9-18]. The synchrotron study reported here shows that the hydrochloride salt crystallizes with two independent, nearly superimposable, dications as a monohydrate with formula 2C{sub 12}H{sub 19}N{sub 5}O{sub 2}S{sup 2+}{center_dot}4Cl{sup -}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O. Hydrogen bonding utilizing the H atoms of the dication is found to favor certain molecular conformations in the salt, which are significantly different from those found as bound in the enzyme. Ligand docking studies starting from either of these dications or related neutral structures successfully place the conformationally revised structures in the enzyme active site but only under particular hydrogen-bonding and molecular flexibility criteria. Density functional theory calculations verify the energy similarity of the indendent cations and confirm the significant energy cost of the required conformation change to the enzyme bound form. The results suggest the using crystallographically determined free ligand coordinates as starting parameters for modelling may have serious limitations.

  6. Evaluating the Thermal Damage Resistance of Reduced Graphene Oxide/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Lamuel; Feldman, Ari; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Lehman, John; Singh, Gurpreet; National Institute of Standards and Technology Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene are known to exhibit some exceptional thermal (K ~ 2000 to 4400 W.m-1K-1 at 300K) and optical properties. Here, we demonstrate preparation and testing of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and chemically modified graphene-composite spray coatings for use on thermal detectors for high-power lasers. The synthesized nanocomposite material was tested by preparing spray coatings on aluminum test coupons used as a representation of the thermal detector's surface. These coatings were then exposed to increasing laser powers and extended exposure times to quantify their damage threshold and optical absorbance. The graphene/carbon nanotube (prepared at varying mass% of graphene in CNTs) coatings demonstrated significantly higher damage threshold values at 2.5 kW laser power (10.6 μm wavelength) than carbon paint or MWCNTs alone. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of irradiated specimens showed that the composite coating endured high laser-power densities (up to 2 kW.cm-2) without significant visual damage. This research is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation (Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems Division), under grant no. 1335862 to G. Singh.

  7. First-principles search for potential high temperature superconductors in the Mg-B-A (A=alkaline metal) system with high boron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepulskyy, Roman; Mazin, Igor; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2008-03-01

    Possible superconductivity at 50K was recently reported [1] in the Mg-B-A (A=Cs, Rb, Ba) system. Although attempts to reproduce this finding have been unsuccessful so far [2], if a stable or metastable phase could be found by a first principle search similar to that in Ref. 3, this would have lent credibility to the experimental finding [1] and outline possible further directions. The results of Ref. 1 suggest that (a) the superconducting phase is not similar to MgB2 (B site has cubic or similarly high symmetry) and (b) boron content is higher than in MgB2. We report first-principles study of the thermodynamics of alkali and alkaline earth doping in the boron- rich part of the Mg-B phase diagram (MgBn with n>2), searching for a phase that could explain the results of Ref. [1]. [1] A.V. Palnichenko et al., JETP Letters 86, 272 (2007). [2] R K Singh et al http://arxiv.org/abs/0709.4001v1. [3] S. Curtarolo et al, Calphad 29, 163 (2005).

  8. Cognitive Advantages of Blending with Material Anchors in Energy Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Hunter; Close, Eleanor; Scherr, Rachel; McKagan, Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Conceptual blending theory [1] explains how the human imagination creates unreal situations that help us think about reality. In these imaginary blended situations, we establish new correspondences, interactions, and dynamics, and the outcomes of the dynamics lend insight to the nature of various real situations that were used to compose the blend. Blends are not just in the head, however; in some cases, a material system participates in the blend by lending its material structure as conceptual structure [2]. In the instructional activity Energy Theater [3], people represent units of energy and move around in order to solve puzzles of energy transfer and transformation. We use the ideas of blending and material anchors to understand how learners are able to use the representation to their cognitive advantage. [4pt] [1] Fauconnier, G. & Turner, M. (2002). The Way We Think: Conceptual Blending and the Mind's Hidden Complexities. New York: Basic Books.[0pt] [2] Hutchins, E. (2005) Material anchors for conceptual blends. Journal of Pragmatics 37, 1555-1577.[0pt] [3] Scherr, R. E., Close, H. G., McKagan, S. B., & Close, E. W. (2010) ``Energy Theater'': Using the body symbolically to understand energy. In C. Singh, M. Sabella, & S. Rebello (Eds.) 2010 PERC Proceedings. Melville, NY: AIP Press.

  9. Biodynamic Performance of Hyaluronic Acid versus Synovial fluid of the Knee for Osteoarthritic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Corvelli, Michael; Che, Bernadette; Saeui, Christopher; Singh, Anirudha; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural biomaterial present in healthy joints but depleted in osteoarthritis (OA), has been employed clinically to provide symptomatic relief of joint pain. Joint movement combined with a reduced joint lubrication in osteoarthritic knees can result in increased wear and tear, chondrocyte apoptosis, and inflammation, leading to cascading cartilage deterioration. Therefore, development of an appropriate cartilage model and evaluation for its friction properties with potential lubricants in different conditions is necessary, which can closely resemble a mechanically induced OA cartilage. Additionally, the comparison of different models with and without endogenous lubricating surface zone proteins, such as PRG4 promotes a well-rounded understanding of cartilage lubrication. In this study, we present our findings on the lubricating effects of HA on different articular cartilage model surfaces in comparison to synovial fluid, a physiological lubricating biomaterial. The mechanical testings data demonstrated that HA reduced average static and kinetic friction coefficient values of the cartilage samples by 75% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, HA mimicked the friction characteristics of freshly harvested natural synovial fluid throughout all tested and modeled OA conditions with no statistically significant difference. These characteristics led us to exclusively identify HA as an effective boundary layer lubricant in the technology that we develop to treat OA [Singh et al. 2104]. PMID:25858258

  10. Unification of Bell, Leggett-Garg and Kochen-Specker inequalities: Hybrid spatio-temporal inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Siddhartha; Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.; Home, Dipankar

    2013-12-01

    The Bell-type (spatial), Kochen-Specker (contextuality) or Leggett-Garg (temporal) inequalities are based on classically plausible but otherwise quite distinct assumptions. For any of these inequalities, satisfaction is equivalent to a joint probability distribution for all observables in the experiment. This implies a joint distribution for all pairs of observables, and is indifferent to whether or not they commute in the theory. This indifference underpins a unification of the above inequalities into a general framework of correlation inequalities. When the physical scenario is such that the correlated pairs are all compatible, the resulting correlation is nonsignaling, which may be local or multi-particle, corresponding to contextuality or Bell-type inequalities. If the pairs are incompatible, the resulting correlation corresponds to Leggett-Garg (LG) inequalities. That quantum mechanics (QM) violates all these inequalities suggests a close connection between the local, spatial and temporal properties of the theory. As a concrete manifestation of the unification, we extend the method due to Roy and Singh (J. Phys. A, 11 (1978) L167) to derive and study a new class of hybrid spatio-temporal inequalities, where the correlated pairs in the experiment are both compatible or incompatible. The implications for cryptography and monogamy inequalities of the unification are briefly touched upon.