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Sample records for bicap tumor probe

  1. Comparison of low-power YAG laser and BICAP tumor probe for palliation of esophageal cancer strictures.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Machicado, G; Randall, G; Tung, L A; English-Zych, S

    1988-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to determine the applicability of endoscopic palliation for patients with esophagogastric cancer strictures in a referral center, and (b) to compare the efficacy and safety of the BICAP tumor probe with the neodymiumyttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser for such palliation. Forty-two consecutive patients with weight loss and obstructive symptoms from an unresectable, malignant esophageal stricture were referred for endoscopic palliation. Fourteen patients did not meet the criteria for YAG laser or BICAP tumor probe treatment and other therapies were recommended. Twenty-eight patients were treated, the first 14 with low-power YAG laser and the last 14 with BICAP tumor probe. All patients had coagulation of malignant strictures in one session. Treated patients were similar in background variables and stricture lengths but twice as much thermal energy was needed for the YAG laser as the BICAP tumor probe treatment. Treatment results were not statistically different during the median follow-up and survival of 16 wk. As minor complications, either pain or edema requiring dilatation was more common in the YAG laser-treated group than the BICAP tumor probe group. Treatment-related esophageal strictures developed in 21% of patients treated with YAG laser. A fistula developed in 1 patient with noncircumferential cancer in the BICAP tumor probe group. Compared with only the intake of liquids before treatment, 86% of patients could eat a soft or solid diet after initial treatment with BICAP tumor probe or YAG laser. Our conclusions were that for BICAP tumor probe and YAG laser, endoscopic palliation efficacy and safety for circumferential esophageal cancer strictures were similar. The advantages of using the BICAP tumor probe were portability, lower equipment costs, and the ability to treat submucosal, long, or high esophageal cancer strictures in one session. Treatment with YAG laser was safer than BICAP tumor probe for exophytic

  2. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  3. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  4. Probing the tumor microenvironment: collection and induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James K.; Padgen, Michael R.; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Gertler, Frank; Condeelis, John S.; Castracane, James

    2012-03-01

    The Nano Intravital Device, or NANIVID, is under development as an optically transparent, implantable tool to study the tumor microenvironment. Two etched glass substrates are sealed using a thin polymer membrane to create a reservoir with a single outlet. This reservoir is loaded with a hydrogel blend that contains growth factors or other chemicals to be delivered to the tumor microenvironment. When the device is implanted in the tumor, the hydrogel will swell and release these entrapped molecules, forming a gradient. Validation of the device has been performed in vitro using epidermal growth factor (EGF) and MenaINV, a highly invasive, rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. In both 2-D and 3-D environments, cells migrated toward the gradient of EGF released from the device. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of White Leghorn chicken eggs is being utilized to grow xenograft tumors that will be used for ex vivo cell collection. Device optimization is being performed for in vivo use as a tool to collect the invasive cell population. Preliminary cell collection experiments in vivo were performed using a mouse model of breast cancer. As a second application, the device is being explored as a delivery vehicle for chemicals that induce controlled changes in the tumor microenvironment. H2O2 was loaded in the device and generated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells near the device outlet. In the future, other induction targets will be explored, including hypoglycemia and the manipulation of extracellular matrix stiffness.

  5. [Use of BICAP by endoscopic route in the palliative treatment of neoplastic stenosis of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Pantuso, G; Bottino, A; Cipolla, C; Gitto, C; Farro, G; Talarico, F; Latteri, M; Florena, M

    1990-12-01

    Over the years the palliative treatment of neoplastic stenosis of the esophagus in patients who cannot be operated has seen a variation of endoscopic methods which aimed to reopen the alimentary canal either using simple dilatation, or the insertion of endoprostheses, or sclerosing injection or antiblastic therapy, or lastly using disobstructive laser therapy. In particular, the use of Neodymium YAG laser in endoscopic therapy for the deobstruction of neoplastic esophageal stenosis is currently widely used. More recently deobstruction of the stenosis may also be achieved using bipolar diathermocoagulation with BICAP following esophageal dilatation. Recent comparative studies of the use of BICAP and laser therapy in the treatment of neoplastic esophageal stenosis have tended to reveal the complementary characteristics of the two techniques. The present paper reports the Authors' experience in this respect which has been satisfactory with regard to both methods, in line with the findings of other studies. In the study of two groups of 8 patients treated with BICAP and laser therapy respectively, recanalisation was obtained in 100% of cases with good functional results in 75% of patients treated with BICAP and 87.5% of those receiving laser therapy. The time interval between one treatment session and the next in relation to the efficacy of the therapy was similar in both methods and ranged from a minimum of 4 weeks to a maximum of 12 weeks. Complications were scarce in both groups. PMID:1708116

  6. Topical Application of Activity-based Probes for Visualization of Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cutter, Jennifer L.; Cohen, Nathan T.; Wang, Jing; Sloan, Andrew E.; Cohen, Alan R.; Panneerselvam, Ashok; Schluchter, Mark; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew; Basilion, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Several investigators have shown the utility of systemically delivered optical imaging probes to image tumors in small animal models of cancer. Here we demonstrate an innovative method for imaging tumors and tumor margins during surgery. Specifically, we show that optical imaging probes topically applied to tumors and surrounding normal tissue rapidly differentiate between tissues. In contrast to systemic delivery of optical imaging probes which label tumors uniformly over time, topical probe application results in rapid and robust probe activation that is detectable as early as 5 minutes following application. Importantly, labeling is primarily associated with peri-tumor spaces. This methodology provides a means for rapid visualization of tumor and potentially infiltrating tumor cells and has potential applications for directed surgical excision of tumor tissues. Furthermore, this technology could find use in surgical resections for any tumors having differential regulation of cysteine cathepsin activity. PMID:22427947

  7. FISHtrees 3.0: Tumor Phylogenetics Using a Ploidy Probe

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Salim Akhter; Lee, Woei-Jyh; Wangsa, Darawalee; Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin; Ried, Thomas; Schwartz, Russell; Schäffer, Alejandro A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) make it feasible to detect multiple copy-number changes in hundreds of cells of solid tumors. Studies using FISH, sequencing, and other technologies have revealed substantial intra-tumor heterogeneity. The evolution of subclones in tumors may be modeled by phylogenies. Tumors often harbor aneuploid or polyploid cell populations. Using a FISH probe to estimate changes in ploidy can guide the creation of trees that model changes in ploidy and individual gene copy-number variations. We present FISHtrees 3.0, which implements a ploidy-based tree building method based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP). The ploidy-based modeling in FISHtrees includes a new formulation of the problem of merging trees for changes of a single gene into trees modeling changes in multiple genes and the ploidy. When multiple samples are collected from each patient, varying over time or tumor regions, it is useful to evaluate similarities in tumor progression among the samples. Therefore, we further implemented in FISHtrees 3.0 a new method to build consensus graphs for multiple samples. We validate FISHtrees 3.0 on a simulated data and on FISH data from paired cases of cervical primary and metastatic tumors and on paired breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Tests on simulated data show improved accuracy of the ploidy-based approach relative to prior ploidyless methods. Tests on real data further demonstrate novel insights these methods offer into tumor progression processes. Trees for DCIS samples are significantly less complex than trees for paired IDC samples. Consensus graphs show substantial divergence among most paired samples from both sets. Low consensus between DCIS and IDC trees may help explain the difficulty in finding biomarkers that predict which DCIS cases are at most risk to progress to IDC. The FISHtrees software is available at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/FISHtrees. PMID

  8. Probing model tumor interfacial properties using piezoelectric cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2010-09-01

    Invasive malignant breast cancers are typically branchy and benign breast tumors are typically smooth. It is of interest to characterize tumor branchiness (roughness) to differentiate invasive malignant breast cancer from noninvasive ones. In this study, we examined the shear modulus (G) to elastic modulus (E) ratio, G/E, as a quantity to describe model tumor interfacial roughness using a piezoelectric cantilever capable of measuring both tissue elastic modulus and tissue shear modulus. The piezoelectric cantilever used had two lead zirconate titanate layers to facilitate all-electrical elastic (shear) modulus measurements using one single device. We constructed model tissues with tumors by embedding one-dimensional (1D) corrugated inclusions and three-dimensional (3D) spiky-ball inclusions made of modeling clay in gelatin. We showed that for smooth inclusions, G/E was 0.3 regardless of the shear direction. In contrast, for a 1D corrugated rough inclusion G/E was 0.3 only when the shear was parallel to corrugation and G/E increased with an increasing angle between the shear direction and the corrugation. When the shear was perpendicular to corrugation, G/E became >0.7. For 3D isotropic spiky-ball inclusions we showed that the G/E depended on the degree of the roughness. Using the ratio s/r of the spike length (s) to the overall inclusion radius (r) as a roughness parameter, we showed that for inclusions with s/r larger than or equal to 0.28, the G/E ratio over the inclusions was larger than 0.7 whereas for inclusions with s/r less than 0.28, the G/E decreased with decreasing s/r to around 0.3 at s/r=0. In addition, we showed that the depth limit of the G/E measurement is twice the width of the probe area of the piezoelectric cantilever. PMID:20887005

  9. Computer-aided design of peptide near infrared fluorescent probe for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congying; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Integrin αvβ3 receptors are expressed on activated endothelial cells during neovascularization to maintain tumor growth, so they become hot research tagets in cancer diagnosis. Peptides possess several attractive features when compared to protein and small molecule, such as small size and high structural compatibility with target proteins. Efficient design of high-affinity peptide ligands to Integrin αvβ3 receptors has been an important problem. Designed peptides in silico provide a valuable and high-selectivity peptide, meanwhile decrease the time of drug screening. In this study, we design peptide which can bind with integrin αvβ3 via computer, and then synthesis near infrared fluorescent probe. The characterization of this near infrared fluorescent probe was detected by UV. To investigate the tumor cell targeting of this probe, it was labeled with visible fluorescent dye Rhodamine B (RhB) for microscopy. To evaluate the targeting capability of this near infrared fluorescent probe, mice bearing integrin αvβ3 positive tumor xenografts were used. In vitro cellular experiments indicated that this probe have a clear binding affinity to αvβ3-positive tumor cells. In vivo experiments confirmed the receptor binding specificity of this probe. The peptide of computational design can bind with integrin αvβ3. Combined peptide near-infrared fluorescent probe with imaging technology use for clinical and tumor diagnosis have a greater development in future.

  10. Synthesis of dimeric cyclic RGD based near-infrared probe for in vivo tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jie; Wan, Shunan; Tian, Junmei; Chi, Xuemei; Du, Changli; Deng, Dawei; Chen, Wei R.; Gu, Yueqing

    2012-03-01

    Cell adhesion molecule integrin αvβ3 is an excellent target for tumor interventions because of its unique expression on the surface of several types of solid tumor cells and on almost all sprouting tumor vasculatures. In this manuscript, we describe the synthesis of near-infrared (NIR) fluorochrome ICG-Der-02-labeled dimeric cyclic RGD peptides (ICG-Der-02-c(RGDyK)2) for in vivo tumor integrin targeting. The optical properties and structure of the probe were intensively characterized. Afterwards, the integrin specificity of the fluorescent probe was tested in vitro for receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy and in vivo for subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 and U87MG tumor targeting. The results indicated that after labeling RGD peptide, the optical properties of ICG-Der-02 showed no obvious change. Besides, in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting experiment indicated that the ICG-Der-02-c(RGDyK)2 probe with high integrin affinity showed excellent tumor activity accumulation. Noninvasive NIR fluorescence imaging is able to detect tumor integrin expression based upon the highly potent RGD peptide probe.

  11. Aminopeptidase N/CD13 targeting fluorescent probes: synthesis and application to tumor cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhouen; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Kazuhito; Hatta, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2005-11-01

    A family of fluorescein-peptide conjugates (CNP1-3) for aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) targeting fluorescent probes were designed and synthesized. Among the three conjugates, CNP1 bearing tumor-homing cyclic peptide CNGRC, could selectively label APN/CD13 over-expressing on the surface of tumor cells of HT-1080, as identified by means of fluorescent microscopic cell imaging. CNP1 was shown to be a promising fluorescent probe applicable to tumor-targeting molecular imaging. PMID:15885853

  12. Peptides as targeting probes against tumor vasculature for diagnosis and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor vasculature expresses a distinct set of molecule signatures on the endothelial cell surface different from the resting blood vessels of other organs and tissues in the body. This makes them an attractive target for cancer therapy and molecular imaging. The current technology using the in vivo phage display biopanning allows us to quickly isolate and identify peptides potentially homing to various tumor blood vessels. Tumor-homing peptides in conjugation with chemotherapeutic drugs or imaging contrast have been extensively tested in various preclinical and clinical studies. These tumor-homing peptides have valuable potential as targeting probes for tumor molecular imaging and drug delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances about the applications of tumor-homing peptides selected by in vivo phage display library screening against tumor vasculature. We also introduce the characteristics of the latest discovered tumor-penetrating peptides in their potential clinical applications. PMID:23046982

  13. A near-infrared multifunctional fluorescent probe with an inherent tumor-targeting property for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Li, Yang; Jin, Di; Xing, Yuzhi; Yan, Xilong; Chen, Ligong

    2015-07-25

    A mitochondria-targeting probe, by conjugating a quaternary ammonium cation with glucosamine modified pH-activated cyanine, was designed and synthesized. This probe has excellent selectivity and sensitivity toward pH, stability, cellular membrane permeability and low cytotoxicity. Owing to the acidic feature of tumors and the more negative mitochondrial membrane potential of tumor cells than that of normal cells, this probe can selectively accumulate in tumor cells and light up its fluorescence. It has been successfully applied for in vivo tumor imaging with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, this multifunctional switchable sensor was also employed for the fluorescent imaging of the fluctuation of intracellular pH in HeLa cells. PMID:26104217

  14. Systematic Construction and Calculation of Electronic Properties of Fullerene Series Related by Rotational Symmetry: From Fullerenes to Bicapped Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Jerry Ray

    2016-06-01

    The results herein demonstrate that the methods of circumscribing and the facile calculation of Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) eigenvalues by mirror-plane fragmentation have a broad application in the construction of carbon cluster series and the systematic study of trends in their electronic properties. In comparing open-ended nanotubes and their isomeric elongated fullerenes (bicapped nanotubes), we show that the former are more aromatic but the latter are more conjugated and that progressive elongation increases aromaticity and conjugation in both. Recursion equations that will allow one to obtain the eigenvalues to all 5-endcapped nanotubes are given. PMID:27213617

  15. Analysis of the Distribution of Magnetic Fluid inside Tumors by a Giant Magnetoresistance Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kurnicki, Adam; Yamada, Sotoshi; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42°C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe. PMID:24312280

  16. Enhancement of Fluorescent Probe Penetration into Tumors In Vivo Using Unseeded Inertial Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Pillon, Arnaud; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Cartron, Valérie; Cèbe, Patrick; Chansard, Nathalie; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-induced cavitation has found many applications in the field of cancer therapy. One of its beneficial effects is the enhancement of drug intake by tumor cells. Our group has developed a device that can create and control unseeded cavitation in tissue using ultrasound. We conducted experiments on tumor-bearing mice using our device to assess the impact of sonication on the penetration of fluorescent probes into tumor cells. We studied the influence of pressure level, timing of sonication and sonication duration on treatment efficiency. Our results indicate that fluorescent probes penetrate better into tumors exposed to ultrasound. The best results revealed an increase in penetration of 61% and were obtained when sonicating the tumor in presence of the probes with a peak negative pressure at focus of 19 MPa. At this pressure level, the treatment generated only minor skin damage. Treatments could be significantly accelerated as equivalent enhanced penetration of probes was achieved when multiplying the initial raster scan speed by a factor of four. PMID:27087691

  17. Docosahexaenoic acid conjugated near infrared flourescence probe for in vivo early tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siwen; Cao, Jie; Qin, Jingyi; Zhang, Xin; Achilefu, Samuel; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid(DHA) is an omega-3 C22 natural fatty acid with six cis double bonds and as a constituent of membranes used as a precursor for metabolic and biochemical path ways. In this manuscript,we describe the synthesis of near-infrared(NIR) flourescence ICG-Der-01 labeled DHA for in vitro and vivo tumor targeting.The structure of the probe was intensively characterized by UV and MS. The in vitro and vivo tumor targeting abilities of the DHA-based NIR probes were investigeted in MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 xenograft mice model differently by confocal microscopy and CCD camera. The cell cytotoxicity were tested in tumor cells MCF-7 .The results shows that the DHA-based NIR probes have high affinity with the tumor both in vitro and vivo.In addition ,we also found that the DHA-based NIR probes have the apparent cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells .which demonstrated that DHA was conjugated with other antitumor drug could increase the abilities of antirumor efficacy .So DHA-ICG-Der-01 is a promising optical agent for diagnosis of tumors especially in their early stage.

  18. Single-cell profiling approaches to probing tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Ramalingam, Naveen; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Lim, Chwee Teck; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi

    2016-07-15

    Tumor heterogeneity is a major hindrance in cancer classification, diagnosis and treatment. Recent technological advances have begun to reveal the true extent of its heterogeneity. Single-cell analysis (SCA) is emerging as an important approach to detect variations in morphology, genetic or proteomic expression. In this review, we revisit the issue of inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity, and list various modes of SCA techniques (cell-based, nucleic acid-based, protein-based, metabolite-based and lipid-based) presently used for cancer characterization. We further discuss the advantages of SCA over pooled cell analysis, as well as the limitations of conventional techniques. Emerging trends, such as high-throughput sequencing, are also mentioned as improved means for cancer profiling. Collectively, these applications have the potential for breakthroughs in cancer treatment. PMID:26789729

  19. Single cell molecular recognition of migrating and invading tumor cells using a targeted fluorescent probe to receptor PTPmu.

    PubMed

    Burden-Gulley, Susan M; Qutaish, Mohammed Q; Sullivant, Kristin E; Tan, Mingqian; Craig, Sonya E L; Basilion, James P; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Wilson, David L; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2013-04-01

    Detection of an extracellular cleaved fragment of a cell-cell adhesion molecule represents a new paradigm in molecular recognition and imaging of tumors. We previously demonstrated that probes that recognize the cleaved extracellular domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPmu) label human glioblastoma brain tumor sections and the main tumor mass of intracranial xenograft gliomas. In this article, we examine whether one of these probes, SBK2, can label dispersed glioma cells that are no longer connected to the main tumor mass. Live mice with highly dispersive glioma tumors were injected intravenously with the fluorescent PTPmu probe to test the ability of the probe to label the dispersive glioma cells in vivo. Analysis was performed using a unique three-dimensional (3D) cryo-imaging technique to reveal highly migratory and invasive glioma cell dispersal within the brain and the extent of colabeling by the PTPmu probe. The PTPmu probe labeled the main tumor site and dispersed cells up to 3.5 mm away. The cryo-images of tumors labeled with the PTPmu probe provide a novel, high-resolution view of molecular tumor recognition, with excellent 3D detail regarding the pathways of tumor cell migration. Our data demonstrate that the PTPmu probe recognizes distant tumor cells even in parts of the brain where the blood-brain barrier is likely intact. The PTPmu probe has potential translational significance for recognizing tumor cells to facilitate molecular imaging, a more complete tumor resection and to serve as a molecular targeting agent to deliver chemotherapeutics to the main tumor mass and distant dispersive tumor cells. PMID:22987116

  20. A bispecific peptide based near-infrared probe for in vivo tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li; Chen, Wei R.; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and HER2 are members of recepeter tyrosine kinase family. Overexpression of EGFR and HER2 has been observed in a variety of human tumors, making these receptors promising targets for tumor diagnosis. An affibody targeting HER2 and a nanobody targeting EGFR were reported before. In this Manuscript, we described an bispecific peptide combined with an affibody and a nanonbody through a linker―(G4S)3 . And the bispecific peptide was labeled with near-infrared (NIR) fluorochrome ICG-Der-02 for in vivo tumor EGFR and HER2 targeting. Afterwards, the EGFR and HER2 specificity of the fluorescent probe was tested in vitro for receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy and in vivo for subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 tumor targeting. The results indicated that the bispecific peptide had a high affinity to EGFR and HER2. Besides, in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting experiment indicated that the ICG-Der-02-( bispecific peptide) showed excellent tumor activity accumulation. Noninvasive NIR fluorescence imaging is able to detect tumor EGFR and HER2 expression based upon the highly potent bispecific peptide probe.

  1. A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Ashton, Jeffrey R.; Moding, Everett J.; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Register, Janna K.; Fales, Andrew M.; Choi, Jaeyeon; Whitley, Melodi J.; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Qi, Yi; Ma, Yan; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy. PMID:26155311

  2. MUC1 aptamer based near infrared fluorescence probes for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Ma, Yuxiang; Cui, Sisi; Cao, Jie; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is a cell surface mucin broadly expressed in mucosal tissues. The aberrant expression of MUC1 under-glycosylated forms has been reported in various carcinomas of the epithelium, such as breast, pancreatic and ovarian cancers. Using the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology, aptamers previously selected against MUC1 glycoprotein with high affinities and specificities. In this study, we developed two targeted near-infrared fluorescent probes for tumor in-vivo diagnostics using a MUC1 aptamer(APT) as targeted ligand and near-infrared fluorescent dye (ICG-Der-02) as labelling. MUC1 aptamer conjugated ICG-Der-02 (APT-ICG-Der-02) displayed a great selectivity to MUC1 positive cell line MCF7 and MCF7 xenograft-bearing nude mice. To improve the high targeting of the probe to the tumor cells, PEG, with high biocompatibility, non immunogenicity and long circulation, was conjugated to the probe .The new probe (APT-PEG-ICG-Der-02) showed better tumour uptake and clearance, and also displayed a great selectivity to MCF7 tumor-bearing nude mice. Data obtained demonstrate a high potential of the targeted near-infrared fluorescent probes in cancer early diagnosis.

  3. Cellular heterogeneity profiling by hyaluronan probes reveals an invasive but slow-growing breast tumor subset

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Kwon, Daniel H.; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Tolg, Cornelia; Leong, Hon S.; Lewis, John D.; Turley, Eva A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity confounds cancer diagnosis and the outcome of therapy, necessitating analysis of tumor cell subsets within the tumor mass. Elevated expression of hyaluronan (HA) and HA receptors, receptor for HA-mediated motility (RHAMM)/HA-mediated motility receptor and cluster designation 44 (CD44), in breast tumors correlates with poor outcome. We hypothesized that a probe for detecting HA–HA receptor interactions may reveal breast cancer (BCa) cell heterogeneity relevant to tumor progression. A fluorescent HA (F-HA) probe containing a mixture of polymer sizes typical of tumor microenvironments (10–480 kDa), multiplexed profiling, and flow cytometry were used to monitor HA binding to BCa cell lines of different molecular subtypes. Formulae were developed to quantify binding heterogeneity and to measure invasion in vivo. Two subsets exhibiting differential binding (HA−/low vs. HAhigh) were isolated and characterized for morphology, growth, and invasion in culture and as xenografts in vivo. F-HA–binding amounts and degree of heterogeneity varied with BCa subtype, were highest in the malignant basal-like cell lines, and decreased upon reversion to a nonmalignant phenotype. Binding amounts correlated with CD44 and RHAMM displayed but binding heterogeneity appeared to arise from a differential ability of HA receptor-positive subpopulations to interact with F-HA. HAhigh subpopulations exhibited significantly higher local invasion and lung micrometastases but, unexpectedly, lower proliferation than either unsorted parental cells or the HA−/low subpopulation. Querying F-HA binding to aggressive tumor cells reveals a previously undetected form of heterogeneity that predicts invasive/metastatic behavior and that may aid both early identification of cancer patients susceptible to metastasis, and detection/therapy of invasive BCa subpopulations. PMID:24733940

  4. Fluorescence in vivo imaging of live tumor cells with pH-activatable targeted probes via receptor-mediated endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Daisuke; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Hama, Yukihiro; Koyama, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2009-02-01

    One goal of molecular imaging is to establish a widely applicable technique for specific detection of tumors with minimal background. Here, we achieve specific in vivo tumor visualization with a newly-designed "activatable" targeted fluorescence probe. This agent is activated after cellular internalization by sensing the pH change in the lysosome. Novel acidic pH-activatable probes based on the BODIPY fluorophore were synthesized, and then conjugated to a cancer-targeting monoclonal antibody, Trastuzumab, or galactosyl serum albumin (GSA). As proof of concept, ex and in vivo imaging of two different tumor mouse models was performed: HER2-overexpressed lung metastasis tumor with Trastuzumab-pH probe conjugates and lectin-overexpressed i.p. disseminated tumor with GSA-pH probe conjugates. These pH-activatable targeted probes were highly specific for tumors with minimal background signal. Because the acidic pH in lysosomes is maintained by the energy-consuming proton pump, only viable cancer cells were successfully visualized. Furthermore, this strategy was also applied to fluorescence endoscopy in tumor mouse models, resulting in specific visualization of tumors as small as submillimeter in size that could hardly detected by naked eyes because of their poor contrast against normal tissues. The design concept can be widely adapted to cancer-specific cell-surface-targeting molecules that result in cellular internalization.

  5. A ratiometric theranostic probe for tumor targeting therapy and self-therapeutic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Ying; Cheng, Hong; Xie, Bo-Ru; Qiu, Wen-Xiu; Song, Li-Lin; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Feedback imaging-guided precise photodynamic therapy (PDT) can facilitate the development of personalized medicine. In this work, a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based theranostic probe was fabricated for simultaneous tumor targeting PDT and ratiometric imaging of the therapeutic effect. The theranostic probe (designated as P-PpIX) was comprised of a targeting moiety, a caspase-3 responsive linker, a FRET fluorophore pair and a photosensitizer. It was found that P-PpIX exhibited low intrinsic background fluorescence due to the high FRET quenching efficiency. The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) targeting moiety allowed P-PpIX to selectively accumulate in αvβ3 integrin overexpressed tumor cells. Upon photo irradiation, the PDT effect of P-PpIX could induce cell death with apoptosis related mechanism, and the activated caspase-3 would subsequently cleave the Asp-Glu-Val-Asp (DEVD) peptide sequence to terminate the intramolecular FRET process. The activated caspase-3 expression and the real time therapeutic efficacy could be precisely assessed in situ by the fluorescence intensity ratio of the released 5(6)-carboxylfluorescein (FAM, reporter fluorescence) and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, internal reference fluorescence). This novel ratiometric theranostic probe could provide the real-time feedback for precise PDT. PMID:27475726

  6. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Löser, Reik; Pietzsch, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging. After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge toward their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes. PMID:26157794

  7. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löser, Reik; Pietzsch, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging. After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge towards their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes.

  8. Probing matrix and tumor mechanics with in situ calibrated optical trap based active microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Jack Rory; Vieira, Wilfred; Tanner, Kandice; Tissue Morphodynamics Unit Team

    Aberrant extracellular matrix deposition and vascularization, concomitant with proliferation and phenotypic changes undergone by cancer cells, alter mechanical properties in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression. Tumor mechanics conversely influence progression, and the identification of physical biomarkers promise improved diagnostic and prognostic power. Optical trap based active microrheology enables measurement of forces up to 0.5 mm within a sample, allowing interrogation of in vitro biomaterials, ex vivo tissue sections, and small organisms in vivo. We fabricated collagen I hydrogels exhibiting distinct structural properties by tuning polymerization temperature Tp, and measured their shear storage and loss moduli at frequencies 1-15k Hz at multiple amplitudes. Lower Tp gels, with larger pore size but thicker, longer fibers, were stiffer than higher Tp gels; decreasing strain increased loss moduli and decreased storage moduli at low frequencies. We subcutanously injected probes with metastatic murine melanoma cells into mice. The excised tumors displayed storage and loss moduli 40 Pa and 10 Pa at 1 Hz, increasing to 500 Pa and 1 kPa at 15 kHz, respectively.

  9. Probe-free allele-specific copy number detection and analysis of tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ailin; Guan, Xiaowei; Gu, Xinbin; Xie, Guiqin

    2016-03-15

    Cancer development and progression frequently involve nucleotide mutations as well as amplifications and deletions of genomic segments. Quantification of allele-specific copy number is an important step in characterizing tumor genomes for precision medicine. Despite advances in approaches to high-throughput genomic DNA analysis, inexpensive and simple methods for analyzing complex nucleotide and copy number variants are still needed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for discovering and genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms are becoming increasingly important in genetic analysis. In this study, we describe a simple, single-tube, probe-free method that combines SYBR Green I-based quantitative real-time PCR and quantitative melting curve analysis both to detect specific nucleotide variants and to quantify allele-specific copy number variants of tumors. The approach is based on the quantification of the targets of interest and the relative abundance of two alleles in a single tube. The specificity, sensitivity, and utility of the assay were demonstrated in detecting allele-specific copy number changes critical for carcinogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Our approach would be useful for allele-specific copy number analysis or precise genotyping. PMID:26743720

  10. Azo-Based Iridium(III) Complexes as Multicolor Phosphorescent Probes to Detect Hypoxia in 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingli; Li, Guanying; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yu; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important characteristic of malignant solid tumors and is considered as a possible causative factor for serious resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. The exploration of novel fluorescent probes capable of detecting hypoxia in solid tumors will aid tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of “off-on” phosphorescence probes for hypoxia detection in adherent and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. All of the iridium(III) complexes incorporate an azo group as an azo-reductase reactive moiety to detect hypoxia. Reduction of non-phosphorescent probes Ir1-Ir8 by reductases under hypoxic conditions resulted in the generation of highly phosphorescent corresponding amines for detection of hypoxic regions. Moreover, these probes can penetrate into 3D multicellular spheroids over 100 μm and image the hypoxic regions. Most importantly, these probes display a high selectivity for the detection of hypoxia in 2D cells and 3D multicellular spheroids. PMID:26423609

  11. (99m)Tc-amitrole as a novel selective imaging probe for solid tumor: In silico and preclinical pharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Essa, B M; Sakr, T M; Khedr, Mohammed A; El-Essawy, F A; El-Mohty, A A

    2015-08-30

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) inhibitors are very selective for solid tumor due to their high binding affinity to the LPO enzyme. A computational study was used to select top-ranked LPO inhibitor (alone and in complex with (99m)Tc) with high in silico affinity. The novel prepared (99m)Tc-amitrole complex demonstrated both in silico and in vivo high affinity toward solid tumors.(99m)Tc-amitrole was radio-synthesized with a high radiochemical yield (89.7±3.25). It showed in vitro stability for up to 6h. Its preclinical evaluation in solid tumor-bearing mice showed high retention and biological accumulation in solid tumor cells with a high Target/Non-Target (T/NT) ratio equal to 4.9 at 60min post-injection. The data described previously could recommend (99m)Tc-amitrole as potential targeting scintigraphic probe for solid tumor imaging. PMID:25956074

  12. Continuous sensing of tumor-targeted molecular probes with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashurama, Natesh; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; De La Zerda, Adam; El Kalassi, Pascale; Cho, Seongjae; Liu, Hongguang; Teed, Robert; Levy, Hart; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Cheng, Zhen; Levi, Ofer; Harris, James S.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2012-11-01

    Molecular optical imaging is a widespread technique for interrogating molecular events in living subjects. However, current approaches preclude long-term, continuous measurements in awake, mobile subjects, a strategy crucial in several medical conditions. Consequently, we designed a novel, lightweight miniature biosensor for in vivo continuous optical sensing. The biosensor contains an enclosed vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser and an adjacent pair of near-infrared optically filtered detectors. We employed two sensors (dual sensing) to simultaneously interrogate normal and diseased tumor sites. Having established the sensors are precise with phantom and in vivo studies, we performed dual, continuous sensing in tumor (human glioblastoma cells) bearing mice using the targeted molecular probe cRGD-Cy5.5, which targets αVβ3 cell surface integrins in both tumor neovasculature and tumor. The sensors capture the dynamic time-activity curve of the targeted molecular probe. The average tumor to background ratio after signal calibration for cRGD-Cy5.5 injection is approximately 2.43±0.95 at 1 h and 3.64±1.38 at 2 h (N=5 mice), consistent with data obtained with a cooled charge coupled device camera. We conclude that our novel, portable, precise biosensor can be used to evaluate both kinetics and steady state levels of molecular probes in various disease applications.

  13. Continuous sensing of tumor-targeted molecular probes with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser-based biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; O’Sullivan, Thomas D.; De La Zerda, Adam; El Kalassi, Pascale; Cho, Seongjae; Liu, Hongguang; Teed, Robert; Levy, Hart; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Cheng, Zhen; Levi, Ofer; Harris, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Molecular optical imaging is a widespread technique for interrogating molecular events in living subjects. However, current approaches preclude long-term, continuous measurements in awake, mobile subjects, a strategy crucial in several medical conditions. Consequently, we designed a novel, lightweight miniature biosensor for in vivo continuous optical sensing. The biosensor contains an enclosed vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser and an adjacent pair of near-infrared optically filtered detectors. We employed two sensors (dual sensing) to simultaneously interrogate normal and diseased tumor sites. Having established the sensors are precise with phantom and in vivo studies, we performed dual, continuous sensing in tumor (human glioblastoma cells) bearing mice using the targeted molecular probe cRGD-Cy5.5, which targets αVβ3 cell surface integrins in both tumor neovasculature and tumor. The sensors capture the dynamic time-activity curve of the targeted molecular probe. The average tumor to background ratio after signal calibration for cRGD-Cy5.5 injection is approximately 2.43±0.95 at 1 h and 3.64±1.38 at 2 h (N=5 mice), consistent with data obtained with a cooled charge coupled device camera. We conclude that our novel, portable, precise biosensor can be used to evaluate both kinetics and steady state levels of molecular probes in various disease applications. PMID:23123976

  14. In vivo intra-operative breast tumor margin detection using a portable OCT system with a handheld surgical imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson-Bhatt, Sarah J.; Nolan, Ryan; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Adie, Steven G.; Putney, Jeffrey; Darga, Donald; McCormick, Daniel T.; Cittadine, Andrew; Marjanovic, Marina; Chaney, Eric J.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; South, Fredrick; Carney, P. Scott; Cradock, Kimberly A.; Liu, Z. George; Ray, Partha S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-02-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is a frequent option for women with stage I and II breast cancer, and with radiation treatment, can be as effective as a mastectomy. However, adequate margin detection remains a challenge, and too often additional surgeries are required. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides a potential method for real-time, high-resolution imaging of breast tissue during surgery. Intra-operative OCT imaging of excised breast tissues has been previously demonstrated by several groups. In this study, a novel handheld surgical probe-based OCT system is introduced, which was used by the surgeon to image in vivo, within the tumor cavity, and immediately following tumor removal in order to detect the presence of any remaining cancer. Following resection, study investigators imaged the excised tissue with the same probe for comparison. We present OCT images obtained from over 15 patients during lumpectomy and mastectomy surgeries. Images were compared to post-operative histopathology for diagnosis. OCT images with micron scale resolution show areas of heterogeneity and disorganized features indicative of malignancy, compared to more uniform regions of normal tissue. Video-rate acquisition shows the inside of the tumor cavity as the surgeon sweeps the probe along the walls of the surgical cavity. This demonstrates the potential of OCT for real-time assessment of surgical tumor margins and for reducing the unacceptably high re-operation rate for breast cancer patients.

  15. SU-E-I-81: Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors with Dual PET-MR Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, P; Peng, Y; Sun, M; Yang, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression in malignant tumors provides important information influencing patient management. Radionuclide in vivo imaging of HER2 may permit the detection of HER2 in both primary tumors and metastases by a single noninvasive procedure. Trastuzumab, effective in about 15 % of women with breast cancer, downregulates signalling through the Akt/PI3K and MAPK pathways.These pathways modulate metabolism which can be monitored by positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: The relationship between response of HER2 overexpressing tumours and changes in imaging PET or SPECT and MRI will be examined by a integrated bimodal imaging probe.Small (7 kDa) high-affinity anti-HER2 Affibody molecules and KCCYSL targeting peptide may be suitable tracers for visualization of HER2-expressing tumors. Peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) as MRI imaging and CB-TE2A as PET imaging are integrated into a single synthetic molecule in the HER2 positive cancer. Results: One of targeted contrast bimodal imaging probe agents was synthesized and evaluated to target HER2-expressing tumors in a HER2 positive rat model. We will report the newest results regarding the development of bimodal imaging probes. Conclusion: The preliminary results of the bimodal imaging probe presents high correlation of MRI signal and PET imaging intensity in vivo. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by single model contrast agents. It is envisioned that this bimodal agents can hold great potential for accurate detection of HER2-expressing tumors which are critical for clinical management of the disease.

  16. Development of a spatially offset Raman spectroscopy probe for breast tumor surgical margin evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Matthew D.; Vargis, Elizabeth; de Matos Granja, Nara; Wilson, Robert H.; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Kelley, Mark C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2011-01-01

    The risk of local recurrence for breast cancers is strongly correlated with the presence of a tumor within 1 to 2 mm of the surgical margin on the excised specimen. Previous experimental and theoretical results suggest that spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) holds much promise for intraoperative margin analysis. Based on simulation predictions for signal-to-noise ratio differences among varying spatial offsets, a SORS probe with multiple source-detector offsets was designed and tested. It was then employed to acquire spectra from 35 frozen–thawed breast tissue samples in vitro. Spectra from each detector ring were averaged to create a composite spectrum with biochemical information covering the entire range from the tissue surface to ∼2 mm below the surface, and a probabilistic classification scheme was used to classify these composite spectra as “negative” or “positive” margins. This discrimination was performed with 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity, or with 100% positive predictive value and 94% negative predictive value. PMID:21806286

  17. Electrochemiluminescence signal amplification combined with a conformation-switched hairpin DNA probe for determining the methylation level and position in the Hsp53 tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Meixing; Fan, Mengxing; Gu, Jinxing; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2014-03-18

    We report a new strategy for detection of the methylation level and position in the Hsp53 tumor suppressor gene based on the electrochemiluminescence signal amplification combined with a conformation-switched hairpin DNA probe for improving selectivity. PMID:24501739

  18. Intraoperative gamma hand-held probe navigation in resection of osteoid osteoma tumor--report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Cengić, Tomislav; Corluka, Stipe; Petrović, Tadija; Baranović, Senka; Kovacić, Ksenija; Kolundzić, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Two cases of osteoid osteoma tumor (OO) are presented and our early experience with intraoperative gamma probing to localize OO during surgery is reported. The concept of radioguided surgery was developed 60 years ago and the gamma detection probe technology for radioguided biopsy and/or resection of bone lesions has been applied since the early 1980s. Bone scintigraphy is very important for initial diagnosis of OO with almost 100% sensitivity. The bone scan finding is specific, with so called double density appearance, very intense accumulation of radiopharmaceutical in the nidus and therefore great difference between the nidus and the surrounding healthy bone, thus making possible to treat this lesion with probe guided surgery. Three phase bone scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography were conducted in our patients for initial diagnosis of OO. A second bone scintigraphy was performed before surgery. The surgery followed 12-15 hours later by intraoperative nidus detection with a hand-held gamma probe. Gamma hand-held probe is a system that detects gamma photons. The count rate in the nidus area on the day of surgery was 3 to 4 times higher than in the healthy bone area. Drilling was performed until the counts decreased to the level of the surrounding bone counts, thereby confirming complete excision. This is the method of choice for minimizing bone resection, the risk of pathologic fracture, the need of bone grafting, and reducing the period of convalescence. Evidence for the treatment efficiency is pain disappearance after the surgery. PMID:24053090

  19. Multi-parametric imaging of tumor spheroids with ultra-bright and tunable nanoparticle O2 probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergey M.; Jenkins, James; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal probes allow for flexible choice of imaging equipment when performing quenched-phosphorescence O2 measurements: one- or two-photon, PLIM or intensity-based ratiometric read-outs. Spectral and temporal (e.g. FLIMPLIM) discrimination can be used to image O2 together with pH, Ca2+, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell death markers or cell/organelle specific markers. However, the main challenge of existing nanoparticle probes is their limited diffusion across thick (> 20-50 μm) 3D cell models such as tumor spheroids. Here, we present new class of polymeric nanoparticle probes having tunable size, charge, cell-penetrating ability, and reporter dyes. Being spectrally similar to the recently described MM2, PA2 and other O2 probes, they are 5-10 times brighter, demonstrate improved ratiometric response and their surface chemistry can be easily modified. With cultures of 2D and 3D cell models (fibroblasts, PC12 aggregates, HCT116 human colon cancer spheroids) we found cell-specific staining by these probes. However, the efficient staining of model of interest can be tuned by changing number of positive and negative surface groups at nanoparticle, to allow most efficient loading. We also demonstrate how real-time monitoring of oxygenation can be used to select optimal spheroid production with low variability in size and high cell viability.

  20. Fluorescence-Guided Probes of Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles with Computed Tomography Imaging Accesses for in Vivo Tumor Resection.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Su, Hsin-Jan; Lai, Wei-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Wang, Di-Yan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of molecular imaging probes for fluorescence-guided surgery has shown great progresses for determining tumor margin to execute the tissue resection. Here we synthesize the fluorescent gold nanoparticles conjugated with diatrizoic acid and nucleolin-targeted AS1411 aptamer. The nanoparticle conjugates exhibit high water-solubility, good biocompatibility, visible fluorescence and strong X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) contrast enhancement. The fluorescent nanoparticle conjugates are applied as a molecular contrast agent to reveal the tumor location in CL1-5 tumor-bearing mice by CT imaging. Furthermore, the orange-red fluorescence emitting from the conjugates in the CL1-5 tumor can be easily visualized by the naked eyes. After the resection, the IVIS measurements show that the fluorescence signal of the nanoparticle conjugates in the tumor is greatly enhanced in comparison to that in the controlled experiment. Our work has shown potential application of functionalized nanoparticles as a dual-function imaging agent in clinical fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:26507179

  1. Ball lens hollow fiber Raman probe and Fourier transform infrared applied for studying non-clinic samples colorectal tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriana, Bibin B.; Miyoshi, N.; Limantara, L.; Soeratman, C. Linda R.; Ishigaki, M.; Maeda, Y.; Taketani, A.; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2013-02-01

    Ball-lens hollow fiber Raman Probe (BHRP) and FTIR spectroscopy were main tools in this study. Thus, both of equipments detected the alteration of antisymmetric and symmetric P=O stretching vibration within our mice colorectal tumor models. Some differences of spectra due to randomly the edge of each BHRP and FTIR attached the surface of tumor during measurements. Meanwhile, the application of FTIR potentially differentiates the grade levels of non-clinic samples colorectal tumor models at four different grades (normal, grade 1, grade 2 and grade 3). Detailed investigations were assignable to wave numbers that publicized to represent biochemical alteration. The whole of investigated spectra in the fingerprint region revealed some different peaks and shoulders, most of which were assignable to wave numbers that exposed to represent biochemical alteration within the tissue. Differences in peak heights and peak ratio indicated differences in biochemical composition of cancer from different grade level. However, all collected colorectal tumor model at different peak was distinguishable, where antisymmetric and symmetric P=O stretching vibration was imaged and mapped clearly by both equipments. Therefore, BHRP were comfortable for in vivo studies. Meanwhile FTIR spectral analysis in combination with calibration curve might be used to distinguish cancer grade within colorectal tumor model tissue for ex vivo study.

  2. Fluorescence-Guided Probes of Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles with Computed Tomography Imaging Accesses for in Vivo Tumor Resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Su, Hsin-Jan; Lai, Wei-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Wang, Di-Yan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of molecular imaging probes for fluorescence-guided surgery has shown great progresses for determining tumor margin to execute the tissue resection. Here we synthesize the fluorescent gold nanoparticles conjugated with diatrizoic acid and nucleolin-targeted AS1411 aptamer. The nanoparticle conjugates exhibit high water-solubility, good biocompatibility, visible fluorescence and strong X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) contrast enhancement. The fluorescent nanoparticle conjugates are applied as a molecular contrast agent to reveal the tumor location in CL1-5 tumor-bearing mice by CT imaging. Furthermore, the orange-red fluorescence emitting from the conjugates in the CL1-5 tumor can be easily visualized by the naked eyes. After the resection, the IVIS measurements show that the fluorescence signal of the nanoparticle conjugates in the tumor is greatly enhanced in comparison to that in the controlled experiment. Our work has shown potential application of functionalized nanoparticles as a dual-function imaging agent in clinical fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:26507179

  3. In-vivo imaging of breast cancer with ultrasound tomography: probing the tumor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, Nebojsa; Littrup, Peter; West, Erik; Ranger, Bryan; Li, Cuiping; Schmidt, Steven

    2011-03-01

    We report on the use of ultrasound tomography (UST) to characterize breast cancer and study the local and distant tumor environments. We have imaged the tumor and its environment in 3 cases of breast cancer using a UST prototype and its associated image reconstruction algorithms. After generating images of reflection, sound speed and attenuation, the images were fused in combinations that allowed visualization and characterization of the interior of the tumor as well as the tissue immediate to the tumor and beyond. The reflection UST images demonstrated the presence of spiculation, and architectural distortion, indicators of both local tumor invasion and distant involvement with surrounding tissues. Furthermore, the sound speed images showed halos of elevated sound speed surrounding the tumors, indicating a local environment characterized by stiff tissues. The combination of sound speed and attenuation images revealed that the tumor interiors were the stiffest tissues in the region studied. These features and characteristics are commensurate with the known biomechanical properties of cancer and may be manifestations of the desmoplastic process that is associated with tumor invasion. We propose that UST imaging may prove to be a valuable tool for characterizing cancers and studying the tumor invasion process.

  4. Targeted quantum dots fluorescence probes functionalized with aptamer and peptide for transferrin receptor on tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming-Zhen; Yu, Rong-Na; Chen, Jun; Ma, Zhi-Ya; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2012-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) fluorescent probes based on oligonucleotide aptamers and peptides with specific molecular recognition have attracted much attention. In this paper, CdSe/ZnS QDs probes for targeted delivery to mouse and human cells using aptamer GS24 and peptide T7 specific to mouse/human transferrin receptors were developed. Capillary electrophoresis analyses indicated that the optimal molar ratios of QDs to aptamer or peptide were 1:5. Fluorescence and confocal microscope imaging revealed QD-GS24 and QD-T7 probes were able to specifically recognize B16 cells and HeLa cells respectively. Quantitative flow cytometry analysis indicated the transportation of QD-GS24 or QD-T7 into cells could be promoted by corresponding free transferrin. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the uptake of probes in cells and the effective intracellular delivery. MTT assay suggested the cytotoxicity of probes was related to the surface ligand, and aptamer GS24 (or peptide T7) could reduce the cytotoxicity of probes to a certain degree. The study has great significance for preparing QDs fluorescent probes using non-antibody target molecules.

  5. In Vivo Tumor Angiogenesis Imaging Using Peptide-Based Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Conti, Peter S; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an emerging imaging technique for studying diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with a near-infrared emitting fluorophore for targeting tumor angiogenesis offers a noninvasive method for early tumor detection and efficient monitoring of tumor response to anti-angiogenesis therapy. CD13 receptor, a zinc-dependent membrane-bound ectopeptidase, plays important roles in regulating tumor angiogenesis and the growth of new blood vessels. In this chapter, we use CD13 receptor as an example to demonstrate how to construct CD13-specific NGR-containing peptides via bioorthogonal click chemistry for visualizing and quantifying the CD13 receptor expression in vivo by means of NIRF optical imaging. PMID:27283419

  6. Folate-modified gold nanoclusters as near-infrared fluorescent probes for tumor imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Li, Shulan; Li, Bowen; Ren, Xueyan; Li, Shengnan; Mahounga, Didel M; Cui, Sisi; Gu, Yueqing; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-09-28

    Ultra-small gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are highly promising materials for tumor imaging and therapy because of their low toxicity, intrinsic fluorescence, and the availability of multifunctional groups for covalent linkage of diverse bioactive molecules. Au NCs stabilized by bovine serum albumin (BSA) were prepared via an improved "green" synthetic routine. To ameliorate the selective affinity of Au NCs for high folate receptor (FR) expressing tumors, folic acid (FA) was immobilized on the surface of Au NCs. Subsequently, a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye MPA was conjugated with Au-FA NCs for in vitro and in vivo fluorescence imaging. Similarly, Doxorubicin (DOX), a widely used clinical anticancer drug, was also conjugated to the folate-modified Au NCs to form a prodrug (Au-FA-DOX). Cellular and in vivo acute toxicity studies demonstrated the low toxicity of the Au-FA-MPA to normal cells and tissues. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo study of the dynamic behavior and targeting ability of Au-FA-MPA to different tumors validated the high selective affinity of Au-FA-MPA to FR positive tumors. With regard to the Au-FA-DOX, high anti-tumor activity was displayed by this pro-drug due to the FR mediated uptake. Herein, all of the results supported the potential of using ligand-modified Au NCs for tumor imaging and targeted therapy. PMID:22930451

  7. SELEX Aptamer Used as a Probe to Detect Circulating Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Li, Shaohua; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Lanping; Shao, Ningsheng; Zhao, Xiaohang

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the quantity and dynamics of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood of patients afflicted with solid tumours have great relevance in therapeutic efficacy and prognosis. Different methods based on various strategies have been developed to isolate and identify CTCs, but their efficacy needs to be improved because of the rarity and complexity of CTCs. This study was designed to examine the possibility of using a SELEX aptamer (BC-15) as a probe to identify rare CTCs out of background nucleated cells. Aptamer BC-15 was selected from a random oligonucleotide library screened against human breast cancer tissue. Fluorescence staining showed that BC-15 had a high affinity for nuclei of human cancer cell lines of various origins as well as CTCs isolated from pancreatic cancer patients, whereas its binding capacity for non-tumor breast epithelial cells and leukocytes was almost undetectable. BC-15+/CD45- cells in cancer patient blood were also found to be cytokeratins 18-positive and aneuploid by immunofluorescence staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization, respectively. Finally, the aptamer method was compared with the well-established anti-cytokeratin method using 15 pancreatic cancer patient blood samples, and enumeration indicated no difference between these two methods. Our study establishes a novel way to identify CTCs by using a synthetic aptamer probe. This new approach is comparable with the anti-cytokeratin-based CTC identification method. PMID:25799539

  8. MR-guided interstitial thermal therapy for the treatment of brain tumors with a multi-element ultrasound probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canney, Michael; Carpentier, Alexandre; Beccaria, Kevin; Souchon, Rémi; Chavrier, Françoise; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a new therapeutic ultrasound device is presented that is designed for performing minimally invasive thermal ablation of brain tumors under guidance with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The device consists of an array of ultrasound transducers, oriented on multiple faces of a flexible sheath with an integrated cooling system that can be directly inserted into the brain through a small burr hole in the skull. Heating can be monitored using real-time MRI and conformed to the tumor volume by varying the power to the individual elements on the probe. In this work, preliminary testing of the device was performed and included acoustic characterization, numerical simulations, and experiments in a clinical MRI system. Numerical simulations of the acoustic field and temperature rise during heating were compared with results of in vitro testing using bovine brain samples. The results demonstrate that the device has good MRI compatibility and is capable of generating output surface intensities of greater than 20 W/cm2, which is sufficient to ablate tissue at depths of more than 10 mm from the probe in less than four minutes of heating.

  9. Synthesis of well-defined bicapped octahedral iron clusters [((tren) L)2 Fe8 (PMe2 Ph)2 ](n) (n=0, -1).

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Raúl Hernández; Willis, Alexander M; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Betley, Theodore A

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of polynuclear clusters with control over size and cluster geometry remains an unsolved challenge. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of open-shell octairon clusters supported by two heptaamine ligands [o-H2 NC6 H4 NH(CH2 )2 ]3 N ((tren) LH9 ). The crystal structure of the all-ferrous species ([(tren) L)2 Fe8 (PMe2 Ph)2 ] (1) displays a bicapped octahedral geometry with FeFe distances ranging from 2.4071(6) to 2.8236(5) Å, where the ligand amine units are formally in amine, amide, and imide oxidation states. Several redox states of the octairon cluster are accessible, as ascertained using cyclic voltammetry. The one-electron-reduced clusters [M](+) [((tren) L)2 Fe8 (PMe2 Ph)2 ](-) (M=Bu4 N (2 a); (15-crown-5)Na(thf) (2 b)) were isolated and characterized. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data indicates that the exchange coupling within the [Fe8 ] core is antiferromagnetic which is attenuated upon reduction to the mixed valent anion. PMID:26298064

  10. Tissue distribution and real-time fluorescence measurement of a tumor-targeted nanodevice by a two photon optical fiber fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Thommey P.; Ye, Jing Yong; Yang, Chu-Sheng; Myaing, Monthiri; Majoros, Istvan J.; Kotlyar, Alina; Cao, Zhengyi; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Real-time fluorescence measurement in deep tumors in live animals (or humans) by conventional methods has significant challenges. We have developed a two-photon optical fiber fluorescence (TPOFF) probe as a minimally invasive technique for quantifying fluorescence in solid tumors in live mice. Here we demonstrate TPOFF for real-time measurements of targeted drug delivery dynamics to tumors in live mice. 50-femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm were coupled into a single mode optical fiber and delivered into the tumor through a 27-gauge needle. Fluorescence was collected back through the same fiber, filtered, and detected with photon counting. Biocompatible dendrimer-based nanoparticles were used for targeted delivery of fluorescent materials into tumors. Dendrimers with targeting agent folic acid and fluorescent reporter 6-TAMRA (G5-6T-FA) were synthesized. KB cell tumors expressing high levels of FA receptors were developed in SCID mice. We initially demonstrated the specific uptake of the targeted conjugates into tumor, kidney and liver, using the TPOFF probe. The tumor fluorescence was then taken in live mice at 30 min, 2 h and 24 h with the TPOFF probe. G5-6T-FA accumulated in the tumor with maximum mean levels reaching 673 +/- 67 nM at the 2 h time point. In contrast, the levels of a control, non-targeted conjugate (G5-6T) at 2 h reached a level of only 136 +/- 28 nM in tumors, and decrease quickly. This indicates that the TPOFF probe can be used as a minimally invasive detection system for quantifying the specific targeting of a fluorescent nanodevice on a real-time basis.

  11. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  12. Azobenzene-caged sulforhodamine dyes: a novel class of ‘turn-on’ reactive probes for hypoxic tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Piao, Wen; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    New sulforhodamine-based fluorescent ‘turn-on’ probes have been developed for the direct imaging of cellular hypoxia. Rapid access to this novel class of water-soluble ‘azobenzene-caged’ fluorophores was made possible through an easily-implementable azo-coupling reaction between a fluorescent primary arylamine derived from a sulforhodamine 101 scaffold (named SR101-NaphtNH 2 ) and a tertiary aniline whose N-substituents are neutral, cationic, or zwitterionic. The detection mechanism is based on the bioreductive cleavage of the azo bond that restores strong far-red fluorescence (emission maximum at 625 nm) by regenerating the original sulforhodamine SR101-NaphtNH 2 . This valuable fluorogenic response was obtained for the three ‘smart’ probes studied in this work, as shown by an in vitro assay using rat liver microsomes placed under aerobic and then under hypoxic conditions. Most importantly, the probe namely SR101-NaphtNH 2 -Hyp-diMe was successfully applied for imaging the hypoxic status of tumor cells (A549 cells).

  13. RGD-conjugated two-photon absorbing near-IR emitting fluorescent probes for tumor vascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfield, Kevin D.; Yue, Xiling; Morales, Alma R.; Githaiga, Grace W.; Woodward, Adam W.; Tang, Simon; Sawada, Junko; Komatsu, Masanobu; Liu, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the activation and inhibition of angiogenesis processes is important in the progression of cancer. Application of targeting peptides, such as a small peptide that contains adjacent L-arginine (R), glycine (G) and L-aspartic acid (D) residues can afford high selectivity and deep penetration in vessel imaging. To facilitate deep tissue vasculature imaging, probes that can be excited via two-photon absorption (2PA) in the near-infrared (NIR) and subsequently emit in the NIR are essential. In this study, the enhancement of tissue image quality with RGD conjugates was investigated with new NIR-emitting pyranyl fluorophore derivatives in two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of the new probes were comprehensively characterized; significantly the probes exhibited good 2PA over a broad spectral range from 700-1100 nm. Cell and tissue images were then acquired and examined, revealing deep penetration and high contrast with the new pyranyl RGD-conjugates up to 350 μm in tumor tissue.

  14. RGD-conjugated two-photon absorbing near-IR emitting fluorescent probes for tumor vasculature imaging.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiling; Morales, Alma R; Githaiga, Grace W; Woodward, Adam W; Tang, Simon; Sawada, Junko; Komatsu, Masanobu; Liu, Xuan; Belfield, Kevin D

    2015-11-21

    Observation of the activation and inhibition of angiogenesis processes is important in the progression of cancer. Application of targeting peptides, such as a small peptide that contains adjacent L-arginine (R), glycine (G) and L-aspartic acid (D) residues can afford high selectivity and deep penetration in vessel imaging. To facilitate deep tissue vasculature imaging, probes that can be excited via two-photon absorption (2PA) in the near-infrared (NIR) and subsequently emit in the NIR are essential. In this study, the enhancement of tissue image quality with RGD conjugates was investigated with new NIR-emitting pyranyl fluorophore derivatives in two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of the new probes were comprehensively characterized; significantly the probes exhibited good 2PA over a broad spectral range from 700-1100 nm. Cell and tissue images were then acquired and examined, revealing deep penetration and high contrast with the new pyranyl RGD-conjugates up to 350 μm in tumor tissue. PMID:26351137

  15. Intracellular hypoxia of tumor tissue estimated by noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry technique using paramagnetic probes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Atsuko; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Matsumoto, Shingo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Sowers, Anastasia L; Koscielniak, Janusz W; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2011-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry at 700 MHz operating frequency employing a surface coil resonator is used to assess tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) using paramagnetic media whose linewidth and decay constant are related to oxygen concentration. Differences in extracellular and intracellular pO(2) in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumor tissue were tested using several types of water-soluble paramagnetic media, which localize extracellularly or permeate through the cell membrane. The nitroxide carboxy-PROXYL (CxP) can only be distributed in blood plasma and extracellular fluids whereas the nitroxides carbamoyl-PROXYL (CmP) and TEMPOL (TPL) can permeate cell membranes and localize intracellularly. EPR signal decay constant and the linewidth of the intravenously administered nitroxides in SCC tumor tissues implanted in mouse thigh and the contralateral normal muscle of healthy mice breathing gases with different pO(2) were compared. The pO(2) in the blood can depend on the oxygen content in the breathing gas while tissue pO(2) was not directly influenced by pO(2) in the breathing gas. The decay constants of CmP and TPL in tumor tissue were significantly larger than in the normal muscles, and lower linewidths of CmP and TPL in tumor tissue was observed. The SCC tumor showed intracellular hypoxia even though the extracellular pO(2) is similar to normal tissue in the peripheral region. PMID:21212532

  16. A Quick Responsive Fluorogenic pH Probe for Ovarian Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Qi, Jianjun; Hu, Lingchuan; Han, Myung Shin; Kim, Young

    2015-01-01

    A novel cell-permeable compound, CypH-1, that is non-fluorescent at neutral pH, but fluoresces under mildly acidic conditions with a near infrared maximum emission wavelength was designed for the detection of tumors in the clinical setting. The potential of CypH-1 in ovarian cancer imaging was demonstrated using a murine model. The intraperitoneally administered CypH-1 results in a robust fluorescence signal of discrete neoplastic lesions with millimeter range resolution within few hours. Moreover, fluorescence signal is strikingly enhanced at peripheral regions of tumors at the microscopic level suggesting a sharp physiological difference at the tumor/normal tissue interface. This robust acid-activated imaging agent is expected to have significant impact in broad surgical and diagnostic applications. PMID:26284146

  17. Probing the Backbone Function of Tumor Targeting Peptides by an Amide-to-Triazole Substitution Strategy.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Ibai E; Vomstein, Sandra; Fischer, Christiane A; Mascarin, Alba; Mindt, Thomas L

    2015-09-24

    Novel backbone-modified radiolabeled analogs based on the tumor targeting peptide bombesin were synthesized and fully evaluated in vitro and in vivo. We have recently introduced the use of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles as metabolically stable trans-amide bond surrogates in radiolabeled peptides in order to improve their tumor targeting. As an extension of our approach, we now report several backbone-modified analogs of the studied bombesin peptide bearing multiple triazole substitutions. We investigated the effect of the modifications on several biological parameters including the internalization of the radiopeptidomimetics into tumor cells, their affinity toward the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPr), metabolic stability in blood plasma, and biodistribution in mice bearing GRPr-expressing xenografts. The backbone-modified radiotracers exhibited a significantly increased resistance to proteolytic degradation. In addition, some of the radiopeptidomimetics retained a nanomolar affinity toward GRPr, resulting in an up to 2-fold increased tumor uptake in vivo in comparison to a (all amide bond) reference compound. PMID:26309061

  18. A turn-on fluorescent probe for tumor hypoxia imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qi; Yu, Tao; Zhu, Weiping; Xu, Yufang; Qian, Xuhong

    2015-10-11

    A novel "turn-on" fluorescent probe HP for hypoxia imaging was designed and synthesized based on rhodamine B and a naphthalimide fluorophore. The fluorescence of HP is very weak owing to the FRET effect from rhodamine B to the azo-naphthalimide unit. Under hypoxia conditions, the azo-bond is reduced and the fluorescence at 581 nm enhances dramatically as a result of disintegration of the quencher structure. Verified by the cyclic voltammetry reduction potential and proposed product HPN, the probe HP could undergo the chemical and cytochrome P450 enzymatic reduction quickly. When cultured with HeLa cells, HP showed remarkable fluorescence differences at various oxygen concentrations, and the ratio of fluorescence intensity between hypoxic and normoxic cells could reach 9 fold. PMID:26295073

  19. Development of a novel fluorescent imaging probe for tumor hypoxia by use of a fusion protein with oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2007-02-01

    More malignant tumors contain more hypoxic regions. In hypoxic tumor cells, expression of a series of hypoxiaresponsive genes related to malignant phenotype such as angiogenesis and metastasis are induced. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a master transcriptional activator of such genes, and thus imaging of hypoxic tumor cells where HIF-1 is active, is important in cancer therapy. We have been developing PTD-ODD fusion proteins, which contain protein transduction domain (PTD) and the VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of HIF-1 alpha subunit (HIF-1α). Thus PTD-ODD fusion proteins can be delivered to any tissue in vivo through PTD function and specifically stabilized in hypoxic cells through ODD function. To investigate if PTD-ODD fusion protein can be applied to construct hypoxia-specific imaging probes, we first constructed a fluorescent probe because optical imaging enable us to evaluate a probe easily, quickly and economically in a small animal. We first construct a model fusion porein PTD-ODD-EGFP-Cy5.5 named POEC, which is PTD-ODD protein fused with EGFP for in vitro imaging and stabilization of fusion protein, and conjugated with a near-infrared dye Cy5.5. This probe is designed to be degraded in normoxic cells through the function of ODD domain and followed by quick clearance of free fluorescent dye. On the other hand, this prove is stabilized in hypoxic tumor cells and thus the dye is stayed in the cells. Between normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the difference in the clearance rate of the dye will reveals suited contrast for tumor-hypoxia imaging. The optical imaging probe has not been optimized yet but the results presented here exhibit a potential of PTD-ODD fusion protein as a hypoxia-specific imaging probe.

  20. Evaluation of Polymethine Dyes as Potential Probes for Near Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Tumors: Part - 1

    PubMed Central

    James, Nadine S.; Chen, Yihui; Joshi, Penny; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Henary, Maged; Strekowsk, Lucjan; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) organic dyes have become important for many biomedical applications, including in vivo optical imaging. Conjugation of NIR fluorescent dyes to photosensitizing molecules (photosensitizers) holds strong potential for NIR fluorescence image guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. Therefore, we were interested in investigating the photophysical properties, in vivo tumor-affinity and fluorescence imaging potential of a series of heterocyclic polymethine dyes, which could then be conjugated to certain PDT agents. For our present study, we selected a series of symmetrical polymethine dyes containing a variety of bis-N-substituted indole or benzindole moieties linked by linear conjugation with and without a fused substituted cyclohexene ring. The N-alkyl side chain at the C-terminal position was functionalized with sulfonic, carboxylic acid, methyl ester or hydroxyl groups. Although, among the parent cyanine dyes investigated, the commercially available, cyanine dye IR783 (3) (bis-indole-N-butylsulfonate)-polymethine dye with a cyclic chloro-cyclohexene moiety showed best fluorescence-imaging ability, based on its spectral properties (λAbs=782 nm, λFl=810 nm, ε = 261,000 M-1cm-1, ΦFl≈0.08) and tumor affinity. In addition to 3, parent dyes IR820 and Cypate (6) were also selected and subjected to further modifications by introducing desired functional groups, which could enable further conjugation of the cyanine dyes to an effective photosensitizer HPPH developed in our laboratory. The synthesis and biological studies (tumor-imaging and PDT) of the resulting bifunctional conjugates are discussed in succeeding paper (Part-2 of this study). PMID:24019854

  1. Engineering Agatoxin, a Cystine-Knot Peptide from Spider Venom, as a Molecular Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Heidi K.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cystine-knot miniproteins, also known as knottins, have shown great potential as molecular scaffolds for the development of targeted therapeutics and diagnostic agents. For this purpose, previous protein engineering efforts have focused on knottins based on the Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor (EETI) from squash seeds, the Agouti-related protein (AgRP) neuropeptide from mammals, or the Kalata B1 uterotonic peptide from plants. Here, we demonstrate that Agatoxin (AgTx), an ion channel inhibitor found in spider venom, can be used as a molecular scaffold to engineer knottins that bind with high-affinity to a tumor-associated integrin receptor. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a rational loop-grafting approach to engineer AgTx variants that bound to αvβ3 integrin with affinities in the low nM range. We showed that a disulfide-constrained loop from AgRP, a structurally-related knottin, can be substituted into AgTx to confer its high affinity binding properties. In parallel, we identified amino acid mutations required for efficient in vitro folding of engineered integrin-binding AgTx variants. Molecular imaging was used to evaluate in vivo tumor targeting and biodistribution of an engineered AgTx knottin compared to integrin-binding knottins based on AgRP and EETI. Knottin peptides were chemically synthesized and conjugated to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Integrin-binding AgTx, AgRP, and EETI knottins all generated high tumor imaging contrast in U87MG glioblastoma xenograft models. Interestingly, EETI-based knottins generated significantly lower non-specific kidney imaging signals compared to AgTx and AgRP-based knottins. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we demonstrate that AgTx, a knottin from spider venom, can be engineered to bind with high affinity to a tumor-associated receptor target. This work validates AgTx as a viable molecular scaffold for protein engineering, and further demonstrates the promise of using tumor

  2. Plasma Membrane Lesions In Anthracycline-Resistant Tumor Cells Probed Using A Fluorescent Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Thomas G.; Doroshow, James H.

    1989-06-01

    Human cancer cells selected for resistance to several structurally unrelated cytotoxic drugs are known to display plasma membrane alterations such as amplified levels of a variety of glycoproteins, modifications in lipid composition, alterations in membrane fluidity and increased cellular fragility to osmotic shock. We have studied the plasma membrane fluidity of HL60 human leukemia cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells that have been selected for acquired resistance against the cytocidal effects of the anthracycline anticancer drug Adriamycin. Fluidity measurements were accomplished by evaluating the fluorescence anisotropy of the plasma membrane specific probe trimethylamino-1,6-dipihenylhexatriene (TMA.DPH) bound to whole, living cells. TMA.DPH anisotropy values for MCF-7 sensitive and 12-fold resistant cells were 0.306 and 0.285, respectively, while anisotropy values for HL-60 sensitive and 80-fold resistant cells lines were 0.310 and 0.295, respectively. In all cases, cell viability exceeded 97% and anisotropy values were subject to a day-to-day uncertainty of +/-2%. Our results demonstrate that increased plasma membrane fluidity apparently accompanies the development of resistance in both cell lines. Because it is known that increased membrane fluidity results in significantly decreased Adriamycin binding in artificial membrane systems, we propose here that decreased drug associations with fluidized, plasma membrane lipid bilayer regions may be a mechanism which contributes, in part, to the reduced rates of drug accumulation observed in HL60 and MCF-7 cells resistant to Adriamycin.

  3. Dialkoxyquinazolines: Screening Epidermal Growth Factor ReceptorTyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Potential Tumor Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Lim, John K.; Coffing, Stephanie L.; Hom,Darren L.; Negash, Kitaw; Ono, Michele Y.; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Taylor,Scott E.; Vanderpoel, Jennifer L.; Slavik, Sarah M.; Morris, Andrew B.; Riese II, David J.

    2005-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a long-standingdrug development target, is also a desirable target for imaging. Sixteendialkoxyquinazoline analogs, suitable for labeling with positron-emittingisotopes, have been synthesized and evaluated in a battery of in vitroassays to ascertain their chemical and biological properties. Thesecharacteristics provided the basis for the adoption of a selection schemato identify lead molecules for labeling and in vivo evaluation. A newEGFR tyrosine kinase radiometric binding assay revealed that all of thecompounds possessed suitable affinity (IC50 = 0.4 - 51 nM) for the EGFRtyrosine kinase. All of the analogs inhibited ligand-induced EGFRtyrosine phosphorylation (IC50 = 0.8 - 20 nM). The HPLC-estimatedoctanol/water partition coefficients ranged from 2.0-5.5. Four compounds,4-(2'-fluoroanilino)- and 4-(3'-fluoroanilino)-6,7-diethoxyquinazoline aswell as 4-(3'-chloroanilino)- and4-(3'-bromoanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, possess the bestcombination of characteristics that warrant radioisotope labeling andfurther evaluation in tumor-bearing mice.

  4. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marina; te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m-1, force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  5. Magnetically engineered Cd-free quantum dots as dual-modality probes for fluorescence/magnetic resonance imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ke; Jing, Lihong; Liu, Chunyan; Hou, Yi; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-02-01

    Magnetically engineered Cd-free CuInS2@ZnS:Mn quantum dots (QDs) were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential dual-modality probes for fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumors in vivo. The synthesis of Mn-doped core-shell structured CuInS2@ZnS mainly comprised three steps, i.e., the preparation of fluorescent CuInS2 seeds, the particle surface coating of ZnS, and the Mn-doping of the ZnS shells. Systematic spectroscopy studies were carried out to illustrate the impacts of ZnS coating and the following Mn-doping on the optical properties of the QDs. In combination with conventional fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, the structure of CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs prepared under optimized conditions presented a Zn gradient CuInS2 core and a ZnS outer shell, while Mn ions were mainly located in the ZnS shell, which well balanced the optical and magnetic properties of the resultant QDs. For the following in vivo imaging experiments, the hydrophobic CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs were transferred into water upon ligand exchange reactions by replacing the 1-dodecanethiol ligand with dihydrolipoic acid-poly(ethylene glycol) (DHLA-PEG) ligand. The MTT assays based on HeLa cells were carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the current Cd-free CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs for comparing with that of water soluble CdTe QDs. Further in vivo fluorescence and MR imaging experiments suggested that the PEGylated CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs could well target both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumors in vivo. PMID:24239108

  6. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a tumor is cancer , possible treatments may include: Chemotherapy Radiation Surgery Targeted cancer therapy Biologic therapy Other treatment options

  7. Comparison of surface micro-structured and plasmonic all-fiber delivery probes for laser-induced thermotherapy of tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassino, Riccardo; Dhara, Papiya; Liu, Yu; Yu, Hao; Braglia, Andrea; Olivero, Massimo; Vallan, Alberto; Perrone, Guido

    2016-03-01

    The paper compares two different approaches to design an innovative probe with optimized heated area for laser ablation of solid tumors: micro-patterning of the fiber delivery tip, and exploitation of the dissipation of plasmonic waves at the metal-dielectric interface. Both probes integrate a fiber Bragg grating for real- time monitoring of the obtained temperature increase to provide feedback to surgeons in practical applications. Experimental characterizations carried out using liver phantoms and ex-vivo porcine livers have demonstrated that both approaches can be used for the devised application, although further optimizations and tests are still necessary before clinical assessment.

  8. Comprehensive Screening of Gene Copy Number Aberrations in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Solid Tumors Using Molecular Inversion Probe-Based Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Array.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajesh R; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Chen, Hui; Almohammedsalim, Alaa A; Sahin, Ayesagul; Bosamra, Alex; Patel, Keyur P; Routbort, Mark J; Lu, Xinyan; Ronald, Abraham; Mishra, Bal Mukund; Virani, Shumaila; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2016-09-01

    Gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) represent a major class of cancer-related genomic alterations that drive solid tumors. Comprehensive and sensitive detection of CNAs is challenging because of often low quality and quantity of DNA isolated from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) solid tumor samples. Here, in a clinical molecular diagnostic laboratory, we tested the utility and validated a molecular inversion probe-based (MIP) array to routinely screen for CNAs in solid tumors. Using low-input FFPE DNA, the array detects genome-wide CNAs with a special focus on 900 cancer-related genes. A cohort of 76 solid tumors of various types and tumor cellularity (20% to 100%), and four cancer cell lines were used. These harbored CNAs in clinically important genes (ERBB2, EGFR, FGFR1, KRAS, MYC) as detected by orthogonal techniques like next-generation sequencing or fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results of the MIP array were concordant with results from orthogonal techniques, and also provided additional information regarding the allelic nature of the CNAs. Limit-of-detection and assay reproducibility studies showed a high degree of sensitivity and reproducibility of detection, respectively. FFPE compatibility, ability to detect CNAs with high sensitivity, accuracy, and provide valuable information such as loss of heterozygosity along with relatively short turnaround times makes the MIP array a desirable clinical platform for routine screening of solid tumors in a clinical laboratory. PMID:27392636

  9. Tethered Hsp90 Inhibitors Carrying Optical or Radioiodinated Probes Reveal Selective Internalization of Ectopic Hsp90 in Malignant Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barrott, Jared J.; Hughes, Philip F.; Osada, Takuya; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Hartman, Zachary C.; Loiselle, David R.; Spector, Neil L.; Neckers, Len; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Hu, Fangyao; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Haystead, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hsp90 inhibitors have demonstrated unusual selectivity for tumor cells despite its ubiquitous expression. This phenomenon has remained unexplained but could be influenced by ectopically expressed Hsp90 in tumors. We have synthesized novel Hsp90 inhibitors that can carry optical or radioiodinated probes via a PEG tether. We show that these tethered inhibitors selectively recognize cells expressing ectopic Hsp90 and become internalized. The internalization process is blocked by Hsp90 antibodies, suggesting that active cycling of the protein is occurring at the plasma membrane. In mice, we show exquisite accumulation of the fluor-tethered versions within breast tumors at very sensitive levels. Cell-based assays with the radiolabeled version showed picomolar detection in cells that express ectopic Hsp90. Our findings show that fluor-tethered or radiolabeled inhibitors targeting ectopic Hsp90 can be used to detect breast cancer malignancies through non-invasive imaging. PMID:24035283

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of a radioiodinated 4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-2-pyridinone derivative as a survivin targeting SPECT probe for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Natsumi; Haratake, Mamoru; Yoshida, Sakura; Magata, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Morio

    2016-02-01

    Survivin is overexpressed in most of the cancerous tissues but not in terminally differentiated normal tissues, making it an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy of various types of cancers. In this study, we aimed to develop 4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-2-pyridinone (DCP) derivatives, as novel cancer imaging probes that target survivin. Chloro and iodo analogs of DCP (CDCP and IDCP, respectively) were successfully synthesized by using a previously unreported carbon monoxide-free procedure. IDCP exhibited a slightly higher binding affinity for recombinant human survivin (Kd=34 nM) than that of CDCP (Kd=44 nM). Fluorescence staining indicated that both CDCP and IDCP showed high signals in MDA-MB-231 cells with high levels of survivin expression. Significantly low fluorescent signals were observed in MCF-10A cells, which showed low levels of survivin expression. [(125)I]IDCP was synthesized for the application of IDCP to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Quantitative in vitro binding of [(125)I]IDCP in cell cultures showed results consistent to those observed after fluorescent staining. In vivo biodistribution studies in tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that the tumor uptake of [(125)I]IDCP increased gradually with time and was 0.65% injected dose per gram (% ID/g) at 180 min. The maximum tumor/blood and tumor/muscle ratio at 60 min were 0.87 and 2.27, respectively, indicating inadequate [(125)I]IDCP accumulation in tumors necessary for in vivo imaging. Although further structural modifications are necessary to improve pharmacokinetic properties of IDCP, this study demonstrates the feasibility of using the DCP backbone as a scaffold for the development of survivin-targeting tumor imaging probes. PMID:26733475

  11. In vivo assessment of HER2 receptor density in HER2-positive tumors by near-infrared imaging, using repeated injections of the fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Hassan, Moinuddin; Zielinski, Rafal; Horton, Jason A; Capala, Jacek; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Chernomordik, Victor

    2014-10-01

    HER2 overexpression and amplification of the HER2/neu gene have been found in approximately 25% of invasive breast carcinomas. They are associated with a poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in breast cancer patients. Up to now, clinical evaluation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression is based on ex vivo methods (immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) staining of biopsied tissue). Our goal is to realize "image and treat" paradigm using targeted fluorescent probes to evaluate expression levels of cell biomarkers responsible for cancer progression and to monitor the efficacy of corresponding monoclonal antibody treatments. We used fluorescent Affibody-based probes for in vivo analysis of HER2 receptors using near-infrared optical imaging that do not interfere with binding of the therapeutic agents to these receptors. We have analyzed two types of breast carcinoma xenografts with significant differences in HER2 expression (31 and 21 according to classification) in the mouse model. Using our kinetic model to analyze the temporal variations of the fluorescence intensity in the tumor area after two subsequent injections allowed us to assess quantitatively the difference in HER2 expression levels for two tumor types (BT-474 and MD-MBA-361). This result was substantiated by ELISA ex vivo assays of HER2 expression in the same tumors. PMID:24000992

  12. High-sensitivity detection of breast tumors in vivo by use of a pH-sensitive near-infrared fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathejczyk, Julia Eva; Pauli, Jutta; Dullin, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute; Alves, Frauke; Napp, Joanna

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the potential of the pH-sensitive dye, CypHer5E, conjugated to Herceptin (pH-Her) for the sensitive detection of breast tumors in mice using noninvasive time-domain near-infrared fluorescence imaging and different methods of data analysis. First, the fluorescence properties of pH-Her were analyzed as function of pH and/or dye-to-protein ratio, and binding specificity was confirmed in cell-based assays. Subsequently, the performance of pH-Her in nude mice bearing orthotopic HER2-positive (KPL-4) and HER2-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast carcinoma xenografts was compared to that of an always-on fluorescent conjugate Alexa Fluor 647-Herceptin (Alexa-Her). Subtraction of autofluorescence and lifetime (LT)-gated image analyses were performed for background fluorescence suppression. In mice bearing HER2-positive tumors, autofluorescence subtraction together with the selective fluorescence enhancement of pH-Her solely in the tumor's acidic environment provided high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). This led to an improved sensitivity of tumor detection compared to Alexa-Her. In contrast, LT-gated imaging using LTs determined in model systems did not improve tumor-detection sensitivity in vivo for either probe. In conclusion, pH-Her is suitable for sensitive in vivo monitoring of HER2-expressing breast tumors with imaging in the intensity domain and represents a promising tool for detection of weak fluorescent signals deriving from small tumors or metastases.

  13. In situ characterization of antigenic and functional tissue factor expression in human tumors utilizing monoclonal antibodies and recombinant factor VIIa as probes.

    PubMed Central

    Contrino, J.; Hair, G. A.; Schmeizl, M. A.; Rickles, F. R.; Kreutzer, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of blood coagulation in vivo, is expressed in vitro by a variety of cells. Previous efforts to localize TF in tissue and cells have been limited principally to the use of immunological techniques. In the present study, we describe a novel functional probe for TF expression, which can be utilized to localize functional TF in situ in human cells and tissues. This probe, a biotinylated phe-pro-arg-chloro-methyl-ketone-labeled rVIIa (FPR-ck-VIIa), interacts with TF via high-affinity binding sites. The binding of FPR-ck-VIIa, therefore, can be correlated with the ability of TF to activate clotting. In the described studies, TF antigen (TF:Ag) expression was examined immunohistochemically with various TF-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and was correlated with functional TF expression using our novel TF-binding probe (eg, FPR-ck-VIIa). Initial results indicate that TF:Ag expression correlates with the expression of functional TF (TF:VIIa), and the specificity of both types of probes was confirmed. Parallel antigenic and functional TF expression in situ was demonstrated in various human tumors. We believe this to be the first demonstration of functional TF in situ in human cells and tissues. We suggest that FPR-ck-VIIa should prove a useful reagent for studying the role of TF in the pathogenesis of clotting complications of human disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7992837

  14. Evaluation of 6-([18F] fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoic-anilide (18F-FAHA) as imaging probe in tumor xenograft mice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fiona; Cho, Sung Ju; Yu, Lihai; Hudson, Robert H. E.; Luyt, Leonard G.; Pin, Christopher L.; Kovacs, Michael S.; Koropatnick, James; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-03-01

    Alteration in genetic expression is as important as gene mutation in cancer development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes affect gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. Histone deacetylase (HDAC), an enzyme facilitating histone remodelling, can lead to silencing of tumor suppressor genes making HDAC inhibitors viable anticancer drugs against tumors with increased activity of the enzyme. In this study we evaluated 18F-fluroacetamido-1-hexanoicanilide (18F-FAHA), an artificial HDAC substrate, as imaging probe of HDAC activity of human tumor xenografts in immunocompromised host mice. Human breast and melanoma cell lines, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-435 respectively, known to overexpress HDAC activity were xenografted into immunocompromised mice and HDAC activity was imaged using 18F-FAHA. The melanoma group was treated with saline, SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, an approved anticancer HDAC inhibitor) in DMSO, or DMSO as positive control. Tracer kinetic modelling and SUV were used to estimate HDAC activity from dynamic PET data. Both breast tumor and melanoma group showed great variability in binding rate constant (BRC) of 18F-FAHA suggesting highly variable inter- and intra-tumoral HDAC activity. For the SAHA treated melanoma group, HDAC activity, as monitored by BRC of 18F-FAHA, decreased more than the two (positive and negative) control groups but not tumor growth. Our preliminary study showed that noninvasive PET imaging with 18F-FAHA has the potential to identify patients for whom treatment with HDAC inhibitors are appropriate, to assess the effectiveness of that treatment as an early marker of target reduction, and also eliminate the need for invasive tissue biopsy to individualize treatment.

  15. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  16. Study of normal/tumorous tissue fluorescence using a pH-dependent fluorescent probe in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Maunoury, Vincent; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Abbas, Y.; Coustaut, Denise

    1992-04-01

    The pH of interstitial fluid of malignant tumors tends to be lower than that of normal tissue and depressed by glucose administration. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of dual-wavelength ratio fluorometry using a pH-dependent indicator (5,6-carboxyfluorescein: 5,6-CF) for the characterization of normal and tumoral areas in vivo. 5,6-CF has two main characteristics: it has two wavelengths of maximum absorbance (465 and 490 nm) and its fluorescence emission (maximum at 515 nm) increases as a function of pH in the physiological 6 - 7.4 pH range. The experimental study was performed on 31 CDF mice bearing lymphoid leukaemia P388 grafted subcutaneously. The tissular pH values were evaluated from the ratio of the fluorescence intensities (I490/I465) on the basis of a calibration curve linking pH measurements performed intratissularly with a microelectrode and fluorescence intensities ratio values. The fluorescence intensity reached its maximum value at 60 min after 5,6-CF and glucose administration, followed by a plateau (90 min). The ratios remain constant at 1.79 +/- 0.06 for normal tissue and 1.61 +/- 0.07 (without glucose administration) for tumoral tissue. The tumoral tissue ratios decrease down to 1.35 +/- 0.04 after 6 g/kg glucose administration. These results were correlated to the pH measurements in accordance to the calibration curve. This study validates the relevance of dual-wavelength fluorometry using a pH-dependent indicator to characterize in-vivo normal and tumoral tissues after glucose administration.

  17. 3D Cell-SELEX: Development of RNA aptamers as molecular probes for PC-3 tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Souza, Aline G; Marangoni, Karina; Fujimura, Patrícia T; Alves, Patrícia T; Silva, Márcio J; Bastos, Victor Alexandre F; Goulart, Luiz R; Goulart, Vivian A

    2016-02-15

    Human prostate cancer (PCa) is a highly heterogeneous and multifactorial disease. Current clinical biomarkers are not sufficiently accurate, thus being unable to predict the clinical outcome. Therefore, searching for new biomarkers aiming to improve diagnosis, prognosis and therapy is still required. In this study, we performed 3D Cell-SELEX against PC-3 prostate cancer cell line, a novel strategy to select specific nucleic acid ligands against spheroid cells in 3D cell culture. This original system combines Cell-SELEX, a process that exploits the cellular structure to generate specific ligands, and 3D cell culture, an approach that mimics the tissue microenvironment in vitro. In the first round of 3D Cell-SELEX, a negative selection against RWPE-1, non-tumor cell line, was performed to subtract non-tumor specific aptamers. The supernatant was used in eight additional rounds of selection, which were performed against PC-3 cell line. After nine selection cycles, eight PC-3 specific RNA aptamers were selected and sequenced. The aptamers presented sizes between 20 and 50 nucleotides-long, with low free energy (∆G<-13.6), which contributed for their spontaneous folding and high stability. Furthermore, our results showed the aptamer A4 as a specific ligand to prostate tumor cells, with dissociation constant in the nanomolar scale. Therefore, the novel 3D Cell-SELEX procedure improved the selection of PCa cell-surface ligands and the aptamer A4 has shown potential for the identification of prostate tumor cells, suggesting the application of this molecule in further screening assays for PCa. PMID:26821206

  18. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Wanming; Yuan, Dezheng; Song, Jindan; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The large external antigen (LEA) is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605) conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05), indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of the cell lines, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. The results of this study indicate that QD-ICC has the potential to noninvasively detect rare circulating tumor cells in clinical samples in real clinical applications. PMID:26834472

  19. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Wanming; Yuan, Dezheng; Song, Jindan; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The large external antigen (LEA) is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605) conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05), indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of the cell lines, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. The results of this study indicate that QD-ICC has the potential to noninvasively detect rare circulating tumor cells in clinical samples in real clinical applications. PMID:26834472

  20. Trimodal color-fluorescence-polarization endoscopy aided by a tumor selective molecular probe accurately detects flat lesions in colitis-associated cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charanya, Tauseef; York, Timothy; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Garcia, Missael; Akers, Walter J.; Rubin, Deborah; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) arises from premalignant flat lesions of the colon, which are difficult to detect with current endoscopic screening approaches. We have developed a complementary fluorescence and polarization reporting strategy that combines the unique biochemical and physical properties of dysplasia and cancer for real-time detection of these lesions. Using azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) treated mice, which recapitulates human CAC and dysplasia, we show that an octapeptide labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye selectively identified all precancerous and cancerous lesions. A new thermoresponsive sol-gel formulation allowed topical application of the molecular probe during endoscopy. This method yielded high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between adenomatous tumors (20.6±1.65) and flat lesions (12.1±1.03) and surrounding uninvolved colon tissue versus CNR of inflamed tissues (1.62±0.41). Incorporation of nanowire-filtered polarization imaging into NIR fluorescence endoscopy shows a high depolarization contrast in both adenomatous tumors and flat lesions in CAC, reflecting compromised structural integrity of these tissues. Together, the real-time polarization imaging provides real-time validation of suspicious colon tissue highlighted by molecular fluorescence endoscopy.

  1. Trimodal color-fluorescence-polarization endoscopy aided by a tumor selective molecular probe accurately detects flat lesions in colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charanya, Tauseef; York, Timothy; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Garcia, Missael; Akers, Walter J.; Rubin, Deborah; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) arises from premalignant flat lesions of the colon, which are difficult to detect with current endoscopic screening approaches. We have developed a complementary fluorescence and polarization reporting strategy that combines the unique biochemical and physical properties of dysplasia and cancer for real-time detection of these lesions. Using azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) treated mice, which recapitulates human CAC and dysplasia, we show that an octapeptide labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye selectively identified all precancerous and cancerous lesions. A new thermoresponsive sol-gel formulation allowed topical application of the molecular probe during endoscopy. This method yielded high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between adenomatous tumors (20.6±1.65) and flat lesions (12.1±1.03) and surrounding uninvolved colon tissue versus CNR of inflamed tissues (1.62±0.41). Incorporation of nanowire-filtered polarization imaging into NIR fluorescence endoscopy shows a high depolarization contrast in both adenomatous tumors and flat lesions in CAC, reflecting compromised structural integrity of these tissues. Together, the real-time polarization imaging provides real-time validation of suspicious colon tissue highlighted by molecular fluorescence endoscopy. PMID:25473883

  2. Quality analysis of in vivo near-infrared fluorescence and conventional gamma images acquired using a dual-labeled tumor-targeting probe.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jessica P; Ke, Shi; Wang, Wei; Li, Chun; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic peptide, cyclopentapeptide cyclo(lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-phe) (c(KRGDf)), which is known to target alpha(v)beta3 integrin, is dual-labeled with a radiotracer, (111)indium, for gamma scintigraphy as well as with a near-infrared dye, IRDye800, for continuous-wave (cw) imaging of alpha(v)beta3 positive human M21 melanoma in xenografts. Twenty-four hours after administration of the dual-labeled peptide at a dose equivalent to 90 microCi of (111)In and 5 nmol of near-infrared (NIR) dye, whole-body gamma scintigraphy and cw imaging was conducted. Image acquisition time was 15 min for the gamma scintigraphy images and 800 ms for the optical images acquired using an NIR sensitive intensified charge-coupled device. The results show that while the target-to-background ratio (TBR) of nuclear and optical imaging were similar for surface regions of interest and consistent with the origin of gamma and NIR radiation from a common targeted peptide, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was significantly higher for optical than nuclear imaging. Furthermore, an analysis of SNR versus contrast showed greater sensitivity of optical over nuclear imaging for the subcutaneous tumor targets. While tomographic reconstructions are necessary to probe TBR, SNR, and contrast for interior tissues, this work demonstrates for the first time the direct comparison of molecular optical and planar nuclear imaging for surface and subsurface cancers. PMID:16292970

  3. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  4. Preclinical Evaluation of a Potential GSH Ester Based PET/SPECT Imaging Probe DT(GSHMe)2 to Detect Gamma Glutamyl Transferase Over Expressing Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Harleen; Meena, Virendra Kumar; Prakash, Surbhi; Chuttani, Krishna; Chadha, Nidhi; Jaswal, Ambika; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Hazari, Puja Panwar

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is an important biomarker in malignant cancers. The redox processes ensuing from GGT-mediated metabolism of extracellular GSH are implicated in critical aspects of tumor cell biology. Reportedly, Glutathione monoethyl ester (GSHMe) is a substrate of GGT, which has been used for its rapid transport over glutathione. Exploring GGT to be an important target, a homobivalent peptide system, DT(GSHMe)2 was designed to target GGT-over expressing tumors for diagnostic purposes. DT(GSHMe)2 was synthesized, characterized and preclinically evaluated in vitro using toxicity, cell binding assays and time dependent experiments. Stable and defined radiochemistry with 99mTc and 68Ga was optimized for high radiochemical yield. In vivo biodistribution studies were conducted for different time points along with scintigraphic studies of radiolabeled DT(GSHMe)2 on xenografted tumor models. For further validation, in silico docking studies were performed on GGT (hGGT1, P19440). Preclinical in vitro evaluations on cell lines suggested minimal toxicity of DT(GSHMe)2 at 100 μM concentration. Kinetic analysis revealed transport of 99mTc-DT(GSHMe)2 occurs via a saturable high-affinity carrier with Michaelis constant (Km) of 2.25 μM and maximal transport rate velocity (Vmax) of 0.478 μM/min. Quantitative estimation of GGT expression from western blot experiments showed substantial expression with 41.6 ± 7.07 % IDV for tumor. Small animal micro PET (Positron Emission Tomography)/CT(Computed Tomography) coregistered images depicted significantly high uptake of DT(GSHMe)2 at the BMG-1 tumor site. ROI analysis showed high tumor to contra lateral muscle ratio of 9.33 in PET imaging studies. Avid accumulation of radiotracer was observed at tumor versus inflammation site at 2 h post i.v. injection in an Ehrlich Ascites tumor (EAT) mice model, showing evident specificity for tumor. We propose DT(GSHMe)2 to be an excellent candidate for prognostication and tumor

  5. A Comparative pO2 Probe and [18F]-Fluoro-Azomycinarabino-Furanoside ([18F]FAZA) PET Study Reveals Anesthesia-Induced Impairment of Oxygenation and Perfusion in Tumor and Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mahling, Moritz; Fuchs, Kerstin; Thaiss, Wolfgang M.; Maier, Florian C.; Feger, Martina; Bukala, Daniel; Harant, Maren; Eichner, Martin; Reutershan, Jörg; Lang, Florian; Reischl, Gerald; Pichler, Bernd J.; Kneilling, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia can be identified by [18F]FAZA positron emission tomography, or invasively using oxygen probes. The impact of anesthetics on tumor hypoxia remains controversial. The aim of this comprehensive study was to investigate the impact of isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine anesthesia on [18F]FAZA uptake and partial oxygen pressure (pO2) in carcinoma and muscle tissue of air- and oxygen-breathing mice. Methods CT26 colon carcinoma-bearing mice were anesthetized with isoflurane (IF) or ketamine/xylazine (KX) while breathing air or oxygen (O2). We performed 10 min static PET scans 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after [18F]FAZA injection and calculated the [18F]FAZA-uptake and tumor-to-muscle ratios (T/M). In another experimental group, we placed a pO2 probe in the tumor as well as in the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the pO2 and perfusion. Results Ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice yielded up to 3.5-fold higher T/M-ratios compared to their isoflurane-anesthetized littermates 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after [18F]FAZA injection regardless of whether the mice breathed air or oxygen (3 h, KX-air: 7.1 vs. IF-air: 1.8, p = 0.0001, KX-O2: 4.4 vs. IF-O2: 1.4, p < 0.0001). The enhanced T/M-ratios in ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice were mainly caused by an increased [18F]FAZA uptake in the carcinomas. Invasive pO2 probe measurements yielded enhanced intra-tumoral pO2 values in air- and oxygen-breathing ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice compared to isoflurane-anesthetized mice (KX-air: 1.01 mmHg, IF-air: 0.45 mmHg; KX-O2 9.73 mmHg, IF-O2: 6.25 mmHg). Muscle oxygenation was significantly higher in air-breathing isoflurane-anesthetized (56.9 mmHg) than in ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice (33.8 mmHg, p = 0.0003). Conclusion [18F]FAZA tumor uptake was highest in ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice regardless of whether the mice breathed air or oxygen. The generally lower [18F]FAZA whole-body uptake in isoflurane-anesthetized mice could be due to the higher muscle pO2-values in these mice

  6. Probing tumor-stroma interactions and response to photodynamic therapy in a 3D pancreatic cancer-fibroblast co-culture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glidden, Michael D.; Massodi, Iqbal; Rizvi, Imran; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal disease that is often unresectable by the time of diagnosis and is typically non-responsive to chemo- and radiotherapy, resulting in a five year survival of only 3%. Tumors of the pancreas are characterized by a dense fibrous stroma rich in extracellular matrix proteins, which is implicated in poor therapeutic response, though its precise roles remain poorly understood. Indeed, while the use of therapeutics that target the stroma is an emerging paradigm in the clinical management of this disease, the primary focus of such efforts is to enhance drug penetration through dense fibrous stroma and it is unclear to what extent the characteristically rigid stroma of pancreatic tumors imparts drug resistance by acting as a complex signaling partner, or merely as a physical barrier for drug delivery. Here we use 3D in vitro co-cultures of pancreatic cancer cells and normal human fibroblasts as a model system to study heterotypic interactions between these populations. Leveraging this in vitro model along with image-based methods for quantification of growth and therapeutic endpoints, we characterize these co-cultures and examine the role of verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting tumor-fibroblast interactions in pancreatic tumors.

  7. Toehold enabling stem-loop inspired hemiduplex probe with enhanced sensitivity and sequence-specific detection of tumor DNA in serum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Siqi; Zhang, Yulin; Tang, Lina; Jin, Dan; Ning, Yong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-15

    The sensitivity of structure-switchable electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensors is generally limited by the irremovable redox labels that are close to or distant from the sensing interface. To address this issue, we design a semiduplex probe inspired by the stem-loop structure, in which the "nicked loop" domain can serve as toehold to mediate a target-responsive strand-displacement reaction. Such a reaction can fundamentally eliminate the post-responsive background current that arises from the irremovable probe, and thus improve the sensitivity. This novel toehold E-DNA (tE-DNA) sensor is able to achieve a detection limit as low as 0.2pM, which is lower than that of the classic stem-loop structured sensor by two orders of magnitude. Moreover, the toehold domain endows the sensor an excellent selectivity against a single-base mismatched sequence and high binding kinetics. By combining this heterogeneous surface-based dynamic self-assembly design with a homogeneous enzyme amplification strategy, the sensitivity can be further improved by three orders of magnitude to sub-femtomolar level. Additionally, this unique biosensor presents reliable reusability, and is capable of probing low abundance of target DNA directly in complex matrices, such as human serum, with minimal interference. These advantages make our tE-DNA sensor a promising contender in the E-DNA sensor family for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27040528

  8. Probing single-tumor cell interactions with different-age type I collagen networks by synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Marie; Eklouh-Molinier, Christophe; Wehbe, Katia; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Yang, Ying; Cinque, Gianfelice; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D

    2014-01-01

    We report here on a first study using synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and imaging to investigate HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells grown onto different-aged type I collagen networks. Spectral images were analyzed with k-means and fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering algorithms. K-means delineated tumor cells from their surrounding collagen networks and the latter as a function of age mainly due to specific changes in the sugar absorption region. The FCM analysis gave a better nuance of the spectral images. A progression of the biochemical information was observed upon going from the cellular compartments to the pericellular contact regions and to the intact collagens of the different age groups. Two spectral markers based on sugar and protein bands via the intensity ratio (I1032/I1655) and band area ratio (Asugar/Aamide II), showed an increase in advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) with age. A clear-separation of the three age groups was obtained for spectra originating from the peripheral contact areas mainly due to changes in protein band intensities. The above-described markers decreased to constant levels for the three conditions indicating a masking of the biochemical information. These results hold promises to better understand the impact of age on tumor progression processes while highlighting new markers of the tumor cell invasion front. PMID:25193972

  9. Synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of SiFA-tagged bombesin and RGD peptides as tumor imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Simon; Michler, Christina; Leidner, Stephanie; Rensch, Christian; Wängler, Carmen; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Bartenstein, Peter; Wängler, Björn

    2014-04-16

    Gastrin-releasing-peptide (GRP)-receptors and αvβ3-integrins are widely discussed as potential target structures for oncological imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Favored by the overexpression of receptors on the surface of tumor cells good imaging characteristics can be achieved with highly specific radiolabeled receptor ligands. PEGylated bombesin (PESIN) derivatives as specific GRP receptor ligands and RGD (one-letter codes for arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) peptides as specific αvβ3 binders were synthesized and tagged with a silicon-fluorine-acceptor (SiFA) moiety. The SiFA synthon allows for a fast and highly efficient isotopic exchange reaction at room temperature giving the [(18)F]fluoride labeled peptides in up to 62% radiochemical yields (d.c.) and ≥99% radiochemical purity in a total synthesis time of less than 20 min. Using nanomolar quantities of precursor high specific activities of up to 60 GBq μmol(-1) were obtained. To compensate the high lipophilicity of the SiFA moiety various hydrophilic structure modifications were introduced leading to significantly reduced logD values. Competitive displacement experiments with the PESIN derivatives showed a 32 to 6 nM affinity to the GRP receptor on PC3 cells, and with the RGD peptides a 7 to 3 μM affinity to the αvβ3 integrins on U87MG cells. All derivatives proved to be stable in human plasma over at least 120 min. Small animal PET measurements and biodistribution studies revealed an enhanced and specific accumulation of the RGD peptide (18)F-SiFA-LysMe3-γ-carboxy-d-Glu-RGD (17) in the tumor tissue of U87MG tumor-bearing mice of 5.3% ID/g whereas the PESIN derivatives showed a high liver uptake and only a low accumulation in the tumor tissue of PC3 xenografts. Stability studies with compound 17 provided further information on its metabolism in vivo. These results altogether demonstrate that the reduction of the overall lipophilicity of SiFA tagged RGD peptides is a promising

  10. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  11. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  12. Synthesis of AS1411-aptamer-conjugated CdTe quantum dots with high fluorescence strength for probe labeling tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Alibolandi, Mona; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Hadizadeh, Farzin

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report microwave-assisted, one-stage synthesis of high-quality functionalized water-soluble cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs). By selecting sodium tellurite as the Te source, cadmium chloride as the Cd source, mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) as the capping agent, and a borate-acetic acid buffer solution with a pH range of 5-8, CdTe nanocrystals with four colors (blue to orange) were conveniently prepared at 100 °C under microwave irradiation in less than one hour (reaction time: 10-60 min). The influence of parameters such as the pH, Cd:Te molar ratio, and reaction time on the emission range and quantum yield percentage (QY%) was investigated. The structures and compositions of the prepared CdTe QDs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selective area electron diffraction, and X-ray powder diffraction experiments. The formation mechanism of the QDs is discussed in this paper. Furthermore, AS1141-aptamer-conjugated CdTe QDs in the U87MG glioblastoma cell line were assessed with a fluorescence microscope. The obtained results showed that the best conditions for obtaining a high QY of approximately 87% are a pH of 6, a Cd:Te molar ratio of 5:1, and a 30-min reaction time at 100 °C under microwave irradiation. The results showed that AS1141-aptamer-conjugated CdTe QDs could enter tumor cells efficiently. It could be concluded that a facile high-fluorescence-strength QD conjugated with a DNA aptamer, AS1411, which can recognize the extracellular matrix protein nucleolin, can specifically target U87MG human glioblastoma cells. The qualified AS1411-aptamer-conjugated QDs prepared in this study showed excellent capabilities as nanoprobes for cancer targeting and molecular imaging. PMID:25172439

  13. NASA SMART Probe: Breast Cancer Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is evidence in breast cancer and other malignancies that the physiologic environment within a tumor correlates with clinical outcome. We are developing a unique percutaneous Smart Probe to be used at the time of needle biopsy of the breast. The Smart Probe will simultaneously measure multiple physiologic parameters within a breast tumor. Direct and indirect measurements of tissue oxygen levels, blood flow, pH, and tissue fluid pressure will be analyzed in real-time. These parameters will be interpreted individually and collectively by innovative neural network techniques using advanced intelligent software. The goals are 1) develop a pecutaneous Smart Probe with multiple sensor modalities and applying advanced Information Technologies to provide real time diagnostic information of the tissue at tip of the probe, 2) test the percutaneous Smart Probe in women with benign and malignant breast masses who will be undergoing surgical biopsy, 3) correlate probe sensor data with benign and malignant status of breast masses, 4) determine whether the probe can detect physiologic differences within a breast tumor, and its margins, and in adjacent normal breast tissue, 5) correlate probe sensor data with known prognostic factors for breast caner, including tumor size, tumor grade, axillary lymph node metastases, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status.

  14. High Efficiency Diffusion Molecular Retention Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanyan; Yuan, Hushan; Cho, Hoonsung; Kuruppu, Darshini; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Agarwal, Aayush; Shah, Khalid; Josephson, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR) tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT) injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding) and RAD (control) probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for 111 In3+), a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or IV methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [111In] RGD and [111In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [111In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by IV). The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide), which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters) for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light. PMID:23505478

  15. Multifunctional imaging probe based on gadofulleride nanoplatform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun-Peng; Liu, Qiao-Ling; Zhen, Ming-Ming; Jiang, Feng; Shu, Chun-Ying; Jin, Chan; Yang, Yongji; Alhadlaq, Hisham A.; Wang, Chun-Ru

    2012-05-01

    A FAR over-expressed tumor targeting multifunctional imaging probe has been fabricated based on gadofulleride nanoplatform. The combination of highly efficient MRI contrast enhancement and sensitive fluorescence imaging along with the preferential uptake toward FAR tumor cells suggest that the obtained multifunctional imaging probe possesses complementary capabilities for anatomical resolution and detection sensitivity.A FAR over-expressed tumor targeting multifunctional imaging probe has been fabricated based on gadofulleride nanoplatform. The combination of highly efficient MRI contrast enhancement and sensitive fluorescence imaging along with the preferential uptake toward FAR tumor cells suggest that the obtained multifunctional imaging probe possesses complementary capabilities for anatomical resolution and detection sensitivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, instruments and methods, synthesis details, XPS characterization for estimation of average molecular formula, evaluation of conjugated FA and FITC ratio, zeta potential and fluorescent images. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30836c

  16. The cluster compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} containing Mo{sub 14} clusters and the new mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters: Synthesis, crystal structure, and electrical and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, Philippe; Guizouarn, Thierry; Gougeon, Patrick

    2015-07-15

    Single crystals of the new quaternary compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} were obtained by solid state reaction. The crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with unit-cell parameters a=9.4432(14) Å, b=11.4828(12) Å, c=20.299(4) Å and Z=4. Full-matrix least-squares refinement on F{sup 2} using 3807 independent reflections for 219 refinable parameters resulted in R{sub 1}=0.0259 and wR{sub 2}=0.0591. The crystal structure contains in addition to Mo{sub 14} clusters the first examples of mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 14} i.e. Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters. The oxygen framework derives from a stacking along the a direction of close-packed layers with sequence (…ABAC…). The Mo–Mo distances range between 2.6938(5) and 2.8420(6) Å and the Mo–O distances between 1.879(5) and 2.250(3) Å, as usually observed in molybdenum oxide clusters. The indium atoms form In{sub 4}{sup 6+} bent chains with In–In distances of 2.6682(5) and 2.6622(8) Å and the Ti atoms are in highly distorted octahedral sites of oxygen atoms with Ti–O distances ranging between 1.865(4) and 2.161(4) Å. Magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the presence of Ti{sup 4+} cations and the absence of localized moments on the Mo network. Electrical resistivity measurements on a single crystal of In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} show a semimetallic behavior. - Graphical abstract: We present here the synthesis, the crystal structure, and the electrical and magnetic properties of the new compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} in which Mo{sub 14} clusters coexist statistically with mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 14} that is Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters. - Highlights: • Single crystals of In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} were obtained by solid state

  17. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  18. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  19. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  20. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  2. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  3. NASA Smart Surgical Probe Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Andrews, Russell J.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Guerrero, Michael; Papasin, Richard; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Information Technologies being developed by NASA to assist astronaut-physician in responding to medical emergencies during long space flights are being employed for the improvement of women's health in the form of "smart surgical probe". This technology, initially developed for neurosurgery applications, not only has enormous potential for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, but broad applicability to a wide range of medical challenges. For the breast cancer application, the smart surgical probe is being designed to "see" a suspicious lump, determine by its features if it is cancerous, and ultimately predict how the disease may progress. A revolutionary early breast cancer detection tool based on this technology has been developed by a commercial company and is being tested in human clinical trials at the University of California at Davis, School of Medicine. The smart surgical probe technology makes use of adaptive intelligent software (hybrid neural networks/fuzzy logic algorithms) with the most advanced physiologic sensors to provide real-time in vivo tissue characterization for the detection, diagnosis and treatment of tumors, including determination of tumor microenvironment and evaluation of tumor margins. The software solutions and tools from these medical applications will lead to the development of better real-time minimally-invasive smart surgical probes for emergency medical care and treatment of astronauts on long space flights.

  4. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  5. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  6. Brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Black, K. L.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Becker, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental tumor biology are being applied to critical clinical problems of primary brain tumors. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, which are sparse in normal brain, is increased as much as 20-fold in brain tumors. Experimental studies show promise in using labeled ligands to these receptors to identify the outer margins of malignant brain tumors. Whereas positron emission tomography has improved the dynamic understanding of tumors, the labeled selective tumor receptors with positron emitters will enhance the ability to specifically diagnose and greatly aid in the pretreatment planning for tumors. Modulation of these receptors will also affect tumor growth and metabolism. Novel methods to deliver antitumor agents to the brain and new approaches using biologic response modifiers also hold promise to further improve the management of brain tumors. Images PMID:1848735

  7. Tumor Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma is also known as a schwannoma, vestibular schwannoma, or neurilemmoma. Characteristics Arises from cells that ... multiple CNS tumors, including neurofibromas, multiple meningiomas, bilateral vestibular schwannomas, optic nerve gliomas, and spinal cord tumors. ...

  8. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  9. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by photoimmunotherapy targeting tumor-associated macrophage in a sorafenib-resistant tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Liquan; Cai, Yuehong; Liu, Hao; Gao, Duo; Lai, Jianhao; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor invasion and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. Clinical evidence suggests that TAM levels are correlated with local tumor relapse, distant metastasis, and poor prognosis in patients. In this study, we synthesized a TAM-targeted probe (IRD-αCD206) by conjugating a monoclonal anti-CD206 antibody with a near-infrared phthalocyanine dye. We then investigated the potential application of the IRD-αCD206 probe to near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of tumors resistant to treatment with the kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment had no effect on tumor growth in a 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer, but induced M2 macrophage polarization in tumors. M2 macrophage recruitment by sorafenib-treated 4T1 tumors was noninvasively visualized by in vivo NIRF imaging of IRD-αCD206. Small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and intratumoral microdistribution analysis indicated TAM-specific localization of the IRD-αCD206 probe in 4T1 tumors after several rounds of sorafenib treatment. Upon light irradiation, IRD-αCD206 suppressed the growth of sorafenib-resistant tumors. In vivo CT imaging and ex vivo histological analysis confirmed the inhibition of lung metastasis in mice by IRD-αCD206 PIT. These results demonstrate the utility of the IRD-αCD206 probe for TAM-targeted diagnostic imaging and treatment of tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutics. PMID:26803407

  11. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  12. Targeting the expression of integrin receptors in tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Sharon; Liang, Kexian; Dorshow, Richard B.; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel I.

    2004-06-01

    Expression of integrin αvβ3 is upregulated in a number of cancers including colon, pancreas, lung and breast. Additionally, αvβ3 integrin expression has been linked to tumor metastasis and targeting this cell surface protein could provide a viable approach to image and evaluate the metastatic potential of tumors. Accordingly, we evaluated the selective retention of some near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes in nude mice bearing A549 lung cancer xenograft that express αvβ3 integrin. Our preliminary results indicate that a novel NIR probe designed to target this integrin selectively accumulated in A549 tumor while other non-integrin specific probes were not retained in the tumor. Blocking studies show that tumor uptake of the probe is mediated by αvβ3 integrin receptor.

  13. Pindborg tumor

    PubMed Central

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  14. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  15. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  17. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis, and the condition, or histology , of the cancer cells when observed under a microscope. "Favorable" histology is associated with a good chance of a cure; tumors with "unfavorable" histology are more aggressive and ...

  18. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  19. Wilms tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this tumor in most children is unknown. A missing iris of the eye (aniridia) is a birth ... Nausea Swelling in the abdomen (abdominal hernia or mass) Vomiting Exams and Tests The doctor or nurse ...

  20. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the brain to reduce spinal fluid pressure. Risks of radiation therapy include damage to healthy brain cells when tumor cells are destroyed. Common side effects from chemotherapy include loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue.

  1. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or malignant, with cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain ... targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Many people get ...

  2. Monoclonals and DNA probes in diagnostic and preventative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Della Povta, G.; Albertini, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Use of DNA Probes for Prenatal and Carrier Diagnosis of Hemophilia and Fragile X Mental Retardation; The Application of DNA Probes to Diagnosis and Research of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Clinical Trial, New Probes and Deletion Mapping; Molecular Genetics of the Human Collagens; Molecular Genetics of Human Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Genes; Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA and Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA: Implications in Diagnosis and Pathogenesis; and DNA Probes to Evaluate the Possible Association of Papovaviruses with Human Tumors.

  3. Targeting tumor acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main features of solid tumors is extracellular acidity, which correlates with tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. We introduced novel approach in targeting of acidic tumors, and translocation of cell-impermeable cargo molecules across cellular membrane. Our approach is based on main principle of insertion and folding of a polypeptide in lipid bilayer of membrane. We have identified family of pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs), which are capable spontaneous insertion and folding in membrane at mild acidic conditions. The affinity of peptides of pHLIP family to membrane at low pH is several times higher than at neutral pH. The process of peptides folding occurs within milliseconds. The energy released in a result of folding (about 2 kcal/mol) could be used to move polar cargo across a membrane, which is a novel concept in drug delivery. pHLIP peptides could be considered as a pH-sensitive single peptide molecular transporters and conjugated with imaging probes for fluorescence, MR, PET and SPECT imaging, they represent a novel in vivo marker of acidity. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 and GM073857 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  4. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  5. Image-guided surgery using multimodality strategy and molecular probes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Hubei

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer surgery is to maximize the excision of tumorous tissue with minimal damage to the collateral normal tissues, reduce the postoperative recurrence, and improve the survival rate of patients. In order to locate tumor lesions, highlight tumor margins, visualize residual disease in the surgical wound, and map potential lymph node metastasis, various imaging techniques and molecular probes have been investigated to assist surgeons to perform more complete tumor resection. Combining imaging techniques with molecular probes is particularly promising as a new approach for image-guided surgery. Considering inherent limitations of different imaging techniques and insufficient sensitivity of nonspecific molecular probes, image-guided surgery with multimodality strategy and specific molecular probes appears to be an optimal choice. In this article, we briefly describe typical imaging techniques and molecular probes followed by a focused review on the current progress of multimodal image-guided surgery with specific molecular navigation. We also discuss optimal strategy that covers all stages of image-guided surgery including preoperative scanning of tumors, intraoperative inspection of surgical bed and postoperative care of patients. PMID:26053199

  6. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model.

    PubMed

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO2 in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10Gy×2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:23831468

  7. [Craniosinusonasal tumors].

    PubMed

    Blagoveshchenskaia, N S; Egorova, V K

    1997-01-01

    Tumors extending into the nasal cavity, cranium, and paranasal sinuses have a number of distinctive features to take into consideration. Among them are the communication with an open air, high incidence of associated intracranial infections, specific complications (i.e. suppurative sinusitis, polyps, mucocele, pneumocephalus, nasal CSF leak). The features mentioned make these lesions unique. 50 consecutive patients underwent treatment in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. The diagnosis was confirmed either by CT, MRI, or at operation. Rhinological and otoneurological signs were also subjected to analysis. Most frequently these tumors (the majority of which were meningiomas (n = 34) extended into the nasal cavity (40 patients) and paranasal sinuses (n = 50). It was noted that the clinical signs vary depending on the histological type of tumor, its location and direction of growth (i.e. medial or lateral). Medially growing tumors usually involved 2-4 sinuses, while laterally growing tumors involved only one sinus. Among the symptoms, disturbances of smell, conductive hearing impairment, deformation of both the soft and hard palate, slowing of the experimental nystagmus due to disturbed extraocular movements. Some light is shed on the differential diagnosis, indications for various surgical approaches (transcranial, transnasal, and facial). The results of surgical treatment and postoperative complications are presented in the paper. The diagnosis and treatment of such patients require an interdisciplinary approach while would involve a team of a neurosurgeon, neuroradiologist, otoneurologist, and a neuro-ophthalmologist. PMID:9424946

  8. Heat pipe cooled probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J. (Inventor); Couch, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The basic heat pipe principle is employed to provide a self-contained passively cooled probe that may be placed into a high temperature environment. The probe consists of an evaporator region of a heat pipe and a sensing instrument. Heat is absorbed as the working fluid evaporates in the probe. The vapor is transported to the vapor space of the condenser region. Heat is dissipated from the condenser region and fins causing condensation of the working fluid, which returns to the probe by gravity and the capillary action of the wick. Working fluid, wick and condenser configurations and structure materials can be selected to maintain the probe within an acceptable temperature range.

  9. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  10. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  11. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  12. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  13. [Thymic tumors].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Mahé, M; Bretel, J-J; Roberti, E; Ruffié, P

    2005-11-01

    Thymomas and thymic carcinomas are rare and slow-growing tumors, which develop within the anterior mediastinum. Thymomas are often associated with autoimmune disorders and most particularly myasthenia gravis. The treatment of choice remains a complete surgical resection. Postoperative radiotherapy is often combined in case of invasive thymoma invading into adjacent organs. Postoperative radiotherapy in stage II with invasion into capsule has been more controversial lately. In inoperable locally advanced, or metastatic thymic tumors, neoadjuvant cisplatin-based followed by surgery and radiotherapy has given interesting results in the past years. PMID:16168694

  14. The NASA Smart Probe Project for real-time multiple microsensor tissue recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.; Mah, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Remote surgery requires automated sensors, effectors and sensor-effector communication. The NASA Smart Probe Project has focused on the sensor aspect. METHODS: The NASA Smart Probe uses neural networks and data from multiple microsensors for a unique tissue signature in real time. Animal and human trials use several probe configurations: (1) 8-microsensor probe (2.5 mm in diameter) for rodent studies (normal and subcutaneous mammary tumor tissues), and (2) 21-gauge needle probe with 3 spectroscopic fibers and an impedance microelectrode for breast cancer diagnosis in humans. Multisensor data are collected in real time (update 100 times/s) using PCs. RESULTS: Human data (collected by NASA licensee BioLuminate) from 15 women undergoing breast biopsy distinguished normal tissue from both benign tumors and breast carcinoma. Tumor margins and necrosis are rapidly detected. CONCLUSION: Real-time tissue identification is achievable. Potential applications, including probes incorporating nanoelectrode arrays, are presented. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  16. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  17. Investigation of a MMP-2 Activity-Dependent Anchoring Probe for Nuclear Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Temma, Takashi; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Yonezawa, Aki; Kondo, Naoya; Sano, Kohei; Sakamoto, Takeharu; Seiki, Motoharu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Since matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an important marker of tumor malignancy, we developed an original drug design strategy, MMP-2 activity dependent anchoring probes (MDAP), for use in MMP-2 activity imaging, and evaluated the usefulness of this probe in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods We designed and synthesized MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000, which consist of 4 independent moieties: RI unit (111In hydrophilic chelate), MMP-2 substrate unit (short peptide), anchoring unit (alkyl chain), and anchoring inhibition unit (polyethylene glycol (PEGn; where n represents the approximate molecular weight, n = 1000, 3000, and 5000). Probe cleavage was evaluated by chromatography after MMP-2 treatment. Cellular uptake of the probes was then measured. Radioactivity accumulation in tumor xenografts was evaluated after intravenous injection of the probes, and probe cleavage was evaluated in tumor homogenates. Results MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000 were cleaved by MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner. MDAP3000 pretreated with MMP-2 showed higher accumulation in tumor cells, and was completely blocked by additional treatment with an MMP inhibitor. MDAP3000 exhibited rapid blood clearance and a high tumor accumulation after intravenous injection in a rodent model. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that MDAP3000 exhibited a considerably slow washout rate from tumors to blood. A certain fraction of cleaved MDAP3000 existed in tumor xenografts in vivo. Conclusions The results indicate the possible usefulness of our MDAP strategy for tumor imaging. PMID:25010662

  18. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... org Tel: 773-577-8750; 800-886-2282 Fax: 847-827-9918 National Brain Tumor Society 55Chapel ... http://www.braintumor.org Tel: 866-455-3214 Fax: 617-924-9998 Pituitary Network Association P.O. ...

  19. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  20. Functional probes for scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio; Akiyama, Kotone; Hamada, Masayuki; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Sakurai, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Inspite of importance of the probe in scanning probe microscopy (SPM), little attention was paid for the SPM probes for most of the measurements of SPM. We developed sharp metal-tip cantilevers with a typical curvature radius better than 5nm using focused ion beam (FIB) suitable for Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM)^1. We obtained atomically resolved KFM images with an energy resolution less than 3meV with the probe^2. We also developed a glass-coated tungsten tip for synchrotron radiation-scanning tunneling microscopy with the FIB method^3 and obtained elementally resolved images in a resolution less than 20nm^4. We are now developing a precise atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography^5 with the FIB-milled tip attached to a quartz tuning fork controlled by noncontact AFM. We will present recent results of our AFM lithography, such as an Au line with a width of 20˜30 nm and characters drawn with Au nano dots on a Si surface. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL 89, 243119 (2006) 5 K. Akiyama et al., JP 61, 22 (2007).

  1. Periodontal probing: a review.

    PubMed

    Al Shayeb, Kwthar Nassar A; Turner, Wendy; Gillam, David G

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal probes are the main instruments that are used to assess the status of the periodontium, either for screening purposes or to evaluate periodontal changes throughout the treatment process. With increased knowledge and understanding of periodontal disease, the probes have evolved from a unidimensional manual shape into a more sophisticated computerised instrument. This is due to the need to increase the accuracy and reproducibility of readings and to improve efficiency (time, effort, money). Each probe has characteristic features that makes it unique and, in some cases, specific and limited to use. The aim of this paper is to present a brief introduction to periodontal disease and the methodology of measuring it, followed by probing limitations. The paper will also discuss the methodology of reducing probing error, examiner calibration and probing reproducibility. PMID:25198634

  2. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  3. Titan Probe navigation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayaraghavan, A.; Wood, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed Cassini mission, a combined Saturn Orbiter/Titan Probe spacecraft will be launched from the Space Shuttle to arrive at Saturn around 2002, by means of a delta-VEGA trajectory. After Saturn-orbit insertion and a pericrone raise maneuver, the probe will be released to enter the Titan atmosphere and impact onto its surface. During its descent phase and impact onto Titan, the probe will maintain radio contact with the orbiter. Since the Titan-probe experimental phase lasts for only about four hours, probe-orbiter geometry and probe-delivery accuracy are critical to successful completion of this part of the mission. From a preliminary navigation analysis for probe delivery accuracy, it seems feasible to deliver the probe within 50 km (1-sigma value) of the desired aim-point in the Titan B-plane. The covariance study, however, clearly indicates the need for optical data, in addition to radio metric data. A Monte Carlo study indicates that a Delta-V capability of 98 m/sec for trajectory correction maneuvers will be sufficient to cover 99 percent of all contingencies during the segment from Saturn-orbit insertion to Titan-probe release.

  4. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  5. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-15

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  6. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-01

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas. PMID:20886976

  7. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  8. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  9. Brain tumor (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  10. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  11. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  12. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumor - metastatic (secondary); Cancer - brain tumor (metastatic) ... For many people with metastatic brain tumors, the cancer is not curable. It will eventually spread to other areas of the body. Prognosis depends on the type of tumor ...

  13. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  14. Magnetically driven filament probe.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Herrmann, A; Rohde, V; Maraschek, M; Müller, H W

    2007-05-01

    A radially movable probe has been developed for studies of filamentary transport in ASDEX Upgrade during edge localized modes (ELMs) by means of Langmuir tips and magnetic pickup coils. The probe is permanently installed at the low field side in the ASDEX Upgrade vacuum vessel and is not subject to limitations in probe size, as, for example, probes on a shared manipulator are. The probe is moved by a magnetic drive, which allows for easy installation in the vessel, and has moderate machine requirements, as it will only require an electric feedthrough and an external power supply. The drive gives a linear motion with a radial range of 5 cm within 50 ms, where range and velocity can be largely scaled according to experimental requirements. The probe has been installed in the outer midplane of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel, where ELM filaments are expected to have their maximum amplitude. Filaments are coherent substructures within an ELM, carrying a fraction of the ELM released energy towards the wall. The new probe allows to measure the structure of these filaments, in particular, parameters such as filament rotation (by time delay measurements) and size (by peak width analysis). Activating the drive moves the probe from a safe position behind the limiter to a position in front of the limiters, i.e., exposes the Langmuir pins to the scrape-off layer plasma. PMID:17552815

  15. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff ... Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning Donate to the ABTA Help advance the understanding ...

  16. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  17. Circumferential pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Fantl, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A probe for measuring circumferential pressure inside a body cavity is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, a urodynamic pressure measurement probe for evaluating human urinary sphincter function is disclosed. Along the length of the probe are disposed a multiplicity of deformable wall sensors which typically comprise support tube sections with flexible side wall areas. These are arranged along the length of the probe in two areas, one just proximal to the tip for the sensing of fluid pressure inside the bladder, and five in the sensing section which is positioned within the urethra at the point at which the urinary sphincter constricts to control the flow of urine. The remainder of the length of the probe comprises multiple rigid support tube sections interspersed with flexible support tube sections in the form of bellows to provide flexibility.

  18. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  19. [Tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Hausamen, J E

    2000-05-01

    Surgery is still the primary therapeutic approach in treatment of tumors in the head and neck area, dating back to the early nineteenth century. More than 150 years ago, hemimaxillectomies and mandibular resections as well as hemiglossectomies were already performed by leading surgeons. The block principle we are now following dates back to Crile, who also established the principle of cervical lymph node dissection. Ablative oncologic surgery has always been closely linked with plastic and reconstructive surgery, rendering radical surgical interventions possible without disfiguring patients. The development of facial reconstructive surgery proceeded in stages, in the first instance as secondary reconstruction using tube pedicled flaps. The change to the concept of primary reconstruction occurred via arterialized skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps to the widely accepted and performed free tissue transfer. Free bone grafting, inaugurated earlier and still representing the majority of bone grafting, has been supplemented for certain reconstructive purposes by free vascularized bone transfer from various donor sites. Although the five-year-survival rate of carcinoma of the oral cavity has remained unchanged in the past 30 years, distinctive improvements in tumor surgery can be recorded. This is primarily based on improved diagnostics such as modern imaging techniques and the refinement of surgical techniques. The DOSAK has worked out distinctive guidelines for effective ablative oncologic surgery. Surgical approaches offering wide exposure and carrying low morbidity play a decisive role in radical resections. For this reason, midfacial degloving offers an essential improvement for the resection of midface tumors, especially from an aesthetic point of view. Tumors situated deep behind the viscerocranium at the skull base can be clearly exposed either through a lateral approach following a temporary osteotomy of the mandibular ramus or a transmandibular, transmaxillar, or

  20. [Desmoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Montagliani, L; Duverger, V

    2008-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are a rare form of malignancy with a great propensity for local extension and recurrence. They typically occur in the abdominal wall or within the abdomen but also may occur extra-abdominally. Most cases are sporadic but traumatic, hormonal, and genetic etiologies have been implicated. The only curative treatment is wide surgical excision, but the risk of local recurrence is high. Several adjuvant or complementary treatments have been proposed and the results show promise; the authors review all these therapies. PMID:18438278

  1. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  2. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  3. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  4. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, George R.; Peter, Frank J.; Butler, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  5. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  6. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  7. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  8. Functional Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Kotone; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Hasegawa, Yukio; Sakurai, Toshio

    2007-03-01

    For superior performance of scanning probe microscopy, we are working to fabricate functional probes. For Kelvin probe force microscopy, we fabricated a metal-tip cantilever by attaching a thin metal wire to a regular Si cantilever and milling it by focused ion beam (FIB)^1. By using the W tip with a curvature radius of 3.5 nm, we obtained the potential profile of Ge/Si(105) surface in atomic resolution with the energy resolution better than 3 meV^2. For synchrotron-radiation-light-irradiated scanning tunneling microscopy which aims at atomically resolved elemental analysis, we fabricated a glass-coated W tip using FIB^3. It is found that the glass coating blocks the unwanted secondary electrons, which come from large area of the sample, by a factor of 40 with respect to the case no coating. Using the tip to detect the electrons emitted just below the tip, we obtained element specific images with a spatial resolution better than 20 nm under the photo irradiation whose energy is just above the adsorption edge of the element^4. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL, in press

  9. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  10. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  11. Detection of disseminated peritoneal tumors by fluorescein diacrylate in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yoshinori; Furuta, Hirokazu; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Dai, Ping; Fujikawa, Yuta; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Morishita, Koki; Hasegawa, Akira; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2009-02-01

    Tumor invasion to the peritoneum is a poor prognostic factor in cancer patients. Accurate diagnosis of disseminated peritoneal tumors is essential to accurate cancer staging. To date, peritoneal washing cytology during laparotomy has been used for diagnosis of peritoneal dissemination of gastrointestinal cancer, but its sensitivity has not been satisfactory. Thus, a more direct approach is indispensable to detect peritoneal dissemination in vivo. Fluorescein diacrylate (FDAcr) is an esterase-sensitive fluorescent probe derived from fluorescein. In cancer cells, fluorescent fluorescein generated by exogenous application of FDAcr selectively deposits owing to its stronger hydrolytic enzyme activity and its lower leakage rate. We examined whether FDAcr can specifically detect disseminated peritoneal tumors in athymic nude mouse models. Intraperitoneally administered FDAcr revealed disseminated peritoneal microscopic tumors not readily recognized on white-light imaging. These results suggest that FDAcr is a useful probe for detecting disseminated peritoneal tumors.

  12. Tumor-Targeted Multimodal Optical Imaging with Versatile Cadmium-Free Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B.; Zhong, Haizheng; Hall, David J.; Han, Wenlong; Qin, Mingde; Zhao, Chuanzhen; Wang, Meina; She, Zhi-Gang; Cao, Chuanbao; Sailor, Michael J.; Stallcup, William B.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of fluorescence imaging technologies requires concurrent improvements in the performance of fluorescent probes. Quantum dots have been extensively used as an imaging probe in various research areas because of their inherent advantages based on unique optical and electronic properties. However, their clinical translation has been limited by the potential toxicity especially from cadmium. Here, a versatile bioimaging probe is developed by using highly luminescent cadmium-free CuInSe2/ZnS core/shell quantum dots conjugated with CGKRK (Cys–Gly–Lys–Arg–Lys) tumor-targeting peptides. This probe exhibits excellent photostability, reasonably long circulation time, minimal toxicity, and strong tumor-specific homing property. The most important feature of this probe is that it shows distinctive versatility in tumor-targeted multimodal imaging including near-infrared, time-gated, and two-photon imaging in different tumor models. In a glioblastoma mouse model, the targeted probe clearly denotes tumor boundaries and positively labels a population of diffusely infiltrating tumor cells, suggesting its utility in precise tumor detection during surgery. This work lays a foundation for potential clinical translation of the probe.

  13. Nuclear probes and intraoperative gamma cameras.

    PubMed

    Heller, Sherman; Zanzonico, Pat

    2011-05-01

    Gamma probes are now an important, well-established technology in the management of cancer, particularly in the detection of sentinel lymph nodes. Intraoperative sentinel lymph node as well as tumor detection may be improved under some circumstances by the use of beta (negatron or positron), rather than gamma detection, because the very short range (∼ 1 mm or less) of such particulate radiations eliminates the contribution of confounding counts from activity other than in the immediate vicinity of the detector. This has led to the development of intraoperative beta probes. Gamma camera imaging also benefits from short source-to-detector distances and minimal overlying tissue, and intraoperative small field-of-view gamma cameras have therefore been developed as well. Radiation detectors for intraoperative probes can generally be characterized as either scintillation or ionization detectors. Scintillators used in scintillation-detector probes include thallium-doped sodium iodide, thallium- and sodium-doped cesium iodide, and cerium-doped lutecium orthooxysilicate. Alternatives to inorganic scintillators are plastic scintillators, solutions of organic scintillation compounds dissolved in an organic solvent that is subsequently polymerized to form a solid. Their combined high counting efficiency for beta particles and low counting efficiency for 511-keV annihilation γ-rays make plastic scintillators well-suited as intraoperative beta probes in general and positron probes in particular Semiconductors used in ionization-detector probes include cadmium telluride, cadmium zinc telluride, and mercuric iodide. Clinical studies directly comparing scintillation and semiconductor intraoperative probes have not provided a clear choice between scintillation and ionization detector-based probes. The earliest small field-of-view intraoperative gamma camera systems were hand-held devices having fields of view of only 1.5-2.5 cm in diameter that used conventional thallium

  14. Reflections on Electric Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2007-10-01

    One of the more immediate temptations for an experimental plasma physicist is to insert some kind of refractory, conducting material into a plasma, as a simple means of probing its charge composition. Irvine Langmuir tried it in the 1920s and was one of the first to develop an electrical probe method in his early work on electrical discharge plasmas. There are now numerous variations on the theme including planar, cylindrical and spherical geometry with single, double and triple probes. There are also probes that resonate, propagate and reciprocate. Some probes are electrostatic and others are electromagnetic; some are effectively wireless; most absorb but some emit. All types can be used in steady and transient plasmas, while special schemes have been devised for RF plasmas, using passive and active compensation. Magnetised plasmas pose further challenges. Each configuration is accompanied by assumptions that constrain both their applicability and the analytical methods that translate the measured currents and voltages variously into charge densities, space potentials, particle fluxes, energy distributions and measures of collisionality. This talk will take a broad look at the options and opportunities for electric probes, principally in the environment of non-equilibrium plasma.

  15. Adolescent and Pediatric Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... abta.org Donate Now Menu Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ... or Complete our contact form Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ...

  16. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  17. Pathology of eyelid tumors.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  18. Pathology of eyelid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pe’er, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  19. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor - Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor - Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on how many people survive this type of ...

  20. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  1. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  2. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... They are among the most common types of childhood cancers. Some are benign tumors, which aren't ... can still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches ...

  3. Tumors and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  4. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Islet cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors ... In the healthy pancreas, cells called islet cells produce hormones that regulate a several bodily functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of ...

  5. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  6. [Synovial tumors and tumor-like lesions].

    PubMed

    Doepfer, A-K; Meurer, A

    2015-10-01

    Synovial tumors comprise a variety of lesions, including those with benign and aggressive neoplastic changes as well as inflammatory causes. In this article we focus on neoplastic tumors. Synovial tumors with other etiologies, such as sarcoidosis, granuloma, synovitis, or gouty arthritis, are not dealt with here. Through a precise differentiation between these disease entities can an optimization of treatment be achieved. PMID:26370407

  7. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  8. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  9. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  10. Pressure measuring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a probe for measuring changes in pressure in a high velocity fluid stream over and adjacent to the surface of an object. The probe is formed of an exterior housing having a closed pressure chamber in which a piezoelectric pressure transducer is mounted. An open connector tube having a probe tip passes a portion of the fluid stream into the closed pressure chamber; any change of pressure within, which requires a settling-time to appear in the closed pressure chamber, is inversely proportional to the cross-sectional area of the connector tube. A cooling chamber formed around the pressure chamber is connected to a source of cooling fluid by means of inlet and outlet tubes.

  11. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  12. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  13. Pioneer III Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Looking more like surgeons, these technicians wearing 'cleanroom' attire inspect the Pioneer III probe before shipping it to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Pioneer III was launched on December 6, 1958 aboard a Juno II rocket at the Atlantic Missile Range, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The mission objectives were to measure the radiation intensity of the Van Allen radiation belt, test long range communication systems, the launch vehicle and other subsystems. The Juno II failed to reach proper orbital escape velocity. The probe re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on December 7th ending its brief mission.

  14. Galactose as Broad Ligand for Multiple Tumor Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuxiang; Chen, Haiyan; Su, Shanyuhan; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Congying; Fida, Guissi; Cui, Sisi; Zhao, Juan; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Galactose residues could be specifically recognized by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) which is highly exhibited on liver tissues. However, ASGPR has not been widely investigated on different tumor cell lines except for hepatoma carcinoma cells, which motivates us to investigate the possibility of galactose serving as a board tumor ligand. In this study, a galactose (Gal)-based probe conjugated with fluorescence dye MPA (Gal-MPA) was constructed for the evaluation of tumor affinities/targeted ability on different tumor cell lines. In the vitro cell study, it was indicated that the fluorescence probe Gal-MPA displayed higher cell affinity to tumor cells (HepG2, MCF-7 and A549) than that of the normal liver cells l02. In the vivo dynamic study of Gal-MPA in tumor-bearing mice (HepG2, MCF-7, A549, HCT116, U87, MDA-MB-231 and S180), it was shown that its high tumor targeted ability with the maximal tumor/normal tissue ratio reached up to 6.8. Meanwhile, the fast tumor-targeted ability within 2 hours and long retention on tumor site up to 120 hours were observed. Our results demonstrated that galactose should be a promising broad ligand for multiple tumor imaging and targeted therapy. Subsequently, Gal was covalently conjugated to doxorubicin (DOX) to form prodrug Gal-DOX for tumor targeted therapy. The therapeutic results of Gal-DOX than DOX being better suggested that galactosylated prodrugs might have the prospective potential in tumor targeted therapy. PMID:26078797

  15. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  16. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  17. The Phoenix Pluto Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunning, George R.; Spapperi, Jeff; Wilkinson, Jeffrey P.; Eldred, Jim; Labij, Dennis; Strinni, Meredith

    1990-01-01

    A design proposal for an unmanned probe to Pluto is presented. The topics covered include: (1) scientific instrumentation; (2) mission management, planning, and costing; (3) power and propulsion system; (4) structural subsystem; (5) command, control, and communication; and (6) attitude and articulation control.

  18. Laboratory plasma probe studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic experiments performed in a collisionless plasma using CO2 as the working gas are described. In particular, simultaneous measurements that have been performed by means of Langmuir- and RF-probes are presented. A resonance occurring above the parallel resonance in the frequency characteristic of a two electrode system is interpreted as being due to the resonant excitation of electroacoustic waves.

  19. Probing the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  20. Experimenting with Temperature Probes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    1989-01-01

    Presented are four activities which are designed to familiarize children with the multiple uses of computers and help them learn about heat and temperature using temperature probes. Included are the tempering effect of water, heat capacity, caloric content of foods, and weather. Hardware and software are discussed. (CW)

  1. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  2. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  3. Adrenal Gland Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home > Types of Cancer > Adrenal Gland Tumor Adrenal Gland Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Adrenal Gland Tumor. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Adrenal Gland Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  4. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. PMID:26614700

  5. Fluorescent nanoparticle probes for imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Santra, Swadeshmukul; Malhotra, Astha

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) have received immense popularity in cancer imaging in recent years because of their attractive optical properties. In comparison to traditional organic-based fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins, FNPs offer much improved sensitivity and photostability. FNPs in certain size range have a strong tendency to enter and retain in solid tumor tissue with abnormal (leaky) vasculature--a phenomenon known as Enhanced Permeation and Retention (EPR) effect, advancing their use for in vivo tumor imaging. Furthermore, large surface area of FNPs and their usual core-shell structure offer a platform for designing and fabricating multimodal/multifunctional nanoparticles (MMNPs). For effective cancer imaging, often the optical imaging modality is integrated with other nonoptical-based imaging modalities such as MRI, X-ray, and PET, thus creating multimodal nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging probes. Such multimodal NP probes can be further integrated with therapeutic drug as well as cancer targeting agent leading to multifunctional NPs. Biocompatibility of FNPs is an important criterion that must be seriously considered during FNP design. NP composition, size, and surface chemistry must be carefully selected to minimize potential toxicological consequences both in vitro and in vivo. In this article, we will mainly focus on three different types of FNPs: dye-loaded NPs, quantum dots (Qdots), and phosphores; briefly highlighting their potential use in translational research. PMID:21480546

  6. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs. PMID:26902424

  7. Mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Soleimanpour, Saeideh; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    This article assembles pertinent insights behind the concept of planarizable push-pull probes. As a response to the planarization of their polarized ground state, a red shift of their excitation maximum is expected to report on either the disorder, the tension, or the potential of biomembranes. The combination of chromophore planarization and polarization contributes to various, usually more complex processes in nature. Examples include the color change of crabs or lobsters during cooking or the chemistry of vision, particularly color vision. The summary of lessons from nature is followed by an overview of mechanosensitive organic materials. Although often twisted and sometimes also polarized, their change of color under pressure usually originates from changes in their crystal packing. Intriguing exceptions include the planarization of several elegantly twisted phenylethynyl oligomers and polymers. Also mechanosensitive probes in plastics usually respond to stretching by disassembly. True ground-state planarization in response to molecular recognition is best exemplified with the binding of thoughtfully twisted cationic polythiophenes to single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides. Molecular rotors, en vogue as viscosity sensors in cells, operate by deplanarization of the first excited state. Pertinent recent examples are described, focusing on λ-ratiometry and intracellular targeting. Complementary to planarization of the ground state with twisted push-pull probes, molecular rotors report on environmental changes with quenching or shifts in emission rather than absorption. The labeling of mechanosensitive channels is discussed as a bioengineering approach to bypass the challenge to create molecular mechanosensitivity and use biological systems instead to sense membrane tension. With planarizable push-pull probes, this challenge is met not with twistome screening, but with "fluorescent flippers," a new concept to insert large and bright monomers into oligomeric

  8. Pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common and mostly benign neoplasia which cause excess or deficiency of pituitary hormones and compressive damage to adjacent organs. Oncogene activation [e.g. PTTG (pituitary tumor-transforming gene) and HMGA2], tumor suppressor gene inactivation (e.g. MEN1 and PRKAR1A), epigenetic changes (e.g. methylation) and humoral factors (e.g. ectopic production of stimulating hormones) are all possible pituitary tumor initiators; the micro-environment of pituitary tumors including steroid milieu, angiogenesis and abnormal cell adhesion further promote tumor growth. Senescence, a cellular defence mechanism against malignant transformation, may explain the benign nature of at least some pituitary tumors. We suggest that future research on pituitary tumor pathogenesis should incorporate systems approaches, and address regulatory mechanisms for pituitary cell proliferation, development of new animal models of pituitary tumor and isolation of functional human pituitary tumor cell lines. PMID:20541667

  9. A mouse-human phase 1 co-clinical trial of a protease-activated fluorescent probe for imaging cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Melodi Javid; Cardona, Diana M; Lazarides, Alexander L; Spasojevic, Ivan; Ferrer, Jorge M; Cahill, Joan; Lee, Chang-Lung; Snuderl, Matija; Blazer, Dan G; Hwang, E Shelley; Greenup, Rachel A; Mosca, Paul J; Mito, Jeffrey K; Cuneo, Kyle C; Larrier, Nicole A; O'Reilly, Erin K; Riedel, Richard F; Eward, William C; Strasfeld, David B; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Lee, W David; Griffith, Linda G; Bawendi, Moungi G; Kirsch, David G; Brigman, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence is a common cause of treatment failure for patients with solid tumors. Intraoperative detection of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed could be used to decrease the risk of a positive surgical margin, reduce rates of reexcision, and tailor adjuvant therapy. We used a protease-activated fluorescent imaging probe, LUM015, to detect cancer in vivo in a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and ex vivo in a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial. In mice, intravenous injection of LUM015 labeled tumor cells, and residual fluorescence within the tumor bed predicted local recurrence. In 15 patients with STS or breast cancer, intravenous injection of LUM015 before surgery was well tolerated. Imaging of resected human tissues showed that fluorescence from tumor was significantly higher than fluorescence from normal tissues. LUM015 biodistribution, pharmacokinetic profiles, and metabolism were similar in mouse and human subjects. Tissue concentrations of LUM015 and its metabolites, including fluorescently labeled lysine, demonstrated that LUM015 is selectively distributed to tumors where it is activated by proteases. Experiments in mice with a constitutively active PEGylated fluorescent imaging probe support a model where tumor-selective probe distribution is a determinant of increased fluorescence in cancer. These co-clinical studies suggest that the tumor specificity of protease-activated imaging probes, such as LUM015, is dependent on both biodistribution and enzyme activity. Our first-in-human data support future clinical trials of LUM015 and other protease-sensitive probes. PMID:26738797

  10. Hypoxia in Microscopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; O’Donoghue, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been commonly observed in a broad spectrum of primary solid malignancies. Hypoxia is associated with tumor progression, increased aggressiveness, enhanced metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Using an animal model, we recently showed that microscopic tumors less than 1 mm diameter were severely hypoxic. In this review, models and techniques for the study of hypoxia in microscopic tumors are discussed. PMID:18384940

  11. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  12. Characterizing intraocular tumors with photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Gursel, Zeynep; Slimani, Naziha; Wang, Xueding; Demirci, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    Intraocular tumors are life-threatening conditions. Long-term mortality from uveal melanoma, which accounts for 80% of primary intraocular tumors, could be as high as 25% depending on the size, ciliary body involvement and extraocular extension. The treatments of intraocular tumors include eye-sparing approaches such as radiotherapy and thermotherapy, and the more aggressive enucleation. The accurate diagnosis of intraocular tumors is thereby critical in the management and follow-up of the patients. The diagnosis of intraocular tumors is usually based on clinical examination with acoustic backscattering based ultrasonography. By analyzing the high frequency fluctuations within the ultrasound (US) signals, microarchitecture information inside the tumor can be characterized. However, US cannot interrogate the histochemical components formulating the microarchitecture. One representative example is the inability of US imaging (and other contemporary imaging modalities as well) in differentiating nevoid and melanoma cells as the two types of cells possesses similar acoustic backscattering properties. Combining optical and US imaging, photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode both the microarchitecture and histochemical component information in biological tissue. This study attempts to characterize ocular tumors by analyzing the high frequency signal components in the multispectral PA images. Ex vivo human eye globes with melanoma and retinoblastoma tumors were scanned using less than 6 mJ per square centimeters laser energy with tunable range of 600-1700 nm. A PA-US parallel imaging system with US probes CL15-7 and L22-14 were used to acquire the high frequency PA signals in real time. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can identify uveal melanoma against retinoblastoma tumors.

  13. Progesterone-Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Determination of progesterone receptor (PR) status in hormone-dependent diseases is essential in ascertaining disease prognosis and monitoring treatment response. The development of a noninvasive means of monitoring these processes would have significant impact on early detection, cost, repeated measurements, and personalized treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely recognized as a technique that can produce longitudinal studies, and PR-targeted MR probes may address a clinical problem by providing contrast enhancement that reports on PR status without biopsy. Commercially available MR contrast agents are typically delivered via intravenous injection, whereas steroids are administered subcutaneously. Whether the route of delivery is important for tissue accumulation of steroid-modified MRI contrast agents to PR-rich tissues is not known. To address this question, modification of the chemistry linking progesterone with the gadolinium chelate led to MR probes with increased water solubility and lower cellular toxicity and enabled administration through the blood. This attribute came at a cost through lower affinity for PR and decreased ability to cross the cell membrane, and ultimately it did not improve delivery of the PR-targeted MR probe to PR-rich tissues or tumors in vivo. Overall, these studies are important, as they demonstrate that targeted contrast agents require optimization of delivery and receptor binding of the steroid and the gadolinium chelate for optimal translation in vivo. PMID:25019183

  14. Progress on the diagnosis and evaluation of brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huile

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Brain tumors are one of the most challenging disorders encountered, and early and accurate diagnosis is essential for the management and treatment of these tumors. In this article, diagnostic modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical imaging are reviewed. We mainly focus on the newly emerging, specific imaging probes, and their potential use in animal models and clinical settings. PMID:24334439

  15. Comparison of NaI(T1), CdTe, and HgI2 surgical probes: effect of scatter compensation on probe performance.

    PubMed

    Kwo, D P; Barber, H B; Barrett, H H; Hickernell, T S; Woolfenden, J M

    1991-01-01

    Spatial variation in the background source distribution makes tumor detection difficult for single-detector probes. Using a single energy window that brackets the photopeak helps discriminate against background events dominated by Compton scattering. Another approach is to use the information provided by an additional window in the Compton region. The performances of NaI(T1), CdTe, and HgI2 surgical probes have been compared under realistic simulations of a tumor-staging procedure using optimal single-sided energy windows and a two-window scatter-subtraction technique. Results showed that despite the differences in energy resolution of the detectors, the performances of the probes in a variable background were similar when optimal single energy windows were used. When the background variations were large, using information provided by a second window improved probe performance. PMID:1870479

  16. Ice-Borehole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  17. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  18. Molecular probes for cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Liang, Grace; Nguyen, Patricia K

    2016-08-01

    Molecular probes provide imaging signal and contrast for the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular level. These probes can be designed to target the cell or tissue of interest and must be retained at the imaging site until they can be detected by the appropriate imaging modality. In this article, we will discuss the basic design of molecular probes, differences among the various types of probes, and general strategies for their evaluation of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27189171

  19. Passive tumor targeting and imaging by using mercaptosuccinic acid-coated near-infrared quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guimiao; Wang, Xiaomei; Yin, Feng; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the preparation of monodispersed quantum dots (QDs) as near-infrared (NIR) optical probes for in vivo pancreatic cancer targeting and imaging. The design of these luminescent probes involves functionalizing NIR QDs with ligand mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which targets the tumor site by enhanced permeability and retention effect. The colloidal and optical stability of the QDs can be maintained for >1 week. In vivo optical imaging studies in nude mice bearing pancreatic tumor show that the probes accumulate at tumor sites for >2.5 hours following intravenous injection of the functionalized NIR QDs. Tumor-labeling studies showed no evidence of harmful effects on the treated animals, even at a dose as high a ~50 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that the engineered MSA-functionalized QDs can serve as a diagnostic platform for early detection of cancer, as well as in image-guided precise surgical resection of tumors. PMID:25609948

  20. Tumor microenvironment and nanotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Meenakshi; Jyoti, Amar; Sethi, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies delineate a predominant role for the tumor microenvironment in tumor growth and progression. Improved knowledge of cancer biology and investigation of the complex functional interrelation between the cellular and noncellular compartments of the tumor microenvironment have provided an ideal platform for the evolution of novel cancer nanotherapies. In addition, multifunctional “smart” nanoparticles carrying imaging agents and delivering multiple drugs targeted preferentially to the tumor/tumor microenvironment will lead to early diagnosis and better treatment for patients with cancer. The emerging knowledge of the tumor microenvironment has enabled rational designing of nanoparticles for combinatorial treatment strategies that include radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis and chemotherapy. This multimodality approach is thus expected to achieve therapeutic efficacy and enhance the quality of life of cancer patients. This review highlights the unique characteristics of the tumor microenvironment that are exploited by nanotechnology to develop novel drug delivery systems aimed to target the tumor/tumor microenvironment. PMID:24634853

  1. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  2. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  3. Fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, K.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Leung, K.N.; Owren, H.M.; Williams, M.D.

    1980-06-01

    An inexpensive, simple, and fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit is presented. This sweeper completes a probe trace in 1.4 ms and has a maximum probe current capability of 5 A. It is suitable for pulsemode plasma operation with density greater than 10/sup 12/ ions/cm/sup 3/.

  4. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  5. Properties of Broezel static probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gašparovič, Peter; Semrád, Karol; Cúttová, Miroslava

    2016-03-01

    The properties of flat static probe designed by Broezel and used in sailplanes are investigated for its planned use in low speed tunnel. Both the numerical CFD model and experiment in low speed wind tunnel confirm yaw insensitivity of the static pressure measured by the probe. The results indicate that the probe is sufficiently accurate for its planned use in wind tunnel measurements.

  6. Galileo probe relay receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prouty, D. A.; Von Der Embse, U. A.

    1982-01-01

    For the Jovian mission, the data link from the Galileo probe to the orbiter uses suppressed-carrier Manchester encoded BPSK modulation and is protected with R = 1/2, K = 7 convolutional coding. The receiver closes the link by acquiring, tracking, and demodulating the data. It has to operate in a highly stressed environment with severe frequency offset, frequency rate, wind gust, and antenna spin conditions. Salient features are described and breadboard test data presented.

  7. Droplet monitoring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, J. R.; Thys, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    A droplet monitoring system is disclosed for analysis of mixed-phase fluid flow in development of gas turbines. The system uses a probe comprising two electrical wires spaced a known distance apart and connected at one end to means for establishing a dc potential between the wires. A drop in the fluid stream momentarily contacting both wires simultaneously causes and electrical signal which is amplified, detected and counted.

  8. Space Probe Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  9. Cosmological probes of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais Marie Melanie

    This Thesis is concerned with two cosmological probes of linear gravity. The first relates to Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the Universe, probed by galaxy surveys. The second to temperature anisotropics of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), probed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Map (WMAP). Both probe the matter and dark energy distributions in the Universe and can be used to test general relativity. The first part of this Thesis (Chapters 2 to 4) is concerned with the analysis of galaxy clustering in redshift space. The second part (Chapters 5 to 7) is concerned with the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect using LSS-CMB cross-correlations. Chapter 1 introduces the cosmological theory and overviews the subsequent chapters. Chapter 2 gives a review of recent results from the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and its Redshift Survey (2MRS). It includes work published in Erdogdu (a) et al. (2006) and Erdogdu (b) et al. (2006). Chapter 3 quantifies the clustering of 2MRS galaxies in redshift space. Chapter 4 uses results from Chapter 3 to constrain cosmological parameters. A selection of work from Chapters 3 and 4 will shortly become available in Rassat et al. (2008), entitled 'Redshift Space Analysis of 2MRS'. Chapter 5 overviews the late-time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) and cross- correlations between the LSS and the CMB. Chapter 6 is also published in Rassat et al. (2007), entitled "Cross-correlation of 2MASS and WMAP3: Implications for the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect". It investigates a detection of the ISW effect and correlations which may affect statistical isotropy in the CMB ('Axis of Evil'). Chapter 7 uses the ISW effect to forecast constraints on dark energy parameters and general modifications of general relativity for the next generation of galaxy surveys, particularly the Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Chapter 8 presents the overall conclusions of this Thesis. Chapter 9 discusses possible extensions to

  10. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.; Weiss, S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Chemla, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have developed a general technique which combines the temporal resolution of ultrafast laser spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of scanned probe microscopy (SPM). Using this technique with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), they have obtained simultaneous 2 ps time resolution and 50 {angstrom} spatial resolution. This improves the time resolution currently attainable with STM by nine orders of magnitude. The potential of this powerful technique for studying ultrafast dynamical phenomena on surfaces with atomic resolution is discussed.

  11. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  12. Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows thermal and electrical conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Imaging targeted-agent binding in vivo with two probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hextrum, Shannon; O'Hara, Julia A.; Jermyn, Michael; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-05-01

    An approach to quantitatively image targeted-agent binding rate in vivo is demonstrated with dual-probe injection of both targeted and nontargeted fluorescent dyes. Images of a binding rate constant are created that reveal lower than expected uptake of epidermal growth factor in an orthotopic xenograft pancreas tumor (2.3×10-5 s-1), as compared to the normal pancreas (3.4×10-5 s-1). This approach allows noninvasive assessment of tumor receptor targeting in vivo to determine the expected contrast, spatial localization, and efficacy in therapeutic agent delivery.

  14. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  15. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  16. Icing Sensor Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward; Kok, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    Aircraft icing is a serious safety problem for the general aviation and some commuter transport airplanes. There has been tremendous growth in the commuter aviation industry in the last few years, Since these type of aircraft generally operate at lower altitudes they consequently spend a far greater proportion of their time operating in icing conditions. For the past thirty years airborne and ground based facilities have relied primarily on two types of cloud physics instrumentation to measure the characteristics of icing clouds: hot wire liquid water content probes and laser based particle sizing probes for the measurement of water droplet size. The instrumentation is severely limited by the technology that was developed during the 1970's and is quite large in size. The goal of this research is to develop one instrument with a wide bandwidth, better response time, higher resolution, user selectability, and small and lightweight. NASA Glenn Research Center, Droplet Measurement Technology, and Meteorology Society of Canada have developed a collaborative effort to develop such an instrument. This paper describes the development and test results of the prototype Icing Sensor Probe.

  17. Molecular magnetic resonance probe targeting VEGF165: preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    You, Xiao-Guang; Tu, Rong; Peng, Ming-Li; Bai, Yu-Jie; Tan, Mingqian; Li, Han-Jian; Guan, Jing; Wen, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A new method for imaging the tumor human vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF 165) is presented. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe was prepared by crosslinking ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles to the aptamer for tumor vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF165-aptamer). The molecular probe was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo activities toward VEGF165. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO nanoparticles conjugate specifically binds to VEGF165 in vitro. A cell proliferation test showed that VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO seems to block the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by free VEGF165, suggesting that VEGF165 is an effective target of this molecular probe. In xenograft mice carrying liver cancer that expresses VEGF165, T2-weighted imaging of the tumor displayed marked negative enhancement 3 h after the intravenous administration of VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO. The enhancement disappeared 6 h after administration of the probe. These results suggest the targeted imaging effect of VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO probe in vivo for VEGF165-expressing tumors. This is the first report of a targeted MRI molecular probe based on USPIO and VEGF165-aptamer. PMID:24729581

  18. Development of photostabilized asymmetrical cyanine dyes for in vivo photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoe, Satoru; Temma, Takashi; Kanazaki, Kengo; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) contributes to tumor diagnosis through the use of PAI probes that effectively accumulate in tumors. Previously, we developed a symmetrical cyanine dye, IC7-1-Bu, which showed high potential as a PAI probe because of its high tumor targeting ability and sufficient in vivo PA signal. However, IC7-1-Bu lacks photostability for multiple laser irradiations, so we developed stabilized PAI probes using IC7-1-Bu as a lead compound. We focused on the effect of singlet oxygen (O) generated by excited PAI probes on probe degeneration. We introduced a triplet-state quencher (TSQ) moiety into IC7-1-Bu to quench O generation and designed three IC-n-T derivatives with different linker lengths (n indicates linker length). The IC-n-T derivatives emitted in vitro PA signals that were comparable to IC7-1-Bu and significantly reduced O generation while showing improved photostability against multiple irradiations. Of the three derivatives evaluated, IC-5-T accumulated in tumors effectively to allow clear PAI of tumors in vivo. Furthermore, the photostability of IC-5-T was 1.5-fold higher than that of IC7-1-Bu in in vivo sequential PAI. These results suggest that IC-5-T is a potential PAI probe for in vivo sequential tumor imaging.

  19. Development of photostabilized asymmetrical cyanine dyes for in vivo photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Onoe, Satoru; Temma, Takashi; Kanazaki, Kengo; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) contributes to tumor diagnosis through the use of PAI probes that effectively accumulate in tumors. Previously, we developed a symmetrical cyanine dye, IC7-1-Bu, which showed high potential as a PAI probe because of its high tumor targeting ability and sufficient in vivo PA signal. However, IC7-1-Bu lacks photostability for multiple laser irradiations, so we developed stabilized PAI probes using IC7-1-Bu as a lead compound. We focused on the effect of singlet oxygen (1O2) generated by excited PAI probes on probe degeneration. We introduced a triplet-state quencher (TSQ) moiety into IC7-1-Bu to quench 1O2 generation and designed three IC-n-T derivatives with different linker lengths (n indicates linker length). The IC-n-T derivatives emitted in vitro PA signals that were comparable to IC7-1-Bu and significantly reduced 1O2 generation while showing improved photostability against multiple irradiations. Of the three derivatives evaluated, IC-5-T accumulated in tumors effectively to allow clear PAI of tumors in vivo. Furthermore, the photostability of IC-5-T was 1.5-fold higher than that of IC7-1-Bu in in vivo sequential PAI. These results suggest that IC-5-T is a potential PAI probe for in vivo sequential tumor imaging. PMID:26358819

  20. Spinal tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Binning, Mandy; Klimo, Paul; Gluf, Wayne; Goumnerova, Liliana

    2007-10-01

    Pediatric spine tumors encompass a diverse group of pathologic diagnoses that differ markedly based on the location and age of the child. Children can be affected by primary and metastatic tumors, making the differential diagnosis and treatment options extensive. This article discusses the features of spinal tumors in children based primarily on location: extradural, intradural-extramedullary, and intramedullary tumors. Because this article deals with such a broad topic, detailed descriptions and outcomes of surgical and nonsurgical treatments for each particular tumor are limited. Rather, the key clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic features of each tumor are discussed. PMID:17991588

  1. Comparative evaluation of probing depth and clinical attachment level using a manual probe and Florida probe

    PubMed Central

    Kour, Amandeep; Kumar, Ashish; Puri, Komal; Khatri, Manish; Bansal, Mansi; Gupta, Geeti

    2016-01-01

    Background: To compare and evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner efficacy and reproducibility of the first-generation manual (Williams) probe and the third-generation Florida probe in terms of measuring pocket probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Materials and Methods: Forty subjects/4000 sites were included in this comparative, cross-sectional study. Group- and site-wise categorizations were done. Based on gingival index, PD, and CAL, patients were divided into four groups, i.e., periodontally healthy, gingivitis, mild to moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis. Further, based on these parameters, a total of 4000 sites, with 1000 sites in each category randomly selected from these 40 patients, were taken. Full mouth PD and CAL measurements were recorded with two probes, by Examiner 1 and on Ramfjord teeth by Examiner 2. Results: Full mouth and Ramfjord teeth group- and site-wise PD obtained with the manual probe by both the examiners were statistically significantly deeper than that obtained with the Florida probe. The full mouth and Ramfjord teeth mean CAL measurement by Florida probe was higher as compared to manual probe in mild to moderate periodontitis group and sites, whereas in severe periodontitis group and sites, manual probe recorded higher CAL as compared to Florida probe. Conclusion: Mean PD and CAL measurements were deeper with the manual probe as compared to the Florida probe in all the groups and sites, except for the mild-moderate periodontitis group and sites where the CAL measurements with the manual probe were less than the Florida probe. Manual probe was more reproducible and showed less interexaminer variability as compared to the Florida probe. PMID:27563204

  2. Utilizing Gold Nanoparticle Probes to Visually Detect DNA Methylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kui; Zhang, Mingyi; Chang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Qin, Yanxia; Li, Juan; Cui, Suxia; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-06-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect endows gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with the ability to visualize biomolecules. In the present study, we designed and constructed a GNP probe to allow the semi-quantitative analysis of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cultured cells. To construct the probe, the GNP surfaces were coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by forming Au-S bonds. The ssDNA contains a thiolated 5'-end, a regulatory domain of 12 adenine nucleotides, and a functional domain with absolute pairing with methylated p16 sequence (Met- p16). The probe, paired with Met- p16, clearly changed the color of aggregating GNPs probe in 5 mol/L NaCl solution. Utilizing the probe, p16 gene methylation in HCT116 cells was semi-quantified. Further, the methylation of E-cadherin, p15, and p16 gene in Caco2, HepG2, and HCT116 cell lines were detected by the corresponding probes, constructed with three domains. This simple and cost-effective method was useful for the diagnosis of DNA methylation-related diseases.

  3. Utilizing Gold Nanoparticle Probes to Visually Detect DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kui; Zhang, Mingyi; Chang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Qin, Yanxia; Li, Juan; Cui, Suxia; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-12-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect endows gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with the ability to visualize biomolecules. In the present study, we designed and constructed a GNP probe to allow the semi-quantitative analysis of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cultured cells. To construct the probe, the GNP surfaces were coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by forming Au-S bonds. The ssDNA contains a thiolated 5'-end, a regulatory domain of 12 adenine nucleotides, and a functional domain with absolute pairing with methylated p16 sequence (Met-p16). The probe, paired with Met-p16, clearly changed the color of aggregating GNPs probe in 5 mol/L NaCl solution. Utilizing the probe, p16 gene methylation in HCT116 cells was semi-quantified. Further, the methylation of E-cadherin, p15, and p16 gene in Caco2, HepG2, and HCT116 cell lines were detected by the corresponding probes, constructed with three domains. This simple and cost-effective method was useful for the diagnosis of DNA methylation-related diseases. PMID:27325520

  4. Magnetomotive molecular probes for targeted contrast enhancement and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-03-01

    The diagnostic, interrogational, and therapeutic potential of molecular probes is rapidly being investigated and exploited across virtually every biomedical imaging modality. While many types of probes enhance contrast or delivery therapy by static localization to targeted sites, significant potential exists for utilizing dynamic molecular probes. Recent examples include molecular beacons, photoactivatable probes, or controlled switchable drug-releasing particles, to name a few. In this review, we describe a novel class of dynamic molecular probes that rely on the application and control of localized external magnetic fields. These magnetomotive molecular probes can provide optical image contrast through a modulated scattering signal, can interrogate the biomechanical properties of their viscoelastic microenvironment by tracking their underdamped oscillatory step-response to applied fields, and can potentially delivery therapy through nanometer-to-micrometer mechanical displacement or local hyperthermia. This class of magnetomotive agents includes not only magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles, but also new magnetomotive microspheres or nanostructures with embedded iron-oxide agents. In vitro three-dimensional cell assays and in vivo targeting studies in animal tumor models have demonstrated the potential for multimodal detection and imaging, using magnetic resonance imaging for whole-body localization, and magnetomotive optical coherence tomography for high-resolution localization and imaging.

  5. Tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  6. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

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  7. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

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    MedlinePlus

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  9. Dinosaurs Got Tumors, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159760.html Dinosaurs Got Tumors, Too Benign facial growth discovered in ... 2016 THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Even dinosaurs developed tumors, with some more prone to growths ...

  10. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...