Science.gov

Sample records for biconcircular gradient vector

  1. Support vector classifiers via gradient systems with discontinuous righthand sides.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo V; Kaszkurewicz, Eugenius; Bhaya, Amit

    2006-12-01

    Gradient dynamical systems with discontinuous righthand sides are designed using Persidskii-type nonsmooth Lyapunov functions to work as support vector machines (SVMs) for the discrimination of nonseparable classes. The gradient systems are obtained from an exact penalty method applied to the constrained quadratic optimization problems, which are formulations of two well known SVMs. Global convergence of the trajectories of the gradient dynamical systems to the solution of the corresponding constrained problems is shown to be independent of the penalty parameters and of the parameters of the SVMs. The proposed gradient systems can be implemented as simple analog circuits as well as using standard software for integration of ODEs, and in order to use efficient integration methods with adaptive stepsize selection, the discontinuous terms are smoothed around a neighborhood of the discontinuity surface by means of the boundary layer technique. The scalability of the proposed gradient systems is also shown by means of an implementation using parallel computers, resulting in smaller processing times when compared with traditional SVM packages. PMID:17011165

  2. Creation of polarization gradients from superposition of counter propagating vector LG beams.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sunil; Kozawa, Yuichi; Miyamoto, Yoko

    2015-12-28

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the formation of standing waves using cylindrically polarized vector Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams. It is shown that complex interplay between the radial and azimuthal polarization state can be used to realize different kinds of polarization gradients with cylindrically symmetric polarization distribution. Expressions for four different cases are presented and local dynamics of spatial polarization distribution is studied. We show cylindrically symmetric Sisyphus and corkscrew type polarization gradients can be obtained from vector LG beams. The optical landscape presented here with spatially periodic polarization patterns may find important applications in the field of atom optics, atom interferometry, atom lithography, and optical trapping. PMID:26832055

  3. Determination of the Earth's lithospheric magnetic field using vector gradient data from the Swarm satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2015-04-01

    One of the main goals of the Swarm three-satellite constellation mission is to determine the lithospheric field globally with the best possible resolution. To achieve that, explicit advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm has to be taken by using gradient estimates. We derive lithospheric field models using more than one year of East-West and North-South magnetic gradient data, approximated by first differences of field vector data between the two lower Swarm satellites and along each satellite orbit, respectively. Despite the current relatively high altitude of 450 km of the Swarm satellites, the results are promising. We find that Swarm gradient data are less sensitive to large-scale external field fluctuations and enhance the resolution of the determined lithospheric field compared to only vector data. The derived models agree very well with previous models derived from CHAMP data, serving as an initial validation of the Swarm mission.

  4. A Genealogy of Convex Solids Via Local and Global Bifurcations of Gradient Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, Gábor; Holmes, Philip; Lángi, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional convex bodies can be classified in terms of the number and stability types of critical points on which they can balance at rest on a horizontal plane. For typical bodies, these are non-degenerate maxima, minima, and saddle points, the numbers of which provide a primary classification. Secondary and tertiary classifications use graphs to describe orbits connecting these critical points in the gradient vector field associated with each body. In previous work, it was shown that these classifications are complete in that no class is empty. Here, we construct 1- and 2-parameter families of convex bodies connecting members of adjacent primary and secondary classes and show that transitions between them can be realized by codimension 1 saddle-node and saddle-saddle (heteroclinic) bifurcations in the gradient vector fields. Our results indicate that all combinatorially possible transitions can be realized in physical shape evolution processes, e.g., by abrasion of sedimentary particles.

  5. A novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on matched filtering and gradient vector flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2013-10-01

    The microvasculature network of retina plays an important role in the study and diagnosis of retinal diseases (age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy for example). Although it is possible to noninvasively acquire high-resolution retinal images with modern retinal imaging technologies, non-uniform illumination, the low contrast of thin vessels and the background noises all make it difficult for diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce a novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on gradient vector flow and matched filtering to segment retinal vessels with different likelihood. Firstly, we use isotropic Gaussian kernel and adaptive histogram equalization to smooth and enhance the retinal images respectively. Secondly, a multi-scale matched filtering method is adopted to extract the retinal vessels. Then, the gradient vector flow algorithm is introduced to locate the edge of the retinal vessels. Finally, we combine the results of matched filtering method and gradient vector flow algorithm to extract the vessels at different likelihood levels. The experiments demonstrate that our algorithm is efficient and the intensities of vessel images exactly represent the likelihood of the vessels.

  6. Improved Gradient Vector Flow for robust shape estimation in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Marques, Jorge S

    2010-01-01

    We propose a improved Gradient Vector Flow (iGVF) for active contour detection. The algorithm herein proposed allows to surpass the problems of the GVF, which occur in noisy images with cluttered background. We experimentally illustrate that the proposed modified version of the GVF algorithm has a better performance in noisy images. The main difference concerns the use of more robust and informative features (edge segments) which significantly reduce the influence of noise. Experiments with real data from several image modalities are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed approach. PMID:21097295

  7. Multi-color incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient methods for vector computers. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    In this research, we are concerned with the solution on vector computers of linear systems of equations, Ax = b, where A is a larger, sparse symmetric positive definite matrix. We solve the system using an iterative method, the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient method (ICCG). We apply a multi-color strategy to obtain p-color matrices for which a block-oriented ICCG method is implemented on the CYBER 205. (A p-colored matrix is a matrix which can be partitioned into a pXp block matrix where the diagonal blocks are diagonal matrices). This algorithm, which is based on a no-fill strategy, achieves O(N/p) length vector operations in both the decomposition of A and in the forward and back solves necessary at each iteration of the method. We discuss the natural ordering of the unknowns as an ordering that minimizes the number of diagonals in the matrix and define multi-color orderings in terms of disjoint sets of the unknowns. We give necessary and sufficient conditions to determine which multi-color orderings of the unknowns correpond to p-color matrices. A performance model is given which is used both to predict execution time for ICCG methods and also to compare an ICCG method to conjugate gradient without preconditioning or another ICCG method. Results are given from runs on the CYBER 205 at NASA's Langley Research Center for four model problems.

  8. Detection of blob objects in microscopic zebrafish images based on gradient vector diffusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Liu, Tianming; Nie, Jingxin; Guo, Lei; Malicki, Jarema; Mara, Andrew; Holley, Scott A; Xia, Weiming; Wong, Stephen T C

    2007-10-01

    The zebrafish has become an important vertebrate animal model for the study of developmental biology, functional genomics, and disease mechanisms. It is also being used for drug discovery. Computerized detection of blob objects has been one of the important tasks in quantitative phenotyping of zebrafish. We present a new automated method that is able to detect blob objects, such as nuclei or cells in microscopic zebrafish images. This method is composed of three key steps. The first step is to produce a diffused gradient vector field by a physical elastic deformable model. In the second step, the flux image is computed on the diffused gradient vector field. The third step performs thresholding and nonmaximum suppression based on the flux image. We report the validation and experimental results of this method using zebrafish image datasets from three independent research labs. Both sensitivity and specificity of this method are over 90%. This method is able to differentiate closely juxtaposed or connected blob objects, with high sensitivity and specificity in different situations. It is characterized by a good, consistent performance in blob object detection. PMID:17654652

  9. Retinal Microaneurysms Detection Using Gradient Vector Analysis and Class Imbalance Classification

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Baisheng; Wu, Xiangqian; Bu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Retinal microaneurysms (MAs) are the earliest clinically observable lesions of diabetic retinopathy. Reliable automated MAs detection is thus critical for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. This paper proposes a novel method for the automated MAs detection in color fundus images based on gradient vector analysis and class imbalance classification, which is composed of two stages, i.e. candidate MAs extraction and classification. In the first stage, a candidate MAs extraction algorithm is devised by analyzing the gradient field of the image, in which a multi-scale log condition number map is computed based on the gradient vectors for vessel removal, and then the candidate MAs are localized according to the second order directional derivatives computed in different directions. Due to the complexity of fundus image, besides a small number of true MAs, there are also a large amount of non-MAs in the extracted candidates. Classifying the true MAs and the non-MAs is an extremely class imbalanced classification problem. Therefore, in the second stage, several types of features including geometry, contrast, intensity, edge, texture, region descriptors and other features are extracted from the candidate MAs and a class imbalance classifier, i.e., RUSBoost, is trained for the MAs classification. With the Retinopathy Online Challenge (ROC) criterion, the proposed method achieves an average sensitivity of 0.433 at 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, 4 and 8 false positives per image on the ROC database, which is comparable with the state-of-the-art approaches, and 0.321 on the DiaRetDB1 V2.1 database, which outperforms the state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:27564376

  10. Magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Lesur, Vincent; Lane, Richard; Wang, Huilin

    2015-06-01

    We examined the mathematical and computational aspects of the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system (SCS). This work is relevant for 3-D modelling that is performed with lithospheric vertical scales and global, continent or large regional horizontal scales. The curvature of the Earth is significant at these scales and hence, a SCS is more appropriate than the usual Cartesian coordinate system (CCS). The 3-D arrays of spherical prisms (SP; `tesseroids') can be used to model the response of volumes with variable magnetic properties. Analytical solutions do not exist for these model elements and numerical or mixed numerical and analytical solutions must be employed. We compared various methods for calculating the response in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. The methods were (1) the spherical coordinate magnetic dipole method (MD), (2) variants of the 3-D Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration method (3-D GLQI) with (i) different numbers of nodes in each of the three directions, and (ii) models where we subdivided each SP into a number of smaller tesseroid volume elements, (3) a procedure that we term revised Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration (3-D RGLQI) where the magnetization direction which is constant in a SCS is assumed to be constant in a CCS and equal to the direction at the geometric centre of each tesseroid, (4) the Taylor's series expansion method (TSE) and (5) the rectangular prism method (RP). In any realistic application, both the accuracy and the computational efficiency factors must be considered to determine the optimum approach to employ. In all instances, accuracy improves with increasing distance from the source. It is higher in the percentage terms for potential than the vector or tensor response. The tensor errors are the largest, but they decrease more quickly with distance from the source. In our comparisons of relative computational efficiency, we found

  11. A 3-D Poisson Solver Based on Conjugate Gradients Compared to Standard Iterative Methods and Its Performance on Vector Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitza, H.; Eppel, D.

    1987-02-01

    A conjugate gradient method for solving a 3-D Poisson equation in Cartesian unequally spaced coordinates is tested in concurrence to standard iterative methods. It is found that the tested algorithm is far superior to Red-Black-SOR with optimal parameter. In the conjugate gradient method no relaxation parameter is needed, and there are no restrictions on the number of gridpoints in the three directions. The iteration routine is vectorizable to a large extent by the compiler of a CYBER 205 without any special preparations. Utilizing some special features of vector computers it is completely vectorizable with only minor changes in the code.

  12. Subvoxel segmentation and representation of brain cortex using fuzzy clustering and gradient vector diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming-Ching; Tao, Xiaodong

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation and representation of human brain cortex from Magnetic Resonance (MR) images is an important step for visualization and analysis in many neuro imaging applications. In this paper, we propose an automatic and fast algorithm to segment the brain cortex and to represent it as a geometric surface on which analysis can be carried out. The algorithm works on T1 weighted MR brain images with extracranial tissue removed. A fuzzy clustering algorithm with a parametric bias field model is applied to assign membership values of gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to each voxel. The cortical boundaries, namely the WM-GM and GM-CSF boundary surfaces, are extracted as iso-surfaces of functions derived from these membership functions. The central surface (CS), which traces the peak values (or ridges) of the GM membership function, is then extracted using gradient vector diffusion. Our main contribution is to provide a generic, accurate, fast, yet fully-automatic approach to (i) produce a soft segmentation of the MR brain image with intensity field correction, (ii) extract both the boundary and the center of the cortex in a surface form, where the topology and geometry can be explicitly examined, and (iii) use the extracted surfaces to model the curvy, folding cortical volume, which allows an intuitive measurement of the thickness. As a demonstration, we compute cortical thickness from the surfaces and compare the results with what has been reported in the literature. The entire process from raw MR image to cortical surface reconstruction takes on average between five to ten minutes.

  13. Gradient-based fusion of infrared and visual face images using support vector machine for human face identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Priya; Bhowmik, Mrinal K.; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; De, Barin K.; Nasipuri, Mita

    2013-03-01

    Pose and illumination invariant face recognition problem is now-a-days an emergent problem in the field of information security. In this paper, gradient based fusion method of gradient visual and corresponding infrared face images have been proposed to overcome the problem of illumination varying conditions. This technique mainly extracts illumination insensitive features under different conditions for effective face recognition purpose. The gradient image is computed from a visible light image. Information fusion is performed in the gradient map domain. The image fusion of infrared image and corresponding visual gradient image is done in wavelet domain by taking the maximum information of approximation and detailed coefficients. These fused images have been taken for dimension reduction using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). The reduced face images are taken for training and testing purposes from different classes of different datasets of IRIS face database. SVM multiclass strategy `one-vs.-all' have been taken in the experiment. For training support vector machine, Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO) algorithm has been used. Linear kernel and Polynomial kernel with degree 3 are used in SVM kernel functions. The experiment results show that the proposed approach generates good classification accuracies for the face images under different lighting conditions.

  14. High-sensitivity in-plane vector magnetometry using the alternating gradient force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Luc; Rahmani, Anas; Renaudin, Patrice; Wack, André

    2003-05-01

    The alternating gradient force magnetometer is a highly sensitive tool particularly suited for thin films magnetometry. The measurement technique is based upon the alternating force generated on a magnetized sample by a set of field-gradient coils. The so-induced sample oscillation is directly proportional to the sample's magnetization. High sensitivity measurements are achieved by mounting the sample at the end of a cantilever attached to a piezoelectric bimorph element, and by tuning the excitation frequency close to the mechanical resonance of the sample-cantilever assembly. Here we describe a new design that allows to measure both in-plane components of the magnetization of a thin film sample, for any direction of the external magnetic field within the sample's plane. By rotating the sample-probe assembly, we find the output signal to be proportional to the projection of the alternating force along the sense axis of the piezoelectric bimorph. Besides, the resonance frequency of the system remains unchanged. Thus, hysteresis loops can be measured accurately for various angles between the applied field and an in-plane anisotropy axis. The signal only vanishes when the alternating force is orthogonal to the bimorph axis. Moreover, we have designed a set of two pairs of gradient coils, whose axis are orthogonal to one another. By varying the excitation current within these two pairs of coils, it is possible to rotate the alternating gradient direction, to detect magnetization components along or perpendicular to the external field.

  15. Galactic interstellar turbulence across the southern sky seen through spatial gradients of the polarization vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobelli, M.; Burkhart, B.; Haverkorn, M.; Lazarian, A.; Carretti, E.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Bernardi, G.; Kesteven, M. J.; Poppi, S.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: Radio synchrotron polarization maps of the Galaxy can be used to infer the properties of interstellar turbulence in the diffuse magneto-ionic medium (MIM). In this paper, we investigate the normalized spatial gradient of linearly polarized synchrotron emission (|∇P|/|P|) as a tracer of turbulence, the relationship of the gradient to the sonic Mach number of the MIM, and changes in morphology of the gradient as a function of Galactic position in the southern sky. Methods: We used data from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S-PASS) to image the normalized spatial gradient of the linearly polarized synchrotron emission (|∇P|/|P|) in the entire southern sky at 2.3 GHz. The spatial gradient of linear polarization reveals rapid changes in the density and magnetic fluctuations in the MIM due to magnetic turbulence as a function of Galactic position. We made comparisons of these data to ideal MHD numerical simulations. To constrain the sonic Mach number (Ms), we applied a high-order moments analysis to the observations and to the simulated diffuse, isothermal ISM with ideal magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence. Results: We find that polarization gradient maps reveal elongated structures, which we associate with turbulence in the MIM. Our analysis indicates that turbulent MIM is in a generally transonic regime. This result for the turbulent regime is more general than the ones deduced by the analysis of electron density variation data, because it is based on the stochastic imprints of the Faraday rotation effect, which is also sensitive to the magnetic field fluctuations. Filamentary structures are seen with typical widths down to the angular resolution, and the observed morphologies closely match numerical simulations and, in some cases, Hα contours. The |∇P|/|P| intensity is found to be approximately log-normal distributed. No systematic variations in the sonic Mach number are observed as a function of Galactic coordinates, which is consistent with

  16. Non-singular expressions for the vector and the gradient tensor of gravitation in a geocentric spherical frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshagh, Mehdi

    2008-12-01

    The traditional expressions of the gravitational vector (GV) and the gravitational gradient tensor (GGT) have complicated forms depending on the first- and the second-order derivatives of associated Legendre functions (ALF), and also singular terms when approaching the poles. This article presents alternative expressions for the GV and GGT, which are independent of the derivatives, and are also non-singular. By using such expressions, it suffices to compute the ALF to two additional degrees and orders, instead of computing the first and the second derivatives of all the ALF. Therefore, the formulas are suitable for computer programming. Matlab software as well as an output of a numerical computation around the North Pole is also presented based on the derived formulas.

  17. Particle velocity gradient based acoustic mode beamforming for short linear vector sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Gur, Berke

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a subtractive beamforming algorithm for short linear arrays of two-dimensional particle velocity sensors is described. The proposed method extracts the highly directional acoustic modes from the spatial gradients of the particle velocity field measured at closely spaced sensors along the array. The number of sensors in the array limits the highest order of modes that can be extracted. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that the acoustic mode beamformer achieves directivity comparable to the maximum directivity that can be obtained with differential microphone arrays of equivalent aperture. When compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamformers for pressure sensor arrays, the proposed method achieves comparable directivity with 70%-85% shorter apertures. Moreover, the proposed method has additional capabilities such as high front-back (port-starboard) discrimination, frequency and steer direction independent response, and robustness to correlated ambient noise. Small inter-sensor spacing that results in very compact apertures makes the proposed beamformer suitable for space constrained applications such as hearing aids and short towed arrays for autonomous underwater platforms. PMID:24907810

  18. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.; Neuber, S.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.; Haueisen, J.

    2015-05-15

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  19. Non-singular spherical harmonic expressions of geomagnetic vector and gradient tensor fields in the local north-oriented reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Chen, C.; Lesur, V.; Wang, L.

    2015-07-01

    General expressions of magnetic vector (MV) and magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of spherical harmonics at different degrees/orders are relatively complicated and singular at the poles. In this paper, we derived alternative non-singular expressions for the MV, the MGT and also the third-order partial derivatives of the magnetic potential field in the local north-oriented reference frame. Using our newly derived formulae, the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields and also the third-order partial derivatives of the magnetic potential field at an altitude of 300 km are calculated based on a global lithospheric magnetic field model GRIMM_L120 (GFZ Reference Internal Magnetic Model, version 0.0) with spherical harmonic degrees 16-90. The corresponding results at the poles are discussed and the validity of the derived formulas is verified using the Laplace equation of the magnetic potential field.

  20. Non-singular spherical harmonic expressions of geomagnetic vector and gradient tensor fields in the local north-oriented reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Chen, C.; Lesur, V.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    General expressions of magnetic vector (MV) and magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of spherical harmonics at different degrees and orders, are relatively complicated and singular at the poles. In this paper, we derived alternative non-singular expressions for the MV, the MGT and also the higher-order partial derivatives of the magnetic field in local north-oriented reference frame. Using our newly derived formulae, the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields at an altitude of 300 km are calculated based on a global lithospheric magnetic field model GRIMM_L120 (version 0.0) and the main magnetic field model of IGRF11. The corresponding results at the poles are discussed and the validity of the derived formulas is verified using the Laplace equation of the potential field.

  1. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Gradients of GDNF in the Injured Peripheral Nerve: Effects on Nerve Coil Formation, Schwann Cell Maturation and Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Ruben; de Winter, Fred; Hoyng, Stefan A.; Roet, Kasper C. D.; Ehlert, Erich M.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Verhaagen, Joost; Tannemaat, Martijn R.

    2013-01-01

    Although the peripheral nerve is capable of regeneration, only a small minority of patients regain normal function after surgical reconstruction of a major peripheral nerve lesion, resulting in a severe and lasting negative impact on the quality of life. Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent survival- and outgrowth-promoting effects on motoneurons, but locally elevated levels of GDNF cause trapping of regenerating axons and the formation of nerve coils. This phenomenon has been called the “candy store” effect. In this study we created gradients of GDNF in the sciatic nerve after a ventral root avulsion. This approach also allowed us to study the effect of increasing concentrations of GDNF on Schwann cell proliferation and morphology in the injured peripheral nerve. We demonstrate that lentiviral vectors can be used to create a 4 cm long GDNF gradient in the intact and lesioned rat sciatic nerve. Nerve coils were formed throughout the gradient and the number and size of the nerve coils increased with increasing GDNF levels in the nerve. In the nerve coils, Schwann cell density is increased, their morphology is disrupted and myelination of axons is severely impaired. The total number of regenerated and surviving motoneurons is not enhanced after the distal application of a GDNF gradient, but increased sprouting does result in higher number of motor axon in the distal segment of the sciatic nerve. These results show that lentiviral vector mediated overexpression of GDNF exerts multiple effects on both Schwann cells and axons and that nerve coil formation already occurs at relatively low concentrations of exogenous GDNF. Controlled expression of GDNF, by using a viral vector with regulatable GDNF expression, may be required to avoid motor axon trapping and to prevent the effects on Schwann cell proliferation and myelination. PMID:23951085

  2. Least-squares gradient calculation from multi-point observations of scalar and vector fields: methodology and applications with Cluster in the plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Keyser, J.; Darrouzet, F.; Dunlop, M. W.; Décréau, P. M. E.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes a general-purpose algorithm for computing the gradients in space and time of a scalar field, a vector field, or a divergence-free vector field, from in situ measurements by one or more spacecraft. The algorithm provides total error estimates on the computed gradient, including the effects of measurement errors, the errors due to a lack of spatio-temporal homogeneity, and errors due to small-scale fluctuations. It also has the ability to diagnose the conditioning of the problem. Optimal use is made of the data, in terms of exploiting the maximum amount of information relative to the uncertainty on the data, by solving the problem in a weighted least-squares sense. The method is illustrated using Cluster magnetic field and electron density data to compute various gradients during a traversal of the inner magnetosphere. In particular, Cluster is shown to cross azimuthal density structure, and the existence of field-aligned currents in the plasmasphere is demonstrated.

  3. Location and depth estimation of point-dipole and line of dipoles using analytic signals of the magnetic gradient tensor and magnitude of vector components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruç, Bülent

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) provides gradient components of potential fields with mathematical properties which allow processing techniques e.g. analytic signal techniques. With MGT emerging as a new tool for geophysical exploration, the mathematical modelling of gradient tensor fields is necessary for interpretation of magnetic field measurements. The point-dipole and line of dipoles are used to approximate various magnetic objects. I investigate the maxima of the magnitude of magnetic vector components (MMVC) and analytic signals of magnetic gradient tensor (ASMGT) resulting from point-dipole and line of dipoles sources in determining horizontal locations. I also present a method in which depths of these sources are estimated from the ratio of the maximum of MMVC to the maximum of ASMGT. Theoretical examples have been carried out to test the feasibility of the method in obtaining source locations and depths. The method has been applied to the MMVC and ASMGT computed from the total field data over a basic/ultrabasic body at the emerald deposit of Socotó, Bahia, Brazil and buried water supply pipe near Jadaguda Township, India. In both field examples, the method produces good correlations with previous interpretations.

  4. Gradient vector fields based on variational image decomposition for skeletonization of electronic speckle pattern interferometry fringe patterns with variable density and their applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Tang, Chen; Li, Biyuan; Su, Yonggang

    2016-09-01

    The skeletonization methods based on gradient vector fields (GVFs) have been a powerful tool for electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) fringe patterns. However, the skeletonization of ESPI fringe patterns with variable density has been an open problem in this area. In this paper, we propose a novel method for calculating GVFs based on the variational image decomposition of ESPI fringe patterns with variable density. In the proposed method, the GVFs of low-density regions are described in Beppo-Levi space, the high-density regions in Hilbert space and the noise regions in curvelet space. The GVFs of a whole image are the sum of the decomposed GVFs of low-density regions and high-density regions. The skeletons of ESPI fringe patterns with variable density can be obtained based on the topological analysis of the GVFs of a whole image. We apply the proposed method to a computer-simulated and two experimentally obtained ESPI fringe patterns with variable density and compare them with the related skeleton methods based on GVFs. The experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed method outperforms the other methods, even when the quality of the ESPI fringe patterns is considerably low. PMID:27607264

  5. On gradient field theories: gradient magnetostatics and gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Markus

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the fundamentals of gradient field theories are presented and reviewed. In particular, the theories of gradient magnetostatics and gradient elasticity are investigated and compared. For gradient magnetostatics, non-singular expressions for the magnetic vector gauge potential, the Biot-Savart law, the Lorentz force and the mutual interaction energy of two electric current loops are derived and discussed. For gradient elasticity, non-singular forms of all dislocation key formulas (Burgers equation, Mura equation, Peach-Koehler stress equation, Peach-Koehler force equation, and mutual interaction energy of two dislocation loops) are presented. In addition, similarities between an electric current loop and a dislocation loop are pointed out. The obtained fields for both gradient theories are non-singular due to a straightforward and self-consistent regularization.

  6. An atomic orbital-based formulation of analytical gradients and nonadiabatic coupling vector elements for the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field method on graphical processing units.

    PubMed

    Snyder, James W; Hohenstein, Edward G; Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J

    2015-10-21

    We recently presented an algorithm for state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) orbital optimization that capitalizes on sparsity in the atomic orbital basis set to reduce the scaling of computational effort with respect to molecular size. Here, we extend those algorithms to calculate the analytic gradient and nonadiabatic coupling vectors for SA-CASSCF. Combining the low computational scaling with acceleration from graphical processing units allows us to perform SA-CASSCF geometry optimizations for molecules with more than 1000 atoms. The new approach will make minimal energy conical intersection searches and nonadiabatic dynamics routine for molecular systems with O(10(2)) atoms. PMID:26493897

  7. An atomic orbital-based formulation of analytical gradients and nonadiabatic coupling vector elements for the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field method on graphical processing units

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, James W.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.

    2015-10-21

    We recently presented an algorithm for state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) orbital optimization that capitalizes on sparsity in the atomic orbital basis set to reduce the scaling of computational effort with respect to molecular size. Here, we extend those algorithms to calculate the analytic gradient and nonadiabatic coupling vectors for SA-CASSCF. Combining the low computational scaling with acceleration from graphical processing units allows us to perform SA-CASSCF geometry optimizations for molecules with more than 1000 atoms. The new approach will make minimal energy conical intersection searches and nonadiabatic dynamics routine for molecular systems with O(10{sup 2}) atoms.

  8. Manipulating the Gradient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaze, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a cooperative learning, group lab for a Calculus III course to facilitate comprehension of the gradient vector and directional derivative concepts. The lab is a hands-on experience allowing students to manipulate a tangent plane and empirically measure the effect of partial derivatives on the direction of optimal ascent. (Contains 7…

  9. Symbolic computer vector analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoutemyer, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A MACSYMA program is described which performs symbolic vector algebra and vector calculus. The program can combine and simplify symbolic expressions including dot products and cross products, together with the gradient, divergence, curl, and Laplacian operators. The distribution of these operators over sums or products is under user control, as are various other expansions, including expansion into components in any specific orthogonal coordinate system. There is also a capability for deriving the scalar or vector potential of a vector field. Examples include derivation of the partial differential equations describing fluid flow and magnetohydrodynamics, for 12 different classic orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems.

  10. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  11. Primer vector theory and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A method developed to compute two-body, optimal, N-impulse trajectories was presented. The necessary conditions established define the gradient structure of the primer vector and its derivative for any set of boundary conditions and any number of impulses. Inequality constraints, a conjugate gradient iterator technique, and the use of a penalty function were also discussed.

  12. Irradiance gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.J. Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne ); Heckbert, P.S. . School of Computer Science Technische Hogeschool Delft . Dept. of Technical Mathematics and Informatics)

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  13. Divergence-based vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Villmann, Thomas; Haase, Sven

    2011-05-01

    Supervised and unsupervised vector quantization methods for classification and clustering traditionally use dissimilarities, frequently taken as Euclidean distances. In this article, we investigate the applicability of divergences instead, focusing on online learning. We deduce the mathematical fundamentals for its utilization in gradient-based online vector quantization algorithms. It bears on the generalized derivatives of the divergences known as Fréchet derivatives in functional analysis, which reduces in finite-dimensional problems to partial derivatives in a natural way. We demonstrate the application of this methodology for widely applied supervised and unsupervised online vector quantization schemes, including self-organizing maps, neural gas, and learning vector quantization. Additionally, principles for hyperparameter optimization and relevance learning for parameterized divergences in the case of supervised vector quantization are given to achieve improved classification accuracy. PMID:21299418

  14. Vector Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Vector addition is an important skill for introductory physics students to master. For years, I have used a fun example to introduce vector addition in my introductory physics classes based on one with which my high school physics teacher piqued my interest many years ago.

  15. Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Yukiko

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is affected by climatic factors. In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution. The different responses of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus to various environments result in a difference in spatial distribution along north-south and urban-rural gradients, and between the indoors and outdoors. In the north-south gradient, climate associated with survival is an important factor in spatial distribution. In the urban-rural gradient, different distribution reflects a difference in adult niches and is modified by geographic and human factors. The direct response of the two species to the environment around houses is related to different spatial distribution indoors and outdoors. Dengue viruses circulate mainly between human and vector mosquitoes, and the vector presence is a limiting factor of transmission. Therefore, spatial distribution of dengue vectors is a significant concern in the epidemiology of the disease. Current technologies such as GIS, satellite imagery and statistical models allow researchers to predict the spatial distribution of vectors in the changing environment. Although it is difficult to confirm the actual effect of environmental and climate changes on vector abundance and vector-borne diseases, environmental changes caused by humans and human behavioral changes due to climate change can be expected to exert an impact on dengue vectors. Longitudinal monitoring of dengue vectors and viruses is therefore necessary. PMID:22500133

  16. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  17. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  18. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  19. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  20. Multi-point gradient calculation with constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Keyser, Johan

    Multi-spacecraft missions resolve the space-time ambiguity inherent in single-spacecraft in situ measurements. One particularly useful technique is the computation of the gradients (spaceand time-derivatives) from multi-point observations of scalar and vector fields. Given the diffi- culties inherent in computing derivatives, we propose to improve the determination of gradients by imposing additional information in the form of constraints. We discuss geometric constraints on the orientation of the gradient vectors and physically-motivated constraints. For instance, imposing the divergence-free condition for the magnetic field leads to an improved curlometer. We describe the usefulness of such constrained least-squares gradient techniques as applied to magnetic field and plasma density observations by Cluster.

  1. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-04-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  2. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  3. Conjugate gradient algorithms using multiple recursions

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, T.; Manteuffel, T.

    1996-12-31

    Much is already known about when a conjugate gradient method can be implemented with short recursions for the direction vectors. The work done in 1984 by Faber and Manteuffel gave necessary and sufficient conditions on the iteration matrix A, in order for a conjugate gradient method to be implemented with a single recursion of a certain form. However, this form does not take into account all possible recursions. This became evident when Jagels and Reichel used an algorithm of Gragg for unitary matrices to demonstrate that the class of matrices for which a practical conjugate gradient algorithm exists can be extended to include unitary and shifted unitary matrices. The implementation uses short double recursions for the direction vectors. This motivates the study of multiple recursion algorithms.

  4. A modified conjugate gradient solver for very large systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkai, D.; Moriarty, K. J. M.; Rebbi, C.

    1985-03-01

    A modified conjugate gradient method is derived which requires only one pass through the coefficients and the temporary vectors. The method is applicable to problems which may be complex and non-symmetric. The method is implemented on a vector processor (the CDC CYBER 205) and applied to a high-energy physics lattice gauge theory problem, though the implementation methodology is quite general.

  5. Overview of vector sensors for undersea applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEachern, James F.

    2003-10-01

    An overview of vector sensors for sonar applications is presented. The most prolific use of vector or pressure gradient sensors has been in directional sonobuoys to accomplish effective directional measurements with a sensor that is much smaller than the signal wavelength. Common characteristics, implementation issues, and self noise sources of directional hydrophones are reviewed. Arrays of vector sensors began to emerge in the 1980s and have the attractive property of being able to provide substantially higher directivity for a smaller equivalent aperture than that required for a scalar (omnidirectional) sensor array. Dyadic sensors bring additional directivity but development is required to realize them in a compact configuration. Future applications of vector sensors are discussed. The limited amount of information relative to the ocean acoustic vector fields is noted as a corollary technological requirement for the widespread adoption of vector sensors in sonar systems.

  6. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  7. Minimizing inner product data dependencies in conjugate gradient iteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, J.

    1983-01-01

    The amount of concurrency available in conjugate gradient iteration is limited by the summations required in the inner product computations. The inner product of two vectors of length N requires time c log(N), if N or more processors are available. This paper describes an algebraic restructuring of the conjugate gradient algorithm which minimizes data dependencies due to inner product calculations. After an initial start up, the new algorithm can perform a conjugate gradient iteration in time c*log(log(N)).

  8. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-12-10

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  9. Gradient systems on coupled cell networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoel, Miriam; Roberts, Mark

    2015-10-01

    For networks of coupled dynamical systems we characterize admissible functions, that is, functions whose gradient is an admissible vector field. The schematic representation of a gradient network dynamical system is of an undirected cell graph, and we use tools from graph theory to deduce the general form of such functions, relating it to the topological structure of the graph defining the network. The coupling of pairs of dynamical systems cells is represented by edges of the graph, and from spectral graph theory we detect the existence and nature of equilibria of the gradient system from the critical points of the coupling function. In particular, we study fully synchronous and 2-state patterns of equilibria on regular graphs. These are two special types of equilibrium configurations for gradient networks. We also investigate equilibrium configurations of {{\\mathbf{S}}1} -invariant admissible functions on a ring of cells.

  10. A generalized nonlocal vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alali, Bacim; Liu, Kuo; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-10-01

    A nonlocal vector calculus was introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) that has proved useful for the analysis of the peridynamics model of nonlocal mechanics and nonlocal diffusion models. A formulation is developed that provides a more general setting for the nonlocal vector calculus that is independent of particular nonlocal models. It is shown that general nonlocal calculus operators are integral operators with specific integral kernels. General nonlocal calculus properties are developed, including nonlocal integration by parts formula and Green's identities. The nonlocal vector calculus introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) is shown to be recoverable from the general formulation as a special example. This special nonlocal vector calculus is used to reformulate the peridynamics equation of motion in terms of the nonlocal gradient operator and its adjoint. A new example of nonlocal vector calculus operators is introduced, which shows the potential use of the general formulation for general nonlocal models.

  11. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  12. Foamy virus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D W; Miller, A D

    1996-01-01

    Human foamy virus (HFV) is a retrovirus of the spumavirus family. We have constructed vectors based on HFV that encode neomycin phosphotransferase and alkaline phosphatase. These vectors are able to transduce a wide variety of vertebrate cells by integration of the vector genome. Unlike vectors based on murine leukemia virus, HFV vectors are not inactivated by human serum, and they transduce stationary-phase cultures more efficiently than murine leukemia virus vectors. These properties, as well as their large packaging capacity, make HFV vectors promising gene transfer vehicles. PMID:8523528

  13. Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David

    2005-01-01

    We have worked with our collaborators at the University of Milan (Professor Marzio Giglio and his group-supported by ASI) to define the science required to measure gradient driven fluctuations in the microgravity environment. Such a study would provide an accurate test of the extent to which the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics can be used to predict the properties of fluids maintained in a stressed, non-equilibrium state. As mentioned above, the results should also provide direct visual insight into the behavior of a variety of fluid systems containing gradients or interfaces, when placed in the microgravity environment. With support from the current grant, we have identified three key systems for detailed investigation. These three systems are: 1) A single-component fluid to be studied in the presence of a temperature gradient; 2) A mixture of two organic liquids to be studied both in the presence of a temperature gradient, which induces a steady-state concentration gradient, and with the temperature gradient removed, but while the concentration gradient is dying by means of diffusion; 3) Various pairs of liquids undergoing free diffusion, including a proteidbuffer solution and pairs of mixtures having different concentrations, to allow us to vary the differences in fluid properties in a controlled manner.

  14. Principal patterns of fractional-order differential gradients for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Cao, Qi; Zhao, Anping

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the ability of fractional-order differentiation (FD) for facial texture representation and present a local descriptor, called the principal patterns of fractional-order differential gradients (PPFDGs), for face recognition. In PPFDG, multiple FD gradient patterns of a face image are obtained utilizing multiorientation FD masks. As a result, each pixel of the face image can be represented as a high-dimensional gradient vector. Then, by employing principal component analysis to the gradient vectors over the centered neighborhood of each pixel, we capture the principal gradient patterns and meanwhile compute the corresponding orientation patterns from which oriented gradient magnitudes are computed. Histogram features are finally extracted from these oriented gradient magnitude patterns as the face representation using local binary patterns. Experimental results on face recognition technology, A.M. Martinez and R. Benavente, Extended Yale B, and labeled faces in the wild face datasets validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Reduced Vector Preisach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new vector Preisach model, called the Reduced Vector Preisach model (RVPM), was developed for fast computations. This model, derived from the Simplified Vector Preisach model (SVPM), has individual components that like the SVPM are calculated independently using coupled selection rules for the state vector computation. However, the RVPM does not require the rotational correction. Therefore, it provides a practical alternative for computing the magnetic susceptibility using a differential approach. A vector version, using the framework of the DOK model, is implemented. Simulation results for the reduced vector Preisach model are also presented.

  16. Laser textured surface gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  17. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  18. The vector ruling protractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    The theory, structure and working of a vector slide rule is presented in this report. This instrument is used for determining a vector in magnitude and position when given its components and its moment about a point in their plane.

  19. Restart 68000 vector remapping

    SciTech Connect

    Gustin, J.

    1984-05-03

    The circuit described allows power-on-reset (POR) vector fetch from ROM for a 68000 microprocessor. It offers programmability of exception vectors, including the restart vector. This method eliminates the need for high-resolution, address-decoder peripheral circuitry.

  20. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  1. MATRIX AND VECTOR SERVICES

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-18

    PETRA V2 provides matrix and vector services and the ability construct, query, and use matrix and vector objects that are used and computed by TRILINOS solvers. It provides all basic matr5ix and vector operations for solvers in TRILINOS.

  2. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  3. Bioactive Molecule Prediction Using Extreme Gradient Boosting.

    PubMed

    Babajide Mustapha, Ismail; Saeed, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Following the explosive growth in chemical and biological data, the shift from traditional methods of drug discovery to computer-aided means has made data mining and machine learning methods integral parts of today's drug discovery process. In this paper, extreme gradient boosting (Xgboost), which is an ensemble of Classification and Regression Tree (CART) and a variant of the Gradient Boosting Machine, was investigated for the prediction of biological activity based on quantitative description of the compound's molecular structure. Seven datasets, well known in the literature were used in this paper and experimental results show that Xgboost can outperform machine learning algorithms like Random Forest (RF), Support Vector Machines (LSVM), Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFN) and Naïve Bayes (NB) for the prediction of biological activities. In addition to its ability to detect minority activity classes in highly imbalanced datasets, it showed remarkable performance on both high and low diversity datasets. PMID:27483216

  4. Density gradient expansion of correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present a general scheme based on nonlinear response theory to calculate the expansion of correlation functions such as the pair-correlation function or the exchange-correlation hole of an inhomogeneous many-particle system in terms of density derivatives of arbitrary order. We further derive a consistency condition that is necessary for the existence of the gradient expansion. This condition is used to carry out an infinite summation of terms involving response functions up to infinite order from which it follows that the coefficient functions of the gradient expansion can be expressed in terms of the local density profile rather than the background density around which the expansion is carried out. We apply the method to the calculation of the gradient expansion of the one-particle density matrix to second order in the density gradients and recover in an alternative manner the result of Gross and Dreizler [Gross and Dreizler, Z. Phys. AZPAADB0340-219310.1007/BF01413038 302, 103 (1981)], which was derived using the Kirzhnits method. The nonlinear response method is more general and avoids the turning point problem of the Kirzhnits expansion. We further give a description of the exchange hole in momentum space and confirm the wave vector analysis of Langreth and Perdew [Langreth and Perdew, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.21.5469 21, 5469 (1980)] for this case. This is used to derive that the second-order gradient expansion of the system averaged exchange hole satisfies the hole sum rule and to calculate the gradient coefficient of the exchange energy without the need to regularize divergent integrals.

  5. Multiclass Reduced-Set Support Vector Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Benyang; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2006-01-01

    There are well-established methods for reducing the number of support vectors in a trained binary support vector machine, often with minimal impact on accuracy. We show how reduced-set methods can be applied to multiclass SVMs made up of several binary SVMs, with significantly better results than reducing each binary SVM independently. Our approach is based on Burges' approach that constructs each reduced-set vector as the pre-image of a vector in kernel space, but we extend this by recomputing the SVM weights and bias optimally using the original SVM objective function. This leads to greater accuracy for a binary reduced-set SVM, and also allows vectors to be 'shared' between multiple binary SVMs for greater multiclass accuracy with fewer reduced-set vectors. We also propose computing pre-images using differential evolution, which we have found to be more robust than gradient descent alone. We show experimental results on a variety of problems and find that this new approach is consistently better than previous multiclass reduced-set methods, sometimes with a dramatic difference.

  6. Estimating locations and total magnetization vectors of compact magnetic sources from scalar, vector, or tensor magnetic measurements through combined Helbig and Euler analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, J.D.; Nabighian, M.N.; Smith, D.V.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Helbig method for estimating total magnetization directions of compact sources from magnetic vector components is extended so that tensor magnetic gradient components can be used instead. Depths of the compact sources can be estimated using the Euler equation, and their dipole moment magnitudes can be estimated using a least squares fit to the vector component or tensor gradient component data. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. Covariantized vector Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Matthew; Koyama, Kazuya; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-03-01

    Vector Galileons are ghost-free systems containing higher derivative interactions of vector fields. They break the vector gauge symmetry, and the dynamics of the longitudinal vector polarizations acquire a Galileon symmetry in an appropriate decoupling limit in Minkowski space. Using an Arnowitt-Deser-Misner approach, we carefully reconsider the coupling with gravity of vector Galileons, with the aim of studying the necessary conditions to avoid the propagation of ghosts. We develop arguments that put on a more solid footing the results previously obtained in the literature. Moreover, working in analogy with the scalar counterpart, we find indications for the existence of a "beyond Horndeski" theory involving vector degrees of freedom that avoids the propagation of ghosts thanks to secondary constraints. In addition, we analyze a Higgs mechanism for generating vector Galileons through spontaneous symmetry breaking, and we present its consistent covariantization.

  8. Gradient enhanced spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijl, Peter C.; Hurd, Ralph E.

    2011-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the personal recollections of the authors regarding their contributions to the introduction of shielded gradient technology into NMR spectroscopy during the late 1980s and early 1990s. It provides some background into early probe design and details some of the early technical progress with the use of shielded magnetic field gradients for coherence selection in high resolution NMR and describes the developments at General Electric, the National Institutes of Health, Georgetown University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine that ultimately led to this technology becoming commonplace in modern NMR spectroscopy. Most of this early technical work was published in the Journal of Magnetic Resonance.

  9. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed.

  10. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  11. Gradient tabu search.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Svetlana; Engels, Bernd

    2007-01-30

    This paper presents a modification of the tabu search called gradient tabu search (GTS). It uses analytical gradients for a fast minimization to the next local minimum and analytical diagonal elements of the Hessian to escape local minima. For an efficient blocking of already visited areas tabu regions and tabu directions are introduced into the tabu list (TL). Trials with various well-known test functions indicate that the GTS is a very promising approach to determine local and global minima of differentiable functions. Possible application areas could be optimization routines for force field parameters or conformational searches for large molecules. PMID:17186482

  12. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  13. Index Sets and Vectorization

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, J A

    2012-03-27

    Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

  14. Face recognition using local gradient binary count pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaochao; Lin, Yaping; Ou, Bo; Yang, Junfeng; Wu, Zhelun

    2015-11-01

    A local feature descriptor, the local gradient binary count pattern (LGBCP), is proposed for face recognition. Unlike some current methods that extract features directly from a face image in the spatial domain, LGBCP encodes the local gradient information of the face's texture in an effective way and provides a more discriminative code than other methods. We compute the gradient information of a face image through convolutions with compass masks. The gradient information is encoded using the local binary count operator. We divide a face into several subregions and extract the distribution of the LGBCP codes from each subregion. Then all the histograms are concatenated into a vector, which is used for face description. For recognition, the chi-square statistic is used to measure the similarity of different feature vectors. Besides directly calculating the similarity of two feature vectors, we provide a weighted matching scheme in which different weights are assigned to different subregions. The nearest-neighborhood classifier is exploited for classification. Experiments are conducted on the FERET, CAS-PEAL, and AR face databases. LGBCP achieves 96.15% on the Fb set of FERET. For CAS-PEAL, LGBCP gets 96.97%, 98.91%, and 90.89% on the aging, distance, and expression sets, respectively.

  15. Bigravity from gradient expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasuho; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    We discuss how the ghost-free bigravity coupled with a single scalar field can be derived from a braneworld setup. We consider DGP two-brane model without radion stabilization. The bulk configuration is solved for given boundary metrics, and it is substituted back into the action to obtain the effective four-dimensional action. In order to obtain the ghost-free bigravity, we consider the gradient expansion in which the brane separation is supposed to be sufficiently small so that two boundary metrics are almost identical. The obtained effective theory is shown to be ghost free as expected, however, the interaction between two gravitons takes the Fierz-Pauli form at the leading order of the gradient expansion, even though we do not use the approximation of linear perturbation. We also find that the radion remains as a scalar field in the four-dimensional effective theory, but its coupling to the metrics is non-trivial.

  16. Vectorization of algorithms for solving systems of difference equations

    SciTech Connect

    Buzbee, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Today's fastest computers achieve their highest level of performance when processing vectors. Consequently, considerable effort has been spent in the past decade developing algorithms that can be expressed as operations on vectors. In this paper two types of vector architecture are defined. A discussion is presented on the variation of performance that can occur on a vector processor as a function of algorithm and implementation, the consequences of this variation, and the performance of some basic operators on the two classes of vector architecture. Also discussed is the performance of higher-level operators, including some that should be used with caution. With both types of operators, the implementation of techniques for solving systems of difference equations is discussed. Included are fast Poisson solvers and point, line, and conjugate-gradient techniques. 1 figure.

  17. Vector theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-15

    This article provides a general study of the Hamiltonian stability and the hyperbolicity of vector field models involving both a general function of the Faraday tensor and its dual, f(F{sup 2},FF-tilde), as well as a Proca potential for the vector field, V(A{sup 2}). In particular it is demonstrated that theories involving only f(F{sup 2}) do not satisfy the hyperbolicity conditions. It is then shown that in this class of models, the cosmological dynamics always dilutes the vector field. In the case of a nonminimal coupling to gravity, it is established that theories involving Rf(A{sup 2}) or Rf(F{sup 2}) are generically pathologic. To finish, we exhibit a model where the vector field is not diluted during the cosmological evolution, because of a nonminimal vector field-curvature coupling which maintains second-order field equations. The relevance of such models for cosmology is discussed.

  18. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  19. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  20. Plasmonic phase-gradient metasurface for spontaneous emission control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langguth, L.; Schokker, A. H.; Guo, K.; Koenderink, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    We combine the concept of phase-gradient metasurfaces with fluorescence directionality control of an ensemble of incoherent emitters. We design a periodic metasurface to control the scattering amplitude of the lattice in momentum space. The lattice is embedded in a waveguiding layer doped with organic fluorophores. In contrast to the usual symmetric directionality that plasmonic lattices impart on emission, we find that the phase gradient translates into asymmetric directional emission into the far field, determined by scattering on a subset of the reciprocal lattice vectors. The measured asymmetry is well explained by analytical modeling.

  1. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  2. Continuous gravity gradient logging

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.L.; Lyle, W.D. Jr.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described for conducting a gravimetry survey of an earth formation, comprising the steps of: (a) continuously traversing the earth formation with a gravity logging tool having a column of fluid within the tool, (b) measuring a first pressure difference along a first interval within the column of fluid, (c) measuring a second pressure difference along a second interval within the column of fluid, (d) differencing the first and second pressure differences to determine the gravity gradient along the earth formation between the first and second intervals.

  3. Shadowgraph Study of Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David; Nikolaenko, Gennady; Giglio, Marzio; Vailati, Alberto; Croccolo, Fabrizio; Meyer, William

    2002-01-01

    A fluid or fluid mixture, subjected to a vertical temperature and/or concentration gradient in a gravitational field, exhibits greatly enhanced light scattering at small angles. This effect is caused by coupling between the vertical velocity fluctuations due to thermal energy and the vertically varying refractive index. Physically, small upward or downward moving regions will be displaced into fluid having a refractive index different from that of the moving region, thus giving rise to the enhanced scattering. The scattered intensity is predicted to vary with scattering wave vector q, as q(sup -4), for sufficiently large q, but the divergence is quenched by gravity at small q. In the absence of gravity, the long wavelength fluctuations responsible for the enhanced scattering are predicted to grow until limited by the sample dimensions. It is thus of interest to measure the mean-squared amplitude of such fluctuations in the microgravity environment for comparison with existing theory and ground based measurements. The relevant wave vectors are extremely small, making traditional low-angle light scattering difficult or impossible because of stray elastically scattered light generated by optical surfaces. An alternative technique is offered by the shadowgraph method, which is normally used to visualize fluid flows, but which can also serve as a quantitative tool to measure fluctuations. A somewhat novel shadowgraph apparatus and the necessary data analysis methods will be described. The apparatus uses a spatially coherent, but temporally incoherent, light source consisting of a super-luminescent diode coupled to a single-mode optical fiber in order to achieve extremely high spatial resolution, while avoiding effects caused by interference of light reflected from the various optical surfaces that are present when using laser sources. Results obtained for a critical mixture of aniline and cyclohexane subjected to a vertical temperature gradient will be presented. The

  4. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  5. Understanding Vector Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curjel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities that help students understand the idea of a vector field. Included are definitions, flow lines, tangential and normal components along curves, flux and work, field conservation, and differential equations. (KR)

  6. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  7. Poynting-vector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  8. Non Linear Conjugate Gradient

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-11-17

    Software that simulates and inverts electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a time harmonic source field excitation arising from the following antenna geometery: loops and grounded bipoles, as well as point electric and magnetic dioples. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code NLCGCS_MP ver 1.0. The upgrade includes the following components: Incorporation of new 1 D field sourcing routines to more accurately simulate the 3D electromagnetic field for arbitrary geologic& media, treatment for generalized finite length transmitting antenna geometry (antennas with vertical and horizontal component directions). In addition, the software has been upgraded to treat transverse anisotropy in electrical conductivity.« less

  9. Analytic Gradient for Density Functional Theory Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method.

    PubMed

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Zahariev, Federico; Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    The equations for the response terms for the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with the density functional theory (DFT) gradient are derived and implemented. Compared to the previous FMO-DFT gradient, which lacks response terms, the FMO-DFT analytic gradient has improved accuracy for a variety of functionals, when compared to numerical gradients. The FMO-DFT gradient agrees with the fully ab initio DFT gradient in which no fragmentation is performed, while reducing the nonlinear scaling associated with standard DFT. Solving for the response terms requires the solution of the coupled perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS) equations, where the CPKS equations are solved through a decoupled Z-vector procedure called the self-consistent Z-vector method. FMO-DFT is a nonvariational method and the FMO-DFT gradient is unique compared to standard DFT gradients in that the FMO-DFT gradient requires terms from both DFT and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) theories. PMID:26583213

  10. Tectorial Membrane Stiffness Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Emadi, Gulam; Getnick, Geoffrey; Quesnel, Alicia; Dallos, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear processes sound with high sensitivity and fine resolution over a wide frequency range. The underlying mechanism for this remarkable ability is the “cochlear amplifier”, which operates by modifying cochlear micromechanics. However, it is largely unknown how the cochlea implements this modification. Although gradual improvements in experimental techniques have yielded ever-better descriptions of gross basilar membrane vibration, the internal workings of the organ of Corti and of the tectorial membrane have resisted exploration. Although measurements of cochlear function in mice with a gene mutation for α-tectorin indicate the tectorial membrane's key role in the mechanoelectrical transformation by the inner ear, direct experimental data on the tectorial membrane's physical properties are limited, and only a few direct measurements on tectorial micromechanics are available. Using the hemicochlea, we are able to show that a tectorial membrane stiffness gradient exists along the cochlea, similar to that of the basilar membrane. In artificial perilymph (but with low calcium), the transversal and radial driving point stiffnesses change at a rate of –4.0 dB/mm and −4.9 dB/mm, respectively, along the length of the cochlear spiral. In artificial endolymph, the stiffness gradient for the transversal component was –3.4 dB/mm. Combined with the changes in tectorial membrane dimensions from base to apex, the radial stiffness changes would be able to provide a second frequency-place map in the cochlea. Young's modulus, which was obtained from measurements performed in the transversal direction, decreased by −2.6 dB/mm from base to apex. PMID:17496047

  11. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    SciTech Connect

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G.

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  12. A fast, preconditioned conjugate gradient Toeplitz solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Victor; Schrieber, Robert

    1989-01-01

    A simple factorization is given of an arbitrary hermitian, positive definite matrix in which the factors are well-conditioned, hermitian, and positive definite. In fact, given knowledge of the extreme eigenvalues of the original matrix A, an optimal improvement can be achieved, making the condition numbers of each of the two factors equal to the square root of the condition number of A. This technique is to applied to the solution of hermitian, positive definite Toeplitz systems. Large linear systems with hermitian, positive definite Toeplitz matrices arise in some signal processing applications. A stable fast algorithm is given for solving these systems that is based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient method. The algorithm exploits Toeplitz structure to reduce the cost of an iteration to O(n log n) by applying the fast Fourier Transform to compute matrix-vector products. Matrix factorization is used as a preconditioner.

  13. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.

  14. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  15. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  16. ILUBCG2-11: Solution of 11-banded nonsymmetric linear equation systems by a preconditioned biconjugate gradient routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-M.; Koniges, A. E.; Anderson, D. V.

    1989-10-01

    The biconjugate gradient method (BCG) provides an attractive alternative to the usual conjugate gradient algorithms for the solution of sparse systems of linear equations with nonsymmetric and indefinite matrix operators. A preconditioned algorithm is given, whose form resembles the incomplete L-U conjugate gradient scheme (ILUCG2) previously presented. Although the BCG scheme requires the storage of two additional vectors, it converges in a significantly lesser number of iterations (often half), while the number of calculations per iteration remains essentially the same.

  17. Gradients in analyzability.

    PubMed

    Grotstein, J S

    A discussion of "Some Communicative Properties of the Bipersonal Field" by Robert Langs, M.D. In response to Dr. Langs' delineation of the bipersonal field concept and his clinical elaboration of a triad of disorders which are graded into classifications of descending analyzability: Types A,B, and C fields. I confirm his thesis and endeavor to demonstrate some underlying foundations of his categorical assumptions, namely the conceptions of projective identification, of the intactness of the background object of primary identification, the conception of a dual-track theory of infantile development in order to delineate the parallel between the separated self and the continuation of primary identification, and the postulation of manic and schizoid types of narcissistic character disorders (Types B and C respectively). All of these conceptions are vicissitudes of the varying ways in which patients confront the depressive position of separation-individuation with rapprochement and, thereby, conform to a gradient in which symbolization interpretations can be utilized in analytic treatment. PMID:738806

  18. Vector WIMP miracle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Seto, Osamu

    2012-07-01

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) is well known to be a good candidate for dark matter, and it is also predicted by many new physics models beyond the standard model at the TeV scale. We found that, if the WIMP is a vector particle (spin-one particle) which is associated with some gauge symmetry broken at the TeV scale, the Higgs mass is often predicted to be 120-125 GeV, which is very consistent with the result of Higgs searches recently reported by ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. In this Letter, we consider the vector WIMP using a non-linear sigma model in order to confirm this result as general as possible in a bottom-up approach. Near-future prospects to detect the vector WIMP at both direct and indirect detection experiments of dark matter are also discussed.

  19. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  20. Vectorized garbage collection

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, A.W.; Bendiksen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Garbage collection can be done in vector mode on supercomputers like the Cray-2 and the Cyber 205. Both copying collection and mark-and-sweep can be expressed as breadth-first searches in which the queue can be processed in parallel. The authors have designed a copying garbage collector whose inner loop works entirely in vector mode. The only significant limitation of the algorithm is that if the size of the records is not constant, the implementation becomes much more complicated. The authors give performance measurements of the algorithm as implemented for Lisp CONS cells on the Cyber 205. Vector-mode garbage collection performs up to 9 times faster than scalar-mode collection.

  1. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  2. Scalar-vector bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejon-Barrera, Fernando; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We work out all of the details required for implementation of the conformal bootstrap program applied to the four-point function of two scalars and two vectors in an abstract conformal field theory in arbitrary dimension. This includes a review of which tensor structures make appearances, a construction of the projectors onto the required mixed symmetry representations, and a computation of the conformal blocks for all possible operators which can be exchanged. These blocks are presented as differential operators acting upon the previously known scalar conformal blocks. Finally, we set up the bootstrap equations which implement crossing symmetry. Special attention is given to the case of conserved vectors, where several simplifications occur.

  3. Density Gradients in Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines experiments in which a density gradient might be used to advantage. A density gradient consists of a column of liquid, the composition and density of which varies along its length. The procedure can be used in analysis of solutions and mixtures and in density measures of solids. (Author/TS)

  4. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R

    2006-08-16

    Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators are vacuum insulating structures composed of thin, alternating layers of dielectric and metal. They are currently being developed for application to high-current accelerators and related pulsed power systems. This paper describes some of the High-Gradient Insulator research currently being conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  5. Empirical equation estimates geothermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M. )

    1995-01-02

    An empirical equation can estimate geothermal (natural) temperature profiles in new exploration areas. These gradients are useful for cement slurry and mud design and for improving electrical and temperature log interpretation. Downhole circulating temperature logs and surface outlet temperatures are used for predicting the geothermal gradients.

  6. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  7. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  8. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  9. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  10. Singular Vectors' Subtle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Lachance, Michael; Remski, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists use adjacency tables to discover influence networks within and among groups. Building on work by Moler and Morrison, we use ordered pairs from the components of the first and second singular vectors of adjacency matrices as tools to distinguish these groups and to identify particularly strong or weak individuals.

  11. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  12. Vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    2009-08-01

    Vector-borne diseases have been the scourge of man and animals since the beginning of time. Historically, these are the diseases that caused the great plagues such as the 'Black Death' in Europe in the 14th Century and the epidemics of yellow fever that plagued the development of the New World. Others, such as Nagana, contributed to the lack of development in Africa for many years. At the turn of the 20th Century, vector-borne diseases were among the most serious public and animal health problems in the world. For the most part, these diseases were controlled by the middle of the 20th Century through the application of knowledge about their natural history along with the judicious use of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and other residual insecticides to interrupt the transmission cycle between arthropod and vertebrate host. However, this success initiated a period of complacency in the 1960s and 1970s, which resulted in the redirection of resources away from prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. The 1970s was also a time in which there were major changes to public health policy. Global trends, combined with changes in animal husbandry, urbanisation, modern transportation and globalisation, have resulted in a global re-emergence of epidemic vector-borne diseases affecting both humans and animals over the past 30 years. PMID:20128467

  13. Research in vector control

    PubMed Central

    Quarterman, K. D.

    1963-01-01

    Current research on vector control is directed mainly at finding answers to the problem of resistance. Despite considerable advances in knowledge of the genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and ecology of resistant vectors, the only practical answer found so far has been the development of new, substitute insecticides. At present the operational needs of existing large-scale control or eradication programmes swallow up much of the funds, personnel and facilities that might otherwise be devoted to basic research. Moreover, to back up these programmes, there is a continuing need for applied research on such questions as the packaging of pesticides, improvements in equipment and the development of new formulations. The author gives examples of applied research already carried out or in progress and indicates some areas of both basic and applied research demanding urgent attention. Like other participants in the seminar, he stresses the fundamental importance of ecological studies. He also examines the concept of integrated vector control and points out that the realization of this concept presupposes close co-ordination between basic and applied research, laboratory and field studies, and investigations on chemical and non-chemical vector control measures. PMID:20604177

  14. Integrating the Gradient of the Thin Wire Kernel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champagne, Nathan J.; Wilton, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    A formulation for integrating the gradient of the thin wire kernel is presented. This approach employs a new expression for the gradient of the thin wire kernel derived from a recent technique for numerically evaluating the exact thin wire kernel. This approach should provide essentially arbitrary accuracy and may be used with higher-order elements and basis functions using the procedure described in [4].When the source and observation points are close, the potential integrals over wire segments involving the wire kernel are split into parts to handle the singular behavior of the integrand [1]. The singularity characteristics of the gradient of the wire kernel are different than those of the wire kernel, and the axial and radial components have different singularities. The characteristics of the gradient of the wire kernel are discussed in [2]. To evaluate the near electric and magnetic fields of a wire, the integration of the gradient of the wire kernel needs to be calculated over the source wire. Since the vector bases for current have constant direction on linear wire segments, these integrals reduce to integrals of the form

  15. Gradient estimation using configurations of two or three spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, J.; Sorbalo, E.; He, M.; Blagau, A.

    2013-11-01

    The forthcoming three-satellite mission Swarm will allow us to investigate plasma processes and phenomena in the upper ionosphere from an in-situ multi-spacecraft perspective. Since with less than four points in space the spatiotemporal ambiguity cannot be resolved fully, analysis tools for estimating spatial gradients, wave vectors, or boundary parameters need to utilise additional information such as geometrical or dynamical constraints. This report deals with gradient estimation where the planar component is constructed using instantaneous three-point observations or, for quasi-static structures, by means of measurements along the orbits of two close spacecraft. A new least squares (LS) gradient estimator for the latter case is compared with existing finite difference (FD) schemes and also with a three-point LS technique. All available techniques are presented in a common framework to facilitate error analyses and consistency checks, and to show how arbitrary combinations of planar gradient estimators and constraints can be formed. The accuracy of LS and FD planar gradient estimators is assessed in terms of prescribed and adjustable discretization parameters to optimise their performance along the satellite orbits. Furthermore, we discuss the implications of imperfect constraint equations for error propagation, and address the effects of sub-scale structures. The two-spacecraft LS scheme is demonstrated using Cluster FGM measurements at a planar and essentially force-free plasma boundary in the solar wind where all three different types of constraints to construct out-of-plane derivatives can be applied.

  16. Combining Step Gradients and Linear Gradients in Density.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok A; Walz, Jenna A; Gonidec, Mathieu; Mace, Charles R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-06-16

    Combining aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS) and magnetic levitation (MagLev) provides a method to produce hybrid gradients in apparent density. AMPS—solutions of different polymers, salts, or surfactants that spontaneously separate into immiscible but predominantly aqueous phases—offer thermodynamically stable steps in density that can be tuned by the concentration of solutes. MagLev—the levitation of diamagnetic objects in a paramagnetic fluid within a magnetic field gradient—can be arranged to provide a near-linear gradient in effective density where the height of a levitating object above the surface of the magnet corresponds to its density; the strength of the gradient in effective density can be tuned by the choice of paramagnetic salt and its concentrations and by the strength and gradient in the magnetic field. Including paramagnetic salts (e.g., MnSO4 or MnCl2) in AMPS, and placing them in a magnetic field gradient, enables their use as media for MagLev. The potential to create large steps in density with AMPS allows separations of objects across a range of densities. The gradients produced by MagLev provide resolution over a continuous range of densities. By combining these approaches, mixtures of objects with large differences in density can be separated and analyzed simultaneously. Using MagLev to add an effective gradient in density also enables tuning the range of densities captured at an interface of an AMPS by simply changing the position of the container in the magnetic field. Further, by creating AMPS in which phases have different concentrations of paramagnetic ions, the phases can provide different resolutions in density. These results suggest that combining steps in density with gradients in density can enable new classes of separations based on density. PMID:25978093

  17. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  18. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  19. Stochastic estimates of gradient from laser measurements for an autonomous Martian roving vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    The general problem of estimating the state vector x from the state equation h = Ax where h, A, and x are all stochastic, is presented. Specifically, the problem is for an autonomous Martian roving vehicle to utilize laser measurements in estimating the gradient of the terrain. Error exists due to two factors - surface roughness and instrumental measurements. The errors in slope depend on the standard deviations of these noise factors. Numerically, the error in gradient is expressed as a function of instrumental inaccuracies. Certain guidelines for the accuracy of permissable gradient must be set. It is found that present technology can meet these guidelines.

  20. Stochastic estimates of gradient from laser measurements for an autonomous Martian Roving Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C. N.; Burger, P.

    1973-01-01

    The general problem presented in this paper is one of estimating the state vector x from the state equation h = Ax, where h, A, and x are all stochastic. Specifically, the problem is for an autonomous Martian Roving Vehicle to utilize laser measurements in estimating the gradient of the terrain. Error exists due to two factors - surface roughness and instrumental measurements. The errors in slope depend on the standard deviations of these noise factors. Numerically, the error in gradient is expressed as a function of instrumental inaccuracies. Certain guidelines for the accuracy of permissable gradient must be set. It is found that present technology can meet these guidelines.-

  1. Parameter-exploring policy gradients.

    PubMed

    Sehnke, Frank; Osendorfer, Christian; Rückstiess, Thomas; Graves, Alex; Peters, Jan; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    We present a model-free reinforcement learning method for partially observable Markov decision problems. Our method estimates a likelihood gradient by sampling directly in parameter space, which leads to lower variance gradient estimates than obtained by regular policy gradient methods. We show that for several complex control tasks, including robust standing with a humanoid robot, this method outperforms well-known algorithms from the fields of standard policy gradients, finite difference methods and population based heuristics. We also show that the improvement is largest when the parameter samples are drawn symmetrically. Lastly we analyse the importance of the individual components of our method by incrementally incorporating them into the other algorithms, and measuring the gain in performance after each step. PMID:20061118

  2. Spatial gradient tuning in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Tom; Goldflam, Michael; Jokerst, Nan; Basov, Dimitri; Smith, David

    2011-03-01

    Gradient Index (GRIN) metamaterials have been used to create devices inspired by, but often surpassing the potential of, conventional GRIN optics. The unit-cell nature of metamaterials presents the opportunity to exert much greater control over spatial gradients than is possible in natural materials. This is true not only during the design phase but also offers the potential for real-time reconfiguration of the metamaterial gradient. This ability fits nicely into the picture of transformation-optics, in which spatial gradients can enable an impressive suite of innovative devices. We discuss methods to exert control over metamaterial response, focusing on our recent demonstrations using Vanadium Dioxide. We give special attention to role of memristance and mem-capacitance observed in Vanadium Dioxide, which simplify the demands of stimuli and addressing, as well as intersecting metamaterials with the field of memory-materials.

  3. Preloadable vector sensitive latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acres, William R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A preloadable vector-sensitive latch which automatically releases when the force vector from a latch memebr reaches a specified release angle is presented. In addition, it contains means to remove clearance between the latched members and to preload the latch to prevent separation at angles less than the specified release angle. The latch comprises a triangular main link, a free link connected between a first corner of the main link and a yoke member, a housing, and an actuator connected between the yoke member and the housing. A return spring bias means connects the main link to a portion of the housing. A second corner of the main link is slidably and pivotally connected to the housing via a slot in a web portion of the housing. The latch housing has a rigid docking ring alignable with a mating locking ring which is engageable by a locking roller journalled on the third corner of the triangular main link.

  4. Generalized gradient and contour program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellman, Marshall Strong

    1972-01-01

    This program computes estimates of gradients, prepares contour maps, and plots various sets of data provided by the user on the CalComp plotters. The gradients represent the maximum rates of change of a real variable Z=f(X,Y) with respect to the twodimensional rectangle on which the function is defined. The contours are lines of equal Z values. The program also plots special line data sets provided by the user.

  5. Vector Magnetograph Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed during the period of November 1994 through March 1996 on the design of a Space-borne Solar Vector Magnetograph. This work has been performed as part of a design team under the supervision of Dr. Mona Hagyard and Dr. Alan Gary of the Space Science Laboratory. Many tasks were performed and this report documents the results from some of those tasks, each contained in the corresponding appendix. Appendices are organized in chronological order.

  6. Some experiences with Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng; Kim, Hyoung M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors for reduced-order modeling in structural dynamics and for control of flexible structures. Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors are defined and illustrated, and several applications that have been under study at The University of Texas at Austin are reviewed: model reduction for undamped structural dynamics systems, component mode synthesis using Krylov vectors, model reduction of damped structural dynamics systems, and one-sided and two-sided unsymmetric block-Lanczos model-reduction algorithms.

  7. Isomap based supporting vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W. N.

    2015-12-01

    This research presents a new isomap based supporting vector machine method. Isomap is a dimension reduction method which is able to analyze nonlinear relationship of data on manifolds. Accordingly, support vector machine is established on the isomap manifold to classify given and predict unknown data. A case study of the isomap based supporting vector machine for environmental planning problems is conducted.

  8. Signal Selection in High-Resolution NMR by Pulsed Field Gradients. I. Geometrical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitschang, Lorenz

    1999-03-01

    A geometrical description for the selection of coherence transfer pathways in high resolution NMR by the application of pulsed field gradients along three orthogonal directions in space is presented. The response of the spin system is one point of the three-dimensional Fourier transform of the sample volume affected by a sequence of field gradients. The property that a pathway is retained (or suppressed) when a sequence of field gradients is applied is expressed by the property of vectors, representing the pathway and the sequence, respectively, to be orthogonal (or not orthogonal). Ignoring imperfections of RF pulses, and with the exception of sensitivity enhanced experiments and experiments where the relevant coherence order is zero while field gradients are applied, it is shown that at most only half of the relevant pathways, as compared to a phase cycled experiment, are retained when field gradients are used for signal selection.

  9. Properties of the Acoustic Vector Field in Underwater Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, David R.

    This thesis focuses on the description and measurement of the underwater acoustic field, based on vector properties of acoustic particle velocity. The specific goal is to interpret vector sensor measurements in underwater waveguides, in particular those measurements made in littoral (shallow) waters. To that end, theoretical models, which include the effects of reflections from the waveguide boundaries, are developed for the acoustic intensity, i.e. the product of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity. Vector properties of acoustic intensity are shown to correspond to a non-dimensional vector property of acoustic particle velocity, its degree of circularity, which describes the trajectory of particle motion. Both experimental measurements and simulations of this non-dimensional vector property are used to analyze characteristics of sound propagation in underwater waveguides. Two measurement techniques are utilized in the experiments described in this thesis. In the first, particle velocity is obtained indirectly by time integration of the measured pressure gradient between two closely spaced (with respect to an acoustic wavelength) conventional pressure sensitive hydrophones. This method was used in ocean experiments conducted with vertical line arrays of hydrophones. In the second technique, particle velocity is measured directly by time integration of the signal generated by an accelerometer. An additional pressure measurement from a co-located hydrophone forms what is known as a "combined sensor" in the Russian literature, which allows for estimation of the vector acoustic intensity. This method was utilized mainly in laboratory experiments.

  10. An M-step preconditioned conjugate gradient method for parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a preconditioned conjugate gradient method that can be effectively implemented on both vector machines and parallel arrays to solve sparse symmetric and positive definite systems of linear equations. The implementation on the CYBER 203/205 and on the Finite Element Machine is discussed and results obtained using the method on these machines are given.

  11. Determination of hearth position of a forthcoming strong EQ using gradients and phase velocities of ULF geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Ismaguilov, V. S.; Hattori, K.; Hayakawa, M.

    Behavior of gradient and phase velocity vectors of ULF ( F < 1 Hz) geomagnetic disturbances was investigated for two earthquake (EQ) events in Japan in 2000 ( M > 6) and 2003 ( M = 5.8) years. The gradient and phase velocity vectors were determined using the data of three high-sensitive three-component magnetic stations situated at a distance ∼5 km from each other (magnetic gradientometer). Two gradientometers were installed southeast and southwest of Tokyo at a distance ∼150 km from each other. It was found that the gradient and phase velocity values had anomaly changes 3-4 months before the strong EQs. New directions of the gradient vectors took place in the same period - the directions just to the forthcoming EQ epicenter. The directions from the forthcoming EQ epicenter arouse for the phase velocity vectors. We propose to use the gradient and phase velocity vectors of the ULF geomagnetic disturbances as important factors of the short-term prediction of strong earthquakes.

  12. Vector representation of tourmaline compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    The vector method for representing mineral compositions of amphibole and mica groups is applied to the tourmaline group. Consideration is given to the methods for drawing the relevant vector diagrams, relating the exchange vectors to one another, and contouring the diagrams for constant values of Na, Ca, Li, Fe, Mg, Al, Si, and OH. The method is used to depict a wide range of possible tourmaline end-member compositions and solid solutions, starting from a single point. In addition to vector depictions of multicomponent natural tourmalines, vectors are presented for simpler systems such as (Na,Al)-tourmalines, alkali-free tourmalines, and elbaites.

  13. Vector Theory of Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. S.

    So far, works on ultrasonic diffraction imaging are based on scalar theory of sound wave. This is not correct as sound has vector nature. But when sound propagates in solids, its vector nature has to be considered as polarization occurs and transverse wave as well as longitudinal wave will appear. Vector theory is especially needed when the obstacle size is smaller than the wavelength. We use the Smythe-Kirchhoff approach for the vector theory of diffraction. We derive the image formation theory based on the vector diffraction theory. The effect of polarization on acoustical imaging is discussed.

  14. Estimation of coastal density gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, M. J.; Palmer, M. R.; Polton, J. A.; O'Neill, C. K.

    2012-04-01

    Density gradients in coastal regions with significant freshwater input are large and variable and are a major control of nearshore circulation. However their measurement is difficult, especially where the gradients are largest close to the coast, with significant uncertainties because of a variety of factors - spatial and time scales are small, tidal currents are strong and water depths shallow. Whilst temperature measurements are relatively straightforward, measurements of salinity (the dominant control of spatial variability) can be less reliable in turbid coastal waters. Liverpool Bay has strong tidal mixing and receives fresh water principally from the Dee, Mersey, Ribble and Conwy estuaries, each with different catchment influences. Horizontal and vertical density gradients are variable both in space and time. The water column stratifies intermittently. A Coastal Observatory has been operational since 2002 with regular (quasi monthly) CTD surveys on a 9 km grid, an situ station, an instrumented ferry travelling between Birkenhead and Dublin and a shore-based HF radar system measuring surface currents and waves. These measurements are complementary, each having different space-time characteristics. For coastal gradients the ferry is particularly useful since measurements are made right from the mouth of Mersey. From measurements at the in situ site alone density gradients can only be estimated from the tidal excursion. A suite of coupled physical, wave and ecological models are run in association with these measurements. The models, here on a 1.8 km grid, enable detailed estimation of nearshore density gradients, provided appropriate river run-off data are available. Examples are presented of the density gradients estimated from the different measurements and models, together with accuracies and uncertainties, showing that systematic time series measurements within a few kilometres of the coast are a high priority. (Here gliders are an exciting prospect for

  15. Vector Disparity Sensor with Vergence Control for Active Vision Systems

    PubMed Central

    Barranco, Francisco; Diaz, Javier; Gibaldi, Agostino; Sabatini, Silvio P.; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based) and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system. PMID:22438737

  16. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Glen A; Ueti, Massaro W

    2015-01-01

    Equine piroplasmosis is a disease of Equidae, including horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras, caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick vectors, and although they have inherent differences they are categorized together because they cause similar pathology and have similar morphologies, life cycles, and vector relationships. To complete their life cycle, these parasites must undergo a complex series of developmental events, including sexual-stage development in their tick vectors. Consequently, ticks are the definitive hosts as well as vectors for these parasites, and the vector relationship is restricted to a few competent tick species. Because the vector relationship is critical to the epidemiology of these parasites, we highlight current knowledge of the vector ecology of these tick-borne equine pathogens, emphasizing tick transmissibility and potential control strategies to prevent their spread. PMID:25564746

  17. Wideband direction finding via shielded gradient beamspace techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudner, Terry J.; Henderson, Terry L.

    2003-10-01

    Monopulse techniques have been used for over 50 years in the radar community to estimate the direction of arrival (DOA) of incoming echoes. In recent years, a variant of the monopulse technique has been developed, termed the shielded gradient technique, which allows DOA estimation for signals of arbitrary bandwidth. The technique maps the array-output M-vector into a frequency-invariant B-dimensional beamspace. The work presented here describes the shielded gradient beamspace model in its higher-order form, and develops wideband DOA estimation algorithms analogous to the narrow-band MUSIC, root-MUSIC, and ESPRIT algorithms. The performance of these new algorithms is studied through simulation and application to measured, in-water sonar data. They are also compared via simulation to existing wideband DOA estimation algorithms. [Work supported by the Internal Research and Development Program under Contract No. FEE-800.

  18. Rapid Gradient-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Gradient echo sequences are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for numerous applications ranging from angiography to perfusion to functional MRI. Compared with spin-echo techniques, the very short repetition times of gradient-echo methods enable very rapid 2D and 3D imaging, but also lead to complicated “steady states.” Signal and contrast behavior can be described graphically and mathematically, and depends strongly on the type of spoiling: fully balanced (no spoiling), gradient spoiling, or RF-spoiling. These spoiling options trade off between high signal and pure T1 contrast while the flip angle also affects image contrast in all cases, both of which can be demonstrated theoretically and in image examples. As with spin-echo sequences, magnetization preparation can be added to gradient-echo sequences to alter image contrast. Gradient echo sequences are widely used for numerous applications such as 3D perfusion imaging, functional MRI, cardiac imaging and MR angiography. PMID:23097185

  19. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  20. Full-sky lensing reconstruction of gradient and curl modes from CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi E-mail: yamauchi@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-01-01

    We present a method of lensing reconstruction on the full sky, by extending the optimal quadratic estimator proposed by Okamoto and Hu (2003) to the case including the curl mode of deflection angle. The curl mode is induced by the vector and tensor metric perturbations, and the reconstruction of the curl mode would be a powerful tool to not only check systematics in the estimated gradient mode but also probe any vector and tensor sources. We find that the gradient and curl modes can be reconstructed separately, thanks to the distinctive feature in the parity symmetry between the gradient and curl modes. We compare our estimator with the flat-sky estimator proposed by Cooray et al (2005). Based on the new formalism, the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the curl mode produced by the primordial gravitational-waves and a specific model of cosmic strings are estimated, and prospects for future observations are discussed.

  1. The influence of ALN-Al gradient material gradient index on ballistic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youcong; Liu, Qiwen; Li, Yao; Shen, Qiang

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of the gradient material is superior to laminated material, and gradient materials have different gradient types. Using ls-dyna to simulate the ballistic performance of ALN-AL gradient target plates which contain three gradient index (b = 1, b = 0.5, b = 2). Through Hopkinson bar numerical simulation to the target plate materials, we obtained the reflection stress wave and transmission stress wave state of gradient material to get the best gradient index. The internal stress state of gradient material is simulated by amplification processing of the target plate model. When the gradient index b is equal to 1, the gradient target plate is best of all.

  2. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronan, Micheal T.

    1989-04-01

    Measurements of exclusive untagged ρ0ρ0,ρφ,K*K¯*, and ρω production and tagged ρ0ρ0 production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented.

  3. Polynomial preconditioning for conjugate gradient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.

    1987-12-01

    The solution of a linear system of equations, Ax = b, arises in many scientific applications. If A is large and sparse, an iterative method is required. When A is hermitian positive definite (hpd), the conjugate gradient method of Hestenes and Stiefel is popular. When A is hermitian indefinite (hid), the conjugate residual method may be used. If A is ill-conditioned, these methods may converge slowly, in which case a preconditioner is needed. In this thesis we examine the use of polynomial preconditioning in CG methods for both hermitian positive definite and indefinite matrices. Such preconditioners are easy to employ and well-suited to vector and/or parallel architectures. We first show that any CG method is characterized by three matrices: an hpd inner product matrix B, a preconditioning matrix C, and the hermitian matrix A. The resulting method, CG(B,C,A), minimizes the B-norm of the error over a Krylov subspace. We next exploit the versatility of polynomial preconditioners to design several new CG methods. To obtain an optimum preconditioner, we solve a constrained minimax approximation problem. The preconditioning polynomial, C(lambda), is optimum in that it minimizes a bound on the condition number of the preconditioned matrix, p/sub m/(A). An adaptive procedure for dynamically determining the optimum preconditioner is also discussed. Finally, in a variety of numerical experiments, conducted on a Cray X-MP/48, we demonstrate the effectiveness of polynomial preconditioning. 66 ref., 19 figs., 39 tabs.

  4. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Anaya, R M; Blackfield, D; Chen, Y -; Falabella, S; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Paul, A C; Sampayan, S; Sanders, D M; Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Krogh, M

    2006-11-15

    High voltage systems operated in vacuum require insulating materials to maintain spacing between conductors held at different potentials, and may be used to maintain a nonconductive vacuum boundary. Traditional vacuum insulators generally consist of a single material, but insulating structures composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal can also be built. These ''High-Gradient Insulators'' have been experimentally shown to withstand higher voltage gradients than comparable conventional insulators. As a result, they have application to a wide range of high-voltage vacuum systems where compact size is important. This paper describes ongoing research on these structures, as well as the current theoretical understanding driving this work.

  5. Oxidation in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick's first law of diffusion to include a heat flux term--a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and for nickel doped with chromium. Research in progress is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient above 800 C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. The tests are being carried out in the new high temperature gaseous corrosion and corrosion/erosion facility at the Albany Research Center.

  6. Templating Surfaces with Gradient Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Genzer,J.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most versatile and widely used methods of forming surfaces with position-dependent wettability is that conceived by Chaudhury and Whitesides more than a decade ago. In this paper we review several projects that utilize this gradient-forming methodology for: controlled of deposition of self-assembled monolayers on surfaces, generating arrays of nanoparticles with number density gradients, probing the mushroom-to-brush transition in surface-anchored polymers, and controlling the speed of moving liquid droplets on surfaces.

  7. Variable metric conjugate gradient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, T.; Manteuffel, T.

    1994-07-01

    1.1 Motivation. In this paper we present a framework that includes many well known iterative methods for the solution of nonsymmetric linear systems of equations, Ax = b. Section 2 begins with a brief review of the conjugate gradient method. Next, we describe a broader class of methods, known as projection methods, to which the conjugate gradient (CG) method and most conjugate gradient-like methods belong. The concept of a method having either a fixed or a variable metric is introduced. Methods that have a metric are referred to as either fixed or variable metric methods. Some relationships between projection methods and fixed (variable) metric methods are discussed. The main emphasis of the remainder of this paper is on variable metric methods. In Section 3 we show how the biconjugate gradient (BCG), and the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) methods fit into this framework as variable metric methods. By modifying the underlying Lanczos biorthogonalization process used in the implementation of BCG and QMR, we obtain other variable metric methods. These, we refer to as generalizations of BCG and QMR.

  8. Orderings for conjugate gradient preconditionings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of orderings on the rate of convergence of the conjugate gradient method with SSOR or incomplete Cholesky preconditioning is examined. Some results also are presented that help to explain why red/black ordering gives an inferior rate of convergence.

  9. Gradient Tempering Of Bearing Races

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, Richardson A.

    1991-01-01

    Gradient-tempering process increases fracture toughness and resistance to stress-corrosion cracking of ball-bearing races made of hard, strong steels and subject to high installation stresses and operation in corrosive media. Also used in other applications in which local toughening of high-strength/low-toughness materials required.

  10. HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC PARTICULATE COLLECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the initial phases of an evaluation of high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) as a potential method of fine particle collection from industrial stack gases. HGMS is a relatively new separation technique that has been shown to be capable of removing small, w...

  11. Multiscale hierarchical support vector clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Michael Saas; Holm, David Alberg; Sjöstrand, Karl; Ley, Carsten Dan; Rowland, Ian John; Larsen, Rasmus

    2008-03-01

    Clustering is the preferred choice of method in many applications, and support vector clustering (SVC) has proven efficient for clustering noisy and high-dimensional data sets. A method for multiscale support vector clustering is demonstrated, using the recently emerged method for fast calculation of the entire regularization path of the support vector domain description. The method is illustrated on artificially generated examples, and applied for detecting blood vessels from high resolution time series of magnetic resonance imaging data. The obtained results are robust while the need for parameter estimation is reduced, compared to support vector clustering.

  12. VLSI Processor For Vector Quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Pixel intensities in each kernel compared simultaneously with all code vectors. Prototype high-performance, low-power, very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit designed to perform compression of image data by vector-quantization method. Contains relatively simple analog computational cells operating on direct or buffered outputs of photodetectors grouped into blocks in imaging array, yielding vector-quantization code word for each such block in sequence. Scheme exploits parallel-processing nature of vector-quantization architecture, with consequent increase in speed.

  13. Localization and vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes the following localization property for vector spherical harmonics: a wide class of non-local, vector-valued operators reduce to local, multiplication-type operations when applied to a vector spherical harmonic. As localization occurs in a very precise, quantifiable and explicitly computable fashion, the localization property provides a set of useful formulae for analyzing vector-valued fractional diffusion and non-local differential equations defined on S d - 1. As such analyses require a detailed understanding of operators for which localization occurs, we provide several applications of the result in the context of non-local differential equations.

  14. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  15. The MSFC Vector Magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Cumings, N. P.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's solar vector magnetograph system is described; this system allows measurements of all components of the Sun's photospheric magnetic field over a 5 × 5 or 2.0 × 2.0 arc min square field-of-view with an optimum time resolution of ˜ 100 s and an optimum signal-to-noise of ˜1600. The basic system components are described, including the optics, detector, digital system and associated electronics. Automatic sequencing and control functions are outlined as well as manual selections of system parameters which afford unique system flexibility. Results of system calibration and performance are presented, including linearity, dynamic range, uniformity, spatial and spectral resolutions, signal-to-noise, electro-optical retardation and polarization calibration. Scientific investigations which utilize the unique characteristics of the instrument are described and typical results are presented.

  16. The MSFC vector magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Cumings, N. P.; West, E. A.

    1981-02-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's solar vector magnetograph system allows measurements of all components of the Sun's photospheric magnetic field over a 5 x 5 or 2.5 x 2.5 arc min square field of view with an optimum time resolution of approximately 100 sec and an optimum signal-to-noise of approximately 1000. The basic system components are described, including the optics, detector, digital system, and associated electronics. Automatic sequencing and control functions are outlined as well as manual selections of system parameters which afford unique system flexibility. Results of system calibration and performance are presented, including linearity, dynamic range, uniformity, spatial and spectral resolutions, signal-to-noise, electro-optical retardation and polarization calibration.

  17. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the

  18. Iterative methods for the WLS state estimation on RISC, vector, and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Nieplocha, J.; Carroll, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    We investigate the suitability and effectiveness of iterative methods for solving the weighted-least-square (WLS) state estimation problem on RISC, vector, and parallel processors. Several of the most popular iterative methods are tested and evaluated. The best performing preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) is very well suited for vector and parallel processing as is demonstrated for the WLS state estimation of the IEEE standard test systems. A new sparse matrix format for the gain matrix improves vector performance of the PCG algorithm and makes it competitive to the direct solver. Internal parallelism in RISC processors, used in current multiprocessor systems, can be taken advantage of in an implementation of this algorithm.

  19. An efficient method for recovering Lyapunov vectors from singular vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher L.; Samelson, Roger M.

    2007-05-01

    Lyapunov vectors are natural generalizations of normal modes for linear disturbances to aperiodic deterministic flows and offer insights into the physical mechanisms of aperiodic flow and the maintenance of chaos. Most standard techniques for computing Lyapunov vectors produce results which are norm-dependent and lack invariance under the linearized flow (except for the leading Lyapunov vector) and these features can make computation and physical interpretation problematic. An efficient, norm-independent method for constructing the n most rapidly growing Lyapunov vectors from n - 1 leading forward and n leading backward asymptotic singular vectors is proposed. The Lyapunov vectors so constructed are invariant under the linearized flow in the sense that, once computed at one time, they are defined, in principle, for all time through the tangent linear propagator. An analogous method allows the construction of the n most rapidly decaying Lyapunov vectors from n decaying forward and n - 1 decaying backward singular vectors. This method is demonstrated using two low-order geophysical models.

  20. Towed and Shipboard Vector Magnetometers in Marine Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barckhausen, U.; Engels, M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of vector magnetometer components in geomagnetics has many advantages compared to the use of total field magnetometers. However, in marine geophysics the robust and easy-to-use Proton Precession magnetometers are still the standard instruments. Most of the few vector magnetometers in use work on multi instrument deep submersible platforms. Here we present some new instrumental and methodological aspects of surface towed fluxgate vector magnetometers which we use in a combination with Overhauser sensors. Processed fluxgate total field data are practically identical to the Overhauser reference and even provide a reliable gradient when combined with one Overhauser.The vertical component derived from the vector data constrains 2-D modelling much better than the total field alone. Although towed vector magnetometers typically provide no independent estimate of yaw, we illustrate that a numerical yaw (bandpass filtered magnetic heading) can provide reasonable estimates of the horizontal field components. These component data open additional analysis tools: the strike direction of magnetic lineations can be estimated from single profiles by either magnetic boundary strike ellipses in the space domain or by coherences between vertical and horizontal components in the wavenumber domain. Auto power spectra of the total field provide an approximate depth to the anomaly source or, if in obvious contradiction to the bathymetric depth, allow the detection of distortions, for example, by external temporal geomagnetic variations. A more common application is the use of vector magnetometers as shipboard instruments where the sensor's orientation can easily be resolved with data from the ship's positioning systems. We present some comparisons of shipboard and towed vector data. The quality of the magnetic data recorded onboard the ship can be surprisingly good after a thorough compensation for the ship's magnetic field.

  1. Vector calculus in non-integer dimensional space and its applications to fractal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2015-02-01

    We suggest a generalization of vector calculus for the case of non-integer dimensional space. The first and second orders operations such as gradient, divergence, the scalar and vector Laplace operators for non-integer dimensional space are defined. For simplification we consider scalar and vector fields that are independent of angles. We formulate a generalization of vector calculus for rotationally covariant scalar and vector functions. This generalization allows us to describe fractal media and materials in the framework of continuum models with non-integer dimensional space. As examples of application of the suggested calculus, we consider elasticity of fractal materials (fractal hollow ball and fractal cylindrical pipe with pressure inside and outside), steady distribution of heat in fractal media, electric field of fractal charged cylinder. We solve the correspondent equations for non-integer dimensional space models.

  2. High gradient RF breakdown studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa Leanne

    Higher accelerating gradients are required by future demands for TeV electron linear colliders. With higher energy comes the challenge of handling stronger electromagnetic fields in the accelerator structures and in the microwave sources that supply the power. A limit on the maximum field gradient is imposed by rf electrical breakdown. Investigating methods to achieve higher gradients and to better understand the mechanisms involved in the rf breakdown process has been the focal point of this study. A systematic series of rf breakdown experiments have been conducted at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center utilizing a transmission cavity operating in the TM020 mode. A procedure was developed to examine the high gradient section of the cavity in an electron microscope. The results have revealed that breakdown asymmetry exists between opposing high gradient surfaces. During breakdown, a plasma formation is detected localized near the surface with no visible evidence of an arc traversing the gap. These findings support the theory that high frequency rf breakdown is a single surface phenomenon. Other results from this study have shown that breakdown can occur at relatively low voltages when surface irregularities exist and along grain boundaries. A series of steps have been developed through this study that have significantly reduced the number of breakdowns that occur along grain boundaries. Testing under various vacuum conditions (10-11--10 -5 Torr) have revealed that while the breakdown threshold remained the same, the field emitted current density increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This suggests that the total field emitted current density is not the critical parameter in the initiation of high frequency vacuum breakdown. In the course of this study, microparticles were carefully tracked before and after rf processing. The outcome of this research suggests that expensive cleanroom facilities may not offer any advantage over practicing good cleaning and

  3. Dislocation microstructures and strain-gradient plasticity with one active slip plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Garroni, Adriana; Müller, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We study dislocation networks in the plane using the vectorial phase-field model introduced by Ortiz and coworkers, in the limit of small lattice spacing. We show that, in a scaling regime where the total length of the dislocations is large, the phase field model reduces to a simpler model of the strain-gradient type. The limiting model contains a term describing the three-dimensional elastic energy and a strain-gradient term describing the energy of the geometrically necessary dislocations, characterized by the tangential gradient of the slip. The energy density appearing in the strain-gradient term is determined by the solution of a cell problem, which depends on the line tension energy of dislocations. In the case of cubic crystals with isotropic elasticity our model shows that complex microstructures may form in which dislocations with different Burgers vector and orientation react with each other to reduce the total self-energy.

  4. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  5. Bubble vector in automatic merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, P. R.; Butler, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is within the capability of the DMAP language to build a set of vectors that can grow incrementally to be applied automatically and economically within a DMAP loop that serves to append sub-matrices that are generated within a loop to a core matrix. The method of constructing such vectors is explained.

  6. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  7. Computational strain gradient crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niordson, Christian F.; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method for viscous strain gradient crystal plasticity theory is presented, which incorporates both energetic and dissipative gradient effects. The underlying minimum principles are discussed as well as convergence properties of the proposed finite element procedure. Three problems of plane crystal plasticity are studied: pure shear of a single crystal between rigid platens as well as plastic deformation around cylindrical voids in hexagonal close packed and face centered cubic crystals. Effective in-plane constitutive slip parameters for plane strain deformation of specifically oriented face centered cubic crystals are developed in terms of the crystallographic slip parameters. The effect on geometrically necessary dislocation structures introduced by plastic deformation is investigated as a function of the ratio of void radius to plasticity length scale.

  8. High gradient directional solidification furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, B. R.; Whitt, W. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high gradient directional solidification furnace is disclosed which includes eight thermal zones throughout the length of the furnace. In the hot end of the furnace, furnace elements provide desired temperatures. These elements include Nichrome wire received in a grooved tube which is encapsulated y an outer alumina core. A booster heater is provided in the hot end of the furnace which includes toroidal tungsten/rhenium wire which has a capacity to put heat quickly into the furnace. An adiabatic zone is provided by an insulation barrier to separate the hot end of the furnace from the cold end. The old end of the furnace is defined by additional heating elements. A heat transfer plate provides a means by which heat may be extracted from the furnace and conducted away through liquid cooled jackets. By varying the input of heat via the booster heater and output of heat via the heat transfer plate, a desired thermal gradient profile may be provided.

  9. Carbon and Oxygen Galactic Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carigi, L.; Peimbert, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2006-06-01

    A chemical evolution model of the Galaxy has been computed to reproduce the O/H gradients from Galactic HII regions. This model solves the C enrichment problem because it fits the C/H and C/O gradients and the C and O histories of the solar vicinity. The model is based on C yields dependent on metallicity (Z) owing to stellar winds. The C yields of massive stars (MS) increase with Z and those of low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) decrease with Z. An important result is that the fraction of carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) due to MS and LIMS is strongly dependent on Z of the ISM, therefore, that fraction depends on time and on the Galactocentric distance. At present and in the solar vicinity about half of the C in the interstellar medium has been produced by MS and half by LIMS.

  10. Rice Reoviruses in Insect Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Li, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rice reoviruses, transmitted by leafhopper or planthopper vectors in a persistent propagative manner, seriously threaten the stability of rice production in Asia. Understanding the mechanisms that enable viral transmission by insect vectors is a key to controlling these viral diseases. This review describes current understanding of replication cycles of rice reoviruses in vector cell lines, transmission barriers, and molecular determinants of vector competence and persistent infection. Despite recent breakthroughs, such as the discoveries of actin-based tubule motility exploited by viruses to overcome transmission barriers and mutually beneficial relationships between viruses and bacterial symbionts, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of transmission mechanisms. Advances in genome sequencing, reverse genetics systems, and molecular technologies will help to address these problems. Investigating the multiple interaction systems among the virus, insect vector, insect symbiont, and plant during natural infection in the field is a central topic for future research on rice reoviruses. PMID:27296147

  11. A neural support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Support vector machines are state-of-the-art pattern recognition algorithms that are well founded in optimization and generalization theory but not obviously applicable to the brain. This paper presents Bio-SVM, a biologically feasible support vector machine. An unstable associative memory oscillates between support vectors and interacts with a feed-forward classification pathway. Kernel neurons blend support vectors and sensory input. Downstream temporal integration generates the classification. Instant learning of surprising events and off-line tuning of support vector weights trains the system. Emotion-based learning, forgetting trivia, sleep and brain oscillations are phenomena that agree with the Bio-SVM model. A mapping to the olfactory system is suggested. PMID:20092978

  12. Strategies for targeting lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Szécsi, Judit; Cosset, Francois-Loîc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2008-12-01

    Vectors derived from retroviruses such as lentiviruses and onco-retroviruses are probably among the most suitable tools to achieve a long-term gene transfer since they allow stable integration of a transgene and its propagation in daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses (MLV) since in contrast to the latter they can transduce non-proliferating target cells. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer approaches in vivo. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to upgrade lentiviral vectors for tissue or cell targeting and which have potential for in vivo gene delivery. In this overview we distinguish between three types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies (Fig 1): 1) targeting of vectors at the level of vector-cell entry through lentiviral vector surface modifications; 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue specific promoters into lentiviral vectors; 3) a novel microRNA technology that rather than targeting the 'right' cells will 'detarget' transgene expression from non-target cells while achieving high expression in the target-cell. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value for several gene therapy approaches but combining these three layers of transgene expression control will offer tools to really overcome several drawbacks in the field such as side-effect of off-target expression, clearance of transgene modified cells by immune response to the transgene and lack of biosecurity and efficiency in in vivo approaches. PMID:19075628

  13. Superdirective and gradient sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merklinger, Harold M.

    2003-10-01

    During the late 1960s and the 1970s, underwater acoustic investigators examined superdirective and gradient sensor systems in order to enhance submarine detection capabilities for surface ships and maritime aircraft. Simple gradient processing had already been used in both in-air acoustic systems (cardioid and super-cardioid microphones) as well as radio and radar applications. Superdirective techniques were known [R. L. Pritchard, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 25, 879 (1953)] and sometimes exploited in radar systems. It was quickly demonstrated that simple gradient sensors and modest degrees of superdirective array processing were possible, although self-noise and the ability to calibrate hydrophones limited the processing gains achievable. Circular superdirective arrays were used extensively by the Defence Research Establishment Atlantic for noise directionality measurements in the frequency range 4 Hz to about 1 kHz and considered for naval ASW applications until the superiority of oil-filled conventional arrays became apparent. Nevertheless, the significant theoretical and practical development of spatial harmonic beamforming and direction finding was completed. Although much of this work was not considered classified, neither was it widely published. This presentation will review the concepts developed and progress made. Beamforming, noise mitigation and calibration issues are covered.

  14. Vector Network Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-10-20

    Vector network analyzers are a convenient way to measure scattering parameters of a variety of microwave devices. However, these instruments, unlike oscilloscopes for example, require a relatively high degree of user knowledge and expertise. Due to the complexity of the instrument and of the calibration process, there are many ways in which an incorrect measurement may be produced. The Microwave Project, which is part of Sandia National Laboratories Primary Standards Laboratory, routinely uses check standardsmore » to verify that the network analyzer is operating properly. In the past, these measurements were recorded manually and, sometimes, interpretation of the results was problematic. To aid our measurement assurance process, a software program was developed to automatically measure a check standard and compare the new measurements with an historical database of measurements of the same device. The program acquires new measurement data from selected check standards, plots the new data against the mean and standard deviation of prior data for the same check standard, and updates the database files for the check standard. The program is entirely menu-driven requiring little additional work by the user.« less

  15. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.T.

    1988-12-09

    Measurements of exclusive untagged /rho//sup 0//rho//sup 0/, /rho//phi/, K/sup *//bar K//sup */, and /rho/..omega.. production and tagged /rho//sup 0//rho//sup 0/ production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M. T.

    1989-04-25

    Measurements of exclusive untagged /rho//sup 0//rho0/,/rho//phi/,/ital K//sup *//ital K/bar /*/, and /rho/..omega.. production and tagged /rho//sup 0//rho0/ production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented.

  17. Surface reconstruction in gradient-field domain using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Mohammad; Michailovich, Oleg V; Wang, Zhou

    2015-05-01

    Surface reconstruction from measurements of spatial gradient is an important computer vision problem with applications in photometric stereo and shape-from-shading. In the case of morphologically complex surfaces observed in the presence of shadowing and transparency artifacts, a relatively large dense gradient measurements may be required for accurate surface reconstruction. Consequently, due to hardware limitations of image acquisition devices, situations are possible in which the available sampling density might not be sufficiently high to allow for recovery of essential surface details. In this paper, the above problem is resolved by means of derivative compressed sensing (DCS). DCS can be viewed as a modification of the classical CS, which is particularly suited for reconstructions involving image/surface gradients. In DCS, a standard CS setting is augmented through incorporation of additional constraints arising from some intrinsic properties of potential vector fields. We demonstrate that using DCS results in reduction in the number of measurements as compared with the standard (dense) sampling, while producing estimates of higher accuracy and smaller variability as compared with CS-based estimates. The results of this study are further supported by a series of numerical experiments. PMID:25769157

  18. On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--part II: derivation and special cases

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-09-10

    Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier's law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as non-linear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coefficient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier's law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or sufficient.

  19. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  20. Enhancing poxvirus vectors vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Esteban, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing heterologous antigens from pathogens are currently at various stages in clinical trials with the aim to establish their efficacy. This is because these vectors have shown excellent safety profiles, significant immunogenicity against foreign expressed antigens and are able to induce protective immune responses. In view of the limited efficacy triggered by some poxvirus strains used in clinical trials (i.e, ALVAC in the RV144 phase III clinical trial for HIV), and of the restrictive replication capacity of the highly attenuated vectors like MVA and NYVAC, there is a consensus that further improvements of these vectors should be pursuit. In this review we considered several strategies that are currently being implemented, as well as new approaches, to improve the immunogenicity of the poxvirus vectors. This includes heterologous prime/boost protocols, use of co-stimulatory molecules, deletion of viral immunomodulatory genes still present in the poxvirus genome, enhancing virus promoter strength, enhancing vector replication capacity, optimizing expression of foreign heterologous sequences, and the combined use of adjuvants. An optimized poxvirus vector triggering long-lasting immunity with a high protective efficacy against a selective disease should be sought. PMID:25424927

  1. Investigation, design, and integration of insert gradient coils in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Rebecca E.

    three imaging axes. Both resistive and inductive merits were investigated. Of these, inductive values proved to be the limiting factor when designing coils sized to perform in a full body MRI system. Optimal merit and gradient strength were obtained from a butterfly design, and planar coils provided localized strength over a larger region. A butterfly coil was constructed with hollow copper wiring and powered to produce diffusion weighting during MRI. Diffusion contrast b=1300 s/mm2 was obtained using the insert with significant time and signal to noise ratio improvements. Keywords: butterfly coil, magnetic resonance imaging, electric field, gradient coil, inductive merit, nerve stimulation threshold, optimization, peripheral nerve stimulation, planar gradient, resistive merit, scalar potential, simulation, stimulation, vector potential, optimization.

  2. An education gradient in health, a health gradient in education, or a confounded gradient in both?

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jamie L; von Hippel, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    There is a positive gradient associating educational attainment with health, yet the explanation for this gradient is not clear. Does higher education improve health (causation)? Do the healthy become highly educated (selection)? Or do good health and high educational attainment both result from advantages established early in the life course (confounding)? This study evaluates these competing explanations by tracking changes in educational attainment and Self-rated Health (SRH) from age 15 to age 31 in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997 cohort. Ordinal logistic regression confirms that high-SRH adolescents are more likely to become highly educated. This is partly because adolescent SRH is associated with early advantages including adolescents' academic performance, college plans, and family background (confounding); however, net of these confounders adolescent SRH still predicts adult educational attainment (selection). Fixed-effects longitudinal regression shows that educational attainment has little causal effect on SRH at age 31. Completion of a high school diploma or associate's degree has no effect on SRH, while completion of a bachelor's or graduate degree have effects that, though significant, are quite small (less than 0.1 points on a 5-point scale). While it is possible that educational attainment would have greater effect on health at older ages, at age 31 what we see is a health gradient in education, shaped primarily by selection and confounding rather than by a causal effect of education on health. PMID:26943010

  3. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases - Incidence through Vectors.

    PubMed

    Savić, Sara; Vidić, Branka; Grgić, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests - ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples

  4. Vector statistics of LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.; Underwood, D.

    1977-01-01

    A digitized multispectral image, such as LANDSAT data, is composed of numerous four dimensional vectors, which quantitatively describe the ground scene from which the data are acquired. The statistics of unique vectors that occur in LANDSAT imagery are studied to determine if that information can provide some guidance on reducing image processing costs. A second purpose of this report is to investigate how the vector statistics are changed by various types of image processing techniques and determine if that information can be useful in choosing one processing approach over another.

  5. Baculovirus as a vaccine vector

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsin-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Baculovirus is extensively utilized as an excellent tool for production of recombinant protein in insect cells. Baculovirus infects insects in nature and is non-pathogenic to humans. In addition to insect cells, baculovirus is capable of transducing a broad range of animal cells. Due to its biosafety, large cloning capacity, low cytotoxicity, and non-replication nature in the transduced cells as well as the ease of manipulation and production, baculovirus has been utilized as RNA interference mediators, gene delivery vectors, and vaccine vectors for a wide variety of applications. This article focuses on the utilization of baculoviruses as vaccine vectors to prepare antigen or subunit vaccines. PMID:22705893

  6. Polarization-insensitive unidirectional spoof surface plasmon polaritons coupling by gradient metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong-yu, Shi; An-xue, Zhang; Jian-zhong, Chen; Jia-fu, Wang; Song, Xia; Zhuo, Xu

    2016-07-01

    A polarization-insensitive unidirectional spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupler mediated by a gradient metasurface is proposed. The field distributions and average Poynting vector of the coupled spoof SPPs are analyzed. The simulated and experimental results support the theoretical analysis and indicate that the designed gradient metasurface can couple both the parallel-polarized and normally-polarized incident waves to the spoof SPPs propagating in the same direction at about 5 GHz. Project supported by the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2015M580849) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471292, 61501365, 61471388, 61331005, 41404095, and 41390454).

  7. Multiple-Point Temperature Gradient Algorithm for Ring Laser Gyroscope Bias Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Geng; Zhang, Pengfei; Wei, Guo; Xie, Yuanping; Yu, Xudong; Long, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    To further improve ring laser gyroscope (RLG) bias stability, a multiple-point temperature gradient algorithm is proposed for RLG bias compensation in this paper. Based on the multiple-point temperature measurement system, a complete thermo-image of the RLG block is developed. Combined with the multiple-point temperature gradients between different points of the RLG block, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to tune the support vector machine (SVM) parameters, and an optimized design for selecting the thermometer locations is also discussed. The experimental results validate the superiority of the introduced method and enhance the precision and generalizability in the RLG bias compensation model. PMID:26633401

  8. Multiple-Point Temperature Gradient Algorithm for Ring Laser Gyroscope Bias Compensation.

    PubMed

    Li, Geng; Zhang, Pengfei; Wei, Guo; Xie, Yuanping; Yu, Xudong; Long, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    To further improve ring laser gyroscope (RLG) bias stability, a multiple-point temperature gradient algorithm is proposed for RLG bias compensation in this paper. Based on the multiple-point temperature measurement system, a complete thermo-image of the RLG block is developed. Combined with the multiple-point temperature gradients between different points of the RLG block, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to tune the support vector machine (SVM) parameters, and an optimized design for selecting the thermometer locations is also discussed. The experimental results validate the superiority of the introduced method and enhance the precision and generalizability in the RLG bias compensation model. PMID:26633401

  9. Relativistic Gamow vectors: State vectors for unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldas, Hany Kamel Halim

    The relativistic Gamow vectors are derived from the analytic continuation of the angular momentum velocity kets to the resonance pole of the S- matrix. This construction is justifiable within a Rigged Hilbert Space of Hardy class functions. The kets obtained | p j3[ sRjR ]-> are characterized by a spin jR and a complex mass square sR = (MR - iΓ R/2)2. Our use of the velocity kets renders the Gamow vectors | p j3[ sRjR ]-> ``minimally complex'', as the 4-velocities p̂μ = p μ/ s are taken real and they remain real under Lorentz transformations. When the symmetry transformations of the Gamow vectors are considered, it is found that they obey a semigroup time evolution in the forward light cone for the subgroup of P with causal space- time translations, i.e., for space-time translations with 4-vectors x such that x2 >= 0. This semigroup evolution, which is a consequence of the characterization obtained for the Gamow vectors as functionals in a Rigged Hilbert Space, is in conformity with the time directedness associated with decay phenomena. The Gamow vectors, with a Breit-Wigner distribution and exponential decay law, provide a description of decaying particles with a wide range of Γ/ M. Moreover, the Gamow vectors, being members of a complex basis vector expansion, allow the Wigner-Weisskopf's based effective theories, such as the Lee-Oehme-Yang theory for the neutral K-mesons, to be obtained as an approximation in an exact formalism.

  10. Are Bred Vectors The Same As Lyapunov Vectors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnay, E.; Corazza, M.; Cai, M.

    Regional loss of predictability is an indication of the instability of the underlying flow, where small errors in the initial conditions (or imperfections in the model) grow to large amplitudes in finite times. The stability properties of evolving flows have been studied using Lyapunov vectors (e.g., Alligood et al, 1996, Ott, 1993, Kalnay, 2002), singular vectors (e.g., Lorenz, 1965, Farrell, 1988, Molteni and Palmer, 1993), and, more recently, with bred vectors (e.g., Szunyogh et al, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). Bred vectors (BVs) are, by construction, closely related to Lyapunov vectors (LVs). In fact, after an infinitely long breeding time, and with the use of infinitesimal ampli- tudes, bred vectors are identical to leading Lyapunov vectors. In practical applications, however, bred vectors are different from Lyapunov vectors in two important ways: a) bred vectors are never globally orthogonalized and are intrinsically local in space and time, and b) they are finite-amplitude, finite-time vectors. These two differences are very significant in a dynamical system whose size is very large. For example, the at- mosphere is large enough to have "room" for several synoptic scale instabilities (e.g., storms) to develop independently in different regions (say, North America and Aus- tralia), and it is complex enough to have several different possible types of instabilities (such as barotropic, baroclinic, convective, and even Brownian motion). Bred vectors share some of their properties with leading LVs (Corazza et al, 2001a, 2001b, Toth and Kalnay, 1993, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). For example, 1) Bred vectors are independent of the norm used to define the size of the perturba- tion. Corazza et al. (2001) showed that bred vectors obtained using a potential enstro- phy norm were indistinguishable from bred vectors obtained using a streamfunction squared norm, in contrast with singular vectors. 2) Bred vectors are independent of the length of the rescaling period as long as the

  11. Oxygen gradients in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Pittman, R N

    2011-07-01

    Early in the last century August Krogh embarked on a series of seminal studies to understand the connection between tissue metabolism and mechanisms by which the cardiovascular system supplied oxygen to meet those needs. Krogh recognized that oxygen was supplied from blood to the tissues by passive diffusion and that the most likely site for oxygen exchange was the capillary network. Studies of tissue oxygen consumption and diffusion coefficient, coupled with anatomical studies of capillarity in various tissues, led him to formulate a model of oxygen diffusion from a single capillary. Fifty years after the publication of this work, new methods were developed which allowed the direct measurement of oxygen in and around microvessels. These direct measurements have confirmed the predictions by Krogh and have led to extensions of his ideas resulting in our current understanding of oxygenation within the microcirculation. Developments during the last 40 years are reviewed, including studies of oxygen gradients in arterioles, capillaries, venules, microvessel wall and surrounding tissue. These measurements were made possible by the development and use of new methods to investigate oxygen in the microcirculation, so mention is made of oxygen microelectrodes, microspectrophotometry of haemoglobin and phosphorescence quenching microscopy. Our understanding of oxygen transport from the perspective of the microcirculation has gone from a consideration of oxygen gradients in capillaries and tissue to the realization that oxygen has the ability to diffuse from any microvessel to another location under the conditions that there exists a large enough PO(2) gradient and that the permeability for oxygen along the intervening pathway is sufficient. PMID:21281453

  12. Radially polarized cylindrical vector beams from a monolithic microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidoo, Darryl; Fromager, Michael; Ait-Ameur, Kamel; Forbes, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Monolithic microchip lasers consist of a thin slice of laser crystal where the cavity mirrors are deposited directly onto the end faces. While this property makes such lasers very compact and robust, it prohibits the use of intracavity laser beam shaping techniques to produce complex light fields. We overcome this limitation and demonstrate the selection of complex light fields in the form of vector-vortex beams directly from a monolithic microchip laser. We employ pump reshaping and a thermal gradient across the crystal surface to control both the intensity and polarization profile of the output mode. In particular, we show laser oscillation on a superposition of Laguerre-Gaussian modes of zero radial and nonzero azimuthal index in both the scalar and vector regimes. Such complex light fields created directly from the source could find applications in fiber injection, materials processing and in simulating quantum processes.

  13. Neural cell image segmentation method based on support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shiwei; Ren, Kan

    2015-10-01

    In the analysis of neural cell images gained by optical microscope, accurate and rapid segmentation is the foundation of nerve cell detection system. In this paper, a modified image segmentation method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed to reduce the adverse impact caused by low contrast ratio between objects and background, adherent and clustered cells' interference etc. Firstly, Morphological Filtering and OTSU Method are applied to preprocess images for extracting the neural cells roughly. Secondly, the Stellate Vector, Circularity and Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features are computed to train SVM model. Finally, the incremental learning SVM classifier is used to classify the preprocessed images, and the initial recognition areas identified by the SVM classifier are added to the library as the positive samples for training SVM model. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve much better segmented results than the classic segmentation algorithms.

  14. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    D. Staack; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2003-11-24

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons.

  15. Autonomous pump against concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2016-03-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, we have studied the molecular transport in asymmetric nanochannels. The efficiency of the molecular pump depends on the angle and apertures of the asymmetric channel, the environmental temperature and average concentration of the particles. The pumping effect can be explained as the competition between the molecular force field and the thermal disturbance. Our results provide a green approach for pumping fluid particles against the concentration gradient through asymmetric nanoscale thin films without any external forces. It indicates that pumping vacuum can be a spontaneous process.

  16. Autonomous pump against concentration gradient

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhi-cheng; Zheng, Dong-qin; Ai, Bao-quan; Zhong, Wei-rong

    2016-01-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, we have studied the molecular transport in asymmetric nanochannels. The efficiency of the molecular pump depends on the angle and apertures of the asymmetric channel, the environmental temperature and average concentration of the particles. The pumping effect can be explained as the competition between the molecular force field and the thermal disturbance. Our results provide a green approach for pumping fluid particles against the concentration gradient through asymmetric nanoscale thin films without any external forces. It indicates that pumping vacuum can be a spontaneous process. PMID:26996204

  17. Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof, M.

    1996-10-01

    Generalized gradient approximations (GGA{close_quote}s) for the exchange-correlation energy improve upon the local spin density (LSD) description of atoms, molecules, and solids. We present a simple derivation of a simple GGA, in which all parameters (other than those in LSD) are fundamental constants. Only general features of the detailed construction underlying the Perdew-Wang 1991 (PW91) GGA are invoked. Improvements over PW91 include an accurate description of the linear response of the uniform electron gas, correct behavior under uniform scaling, and a smoother potential. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Electron Temperature Gradient Mode Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Kim, J.-H.; Hoang, G. T.; Park, H.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B. P.

    2008-05-14

    Anomalous electron thermal losses plays a central role in the history of the controlled fusion program being the first and most persistent form of anomalous transport across all toroidal magnetic confinement devices. In the past decade the fusion program has made analysis and simulations of electron transport a high priority with the result of a clearer understanding of the phenomenon, yet still incomplete. Electron thermal transport driven by the electron temperature gradient is examined in detail from theory, simulation and power balance studies in tokamaks with strong auxiliary heating.

  19. Design and analysis of vector color error diffusion halftoning systems.

    PubMed

    Damera-Venkata, N; Evans, B L

    2001-01-01

    Traditional error diffusion halftoning is a high quality method for producing binary images from digital grayscale images. Error diffusion shapes the quantization noise power into the high frequency regions where the human eye is the least sensitive. Error diffusion may be extended to color images by using error filters with matrix-valued coefficients to take into account the correlation among color planes. For vector color error diffusion, we propose three contributions. First, we analyze vector color error diffusion based on a new matrix gain model for the quantizer, which linearizes vector error diffusion. The model predicts the key characteristics of color error diffusion, esp. image sharpening and noise shaping. The proposed model includes linear gain models for the quantizer by Ardalan and Paulos (1987) and by Kite et al. (1997) as special cases. Second, based on our model, we optimize the noise shaping behavior of color error diffusion by designing error filters that are optimum with respect to any given linear spatially-invariant model of the human visual system. Our approach allows the error filter to have matrix-valued coefficients and diffuse quantization error across color channels in an opponent color representation. Thus, the noise is shaped into frequency regions of reduced human color sensitivity. To obtain the optimal filter, we derive a matrix version of the Yule-Walker equations which we solve by using a gradient descent algorithm. Finally, we show that the vector error filter has a parallel implementation as a polyphase filterbank. PMID:18255498

  20. Solid rocket thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Thrust vector control systems that superimpose a side force on the motor thrust, steering being achieved by the side force causing a moment about the vehicle center of gravity are described. A brief review of thrust vector control systems is presented, and two systems, flexible joint and liquid injection, are treated in detail. Treatment of the flexible-joint thrust vector control system is limited to the design of the flexible joint and its insulation against hot motor gases. Treatment of the liquid injection thrust vector control system is limited to discussion of the injectant, valves, piping, storage tanks, and pressurization system; no evaluation is presented of the nozzle except for (1) the effect of the injectant and erosion at the injection port and (2) the effect of injection on pressure distribution within the nozzle.

  1. Experiments With Magnetic Vector Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental apparatus and method for the study of magnetic vector potential (MVP). Includes a discussion of inherent errors in the calculations involved, precision of the results, and further applications of MVP. (GS)

  2. Effective Masses of Vector Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foell, Charles; Clougherty, Dennis

    2006-03-01

    We consider the vector polarons of a one-dimensional model of an electron in a doubly (or nearly) degenerate band that couples to two elastic distortions, as described previously by Clougherty and Foell [1]. A variational approach is used to analytically and numerically calculate effective masses of the three types of vector polarons. [1] D. P. Clougherty and C. A. Foell, Phys. Rev. B 70, 052301 (2004).

  3. Coulomb problem for vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchiev, M.Yu.; Flambaum, V.V.

    2006-05-01

    The Coulomb problem for vector bosons W{sup {+-}} incorporates a well-known difficulty; the charge of the boson localized in a close vicinity of the attractive Coulomb center proves to be infinite. The paradox is shown to be resolved by the QED vacuum polarization, which brings in a strong effective repulsion that eradicates the infinite charge of the boson on the Coulomb center. This property allows one to define the Coulomb problem for vector bosons properly.

  4. Molecular dynamics on vector computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, F.; Mountain, R. D.; Oconnell, J.

    1985-10-01

    An algorithm called the method of lights (MOL) has been developed for the computerized simulation of molecular dynamics. The MOL, implemented on the CYBER 205 computer, is based on sorting and reformulating the manner in which neighbor lists are compiled, and it uses data structures compatible with specialized vector statements that perform parallel computations. The MOL is found to reduce running time over standard methods in scalar form, and vectorization is shown to produce an order-of-magnitude reduction in execution time.

  5. Bicrystals with strain gradient effects

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, J.Y.

    1997-01-09

    Boundary between two perfectly bonded single crystals plays an important role in determining the deformation of the bicrystals. This work addresses the role of the grain boundary by considering the elevated hardening of a slip system due to a slip gradient. The slip gradients are associated with geometrically necessary dislocations and their effects become pronounced when a representative length scale of the deformation field is comparable to the dominant microstructural length scale of a material. A new rate-dependent crystal plasticity theory is presented and has been implemented within the finite element method framework. A planar bicrystal under uniform in-plane loading is studied using the new crystal theory. The strain is found to be continuous but nonuniform within a boundary layer around the interface. The lattice rotation is also nonuniform within the boundary layer. The width of the layer is determined by the misorientation of the grains, the hardening of slip systems, and most importantly by the characteristic material length scales. The overall yield strength of the bicrystal is also obtained. A significant grain-size dependence of the yield strength, the Hall- Petch effect is predicted.

  6. Gradient-Modulated PETRA MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Goerke, Ute; Wang, Luning; Ellermann, Jutta; Metzger, Gregory J.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T2* signal decay is a common issue in radial ultrashort echo time MRI sequences. One solution is to use a higher readout bandwidth, but this may be impractical for some techniques like pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), which is a hybrid method of zero echo time and single point imaging techniques. Specifically, PETRA has severe specific absorption rate (SAR) and radiofrequency (RF) pulse peak power limitations when using higher bandwidths in human measurements. In this study, we introduce gradient modulation (GM) to PETRA to reduce image blurring artifacts while keeping SAR and RF peak power low. Tolerance of GM-PETRA to image blurring was evaluated in simulations and experiments by comparing with the conventional PETRA technique. We performed inner ear imaging of a healthy subject at 7T. GM-PETRA showed significantly less image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T2* signal decay compared to PETRA. In in vivo imaging, GM-PETRA nicely captured complex structures of the inner ear such as the cochlea and semicircular canals. Gradient modulation can improve the PETRA image quality and mitigate SAR and RF peak power limitations without special hardware modification in clinical scanners. PMID:26771005

  7. Axisymmetric Coanda-assisted vectoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Dustin; Smith, Barton L.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental demonstration of a jet vectoring technique used in our novel spray method called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM makes use of the Coanda effect on axisymmetric geometries through the interaction of two jets: a primary jet and a control jet. The primary jet has larger volume flow rate but generally a smaller momentum flux than the control jet. The primary jet flows through the center of a rounded collar. The control jet is parallel to the primary and is adjacent to the convex collar. The Reynolds number range for the primary jet at the exit plane was between 20,000 and 80,000. The flow was in the incompressible Mach number range (Mach < 0.3). The control jet attaches to the convex wall and vectors according to known Coanda effect principles, entraining and vectoring the primary jet, resulting in controllable r - θ directional spraying. Several annular control slots and collar radii were tested over a range of momentum flux ratios to determine the effects of these variables on the vectored jet angle and spreading. Two and Three-component Particle Image Velocimetry systems were used to determine the vectoring angle and the profile of the combined jet in each experiment. The experiments show that the control slot and expansion radius, along with the momentum ratios of the two jets predominantly affected the vectoring angle and profile of the combined jets.

  8. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Tim; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Gomit, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A pair of parallel synthetic jets can be vectored by applying a phase difference between the two driving signals. The resulting jet can be merged or bifurcated and either vectored towards the actuator leading in phase or the actuator lagging in phase. In the present study, the influence of phase difference and Strouhal number on the vectoring behaviour is examined experimentally. Phase-locked vorticity fields, measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), are used to track vortex pairs. The physical mechanisms that explain the diversity in vectoring behaviour are observed based on the vortex trajectories. For a fixed phase difference, the vectoring behaviour is shown to be primarily influenced by pinch-off time of vortex rings generated by the synthetic jets. Beyond a certain formation number, the pinch-off timescale becomes invariant. In this region, the vectoring behaviour is determined by the distance between subsequent vortex rings. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC grant agreement no. 277472).

  9. Host Life History Strategy, Species Diversity, and Habitat Influence Trypanosoma cruzi Vector Infection in Changing Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Calzada, José E.; Saldaña, Azael; Carroll, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama. Methodology/Principal Findings R. pallescens vectors (N = 643) were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3%) vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3%) dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas) were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as rmax, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase), and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites) were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of rmax were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site. Conclusions/Significance In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially

  10. Using a Gradient Vector to Find Multiple Periodic Oscillations in Suspension Bridge Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, L. D.; McKenna, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes how the method of steepest descent can be used to find periodic solutions of differential equations. Applications to two suspension bridge models are discussed, and the method is used to find non-obvious large-amplitude solutions.

  11. Strength gradient enhances fatigue resistance of steels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Gang; Wang, Hongtao; Wei, Yujie; Gao, Huajian

    2016-01-01

    Steels are heavily used in infrastructure and the transportation industry, and enhancing their fatigue resistance is a major challenge in materials engineering. In this study, by introducing a gradient microstructure into 304 austenitic steel, which is one of the most widely used types of stainless steel, we show that a strength gradient substantially enhances the fatigue life of the material. Pre-notched samples with negative strength gradients in front of the notch's tip endure many more fatigue cycles than do samples with positive strength gradients during the crack initiation stage, and samples with either type of gradient perform better than do gradient-free samples with the same average yield strength. However, as a crack grows, samples with positive strength gradients exhibit better resistance to fatigue crack propagation than do samples with negative gradients or no gradient. This study demonstrates a simple and promising strategy for using gradient structures to enhance the fatigue resistance of materials and complements related studies of strength and ductility. PMID:26907708

  12. Strength gradient enhances fatigue resistance of steels

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Gang; Wang, Hongtao; Wei, Yujie; Gao, Huajian

    2016-01-01

    Steels are heavily used in infrastructure and the transportation industry, and enhancing their fatigue resistance is a major challenge in materials engineering. In this study, by introducing a gradient microstructure into 304 austenitic steel, which is one of the most widely used types of stainless steel, we show that a strength gradient substantially enhances the fatigue life of the material. Pre-notched samples with negative strength gradients in front of the notch’s tip endure many more fatigue cycles than do samples with positive strength gradients during the crack initiation stage, and samples with either type of gradient perform better than do gradient-free samples with the same average yield strength. However, as a crack grows, samples with positive strength gradients exhibit better resistance to fatigue crack propagation than do samples with negative gradients or no gradient. This study demonstrates a simple and promising strategy for using gradient structures to enhance the fatigue resistance of materials and complements related studies of strength and ductility. PMID:26907708

  13. Strength gradient enhances fatigue resistance of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Gang; Wang, Hongtao; Wei, Yujie; Gao, Huajian

    2016-02-01

    Steels are heavily used in infrastructure and the transportation industry, and enhancing their fatigue resistance is a major challenge in materials engineering. In this study, by introducing a gradient microstructure into 304 austenitic steel, which is one of the most widely used types of stainless steel, we show that a strength gradient substantially enhances the fatigue life of the material. Pre-notched samples with negative strength gradients in front of the notch’s tip endure many more fatigue cycles than do samples with positive strength gradients during the crack initiation stage, and samples with either type of gradient perform better than do gradient-free samples with the same average yield strength. However, as a crack grows, samples with positive strength gradients exhibit better resistance to fatigue crack propagation than do samples with negative gradients or no gradient. This study demonstrates a simple and promising strategy for using gradient structures to enhance the fatigue resistance of materials and complements related studies of strength and ductility.

  14. Strain gradient effects on cyclic plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niordson, Christian F.; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2010-04-01

    Size effects on the cyclic shear response are studied numerically using a recent higher order strain gradient visco-plasticity theory accounting for both dissipative and energetic gradient hardening. Numerical investigations of the response under cyclic pure shear and shear of a finite slab between rigid platens have been carried out, using the finite element method. It is shown for elastic-perfectly plastic solids how dissipative gradient effects lead to increased yield strength, whereas energetic gradient contributions lead to increased hardening as well as a Bauschinger effect. For linearly hardening materials it is quantified how dissipative and energetic gradient effects promote hardening above that of conventional predictions. Usually, increased hardening is attributed to energetic gradient effects, but here it is found that also dissipative gradient effects lead to additional hardening in the presence of conventional material hardening. Furthermore, it is shown that dissipative gradient effects can lead to both an increase and a decrease in the dissipation per load cycle depending on the magnitude of the dissipative length parameter, whereas energetic gradient effects lead to decreasing dissipation for increasing energetic length parameter. For dissipative gradient effects it is found that dissipation has a maximum value for some none zero value of the material length parameter, which depends on the magnitude of the deformation cycles.

  15. Gradient scaling for nonuniform meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.G.; Ruppel, H.M.; Demuth, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of nonuniform meshes on the accuracy of finite-difference calculations of fluid flow. In particular, when a simple shock propagates through a nonuniform mesh, one may fail to model the jump conditions across the shock even when the equations are differenced in manifestly conservative fashion. We develop an approximate dispersion analysis of the numerical equations and identify the source of the mesh dependency with the form of the artificial viscosity. We then derive an algebraic correction to the numerical equations - a scaling factor for the pressure gradient - to essentially eliminate the mesh dependency. We present several calculations to illustrate our theory. We conclude with an alternate interpretation of our results. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Novel hybrid classified vector quantization using discrete cosine transform for image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Fayadh, Ali; Hussain, Abir Jaafar; Lisboa, Paulo; Al-Jumeily, Dhiya

    2009-04-01

    We present a novel image compression technique using a classified vector Quantizer and singular value decomposition for the efficient representation of still images. The proposed method is called hybrid classified vector quantization. It involves a simple but efficient classifier-based gradient method in the spatial domain, which employs only one threshold to determine the class of the input image block, and uses three AC coefficients of discrete cosine transform coefficients to determine the orientation of the block without employing any threshold. The proposed technique is benchmarked with each of the standard vector quantizers generated using the k-means algorithm, standard classified vector quantizer schemes, and JPEG-2000. Simulation results indicate that the proposed approach alleviates edge degradation and can reconstruct good visual quality images with higher peak signal-to-noise ratio than the benchmarked techniques, or be competitive with them.

  17. Evidence that implicit assumptions of 'no evolution' of disease vectors in changing environments can be violated on a rapid timescale.

    PubMed

    Egizi, Andrea; Fefferman, Nina H; Fonseca, Dina M

    2015-04-01

    Projected impacts of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics must consider many variables relevant to hosts, vectors and pathogens, including how altered environmental characteristics might affect the spatial distributions of vector species. However, many predictive models for vector distributions consider their habitat requirements to be fixed over relevant time-scales, when they may actually be capable of rapid evolutionary change and even adaptation. We examine the genetic signature of a spatial expansion by an invasive vector into locations with novel temperature conditions compared to its native range as a proxy for how existing vector populations may respond to temporally changing habitat. Specifically, we compare invasions into different climate ranges and characterize the importance of selection from the invaded habitat. We demonstrate that vector species can exhibit evolutionary responses (altered allelic frequencies) to a temperature gradient in as little as 7-10 years even in the presence of high gene flow, and further, that this response varies depending on the strength of selection. We interpret these findings in the context of climate change predictions for vector populations and emphasize the importance of incorporating vector evolution into models of future vector-borne disease dynamics. PMID:25688024

  18. Director alignment relative to the temperature gradient in nematic liquid crystals studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-07-28

    The director alignment relative to the temperature gradient in nematic liquid crystal model systems consisting of soft oblate or prolate ellipsoids of revolution has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The temperature gradient is maintained by thermostating different parts of the system at different temperatures by using a Gaussian thermostat. It is found that the director of the prolate ellipsoids aligns perpendicularly to the temperature gradient whereas the director of the oblate ellipsoids aligns parallel to this gradient. When the director is oriented in between the parallel and perpendicular orientations a torque is exerted forcing the director to the parallel or perpendicular orientation. Because of symmetry restrictions there is no linear dependence of the torque being a pseudovector on the temperature gradient being a polar vector in an axially symmetric system such as a nematic liquid crystal. The lowest possible order of this dependence is quadratic. Thus the torque is very weak when the temperature gradient is small, which may explain why this orientation phenomenon is hard to observe experimentally. In both cases the director attains the orientation that minimises the irreversible entropy production. PMID:24919847

  19. Toward an integrated view of ionospheric plasma instabilities: Altitudinal transitions and strong gradient case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, Roman A.

    2016-04-01

    A general dispersion relation is derived that integrates the Farley-Buneman, gradient-drift, and current-convective plasma instabilities (FBI, GDI, and CCI) within the same formalism for an arbitrary altitude, wave propagation vector, and background density gradient. The limiting cases of the FBI/GDI in the E region for nearly field-aligned irregularities, GDI/CCI in the main F region at long wavelengths, and GDI at high altitudes are successfully recovered using analytic analysis. Numerical solutions are found for more general representative cases spanning the entire ionosphere. It is demonstrated that the results are consistent with those obtained using a general FBI/GDI/CCI theory developed previously at and near E region altitudes under most conditions. The most significant differences are obtained for strong gradients (scale lengths of 100 m) at high altitudes such as those that may occur during highly structured soft particle precipitation events. It is shown that the strong gradient case is dominated by inertial effects and, for some scales, surprisingly strong additional damping due to higher-order gradient terms. The growth rate behavior is examined with a particular focus on the range of wave propagations with positive growth (instability cone) and its transitions between altitudinal regions. It is shown that these transitions are largely controlled by the plasma density gradients even when FBI is operational.

  20. Distributed semi-supervised support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Scardapane, Simone; Fierimonte, Roberto; Di Lorenzo, Paolo; Panella, Massimo; Uncini, Aurelio

    2016-08-01

    The semi-supervised support vector machine (S(3)VM) is a well-known algorithm for performing semi-supervised inference under the large margin principle. In this paper, we are interested in the problem of training a S(3)VM when the labeled and unlabeled samples are distributed over a network of interconnected agents. In particular, the aim is to design a distributed training protocol over networks, where communication is restricted only to neighboring agents and no coordinating authority is present. Using a standard relaxation of the original S(3)VM, we formulate the training problem as the distributed minimization of a non-convex social cost function. To find a (stationary) solution in a distributed manner, we employ two different strategies: (i) a distributed gradient descent algorithm; (ii) a recently developed framework for In-Network Nonconvex Optimization (NEXT), which is based on successive convexifications of the original problem, interleaved by state diffusion steps. Our experimental results show that the proposed distributed algorithms have comparable performance with respect to a centralized implementation, while highlighting the pros and cons of the proposed solutions. To the date, this is the first work that paves the way toward the broad field of distributed semi-supervised learning over networks. PMID:27179615

  1. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers. PMID:9034598

  2. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  3. Symbolic vector analysis in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W. M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1999-01-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the underlying coordinate systems. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. Besides the basic vector analysis functions, the package provides asymptotic capabilities, 2D vector analysis notation, and a simple interface for users to define their own coordinate systems. These features will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis in complicated coordinate systems is required. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  4. Mathematics of Experimentally Generated Chemoattractant Gradients.

    PubMed

    Postma, Marten; van Haastert, Peter J M

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells move in the direction of a chemical gradient. Several assays have been developed to measure this chemotactic response, but no complete mathematical models of the spatial and temporal gradients are available to describe the fundamental principles of chemotaxis. Here we provide analytical solutions for the gradients formed by release of chemoattractant from a point source by passive diffusion or forced flow (micropipettes) and gradients formed by laminar diffusion in a Zigmond chamber. The results show that gradients delivered with a micropipette are formed nearly instantaneously, are very steep close to the pipette, and have a steepness that is strongly dependent on the distance from the pipette. In contrast, gradients in a Zigmond chamber are formed more slowly, are nearly independent of the distance from the source, and resemble the temporal and spatial properties of the natural cAMP wave that Dictyostelium cells experience during cell aggregation. PMID:27271915

  5. Phase Behavior of Gradient Copolymer Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandav, Gunja; Gallow, Keith; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ganesan, Venkat

    2012-02-01

    We study the behavior of amphiphilic linear gradient copolymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Using Bond Fluctuation model and parallel tempering algorithm, we explore qualitative behavior of this class of polymers with varying gradient strength; which is the largest difference in the instantaneous composition along the polymer chain. Under poor solvent conditions, the chains collapse to form micelles. We find a linear dependence of hydrophilic to hydrophobic transition temperature on gradient strength. Systematic analysis of these clusters reveals a strong dependence of micelle properties on gradient strength. Also, we discuss our results with reference to recent experiments on synthesis and cloud point depression in gradient copolymers confirming gradient strength as key parameter in tuning micelle properties.

  6. Biomimetic Gradient Polymers with Enhanced Damping Capacities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Huan; Guo, Jing; Cheng, Beichen; Cao, Yuan; Lu, Shengjun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Designing gradient structures, mimicking biological materials, such as pummelo peels and tendon, is a promising strategy for developing advanced materials with superior energy damping capacities. Here a facile and effective approach for fabricating polymers with composition gradients at millimeter length scale is presented. The gradient thiol-ene polymers (TEPs) are created by the use of density difference of ternary thiol-ene-ene precursors and the subsequent photo-crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. The compositional gradients are analyzed via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), compressive modulus testing, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation, and swelling measurements. In contrast to homogeneous TEPs networks, the resultant gradient polymer shows a broader effective damping temperature range combining with good mechanical properties. The present result provides an effective route toward high damping materials by the fabrication of gradient structures. PMID:26776353

  7. A complete implementation of the conjugate gradient algorithm on a reconfigurable supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, David H; Dubois, Andrew J; Connor, Carolyn M; Boorman, Thomas M; Poole, Stephen W

    2008-01-01

    The conjugate gradient is a prominent iterative method for solving systems of sparse linear equations. Large-scale scientific applications often utilize a conjugate gradient solver at their computational core. In this paper we present a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based implementation of a double precision, non-preconditioned, conjugate gradient solver for fmite-element or finite-difference methods. OUf work utilizes the SRC Computers, Inc. MAPStation hardware platform along with the 'Carte' software programming environment to ease the programming workload when working with the hybrid (CPUIFPGA) environment. The implementation is designed to handle large sparse matrices of up to order N x N where N <= 116,394, with up to 7 non-zero, 64-bit elements per sparse row. This implementation utilizes an optimized sparse matrix-vector multiply operation which is critical for obtaining high performance. Direct parallel implementations of loop unrolling and loop fusion are utilized to extract performance from the various vector/matrix operations. Rather than utilize the FPGA devices as function off-load accelerators, our implementation uses the FPGAs to implement the core conjugate gradient algorithm. Measured run-time performance data is presented comparing the FPGA implementation to a software-only version showing that the FPGA can outperform processors running up to 30x the clock rate. In conclusion we take a look at the new SRC-7 system and estimate the performance of this algorithm on that architecture.

  8. Fast and accurate circle detection using gradient-direction-based segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Chen, Ke; Gao, Xiaohui

    2013-06-01

    We present what is to our knowledge the first-ever fitting-based circle detection algorithm, namely, the fast and accurate circle (FACILE) detection algorithm, based on gradient-direction-based edge clustering and direct least square fitting. Edges are segmented into sections based on gradient directions, and each section is validated separately; valid arcs are then fitted and further merged to extract more accurate circle information. We implemented the algorithm with the C++ language and compared it with four other algorithms. Testing on simulated data showed FACILE was far superior to the randomized Hough transform, standard Hough transform, and fast circle detection using gradient pair vectors with regard to processing speed and detection reliability. Testing on publicly available standard datasets showed FACILE outperformed robust and precise circular detection, a state-of-art arc detection method, by 35% with regard to recognition rate and is also a significant improvement over the latter in processing speed. PMID:24323106

  9. Extrapolation methods for vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    This paper derives, describes, and compares five extrapolation methods for accelerating convergence of vector sequences or transforming divergent vector sequences to convergent ones. These methods are the scalar epsilon algorithm (SEA), vector epsilon algorithm (VEA), topological epsilon algorithm (TEA), minimal polynomial extrapolation (MPE), and reduced rank extrapolation (RRE). MPE and RRE are first derived and proven to give the exact solution for the right 'essential degree' k. Then, Brezinski's (1975) generalization of the Shanks-Schmidt transform is presented; the generalized form leads from systems of equations to TEA. The necessary connections are then made with SEA and VEA. The algorithms are extended to the nonlinear case by cycling, the error analysis for MPE and VEA is sketched, and the theoretical support for quadratic convergence is discussed. Strategies for practical implementation of the methods are considered.

  10. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  11. Boosting with Averaged Weight Vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the previous base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. Some researchers have pointed out the intuition that it is probably better to construct a distribution that is orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous base models, but that this is not always possible. We present an algorithm that attempts to come as close as possible to this goal in an efficient manner. We present experimental results demonstrating significant improvement over AdaBoost and the Totally Corrective boosting algorithm, which also attempts to satisfy this goal.

  12. Ant colony optimization and stochastic gradient descent.

    PubMed

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Dorigo, Marco

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we study the relationship between the two techniques known as ant colony optimization (ACO) and stochastic gradient descent. More precisely, we show that some empirical ACO algorithms approximate stochastic gradient descent in the space of pheromones, and we propose an implementation of stochastic gradient descent that belongs to the family of ACO algorithms. We then use this insight to explore the mutual contributions of the two techniques. PMID:12171633

  13. Nanofiber Scaffold Gradients for Interfacial Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Young, Marian F.; Thomas, Vinoy; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Tison, Christopher K.; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Miles, William C.; Simon, Carl G.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed a 2-spinnerette device that can directly electrospin nanofiber scaffolds containing a gradient in composition that can be used to engineer interfacial tissues such as ligament and tendon. Two types of nanofibers are simultaneously electrospun in an overlapping pattern to create a nonwoven mat of nanofibers containing a composition gradient. The approach is an advance over previous methods due to its versatility - gradients can be formed from any materials that can be electrospun. A dye was used to characterize the 2-spinnerette approach and applicability to tissue engineering was demonstrated by fabricating nanofibers with gradients in amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (nACP). Adhesion and proliferation of osteogenic cells (MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblasts) on gradients was enhanced on the regions of the gradients that contained higher nACP content yielding a graded osteoblast response. Since increases in soluble calcium and phosphate ions stimulate osteoblast function, we measured their release and observed significant release from nanofibers containing nACP. The nanofiber-nACP gradients fabricated herein can be applied to generate tissues with osteoblast gradients such as ligaments or tendons. In conclusion, these results introduce a versatile approach for fabricating nanofiber gradients that can have application for engineering graded tissues. PMID:22286209

  14. Bred vectors, singular vectors, and Lyapunov vectors in simple and complex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, Adrienne

    We compute and compare three types of vectors frequently used to explore the instability properties of dynamical models, Lyapunov vectors (LVs), singular vectors (SVs), and bred vectors (BVs). The first model is the Lorenz (1963) three-variable model. We find BVs align with the locally fastest growing LV, which is often the second fastest growing global LV. The growth rates of the three types of vectors reveal all predict regime changes and durations of new regimes, as shown for BVs by Evans et al. (2004). The second model is the toy 'atmosphere-ocean model' developed by Pena and Kalnay (2004) coupling three Lorenz (1963) models with different time scales to test the effects of fast and slow modes of growth on the dynamical vectors. A fast 'extratropical atmosphere' is weakly coupled to a fast 'tropical atmosphere' which is strongly coupled to a slow 'ocean' system, the latter coupling imitating the tropical El Nino--Southern Oscillation. BVs separate the fast and slow modes of growth through appropriate selection of the breeding parameters. LVs successfully separate the fast 'extratropics' but cannot completely decouple the 'tropics' from the 'ocean,' leading to 'coupled' LVs that are affected by both systems but mainly dominated by one. SVs identify the fast modes but cannot capture the slow modes until the fast 'extratropics' are replaced with faster 'convection.' The dissimilar behavior of the three types of vectors degrades the similarities of the subspaces they inhabit (Norwood et al. 2013). The third model is a quasi-geostrophic channel model (Rotunno and Bao 1996) that is a simplification of extratropical synoptic-scale motions with baroclinic instabilities only. We were unable to successfully compute LVs for it. However, randomly initialized BVs quickly converge to a single vector that is the leading LV. The last model is the SPEEDY model created by Molteni (2003). It is a simplified general atmospheric circulation model with several types of instabilities

  15. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Amanda; Vetrini, Francesco; Ng, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are devoid of all viral coding sequences, possess a large cloning capacity, and can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types from various species independent of the cell cycle to mediate long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. These non-integrating vectors hold tremendous potential for a variety of gene transfer and gene therapy applications. Here, we review the production technologies, applications, obstacles to clinical translation and their potential resolutions, and the future challenges and unanswered questions regarding this promising gene transfer technology. PMID:24533227

  16. Convective and moist vorticity vectors associated with tropical oceanic convection: A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shouting; Li, Xiaofan; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Shie, Chung-Lin; Lang, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The relationships between cloud hydrometeors and convective/moist vorticity vectors are investigated using hourly data from a three-dimensional, 5-day cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). Vertical components of convective and moist vorticity vectors are highly correlated with cloud hydrometeors. The vertical components represent the interaction between horizontal vorticity and horizontal moist potential temperature/specific humidity gradient. The vertical components of convective and moist vorticity vectors can be used to study tropical oceanic convection in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional frameworks.

  17. Multispectral face liveness detection method based on gradient features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ya-Li; Hao, Xiaoli; Wang, Yueyang; Guo, Changqing

    2013-11-01

    Face liveness detection aims to distinguish genuine faces from disguised faces. Most previous works under visible light focus on classification of genuine faces and planar photos or videos. To handle the three-dimensional (3-D) disguised faces, liveness detection based on multispectral images has been shown to be an effective choice. In this paper, a gradient-based multispectral method has been proposed for face liveness detection. Three feature vectors are developed to reduce the influence of varying illuminations. The reflectance-based feature achieves the best performance, which has a true positive rate of 98.3% and a true negative rate of 98.7%. The developed methods are also tested on individual bands to provide a clue for band selection in the imaging system. Preliminary results on different face orientations are also shown. The contributions of this paper are threefold. First, a gradient-based multispectral method has been proposed for liveness detection, which considers the reflectance properties of all the distinctive regions in a face. Second, three illumination-robust features are studied based on a dataset with two-dimensional planar photos, 3-D mannequins, and masks. Finally, the performance of the method on different spectral bands and face orientations is also shown in the evaluations.

  18. Vector Acoustics, Vector Sensors, and 3D Underwater Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, D.

    2007-12-01

    Vector acoustic data has two more dimensions of information than pressure data and may allow for 3D underwater imaging with much less data than with hydrophone data. The vector acoustic sensors measures the particle motions due to passing sound waves and, in conjunction with a collocated hydrophone, the direction of travel of the sound waves. When using a controlled source with known source and sensor locations, the reflection points of the sound field can be determined with a simple trigonometric calculation. I demonstrate this concept with an experiment that used an accelerometer based vector acoustic sensor in a water tank with a short-pulse source and passive scattering targets. The sensor consists of a three-axis accelerometer and a matched hydrophone. The sound source was a standard transducer driven by a short 7 kHz pulse. The sensor was suspended in a fixed location and the hydrophone was moved about the tank by a robotic arm to insonify the tank from many locations. Several floats were placed in the tank as acoustic targets at diagonal ranges of approximately one meter. The accelerometer data show the direct source wave as well as the target scattered waves and reflections from the nearby water surface, tank bottom and sides. Without resorting to the usual methods of seismic imaging, which in this case is only two dimensional and relied entirely on the use of a synthetic source aperture, the two targets, the tank walls, the tank bottom, and the water surface were imaged. A directional ambiguity inherent to vector sensors is removed by using collocated hydrophone data. Although this experiment was in a very simple environment, it suggests that 3-D seismic surveys may be achieved with vector sensors using the same logistics as a 2-D survey that uses conventional hydrophones. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, program element 61153N.

  19. An overview of NSPCG: A nonsymmetric preconditioned conjugate gradient package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppe, Thomas C.; Joubert, Wayne D.; Kincaid, David R.

    1989-05-01

    The most recent research-oriented software package developed as part of the ITPACK Project is called "NSPCG" since it contains many nonsymmetric preconditioned conjugate gradient procedures. It is designed to solve large sparse systems of linear algebraic equations by a variety of different iterative methods. One of the main purposes for the development of the package is to provide a common modular structure for research on iterative methods for nonsymmetric matrices. Another purpose for the development of the package is to investigate the suitability of several iterative methods for vector computers. Since the vectorizability of an iterative method depends greatly on the matrix structure, NSPCG allows great flexibility in the operator representation. The coefficient matrix can be passed in one of several different matrix data storage schemes. These sparse data formats allow matrices with a wide range of structures from highly structured ones such as those with all nonzeros along a relatively small number of diagonals to completely unstructured sparse matrices. Alternatively, the package allows the user to call the accelerators directly with user-supplied routines for performing certain matrix operations. In this case, one can use the data format from an application program and not be required to copy the matrix into one of the package formats. This is particularly advantageous when memory space is limited. Some of the basic preconditioners that are available are point methods such as Jacobi, Incomplete LU Decomposition and Symmetric Successive Overrelaxation as well as block and multicolor preconditioners. The user can select from a large collection of accelerators such as Conjugate Gradient (CG), Chebyshev (SI, for semi-iterative), Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES), Biconjugate Gradient Squared (BCGS) and many others. The package is modular so that almost any accelerator can be used with almost any preconditioner.

  20. Quantifying solar superactive regions with vector magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. Q.; Wang, J. X.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The vector magnetic field characteristics of superactive regions (SARs) hold the key for understanding why SARs are extremely active and provide the guidance in space weather prediction. Aims: We aim to quantify the characteristics of SARs using the vector magnetograms taken by the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at Huairou Solar Observatory Station. Methods: The vector magnetic field characteristics of 14 SARs in solar cycles 22 and 23 were analyzed using the following four parameters: 1) the magnetic flux imbalance between opposite polarities; 2) the total photospheric free magnetic energy; 3) the length of the magnetic neutral line with its steep horizontal magnetic gradient; and 4) the area with strong magnetic shear. Furthermore, we selected another eight large and inactive active regions (ARs), which are called fallow ARs (FARs), to compare them with the SARs. Results: We found that most of the SARs have a net magnetic flux higher than 7.0 × 1021 Mx, a total photospheric free magnetic energy higher than 1.0 × 1024 erg cm-1, a magnetic neutral line with a steep horizontal magnetic gradient (≥300 G Mm-1) longer than 30 Mm, and an area with strong magnetic shear (shear angle ≥ 80°) greater than 100 Mm2. In contrast, the values of these parameters for the FARs are mostly very low. The Pearson χ2 test was used to examine the significance of the difference between the SARs and FARs, and the results indicate that these two types of ARs can be fairly distinguished by each of these parameters. The significance levels are 99.55%, 99.98%, 99.98%, and 99.96%, respectively. However, no single parameter can distinguish them perfectly. Therefore we propose a composite index based on these parameters, and find that the distinction between the two types of ARs is also significant with a significance level of 99.96%. These results are useful for a better physical understanding of the SAR and FAR.

  1. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing hydrogen as an energy vector is considered, with special attention given to means of hydrogen production. The state-of-the-art in thermochemical processes is reviewed, and criteria for the technical and economic feasibility of large-scale thermochemical water splitting processes are presented. The production of hydrogen from coal and from photolysis of water is discussed.

  2. Portfolio Analysis for Vector Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Classic stock portfolio analysis provides an applied context for Lagrange multipliers that undergraduate students appreciate. Although modern methods of portfolio analysis are beyond the scope of vector calculus, classic methods reinforce the utility of this material. This paper discusses how to introduce classic stock portfolio analysis in a…

  3. Biosafety Features of Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Schambach, Axel; Zychlinski, Daniela; Ehrnstroem, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Over the past decades, lentiviral vectors have evolved as a benchmark tool for stable gene transfer into cells with a high replicative potential. Their relatively flexible genome and ability to transduce many forms of nondividing cells, combined with the potential for cell-specific pseudotyping, provides a rich resource for numerous applications in experimental platforms and therapeutic settings. Here, we give an overview of important biosafety features of lentiviral vectors, with detailed discussion of (i) the principles of the lentiviral split-genome design used for the construction of packaging cells; (ii) the relevance of modifications introduced into the lentiviral long terminal repeat (deletion of enhancer/promoter sequences and introduction of insulators); (iii) the basic features of mRNA processing, including the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) interaction and the modifications of the 3′ untranslated region of lentiviral vectors with various post-transcriptional regulatory elements affecting transcriptional termination, polyadenylation, and differentiation-specific degradation of mRNA; and (iv) the characteristic integration pattern with the associated risk of transcriptional interference with cellular genes. We conclude with considerations regarding the importance of cell targeting via envelope modifications. Along this course, we address canonical biosafety issues encountered with any type of viral vector: the risks of shedding, mobilization, germline transmission, immunogenicity, and insertional mutagenesis. PMID:23311447

  4. Transcriptomics and disease vector control

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing can be used to compare transcriptomes under different conditions. A study in BMC Genomics applies this approach to investigating the effects of exposure to a range of xenobiotics on changes in gene expression in the larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue fever. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/216 PMID:20525113

  5. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is a disease of equidae including horses, donkeys, mules and zebras caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick-vectors and although they have inherent differences, they ...

  6. Auxiliary function approach to independent component analysis and independent vector analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, N.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we review an auxiliary function approach to independent component analysis (ICA) and independent vector analysis (IVA). The derived algorithm consists of two alternative updates: 1) weighted covariance matrix update and 2) demixing matrix update, which include no tuning parameters such as a step size in the gradient descent method. The monotonic decrease of the objective function is guaranteed by the principle of the auxiliary function method. The experimental evaluation shows that the derived update rules yield faster convergence and better results than natural gradient updates. An efficient implementation on a mobile phone is also presented.

  7. Online Sequential Projection Vector Machine with Adaptive Data Mean Update

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Jia, Ji-Ting; Zhang, Qiong; Deng, Wan-Yu; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple online learning algorithm especial for high-dimensional data. The algorithm is referred to as online sequential projection vector machine (OSPVM) which derives from projection vector machine and can learn from data in one-by-one or chunk-by-chunk mode. In OSPVM, data centering, dimension reduction, and neural network training are integrated seamlessly. In particular, the model parameters including (1) the projection vectors for dimension reduction, (2) the input weights, biases, and output weights, and (3) the number of hidden nodes can be updated simultaneously. Moreover, only one parameter, the number of hidden nodes, needs to be determined manually, and this makes it easy for use in real applications. Performance comparison was made on various high-dimensional classification problems for OSPVM against other fast online algorithms including budgeted stochastic gradient descent (BSGD) approach, adaptive multihyperplane machine (AMM), primal estimated subgradient solver (Pegasos), online sequential extreme learning machine (OSELM), and SVD + OSELM (feature selection based on SVD is performed before OSELM). The results obtained demonstrated the superior generalization performance and efficiency of the OSPVM. PMID:27143958

  8. Subfilter scalar-flux vector orientation in homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Verma, Siddhartha; Blanquart, G

    2014-06-01

    The geometric orientation of the subfilter-scale scalar-flux vector is examined in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Vector orientation is determined using the eigenframe of the resolved strain-rate tensor. The Schmidt number is kept sufficiently large so as to leave the velocity field, and hence the strain-rate tensor, unaltered by filtering in the viscous-convective subrange. Strong preferential alignment is observed for the case of Gaussian and box filters, whereas the sharp-spectral filter leads to close to a random orientation. The orientation angle obtained with the Gaussian and box filters is largely independent of the filter width and the Schmidt number. It is shown that the alignment direction observed numerically using these two filters is predicted very well by the tensor-diffusivity model. Moreover, preferred alignment of the scalar gradient vector in the eigenframe is shown to mitigate any probable issues of negative diffusivity in the tensor-diffusivity model. Consequentially, the model might not suffer from solution instability when used for large eddy simulations of scalar transport in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Further a priori tests indicate poor alignment of the Smagorinsky and stretched vortex model predictions with the exact subfilter flux. Finally, strong filter dependence of subfilter scalar-flux orientation suggests that explicit filtering may be preferable to implicit filtering in large eddy simulations. PMID:25019887

  9. Calibration of SQUID vector magnetometers in full tensor gradiometry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffler, M.; Queitsch, M.; Stolz, R.; Chwala, A.; Krech, W.; Meyer, H.-G.; Kukowski, N.

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of magnetic vector or tensor quantities, namely of field or field gradient, delivers more details of the underlying geological setting in geomagnetic prospection than a scalar measurement of a single component or of the scalar total magnetic intensity. Currently, highest measurement resolutions are achievable with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based systems. Due to technological limitations, it is necessary to suppress the parasitic magnetic field response from the SQUID gradiometer signals, which are a superposition of one tensor component and all three orthogonal magnetic field components. This in turn requires an accurate estimation of the local magnetic field. Such a measurement can itself be achieved via three additional orthogonal SQUID reference magnetometers. It is the calibration of such a SQUID reference vector magnetometer system that is the subject of this paper. A number of vector magnetometer calibration methods are described in the literature. We present two methods that we have implemented and compared, for their suitability of rapid data processing and integration into a full tensor magnetic gradiometry, SQUID-based, system. We conclude that the calibration routines must necessarily model fabrication misalignments, field offset and scale factors, and include comparison with a reference magnetic field. In order to enable fast processing on site, the software must be able to function as a stand-alone toolbox.

  10. Online Sequential Projection Vector Machine with Adaptive Data Mean Update.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Jia, Ji-Ting; Zhang, Qiong; Deng, Wan-Yu; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple online learning algorithm especial for high-dimensional data. The algorithm is referred to as online sequential projection vector machine (OSPVM) which derives from projection vector machine and can learn from data in one-by-one or chunk-by-chunk mode. In OSPVM, data centering, dimension reduction, and neural network training are integrated seamlessly. In particular, the model parameters including (1) the projection vectors for dimension reduction, (2) the input weights, biases, and output weights, and (3) the number of hidden nodes can be updated simultaneously. Moreover, only one parameter, the number of hidden nodes, needs to be determined manually, and this makes it easy for use in real applications. Performance comparison was made on various high-dimensional classification problems for OSPVM against other fast online algorithms including budgeted stochastic gradient descent (BSGD) approach, adaptive multihyperplane machine (AMM), primal estimated subgradient solver (Pegasos), online sequential extreme learning machine (OSELM), and SVD + OSELM (feature selection based on SVD is performed before OSELM). The results obtained demonstrated the superior generalization performance and efficiency of the OSPVM. PMID:27143958

  11. Gradient Sensing: Engineering the Yeast Love Affair.

    PubMed

    Goryachev, Andrew B; Leda, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    A new study in fission yeasts promotes the notion that transient polarity patches that wander the cell surface at the onset of mating are discrete agents of gradient sensing. This concept unexpectedly bridges the modes of gradient sensing in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. PMID:27269722

  12. An Inexpensive Digital Gradient Controller for HPLC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, James E.; Carr, Peter W.

    1983-01-01

    Use of gradient elution techniques in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is often essential for direct separation of complex mixtures. Since most commercial controllers have features that are of marginal value for instructional purposes, a low-cost controller capable of illustrating essential features of gradient elution was developed.…

  13. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient.

  14. Beam quality measure for vector beams.

    PubMed

    Ndagano, Bienvenu; Sroor, Hend; McLaren, Melanie; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Vector beams have found a myriad of applications, from laser materials processing to microscopy, and are now easily produced in the laboratory. They are usually differentiated from scalar beams by qualitative measures, for example, visual inspection of beam profiles after a rotating polarizer. Here we introduce a quantitative beam quality measure for vector beams and demonstrate it on cylindrical vector vortex beams. We show how a single measure can be defined for the vector quality, from 0 (purely scalar) to 1 (purely vector). Our measure is derived from a quantum toolkit, which we show applies to classical vector beams. PMID:27472580

  15. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  16. Density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a spherical tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y; Kaye, S M; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann, N C; Smith, D R; Yuh, H

    2011-04-22

    In this Letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k(⊥)ρ(s) ≲ 10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of 2 decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity. PMID:21599377

  17. Dual fuel gradients in uranium silicide plates

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, B.W.

    1997-08-01

    Babcock & Wilcox has been able to achieve dual gradient plates with good repeatability in small lots of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} plates. Improvements in homogeneity and other processing parameters and techniques have allowed the development of contoured fuel within the cladding. The most difficult obstacles to overcome have been the ability to evaluate the bidirectional fuel loadings in comparison to the perfect loading model and the different methods of instilling the gradients in the early compact stage. The overriding conclusion is that to control the contour of the fuel, a known relationship between the compact, the frames and final core gradient must exist. Therefore, further development in the creation and control of dual gradients in fuel plates will involve arriving at a plausible gradient requirement and building the correct model between the compact configuration and the final contoured loading requirements.

  18. Can Molecular Gradients Wire the Brain?

    PubMed

    Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2016-04-01

    Concentration gradients are believed to play a key role in guiding axons to their appropriate targets during neural development. However, there are fundamental physical constraints on gradient detection, and these strongly limit the fidelity with which axons can respond to gradient cues. I discuss these constraints and argue they suggest that many axon guidance events in vivo cannot be explained solely in terms of gradient-based mechanisms. Rather, precise wiring requires the collaboration of gradients with other types of guidance cues. Since we know relatively little about how this might work, I argue that our understanding of how the brain becomes wired up during development is still at an early stage. PMID:26927836

  19. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    DOEpatents

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  20. Induced population gradients in galaxy merger remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We use numerical models to investigate the nature of induced population gradients in merger remnants. As noted by White, we find that the population mixing in stellar-dynamical mergers is rather moderate, leading to metallicity gradients in the remnant that are closely tied to gradients in the progenitor galaxies. Furthermore, the resultant metallicity gradients are poorly fitted by power laws, showing significant nonlinearities within an effective radius. If constant metallicity bulges are added to the progenitor disks, the strong relation between final and initial metallicity gradients is diluted, but the final gradients are still not well fitted by power laws. Detailed studies of the shape of the metallicity gradients in elliptical galaxies should help determine the degree to which stellar-dynamical mergers have contributed to the population of present-day ellipticals. We also consider the effects of centrally concentrated starbursts on metallicity gradients. Using simple models for metallicity enhancement, we find that addition of a metal-rich starburst population can reproduce the magnitude and shape of metallicity gradients observed in elliptical galaxies. However, even in such cases the metallicity gradients in the merger remnant should steepen significantly beyond an effective radius. Modelling such merger-induced starbursts with population synthesis techniques, we find that if the starburst is characterized by solar metallicity, it should be detectable as a bluing of the nuclear regions for several Gyr. However, if the starburst is metal-rich, the reddening effects of higher metallicity makes the broad-band signature of the starburst much more difficult to detect.

  1. Higher-frequency extension of the gauging ranges of vector receivers in the nonuniform field of measuring chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, V. A.; Goncharenko, B. I.; Zadorozhnyi, S. S.; Starkova, M. V.

    2012-09-01

    The paper discusses the frequency-dependent error of gauging acoustic receivers in the field of a standing wave and the fundamental possibility of extending the operating range of gauging of hydrophones toward high frequencies and finite-size vector receivers (acoustic pressure gradient receivers) in a vertical liquid column, oscillating in a small-volume cylindrical chamber.

  2. Normal vector magnetocardiogram. I. Correlation with the normal vector ECG.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, J; Oja, S; Malmivuo, J

    1994-07-01

    The vector magnetocardiogram (VMCG) has been measured with the corrected unipositional VMCG lead system and analyzed statistically in 290 normal subjects. The morphologic study of the QRS waveforms showed that in the right-to-left (X) component, the triphasic qRs waveform appeared in 55% of the subjects. The superoinferior (Y) component was characterized by a prominent S wave in 96% of the subjects, and the anteroposterior (Z) component was also characterized by a prominent S wave in 95% . The VMGs were compared with the vector electrocardiograms (VECG) recorded in a subgroup of 200 subjects, in whom both the VMCG and VECG were available for computer analysis. The normal variability of the spatial vector magnitude measurements was significantly greater in the VMCG than in the VECG. Some similarities were observed in the waveforms of the time-averaged QRS complexes between the VMCG and VECG. Multiple linear regression analysis between the VMCG and VECG showed that maximally 27, 45, and 41% of the variation in the instantaneous QRS X, Y, and Z amplitudes of the VMCG, respectively, could be explained by the instantaneous X, Y, and Z amplitudes of the VECG. PMID:7930985

  3. Comparative Analysis of Cesium Chloride- and Iodixanol-Based Purification of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors for Preclinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Benjamin; Miller, Felix D; Rist, Wolfgang; Lamla, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Cesium chloride (CsCl)- and iodixanol-based density gradients represent the core step in most protocols for serotype-independent adeno-associated virus (AAV) purification established to date. However, despite controversial reports about the purity and bioactivity of AAV vectors derived from each of these protocols, systematic comparisons of state-of-the-art variants of these methods are sparse. To define exact conditions for such a comparison, we first fractionated both gradients to analyze the distribution of intact, bioactive AAVs and contaminants, respectively. Moreover, we tested four different polishing methods (ultrafiltration, size-exclusion chromatography, hollow-fiber tangential flow filtration, and polyethylene glycol precipitation) implemented after the iodixanol gradient for their ability to deplete iodixanol and protein contaminations. Last, we conducted a side-by-side comparison of the CsCl and iodixanol/ultrafiltration protocol. Our results demonstrate that iodixanol-purified AAV preparations show higher vector purity but harbor more (∼20%) empty particles as compared with CsCl-purified vectors (<1%). Using mass spectrometry, we analyzed prominent protein impurities in the AAV vector product, thereby identifying known and new, possibly AAV-interacting proteins as major contaminants. Thus, our study not only provides a helpful guide for the many laboratories entering the AAV field, but also builds a basis for further investigation of cellular processes involved in AAV vector assembly and trafficking. PMID:26222983

  4. Comparative Analysis of Cesium Chloride- and Iodixanol-Based Purification of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors for Preclinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Benjamin; Miller, Felix D.; Rist, Wolfgang; Lamla, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Cesium chloride (CsCl)- and iodixanol-based density gradients represent the core step in most protocols for serotype-independent adeno-associated virus (AAV) purification established to date. However, despite controversial reports about the purity and bioactivity of AAV vectors derived from each of these protocols, systematic comparisons of state-of-the-art variants of these methods are sparse. To define exact conditions for such a comparison, we first fractionated both gradients to analyze the distribution of intact, bioactive AAVs and contaminants, respectively. Moreover, we tested four different polishing methods (ultrafiltration, size-exclusion chromatography, hollow-fiber tangential flow filtration, and polyethylene glycol precipitation) implemented after the iodixanol gradient for their ability to deplete iodixanol and protein contaminations. Last, we conducted a side-by-side comparison of the CsCl and iodixanol/ultrafiltration protocol. Our results demonstrate that iodixanol-purified AAV preparations show higher vector purity but harbor more (∼20%) empty particles as compared with CsCl-purified vectors (<1%). Using mass spectrometry, we analyzed prominent protein impurities in the AAV vector product, thereby identifying known and new, possibly AAV-interacting proteins as major contaminants. Thus, our study not only provides a helpful guide for the many laboratories entering the AAV field, but also builds a basis for further investigation of cellular processes involved in AAV vector assembly and trafficking. PMID:26222983

  5. SAGRAD: A Program for Neural Network Training with Simulated Annealing and the Conjugate Gradient Method.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Javier; Torres-Jimenez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    SAGRAD (Simulated Annealing GRADient), a Fortran 77 program for computing neural networks for classification using batch learning, is discussed. Neural network training in SAGRAD is based on a combination of simulated annealing and Møller's scaled conjugate gradient algorithm, the latter a variation of the traditional conjugate gradient method, better suited for the nonquadratic nature of neural networks. Different aspects of the implementation of the training process in SAGRAD are discussed, such as the efficient computation of gradients and multiplication of vectors by Hessian matrices that are required by Møller's algorithm; the (re)initialization of weights with simulated annealing required to (re)start Møller's algorithm the first time and each time thereafter that it shows insufficient progress in reaching a possibly local minimum; and the use of simulated annealing when Møller's algorithm, after possibly making considerable progress, becomes stuck at a local minimum or flat area of weight space. Outlines of the scaled conjugate gradient algorithm, the simulated annealing procedure and the training process used in SAGRAD are presented together with results from running SAGRAD on two examples of training data. PMID:26958442

  6. SAGRAD: A Program for Neural Network Training with Simulated Annealing and the Conjugate Gradient Method

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Javier; Torres-Jimenez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    SAGRAD (Simulated Annealing GRADient), a Fortran 77 program for computing neural networks for classification using batch learning, is discussed. Neural network training in SAGRAD is based on a combination of simulated annealing and Møller’s scaled conjugate gradient algorithm, the latter a variation of the traditional conjugate gradient method, better suited for the nonquadratic nature of neural networks. Different aspects of the implementation of the training process in SAGRAD are discussed, such as the efficient computation of gradients and multiplication of vectors by Hessian matrices that are required by Møller’s algorithm; the (re)initialization of weights with simulated annealing required to (re)start Møller’s algorithm the first time and each time thereafter that it shows insufficient progress in reaching a possibly local minimum; and the use of simulated annealing when Møller’s algorithm, after possibly making considerable progress, becomes stuck at a local minimum or flat area of weight space. Outlines of the scaled conjugate gradient algorithm, the simulated annealing procedure and the training process used in SAGRAD are presented together with results from running SAGRAD on two examples of training data. PMID:26958442

  7. Lentiviral Vectors for Immune Cells Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Steven; Tai, April; Wang, Pin

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are efficient gene delivery vehicles suitable for delivering long-term transgene expression in various cell types. Engineering lentiviral vectors to have the capacity to transduce specific cell types is of great interest to advance the translation of lentiviral vectors towards the clinic. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to target lentiviral vectors to cells of the immune system. In this overview we distinguish between two types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies: 1) targeting of the vectors to specific cells by lentiviral vector surface modifications, and 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue-specific promoters to drive transgene expression. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value but ultimately combining these approaches may help reduce the effects of off-target expression and improve the efficiency and saftey of lentiviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:20085508

  8. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  9. Principal fiber bundle description of number scaling for scalars and vectors: application to gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benioff, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to put the description of number scaling and its effects on physics and geometry on a firmer foundation, and to make it more understandable. A main point is that two different concepts, number and number value are combined in the usual representations of number structures. This is valid as long as just one structure of each number type is being considered. It is not valid when different structures of each number type are being considered. Elements of base sets of number structures, considered by themselves, have no meaning. They acquire meaning or value as elements of a number structure. Fiber bundles over a space or space time manifold, M, are described. The fiber consists of a collection of many real or complex number structures and vector space structures. The structures are parameterized by a real or complex scaling factor, s. A vector space at a fiber level, s, has, as scalars, real or complex number structures at the same level. Connections are described that relate scalar and vector space structures at both neighbor M locations and at neighbor scaling levels. Scalar and vector structure valued fields are described and covariant derivatives of these fields are obtained. Two complex vector fields, each with one real and one imaginary field, appear, with one complex field associated with positions in M and the other with position dependent scaling factors. A derivation of the covariant derivative for scalar and vector valued fields gives the same vector fields. The derivation shows that the complex vector field associated with scaling fiber levels is the gradient of a complex scalar field. Use of these results in gauge theory shows that the imaginary part of the vector field associated with M positions acts like the electromagnetic field. The physical relevance of the other three fields, if any, is not known.

  10. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets. PMID:26864314

  11. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics

    PubMed Central

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth’s mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets. PMID:26864314

  12. Extraordinary strain hardening by gradient structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, XiaoLei; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Liu; Yuan, Fuping; Zhu, Yuntian T.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient structures have evolved over millions of years through natural selection and optimization in many biological systems such as bones and plant stems, where the structures change gradually from the surface to interior. The advantage of gradient structures is their maximization of physical and mechanical performance while minimizing material cost. Here we report that the gradient structure in engineering materials such as metals renders a unique extra strain hardening, which leads to high ductility. The grain-size gradient under uniaxial tension induces a macroscopic strain gradient and converts the applied uniaxial stress to multiaxial stresses due to the evolution of incompatible deformation along the gradient depth. Thereby the accumulation and interaction of dislocations are promoted, resulting in an extra strain hardening and an obvious strain hardening rate up-turn. Such extraordinary strain hardening, which is inherent to gradient structures and does not exist in homogeneous materials, provides a hitherto unknown strategy to develop strong and ductile materials by architecting heterogeneous nanostructures. PMID:24799688

  13. BIOMIMETIC GRADIENT HYDROGELS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Hancock, Matthew J.; Donnelly, Joseph P.; Iyer, Dharini; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    During tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, cells experience various signals in their environments, including gradients of physical and chemical cues. Spatial and temporal gradients regulate various cell behaviours such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation during development, inflammation, wound healing, and cancer. One of the goals of functional tissue engineering is to create microenvironments that mimic the cellular and tissue complexity found in vivo by incorporating physical, chemical, temporal, and spatial gradients within engineered three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Hydrogels are ideal materials for 3D tissue scaffolds that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Various techniques from material science, microscale engineering, and microfluidics are used to synthesise biomimetic hydrogels with encapsulated cells and tailored microenvironments. In particular, a host of methods exist to incorporate micrometer to centimetre scale chemical and physical gradients within hydrogels to mimic the cellular cues found in vivo. In this review, we draw on specific biological examples to motivate hydrogel gradients as tools for studying cell–material interactions. We provide a brief overview of techniques to generate gradient hydrogels and showcase their use to study particular cell behaviours in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D environments. We conclude by summarizing the current and future trends in gradient hydrogels and cell–material interactions in context with the long-term goals of tissue engineering. PMID:21874065

  14. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-02-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth’s mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets.

  15. ATLAS3D Stellar Population Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntschner, Harald

    2015-04-01

    We present stellar population gradients of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey: a complete, volume-limited multi-wavelength survey of 260 early-type galaxies in the local 42 Mpc volume. Using emission-corrected spectra integrated within elliptical annuli we measure line-strength indices and apply single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement as function of radius. For all galaxies we derive basic linear stellar population gradients versus radius logR/Re). These gradients are examined on their own and versus three mass-sensitive parameters: K-band luminosity MK, velocity dispersion within one effective radius log σe, and our dynamical mass MJAM. We find a correlation between positive age gradients (younger centre) and steeper negative metallicity gradients with a Spearman rank correlation coefficient of -0.46 and a significance of 7.65 × 10-15. Furthermore, we find a robustly estimated mean metallicity gradient of Δ[Z/H] = -0.37 +/- 0.01 for the sample with a significant trend for more massive galaxies to have shallower profiles. While there is no clear distinction between fast and slow rotators or signs of environmental influence, we do detect a significantly larger range of [Z/H]-gradients towards low mass galaxies.

  16. Flow field thermal gradient gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boeker, Peter; Leppert, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Negative temperature gradients along the gas chromatographic separation column can maximize the separation capabilities for gas chromatography by peak focusing and also lead to lower elution temperatures. Unfortunately, so far a smooth thermal gradient over a several meters long separation column could only be realized by costly and complicated manual setups. Here we describe a simple, yet flexible method for the generation of negative thermal gradients using standard and easily exchangeable separation columns. The measurements made with a first prototype reveal promising new properties of the optimized separation process. The negative thermal gradient and the superposition of temperature programming result in a quasi-parallel separation of components each moving simultaneously near their lowered specific equilibrium temperatures through the column. Therefore, this gradient separation process is better suited for thermally labile molecules such as explosives and natural or aroma components. High-temperature GC methods also benefit from reduced elution temperatures. Even for short columns very high peak capacities can be obtained. In addition, the gradient separation is particularly beneficial for very fast separations below 1 min overall retention time. Very fast measurements of explosives prove the benefits of using negative thermal gradients. The new concept can greatly reduce the cycle time of high-resolution gas chromatography and can be integrated into hyphenated or comprehensive gas chromatography setups. PMID:26235451

  17. BIOMIMETIC GRADIENT HYDROGELS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING.

    PubMed

    Sant, Shilpa; Hancock, Matthew J; Donnelly, Joseph P; Iyer, Dharini; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-12-01

    During tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, cells experience various signals in their environments, including gradients of physical and chemical cues. Spatial and temporal gradients regulate various cell behaviours such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation during development, inflammation, wound healing, and cancer. One of the goals of functional tissue engineering is to create microenvironments that mimic the cellular and tissue complexity found in vivo by incorporating physical, chemical, temporal, and spatial gradients within engineered three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Hydrogels are ideal materials for 3D tissue scaffolds that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Various techniques from material science, microscale engineering, and microfluidics are used to synthesise biomimetic hydrogels with encapsulated cells and tailored microenvironments. In particular, a host of methods exist to incorporate micrometer to centimetre scale chemical and physical gradients within hydrogels to mimic the cellular cues found in vivo. In this review, we draw on specific biological examples to motivate hydrogel gradients as tools for studying cell-material interactions. We provide a brief overview of techniques to generate gradient hydrogels and showcase their use to study particular cell behaviours in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D environments. We conclude by summarizing the current and future trends in gradient hydrogels and cell-material interactions in context with the long-term goals of tissue engineering. PMID:21874065

  18. The Weighted Burgers Vector: a new quantity for constraining dislocation densities and types using electron backscatter diffraction on 2D sections through crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J; Mariani, E; Piazolo, S; Prior, D J; Trimby, P; Drury, M R

    2009-03-01

    The Weighted Burgers Vector (WBV) is defined here as the sum, over all types of dislocations, of [(density of intersections of dislocation lines with a map) x (Burgers vector)]. Here we show that it can be calculated, for any crystal system, solely from orientation gradients in a map view, unlike the full dislocation density tensor, which requires gradients in the third dimension. No assumption is made about gradients in the third dimension and they may be non-zero. The only assumption involved is that elastic strains are small so the lattice distortion is entirely due to dislocations. Orientation gradients can be estimated from gridded orientation measurements obtained by EBSD mapping, so the WBV can be calculated as a vector field on an EBSD map. The magnitude of the WBV gives a lower bound on the magnitude of the dislocation density tensor when that magnitude is defined in a coordinate invariant way. The direction of the WBV can constrain the types of Burgers vectors of geometrically necessary dislocations present in the microstructure, most clearly when it is broken down in terms of lattice vectors. The WBV has three advantages over other measures of local lattice distortion: it is a vector and hence carries more information than a scalar quantity, it has an explicit mathematical link to the individual Burgers vectors of dislocations and, since it is derived via tensor calculus, it is not dependent on the map coordinate system. If a sub-grain wall is included in the WBV calculation, the magnitude of the WBV becomes dependent on the step size but its direction still carries information on the Burgers vectors in the wall. The net Burgers vector content of dislocations intersecting an area of a map can be simply calculated by an integration round the edge of that area, a method which is fast and complements point-by-point WBV calculations. PMID:19250469

  19. Vectorized Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, Grzegorz; Waszak, Michał

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with vector hysteresis modeling. A vector model consisting of individual Jiles-Atherton components placed along principal axes is proposed. The cross-axis coupling ensures general vector model properties. Minor loops are obtained using scaling method. The model is intended for efficient finite element method computations defined in terms of magnetic vector potential. Numerical efficiency is ensured by differential susceptibility approach.

  20. CRAY-1S integer vector utility library

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Tooman, T.P.

    1982-06-01

    This report describes thirty-five integer or packed vector utility routines, and documents their testing. These routines perform various vector searches, linear algebra functions, memory resets, and vector boolean operations. They are written in CAL, the assembly language on the CRAY-1S computer. By utilizing the vector processing features of that machine, they are optimized in terms of run time. Each routine has been extensively tested.

  1. On spinors and null vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinich, Marco

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relations between spinors and null vectors in Clifford algebra of any dimension with particular emphasis on the conditions that a spinor must satisfy to be simple (also: pure). In particular, we prove: (i) a new property for null vectors: each of them bisects spinor space into two subspaces of equal size; (ii) that simple spinors form one-dimensional subspaces of spinor space; (iii) a necessary and sufficient condition for a spinor to be simple that generalizes a theorem of Cartan and Chevalley which becomes a corollary of this result. We also show how to write down easily the most general spinor with a given associated totally null plane. This paper is dedicated to the memory of my father Paolo Budinich who passed away in November 2013 not before transferring to me his enthusiasm for simple spinors.

  2. Vector fields in holographic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Hartle, James; Hawking, S. W.; Hertog, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We extend the holographic formulation of the semiclassical no-boundary wave function (NBWF) to models with Maxwell vector fields. It is shown that the familiar saddle points of the NBWF have a representation in which a regular, Euclidean asymptotic AdS geometry smoothly joins onto a Lorentzian asymptotically de Sitter universe through a complex transition region. The tree level probabilities of Lorentzian histories are fully specified by the action of the AdS region of the saddle points. The scalar and vector matter profiles in this region are complex from an AdS viewpoint, with universal asymptotic phases. The dual description of the semiclassical NBWF thus involves complex deformations of Euclidean CFTs.

  3. Viral vectors for vaccine applications

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngjoo

    2013-01-01

    Traditional approach of inactivated or live-attenuated vaccine immunization has resulted in impressive success in the reduction and control of infectious disease outbreaks. However, many pathogens remain less amenable to deal with the traditional vaccine strategies, and more appropriate vaccine strategy is in need. Recent discoveries that led to increased understanding of viral molecular biology and genetics has rendered the used of viruses as vaccine platforms and as potential anti-cancer agents. Due to their ability to effectively induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, viral vectors are deemed as an attractive alternative to the traditional platforms to deliver vaccine antigens as well as to specifically target and kill tumor cells. With potential targets ranging from cancers to a vast number of infectious diseases, the benefits resulting from successful application of viral vectors to prevent and treat human diseases can be immense. PMID:23858400

  4. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  5. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  6. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  7. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  8. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25804479

  9. Deriving Potential Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-08-01

    The minimum-energy configuration for the magnetic field above the solar photosphere is curl-free (hence, by Ampère's law, also current-free), so can be represented as the gradient of a scalar potential. Since magnetic fields are divergence free, this scalar potential obeys Laplace's equation, given an appropriate boundary condition (BC). With measurements of the full magnetic vector at the photosphere, it is possible to employ either Neumann or Dirichlet BCs there. Historically, the Neumann BC was used with available line-of-sight magnetic field measurements, which approximate the radial field needed for the Neumann BC. Since each BC fully determines the 3D vector magnetic field, either choice will, in general, be inconsistent with some aspect of the observed field on the boundary, due to the presence of both currents and noise in the observed field. We present a method to combine solutions from both Dirichlet and Neumann BCs to determine a hybrid, "least-squares" potential field, which minimizes the integrated square of the residual between the potential and actual fields. We also explore weighting the residuals in the fit by spatially uniform measurement uncertainties. This has advantages both in not overfitting the radial field used for the Neumann BC, and in maximizing consistency with the observations. We demonstrate our methods with SDO/HMI vector magnetic field observations of active region 11158, and find that residual discrepancies between the observed and potential fields are significant, and they are consistent with nonzero horizontal photospheric currents. We also analyze potential fields for two other active regions observed with two different vector magnetographs, and find that hybrid-potential fields have significantly less energy than the Neumann fields in every case - by more than 10^{32} erg in some cases. This has major implications for estimates of free magnetic energy in coronal field models, e.g., non-linear force-free field extrapolations.

  10. Deriving Potential Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-06-01

    The minimum-energy configuration for the magnetic field above the solar photosphere is curl-free (hence, by Ampère's law, also current-free), so can be represented as the gradient of a scalar potential. Since magnetic fields are divergence free, this scalar potential obeys Laplace's equation, given an appropriate boundary condition (BC). With measurements of the full magnetic vector at the photosphere, it is possible to employ either Neumann or Dirichlet BCs there. Historically, the Neumann BC was used with available line-of-sight magnetic field measurements, which approximate the radial field needed for the Neumann BC. Since each BC fully determines the 3D vector magnetic field, either choice will, in general, be inconsistent with some aspect of the observed field on the boundary, due to the presence of both currents and noise in the observed field. We present a method to combine solutions from both Dirichlet and Neumann BCs to determine a hybrid, "least-squares" potential field, which minimizes the integrated square of the residual between the potential and actual fields. We also explore weighting the residuals in the fit by spatially uniform measurement uncertainties. This has advantages both in not overfitting the radial field used for the Neumann BC, and in maximizing consistency with the observations. We demonstrate our methods with SDO/HMI vector magnetic field observations of active region 11158, and find that residual discrepancies between the observed and potential fields are significant, and they are consistent with nonzero horizontal photospheric currents. We also analyze potential fields for two other active regions observed with two different vector magnetographs, and find that hybrid-potential fields have significantly less energy than the Neumann fields in every case - by more than 10^{32} erg in some cases. This has major implications for estimates of free magnetic energy in coronal field models, e.g., non-linear force-free field extrapolations.

  11. GAPS IN SUPPORT VECTOR OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    STEINWART, INGO; HUSH, DON; SCOVEL, CLINT; LIST, NICOLAS

    2007-01-29

    We show that the stopping criteria used in many support vector machine (SVM) algorithms working on the dual can be interpreted as primal optimality bounds which in turn are known to be important for the statistical analysis of SVMs. To this end we revisit the duality theory underlying the derivation of the dual and show that in many interesting cases primal optimality bounds are the same as known dual optimality bounds.

  12. Biological rhythms and vector insects

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Mirian David

    2013-01-01

    The adjustment of all species, animals and plants, to the Earth’s cyclic environments is ensured by their temporal organisation. The relationships between parasites, vectors and hosts rely greatly upon the synchronisation of their biological rhythms, especially circadian rhythms. In this short note, parasitic infections by Protozoa and by microfilariae have been chosen as examples of the dependence of successful transmission mechanisms on temporal components. PMID:24473803

  13. Systolic architectures for vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant A.; Cappello, Peter R.; Gersho, Allen

    1988-01-01

    A family of architectural techniques are proposed which offer efficient computation of weighted Euclidean distance measures for nearest-neighbor codebook searching. The general approach uses a single metric comparator chip in conjunction with a linear array of inner product processor chips. Very high vector-quantization (VQ) throughput can be achieved for many speech and image-processing applications. Several alternative configurations allow reasonable tradeoffs between speed and VLSI chip area required.

  14. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  15. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-01

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  16. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  17. Problems with the Method of Correlated Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, M.C.; Lee, K.

    2005-01-01

    The method of correlated vectors has been used widely to identify variables that are associated with general intelligence (g). Briefly, this method involves finding the correlation between the vector of intelligence subtests' g-loadings and the vector of those subtests' correlations with the variable in question. We describe two major problems…

  18. MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-10

    MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector Level 3 Wednesday, November 7, 2012 ... A new version, F02_0002, of the MISR L3 CMV (Cloud Motion Vector) data product is now available. This new release provides finer ... coverage. These enhancements are the result of reorganizing motion vector information present in the recent Level 2 Cloud product as ...

  19. Gaussian statistics for palaeomagnetic vectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.; Constable, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of treating the statistics of palaeomagnetic directions and intensities jointly and consistently, we represent the mean and the variance of palaeomagnetic vectors, at a particular site and of a particular polarity, by a probability density function in a Cartesian three-space of orthogonal magnetic-field components consisting of a single (unimoda) non-zero mean, spherically-symmetrical (isotropic) Gaussian function. For palaeomagnetic data of mixed polarities, we consider a bimodal distribution consisting of a pair of such symmetrical Gaussian functions, with equal, but opposite, means and equal variances. For both the Gaussian and bi-Gaussian distributions, and in the spherical three-space of intensity, inclination, and declination, we obtain analytical expressions for the marginal density functions, the cumulative distributions, and the expected values and variances for each spherical coordinate (including the angle with respect to the axis of symmetry of the distributions). The mathematical expressions for the intensity and off-axis angle are closed-form and especially manageable, with the intensity distribution being Rayleigh-Rician. In the limit of small relative vectorial dispersion, the Gaussian (bi-Gaussian) directional distribution approaches a Fisher (Bingham) distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a normal distribution. In the opposite limit of large relative vectorial dispersion, the directional distributions approach a spherically-uniform distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a Maxwell distribution. We quantify biases in estimating the properties of the vector field resulting from the use of simple arithmetic averages, such as estimates of the intensity or the inclination of the mean vector, or the variances of these quantities. With the statistical framework developed here and using the maximum-likelihood method, which gives unbiased estimates in the limit of large data numbers, we demonstrate how to

  20. The gradient of potential vorticity, quaternions and an orthonormal frame for fluid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbon, J. D.; Holm, D. D.

    2011-04-01

    The gradient of potential vorticity (PV) is an important quantity because of the way PV (denoted as $q$) tends to accumulate locally in the oceans and atmospheres. Recent analysis by the authors has shown that the vector quantity $\\bdB = \\bnabla q\\times \\bnabla\\theta$ for the three-dimensional incompressible rotating Euler equations evolves according to the same stretching equation as for $\\bom$ the vorticity and $\\bB$, the magnetic field in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The $\\bdB$-vector therefore acts like the vorticity $\\bom$ in Euler's equations and the $\\bB$-field in MHD. For example, it allows various analogies, such as stretching dynamics, helicity, superhelicity and cross helicity. In addition, using quaternionic analysis, the dynamics of the $\\bdB$-vector naturally allow the construction of an orthonormal frame attached to fluid particles\\,; this is designated as a quaternion frame. The alignment dynamics of this frame are particularly relevant to the three-axis rotations that particles undergo as they traverse regions of a flow when the PV gradient $\\bnabla q$ is large.

  1. Propagation properties of Airy-Gaussian vortex beams through the gradient-index medium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruihuang; Deng, Fu; Yu, Weihao; Huang, Jiayao; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    Propagation of Airy-Gaussian vortex (AiGV) beams through the gradient-index medium is investigated analytically and numerically with the transfer matrix method. Deriving the analytic expression of the AiGV beams based on the Huygens diffraction integral formula, we obtain the propagate path, intensity and phase distributions, and the Poynting vector of the first- and second-order AiGV beams, which propagate through the paraxial ABCD system. The ballistic trajectory is no longer conventional parabolic but trigonometric shapes in the gradient-index medium. Especially, the AiGV beams represent the singular behavior at the propagation path and the light intensity distribution. The phase distribution and the Poynting vector exhibit in reverse when the AiGV beams through the singularity. As the order increases, the main lobe of the AiGV beams is gradually overlapped by the vortex core. Further, the sidelobe weakens when the AiGV beams propagate nearly to the singularity. Additionally, the figure of the Poynting vector of the AiGV beams proves the direction of energy flow corresponding to the intensity distribution. The vortex of the second-order AiGV beams is larger, and the propagation velocity is faster than that of the first order. PMID:27409428

  2. Analytic gradients for coupled-cluster energies that include noniterative connected triple excitations - Application to cis- and trans-HONO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rendell, Alistair P.

    1991-01-01

    An efficient formulation of the analytic energy gradient for the single and double excitation coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations is presented. The formulation has a small computational cost, and the algebraic manipulations may be applied generally to the analytic gradient of Moller-Plesset perturbation theory energies. The new formulation has been implemented in an efficient set of programs that utilize highly vectorized algorithms and has been used to investigate the equilibrium structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, and energy separation of cis- and trans-HONO.

  3. Counter-gradient in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libby, P. A.; Bray, K. N. C.

    1980-01-01

    A new theory for premixed turbulent flames normal to the oncoming reactants is developed on the basis of the Bray-Moss-Libby model of premixed combustion and second-order closure. Gradient transport assumptions are carefully avoided. The final formulation focuses on the intensity of the fluctuations of the velocity component normal to the flame and on the mean flux of product. At low rates of heat release corresponding to small intensities of the density fluctuations the new theory is in agreement with our earlier theory based on gradient transport. However, as the heat release increases toward values of practical interest, counter-gradient diffusion, i.e., mean flux in the direction of increasing mean concentration, arises and is attributable to the differential effect of mean pressure gradient on cold reactants and hot products. The implications of these results are discussed.

  4. Coreless Concept for High Gradient Induction Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly; /SLAC

    2008-01-07

    An induction linac cell for a high gradient is discussed. The proposed solid state coreless approach for the induction linac topology (SLIM{reg_sign}) is based on nanosecond mode operation. This mode may have an acceleration gradient comparable with gradients of rf- accelerator structures. The discussed induction system has the high electric efficiency. The key elements are a solid state semiconductor switch and a high electric density dielectric with a thin section length. The energy in the induction system is storied in the magnetic field. The nanosecond current break-up produces the high voltage. The induced voltage is used for acceleration. This manner of an operation allows the use of low voltage elements in the booster part and achieves a high accelerating gradient. The proposed topology was tested in POP (proof of principle) experiments.

  5. Isotachophoresis of proteins in sucrose density gradients.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, F

    1993-10-01

    The separation of proteins from human serum by isotachophoresis in sucrose density gradients, with mixtures of discrete amphoteric substances as spacers, is described. Open columns and columns with a dialysis membrane to hold the sucrose gradients were used. A simple algorithm based on the Kohlrausch function was used to calculate the amount of each spacer. The pH gradients generated in open columns were found to be in agreement with the calculations. The load was up to two gram proteins. The analysis of the fractions obtained after the separation showed a distribution of components similar to as analytical isotachophoresis. It is concluded that sucrose density gradients are suitable as supporting media for the preparative separation of proteins by isotachophoresis. The high resolution attained and the possibility of scaling-up the separation systems are major advantages of this system. In addition, the sample is easily and completely recoverable. PMID:8125049

  6. Gradient systems in view of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Akio; Amari, Shun-ichi

    Dualistic properties of a gradient flow on a manifold M associated with a dualistic structure (g, ∇, ∇ ∗) is studied from an information geometrical viewpoint. Some useful applications are also investigated.

  7. Investigation of ionospheric gradients for GAGAN application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, K. Ravi; Srinivas, V. Satya; Sarma, A. D.

    2009-05-01

    To cater to the needs of aviation applications, GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) system is being implemented over the Indian region. The most prominent parameter affecting the navigation accuracy of GAGAN is ionospheric delay which is a function of TEC. In the equatorial and low latitude regions such as India, TEC is often quite high with large spatial gradients. Carrier phase data from the GAGAN network of Indian TEC Stations is used for estimating ionospheric gradients in multiple viewing directions. Rate of TEC (ROT) and Rate of TEC Index (ROTI) are calculated to identify the ionospheric gradients. Among the satellite signals arriving in multiple directions, the signals which suffer from severe ionospheric gradients are identified and avoided for improving GAGAN positional accuracy. The outcome of this paper will be helpful for improving GAGAN system performance.

  8. Gradients for SL(q)-foliations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoszek, Adam; Kalina, Jerzy; Pierzchalski, Antoni

    2011-12-01

    Gradients, i.e., irreducible (with respect to the orthogonal group) components of the covariant derivative on a foliation, are considered under the assumption that the foliation has holonomy invariant transversal volume form.

  9. Continuous spray forming of functionally gradient materials

    SciTech Connect

    McKechnie, T.N.; Richardson, E.H.

    1995-12-01

    Researchers at Plasma Processes Inc. have produced a Functional Gradient Material (FGM) through advanced vacuum plasma spray processing for high heat flux applications. Outlined in this paper are the manufacturing methods used to develop a four component functional gradient material of copper, tungsten, boron, and boron nitride. The FGM was formed with continuous gradients and integral cooling channels eliminating bondlines and providing direct heat transfer from the high temperature exposed surface to a cooling medium. Metallurgical and x-ray diffraction analyses of the materials formed through innovative VPS (vacuum plasma spray) processing are also presented. Applications for this functional gradient structural material range from fusion reactor plasma facing components to missile nose cones to boilers.

  10. SW New Mexico BHT geothermal gradient calculations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shari Kelley

    2015-07-24

    This file contains a compilation of BHT data from oil wells in southwestern New Mexico. Surface temperature is calculated using the collar elevation. An estimate of geothermal gradient is calculated using the estimated surface temperature and the uncorrected BHT data.

  11. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Simon, M Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-08-16

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm(3)) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1-6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  12. Salinity gradient power: utilizing vapor pressure differences.

    PubMed

    Olsson, M; Wick, G L; Isaacs, J D

    1979-10-26

    By utilizing the vapor pressure difference between high-salinity and lowsalinity wvater, one can obtain power from the gradients of salinity. This scheme eliminates the major problems associated with conversion methods in which membranes are used. The method we tested gave higher conversion efficiencies than membrane methods. Furthermore, hardware and techniques being developed for ocean thermal energy conversion may be applied to this approach to salinity gradient energy conversion. PMID:17809370

  13. Calculating Non-Potentiality in Solar Active Regions Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Non-potential magnetic fields in solar active regions are thought to be associated with flare occurrence. In this study, we parametrize the non-potentiality of several active regions, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and correlate these parameters with flare occurrence. In particular, we focus on a parameter that we call the Gradient-Weighted Inversion Line Length (GWILL). Using data from SOHO/MDI, Mason et al. found that GWILL generally tends to increase before a solar flare. We investigate whether extending the analysis of Mason et. al. to a three-dimensional field enables us to derive better near real-time indicators of flare occurrence. Before HMI, the availability of vector magnetograms was sparse at best. HMI provides continuous vector magnetogram data at a 12-minute cadence. As such, this study represents the first parametrization of non-potentiality in solar active regions using continuous vector magnetic field data.

  14. Automated Classification of Epiphyses in the Distal Radius and Ulna using a Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-hui; Liu, Tai-ang; Wei, Hua; Wan, Lei; Ying, Chong-liang; Zhu, Guang-you

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to automatically classify epiphyses in the distal radius and ulna using a support vector machine (SVM) and to examine the accuracy of the epiphyseal growth grades generated by the support vector machine. X-ray images of distal radii and ulnae were collected from 140 Chinese teenagers aged between 11.0 and 19.0 years. Epiphyseal growth of the two elements was classified into five grades. Features of each element were extracted using a histogram of oriented gradient (HOG), and models were established using support vector classification (SVC). The prediction results and the validity of the models were evaluated with a cross-validation test and independent test for accuracy (PA ). Our findings suggest that this new technique for epiphyseal classification was successful and that an automated technique using an SVM is reliable and feasible, with a relative high accuracy for the models. PMID:27404614

  15. Accessing Interior Vector Magnetic Field Components in Neutron EDM Experiments via Boundary Value Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaster, Brad

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new technique for the determination and monitoring of the interior vector magnetic field components during the operation of neutron EDM experiments. If a suitable three-dimensional volume surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined which contains no interior currents or magnetization, each of the interior vector field components will satisfy the Laplace Equation within this volume. Therefore, if the field components can be measured on the boundary, the interior vector field components can be determined uniquely via numerical solution of the Laplace Equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the magnetic field components and magnetic field gradients in the fiducial volumes of neutron EDM experiments.

  16. Pressure gradient influence in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Nico; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding wall-bounded turbulence is still an ongoing process. Although remarkable progress has been made in the last decades, many challenges still remain. Mean flow statistics are well understood in case of zero pressure gradient flows. However, almost all turbulent boundary layers in technical applications, such as aircrafts, are subjected to a streamwise pressure gradient. When subjecting turbulent boundary layers to adverse pressure gradients, significant changes in the statistical behavior of the near-wall flow have been observed in experimental studies conducted however the details dynamics and characteristics of these flows has not been fully resolved. The sensitivity to Reynolds number and the dependency on several parameters, including the dependence on the pressure gradient parameter, is still under debate and very little information exists about statistically averaged quantities such as the mean velocity profile or Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the understanding of wall-bounded turbulence, this work experimentally investigates turbulent boundary layer subjected to favorable and adverse pressure gradients by means of Particle Image Velocimetry over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, 4200 gradient.

  17. Natural gradient learning algorithms for RBF networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junsheng; Wei, Haikun; Zhang, Chi; Li, Weiling; Guo, Weili; Zhang, Kanjian

    2015-02-01

    Radial basis function (RBF) networks are one of the most widely used models for function approximation and classification. There are many strange behaviors in the learning process of RBF networks, such as slow learning speed and the existence of the plateaus. The natural gradient learning method can overcome these disadvantages effectively. It can accelerate the dynamics of learning and avoid plateaus. In this letter, we assume that the probability density function (pdf) of the input and the activation function are gaussian. First, we introduce natural gradient learning to the RBF networks and give the explicit forms of the Fisher information matrix and its inverse. Second, since it is difficult to calculate the Fisher information matrix and its inverse when the numbers of the hidden units and the dimensions of the input are large, we introduce the adaptive method to the natural gradient learning algorithms. Finally, we give an explicit form of the adaptive natural gradient learning algorithm and compare it to the conventional gradient descent method. Simulations show that the proposed adaptive natural gradient method, which can avoid the plateaus effectively, has a good performance when RBF networks are used for nonlinear functions approximation. PMID:25380332

  18. Highly directional receivers using various combinations of scalar, vector, and dyadic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, James A.

    2003-10-01

    The generalized theory of directional sensors is presented in the form of the Taylor series expansion of the acoustic pressure about a point in space. If the expansion is truncated to second order, the analysis of scalar, vector, and dyadic sensors can be made and corresponds to the zeroth-, first-, and second-order gradient of the acoustic pressure. This translates into using a sufficient number of omni-directional hydrophones or a multimode hydrophone in conjunction with the appropriate finite-differencing operations to achieve the desired beam patterns. Using the linearized Euler equation, the formulation can be recast in terms of the zeroth-order gradient of the acoustic pressure along with the zeroth- and first-order gradient of the particle acceleration. In this case, the zeroth-order terms can be measured directly with an omni-directional hydrophone and a neutrally buoyant accelerometer. The gradient of the particle acceleration can be measured indirectly using finite differences or directly by measuring the angular acceleration akin to a Rayleigh disk. Of particular interest is the use of scalar, vector, and dyadic sensors to localize sources of sound using arc-tangent-squared processing and cardioid-squared processing as opposed to conventional arc-tangent and cardioid processing. [Work supported by ONR 321SS.

  19. A tilted grating interferometer for full vector field differential x-ray phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Simon; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Marone, Federica; Modregger, Peter; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-12-01

    We report on a setup for differential x-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography, that measures the full 2D phase-gradient information. The setup uses a simple one-dimensional x-ray grating interferometer, in which the grating structures of the interferometer are oriented at a tilt angle with respect to the sample rotation axis. In such a configuration, the differential phase images from opposing tomography projections can be combined to yield both components of the gradient vector. We show how the refractive index distribution as well as its x, y, and z gradient components can be reconstructed directly from the recorded projection data. The method can equally well be applied at conventional x-ray tube sources, to analyzer based x-ray imaging or neutron imaging. It is demonstrated with measurements of an x-ray phantom and a rat brain using synchrotron radiation. PMID:22273882

  20. Measurement of apparent cell radii using a multiple wave vector diffusion experiment.

    PubMed

    Weber, T; Ziener, C H; Kampf, T; Herold, V; Bauer, W R; Jakob, P M

    2009-04-01

    It had been previously shown that an idealized version of the two-wave-vector extension of the NMR pulsed-field-gradient spin echo diffusion experiment can be used to determine the apparent radius of geometries with restricted diffusion. In the present work, the feasibility of the experiment was demonstrated in an NMR imaging experiment, in which the apparent radius of axons in white matter tissue was determined. Moreover, numerical simulations have been carried out to determine the reliability of the results. For small diffusion times, the radius is systematically underestimated. Larger gradient area, finite length gradient pulses, and a statistical distribution of radii within a voxel all have a minor influence on the estimated radius. PMID:19205023

  1. Vaccine Design: Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Zhiquan; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2016-01-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) vectors were initially developed for gene transfer for correction of genetic diseases. Although Ad vectors achieved high levels of transgene product expression in a variety of target cells, expression of therapeutic proteins was found to be transient as vigorous T cell responses directed to components of the vector as well as the transgene product rapidly eliminate Ad vector-transduced cells. This opened the use of Ad vectors as vaccine carriers and by now a multitude of preclinical as well as clinical studies has shown that Ad vectors induce very potent and sustained transgene product-specific T and B cell responses. This chapter provides guidance on developing E1-deleted Ad vectors based on available viral molecular clones. Specifically, it describes methods for cloning, viral rescue and purification as well as quality control studies. PMID:27076309

  2. Multiscale vector fields for image pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Kah-Chan; Coggins, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A uniform processing framework for low-level vision computing in which a bank of spatial filters maps the image intensity structure at each pixel into an abstract feature space is proposed. Some properties of the filters and the feature space are described. Local orientation is measured by a vector sum in the feature space as follows: each filter's preferred orientation along with the strength of the filter's output determine the orientation and the length of a vector in the feature space; the vectors for all filters are summed to yield a resultant vector for a particular pixel and scale. The orientation of the resultant vector indicates the local orientation, and the magnitude of the vector indicates the strength of the local orientation preference. Limitations of the vector sum method are discussed. Investigations show that the processing framework provides a useful, redundant representation of image structure across orientation and scale.

  3. Comparative investigation of multiplane thrust vectoring nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F.; Smereczniak, P.; Spetnagel, D.; Thayer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inflight aerodynamic performance of multiplane vectoring nozzles is critical to development of advanced aircraft and flight control systems utilizing thrust vectoring. To investigate vectoring nozzle performance, subscale models of two second-generation thrust vectoring nozzle concepts currently under development for advanced fighters were integrated into an axisymmetric test pod. Installed drag and vectoring performance characteristics of both concepts were experimentally determined in wind tunnel testing. CFD analyses were conducted to understand the impact of internal flow turning on thrust vectoring characteristics. Both nozzles exhibited drag comparable with current nonvectoring axisymmetric nozzles. During vectored-thrust operations, forces produced by external flow effects amounted to about 25 percent of the total force measured.

  4. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  5. Maximizing sparse matrix vector product performance in MIMD computers

    SciTech Connect

    McLay, R.T.; Kohli, H.S.; Swift, S.L.; Carey, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    A considerable component of the computational effort involved in conjugate gradient solution of structured sparse matrix systems is expended during the Matrix-Vector Product (MVP), and hence it is the focus of most efforts at improving performance. Such efforts are hindered on MIMD machines due to constraints on memory, cache and speed of memory-cpu data transfer. This paper describes a strategy for maximizing the performance of the local computations associated with the MVP. The method focuses on single stride memory access, and the efficient use of cache by pre-loading it with data that is re-used while bypassing it for other data. The algorithm is designed to behave optimally for varying grid sizes and number of unknowns per gridpoint. Results from an assembly language implementation of the strategy on the iPSC/860 show a significant improvement over the performance using FORTRAN.

  6. Application of Support Vector Machine to Forex Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruzzaman, Joarder; Sarker, Ruhul A.

    Previous studies have demonstrated superior performance of artificial neural network (ANN) based forex forecasting models over traditional regression models. This paper applies support vector machines to build a forecasting model from the historical data using six simple technical indicators and presents a comparison with an ANN based model trained by scaled conjugate gradient (SCG) learning algorithm. The models are evaluated and compared on the basis of five commonly used performance metrics that measure closeness of prediction as well as correctness in directional change. Forecasting results of six different currencies against Australian dollar reveal superior performance of SVM model using simple linear kernel over ANN-SCG model in terms of all the evaluation metrics. The effect of SVM parameter selection on prediction performance is also investigated and analyzed.

  7. The spin vector of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Chandler, J. F.; Campbell, D. B.; Hine, A. A.; Stacy, N. J. S.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of radar observations from 1964 through 1983 yields the following values for the components of the spin vector of Venus: P = 243.026 + or - 0.006 d (retrograde); alpha = 272.75 + or - 0.09 deg; and delta = 67.10 + or - 0.09 deg, where the standard errors quoted are three- to five-fold larger than the statistical standard errors and encompass the changes in results obtained by various tests designed to expose possible systematic errors. These values demonstrate conclusively that the spin state of Venus is not in resonance with the relative orbital motions of Venus and earth.

  8. The Magsat precision vector magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the Magsat precision vector magnetometer which is designed to measure projections of the ambient field in three orthogonal directions. The system contains a highly stable and linear triaxial fluxgate magnetometer with a dynamic range of + or - 2000 nT (1 nT = 10 to the -9 weber per sq m). The magnetometer electronics, analog-to-digital converter, and digitally controlled current sources are implemented with redundant designs to avoid a loss of data in case of failures. Measurements are carried out with an accuracy of + or - 1 part in 64,000 in magnitude and 5 arcsec in orientation (1 arcsec = 0.00028 deg).

  9. Vector quantization for volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    Volume rendering techniques typically process volumetric data in raw, uncompressed form. As algorithmic and architectural advances improve rendering speeds, however, larger data sets will be evaluated requiring consideration of data storage and transmission issues. In this paper, we analyze the data compression requirements for volume rendering applications and present a solution based on vector quantization. The proposed system compresses volumetric data and then renders images directly from the new data format. Tests on a fluid flow data set demonstrate that good image quality may be achieved at a compression ratio of 17:1 with only a 5 percent cost in additional rendering time.

  10. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.; Smith, O. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a vector wind gust model that is suitable for orbital flight test operations and trade studies was studied. Verification of the hypothesis that gust component variables are gamma distributed, gust modulus is approximately Weibull distributed, and zonal and meridional gust components are bivariate gamma distributed is emphasized. A method of testing for bivariate gamma distributed variables, and two distributions for gust modulus are described. The results of extensive hypothesis testing of one of the distributions are presented, and the validity of the gamma distribution for representation of gust component variables is established.

  11. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  12. Vector field theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, A.; Radicella, N.

    2007-10-15

    Recently proposed theories based on the cosmic presence of a vectorial field are compared and contrasted. In particular the so-called Einstein aether theory is discussed in parallel with a recent proposal of a strained space-time theory (cosmic defect theory). We show that the latter fits reasonably well the cosmic observed data with only one, or at most two, adjustable parameters, while other vector theories use much more. The Newtonian limits are also compared. Finally we show that the cosmic defect theory may be considered as a special case of the aether theories, corresponding to a more compact and consistent paradigm.

  13. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  14. Quantum Electrodynamics for Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, Dalibor; Schindler, Matthias R.; Scherer, Stefan; Gegelia, Jambul

    2005-07-01

    Quantum electrodynamics for {rho} mesons is considered. It is shown that, at the tree level, the value of the gyromagnetic ratio of the {rho}{sup +} is fixed to 2 in a self-consistent effective quantum field theory. Further, the mixing parameter of the photon and the neutral vector meson is equal to the ratio of electromagnetic and strong couplings, leading to the mass difference M{sub {rho}}{sub {sup 0}}-M{sub {rho}}{sub {sup {+-}}}{approx}1 MeV at tree order.

  15. Properties of Vector Preisach Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, Gary R.; Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses rotational anisotropy and rotational accommodation of magnetic particle tape. These effects have a performance impact during the reading and writing of the recording process. We introduce the reduced vector model as the basis for the computations. Rotational magnetization models must accurately compute the anisotropic characteristics of ellipsoidally magnetizable media. An ellipticity factor is derived for these media that computes the two-dimensional magnetization trajectory for all applied fields. An orientation correction must be applied to the computed rotational magnetization. For isotropic materials, an orientation correction has been developed and presented. For anisotropic materials, an orientation correction is introduced.

  16. Vector-tensor and vector-vector decay amplitude analysis of B0-->phiK*0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Sanchez, P del Amo; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Lodovico, F Di; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Nardo, G De; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Buono, L Del; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Marco, E Di; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-02-01

    We perform an amplitude analysis of the decays B(0)-->phiK*(2)(1430)(0), phiK*(892)(0), and phi(Kpi)(0)(S-wave) with a sample of about 384x10(6) BB[over ] pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. The fractions of longitudinal polarization f(L) of the vector-tensor and vector-vector decay modes are measured to be 0.853(-0.069+0.061)+/-0.036 and 0.506+/-0.040+/-0.015, respectively. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay and seven parameters for the vector-tensor decay, including the branching fractions and parameters sensitive to CP violation. PMID:17358843

  17. Wideband radar cross section reduction using two-dimensional phase gradient metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongfeng; Qu, Shaobo; Wang, Jiafu; Chen, Hongya; Zhang, Jieqiu; Xu, Zhuo; Zhang, Anxue

    2014-06-02

    Phase gradient metasurface (PGMs) are artificial surfaces that can provide pre-defined in-plane wave-vectors to manipulate the directions of refracted/reflected waves. In this Letter, we propose to achieve wideband radar cross section (RCS) reduction using two-dimensional (2D) PGMs. A 2D PGM was designed using a square combination of 49 split-ring sub-unit cells. The PGM can provide additional wave-vectors along the two in-plane directions simultaneously, leading to either surface wave conversion, deflected reflection, or diffuse reflection. Both the simulation and experiment results verified the wide-band, polarization-independent, high-efficiency RCS reduction induced by the 2D PGM.

  18. Generation of electromagnetic waves in the very low frequency band by velocity gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, G. Tejero, E.; Crabtree, C.; Amatucci, W.; Rudakov, L.

    2014-01-15

    It is shown that a magnetized plasma layer with a velocity gradient in the flow perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field is unstable to waves in the Very Low Frequency band that spans the ion and electron gyrofrequencies. The waves are formally electromagnetic. However, depending on wave vector k{sup ¯}=kc/ω{sub pe} (normalized by the electron skin depth) and the obliqueness, k{sub ⊥}/k{sub ||}, where k{sub ⊥,||} are wave vectors perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field, the waves are closer to electrostatic in nature when k{sup ¯}≫1 and k{sub ⊥}≫k{sub ||} and electromagnetic otherwise. Inhomogeneous transverse flows are generated in plasma that contains a static electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field, a configuration that may naturally arise in the boundary layer between plasmas of different characteristics.

  19. Genetics of Mosquito Vector Competence

    PubMed Central

    Beerntsen, Brenda T.; James, Anthony A.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2000-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Efforts to control mosquito-borne diseases have been impeded, in part, by the development of drug-resistant parasites, insecticide-resistant mosquitoes, and environmental concerns over the application of insecticides. Therefore, there is a need to develop novel disease control strategies that can complement or replace existing control methods. One such strategy is to generate pathogen-resistant mosquitoes from those that are susceptible. To this end, efforts have focused on isolating and characterizing genes that influence mosquito vector competence. It has been known for over 70 years that there is a genetic basis for the susceptibility of mosquitoes to parasites, but until the advent of powerful molecular biological tools and protocols, it was difficult to assess the interactions of pathogens with their host tissues within the mosquito at a molecular level. Moreover, it has been only recently that the molecular mechanisms responsible for pathogen destruction, such as melanotic encapsulation and immune peptide production, have been investigated. The molecular characterization of genes that influence vector competence is becoming routine, and with the development of the Sindbis virus transducing system, potential antipathogen genes now can be introduced into the mosquito and their effect on parasite development can be assessed in vivo. With the recent successes in the field of mosquito germ line transformation, it seems likely that the generation of a pathogen-resistant mosquito population from a susceptible population soon will become a reality. PMID:10704476

  20. Viral vectors for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Carroll, Miles W

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of cancer have been investigated with renewed vigour, perhaps catalyzed by the clinical successes seen with monoclonal antibody and cytokine based therapies. The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) in multiple cancer types has enabled the development of targeted immunotherapies and allayed some of the safety concerns associated with the induction of deleterious autoimmune reactions. In addition to the TAA or therapeutic gene, the antigen delivery system is equally as important for the development of a successful cancer vaccine. One approach to induce a potent and targeted antitumor response is to use viruses to deliver the TAA to cells of the immune system. A diverse array of oncolytic viruses and recombinant viral vectors encoding numerous therapeutic genes or TAAs have been tested in pre-clinical studies and produced results which, in some cases, justify their clinical development as potential cancer immunotherapies. Within the last 5-10 years, many such recombinant vectors have made the transition from pre-clinical research to clinical development and it is these, which are given most weight in this review. PMID:16146772

  1. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  2. Coexistence and interaction of vector and bound vector solitons in a dispersion-managed fiber laser mode locked by graphene.

    PubMed

    Song, Y F; Zhang, H; Zhao, L M; Shen, D Y; Tang, D Y

    2016-01-25

    We report on the experimental observation of vector and bound vector solitons in a fiber laser passively mode locked by graphene. Localized interactions between vector solitons, vector soliton with bound vector solitons, and vector soliton with a bunch of vector solitons are experimentally investigated. We show that depending on the soliton interactions, various stable and dynamic multiple vector soliton states could be formed. PMID:26832559

  3. Evaluation of Temperature Gradient in Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical model of heat transfer using combined conduction, radiation and convection in AADSF was used to evaluate temperature gradients in the vicinity of the crystal/melt interface for variety of hot and cold zone set point temperatures specifically for the growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT). Reverse usage of hot and cold zones was simulated to aid the choice of proper orientation of crystal/melt interface regarding residual acceleration vector without actual change of furnace location on board the orbiter. It appears that an additional booster heater will be extremely helpful to ensure desired temperature gradient when hot and cold zones are reversed. Further efforts are required to investigate advantages/disadvantages of symmetrical furnace design (i.e. with similar length of hot and cold zones).

  4. MATLAB Simulation of Gradient-Based Neural Network for Online Matrix Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunong; Chen, Ke; Ma, Weimu; Li, Xiao-Dong

    This paper investigates the simulation of a gradient-based recurrent neural network for online solution of the matrix-inverse problem. Several important techniques are employed as follows to simulate such a neural system. 1) Kronecker product of matrices is introduced to transform a matrix-differential-equation (MDE) to a vector-differential-equation (VDE); i.e., finally, a standard ordinary-differential-equation (ODE) is obtained. 2) MATLAB routine "ode45" is introduced to solve the transformed initial-value ODE problem. 3) In addition to various implementation errors, different kinds of activation functions are simulated to show the characteristics of such a neural network. Simulation results substantiate the theoretical analysis and efficacy of the gradient-based neural network for online constant matrix inversion.

  5. Steganalysis for GIF images based on colors-gradient co-occurrence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Rui; Wang, Hongxia

    2012-11-01

    A steganalysis algorithm based on colors-gradient co-occurrence matrix (CGCM) is proposed in this paper. CGCM is constructed with colors matrix and gradient matrix of the GIF image, and 27-dimensional statistical features of CGCM, which are sensitive to the color-correlation between adjacent pixels and the breaking of image texture, are extracted. Support vector machine (SVM) technique takes the 27-dimensional statistical features to detect hidden message in GIF images. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is more effective than Zhao's algorithm for several existing GIF steganographic algorithms and steganography tools, especially for multibit assignment (MBA) steganography and EzStego. Furthermore, the time efficiency of the proposed algorithm is much higher than Zhao's algorithm.

  6. Magnetic field gradients from the ST-5 constellation: Improving magnetic and thermal models of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, M.; Sabaka, T.; Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Busby, C.

    2007-12-01

    We report the development of a new technique (magnetic gradiometry) for satellite-based remote sensing of the lithosphere. The measurements reported here represent the first systematic measurements of lithospheric magnetic field gradients, and were collected from a spinning spacecraft. The three-satellite ST-5 mission collected vector magnetic field observations at 300-800+ km altitudes over mid and high-northern latitudes in 2006. Away from the auroral oval, and over the continents, the gradients of the low altitude (<400 km) total anomaly field are dominated by lithospheric magnetic fields. Using a seismic starting model, and magnetic field observations from ST-5 and other recent satellite missions, we demonstrate how these techniques can be used to improve our knowledge of the processes involved in the thickened crust of the Colorado Plateau and the Sierra Madre Occidental.

  7. Age and metallicity gradients in fossil ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenthaler, P.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Fossil galaxy groups are speculated to be old and highly evolved systems of galaxies that formed early in the universe and had enough time to deplete their L∗ galaxies through successive mergers of member galaxies, building up one massive central elliptical, but retaining the group X-ray halo. Aims: Considering that fossils are the remnants of mergers in ordinary groups, the merger history of the progenitor group is expected to be imprinted in the fossil central galaxy (FCG). We present for the first time radial gradients of single-stellar population (SSP) ages and metallicites in a sample of FCGs to constrain their formation scenario. We also measure line-strength gradients for the strongest absorption features in these galaxies. Methods: We took deep spectra with the long-slit spectrograph ISIS at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) for six FCGs. The obtained spectra are fit with Pegase HR SSP models within the full-spectrum fitting package ULySS yielding SSP ages and metallicities of the stellar populations. We measure radial gradients of SSP ages and metallicities along the major axes. Lick indices are measured for the strongest absorption features to determine line-strength gradients and compare with the full-spectrum fitting results. Results: Our sample comprises some of the most massive galaxies in the universe exhibiting an average central velocity dispersion of σ0 = 271 ± 28 km s-1. Metallicity gradients are throughout negative with comparatively flat slopes of ∇[Fe/H] = -0.19 ± 0.08 while age gradients are found to be insignificant (∇age = 0.00 ± 0.05). All FCGs lie on the fundamental plane, suggesting that they are virialised systems. We find that gradient strengths and central metallicities are similar to those found in cluster ellipticals of similar mass. Conclusions: The comparatively flat metallicity gradients with respect to those predicted by monolithic collapse (∇Z = -0.5) suggest that fossils are indeed the result of

  8. Evidence that implicit assumptions of ‘no evolution’ of disease vectors in changing environments can be violated on a rapid timescale

    PubMed Central

    Egizi, Andrea; Fefferman, Nina H.; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2015-01-01

    Projected impacts of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics must consider many variables relevant to hosts, vectors and pathogens, including how altered environmental characteristics might affect the spatial distributions of vector species. However, many predictive models for vector distributions consider their habitat requirements to be fixed over relevant time-scales, when they may actually be capable of rapid evolutionary change and even adaptation. We examine the genetic signature of a spatial expansion by an invasive vector into locations with novel temperature conditions compared to its native range as a proxy for how existing vector populations may respond to temporally changing habitat. Specifically, we compare invasions into different climate ranges and characterize the importance of selection from the invaded habitat. We demonstrate that vector species can exhibit evolutionary responses (altered allelic frequencies) to a temperature gradient in as little as 7–10 years even in the presence of high gene flow, and further, that this response varies depending on the strength of selection. We interpret these findings in the context of climate change predictions for vector populations and emphasize the importance of incorporating vector evolution into models of future vector-borne disease dynamics. PMID:25688024

  9. Swarm magnetic gradients for lithospheric modelling (SLIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Brönner, Marco; Haagmans, Roger; Fuchs, Martin; Holzrichter, Nils; Olsen, Nils; Baykiev, Eldar

    2016-04-01

    We present first results of a feasibility study to use magnetic gradient information derived from Swarm data for crustal field modelling. The study is part of ESA's Support To Science Element (STSE) Swarm+ Innovations. In a first step, magnetic gradients have been derived from the observations taken by the three Swarm satellites, with emphasis on the two side-by-side flying spacecraft. Next, these gradients are used to compute magnetic gradient grids at 450 km altitude (the present mean altitude of the lower Swarm satellites) for one example region, North-West Europe. The suggested area comprise both exposed basement geology in southern Sweden and Norway with crustal scale magnetic anomalies and the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, a well-studied large scale tectonic fault system. With sensitivity analysis we studied the added benefit of the information from the gradient grids for lithospheric magnetic field modelling. A wealth of aeromagnetic data and additional constraining information for the example area allows us to validate our modelling results in great detail.

  10. Gradient-enhanced FAWSETS perfusion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marro, Kenneth I.; Lee, Donghoon; Hyyti, Outi M.

    2005-08-01

    This work describes the use of custom-built gradients to enhance skeletal muscle perfusion measurements acquired with a previously described arterial spin labeling technique known as FAWSETS (flow-driven arterial water stimulation with elimination of tissue signal). Custom-built gradients provide active control of the static magnetic field gradient on which FAWSETS relies for labeling. This allows selective, 180° modulations of the phase of the perfusion component of the signal. Phase cycling can then be implemented to eliminate all extraneous components leaving a signal that exclusively reflects capillary-level perfusion. Gradient-enhancement substantially reduces acquisition time and eliminates the need to acquire an ischemic signal to quantify perfusion. This removes critical obstacles to application of FAWSETS in organs other than skeletal muscle and makes the measurements more desirable for clinical environments. The basic physical principles of gradient-enhancement are demonstrated in flow phantom experiments and in vivo utility is demonstrated in rat hind limb during stimulated exercise.

  11. Control of vortex breakdown by temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel Angel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2003-11-01

    An axial gradient of temperature can either suppress or enhance vortex breakdown (VB). The underlying mechanism of such VB control is centrifugal or/and gravitational convection. An additional thermal-convection flow directed oppositely to the base flow suppresses VB while a co-flow enhances VB. Our numerical simulations of a compressible flow in a sealed cylinder induced by a rotating bottom disk clearly reveal these effects. We vary the temperature gradient (ɛ), Mach (Ma), Froude (Fr), and Reynolds (Re) numbers, and the aspect ratio (h). As ɛ increases (ɛ>0 corresponding to a temperature gradient parallel to the downward near-axis flow), the VB "bubble," which occurs at ɛ=0, diminishes and then totally disappears. The opposite temperature gradient (ɛ<0) enlarges the VB bubble and makes the flow unsteady. These effects of centrifugal convection become more prominent with increasing Ma and Re. Density variations induced by the temperature gradients are more important for VB control than those induced by the increase in Ma. A new efficient time-evolution code for axisymmetric flows of an ideal gas has facilitated these simulations.

  12. Importance of Ionospheric Gradients for error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravula, Ramprasad

    Importance of Ionospheric Gradients for error Correction R. Ram Prasad1, P.Nagasekhar2 1Sai Spurthi Institute of Technology-JNTU Hyderabad,2Sai Spurthi Institute of Technology-JNTU Hyderabad Email ID:rams.ravula@gmail.com In India, Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has established with an objective to develop space technology and its application to various national tasks. To cater to the needs of civil aviation applications, GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) system is being jointly implemented along with Airports Authority of India (AAI) over the Indian region. The most predominant parameter affecting the navigation accuracy of GAGAN is ionospheric delay which is a function of total number of electrons present in one square meter cylindrical cross sectional area in the line of site direction between the satellite and the user on the earth i.e. Total Electron Content (TEC).The irregular distribution of electron densities i.e. rate of TEC variation, causes Ionospheric gradients such as spatial gradients (Expressed in TECu/km) and temporal gradients (Expressed in TECu /minute). Among the satellite signals arriving to the earth in multiple directions, the signals which suffer from severe ionospheric gradients can be estimated i.e. Rate of TEC Index (ROTI) and Rate of TEC (ROT). These aspects which contribute to errors can be treated for improving GAGAN positional accuracy.

  13. Gradient algorithm applied to laboratory quantum control

    SciTech Connect

    Roslund, Jonathan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-05-15

    The exploration of a quantum control landscape, which is the physical observable as a function of the control variables, is fundamental for understanding the ability to perform observable optimization in the laboratory. For high control variable dimensions, trajectory-based methods provide a means for performing such systematic explorations by exploiting the measured gradient of the observable with respect to the control variables. This paper presents a practical, robust, easily implemented statistical method for obtaining the gradient on a general quantum control landscape in the presence of noise. In order to demonstrate the method's utility, the experimentally measured gradient is utilized as input in steepest-ascent trajectories on the landscapes of three model quantum control problems: spectrally filtered and integrated second harmonic generation as well as excitation of atomic rubidium. The gradient algorithm achieves efficiency gains of up to approximately three times that of the standard genetic algorithm and, as such, is a promising tool for meeting quantum control optimization goals as well as landscape analyses. The landscape trajectories directed by the gradient should aid in the continued investigation and understanding of controlled quantum phenomena.

  14. Performance optimization in electric field gradient focusing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefei; Farnsworth, Paul B; Tolley, H Dennis; Warnick, Karl F; Woolley, Adam T; Lee, Milton L

    2009-01-01

    Electric field gradient focusing (EFGF) is a technique used to simultaneously separate and concentrate biomacromolecules, such as proteins, based on the opposing forces of an electric field gradient and a hydrodynamic flow. Recently, we reported EFGF devices fabricated completely from copolymers functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol), which display excellent resistance to protein adsorption. However, the previous devices did not provide the predicted linear electric field gradient and stable current. To improve performance, Tris-HCl buffer that was previously doped in the hydrogel was replaced with a phosphate buffer containing a salt (i.e., potassium chloride, KCl) with high mobility ions. The new devices exhibited stable current, good reproducibility, and a linear electric field distribution in agreement with the shaped gradient region design due to improved ion transport in the hydrogel. The field gradient was calculated based on theory to be approximately 5.76 V/cm(2) for R-phycoerythrin when the applied voltage was 500 V. The effect of EFGF separation channel dimensions was also investigated; a narrower focused band was achieved in a smaller diameter channel. The relationship between the bandwidth and channel diameter is consistent with theory. Three model proteins were resolved in an EFGF channel of this design. The improved device demonstrated 14,000-fold concentration of a protein sample (from 2 ng/mL to 27 microg/mL). PMID:19081099

  15. Polarisation effects in gradient nano-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Erokhin, N S; Shvartsburg, A B; Zueva, Yu M

    2013-09-30

    The spectra of reflection of s- and p-polarised waves from gradient nanocoatings at arbitrary angles of incidence are found within the framework of two exactly solvable models of such coatings. To use the detected spectra in the visible and IR ranges, for different frequencies and coating thicknesses we present the wave reflection coefficients as functions of dimensionless frequencies related to the refractive index gradient of the coating material. It is shown that reflection from the gradient coatings in question is an order of magnitude weaker than reflection from uniform coatings, other parameters of radiation and the reflection system being equal. We report a new exactly solvable model illustrating the specific effect of gradient film optics – the possibility of non-reflective propagation of an s-wave through such a film (an analogue of the Brewster effect). The prospects are shown for the use of gradient nanostructures with different refractive index profiles to fabricate broadband non-reflective coatings. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  16. Fast gravity, gravity partials, normalized gravity, gravity gradient torque and magnetic field: Derivation, code and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    Derivation of first and second partials of the gravitational potential is given in both normalized and unnormalized form. Two different recursion formulas are considered. Derivation of a general gravity gradient torque algorithm which uses the second partial of the gravitational potential is given. Derivation of the geomagnetic field vector is given in a form that closely mimics the gravitational algorithm. Ada code for all algorithms that precomputes all possible data is given. Test cases comparing the new algorithms with previous data are given, as well as speed comparisons showing the relative efficiencies of the new algorithms.

  17. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  18. Asymmetric acoustic transmission through near-zero-index and gradient-index metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Li, Junfei; Cummer, Steven A.; Jing, Yun

    2016-05-01

    We present a design of acoustic metasurfaces yielding asymmetric transmission within a certain frequency band. The design consists of a layer of gradient-index metasurface and a layer of low refractive index metasurface. Incident waves are controlled in a wave vector dependent manner to create strong asymmetric transmission. Numerical simulations show that the approach provides high transmission contrast between the two incident directions within the designed frequency band. This is further verified by experiments. Compared to previous designs, the proposed approach yields a compact and planar device. Our design may find applications in various scenarios such as noise control and therapeutic ultrasound.

  19. Communication: automatic code generation enables nuclear gradient computations for fully internally contracted multireference theory.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Matthew K; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-02-01

    Analytical nuclear gradients for fully internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) are reported. This implementation has been realized by an automated code generator that can handle spin-free formulas for the CASPT2 energy and its derivatives with respect to variations of molecular orbitals and reference coefficients. The underlying complete active space self-consistent field and the so-called Z-vector equations are solved using density fitting. The implementation has been applied to the vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials of the porphin molecule to illustrate its capability. PMID:25662628

  20. Communication: Automatic code generation enables nuclear gradient computations for fully internally contracted multireference theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Matthew K.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-02-01

    Analytical nuclear gradients for fully internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) are reported. This implementation has been realized by an automated code generator that can handle spin-free formulas for the CASPT2 energy and its derivatives with respect to variations of molecular orbitals and reference coefficients. The underlying complete active space self-consistent field and the so-called Z-vector equations are solved using density fitting. The implementation has been applied to the vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials of the porphin molecule to illustrate its capability.

  1. Dynamics of velocity gradient invariants in turbulence: Restricted Euler and linear diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Jesús; Dopazo, César; Valiño, Luis

    1998-08-01

    A complete system of dynamical equations for the invariants of the velocity gradient, the strain rate, and the rate-of-rotation tensors is deduced for an incompressible flow. The equations for the velocity gradient invariants R and Q were first deduced by Cantwell [Phys. Fluids A 4, 782 (1992)] in terms of Hij, the tensor containing the anisotropic part of the pressure Hessian and the viscous diffusion term in the velocity gradient equation. These equations are extended here for the strain rate tensor invariants, RS and QS, and for the rate-of-rotation tensor invariant, QW, using HijS and HijW, the symmetric and the skew-symmetric parts of Hij, respectively. In order to obtain a complete system, an equation for the square of the vortex stretching vector, Vi≡Sijωj, is required. The resulting dynamical system of invariants is closed using a simple model for the velocity gradient evolution: an isotropic approximation for the pressure term and a linear model for the viscous diffusion term. The local topology and the resulting statistics implied by this model reproduce a number of trends similar to known results from numerical experiments for the small scales of turbulence.

  2. Phase-corrected Bipolar Gradients in Multiecho Gradient-echo Sequences for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianqi; Chang, Shixin; Liu, Tian; Jiang, Hongwei; Dong, Fang; Pei, Mengchao; Wang, Qianfeng; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Object The large echo spacing of unipolar readout gradients in current multiecho gradient-echo sequences for mapping fields in quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) can be reduced using bipolar readout gradients to improve acquisition efficiency. Materials and Methods Phase discrepancies between odd and even echoes in the bipolar readout gradients caused by non-ideal gradient behaviors were measured, modeled as polynomials in space and corrected for accordingly in field mapping. The bipolar approach for multiecho gradient-echo field mapping was compared with the unipolar approach for QSM. Results The odd-even-echo phase discrepancies were approximately constant along the phase encoding direction and linear along the readout and slice-selection directions. A simple linear phase correction in all three spatial directions was shown to enable accurate QSM in the human brain using a bipolar multiecho GRE sequence. Bipolar multiecho acquisition provides QSM in good quantitative agreement with unipolar acquisition while also reducing noise. Conclusion With a linear phase correction between odd-even echoes, bipolar readout gradients can be used in multiecho gradient-echo sequences for QSM. PMID:25408108

  3. Motion Driven by Strain Gradient Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-09-01

    A new driving mechanism for direction-controlled motion of nano-scale objects is proposed, based on a model of stretching a graphene strip linked to a rigid base with linear springs of identical stiffness. We find that the potential energy difference induced by the strain gradient field in the graphene strip substrate can generate sufficient force to overcome the static and kinetic friction forces between the nano-flake and the strip substrate, resulting in the nanoscale flake motion in the direction of gradient reduction. The dynamics of the nano-flake can be manipulated by tuning the stiffness of linear springs, stretching velocity and the flake size. This fundamental law of directional motion induced by strain gradient could be very useful for promising designs of nanoscale manipulation, transportation and smart surfaces.

  4. Using Spatial Gradients to Model Localization Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    D.J.Bammann; D.Mosher; D.A.Hughes; N.R.Moody; P.R.Dawson

    1999-07-01

    We present the final report on a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project, Using Spatial Gradients to Model Localization Phenomena, performed during the fiscal years 1996 through 1998. The project focused on including spatial gradients in the temporal evolution equations of the state variables that describe hardening in metal plasticity models. The motivation was to investigate the numerical aspects associated with post-bifurcation mesh dependent finite element solutions in problems involving damage or crack propagation as well as problems in which strain Localizations occur. The addition of the spatial gradients introduces a mathematical length scale that eliminates the mesh dependency of the solution. In addition, new experimental techniques were developed to identify the physical mechanism associated with the numerical length scale.

  5. Substrate Curvature Gradient Drives Rapid Droplet Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-01

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42 m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100 m/s on tapered surfaces.

  6. Substrate curvature gradient drives rapid droplet motion.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-11

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42  m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100  m/s on tapered surfaces. PMID:25062213

  7. How receptor diffusion influences gradient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, H.; Dayan, P.; Goodhill, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis, or directed motion in chemical gradients, is critical for various biological processes. Many eukaryotic cells perform spatial sensing, i.e. they detect gradients by comparing spatial differences in binding occupancy of chemosensory receptors across their membrane. In many theoretical models of spatial sensing, it is assumed, for the sake of simplicity, that the receptors concerned do not move. However, in reality, receptors undergo diverse modes of diffusion, and can traverse considerable distances in the time it takes such cells to turn in an external gradient. This sets a physical limit on the accuracy of spatial sensing, which we explore using a model in which receptors diffuse freely over the membrane. We find that the Fisher information carried in binding and unbinding events decreases monotonically with the diffusion constant of the receptors. PMID:25551145

  8. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2015-08-01

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  9. Thermal gradient analysis for the ESOPO spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, A.; González, J. Jesús; Sierra, G.; Hernández, J. V.; Pedrayes, M.; Echevarría, J.; Costero, R.; Avila, G.; Arroyo, M.; Cobos, F.; Colorado, E.; Cordova, A.; Chapa, O.; Garcia, B.; Garfias, F.; Granados, F.; Guisa, G.; Luna, E.; Martínez, B.; Michel, R.; Murillo, F.; Pérez, F.; Quechol, S.; Quirós, F.; Tejada, C.

    2008-07-01

    ESOPO will be a spectrograph of medium resolution for the 2.1 m telescope of the National Observatory at San Pedro Martir, Baja California, Mexico. It has been developed by the Instituto de Astronomia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (IA-UNAM). The main goal of this instrument is to modernize the capabilities of making science with that particular telescope. It is planned to achieve a spectral resolution between 500 and 5000. ESOPO is split into two arms; each one specialized in a specific wavelength range covering together all the visible light. A very important issue in spectrographs is to avoid inside thermal gradients. Different temperatures in the optical elements produce mechanical movements and image quality degradation during an exposition. The error budget analysis developed for ESOPO allows establishing the required limits for temperature gradients. In this paper is described the thermal analysis of the spectrograph, including specifications, finite element models, thermal equations and expected thermal gradients.

  10. Motion Driven by Strain Gradient Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    A new driving mechanism for direction-controlled motion of nano-scale objects is proposed, based on a model of stretching a graphene strip linked to a rigid base with linear springs of identical stiffness. We find that the potential energy difference induced by the strain gradient field in the graphene strip substrate can generate sufficient force to overcome the static and kinetic friction forces between the nano-flake and the strip substrate, resulting in the nanoscale flake motion in the direction of gradient reduction. The dynamics of the nano-flake can be manipulated by tuning the stiffness of linear springs, stretching velocity and the flake size. This fundamental law of directional motion induced by strain gradient could be very useful for promising designs of nanoscale manipulation, transportation and smart surfaces. PMID:26323603

  11. Relativistic klystrons for high-gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Deis, G.A.; Houck, T.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S. ); Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W. ); Haimson, J.; Mecklen

    1990-09-05

    Experimental work is being performed by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. We have learned how to overcome or previously reported problem of high power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 330 MW using an 11.4-GHz high-gain tube with multiple output structures. In these experiments the rf pulse is of the same duration as the beam current pulse. In addition, experiments have been performed on two short sections of a high-gradient accelerator using the rf power from a relativistic klystron. An average accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m has been achieved with 80-MW of rf power.

  12. Orthogonal gradient networks via post polymerization reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnayan Kannan, Pandiyarajan; Genzer, Jan

    2015-03-01

    We report a novel synthetic route to generate orthogonal gradient networks through post polymerization reaction using pentaflurophenylmethacrylate (PFPMAc) active ester chemistry. These chemoselective monomers were successfully copolymerized with 5 mole% of the photo (methacryloyloxybenzophenone) and thermal (styrenesulfonylazide) crosslinkers. Subsequently, the copolymers were modified by a series of amines having various alkyl chain lengths. The conversion of post polymerization reaction was monitored using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and noticed that almost all pentaflurophenyl moieties are substituted by amines within in an hour without affecting the crosslinkers. In addition, the incorporation of photo and thermal crosslinkers in the polymer enabled us to achieve stable and covalently surface-bound polymer gradient networks (PGN) in an orthogonal manner, i.e. complete control over the crosslink density of the network in two opposite directions (i.e. heat vs photo). The network properties such as wettability, swelling and tensile modulus of the gradient coatings are studied and revealed in the paper.

  13. Temperature gradient formation while axial gas compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A spinning gas in equilibrium has a rotation-dependent heat capacity. However, as equilibrium is approached, such as after sudden heating, significant variations in temperature appear. Surprisingly, when fast axial compression or instantaneous gas heating occurs, the temperature does not grow homogeneously in radial direction, but instead has a gradient towards to the maximum of potential energy of external or self potential. The gradient monotonically grows with compression rate and the amplitude of the potential. The gradient builds up due to change of equilibrium density distribution, yet, not due to acoustic waves created by the compression. This result was checked in numerical simulations for particles in an external constant gravitational potential and also for rotating gas in the cylinder with perfect slip boundary conditions on the walls. This work was supported by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG52-08NA28553.

  14. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  15. Characterization of thermotropism in primary roots of maize: dependence on temperature and temperature gradient, and interaction with gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    Thermotropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. was studied with respect to gradient strength (degrees C cm-1), temperature of exposure within a gradient, pre-treatment temperature, and gravitropic stimulation. The magnitude of the response decreased with gradient strength. Maximum thermotropism was independent of gradient strength and pre-treatment temperature. The range of temperature for positive and negative thermotropism did not change with pre-treatment temperature. However, the exact range of temperatures for positive and negative thermotropism varied with gradient strengths. In general, temperatures of exposure lower than 25 degrees C resulted in positive tropic responses while temperatures of exposure of 39 degrees C or more resulted in negative tropic responses. Thermotropism was shown to modify and reverse the normal gravitropic curvature of a horizontal root when thermal gradients were applied opposite the 1 g vector. It is concluded that root thermotropism is a consequence of thermal sensing and that the curvature of the primary root results from the interaction of the thermal and gravitational sensing systems.

  16. Analytic energy gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with the density-fitting approximation.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Sherrill, C David

    2016-05-01

    An efficient implementation is presented for analytic gradients of the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method with the density-fitting approximation, denoted DF-CCSD. Frozen core terms are also included. When applied to a set of alkanes, the DF-CCSD analytic gradients are significantly accelerated compared to conventional CCSD for larger molecules. The efficiency of our DF-CCSD algorithm arises from the acceleration of several different terms, which are designated as the "gradient terms": computation of particle density matrices (PDMs), generalized Fock-matrix (GFM), solution of the Z-vector equation, formation of the relaxed PDMs and GFM, back-transformation of PDMs and GFM to the atomic orbital (AO) basis, and evaluation of gradients in the AO basis. For the largest member of the alkane set (C10H22), the computational times for the gradient terms (with the cc-pVTZ basis set) are 2582.6 (CCSD) and 310.7 (DF-CCSD) min, respectively, a speed up of more than 8-folds. For gradient related terms, the DF approach avoids the usage of four-index electron repulsion integrals. Based on our previous study [U. Bozkaya, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 124108 (2014)], our formalism completely avoids construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), using instead 2- and 3-index TPDMs. The DF approach introduces negligible errors for equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic vibrational frequencies. PMID:27155621

  17. Analytic energy gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with the density-fitting approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Uǧur; Sherrill, C. David

    2016-05-01

    An efficient implementation is presented for analytic gradients of the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method with the density-fitting approximation, denoted DF-CCSD. Frozen core terms are also included. When applied to a set of alkanes, the DF-CCSD analytic gradients are significantly accelerated compared to conventional CCSD for larger molecules. The efficiency of our DF-CCSD algorithm arises from the acceleration of several different terms, which are designated as the "gradient terms": computation of particle density matrices (PDMs), generalized Fock-matrix (GFM), solution of the Z-vector equation, formation of the relaxed PDMs and GFM, back-transformation of PDMs and GFM to the atomic orbital (AO) basis, and evaluation of gradients in the AO basis. For the largest member of the alkane set (C10H22), the computational times for the gradient terms (with the cc-pVTZ basis set) are 2582.6 (CCSD) and 310.7 (DF-CCSD) min, respectively, a speed up of more than 8-folds. For gradient related terms, the DF approach avoids the usage of four-index electron repulsion integrals. Based on our previous study [U. Bozkaya, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 124108 (2014)], our formalism completely avoids construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), using instead 2- and 3-index TPDMs. The DF approach introduces negligible errors for equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic vibrational frequencies.

  18. Transforming Vectors Measured By Noncoaligned Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, James R.; Dahlstrom, Eric L.

    1993-01-01

    Method for computing relationships between coordinate axes of two vector-measuring instruments not aligned with each other, one need only measure two nonparallel vectors u and v simultaneously in both coordinate systems. These measurements provide all data needed to compute transformation of any vector from one coordinate system to other. Particularly useful in computing alignments and transformations between accelerometers, gyroscopes, and instruments mounted on platforms subjected to vibrations, thermal strains, and other distortions causing alignments to vary unpredictably with time.

  19. Stereo transparency and the disparity gradient limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKee, Suzanne P.; Verghese, Preeti

    2002-01-01

    Several studies (Vision Research 15 (1975) 583; Perception 9 (1980) 671) have shown that binocular fusion is limited by the disparity gradient (disparity/distance) separating image points, rather than by their absolute disparity values. Points separated by a gradient >1 appear diplopic. These results are sometimes interpreted as a constraint on human stereo matching, rather than a constraint on fusion. Here we have used psychophysical measurements on stereo transparency to show that human stereo matching is not constrained by a gradient of 1. We created transparent surfaces composed of many pairs of dots, in which each member of a pair was assigned a disparity equal and opposite to the disparity of the other member. For example, each pair could be composed of one dot with a crossed disparity of 6' and the other with uncrossed disparity of 6', vertically separated by a parametrically varied distance. When the vertical separation between the paired dots was small, the disparity gradient for each pair was very steep. Nevertheless, these opponent-disparity dot pairs produced a striking appearance of two transparent surfaces for disparity gradients ranging between 0.5 and 3. The apparent depth separating the two transparent planes was correctly matched to an equivalent disparity defined by two opaque surfaces. A test target presented between the two transparent planes was easily detected, indicating robust segregation of the disparities associated with the paired dots into two transparent surfaces with few mismatches in the target plane. Our simulations using the Tsai-Victor model show that the response profiles produced by scaled disparity-energy mechanisms can account for many of our results on the transparency generated by steep gradients.

  20. A surface-towed vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J. S.; Cande, S. C.

    2002-07-01

    We have tested the feasibility of using a commercial motion sensor as a vector magnetometer that can be towed at normal survey speeds behind a research vessel. In contrast to previous studies using a shipboard mounted vector magnetometer, the towed system is essentially unaffected by the magnetization of the towing vessel. Results from a test deployment compare favorably with an earlier vector aeromagnetic survey, indicating that the towed instrument can resolve horizontal and vertical anomalies with amplitudes >30-50 nT. This instrument should be particularly useful in equatorial regions, where the vector anomalies are substantially greater than the corresponding total field anomalies.

  1. Bacteriophage lambda-based expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A C

    2001-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has been in use as a cloning vector for over 25 years, and has been used extensively as an expression vector. The efficiency of packaging and infection, and the simplicity of plaque screening are advantages of lambda as a cloning vector. A number of ingenious modifications help overcome the disadvantages associated with its mode of growth and its size. Some lambda vectors have been designed to be readily converted into plasmids or phagemids, and there are a variety of promoters and fusions that can be used to drive expression of foreign genes. Screening lambda libraries with antibodies or ligands is a powerful way of identifying novel genes. PMID:11434310

  2. Vector space model based on semantic relatedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarchuk, Dmitry; Timofeeva, Galina

    2015-11-01

    Most of data-mining methods are based on the vector space model of knowledge representation. The vector space model uses the frequency of a term in order to determine its relevance in a document. Terms can be similar by semantic meaning but be lexicographically different ones, so the classification based on the frequency of terms does not give desired results in some subject areas such as the vacancies selection. The modified vector space model based on the semantic relatedness is suggested for data-mining in this area. Evaluation results show that the proposed algorithm is better then one based on the standard vector space model.

  3. Surface-engineering of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2004-02-01

    Vectors derived from retroviridae offer particularly flexible properties in gene transfer applications given the numerous possible associations of various viral surface glycoproteins (determining cell tropism) with different types of retroviral cores (determining genome replication and integration). Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) that cannot transduce non-proliferating target cells. Generating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with different viral glycoproteins (GPs) may modulate the physicochemical properties of the vectors, their interaction with the host immune system and their host range. There are however important gene transfer restrictions to some non-proliferative tissues or cell types and recent studies have shown that progenitor hematopoietic stem cells in G(0), non-activated primary blood lymphocytes or monocytes were not transducible by lentiviral vectors. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer applications in vivo. Several innovative approaches have been explored to overcome such problems that have given rise to novel concepts in the field and have provided promising results in preliminary evaluations in vivo. Here we review the different approaches explored to upgrade lentiviral vectors, aiming at developing vectors suitable for in vivo gene delivery. PMID:14978753

  4. Vector perturbations of galaxy number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Tansella, Vittorio

    2016-07-01

    We derive the contribution to relativistic galaxy number count fluctuations from vector and tensor perturbations within linear perturbation theory. Our result is consistent with the the relativistic corrections to number counts due to scalar perturbation, where the Bardeen potentials are replaced with line-of-sight projection of vector and tensor quantities. Since vector and tensor perturbations do not lead to density fluctuations the standard density term in the number counts is absent. We apply our results to vector perturbations which are induced from scalar perturbations at second order and give numerical estimates of their contributions to the power spectrum of relativistic galaxy number counts.

  5. Lean histogram of oriented gradients features for effective eye detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Riti; Savakis, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Reliable object detection is very important in computer vision and robotics applications. The histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) is established as one of the most popular hand-crafted features, which along with support vector machine (SVM) classification provides excellent performance for object recognition. We investigate dimensionality deduction on HOG features in combination with SVM classifiers to obtain efficient feature representation and improved classification performance. In addition to lean HOG features, we explore descriptors resulting from dimensionality reduction on histograms of binary descriptors. We consider three-dimensionality reduction techniques: standard principal component analysis, random projections, a computationally efficient linear mapping that is data independent, and locality preserving projections (LPP), which learns the manifold structure of the data. Our methods focus on the application of eye detection and were tested on an eye database created using the BioID and FERET face databases. Our results indicate that manifold learning is beneficial to classification utilizing HOG features. To demonstrate the broader usefulness of lean HOG features for object class recognition, we evaluated our system's classification performance on the CalTech-101 dataset with favorable outcomes.

  6. Disease Ecology, Biodiversity, and the Latitudinal Gradient in Income

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Matthew H.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Keenan, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    While most of the world is thought to be on long-term economic growth paths, more than one-sixth of the world is roughly as poor today as their ancestors were hundreds of years ago. The majority of the extremely poor live in the tropics. The latitudinal gradient in income is highly suggestive of underlying biophysical drivers, of which disease conditions are an especially salient example. However, conclusions have been confounded by the simultaneous causality between income and disease, in addition to potentially spurious relationships. We use a simultaneous equations model to estimate the relative effects of vector-borne and parasitic diseases (VBPDs) and income on each other, controlling for other factors. Our statistical model indicates that VBPDs have systematically affected economic development, evident in contemporary levels of per capita income. The burden of VBDPs is, in turn, determined by underlying ecological conditions. In particular, the model predicts it to rise as biodiversity falls. Through these positive effects on human health, the model thus identifies measurable economic benefits of biodiversity. PMID:23300379

  7. New iterative gridding algorithm using conjugate gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuguang; Thedens, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Non-uniformly sampled data in MRI applications must be interpolated onto a regular Cartesian grid to perform fast image reconstruction using FFT. The conventional method for this is gridding, which requires a density compensation function (DCF). The calculation of DCF may be time-consuming, ambiguously defined, and may not be always reusable due to changes in k-space trajectories. A recently proposed reconstruction method that eliminates the requirement of DCF is block uniform resampling (BURS) which uses singular value decomposition (SVD). However, the SVD is still computationally intensive. In this work, we present a modified BURS algorithm using conjugate gradient method (CGM) in place of direct SVD calculation. Calculation of a block of grid point values in each iteration further reduces the computational load. The new method reduces the calculation complexity while maintaining a high-quality reconstruction result. For an n-by-n matrix, the time complexity per iteration is reduced from O(n*n*n) in SVD to O(n*n) in CGM. The time can be further reduced when we stop the iteration in CGM earlier according to the norm of the residual vector. Using this method, the quality of the reconstructed image improves compared to regularized BURS. The reduced time complexity and improved reconstruction result make the new algorithm promising in dealing with large-sized images and 3D images.

  8. Gradient Learning Algorithms for Ontology Computing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli

    2014-01-01

    The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting. PMID:25530752

  9. The effect of density gradients on hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Martti; Sillanpää, Sampo

    2003-05-01

    Hydrometers are simple but effective instruments for measuring the density of liquids. In this work, we studied the effect of non-uniform density of liquid on a hydrometer reading. The effect induced by vertical temperature gradients was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A method for compensating for the effect mathematically was developed and tested with experimental data obtained with the MIKES hydrometer calibration system. In the tests, the method was found reliable. However, the reliability depends on the available information on the hydrometer dimensions and density gradients.

  10. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  11. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  12. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  13. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  14. A new nonlinear conjugate gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, Awad; Mamat, Mustafa; Mohd, Ismail bin; Rivaie, Mohd; Omer, Osman

    2015-02-01

    Conjugate gradient (CG) methods are essential for solving large-scale unconstrained optimization problems. Many of studies and modifications have been practiced to improve this method. In this paper, a new class of conjugate gradient coefficients (βk) with a new parameter m = ‖g/k‖ ‖dk-1‖ that possess global convergence properties is presented. The global convergence and sufficient decent property result is established using inexact line searches to determine the step size of CG, denoted as ∝k. Numerical result shows that the new formula is superior and more efficient when compared to other CG coefficients.

  15. Electron heat transport down steep temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, J.P.; Virmont, J.

    1982-12-27

    Electron heat transport is studied by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, with a spherical harmonic representation of the distribution function. The first two terms (f/sub 0/, f/sub 1/) suffice, even in steep temperature gradients. Deviations from the Spitzer-Haerm law appear for lambda/L/sub T/ ((mean free path)/(temperature gradient length))> or approx. =0.01, as a result of non-Maxwellian f/sub 0/. For lambda/L/sub T/> or approx. =1, the heat flux is (1/3) of the free-streaming value. In intermediate cases, a harmonic law describes well the hottest part of the plasma.

  16. 17 GHz High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard J.; Shapiro, Michael A.

    2013-07-10

    This is a report on the MIT High Gradient Accelerator Research program which has included: Operation of the 17 GHz, 25 MeV MIT/Haimson Research Corp. electron accelerator at MIT, the highest frequency, stand-alone accelerator in the world; collaboration with members of the US High Gradient Collaboration, including the design and test of novel structures at SLAC at 11.4 GHz; the design, construction and testing of photonic bandgap structures, including metallic and dielectric structures; the investigation of the wakefields in novel structures; and the training of the next generation of graduate students and postdoctoral associates in accelerator physics.

  17. Principal whitened gradient for information geometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhirong; Laaksonen, Jorma

    2008-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the optimization in information geometry. First, a local Euclidean embedding is identified by whitening the tangent space, which leads to an additive parameter update sequence that approximates the geodesic flow to the optimal density model. Second, removal of the minor components of gradients enhances the estimation of the Fisher information matrix and reduces the computational cost. We also prove that dimensionality reduction is necessary for learning multidimensional linear transformations. The optimization based on the principal whitened gradients demonstrates faster and more robust convergence in simulations on unsupervised learning with synthetic data and on discriminant analysis of breast cancer data. PMID:18255260

  18. Gradient, counter-gradient transport and their transition in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimont, Vladimir L.; Biagioli, Fernando

    2002-03-01

    We theoretically and numerically analyse the phenomenon of counter-gradient transport in turbulent premixed flames with pressure distribution across the flame brush mainly controlled by heat release. The focus is on the transition from counter-gradient to gradient transport obtained when increasing the turbulence intensity/laminar flame speed ratio, a phenomenon recently found in open laboratory flame experiments by Frank et al (1999 Combust. Flame 116 220). The analysis is based on the turbulent flame closure combustion model for the simulation of turbulent premixed flames at strong turbulence (u' >> sL). In this case, earlier work suggests that turbulent premixed flames have non-equilibrium increasing flame brush width controlled in the model only by turbulence and independent from the counter-gradient transport phenomenon which has gasdynamic nature, and equilibrium turbulent flame speed which quickly adapts to the local turbulence. Flames of this type have been called intermediate steady propagation flames. According to the present analysis, transport in turbulent premixed flames is composed of two contributions: real physical gradient turbulent diffusion, which is responsible for the growth of flame brush thickness, and counter-gradient pressure-driven convective transport related to the different acceleration of burnt and unburnt gases subject to the average pressure variation across the turbulent flame. The original gasdynamics model for the pressure-driven transport which is developed here shows that the overall transport may be of gradient or counter-gradient nature according to which of these two contributions is dominant, and that along the flame a transformation from gradient to counter-gradient transport takes place. Reasonable agreement with the mentioned laboratory experimental data strongly support the validity of the present modelling ideas. Finally, we explain why this phenomenon is also highly probable in large-scale industrial burners at much

  19. A Reconstruction Approach for Imaging in 3D Cone Beam Vector Field Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, T.; Theis, D.; Louis, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    3D cone beam vector field tomography (VFT) aims for reconstructing and visualizing the velocity field of a moving fluid by measuring line integrals of projections of the vector field. The data are obtained by ultrasound measurements along a scanning curve which surrounds the object. From a mathematical point of view, we have to deal with the inversion of the vectorial cone beam transform. Since the vectorial cone beam transform of any gradient vector field with compact support is identically equal to zero, we can only hope to reconstruct the solenoidal part of an arbitrary vector field. In this paper we will at first summarize important properties of the cone beam transform for three-dimensional solenoidal vector fields and then propose a solution approach based on the method of approximate inverse. In this context, we intensively make use of results from scalar 3D computerized tomography. The findings presented in the paper will continuously be illustrated by pictures from first numerical experiments done with exact, simulated data. PMID:19197391

  20. Diversity Cascades and Malaria Vectors

    PubMed Central

    CARLSON, JOHN C.; DYER, LEE A.; OMLIN, FRANCOIS X.; BEIER, JOHN C.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between predator diversity and primary consumer abundance can include direct effects and indirect, cascading effects. Understanding these effects on immature Anopheles mosquitoes is important in sub-Saharan Africa, where most cases of malaria occur. Aquatic predators and immature mosquitoes were collected from shallow pools of varying age previously excavated by brickmakers in the western highlands of Kenya. Path analysis showed an indirect negative effect of habitat age on An. gambiae (Giles, 1902) mediated by effects on predator diversity. Disturbance resets habitats to an earlier successional stage, diminishing predator diversity and increasing An. gambiae populations. The increase in vector abundance as a result of reduced predator diversity highlights the public health value in conserving native insect diversity. PMID:19496413

  1. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    Work towards establishing a vector wind profile gust model for the Space Transportation System flight operations and trade studies is reported. To date, all the statistical and computational techniques required were established and partially implemented. An analysis of wind profile gust at Cape Kennedy within the theoretical framework is presented. The variability of theoretical and observed gust magnitude with filter type, altitude, and season is described. Various examples are presented which illustrate agreement between theoretical and observed gust percentiles. The preliminary analysis of the gust data indicates a strong variability with altitude, season, and wavelength regime. An extension of the analyses to include conditional distributions of gust magnitude given gust length, distributions of gust modulus, and phase differences between gust components has begun.

  2. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1981-01-01

    To enable development of a vector wind gust model suitable for orbital flight test operations and trade studies, hypotheses concerning the distributions of gust component variables were verified. Methods for verification of hypotheses that observed gust variables, including gust component magnitude, gust length, u range, and L range, are gamma distributed and presented. Observed gust modulus has been drawn from a bivariate gamma distribution that can be approximated with a Weibull distribution. Zonal and meridional gust components are bivariate gamma distributed. An analytical method for testing for bivariate gamma distributed variables is presented. Two distributions for gust modulus are described and the results of extensive hypothesis testing of one of the distributions are presented. The validity of the gamma distribution for representation of gust component variables is established.

  3. Turbulence measurements in an adverse-pressure-gradient three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer along a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernholz, H. H.; Vagt, J.-D.

    1981-10-01

    Turbulence measurements, including the six components of the Reynolds-stress tensor, have been made along three generators of a circular cylinder with an elliptical nose cone. The pressure distribution was axisymmetric upstream and asymmetric downstream. The streamwise adverse pressure gradient led to almost zero skin friction in the direction of the limiting streamline, and the circumferential pressure gradient led to skew angles up to 30 deg in the vicinity of the wall. It is shown that the normal stresses and the shear stress component behave qualitatively much like those in a two-dimensional adverse pressure-gradient boundary layer. Mean velocity profiles obey the linear and logarithmic law of the wall known from two-dimensional boundary layers both along a line of symmetry and in the three-dimensional boundary layer. Finally, it has been found that the skew angle of the Reynolds shear stress vector leads the skew angle of the resultant velocity gradient, both having the opposite sign of the skew angle of the mean velocity vector, except close to the wall.

  4. Introduction to Vector Field Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Vector field visualization techniques are essential to help us understand the complex dynamics of flow fields. These can be found in a wide range of applications such as study of flows around an aircraft, the blood flow in our heart chambers, ocean circulation models, and severe weather predictions. The vector fields from these various applications can be visually depicted using a number of techniques such as particle traces and advecting textures. In this tutorial, we present several fundamental algorithms in flow visualization including particle integration, particle tracking in time-dependent flows, and seeding strategies. For flows near surfaces, a wide variety of synthetic texture-based algorithms have been developed to depict near-body flow features. The most common approach is based on the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm. There also exist extensions of LIC to support more flexible texture generations for 3D flow data. This tutorial reviews these algorithms. Tensor fields are found in several real-world applications and also require the aid of visualization to help users understand their data sets. Examples where one can find tensor fields include mechanics to see how material respond to external forces, civil engineering and geomechanics of roads and bridges, and the study of neural pathway via diffusion tensor imaging. This tutorial will provide an overview of the different tensor field visualization techniques, discuss basic tensor decompositions, and go into detail on glyph based methods, deformation based methods, and streamline based methods. Practical examples will be used when presenting the methods; and applications from some case studies will be used as part of the motivation.

  5. Gradient and counter-gradient scalar transport in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.; Bray, K. N. C.; Mantel, T.

    1997-02-01

    In premixed turbulent combustion, the modelling of the turbulent flux of the mean reaction progress variable c˜, rho;u[double prime or second]ic[double prime or second], remains, remains somewhat controversial. Classical gradient transport assumptions based on the eddy viscosity concept are often used while both experimental data and theoretical analysis have pointed out the existence of counter-gradient turbulent diffusion. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used in this paper to provide basic information on the turbulent flux of c˜ and study the occurrence of counter-gradient transport. The numerical configuration corresponds to two- or three-dimensional premixed flames in isotropic turbulent flow. The simulations correspond to various flame and flow conditions that are representative of flamelet combustion. They reveal that different flames will feature different turbulent transport properties and that these differences can be related to basic dynamical differences in the flame flow interactions: counter-gradient diffusion occurs when the flow field near the flame is dominated by thermal dilatation due to chemical reaction, whereas gradient diffusion occurs when the flow field near the flame is dominated by the turbulent motions. The DNS-based analysis leads to a simple expression to describe the turbulent flux of c˜, which in turn leads to a simple criterion to delineate between the gradient and counter-gradient turbulent diffusion regimes. This criterion suggests that the occurrence of one regime or the other is determined primarily by the ratio of turbulence intensity divided by the laminar flame speed, u[prime prime or minute]/sL, and by the flame heat release factor, [tau] [identical with] (Tb [minus sign] Tu)/Tu, where Tu and Tb are respectively the temperature within unburnt and burnt gas. Consistent with the Bray Moss Libby theory, counter-gradient (gradient) diffusion is promoted by low (high) values of u[prime prime or minute]/sL and high (low

  6. Density Gradient Columns for Chemical Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, William B.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures for preparing density gradient columns for chemical displays are presented. They include displays illustrating acid-base reactions, metal ion equilibria, and liquid density. The lifetime of these metastable displays is surprising, some lasting for months in display cabinets. (JN)

  7. Magnetic Control of Concentration Gradient in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2005-01-01

    A report describes a technique for rapidly establishing a fluid-concentration gradient that can serve as an initial condition for an experiment on solutal instabilities associated with crystal growth in microgravity. The technique involves exploitation of the slight attractive or repulsive forces exerted on most fluids by a magnetic-field gradient. Although small, these forces can dominate in microgravity and therefore can be used to hold fluids in position in preparation for an experiment. The magnetic field is applied to a test cell, while a fluid mixture containing a concentration gradient is prepared by introducing an undiluted solution into a diluting solution in a mixing chamber. The test cell is then filled with the fluid mixture. Given the magnetic susceptibilities of the undiluted and diluting solutions, the magnetic-field gradient must be large enough that the magnetic force exceeds both (1) forces associated with the flow of the fluid mixture during filling of the test cell and (2) forces imposed by any residual gravitation and fluctuations thereof. Once the test cell has been filled with the fluid mixture, the magnetic field is switched off so that the experiment can proceed, starting from the proper initial conditions.

  8. HOT PRESSING WITH A TEMPERATURE GRADIENT

    DOEpatents

    Hausner, H.H.

    1958-05-20

    A method is described for producing powder metal compacts with a high length to width ratio, which are of substantially uniform density. The process consists in arranging a heating coil around the die and providing a temperature gradient along the length of the die with the highest temperature at the point of the compact farthest away from the ram or plunger.

  9. Examining the Education Gradient in Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterji, Pinka; Joo, Heesoo; Lahiri, Kajal

    2015-01-01

    We examine the education gradient in diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. We take into account diagnosed as well as undiagnosed cases and use methods accounting for the possibility of unmeasured factors that are correlated with education and drive both the likelihood of having illness and the propensity to be diagnosed. Data come from the…

  10. Origins of concentration gradients for diffusiophoresis.

    PubMed

    Velegol, Darrell; Garg, Astha; Guha, Rajarshi; Kar, Abhishek; Kumar, Manish

    2016-05-25

    Fluid transport that is driven by gradients of pressure, gravity, or electro-magnetic potential is well-known and studied in many fields. A subtler type of transport, called diffusiophoresis, occurs in a gradient of chemical concentration, either electrolyte or non-electrolyte. Diffusiophoresis works by driving a slip velocity at the fluid-solid interface. Although the mechanism is well-known, the diffusiophoresis mechanism is often considered to be an esoteric laboratory phenomenon. However, in this article we show that concentration gradients can develop in a surprisingly wide variety of physical phenomena - imposed gradients, asymmetric reactions, dissolution, crystallization, evaporation, mixing, sedimentation, and others - so that diffusiophoresis is in fact a very common transport mechanism, in both natural and artificial systems. We anticipate that in georeservoir extractions, physiological systems, drying operations, laboratory and industrial separations, crystallization operations, membrane processes, and many other situations, diffusiophoresis is already occurring - often without being recognized - and that opportunities exist for designing this transport to great advantage. PMID:27174044

  11. Color gradient background-oriented schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, Frank Austin; Hargather, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    Background-oriented schlieren is a method of visualizing refractive disturbances by comparing digital images with and without a refractive disturbance distorting a background pattern. Traditionally, backgrounds consist of random distributions of high-contrast color transitions or speckle patterns. To image a refractive disturbance, a digital image correlation algorithm is used to identify the location and magnitude of apparent pixel shifts in the background pattern between the two images. Here, a novel method of using color gradient backgrounds is explored as an alternative that eliminates the need to perform a complex image correlation between the digital images. A simple image subtraction can be used instead to identify the location, magnitude, and direction of the image distortions. Gradient backgrounds are demonstrated to provide quantitative data only limited by the camera's pixel resolution, whereas speckle backgrounds limit resolution to the size of the random pattern features and image correlation window size. Quantitative measurement of density in a thermal boundary layer is presented. Two-dimensional gradient backgrounds using multiple colors are demonstrated to allow measurement of two-dimensional refractions. A computer screen is used as the background, which allows for rapid modification of the gradient to tune sensitivity for a particular application.

  12. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  13. Ocean thermal gradient hydraulic power plant.

    PubMed

    Beck, E J

    1975-07-25

    Solar energy stored in the oceans may be used to generate power by exploiting ploiting thermal gradients. A proposed open-cycle system uses low-pressure steam to elevate vate water, which is then run through a hydraulic turbine to generate power. The device is analogous to an air lift pump. PMID:17813707

  14. Uranium Distribution along the Salinity Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, C.; Yoon, H.; Seo, J.; Lee, J.; Chung, K.

    2006-12-01

    Uranium distribution has been examined in the estuarine waters of the Keum River, Korea. Water samples were collected along a salinity gradient, range from 0.2 to 31.5 psu. Dissolved uranium in the samples has been extracted by C-18 SPE cartridge after pre-treatment. Extraction of uranium by C-18 cartridge after complexation with APDC/DDDC shows about 90 % recovery. After concentration of sample onto C-18 cartridge, uranium complex has been sequentially extracted by 50 % and 100 % acetonitrile, respectively. Result shows good recovery efficiency at low pH (2.5 _ 3.0) during the pre-treatment of sample which was presumably related with destabilization of uranium-carbonate complex. In the estuary, uranium shows typical conservative behavior along the salinity gradient. The current result substantiates earlier reports that uranium is conservatively transported from the river to the ocean. Most of dissolved trace metals, except cadmium, decreased with increasing salinity in the estuary. Dissolved organic carbon also decreased along the salinity gradient. Copper was rapidly removed during the mixing with seawaters as a result of organic matter flocculation. Dissolved molybdenum, vanadium and uranium distribution in the estuary showed similarities that those concentration increase along the salinity gradient.

  15. CMB anisotropies from a gradient mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-03-01

    A linear gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect on short distance physics. We confirm this by showing that if there was such a gradient mode extending across the whole observable Universe, it would not cause any hemispherical asymmetry in the power of CMB anisotropies, as long as Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To study the effect of the long wavelength mode on short wavelength modes, we generalize the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. Next, we consider effects that are of second order in the long mode. A gradient mode Φ = qṡx generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce an observable quadrupole moment. For instance, in a matter-dominated model it is equal to Q = 5(qṡx)2/18. This quadrupole can be canceled by superposition of a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a nonlinear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  16. Color gradient background oriented schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, Frank Austin; Hargather, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Background oriented schlieren (BOS) imaging is a method of visualizing refractive disturbances through the comparison of digital images. By comparing images with and without a refractive disturbance visualizations can be achieved via a range of image processing methods. Traditionally, backgrounds consist of random distributions of high contrast speckle patterns. To image a refractive disturbance, a digital image correlation algorithm is used to identify the location and magnitude of apparent pixel shifts in the background pattern. Here a novel method of using color gradient backgrounds is explored as an alternative. The gradient background eliminates the need to perform an image correlation between the two digital images, as simple image subtraction can be used to identify the location, magnitude, and direction of the image distortions. This allows for quicker processing. Two-dimensional gradient backgrounds using multiple colors are shown. The gradient backgrounds are demonstrated to provide quantitative data limited only by the camera's pixel resolution, whereas speckle backgrounds limit resolution to the size of the random pattern features and image correlation window size. Additional results include the use of a computer screen as a background.

  17. Natural equivalents of thermal gradient experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Carmen; Geyer, Adelina; Castro, Antonio; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Crystallization experiments using the intrinsic thermal gradient in 10 mm length capsules loaded in piston-cylinder assemblies were used to investigate silicic magma crystallization. The application of experimental results to natural environments requires the scaling of physical parameters of petrological interest. Therefore, we propose here a comparative study between thermal gradients and numerical simulations of natural magma chambers. We use the Finite Element method to calculate thermal profiles across a cooling silicic magma chamber. These numerical profiles are compared with the intrinsic thermal structure of half-inch, piston-cylinder assemblies at 500 MPa. It is concluded that a set of varied magma chamber geometries and/or distinct stages of their cooling history can approach the intrinsic thermal structure of laboratory experiments. Once the thermal properties for magma and its host rock are fixed, the experimental-numerical approach is mostly dependent on the volume and aspect ratio of the magma chamber. Our results indicate, for instance, that a 10 mm length capsule with a thermal gradient of 40 °C/mm (from 1100 to 700 °C) may represent a 150-1100 m wide portion of a cooling magma chamber of 10-20 km diameter and 2-10 km height, emplaced at a depth of 18 km. Additional possible scenarios are represented by larger magma chambers, up to 30 km diameter, in which the experimental thermal gradient can represent a 150-3700 m-thin-section of the large igneous bodies.

  18. Multi-gradient drilling method and system

    DOEpatents

    Maurer, William C.; Medley, Jr., George H.; McDonald, William J.

    2003-01-01

    A multi-gradient system for drilling a well bore from a surface location into a seabed includes an injector for injecting buoyant substantially incompressible articles into a column of drilling fluid associated with the well bore. Preferably, the substantially incompressible articles comprises hollow substantially spherical bodies.

  19. Transmission of Insect-Vectored Pathogens: Effects of Vector Fitness as a Function of Infectivity Status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of insect vectored pathogens is dependent on the population dynamics of the vector. Epidemiology models typically assume that birth and death rates of pathogen-free and inoculative vectors are equal, an assumption which is not true for all pathosystems. Here a series of simple and gener...

  20. GPS, GNSS, and Ionospheric Density Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, P. M.; O'Hanlon, B.; Humphreys, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric density and density gradients affect GNSS signals in two ways. They can introduce ranging errors or irregularities that form on the density gradients producing scintillation. Here we focus on the issue of ranging errors. There are two approaches to mitigating ranging errors produced by ionospheric density gradients which can be 20-30 m during major magnetic storms. The first approach is to use a reference receiver(s) to determine the ionospheric contribution to ranging errors. The ranging error is then transmitted to the user for correction within the mobile receiver. This approach is frequently referred to as differential GPS and, when multiple reference receivers are used, the system is referred to as an augmentation system. This approach is vulnerable to ionospheric gradients depending on the reference receiver spacing(s) and latency in applying the correction within the mobile receiver. The second approach is to transmit navigation signals at two frequencies and then use the relative delay between the two signals to both estimate the ranging error and calculate the correct range. Currently the dual frequency technique is used by US military receivers with an encryption key and some civilian receivers which must be stationary and average over times long compared to those required for navigation. However, the technology of space based radio navigation is changing. GPS will soon be a system with three frequencies and multiple codes. Furthermore Europe, Russia, and China are developing independent systems to complement and compete with GPS while India and Japan are developing local systems to enhance GPS performance in their regions. In this talk we address two questions. How do density gradients affect augmentation systems including the social consequences and will the new GPS/GNSS systems with multiple civilian frequencies be able to remove ionospheric errors. The answers are not at all clear.

  1. A Context Vector Model for Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billhardt, Holger; Borrajo, Daniel; Maojo, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Presents an indexing and information retrieval method that, based on the vector space model, incorporates term dependencies and thus obtains semantically richer representations of documents. Highlights include term context vectors; techniques for estimating the dependencies among terms; term weights; experimental results on four text collections;…

  2. Clifford Fourier transform on vector fields.

    PubMed

    Ebling, Julia; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2005-01-01

    Image processing and computer vision have robust methods for feature extraction and the computation of derivatives of scalar fields. Furthermore, interpolation and the effects of applying a filter can be analyzed in detail and can be advantages when applying these methods to vector fields to obtain a solid theoretical basis for feature extraction. We recently introduced the Clifford convolution, which is an extension of the classical convolution on scalar fields and provides a unified notation for the convolution of scalar and vector fields. It has attractive geometric properties that allow pattern matching on vector fields. In image processing, the convolution and the Fourier transform operators are closely related by the convolution theorem and, in this paper, we extend the Fourier transform to include general elements of Clifford Algebra, called multivectors, including scalars and vectors. The resulting convolution and derivative theorems are extensions of those for convolution and the Fourier transform on scalar fields. The Clifford Fourier transform allows a frequency analysis of vector fields and the behavior of vector-valued filters. In frequency space, vectors are transformed into general multivectors of the Clifford Algebra. Many basic vector-valued patterns, such as source, sink, saddle points, and potential vortices, can be described by a few multivectors in frequency space. PMID:16138556

  3. 40 CFR 240.206 - Vectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vectors. 240.206 Section 240.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.206 Vectors....

  4. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  5. Vector Knowledge of Beginning Physics Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Randall D.

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Vector Knowledge Test that was designed to see if beginning physics students possess the minimal basic knowledge of vectors that will allow them to proceed with a study of Newtonian mechanics. Concludes that only one-third of the students in a calculus-based introductory course at California Polytechnic had sufficient vector…

  6. Vector particles tunneling from BTZ black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge-Rui; Zhou, Shiwei; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we investigate vector particles' Hawking radiation from a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole. By applying the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi ansatz to the Proca equation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. The expected Hawking temperature is recovered.

  7. Ramond singular vectors and Jack superpolynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarie-Vézina, Ludovic; Desrosiers, Patrick; Mathieu, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The explicit formula for the superconformal singular vectors in the Neveu-Schwarz sector has been obtained recently, via its symmetric polynomial representation, as a sum of Jack superpolynomials. Here we present the analogous, but slightly more complicated, closed-form expression for the Ramond singular vectors.

  8. 40 CFR 240.206 - Vectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vectors. 240.206 Section 240.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.206 Vectors....

  9. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 4, Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide. The subject matter is concerned with displacements, speeds, scalers, vector sum, and vector analysis.The content is arranged in scrambled form, and the use of matrix transparencies is required for students to control their…

  10. Natural evolution of neural support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Two different neural implementations of support vector machines are described and applied to one-shot trainable pattern recognition. The first model is based on oscillating associative memory and is mapped to the olfactory system. The second model is founded on competitive queuing memory originally employed for generating motor action sequences in the brain. Both models include forward pathways where a stream of support vectors is evoked from memory and merges with sensory input to produce support vector machine classifications. Misclassified events are imprinted as new support vector candidates. Support vector machine weights are tuned by virtual experimentation in sleep. Recalled training examples masquerade as sensor input and feedback from the classification process drives a learning process where support vector weights are optimized. For both support vector machine models it is demonstrated that there is a plausible evolutionary path from a simple hard-wired pattern recognizer to a full implementation of a biological kernel machine. Simple and individually beneficial modifications are accumulated in each step along this path. Neural support vector machines can apparently emerge by natural processes. PMID:21744220

  11. Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  12. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (VX,VY,VZ)=(10.5,18.5,7.3)+/-0.1 km s-1 not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (VX,VY,VZ)=(9.9,15.6,6.9)+/-0.2 km s-1. The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0+/-1.4, B=-13.1+/-1.2, K=1.1+/-1.8, and C=-2.9+/-1.4 km s-1 kpc-1. The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at ~-20 km s-1 kpc-1. A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z>1 kpc), but here we surmise its existence in the thin disk at z<200 pc. The most unexpected and unexplained term within

  13. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc

  14. Copyright protection for GIS vector data production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Zhou, W.; Lin, B.; Chen, Y.

    2008-10-01

    Limited by the characters of GIS vector data, such as variety and complexity of expression, universality, mass, disorder and pretty good privacy, etc., the traditional copyright protection methods for image and audio productions cannot be applied into GIS vector data productions directly. In this paper, a solution to copyright protection of GIS vector data productions is proposed. Firstly, information characteristics, data organization and storage characteristics and attack characteristics of GIS vector data are comprehensively analyzed. Secondly, based on hash, file filter driver, dynamic encryption and decryption, the key techniques including zero-watermarking generation, access control, and data content protection are described. Finally, a copyright protection frame of GIS vector data is put forward.

  15. Computational Investigation of Fluidic Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Deere, Karen A.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study of fluidic counterflow thrust vectoring has been conducted. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were run using the computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. For validation, computational results were compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA Langley Jet Exit Test Facility. In general, computational results were in good agreement with experimental performance data, indicating that efficient thrust vectoring can be obtained with low secondary flow requirements (less than 1% of the primary flow). An examination of the computational flowfield has revealed new details about the generation of a countercurrent shear layer, its relation to secondary suction, and its role in thrust vectoring. In addition to providing new information about the physics of counterflow thrust vectoring, this work appears to be the first documented attempt to simulate the counterflow thrust vectoring problem using computational fluid dynamics.

  16. Gateway®-compatible plant transformation vectors.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Mark A; Harwood, Wendy A

    2015-01-01

    Studies in functional genomics and crop improvement programs often rely on the introduction and expression of transgenes in plants. There are two essential components required for in planta transgene expression, a plasmid vector on which the transgene sequence is carried and a delivery system capable of transferring the vector to the target cells. Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation and the binary plasmid vector system is the preferred method of transgene delivery. The cloning technologies used for DNA manipulation underpin many of these studies. Increased demand for efficient high-throughput transformation systems is driving forward improvements in gene cloning techniques. This chapter gives an overview of Gateway(®)-compatible binary vectors for use in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation systems. It describes a fast, efficient, and robust cloning protocol for the production of an over-expression binary vector using Gateway(®) recombinational cloning. PMID:25300827

  17. Developments in Viral Vector-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ura, Takehiro; Okuda, Kenji; Shimada, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors are promising tools for gene therapy and vaccines. Viral vector-based vaccines can enhance immunogenicity without an adjuvant and induce a robust cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to eliminate virus-infected cells. During the last several decades, many types of viruses have been developed as vaccine vectors. Each has unique features and parental virus-related risks. In addition, genetically altered vectors have been developed to improve efficacy and safety, reduce administration dose, and enable large-scale manufacturing. To date, both successful and unsuccessful results have been reported in clinical trials. These trials provide important information on factors such as toxicity, administration dose tolerated, and optimized vaccination strategy. This review highlights major viral vectors that are the best candidates for clinical use. PMID:26344749

  18. Segmentation and texture representation with vector quantizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li; Barba, Joseph

    1990-11-01

    An algorithm for segmentation of cell images and the extraction of texture textons based on vector quantization is presented. Initially a few low dimensional code vectors are employed in a standard vector quantization algorithm to generate a coarse code book a procedure which is equivalent to histogram sharpening. Representative gray level value from each coarse code vector are used to construct a larger fine code book. Coding the original image with the fine code book produces a less distorted image and facilitates cell and nuclear extraction. Texture textons are extracted by application of the same algorithm to the cell area using a larger number of initial code vectors and fine code book. Applications of the algorithm to cytological specimen are presented.

  19. Algorithms for parallel and vector computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, James M.

    1995-01-01

    This is a final report on work performed under NASA grant NAG-1-1112-FOP during the period March, 1990 through February 1995. Four major topics are covered: (1) solution of nonlinear poisson-type equations; (2) parallel reduced system conjugate gradient method; (3) orderings for conjugate gradient preconditioners, and (4) SOR as a preconditioner.

  20. Exploring the Gradient Paths and Zero Flux Surfaces of Molecular Electrostatic Potential.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anmol; Gadre, Shridhar R

    2016-04-12

    The gradient vector field of molecular electrostatic potential, ∇V(r), has remained relatively unexplored in molecular quantum mechanics. The present article explores the conceptual as well as practical aspects of this vector field. A three-dimensional atomic partition of molecular space has been achieved on the basis of zero flux surfaces (ZFSs) of ∇V(r). Such ZFSs may completely enclose some of the atoms in the molecule, unlike what is observed in density-based atomic partitioning. The demonstration of this phenomenon is elucidated through typical examples, e.g., N2, CO, H2O, H2CO, OF(•), :CH2, and NH3BF3, where the electronegative atoms or group of atoms (group electronegativity) exhibits a closed ZFS of ∇V(r) around them. The present article determines an explicit reason for this phenomenon and also provides a necessary and sufficient condition for such a closed ZFS of ∇V(r) to exist. It also describes how the potential-based picture of atoms in molecules differs from its electron density-based analogue. This work further illustrates the manifestation of anisotropy in the gradient paths of MESP of some molecular systems, with respect to CO, (•)OH, H2O, and H2CO, and points to its potential in understanding the reactivity patterns of the interacting molecules. PMID:26881455

  1. Population dynamics of Armigeres subalbatus (Diptera: Culicidae) across a temperate altitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Chaves, L F; Imanishi, N; Hoshi, T

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the impacts of weather fluctuations, and environmental gradients, on the abundance of vectors is fundamental to grasp the dynamic nature of the entomological risk for disease transmission. The mosquito Armigeres subalbatus (Coquillet) is a common vector of filariasis. Nevertheless, its population dynamics have been relatively poorly studied. Here, we present results from a season long study where we studied spatio-temporal abundance patterns of Ar. subalbatus across the altitudinal gradient of Mt. Konpira in Nagasaki, Japan. Spatially, we found that abundance of adult Ar. subalbatus decreased with altitude and increased in areas where the ground was rich in leaf litter. Similarly, adult activity was observed only when relative humidity was over 65%. Temporally, we found that peaks in abundance followed large rainfall events. Nevertheless, this mosquito was under significant density dependence regulation. Our results suggest that Ar. subalbatus population peaks following large rainfall events could reflect the recruitment of individuals that were dormant as dry eggs. We did not find a clear signal of temperature on abundance changes of this mosquito, but only on its phenology. Since ground cover seemed more critical than temperature to its spatial distribution, we propose that this mosquito might have some degree of autonomy to changes in temperature. PMID:26074401

  2. Theory of the jitter radiation in a magnetized plasma accompanying a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Makoto; Fujiki, Kazushiro

    2016-04-01

    The linear stability of a magnetized plasma accompanying a temperature gradient is reexamined by using plasma kinetic theory. We propose that the anisotropic velocity distribution function should be decomposed into two components. One is proportional to the temperature gradient parallel to the background magnetic field. The other is proportional to the temperature gradient perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Since the amplitude of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is proportional to the heat conductivity, and the heat conductivity perpendicular to the magnetic field is strongly reduced, the first component of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is predominant. The anisotropic velocity distribution function induced by the temperature gradient along the background magnetic field drives plasma kinetic instability and circular polarized magnetic plasma waves are excited. We show that the instability is almost identical to the Weibel instability in the weakly magnetized plasma. However, in the case of the instability caused by the temperature gradient, whether wave vectors of modes are parallel to or antiparallel to the background magnetic field, the growth rate of one mode is suppressed and the growth rate of the other mode is enhanced due to the background magnetic field. In the strongly magnetized plasma, one mode is stabilized and only one of the modes remains unstable. The formulae for the jitter radiation spectrum emitted by relativistic electrons when they travel through the magnetized plasma with the plasma waves driven by the instability are deduced at the first time. We show that the synchrotron emission and the jitter radiation are simultaneously emitted from the same relativistic electron. The jitter radiation is expected to be circularly polarized but with a very small polarization degree since almost the same amounts of left-handed and right-handed circular polarized magnetic waves are excited by the instability.

  3. Nonlinear regularization operators as derived from the micromorphic approach to gradient elasticity, viscoplasticity and damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The construction of regularization operators presented in this work is based on the introduction of strain or damage micromorphic degrees of freedom in addition to the displacement vector and of their gradients into the Helmholtz free energy function of the constitutive material model. The combination of a new balance equation for generalized stresses and of the micromorphic constitutive equations generates the regularization operator. Within the small strain framework, the choice of a quadratic potential w.r.t. the gradient term provides the widely used Helmholtz operator whose regularization properties are well known: smoothing of discontinuities at interfaces and boundary layers in hardening materials, and finite width localization bands in softening materials. The objective is to review and propose nonlinear extensions of micromorphic and strain/damage gradient models along two lines: the first one introducing nonlinear relations between generalized stresses and strains; the second one envisaging several classes of finite deformation model formulations. The generic approach is applicable to a large class of elastoviscoplastic and damage models including anisothermal and multiphysics coupling. Two standard procedures of extension of classical constitutive laws to large strains are combined with the micromorphic approach: additive split of some Lagrangian strain measure or choice of a local objective rotating frame. Three distinct operators are finally derived using the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient. A new feature is that a free energy function depending solely on variables defined in the intermediate isoclinic configuration leads to the existence of additional kinematic hardening induced by the gradient of a scalar micromorphic variable. PMID:27274684

  4. Evidence of counter-gradient growth in western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) across thermal gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snover, Melissa; Adams, Michael J.; Ashton, Donald T.; Bettaso, Jamie B.; Welsh, Hartwell H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of size and age at reproductive maturity to population dynamics, this information on counter-gradient growth will improve our ability to understand and predict the consequences of dam operations for downstream turtle populations.

  5. Generation of arbitrary vector fields based on a pair of orthogonal elliptically polarized base vectors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danfeng; Gu, Bing; Rui, Guanghao; Zhan, Qiwen; Cui, Yiping

    2016-02-22

    We present an arbitrary vector field with hybrid polarization based on the combination of a pair of orthogonal elliptically polarized base vectors on the Poincaré sphere. It is shown that the created vector field is only dependent on the latitude angle 2χ but is independent on the longitude angle 2ψ on the Poincaré sphere. By adjusting the latitude angle 2χ, which is related to two identical waveplates in a common path interferometric arrangement, one could obtain arbitrary type of vector fields. Experimentally, we demonstrate the generation of such kind of vector fields and confirm the distribution of state of polarization by the measurement of Stokes parameters. Besides, we investigate the tight focusing properties of these vector fields. It is found that the additional degree of freedom 2χ provided by arbitrary vector field with hybrid polarization allows one to control the spatial structure of polarization and to engineer the focusing field. PMID:26907066

  6. Students' difficulties with unit vectors and scalar multiplication of a vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2012-02-01

    In this article we report an investigation on students' understanding of: 1) unit vectors and, 2) scalar multiplication of a vector. We administered two different tests to a total of 850 students after taking their first introductory physics course on mechanics at a large private Mexican university. The first test about unit vectors was taken by 270 students and the second test about scalar multiplication of a vector by 580 students. In the first part of this article, we analyze students' difficulties sketching the unit vector in the direction of a vector in the Cartesian coordinate plane. In the second part, we analyze students' responses in two types of problems: positive and negative scalar multiplication of a vector. In both parts of this article we describe frequent errors that have not been reported in the literature.

  7. GRASS GIS Vector Processing: Towards GRASS 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Markus; Landa, Martin; Petrasova, Anna; Petras, Vaclav; Chemin, Yann; Neteler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The upcoming GRASS GIS 7 release improves not only raster processing and general design but the vector processing in the first place. GRASS GIS, as a topological GIS, recognizes that the topology plays the key role in the vector processing and analysis. Topology ensures that adjacent geographic components in a single vector map are related. In contrast to non-topological GIS, a border common to two areas exists only once and is shared between the two areas. Topological representation of vector data helps to produce and maintain vector maps with clean geometry as well as enables the user to perform certain analyses that can not be conducted with non-topological or spaghetti data. Non-topological vector data are automatically converted to a topological representation upon import. Further more, various cleaning tools exist to remove non-trivial topological errors. In the upcoming GRASS GIS 7 release the vector library was particularly improved to make it faster and more efficient with an improved internal vector file format. This new topological format reduces memory and disk space requirements, leading to a generally faster processing. Opening an existing vector requires less memory providing additionally support for large files. The new spatial index performs queries faster (compared to GRASS GIS 6 more than 10 times for large vectors). As a new option the user can select a file-based version of the spatial index for large vector data. All topological cleaning tools have been optimized with regard to processing speed, robustness, and system requirements. The topological engine comes with a new prototype for direct read/write support of Simple Features API/OGR. Additionally vector data can be directly exchanged with topological PostGIS 2 databases. Considering the wide spread usage of ESRI Shapefile, a non-topological format for vector data exchange, it is particularly advantageous that GRASS GIS 7 offers advanced cleaning tools. For power users and programmers, the

  8. Detection of Rifampin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Double Gradient-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Scarpellini, Paolo; Braglia, Sergio; Carrera, Paola; Cedri, Maura; Cichero, Paola; Colombo, Alessia; Crucianelli, Rosella; Gori, Andrea; Ferrari, Maurizio; Lazzarin, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    We applied double gradient-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DG-DGGE) for the rapid detection of rifampin (RMP) resistance from rpoB PCR products of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and clinical samples. The results of this method were fully concordant with those of DNA sequencing and susceptibility testing analyses. DG-DGGE is a valid alternative to the other methods of detecting mutations for predicting RMP resistance. PMID:10508043

  9. Gradient parameter and axial and field rays in the gradient-index crystalline lens model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M. V.; Bao, C.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Rama, M. A.; Gómez-Reino, C.

    2003-09-01

    Gradient-index models of the human lens have received wide attention in optometry and vision sciences for considering how changes in the refractive index profile with age and accommodation may affect refractive power. This paper uses the continuous asymmetric bi-elliptical model to determine gradient parameter and axial and field rays of the human lens in order to study the paraxial propagation of light through the crystalline lens of the eye.

  10. Temperature gradients drive mechanical energy gradients in the flight muscle of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    George, N T; Sponberg, S; Daniel, T L

    2012-02-01

    A temperature gradient throughout the dominant flight muscle (dorsolongitudinal muscle, DLM(1)) of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta, together with temperature-dependent muscle contractile rates, demonstrates that significant spatial variation in power production is possible within a single muscle. Using in situ work-loop analyses under varying muscle temperatures and phases of activation, we show that regional differences in muscle temperature will induce a spatial gradient in the mechanical power output throughout the DLM(1). Indeed, we note that this power gradient spans from positive to negative values across the predicted temperature range. Warm ventral subunits produce positive power at their in vivo operating temperatures, and therefore act as motors. Concurrently, as muscle temperature decreases dorsally, the subunits produce approximately zero mechanical power output, acting as an elastic energy storage source, and negative power output, behaving as a damper. Adjusting the phase of activation further influences the temperature sensitivity of power output, significantly affecting the mechanical power output gradient that is expressed. Additionally, the separate subregions of the DLM(1) did not appear to employ significant physiological compensation for the temperature-induced differences in power output. Thus, although the components of a muscle are commonly thought to operate uniformly, a significant within-muscle temperature gradient has the potential to induce a mechanical power gradient, whereby subunits within a muscle operate with separate and distinct functional roles. PMID:22246256

  11. Hydrodynamic gradient expansion in gauge theory plasmas.

    PubMed

    Heller, Michal P; Janik, Romuald A; Witaszczyk, Przemysław

    2013-05-24

    We utilize the fluid-gravity duality to investigate the large order behavior of hydrodynamic gradient expansion of the dynamics of a gauge theory plasma system. This corresponds to the inclusion of dissipative terms and transport coefficients of very high order. Using the dual gravity description, we calculate numerically the form of the stress tensor for a boost-invariant flow in a hydrodynamic expansion up to terms with 240 derivatives. We observe a factorial growth of gradient contributions at large orders, which indicates a zero radius of convergence of the hydrodynamic series. Furthermore, we identify the leading singularity in the Borel transform of the hydrodynamic energy density with the lowest nonhydrodynamic excitation corresponding to a 'nonhydrodynamic' quasinormal mode on the gravity side. PMID:23745858

  12. Edge detection based on gradient ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Lan, Ruo-Ming; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2015-12-28

    We present an experimental demonstration of edge detection based on ghost imaging (GI) in the gradient domain. Through modification of a random light field, gradient GI (GGI) can directly give the edge of an object without needing the original image. As edges of real objects are usually sparser than the original objects, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the edge detection result will be dramatically enhanced, especially for large-area, high-transmittance objects. In this study, we experimentally perform one- and two-dimensional edge detection with a double-slit based on GI and GGI. The use of GGI improves the SNR significantly in both cases. Gray-scale objects are also studied by the use of simulation. The special advantages of GI will make the edge detection based on GGI be valuable in real applications. PMID:26832041

  13. Opinion Formation Models on a Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Gastner, Michael T.; Markou, Nikolitsa; Pruessner, Gunnar; Draief, Moez

    2014-01-01

    Statistical physicists have become interested in models of collective social behavior such as opinion formation, where individuals change their inherently preferred opinion if their friends disagree. Real preferences often depend on regional cultural differences, which we model here as a spatial gradient g in the initial opinion. The gradient does not only add reality to the model. It can also reveal that opinion clusters in two dimensions are typically in the standard (i.e., independent) percolation universality class, thus settling a recent controversy about a non-consensus model. However, using analytical and numerical tools, we also present a model where the width of the transition between opinions scales , not as in independent percolation, and the cluster size distribution is consistent with first-order percolation. PMID:25474528

  14. Program predicts reservoir temperature and geothermal gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that a Fortran computer program has been developed to determine static formation temperatures (SFT) and geothermal gradient (GG). A minimum of input data (only two shut-in temperature logs) is required to obtain the values of SFT and GG. Modeling of primary oil production and designing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects requires knowing the undisturbed (static) reservoir temperature. Furthermore, the bottom hole circulating temperature (BHCT) is an important factor affecting a cement's thickening time, rheological properties, compressive strength, development, and set time. To estimate the values of BHCT, the geothermal gradient should be determined with accuracy. Recently we obtained an approximate analytical solution which describes the shut-in temperature behavior.

  15. A mesh gradient technique for numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A class of successive-improvement optimization methods in which directions of descent are defined in the state space along each trial trajectory are considered. The given problem is first decomposed into two discrete levels by imposing mesh points. Level 1 consists of running optimal subarcs between each successive pair of mesh points. For normal systems, these optimal two-point boundary value problems can be solved by following a routine prescription if the mesh spacing is sufficiently close. A spacing criterion is given. Under appropriate conditions, the criterion value depends only on the coordinates of the mesh points, and its gradient with respect to those coordinates may be defined by interpreting the adjoint variables as partial derivatives of the criterion value function. In level 2, the gradient data is used to generate improvement steps or search directions in the state space which satisfy the boundary values and constraints of the given problem.

  16. MAGNETIC ADVECTION DUE TO DIFFUSIVITY GRADIENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zita, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    We derive and discuss an important source of advection of magnetic fields in plasmas, for a completely general case. Magnetic diffusivity is proportional to electrical resistivity: where the value this parameter is high, it is well known that magnetic fields can leak (or diffuse) rapidly into (or out) of the plasma. Magnetohydrodynamic lore has it that where gradients, or changes in space, of the value of the diffusivity are high, magnetic fields can have enhanced flow (or advection). We derive this phenomenon rigorously, compare our results to other work in the literature, and discuss its implications, especially for kinematic dynamos. As an extra mathematical bonus, we find that the magnetic advection due to diffusivity gradients can be expressed in terms of a diffusion equation within the induction equation, making its computational implementation especially simple.

  17. Gradient Optimization for SC CW Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, William; Kneisel, Peter; Rode, Claus

    2003-05-01

    The proposed rare isotope accelerator (RIA) design consists of a normally conducting radio frequency quadruple (RFQ) section, a superconducting (SC) drift tube cavity section, a SC elliptical multi-cell cavity section and two charge strippers with associated charge state selection and beam matching optics. The SC elliptical section uses two or three multi-cell beta cavity types installed into cryomodules to span the energy region of about 84.5 MeV/nucleon up to 400 MeV/nucleon. This paper focuses on the gradient optimization of these SC elliptical cavities that provide a significant portion of the total acceleration to the beam. The choice of gradient coupled with the cavity quality factor has a strong affect on the overall cost of the accelerator. The paper describes the optimization of the capital and operating cost associated with the RIA elliptical cavity cryomodules.

  18. Opinion formation models on a gradient.

    PubMed

    Gastner, Michael T; Markou, Nikolitsa; Pruessner, Gunnar; Draief, Moez

    2014-01-01

    Statistical physicists have become interested in models of collective social behavior such as opinion formation, where individuals change their inherently preferred opinion if their friends disagree. Real preferences often depend on regional cultural differences, which we model here as a spatial gradient g in the initial opinion. The gradient does not only add reality to the model. It can also reveal that opinion clusters in two dimensions are typically in the standard (i.e., independent) percolation universality class, thus settling a recent controversy about a non-consensus model. However, using analytical and numerical tools, we also present a model where the width of the transition between opinions scales proportional g(-1/4), not proportional g(-4/7) as in independent percolation, and the cluster size distribution is consistent with first-order percolation. PMID:25474528

  19. Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Norman L.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

  20. Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, N.L.

    1983-11-10

    Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

  1. Ecological gradients within a Pennsylvanian mire forest

    SciTech Connect

    DiMichele, W.A.; Falcon-Lang, H.J.; Nelson, W.J.; Brick, S.D.; Ames, P.R.

    2007-05-15

    Pennsylvanian coals represent remains of the earliest peat-forming rain forests, but there is no current consensus on forest ecology. Localized studies of fossil forests suggest intermixture of taxa (heterogeneity), while, in contrast, coal ball and palynological analyses imply the existence of pronounced ecological gradients. Here, we report the discovery of a spectacular fossil forest preserved over 1000 ha on top of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Herrin (No. 6) Coal of Illinois, United States. The forest was abruptly drowned when fault movement dropped a segment of coastal mire below sea level. In the largest study of its kind to date, forest composition is statistically analyzed within a well-constrained paleogeographic context. Findings resolve apparent conflicts in models of Pennsylvanian mire ecology by confirming the existence of forest heterogeneity at the local scale, while additionally demonstrating the emergence of ecological gradients at landscape scale.

  2. Terrestrial carbon dynamics across gradients of urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutyra, L.; Raciti, S.; Rao, P.; Yoon, B.; Dunn, A. L.; Phillips, N.

    2010-12-01

    Most of our global population and its CO2 emissions can be attributed to urban areas. The process of urbanization changes terrestrial carbon stocks and fluxes, which, in turn, impact ecosystem functions and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Most research to date has focused on urban carbon emissions, or separately on urban vegetation carbon exchange. Thus, we are currently lacking the empirical data and evidence of mechanisms linking urban patterns and ecosystem function that are critical to advance urban sustainability efforts. Using the Seattle, WA and Boston, MA regions as contrasting case studies, we explore the relationships between terrestrial carbon exchange and land cover across urban to rural gradients. Micrometeorological, biometric, and remote sensing methods are combined to characterize the relationships between urban land covers and vegetation across gradients of urbanization.

  3. A direct MP2 gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Michael J.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pople, John A.

    1990-02-01

    We present a direct method for evaluating the gradient of the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) energy without storing any quartic quantities, such as two-electron repulsion integrals (ERIs), double substitution amplitudes or the two-particle density matrix. For an N-basis-function calculation, N3 memory is required, and the ERIs and their first derivatives are computed up to O (number of occupied orbitals) times, plus additional ERI evaluations to obtain the Hartree-Fock (HF) orbitals and solve the coupled perturbed HF equation. Larger amounts of memory are used to reduce the O evaluations in the MP2 step. The floating point operation count is still proportional to ON4, as in conventional MP2 gradient codes since ERI evaluation is just an N4 step. Illustrative calculations are reported to assess the performance of the algorithm.

  4. Ecological gradients within a Pennsylvanian mire forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Falcon-Lang, H. J.; Nelson, W.J.; Elrick, S.D.; Ames, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Pennsylvanian coals represent remains of the earliest peat-forming rain forests, but there is no current consensus on forest ecology. Localized studies of fossil forests suggest intermixture of taxa (heterogeneity), while, in contrast, coal ball and palynological analyses imply the existence of pronounced ecological gradients. Here, we report the discovery of a spectacular fossil forest preserved over ???1000 ha on top of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Herrin (No. 6) Coal of Illinois, United States. The forest was abruptly drowned when fault movement dropped a segment of coastal mire below sea level. In the largest study of its kind to date, forest composition is statistically analyzed within a well-constrained paleogeographic context. Findings resolve apparent conflicts in models of Pennsylvanian mire ecology by confirming the existence of forest heterogeneity at the local scale, while additionally demonstrating the emergence of ecological gradients at landscape scale. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  5. Electron profile stiffness and critical gradient studies

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Smith, S. P.; White, A. E.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C.; McKee, G. R.

    2012-08-15

    Electron profile stiffness was studied in DIII-D L-mode discharges by systematically varying the heat flux in a narrow region with electron cyclotron heating and measuring the local change produced in {nabla}T{sub e}. Electron stiffness was found to slowly increase with toroidal rotation velocity. A critical inverse temperature gradient scale length 1/L{sub C} {approx} 3 m{sup -1} was identified at {rho}=0.6 and found to be independent of rotation. Both the heat pulse diffusivity and the power balance diffusivity, the latter determined by integrating the measured dependence of the heat pulse diffusivity on -{nabla}T{sub e}, were fit reasonably well by a model containing a critical inverse temperature gradient scale length and varying linearly with 1/L{sub T} above the threshold.

  6. Cosmic ray intensity gradients in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckibben, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Recent progress in the determination of cosmic-ray intensity gradients is reviewed. Direct satellite measurements of the integral gradient are described together with various types of indirect measurements, including measurements of the Ar-37/Ar-39 ratio in samples from the Lost City meteorite, studies of anisotropies in neutron-monitor counting rates, and analysis of the sidereal diurnal anisotropy observed at a single point on earth. Nucleonic radial gradients and electron gradients measured by satellites in differential energy windows are discussed, and theoretical studies of the physical processes involved in these gradients are summarized. Observations of intensity gradients in heliographic latitude are reported.

  7. Acoustic pressure-vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dehua; Elswick, Roy C.; McEachern, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Pressure-vector sensors measure both scalar and vector components of the acoustic field. December 2003 measurements at the NUWC Seneca Lake test facility verify previous observations that acoustic ambient noise spectrum levels measured by acoustic intensity sensors are reduced relative to either acoustic pressure or acoustic vector sensor spectrum levels. The Seneca measurements indicate a reduction by as much as 15 dB at the upper measurement frequency of 2500 Hz. A nonlinear array synthesis theory for pressure-vector sensors will be introduced that allows smaller apertures to achieve narrow beams. The significantly reduced ambient noise of individual pressure-vector elements observed in the ocean by others, and now at Seneca Lake, should allow a nonlinearly combined array to detect significantly lower levels than has been observed in previous multiplicative processing of pressure sensors alone. Nonlinear array synthesis of pressure-vector sensors differs from conventional super-directive algorithms that linearly combine pressure elements with positive and negative weights, thereby reducing the sensitivity of conventional super-directive arrays. The much smaller aperture of acoustic pressure-vector sensor arrays will be attractive for acoustic systems on underwater vehicles, as well as for other applications that require narrow beam acoustic receivers. [The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of ONR and NUWC.

  8. Performance evaluation of vector-machine architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ju-ho.

    1989-01-01

    Vector machines are well known for their high-peak performance, but the delivered performance varies greatly over different workloads and depends strongly on compiler optimizations. Recently it has been claimed that several horizontal superscalar architectures, e.g., VLIW and polycyclic architectures, provide a more balanced performance across a wider range of scientific workloads than do vector machines. The purpose of this research is to study the performance of register-register vector processors, such as Cray supercomputers, as a function of their architectural features, scheduling schemes, compiler optimization capabilities, and program parameters. The results of this study also provide a base for comparing vector machines with horizontal superscalar machines. An evaluation methodology, based on timing parameters, bottle-necks, and run time bounds, is developed. Cray-1 performance is degraded by the multiple memory loads of index-misaligned vectors and the inability of the Cray Fortran Compiler (CFT) to produce code that hits all the chain slot times. The impact of chaining and two instruction scheduling schemes on one-memory-port vector supercomputers, illustrated by the Cray-1 and Cray-2, is studied. The lack of instruction chaining on the Cray-2 requires a different instruction scheduling scheme from that of the Cray-1. Situations are characterized in which simple vector scheduling can generate code that fully utilizes one functional unit for machines with chaining. Even without chaining, polycyclic scheduling guarantees full utilization of one functional unit, after an initial transient, for loops with acyclic dependence graphs.

  9. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  10. Vector curvaton with varying kinetic function

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Karciauskas, Mindaugas; Wagstaff, Jacques M.

    2010-01-15

    A new model realization of the vector curvaton paradigm is presented and analyzed. The model consists of a single massive Abelian vector field, with a Maxwell-type kinetic term. By assuming that the kinetic function and the mass of the vector field are appropriately varying during inflation, it is shown that a scale-invariant spectrum of superhorizon perturbations can be generated. These perturbations can contribute to the curvature perturbation of the Universe. If the vector field remains light at the end of inflation it is found that it can generate substantial statistical anisotropy in the spectrum and bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. In this case the non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbation is predominantly anisotropic, which will be a testable prediction in the near future. If, on the other hand, the vector field is heavy at the end of inflation then it is demonstrated that particle production is approximately isotropic and the vector field alone can give rise to the curvature perturbation, without directly involving any fundamental scalar field. The parameter space for both possibilities is shown to be substantial. Finally, toy models are presented which show that the desired variation of the mass and kinetic function of the vector field can be realistically obtained, without unnatural tunings, in the context of supergravity or superstrings.

  11. A recursive technique for adaptive vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Vector Quantization (VQ) is fast becoming an accepted, if not preferred method for image compression. The VQ performs well when compressing all types of imagery including Video, Electro-Optical (EO), Infrared (IR), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Multi-Spectral (MS), and digital map data. The only requirement is to change the codebook to switch the compressor from one image sensor to another. There are several approaches for designing codebooks for a vector quantizer. Adaptive Vector Quantization is a procedure that simultaneously designs codebooks as the data is being encoded or quantized. This is done by computing the centroid as a recursive moving average where the centroids move after every vector is encoded. When computing the centroid of a fixed set of vectors the resultant centroid is identical to the previous centroid calculation. This method of centroid calculation can be easily combined with VQ encoding techniques. The defined quantizer changes after every encoded vector by recursively updating the centroid of minimum distance which is the selected by the encoder. Since the quantizer is changing definition or states after every encoded vector, the decoder must now receive updates to the codebook. This is done as side information by multiplexing bits into the compressed source data.

  12. M-step preconditioned conjugate gradient methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L.

    1983-01-01

    Preconditioned conjugate gradient methods for solving sparse symmetric and positive finite systems of linear equations are described. Necessary and sufficient conditions are given for when these preconditioners can be used and an analysis of their effectiveness is given. Efficient computer implementations of these methods are discussed and results on the CYBER 203 and the Finite Element Machine under construction at NASA Langley Research Center are included.

  13. Quantized Concentration Gradient in Picoliter Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jong Wook

    2010-10-01

    Generation of concentration gradient is of paramount importance in the success of reactions for cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, drug-discovery, chemotaxis, cell culture, biomaterials synthesis, and tissue engineering. In conventional method of conducting reactions, the concentration gradients is achieved by using pipettes, test tubes, 96-well assay plates, and robotic systems. Conventional methods require milliliter or microliter volumes of samples for typical experiments with multiple and sequential reactions. It is a challenge to carry out experiments with precious samples that have strict limitations with the amount of samples or the price to pay for the amount. In order to overcome this challenge faced by the conventional methods, fluidic devices with micrometer scale channels have been developed. These devices, however, cause restrictions on changing the concentration due to the fixed gradient set based on fixed fluidic channels.ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Duin, E. C.; Kim, S-K.; Hong, J. W., Determination of Kinetic Parameters, KM and kcat, with a Single Experiment on a Chip. textitAnalytical Chemistry, 81, (9), 3239-3245, 2009.^,ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Hong, J. W., Lorenz-like Chatotic System on a Chip In The 14th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (MicroTAS), The Netherlands, October, 2010. Here, we present a unique microfluidic system that can generate quantized concentration gradient by using series of droplets generated by a mechanical valve based injection method.ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Rho, H.; Hong, J., Fluidic Circuit based Predictive Model of Microdroplet Generation through Mechanical Cutting. In ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, USA, October, 2009.^,ootnotetextLee, W.; Jambovane, S.; Kim, D.; Hong, J., Predictive Model on Micro Droplet Generation through Mechanical Cutting. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 7, (3), 431-438, 2009

  14. Reconstructing global overturning from meridional density gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E. D.; Oliver, K. I. C.; Hirschi, J. J.-M.; Mecking, J. V.

    2016-04-01

    Despite the complexity of the global ocean system, numerous attempts have been made to scale the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), principally in the North Atlantic, with large-scale, basin-wide hydrographic properties. In particular, various approaches to scaling the MOC with meridional density gradients have been proposed, but the success of these has only been demonstrated under limited conditions. Here we present a scaling relationship linking overturning to twice vertically-integrated meridional density gradients via the hydrostatic equation and a "rotated" form of the geostrophic equation. This provides a meridional overturning streamfunction as a function of depth for each basin. Using a series of periodically forced experiments in a global, coarse resolution configuration of the general circulation model NEMO, we explore the timescales over which this scaling is temporally valid. We find that the scaling holds well in the upper Atlantic cell (at 1000 m) for multi-decadal (and longer) timescales, accurately reconstructing the relative magnitude of the response for different frequencies and explaining over 85 % of overturning variance on timescales of 64-2048 years. Despite the highly nonlinear response of the Antarctic cell in the abyssal Atlantic, between 76 and 94 % of the observed variability at 4000 m is reconstructed on timescales of 32 years (and longer). The scaling law is also applied in the Indo-Pacific. This analysis is extended to a higher resolution, stochastically forced simulation for which correlations of between 0.79 and 0.99 are obtained with upper Atlantic MOC variability on timescales >25 years. These results indicate that meridional density gradients and overturning are linked via meridional pressure gradients, and that both the strength and structure of the MOC can be reconstructed from hydrography on multi-decadal and longer timescales provided that the link is made in this way.

  15. Applications of gradient index metamaterials in waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yangyang; Xu, Yadong; Chen, Huanyang

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we find that gradient index metamaterials (GIMs) could be utilized to manipulate wave propagation in waveguides. Through manipulating the conversion between propagating wave and surface wave, we can design some interesting applications in waveguides, such as controlling transmission effect, realizing bending waveguide and achieving waveguide splitting effect. These devices not only work for both transverse electric and magnetic polarized waves, but also function for a broadband of spectra. Numerical simulations are performed to verify our findings. PMID:26656558

  16. Advanced concepts for high-gradient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The promise of high-gradient accelerator research is a future for physics beyond the 5-TeV energy scale. Looking beyond what can be engineered today, the authors examine basic research directions for colliders of the future, from mm-waves to lasers, and from solid-state to plasmas, with attention to material damage, beam-dynamics, a workable collision scheme, and energetics.

  17. Cosmic ray gradients in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Wake, B.; Ip, W.-H.; Axford, I.

    1983-01-01

    Launched in 1972 and 1973 respectively, the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft are now probing the outer heliosphere on their final escape from the sun. The data in this paper extend for almost an entire solar cycle from launch to early 1983, when Pioneer 10 was at a heliocentric distance of 29 AU and Pioneer 11, 13 AU. The UCSD instruments on board were used to study the gradient, and to look at the time and spatial variations of the cosmic ray intensities.

  18. Discontinuity of cortical gradients reflects sensory impairment.

    PubMed

    Saadon-Grosman, Noam; Tal, Zohar; Itshayek, Eyal; Amedi, Amir; Arzy, Shahar

    2015-12-29

    Topographic maps and their continuity constitute a fundamental principle of brain organization. In the somatosensory system, whole-body sensory impairment may be reflected either in cortical signal reduction or disorganization of the somatotopic map, such as disturbed continuity. Here we investigated the role of continuity in pathological states. We studied whole-body cortical representations in response to continuous sensory stimulation under functional MRI (fMRI) in two unique patient populations-patients with cervical sensory Brown-Séquard syndrome (injury to one side of the spinal cord) and patients before and after surgical repair of cervical disk protrusion-enabling us to compare whole-body representations in the same study subjects. We quantified the spatial gradient of cortical activation and evaluated the divergence from a continuous pattern. Gradient continuity was found to be disturbed at the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and the supplementary motor area (SMA), in both patient populations: contralateral to the disturbed body side in the Brown-Séquard group and before repair in the surgical group, which was further improved after intervention. Results corresponding to the nondisturbed body side and after surgical repair were comparable with control subjects. No difference was found in the fMRI signal power between the different conditions in the two groups, as well as with respect to control subjects. These results suggest that decreased sensation in our patients is related to gradient discontinuity rather than signal reduction. Gradient continuity may be crucial for somatotopic and other topographical organization, and its disruption may characterize pathological processing. PMID:26655739

  19. Exploration of very high gradient cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory

    2011-07-01

    Several of the 9-cell ILC cavities processed at Jlab within ongoing ILC R&D program have shown interesting behavior at high fields, such as mode mixing and sudden field emission turn-on during quench. Equipped with thermometry and oscillating superleak transducer (OST) system for quench detection, we couple our RF measurements with local dissipation measurements. In this contribution we report on our findings with high gradient SRF cavities.

  20. DC CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH GRADIENT MULTILAYER INSULATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S E; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M L

    2005-05-26

    We have developed a novel insulator concept that involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods less than 1 mm. We have demonstrated that these structures perform 2 to 5 times better than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We present new testing results showing exceptional behavior at DC, with gradients in excess of 110kV/cm in vacuum.

  1. Discontinuity of cortical gradients reflects sensory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Saadon-Grosman, Noam; Tal, Zohar; Itshayek, Eyal; Amedi, Amir; Arzy, Shahar

    2015-01-01

    Topographic maps and their continuity constitute a fundamental principle of brain organization. In the somatosensory system, whole-body sensory impairment may be reflected either in cortical signal reduction or disorganization of the somatotopic map, such as disturbed continuity. Here we investigated the role of continuity in pathological states. We studied whole-body cortical representations in response to continuous sensory stimulation under functional MRI (fMRI) in two unique patient populations—patients with cervical sensory Brown-Séquard syndrome (injury to one side of the spinal cord) and patients before and after surgical repair of cervical disk protrusion—enabling us to compare whole-body representations in the same study subjects. We quantified the spatial gradient of cortical activation and evaluated the divergence from a continuous pattern. Gradient continuity was found to be disturbed at the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and the supplementary motor area (SMA), in both patient populations: contralateral to the disturbed body side in the Brown-Séquard group and before repair in the surgical group, which was further improved after intervention. Results corresponding to the nondisturbed body side and after surgical repair were comparable with control subjects. No difference was found in the fMRI signal power between the different conditions in the two groups, as well as with respect to control subjects. These results suggest that decreased sensation in our patients is related to gradient discontinuity rather than signal reduction. Gradient continuity may be crucial for somatotopic and other topographical organization, and its disruption may characterize pathological processing. PMID:26655739

  2. Laminate delamination due to thermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, J.W.; Lu, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    Flaw-induced delamination of orthotropic laminates subject to through-thickness temperature gradients is analyzed. A crack-like flaw impedes heat flow through the laminate, producing thermal stresses and crack tip stress intensities. The focus is on delamination cracks which propagate under steady-state conditions. The steady-state analysis becomes accurate for a crack whose length is about one laminate thickness. Moreover, the analysis provides realistic fail-safe criteria for excluding delamination.

  3. Gold-functionalized DNAzyme Nanosensors to Quantify Heavy Metal Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriaens, P.; Vannela, R.

    2005-12-01

    The presence of heavy metals in environmental systems is characterized by steep gradients due to the presence of solid and soluble redox species. The capability to selectively quantify low concentrations of individual redox species continues to present a challenge for site characterization and risk assessment. Recently, DNAzymes, single-stranded DNA molecules with catalytic capabilities that are isolated from random-sequence DNA libraries by ``in vitro selection'', have come to the fore as unique molecular tools for metal detection in aqueous environment. Here we describe the selection and characterization of an RNA-cleaving autocatalytic DNAzyme that links chemical catalysis with real-time fluorescence signaling in the single molecule. From a random pool of 40-nt templates, we have isolated Hg-active DNAzymes using in vitro selection procedures in combination with non-homologous random recombination (NRR). However, significant cleavage was seen for DNA sequences isolated in generation G5. By G8 cycle, more than 32% of the DNA construct was cleaved after 3-h incubation. After eight rounds of selection and amplification, the amount of eluted DNA after respective reaction was found to produce active sequences leading to 32 % catalysis. The introduction of nonhomologous random recombination at 9th cycle yielded drastic increase in catalysis to 55% of the total oligonucleotide pool. DNA sequences from the 9th round of selection (G9) were amplified by PCR and cloned into a vector. DNA sequencing was performed and the M-fold software revealed variety of different families of sequences in the active pool - with DNA-010 sequence being dominant in each family. Similar experiments conducted with As5+ and selection did not show any cleavage until the 8th cycle, with cleavage increasing to 18 % at 14th cycle. Since the catalytic activity can be characterized in terms of metal specificity, speciation and affinity, the catalytic DNA serves as a sensor for a variety of metal ion

  4. Eocene continental climates and latitudinal temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, David R.; Wing, Scott L.

    1995-11-01

    Global climate during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic is thought to have been warmer than at present, but there is debate about winter temperatures. Paleontological data indicate mild temperatures even at high latitudes and in mid-latitude continental interiors, whereas computer simulations of continental paleoclimates produce winter temperatures closer to modern levels. Foliar physiognomy and floristic composition of 23 Eocene floras from the interior of North America and Australia indicate cold month means generally >2 °C, even where the mean annual temperature (MAT) was <15 °C. Reconstructed Eocene latitudinal gradients of MAT are curvilinear but are about 0.4 °C per 1° of latitude in continental interiors at mid-latitudes, much less than the 0.8 1.0 °C per 1° of latitude observed in eastern and central North America today, but similar to modern gradients in the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes and on the west coast of North America. Latitudinal temperature gradients reconstructed here are broadly representative of Eocene climates, showing that the discrepancy between proxy data and simulations will not be resolved by regional adjustments to paleogeography or reinterpretation of individual fossil assemblages. Similar discrepancies between proxy data and general circulation model simulations for other time periods suggest that there is a basic flaw with the way climate models simulate heat transport to, or loss from, continental surfaces.

  5. Phosphorescent imaging of oxygen gradients in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Curtis J.; Kitakis, F.

    1995-08-01

    Until recently, the ability to measure the changing oxygen gradients in perfused tissues in response to metabolic demand, has been limited to point-measurements and/or averaged A-V oxygen differences during perfusion using oxygen electrodes. With the recent introduction of novel phosphorescent probes specifically quenched by oxygen, the ability to spacially map oxygen gradients in real-time may offer new insights into the dynamics of microvascular design and supply. Accordingly, this paper provides initial image data on Langendorff perfused rat hearts wherein the relative change in phosphorescent intensity of Pd-meso-tetra(4- carboxyphenyl)phorphine (2micrometers ) as the reporter probe, is quantitatively related to spacial oxygen gradients as seen on the left-ventricle during changing gassing conditions. Digital image analysis (frame advance), after proper calibration and alignment, provides images which can be usefully interpreted. Clinical applications of such emerging technologies could have wide-spread diagnostic applications not only as applied to the coronary bed, but other tissue surfaces displaying various degrees of aschemia and/or hypoxia.

  6. Exponential gradient maker using a disposable syringe.

    PubMed

    Domingo, A

    1990-08-15

    With a simple modification, any disposable syringe can become a reliable and easy to use exponential gradient maker. The modification consists of two notches, made with a razor blade, in the borders of the rubber sealing tip of the plunger. A clamp in the tube connected to the syringe allows control over solution flow. With the clamp prohibiting drainage, the body of the syringe is filled with the desired volume of starting solution I. A magnetic stir bar, small enough to spin inside the syringe is included. The notched plunger is introduced until no air space remains. This forms the fixed volume, closed mixing chamber, while the rest of the volume of the syringe forms the open chamber. The two chambers are connected through the notches in the plunger. The ending solution II is poured after the introduction of the plunger. Opening the clamp allows solution I in the closed chamber to flow out, and the solution II in the open chamber flows through the notches and mixes with solution I. This exponential gradient maker can be reused many times, but the low cost of the components makes it potentially disposable. This feature is especially useful when using toxic chemicals, or when pouring polyacrylamide gradient gels, since the apparatus may be disposed of after contamination or eventual polymerization. PMID:2278394

  7. Resolution requirements for velocity gradients in turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1994-01-01

    Since high resolution numerical simulations of turbulent flows, or experiments at high Reynolds numbers, represent a substantial investment in resources, the estimation of the minimum resolution required for the study of a given property has been the subject of continued interest. Different properties require, in general, different resolutions, and the present paper is dedicated to the requirements for the measurement of the probability distribution functions of the velocity gradients and, in particular, of their low order moments. The deviation of these quantities from the values corresponding to a Gaussian distribution was one of the first indications of the presence of Reynolds number-dependent intermittency and has been the object of recent interest as numerical simulations have become able to explore the distribution of gradients in the low Reynolds number range, while new experiments have extended the range to increasingly high Reynolds numbers. We will use progressive filtering of the results of numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence as a model for the effect of a sensor of finite size. The numerical issues will be addressed first to ensure that the simulations are fully resolved from the point of view of the velocity gradients. This will also give us an estimate for the numerical resolution required for the different quantities.

  8. Integrated calibration of magnetic gradient tensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Yin; Yingtang, Zhang; Hongbo, Fan; GuoQuan, Ren; Zhining, Li

    2015-01-01

    Measurement precision of a magnetic gradient tensor system is not only connected with the imperfect performance of magnetometers such as bias, scale factor, non-orthogonality and misalignment errors, but also connected with the external soft-iron and hard-iron magnetic distortion fields when the system is used as a strapdown device. So an integrated scalar calibration method is proposed in this paper. In the first step, a mathematical model for scalar calibration of a single three-axis magnetometer is established, and a least squares ellipsoid fitting algorithm is proposed to estimate the detailed error parameters. For the misalignment errors existing at different magnetometers caused by the installation process and misalignment errors aroused by ellipsoid fitting estimation, a calibration method for combined misalignment errors is proposed in the second step to switch outputs of different magnetometers into the ideal reference orthogonal coordinate system. In order to verify effectiveness of the proposed method, simulation and experiment with a cross-magnetic gradient tensor system are performed, and the results show that the proposed method estimates error parameters and improves the measurement accuracy of magnetic gradient tensor greatly.

  9. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI. PMID:23008151

  10. Fast computation of satellite gravitational gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qinchang; Yuan, Lin

    1998-07-01

    The computation of the Earth's potential function at high order and degree with the method of Cunningham (1970) causes overflow most of the time. The normalized method can eliminate the overflows, but leads to formulae much more involved than those in Cunningham's method; besides, the programming is more complex and the computer time required larger. The method presented has the following features: each component of the satellite gravitational gradient can be computed; the formulae are short and easy to be programmed; the method is much quicker than the normalization method and can be carried out with a microcomputer, without overflow even in the case of Earth's spherical harmonics of order and degree as high as 1025 or higher. This method satisfies the present demand to compute the satellite gravitational gradient with high accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present formulae for the fast computation, without overflow, of the gravitational gradient corresponding to Earth's spherical harmonics up to order and degree of 3170×3170 or higher.

  11. Gradient expansion, curvature perturbations, and magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo; Rezaei, Zahra

    2011-04-15

    The properties of magnetized plasmas are always investigated under the hypothesis that the relativistic inhomogeneities stemming from the fluid sources and from the geometry itself are sufficiently small to allow for a perturbative description prior to photon decoupling. The latter assumption is hereby relaxed and predecoupling plasmas are described within a suitable expansion where the inhomogeneities are treated to a given order in the spatial gradients. It is argued that the (general relativistic) gradient expansion shares the same features of the drift approximation, customarily employed in the description of cold plasmas, so that the two schemes are physically complementary in the large-scale limit and for the low-frequency branch of the spectrum of plasma modes. The two-fluid description, as well as the magnetohydrodynamical reduction, is derived and studied in the presence of the spatial gradients of the geometry. Various solutions of the coupled system of evolution equations in the anti-Newtonian regime and in the quasi-isotropic approximation are presented. The relation of this analysis to the so-called separate universe paradigm is outlined. The evolution of the magnetized curvature perturbations in the nonlinear regime is addressed for the magnetized adiabatic mode in the plasma frame.

  12. Pedestrian Detection Using Gradient Local Binary Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning; Xu, Jiu; Goto, Satoshi

    In recent years, local pattern based features have attracted increasing interest in object detection and recognition systems. Local Binary Pattern (LBP) feature is widely used in texture classification and face detection. But the original definition of LBP is not suitable for human detection. In this paper, we propose a novel feature named gradient local binary patterns (GLBP) for human detection. In this feature, original 256 local binary patterns are reduced to 56 patterns. These 56 patterns named uniform patterns are used for generating a 56-bin histogram. And gradient value of each pixel is set as the weight which is always same in LBP based features in histogram calculation to computing the values in 56 bins for histogram. Experiments are performed on INRIA dataset, which shows the proposal GLBP feature is discriminative than histogram of orientated gradient (HOG), Semantic Local Binary Patterns (S-LBP) and histogram of template (HOT). In our experiments, the window size is fixed. That means the performance can be improved by boosting methods. And the computation of GLBP feature is parallel, which make it easy for hardware acceleration. These factors make GLBP feature possible for real-time pedestrian detection.

  13. Collective Chemotaxis through Noisy Multicellular Gradient Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue occurs in many biological processes such as morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Clusters of migratory cells in these systems are capable of responding to gradients of less than 1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell length. Multicellular systems are extremely sensitive to their environment and while the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, how this information leads to coherent migration remains poorly understood. We develop a computational model of multicellular sensing and migration in which groups of cells collectively measure noisy chemical gradients. The output of the sensing process is coupled to individual cells polarization to model migratory behavior. Through the use of numerical simulations, we find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias, but larger clusters also induce more drag on collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimal cluster size for most efficient migration. We discuss how our model could be validated using simple, phenomenological experiments.

  14. Collective Chemotaxis through Noisy Multicellular Gradient Sensing.

    PubMed

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue occurs in many biological processes such as morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Clusters of migratory cells in these systems are capable of responding to gradients of <1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell length. Multicellular systems are extremely sensitive to their environment, and although the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, how this information leads to coherent migration remains poorly understood. We develop a computational model of multicellular sensing and migration in which groups of cells collectively measure noisy chemical gradients. The output of the sensing process is coupled to the polarization of individual cells to model migratory behavior. Through the use of numerical simulations, we find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias, but larger clusters also induce more drag on collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimal cluster size for most efficient migration. We discuss how our model could be validated using simple, phenomenological experiments. PMID:27508447

  15. Fast algorithm for integrating inconsistent gradient fields.

    PubMed

    Rivera, M; Marroquin, J L; Servin, M; Rodriguez-Vera, R

    1997-11-10

    A discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based algorithm for solving a quadratic cost functional is proposed; this regularized functional allows one to obtain a consistent gradient field from an inconsistent one. The calculated consistent gradient may then be integrated by use of simple methods. The technique is presented in the context of the phase-unwrapping problem; however, it may be applied to other problems, such as shapes from shading (a robot-vision technique) when inconsistent gradient fields with irregular domains are obtained. The regularized functional introduced here has advantages over existing techniques; in particular, it is able to manage complex irregular domains and to interpolate over regions with invalid data without any smoothness assumptions over the rest of the lattice, so that the estimation error is reduced. Furthermore, there are no free parameters to adjust. The DFT is used to compute a preconditioner because there is highly efficient hardware to perform the calculations and also because it may be computed by optical means. PMID:18264380

  16. Efficient gradient computation for dynamical models

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, B.; Friston, K.J.; Penny, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation is a fundamental issue that arises across many scales in neuroscience — ranging from the study of single neurons using single electrode recordings to the interaction of thousands of neurons using fMRI. Data assimilation involves inverting a generative model that can not only explain observed data but also generate predictions. Typically, the model is inverted or fitted using conventional tools of (convex) optimization that invariably extremise some functional — norms, minimum descriptive length, variational free energy, etc. Generally, optimisation rests on evaluating the local gradients of the functional to be optimized. In this paper, we compare three different gradient estimation techniques that could be used for extremising any functional in time — (i) finite differences, (ii) forward sensitivities and a method based on (iii) the adjoint of the dynamical system. We demonstrate that the first-order gradients of a dynamical system, linear or non-linear, can be computed most efficiently using the adjoint method. This is particularly true for systems where the number of parameters is greater than the number of states. For such systems, integrating several sensitivity equations – as required with forward sensitivities – proves to be most expensive, while finite-difference approximations have an intermediate efficiency. In the context of neuroimaging, adjoint based inversion of dynamical causal models (DCMs) can, in principle, enable the study of models with large numbers of nodes and parameters. PMID:24769182

  17. The standardised freight container: vector of vectors and vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Reiter, P

    2010-04-01

    The standardised freight container was one of the most important innovations of the 20th Century. Containerised cargoes travel from their point of origin to their destination by ship, road and rail as part of a single journey, without unpacking. This simple concept is the key element in cheap, rapid transport by land and sea, and has led to a phenomenal growth in global trade. Likewise, containerised air cargo has led to a remarkable increase in the inter-continental transportation of goods, particularly perishable items such as flowers, fresh vegetables and live animals. In both cases, containerisation offers great advantages in speed and security, but reduces the opportunity to inspect cargoes in transit. An inevitable consequence is the globalisation of undesirable species of animals, plants and pathogens. Moreover, cheap passenger flights offer worldwide travel for viral and parasitic pathogens in infected humans. The continued emergence of exotic pests, vectors and pathogens throughout the world is an unavoidable consequence of these advances in transportation technology. PMID:20617647

  18. Vector fields and Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Artymowski, Michał; Lalak, Zygmunt E-mail: Zygmunt.Lalak@fuw.edu.pl

    2011-09-01

    In the context of the Loop Quantum Cosmology we have analysed the holonomy correction to the classical evolution of the simplified Bianchi I model in the presence of vector fields. For the Universe dominated by a massive vector field or by a combination of a scalar field and a vector field a smooth transition between Kasner-like and Kasner-unlike solutions for a Bianchi I model has been demonstrated. In this case a lack of initial curvature singularity and a finite maximal energy density appear already at the level of General Relativity, which simulates a classical Big Bounce.

  19. Generating Series for Nested Bethe Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoroshkin, Sergey; Pakuliak, Stanislav

    2008-11-01

    We reformulate nested relations between off-shell Uq(^glN) Bethe vectors as a certain equation on generating series of strings of the composed Uq(^glN) currents. Using inversion of the generating series we find a new type of hierarchical relations between universal off-shell Bethe vectors, useful for a derivation of Bethe equation. As an example of application, we use these relations for a derivation of analytical Bethe ansatz equations [Arnaudon D. et al., Ann. Henri Poincaré 7 (2006), 1217-1268, math-ph/0512037] for the parameters of universal Bethe vectors of the algebra Uq(^gl2).

  20. 600-GHz Electronically Tunable Vector Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert; Maiwald, Frank; Siegel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-dynamic-range, electronically tunable vector measurement system that operates in the frequency range from approximately 560 to approximately 635 GHz has been developed as a prototype of vector measurement systems that would be suitable for use in nearly-real-time active submillimeter-wave imaging. As used here, 'vector measurement system" signifies an instrumentation system that applies a radio-frequency (RF) excitation to an object of interest and measures the resulting amplitude and phase response, relative to either the applied excitatory signal or another reference signal related in a known way to applied excitatory signal.