Science.gov

Sample records for big sky carbon

  1. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Big Sky Carbon Atlas is an online geoportal designed for you to discover, interpret, and access geospatial data and maps relevant to decision support and education on carbon sequestration in the Big Sky Region. In serving as the public face of the Partnership's spatial Data Libraries, the Atlas provides a gateway to geographic information characterizing CO2 sources, potential geologic sinks, terrestrial carbon fluxes, civil and energy infrastructure, energy use, and related themes. In addition to directly serving the BSCSP and its stakeholders, the Atlas feeds regional data to the NatCarb Portal, contributing to a national perspective on carbon sequestration. Established components of the Atlas include a gallery of thematic maps and an interactive map that allows you to: • Navigate and explore regional characterization data through a user-friendly interface • Print your map views or publish them as PDFs • Identify technical references relevant to specific areas of interest • Calculate straight-line or pipeline-constrained distances from point sources of CO2 to potential geologic sink features • Download regional data layers (feature under development) (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  2. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best

  3. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is

  4. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  5. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for

  6. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement

  7. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the

  8. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification

  9. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-10-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  10. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2006-01-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  11. The Big Sky inside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Earle; Ward, Tony J.; Vanek, Diana; Marra, Nancy; Hester, Carolyn; Knuth, Randy; Spangler, Todd; Jones, David; Henthorn, Melissa; Hammill, Brock; Smith, Paul; Salisbury, Rob; Reckin, Gene; Boulafentis, Johna

    2009-01-01

    The University of Montana (UM)-Missoula has implemented a problem-based program in which students perform scientific research focused on indoor air pollution. The Air Toxics Under the Big Sky program (Jones et al. 2007; Adams et al. 2008; Ward et al. 2008) provides a community-based framework for understanding the complex relationship between poor…

  12. Big Sky Telegraph: Telecommunications Guide to Community Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odasz, Frank B., Comp.

    This document contains a wide assortment of papers and promotional materials concerning the Big Sky Telegraph, a Montana-based telecommunications network serving rural economic development organizations. Funded by the US West Foundation and Western Montana College, Big Sky was created to stimulate grassroots innovation in rural education,…

  13. Evolution of the Air Toxics under the Big Sky Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marra, Nancy; Vanek, Diana; Hester, Carolyn; Holian, Andrij; Ward, Tony; Adams, Earle; Knuth, Randy

    2011-01-01

    As a yearlong exploration of air quality and its relation to respiratory health, the "Air Toxics Under the Big Sky" program offers opportunities for students to learn and apply science process skills through self-designed inquiry-based research projects conducted within their communities. The program follows a systematic scope and sequence…

  14. Morning Water on the Big Round Rock in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    There is a little bit of water on the Big Round Rock in the sky. The Rock turns slowly and so it has morning and day and night. The little bit of water sticks to the rocks on the Rock at night, when it is very cold and the water makes ice. When the Sun puts light on it, the water gets hot and goes up in the air. Really, the water is the air. The wind moves the water back the way it came, so the water goes to where the ground is cold and then it sticks to the very cold ground again. Then, the turning Rock slowly carries it back to the morning and it goes over and over like that. This keeps all of the Big Rock's water close to the morning, even though the Big Rock turns all the time. A box on the ground on the Big Rock that is three feet long on each side could catch enough water each month for one drink of water, but a box that is way big could catch a lot more water. We know that the water is there because we can find very little tiny rocks that hit the tiny water bits. Where there is more water, there are not so many of the little tiny rocks and where there is less water, there are more of the little tiny rocks.

  15. 75 FR 32357 - Gallatin National Forest; Montana; Jack Rabbit to Big Sky Meadow Village 161 kV Transmission Line...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Forest Service Gallatin National Forest; Montana; Jack Rabbit to Big Sky Meadow Village 161 kV... Four Corners, west of Bozeman, Montana, to a new substation near Big Sky Meadow Village in Big Sky... facility between the Jack Rabbit substation and the Meadow Village substation, along with building a...

  16. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  17. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  18. Air Toxics under the Big Sky: A Real-World Investigation to Engage High School Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Earle; Smith, Garon; Ward, Tony J.; Vanek, Diana; Marra, Nancy; Jones, David; Henthorn, Melissa; Striebel, Jim

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a problem-based chemistry education model in which students perform scientific research on a local environmentally relevant problem. The project is a collaboration among The University of Montana and local high schools centered around Missoula, Montana. "Air Toxics under the Big Sky" involves high school students in collecting…

  19. The potential of clear-sky carbon dioxide satellite retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert R.; O'Dell, Christopher W.; Taylor, Thomas E.; Mandrake, Lukas; Smyth, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Since the launch of the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) in 2009, retrieval algorithms designed to infer the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) from hyperspectral near-infrared observations of reflected sunlight have been greatly improved. They now generally include the scattering effects of clouds and aerosols, as early work found that absorption-only retrievals, which neglected these effects, often incurred unacceptably large errors, even for scenes with optically thin cloud or aerosol layers. However, these "full-physics" retrievals tend to be computationally expensive and may incur biases from trying to deduce the properties of clouds and aerosols when there are none present. Additionally, algorithms are now available that can quickly and effectively identify and remove most scenes in which cloud or aerosol scattering plays a significant role. In this work, we test the hypothesis that non-scattering, or "clear-sky", retrievals may perform as well as full-physics retrievals for sufficiently clear scenes. Clear-sky retrievals could potentially avoid errors and biases brought about by trying to infer properties of clouds and aerosols when none are present. Clear-sky retrievals are also desirable because they are orders of magnitude faster than full-physics retrievals. Here we use a simplified version of the Atmospheric Carbon Observations from Space (ACOS) XCO2 retrieval algorithm that does not include the scattering and absorption effects of clouds or aerosols. It was found that for simulated Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) measurements, the clear-sky retrieval had errors comparable to those of the full-physics retrieval. For real GOSAT data, the clear-sky retrieval had errors 0-20 % larger than the full-physics retrieval over land and errors roughly 20-35 % larger over ocean, depending on filtration level. In general, the clear-sky retrieval had XCOThe potential of clear-sky carbon dioxide satellite retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. R.; O'Dell, C. W.; Taylor, T. E.; Mandrake, L.; Smyth, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since the launch of the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) in 2009, retrieval algorithms designed to infer the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) from hyperspectral near-infrared observations of reflected sunlight have been greatly improved. They now generally include the scattering effects of clouds and aerosols, as early work found that absorption-only retrievals, which neglected these effects, often incurred unacceptably large errors, even for scenes with optically thin cloud or aerosol layers. However, these "full-physics" retrievals tend to be computationally expensive and may incur biases from trying to deduce the properties of clouds and aerosols when there are none present. Additionally, algorithms are now available that can quickly and effectively identify and remove most scenes in which cloud or aerosol scattering plays a significant role. In this work, we test the hypothesis that non-scattering, or "clear-sky", retrievals may perform as well as full-physics retrievals for sufficiently clear scenes. Clear-sky retrievals could potentially avoid errors and biases brought about by trying to infer properties of clouds and aerosols when none are present. Clear-sky retrievals are also desirable because they are orders of magnitude faster than full-physics retrievals. Here we use a simplified version of the Atmospheric Carbon Observations from Space (ACOS) XCO2 retrieval algorithm that does not include the scattering and absorption effects of clouds or aerosols. It was found that for simulated Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) measurements, the clear-sky retrieval had errors comparable to those of the full-physics retrieval. For real GOSAT data, the clear-sky retrieval had nearly indistinguishable error characteristics over land, but roughly 30-60 % larger errors over ocean, depending on filtration level, compared to the full-physics retrieval. In general, the clear-sky retrieval had XCO2 root-mean-square (RMS) errors of

  1. Laser hazard analysis for airborne AURA (Big Sky variant) Proteus platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-02-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the airborne AURA (Big Sky Laser Technology) lidar system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The AURA lidar system is installed in the instrument pod of a Proteus airframe and is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The targets are located at various distances or ranges from the airborne platform. In order to protect personnel, who may be in the target area and may be subjected to exposures, it was necessary to determine the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) for each laser wavelength, calculate the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD), and determine the maximum 'eye-safe' dwell times for various operational altitudes and conditions. It was also necessary to calculate the appropriate minimum Optical Density (ODmin) of the laser safety eyewear used by authorized personnel who may receive hazardous exposures during ground base operations of the airborne AURA laser system (system alignment and calibration).

  2. It's Not a Big Sky After All: Justification for a Close Approach Prediction and Risk Assessment Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft; Frigm, Ryan; McKinley, David

    2009-01-01

    There is often skepticism about the need for Conjunction Assessment from mission operators that invest in the "big sky theory", which states that the likelihood of a collision is so small that it can be neglected. On 10 February 2009, the collision between Iridium 3; and Cosmos 2251 provided an indication that this theory is invalid and that a CA process should be considered for all missions. This paper presents statistics of the effect of the Iridium/Cosmos collision on NASA's Earth Science Constellation as well as results of analyses which characterize the debris environment for NASA's robotic missions.

  3. The Big Sky Model: A Regional Collaboration for Participatory Research on Environmental Health in the Rural West

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Tony J.; Vanek, Diana; Marra, Nancy; Holian, Andrij; Adams, Earle; Jones, David; Knuth, Randy

    2010-01-01

    The case for inquiry-based, hands-on, meaningful science education continues to gain credence as an effective and appropriate pedagogical approach (Karukstis 2005; NSF 2000). An innovative community-based framework for science learning, hereinafter referred to as the Big Sky Model, successfully addresses these educational aims, guiding high school and tribal college students from rural areas of Montana and Idaho in their understanding of chemical, physical, and environmental health concepts. Students participate in classroom lessons and continue with systematic inquiry through actual field research to investigate a pressing, real-world issue: understanding the complex links between poor air quality and respiratory health outcomes. This article provides background information, outlines the procedure for implementing the model, and discusses its effectiveness as demonstrated through various evaluation tools. PMID:20428505

  4. SkyServer Voyages Website - Using Big Data to Explore Astronomy Concepts in Formal Education Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Kate K.; Masters, Karen; Raddick, Jordan; Lundgren, Britt

    2015-08-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) web interface “SkyServer” has long included online educational materials designed to help students and the public discover the fundamentals of modern astronomy using real observations from the SDSS database. The newly launched SDSS Voyages website updates and expands these activities to reflect new data from subsequent generations of the survey, advances in web technology, and evolving practices in science education. Voyages provides access to quality astronomy, astrophysics, and engineering materials to educators seeking an inquiry approach to fundamental concepts. During this session we will provide an overview of the design and development of Skyserver Voyages and discuss ways to apply this resource at K-12 and university levels.

  5. INNOCENT BYSTANDERS: CARBON STARS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Among stars showing carbon molecular bands (C stars), the main-sequence dwarfs, likely in post-mass transfer binaries, are numerically dominant in the Galaxy. Via spectroscopic selection from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we retrieve 1220 high galactic latitude C stars, {approx}5 times more than previously known, including a wider variety than past techniques such as color or grism selection have netted, and additionally yielding 167 DQ white dwarfs. Of the C stars with proper motion measurements, we identify 69% clearly as dwarfs (dCs), while {approx}7% are giants. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes M{sub i} from {approx}6.5 to 10.5. 'G-type' dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C{sub 2} bands. We report Balmer emission in 22 dCs, none of which are G-types. We find 8 new DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these 'smoking guns' for AGB binary mass transfer. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be 'N'-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Leo A. Two such stars within 30' of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at {approx}40 kpc. We explore the multiwavelength properties of the sample and report the first X-ray detection of a dC star, which shows strong Balmer emission. Our own spectroscopic survey additionally provides the dC surface density from a complete sample of dwarfs limited by magnitude, color, and proper motion.

  6. "Air Toxics under the Big Sky": Examining the Effectiveness of Authentic Scientific Research on High School Students' Science Skills and Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Tony J.; Delaloye, Naomi; Adams, Earle Raymond; Ware, Desirae; Vanek, Diana; Knuth, Randy; Hester, Carolyn Laurie; Marra, Nancy Noel; Holian, Andrij

    2016-01-01

    "Air Toxics Under the Big Sky" is an environmental science outreach/education program that incorporates the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 8 Practices with the goal of promoting knowledge and understanding of authentic scientific research in high school classrooms through air quality research. This research explored: (1)…

  7. Triton's Summer Sky of Methane and Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    According to the first ever infrared analysis of the atmosphere of Neptune's moon Triton, summer is in full swing in its southern hemisphere. The European observing team used ESO's Very Large Telescope and discovered carbon monoxide and made the first ground-based detection of methane in Triton's thin atmosphere. These observations revealed that the thin atmosphere varies seasonally, thickening when warmed. "We have found real evidence that the Sun still makes its presence felt on Triton, even from so far away. This icy moon actually has seasons just as we do on Earth, but they change far more slowly," says Emmanuel Lellouch, the lead author of the paper reporting these results in Astronomy & Astrophysics. On Triton, where the average surface temperature is about minus 235 degrees Celsius, it is currently summer in the southern hemisphere and winter in the northern. As Triton's southern hemisphere warms up, a thin layer of frozen nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide on Triton's surface sublimates into gas, thickening the icy atmosphere as the season progresses during Neptune's 165-year orbit around the Sun. A season on Triton lasts a little over 40 years, and Triton passed the southern summer solstice in 2000. Based on the amount of gas measured, Lellouch and his colleagues estimate that Triton's atmospheric pressure may have risen by a factor of four compared to the measurements made by Voyager 2 in 1989, when it was still spring on the giant moon. The atmospheric pressure on Triton is now between 40 and 65 microbars - 20 000 times less than on Earth. Carbon monoxide was known to be present as ice on the surface, but Lellouch and his team discovered that Triton's upper surface layer is enriched with carbon monoxide ice by about a factor of ten compared to the deeper layers, and that it is this upper "film" that feeds the atmosphere. While the majority of Triton's atmosphere is nitrogen (much like on Earth), the methane in the atmosphere, first detected by

  8. ARE THERE ECHOES FROM THE PRE-BIG-BANG UNIVERSE? A SEARCH FOR LOW-VARIANCE CIRCLES IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Hajian, Amir

    2011-10-20

    In a recent analysis of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year temperature maps, Gurzadyan and Penrose claim to find concentric circular patterns in the sky with anomalously low variances. These circles are presented as observational evidence for violent processes in a universe preceding our big bang as predicted by Penrose's Conformal Cyclic Cosmology. We reassess the statistical significance of the detection of the claimed concentric low-variance circles by comparing the WMAP data with Monte Carlo simulations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky plus realistic modeling of WMAP's anisotropic noise. We find no anomaly in the variances compared with the {Lambda}CDM cosmological model. The observed variances in the data are consistent with a Gaussian CMB sky as predicted by the inflationary cosmology model at better than 3{sigma}.

  9. Carbon Enhanced Stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, Chloe; Wilhelm, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-enhanced stars are excellent probes of the nucleosynthesis history of the universe. The existence of carbon-enhanced stars that also show enhancement of s-process elements, such as barium, suggest that enhancements are initially produced in asymptotic giant branch stars which overflow their Roche lobes and deposit processed elements on to a lower mass binary companion. This process is also one mechanism for producing binary mass transfer, blue stragglers (BS). A second is mass transfer from a first ascent red giant companion. It is therefore expected that some percentage of BS stars (those produced from AGB companions) will show both carbon and barium enhancements. For this study we have chosen SDSS stars in the temperature range of 6000 K ≤ T_eff ≤7000 K. This range samples the halo main-sequence turn-off (MSTO) and BS stars just blueward of MSTO. We make use of measurements of the CH G-band strength, located at ~4330 Å, to estimate the stellar carbon abundance. To measure the G-band strength we use the S magnitude index, optimized by Martell et al. (2008). We run the same index measurements on a grid of synthetic spectra with Teff, Log(g), [Fe/H] and various carbon enhancements. Using the observed S-index and spectral parameters from Segue Stellar Parameter Pipeline, we compare to our calibration grid and determine the carbon abundance. We will present our carbon abundance results along with a rough estimate of barium from our index method and a classification into three broad groups, 1) No enhancement in Ba or C, 2) C enhancement and no Ba enhancement, and 3) C and Ba enhancement. We will present preliminary results on the percentages of each category for both the MSTO and BS stars.

  10. Geochemical processes in ground water resulting from surface mining of coal at the Big Sky and West Decker Mine areas, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A potential hydrologic effect of surface mining of coal in southeastern Montana is a change in the quality of ground water. Dissolved-solids concen- trations in water in spoils aquifers generally are larger than concentrations in water in the coal aquifers they replaced; however, laboratory experiments have indicated that concentrations can decrease if ground water flows from coal-mine spoils to coal. This study was conducted to determine if decreases in concentrations occur onsite and, if so, which geochemical processes caused the decreases. Solid-phase core samples of spoils, unmined over- burden, and coal, and ground-water samples were collected from 16 observation wells at two mine areas. In the Big Sky Mine area, changes in ground- water chemistry along a flow path from an upgradient coal aquifer to a spoils aquifer probably were a result of dedolomitization. Dissolved-solids concentrations were unchanged as water flowed from a spoils aquifer to a downgradient coal aquifer. In the West Decker Mine area, dissolved-solids concentrations apparently decreased from about 4,100 to 2,100 milligrams per liter as water moved along an inferred flow path from a spoils aquifer to a downgradient coal aquifer. Geochemical models were used to analyze changes in water chemistry on the basis of results of solid-phase and aqueous geochemical characteristics. Geochemical processes postulated to result in the apparent decrease in dissolved-solids concentrations along this inferred flow path include bacterial reduction of sulfate, reverse cation exchange within the coal, and precipitation of carbonate and iron-sulfide minerals.

  11. Triton's Summer Sky of Methane and Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    According to the first ever infrared analysis of the atmosphere of Neptune's moon Triton, summer is in full swing in its southern hemisphere. The European observing team used ESO's Very Large Telescope and discovered carbon monoxide and made the first ground-based detection of methane in Triton's thin atmosphere. These observations revealed that the thin atmosphere varies seasonally, thickening when warmed. "We have found real evidence that the Sun still makes its presence felt on Triton, even from so far away. This icy moon actually has seasons just as we do on Earth, but they change far more slowly," says Emmanuel Lellouch, the lead author of the paper reporting these results in Astronomy & Astrophysics. On Triton, where the average surface temperature is about minus 235 degrees Celsius, it is currently summer in the southern hemisphere and winter in the northern. As Triton's southern hemisphere warms up, a thin layer of frozen nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide on Triton's surface sublimates into gas, thickening the icy atmosphere as the season progresses during Neptune's 165-year orbit around the Sun. A season on Triton lasts a little over 40 years, and Triton passed the southern summer solstice in 2000. Based on the amount of gas measured, Lellouch and his colleagues estimate that Triton's atmospheric pressure may have risen by a factor of four compared to the measurements made by Voyager 2 in 1989, when it was still spring on the giant moon. The atmospheric pressure on Triton is now between 40 and 65 microbars - 20 000 times less than on Earth. Carbon monoxide was known to be present as ice on the surface, but Lellouch and his team discovered that Triton's upper surface layer is enriched with carbon monoxide ice by about a factor of ten compared to the deeper layers, and that it is this upper "film" that feeds the atmosphere. While the majority of Triton's atmosphere is nitrogen (much like on Earth), the methane in the atmosphere, first detected by

  12. Big Data for Big Questions: Global Soil Change and the National Soil Carbon Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, L. E.; Swanston, C.

    2010-12-01

    studies, the mean recovery time for forest floor C was 128 yr. In a broader context, these results demonstrate that combining database work with quantitative synthesis (such as meta-analysis) allows scientists to detect large-scale patterns that are obscured by variation within individual studies. And, in addition to improving analytical capacity for addressing large questions, large databases are useful for identifying data gaps in global soil change research. In light of these benefits, now is an opportune time to advance the study of global soil change by networking and sharing data with the National Soil Carbon Network. The NSCN seeks participants in an effort to compile databases, answer big-picture, predictive questions about soil C vulnerability, and identify and fill data gaps and research needs. The NSCN seeks to be a facilitator that links existing resources rather than reinvents them, and offers opportunities for a variety of activities, including sharing sites, data, archives, and lab infrastructure. The NSCN is fundamentally collaborative, and operates under the assumption that our shared scientific interest in global soil change will be best advanced if we work together rather than in isolation.

  13. Quantifying thermal constraints on carbon and water fluxes in a mixed-conifer sky island ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Z.; Minor, R. L.; Potts, D. L.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Western North American forests represent a potential, yet uncertain, sink for atmospheric carbon. Revealing how predicted climatic conditions of warmer temperatures and longer inter-storm periods of moisture stress might influence the carbon status of these forests requires a fuller understanding of plant functional responses to abiotic stress. While data related to snow dominated montane ecosystems has become more readily available to parameterize ecosystem function models, there is a paucity of data available for Madrean sky island mixed-conifer forests, which receive about one third of their precipitation from the North American Monsoon. Thus, we quantified ecophysiological responses to moisture and temperature stress in a Madrean mixed-conifer forest near Tucson, Arizona, within the footprint of the Mt. Bigelow Eddy Covariance Tower. In measuring a series of key parameters indicative of carbon and water fluxes within the dominant species across pre-monsoon and monsoon conditions, we were able to develop a broader understanding of what abiotic drivers are most restrictive to plant performance in this ecosystem. Within Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas Fir), and Pinus strobiformis (Southwestern White Pine) we quantified: (i) the optimal temperature (Topt) for maximum photosynthesis (Amax), (ii) the range of temperatures over which photosynthesis was at least 50% of Amax (Ω50), and (iii) each conifer's water use efficiency (WUE) to relate to the balance between carbon uptake and water loss in this high elevation semiarid ecosystem. Our findings support the prediction that photosynthesis decreases under high temperatures (>30°C) among the three species we measured, regardless of soil moisture status. However, monsoon moisture reduced sensitivity to temperature extremes and fluctuations (Ω50), which substantially magnified total photosynthetic productivity. In particular, wet conditions enhanced Amax the most dramatically for P

  14. Extended ocular hazard distances associated with intrabeam aided viewing of the Sandia remote sensing system, airborne aura laser (Big Sky Variant).

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-08-01

    A laser hazard analysis to determine the Extended Ocular Hazard Distances associated with a possible intrabeam aided viewing of the Sandia Remote Sensing System (SRSS) airborne AURA laser (Big Sky Laser Technology) was performed based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The AURA lidar system is installed in the instrument pod of a Proteus airframe and is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The targets are located at various distances (ranges) from the airborne platform. Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) and maximum ''eye-safe'' dwell times for various operational altitudes associated with unaided intrabeam exposure of ground personnel were determined and presented in a previous SAND report. Although the target areas are controlled and the use of viewing aids are prohibited there is the possibility of the unauthorized use of viewing aids such as binoculars. This aided viewing hazard analysis is supplemental to the previous SAND report for the laser hazard analysis of the airborne AURA.

  15. Results of experiments related to contact of mine-spoils water with coal, West Decker and Big Sky Mines, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, R.E.; Dodge, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Batch-mixing experiments using spoils water and coal from the West Decker and Big Sky Mines were conducted to determine possible chemical changes in water moving from coal-mine spoils through a coal aquifer. The spoils water was combined with air-dried and oven-dried chunks of coal and air-dried and oven-dried crushed coal at a 1:1 weight ratio, mixed for 2 hr, and separated after a total contact time of 24 hr. The dissolved-solids concentration in water used in the experiments decreased an average 210 mg/liter (5-10%). Other chemical changes included general decreases in the concentrations of magnesium, potassium, and bicarbonate, and general increases in the concentrations of barium and boron. The magnitude of the changes increased as the surface area of the coal increased. The quantity of extractable cations and exchangeable cations on the post-mixing coal was larger than on the pre-mixing coal. Equilibrium and mass-transfer relations indicate that adsorption reactions or ion-exchange and precipitation reactions, or both, probably are the major reactions responsible for the chemical changes observed in the experiments. (Authors ' abstract)

  16. Air Toxics Under the Big Sky: examining the effectiveness of authentic scientific research on high school students' science skills and interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Tony J.; Delaloye, Naomi; Adams, Earle Raymond; Ware, Desirae; Vanek, Diana; Knuth, Randy; Hester, Carolyn Laurie; Marra, Nancy Noel; Holian, Andrij

    2016-04-01

    Air Toxics Under the Big Sky is an environmental science outreach/education program that incorporates the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 8 Practices with the goal of promoting knowledge and understanding of authentic scientific research in high school classrooms through air quality research. This research explored: (1) how the program affects student understanding of scientific inquiry and research and (2) how the open-inquiry learning opportunities provided by the program increase student interest in science as a career path. Treatment students received instruction related to air pollution (airborne particulate matter), associated health concerns, and training on how to operate air quality testing equipment. They then participated in a yearlong scientific research project in which they developed and tested hypotheses through research of their own design regarding the sources and concentrations of air pollution in their homes and communities. Results from an external evaluation revealed that treatment students developed a deeper understanding of scientific research than did comparison students, as measured by their ability to generate good hypotheses and research designs, and equally expressed an increased interest in pursuing a career in science. These results emphasize the value of and need for authentic science learning opportunities in the modern science classroom.

  17. Investigation of Variability of Faint Galactic Early-Type Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this poster, we discuss the nature of 66 faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by scrutinizing the plates of the First Byurakan Survey (FBS). These plates display low-resolution spectra of objects located at high Galactic latitudes and have a limiting magnitude of about V=16. Our sample of 66 confirmed spectroscopically to be C stars. These 66 objects are those which show early-type spectra. To better characterize these objects, medium-resolution CCD spectra were obtained and are exploited for them all, together with consideration of their 2MASS near-infrared (NIR) colors and their optical variability. We derive effective temperatures from photometry. Finally, the optical variability of our objects are studied by using the data of the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS). It is found that the vast majority does not display variability. However, for some of them, the phased light curve may indicate the presence of a secondary component.

  18. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  19. Influence of Carbonate Crusts on Trophic Cascades in Big Sur Streams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundio, D.; Lindley, S.

    2005-05-01

    Top-down effects of fish predation in streams are influenced by habitat conditions and traits of intermediate consumers. Along the Big Sur coast, seasonal carbonate crusts form in many streams, and appear to alter insect communities. We conducted a small-scale field experiment in two adjacent tributaries (crusted and crust-free) to determine the effects of predation by juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) on invertebrates and algae in these different stream types. We hypothesized that a trophic cascade would be more likely in the crusted stream, which was dominated by an herbivore vulnerable to steelhead predation (Baetis), than in the crust-free stream, which was dominated by a less vulnerable herbivore (Agapetus). However, excluding steelhead from paving bricks had no effect on algae or Baetis in the crusted stream. Algal abundance was low, suggesting possible bottom-up control. In the crust-free stream, steelhead predation did not affect Agapetus, but nevertheless produced a trophic cascade by causing Baetis to increase by 85%, which in turn depressed algae by 25%. These results suggest that trophic interactions may differ between crust forming and non-crust forming streams, which we plan to test with additional sampling and experiments replicated across stream types.

  20. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the

  1. Sky cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerth, Jordan J.

    Of all of the standard meteorological parameters collected and observed daily, sky cover is not only one of the most complex, but the one that is fairly ambiguously defined and difficult to quantify. Despite that, the implications of how cloud fraction and sky cover are understood not only impact daily weather forecasts, but also present challenges to assessing the state of the earth's climate system. Part of the reason for this is the lack of observational methods for verifying the skill of clouds represented and parameterized in numerical models. While human observers record sky cover as part of routine duties, the spatial coverage of such observations in the United States is relatively sparse. There is greater spatial coverage of automated observations, and essentially complete coverage from geostationary weather satellites that observe the Americas. A good analysis of sky cover reconciles differences between manual observations, automated observations, and satellite observations, through an algorithm that accounts for the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset. This work describes the decision structure for trusting and weighting these similar observations. Some of the issues addressed include: human and instrument error resulting from approximations and estimations, a deficiency in high cloud detectability using surface-based ceilometers, poorly resolved low cloud using infrared channels on space-based radiometers during overnight hours, and decreased confidence in satellite-detected cloud during stray light periods. Using the blended sky cover analysis as the best representation of cloudiness, it is possible to compare the analysis to numerical model fields in order to assess the performance of the model and the parameterizations therein, as well as confirm or uncover additional relationships between sky cover and pertinent fields using an optimization methodology. The optimizer minimizes an affine expression of adjusted fields to the "truth" sky cover

  2. Carbon monoxide stimulates Ca2+ -dependent big-conductance K channels in the cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijian; Yue, Peng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2013-03-01

    We used the patch-clamp technique to examine the role of carbon monoxide (CO) in regulating Ca(2+)-activated big-conductance K (BK) channels in the principal cell of the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Application of CORM3 or CORM2, a CO donor, activated BK channels in the CCD, whereas adding inactivated CORM2/3 had no effect. Superfusion of the CCD with CO-bubbled bath solution also activated the BK channels in the cell-attached patches. The effect of CO on BK channels was not dependent on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) because the effect of CORM3 was also observed in the CCD treated with l-NAME, an agent that inhibits the NOS. Adding a membrane-permeable cGMP analog, 8-bromo-cGMP, significantly increased the BK channel in the CCD. However, inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase failed to abolish the stimulatory effect of CORM3 on BK channels. Moreover, inhibition of cGMP-dependent protein kinase G did not block the stimulatory effect of CORM3 on the BK channels, suggesting that the stimulatory effect of CO on the BK channels was, at least partially, induced by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Western blot demonstrated that heme oxygenase type 1 (HO-1) and HO-2 were expressed in the kidney. Moreover, a high-K (HK) intake increased the expression of HO-1 but not HO-2 in the kidney. A HK intake also increased renal HO activity defined by NADPH-dependent CO generation following addition of heme in the cell lysate from renal cortex and outer medulla. The role of HO in regulating BK channel activity in the CCD was also suggested by experiments in which application of hemin increased the BK channels. The stimulatory effect of hemin on the BK channels was blocked by SnMP, a HO inhibitor. But, adding CORM3 was still able to activate the BK channels in the presence of SnMP. We conclude that CO activates the BK channels, at least partially, through a NO-cGMP-independent pathway and that HO plays a role in mediating the effect of HK intake on the BK channels in the CCD. PMID

  3. Sky Sculpture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Howard

    1980-01-01

    Described is a five-day workshop in the new environmental art form of sky sculpture, which was presented at Wingfield High School in Jackson, Mississippi. Included are daily activities and the design considerations faced by students when planning their balloon creations for flight. (SJL)

  4. Fading Skies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sio, Betsy Menson

    2009-01-01

    A sky fading from blue to white to red at the horizon, and water darkening from light to midnight blue. Strong diagonals slashing through the image, drawing a viewer's eyes deeper into the picture, and delicate trees poised to convey a sense of beauty. These are the fascinating strengths of the ukiyo-e woodblock prints of Japanese artist Ando…

  5. Heavy carbon travertine related to methane generation: A case study of the Big Tarkhan cold spring, Kerch Peninsula, Crimea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokh, Svetlana N.; Shnyukov, Yevgeny F.; Sokol, Ella V.; Novikova, Sofya A.; Kozmenko, Olga A.; Semenova, Dina V.; Rybak, Elena N.

    2015-07-01

    The Big Tarkhan cold spring is located within the Bulganak zone of mud volcanism in the northern Kerch Peninsula (Crimea). The spring waters mainly have Cl-HCO3-Na-Ca chemistry and temperatures from 18 to 23 °C. Active travertine deposition at the site produces abundant calcite and minor amounts of siderite, halite, tincalconite, trona, gaylussite, northupite and amorphous iron hydroxides. Calcite contains the impurities of 0.26-2.16 wt.% MgO, up to 0.87 wt.% FeO, 0.15-0.73 wt.% SrO, 0.28-0.98 BaO, up to 0.43 wt.% MnO, and 0.09-0.60 Na2O. Active travertines are depleted in REE (ΣREE = 2.6-4.8 ppm) compared to the inactive ones. The Kerch travertine calcite shows unusual carbon and oxygen isotope compositions (+ 8.1 ÷ + 12.5‰ VPDB δ13C and + 10.1 ÷ + 12.9‰ VPDB δ18O). Their isotopic and trace element signatures (including REE patterns) suggest their relation to basinal waters and origin from the organic-rich clayey Maikop Fm., which is the principal source rock of the area. The Big Tarkhan travertine deposits are associated with thermogenic methane production.

  6. A Fe-C-Ca big cycle in modern carbon-intensive industries: toward emission reduction and resource utilization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongqi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Wang, Hao; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-01-01

    Herein a big Fe-C-Ca cycle, clarifying the basic element flows and energy flows in modern carbon-intensive industries including the metallurgical industry and the cement industry, was proposed for the first time in the contexts of emission reduction and iron ore degradation nowadays. This big cycle was focused on three industrial elements of Fe, C and Ca and thus it mainly comprised three interdependent loops, i.e., a C-cycle, a Fe-cycle and a Ca-path. As exemplified, we started from the integrated disposal of hot steel slags, a man-made iron resource via char gasification and the employment of hematite, a natural iron resource greatly extended the application area of this idea. Accordingly, based on this concept, the theoretical potentials for energy saving, emission reduction and Fe resource recovery achieved in modern industry are estimated up to 7.66 Mt of standard coal, 63.9 Mt of CO2 and 25.2 Mt of pig iron, respectively. PMID:26923104

  7. A Fe-C-Ca big cycle in modern carbon-intensive industries: toward emission reduction and resource utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongqi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Wang, Hao; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-02-01

    Herein a big Fe-C-Ca cycle, clarifying the basic element flows and energy flows in modern carbon-intensive industries including the metallurgical industry and the cement industry, was proposed for the first time in the contexts of emission reduction and iron ore degradation nowadays. This big cycle was focused on three industrial elements of Fe, C and Ca and thus it mainly comprised three interdependent loops, i.e., a C-cycle, a Fe-cycle and a Ca-path. As exemplified, we started from the integrated disposal of hot steel slags, a man-made iron resource via char gasification and the employment of hematite, a natural iron resource greatly extended the application area of this idea. Accordingly, based on this concept, the theoretical potentials for energy saving, emission reduction and Fe resource recovery achieved in modern industry are estimated up to 7.66 Mt of standard coal, 63.9 Mt of CO2 and 25.2 Mt of pig iron, respectively.

  8. A Fe-C-Ca big cycle in modern carbon-intensive industries: toward emission reduction and resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongqi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Wang, Hao; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-01-01

    Herein a big Fe-C-Ca cycle, clarifying the basic element flows and energy flows in modern carbon-intensive industries including the metallurgical industry and the cement industry, was proposed for the first time in the contexts of emission reduction and iron ore degradation nowadays. This big cycle was focused on three industrial elements of Fe, C and Ca and thus it mainly comprised three interdependent loops, i.e., a C-cycle, a Fe-cycle and a Ca-path. As exemplified, we started from the integrated disposal of hot steel slags, a man-made iron resource via char gasification and the employment of hematite, a natural iron resource greatly extended the application area of this idea. Accordingly, based on this concept, the theoretical potentials for energy saving, emission reduction and Fe resource recovery achieved in modern industry are estimated up to 7.66 Mt of standard coal, 63.9 Mt of CO2 and 25.2 Mt of pig iron, respectively. PMID:26923104

  9. ESA Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merin, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    The ESAC Science Data Centre, ESDC, is working on a science-driven discovery portal for all its astronomy missions with the provisional name Multi-Mission Interface. The first public release of this service will be demonstrated, featuring an interface for sky exploration and for single and multiple target searches. It requires no prior knowledge of any of the missions involved. From a technical point of view, the system offers all-sky projections of full mission datasets using a new-generation HEALPix projection called HiPS; detailed geometrical footprints to access individual observations at the mission archives using VO-TAP queries; and direct access to the underlying mission-specific science archives. A first public release is scheduled before the end of 2015 and will give users worldwide simplified access to high-level science-ready data products from all ESA Astronomy missions plus a number of ESA-produced source catalogues. A demo will accompany the presentation.

  10. Big Society, Big Deal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  11. Explorers of the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Raymond; Haynes, Roslynn D.; Malin, David; McGee, Richard

    2010-08-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Dreaming the stars; 2. Sailing south for a new sky; 3. Astronomy in Sydney town; 4. The struggle for independence; 5. A bid for fame; 6. For love of the subject; 7. Astronomy on a national basis; 8. From swords to ploughshares; 9. Radio astronomy and the big telescopes; 10. Entrepreneurs in astronomy; 11. The advantage of latitude; 12. The high-energy frontier; 13. Diversity through innovation; 14. Optical astronomy goes high tech; 15. A telescope as wide as a continent; Glossary of abbreviations; Glossary of scientific and technical words; Bibliography; Index of names and dates; Subject index.

  12. Carbon Isotopes in Pinus elliotti from Big Pine Key, Florida: Indicators of Seasonal Precipitation, ENSO and Disturbance Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebenack, C.; Willoughby, H. E.; Anderson, W. T.; Cherubini, P.

    2013-12-01

    , and disturbance events. Because slash pine growth is dependent on water availability, a chronology developed using carbon isotopes may provide greater insight into plant stress over time and ultimately may lead to better correlations with climate oscillations. The work presented here is the result of a carbon-isotope study of four slash pine trees from Big Pine Key, Florida. The δ13C data show seasonal stomatal activity in the trees that can be linked to regional precipitation and, to a larger extent, to the ENSO cycles. In addition, there are several anomalies in the carbon isotope record that may indicate the timing of disturbance events.

  13. Bjerknes Lecture: Anticipating the Big Impacts of Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide Increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overpeck, J.

    2005-12-01

    The reality of human-caused global warming is no longer a subject of much serious scientific debate, but many critical details remain to be worked out in what has come to define a whole generation of geophysical careers. We could be called the "Keeling Generation" - those who came to science in the shadow of Keeling curve of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rising steadily and foreshadowing large potential change for the Earth System. To many, the call to help figure out this change has been a prime career motivation. We owe much to the visionaries such as David Keeling, for they build the foundation on which we build. Three decades after the start of the Keeling curve, we know that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are now unprecedented in nearly a million years, and that global warmth could be unprecedented to a similar degree - if it is not now, it could be soon. To many in society, this is enough to warrant action, but to many others the response is more of a "so what?" Society has many technological tools at its disposal, and air conditioning is one that many of us (at least in Arizona) have come to depend on. So, why worry about increasing temperatures? Rising temperatures can, and likely will, have many impacts that will cause society to incur costs (both market and non-market). Many of the possible costs will be incurred by current generations, but paid for by future generations. Perhaps the biggest one, in terms of economic costs, cultural impacts and possibly lives, will be global sea level rise. Sea level could rise up to a meter in this century, and in doing so put entire countries underwater. However, these changes will pale compared to the post-2100 sea level rise that 21st century generations could commit future generations to. Paleoclimatic constraints indicate that warmth by the end of this century could be enough to melt large portions of both the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets, with resulting sea level rise of 4-7m, and at rates that

  14. Microwave Sky image from the WMAP Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A detailed full-sky map of the oldest light in the universe. It is a 'baby picture' of the universe. Colors indicate 'warmer' (red) and 'cooler' (blue) spots. The oval shape is a projection to display the whole sky; similar to the way the globe of the earth can be projected as an oval. The microwave light captured in this picture is from 379,000 years after the Big Bang, over 13 billion years ago. For more information, see http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm/mr_whatsthat.html

  15. Neural network prediction of carbonate lithofacies from well logs, Big Bow and Sand Arroyo Creek fields, Southwest Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, L.; Carr, T.R.

    2006-01-01

    In the Hugoton Embayment of southwestern Kansas, St. Louis Limestone reservoirs have relatively low recovery efficiencies, attributed to the heterogeneous nature of the oolitic deposits. This study establishes quantitative relationships between digital well logs and core description data, and applies these relationships in a probabilistic sense to predict lithofacies in 90 uncored wells across the Big Bow and Sand Arroyo Creek fields. In 10 wells, a single hidden-layer neural network based on digital well logs and core described lithofacies of the limestone depositional texture was used to train and establish a non-linear relationship between lithofacies assignments from detailed core descriptions and selected log curves. Neural network models were optimized by selecting six predictor variables and automated cross-validation with neural network parameters and then used to predict lithofacies on the whole data set of the 2023 half-foot intervals from the 10 cored wells with the selected network size of 35 and a damping parameter of 0.01. Predicted lithofacies results compared to actual lithofacies displays absolute accuracies of 70.37-90.82%. Incorporating adjoining lithofacies, within-one lithofacies improves accuracy slightly (93.72%). Digital logs from uncored wells were batch processed to predict lithofacies and probabilities related to each lithofacies at half-foot resolution corresponding to log units. The results were used to construct interpolated cross-sections and useful depositional patterns of St. Louis lithofacies were illustrated, e.g., the concentration of oolitic deposits (including lithofacies 5 and 6) along local highs and the relative dominance of quartz-rich carbonate grainstone (lithofacies 1) in the zones A and B of the St. Louis Limestone. Neural network techniques are applicable to other complex reservoirs, in which facies geometry and distribution are the key factors controlling heterogeneity and distribution of rock properties. Future work

  16. Investigation of Faint Galactic Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral sky Survey. Optical Variability. I. N-Type AGB Carbon Stars. K-band Absolute Magnitudes and Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.; Sarkissian, A.; Russeil, D.; Mauron, N.; Kostandyan, G.; Vartanian, R.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to present an optical variability study of the comparatively faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by searching the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) low-resolution (lr) spectral plates at high Galactic latitudes using recent wide-area variability databases. The light curves from the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) databases were exploited to study theit variability nature. In this paper, first in this series, the variability classes are presented for 54 N-type Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) C stars. One finds that 9 stars belongs to the group of Mira-type, 43 are Semi-Regular (SR), and 2 stars are Irregular (Irr)-type variables. The variability types of 27 objects has been established for the first time. K-band absolute magnitudes, distances, and height from the Galactic plane were estimated for all of them. We aim to better understand the nature of the selected C stars through spectroscopy, 2MASS photometric colors, and variability data. Most of the tools used in this study are developed within the framework of the Astronomical Virtual Observatory.

  17. Seasonality and Disturbance Events in the Carbon Isotope Record of Pinus elliottii Tree Rings from Big Pine Key, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebenack, C.; Anderson, W. T.; Cherubini, P.

    2012-12-01

    , and disturbance events, such as tropical cyclone impacts. Because slash pine growth is dependent on water availability, a chronology developed using carbon isotopes may provide greater insight into plant stress over time and ultimately may lead to better correlations with climate oscillations. The work presented here is the result of a carbon-isotope study of four slash pine trees located across a freshwater gradient on Big Pine Key, Florida. A site chronology has been developed by cross-dating the δ13C records for each of the trees. The tree located on the distal edge of the freshwater gradient shows an overall enriched isotopic signature over time compared to the trees growing over a deeper part of the local freshwater lens, indicating that these trees are sensitive to water stress. In addition, the carbon isotope data show seasonal stomatal activity in the trees and indicate the timing of two disturbance events.

  18. Infrared sky noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hardware and techniques to measure and compare sky noise at several sites were studied, and a device was developed that would maximize its output and minimize its output for modulation. The instrument and its functions are described. The nature of sky emissions and the fluctuation, gaseous sources of sky noise, and aerosol sources are discussed. It is concluded that sky noise really exists, and the spatial distribution of the sky noise sources are such that observed noise values are linear functions of chopping stroke.

  19. Carbon Isotopes in Pinus elliotti cellulose from Big Pine Key, Florida: Indicators of Seasonal Precipitation, ENSO and Disturbance Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebenack, C.; Willoughby, H. E.; Anderson, W. T., Jr.; Cherubini, P.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term, high-resolution paleoclimate data has never been more important as a means of putting global climate change in context. The inherent complexities of natural climate variability require a very long paleoproxy record that spans many cycles of overlapping multi-scale climate oscillations, such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), in order to distinguish the true effects of climate change. The tropical region has important linkages to global climate regulation and its annual stability makes it highly sensitive to climate change. It is predicted that tropical ecosystems will experience greater climate-related stress than those located at the poles. Yet, this region has an underrepresentation of high-resolution terrestrial paleoclimate records, such as those derived from the tree ring archives. South Florida, like many areas of the subtropics, has few tree species that are suitable for dendrochronological studies due to non-visible or seasonally inconsistent ring production. This study examines the potential of Pinus elliottii trees from Big Pine Key as a high-resolution terrestrial paleoclimate proxy for South Florida. The trees were difficult to cross-date using standard dendrochronology techniques. Instead, a chronology extending from 1927 to 2005 was developed by cross-dating patterns in the δ13C records. There is a strong, but complex, correlation between δ13C, ENSO and the AMO. The δ13C record trends with ENSO during the cool phase of the AMO, but there is an inverse relationship between δ13C and ENSO during the warm phases. The transition in the relationship between δ13C and ENSO occurs about 5 years before the AMO phase shift. In addition, preliminary analysis shows that about 45% of the variance in the carbon isotope chronology is related to precipitation and the ENSO signal is captured through the timing of that precipitation. During El Niño years, there is an increase in dry season

  20. Sky monitoring with LOBSTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Tichy, V.

    2014-12-01

    The X--ray sky monitoring represents valuable energy spectral extension to optical sky monitoring. Lobster--Eye all--sky monitors are able to provide relatively high sensitivity and good time resolution in the soft X--ray energy range up to 10 keV. The fine time resolution can be used to alert optical robotic telescopes for follow--up and multispectral analyzes in the visible light.

  1. 100 Weekly Sky Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    100 Aum Weekly Sky Maps for mission weeks 4 to 44, and the 100 Aum Annual Average Map. Shows sky coverage each week of the DIRBE mission over the period during which the COBE cryogen supply lasted. As the Earth, with COBE in orbit, revolved around the Sun, DIRBE viewed the sky from an ever-changing vantage point in the solar system, enabling light reflected and emitted by the interplanetary dust cloud to be modeled.

  2. Educating for the Preservation of Dark Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Sandra Lee; Cianciolo, Frank; Wetzel, Marc; Finkelstein, Keely; Wren, William; Nance, Craig

    2015-08-01

    The stars at night really are big and bright deep in the heart of Texas at the McDonald Observatory near Fort Davis, Texas. Each year 80,000 visitors from all over the world make the pilgrimage to the Observatory to attend one of the three-times-a-week star parties. Many experience, for the first time, the humbling, splendor of a truly dark night sky. Over the last several years, the Observatory has experienced dramatic increases in visitation demonstrating the public’s appetite for science education, in general, and interest in the night sky, in particular. This increasing interest in astronomy is, ironically, occurring at a time when most of humanity’s skies are becoming increasingly light-polluted frustrating this natural interest. Dark skies and knowledgeable education and outreach staff are an important resource in maintaining the public’s interest in astronomy, support for astronomical research, and local tourism.This year Observatory educators were inspired by the observance of the International Year of Light to promote healthy outdoor lighting through its popular Astronomy Day distance learning program. This program reaches tens of thousands of K-12 students in Texas and other states with a message of how they can take action to preserve dark skies. As well, more than a thousand Boy Scouts visiting during the summer months receive a special program, which includes activities focusing on good lighting practices, thereby earning them credits toward an astronomy badge.The Observatory also offers a half-a-dozen K-12 teacher professional development workshops onsite each year, which provide about 90 teachers with dark skies information, best-practice lighting demonstrations, and red flashlights. Multi-year workshops for National Park and State of Texas Parks personnel are offered on dark sky preservation and sky interpretation at McDonald and a Dark Skies fund for retrofitting lights in the surrounding area has been established. The Observatory also uses

  3. Adnyamathanha Night Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnow, Paul

    2009-06-01

    Aboriginal Australians have been viewing the night skies of Australia for some 45,000 years and possibly much longer. During this time they have been able to develop a complex knowledge of the night sky, the terrestrial environment in addition to seasonal changes. However, few of us in contemporary society have an in-depth knowledge of the nightly waltz of stars above.

  4. Under Summer Skies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    There's no better way to celebrate 2009, the International Year of Astronomy, than by curling up with a good book under summer skies. To every civilization, in every age, the skies inspired imagination and scientific inquiry. There's no better place to start your summer reading than under their influence. Here are a few selections identified by…

  5. WISE Eyes the Whole Sky

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the progress of the WISE all-sky survey over time. WISE, or NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, is perched up in the sky like a wise, old owl, scanning the whole sky on...

  6. Colors of the Sky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Fraser, Alistair B.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the physical principles which result in various colors of the sky. Topics addressed include: blueness, mystical properties of water vapor, ozone, fluctuation theory of scattering, variation of purity and brightness, and red sunsets and sunrises. (DH)

  7. Sloan digital sky survey

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, S.M.; Stoughton, C.; Newberg, H.; Loveday, J.; Petravick, D.; Gurbani, V.; Berman, E.; Sergey, G.; Lupton, R.

    1994-04-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey will produce a detailed digital photometric map of half the northern sky to about 23 magnitude using a special purpose wide field 2.5 meter telescope. From this map we will select {approximately} 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars, and obtain high resolution spectra using the same telescope. The imaging catalog will contain 10{sup 8} galaxies, a similar number of stars, and 10{sup 6} quasar candidates.

  8. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada - An alkaline, meromictic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the distribution and isotopic composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases at the Big Soda Lake, Nevada, has shown that while neither ethylene nor propylene were found in the lake, ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth. It is concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column, and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in delta C-13/CH4/ and CH4/(C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sedimeents are probably due to bacterial processes, which may include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis, and C2-to-C4 alkane production by microorganisms.

  9. Big Dreams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The Keen Johnson Building is symbolic of Eastern Kentucky University's historic role as a School of Opportunity. It is a place that has inspired generations of students, many from disadvantaged backgrounds, to dream big dreams. The construction of the Keen Johnson Building was inspired by a desire to create a student union facility that would not…

  10. Big bluestem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) is a warm season grass native to North America, accounting for 40% of the herbaceous biomass of the tall grass prairie, and a candidate for bioenergy feedstock production. The goal of this study was to measure among and within population genetic variation of natura...

  11. Big Opportunities and Big Concerns of Big Data in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yinying

    2016-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the ever-increasing influx of big data, this article examines the opportunities and concerns over big data in education. Specifically, this article first introduces big data, followed by delineating the potential opportunities of using big data in education in two areas: learning analytics and educational policy. Then, the…

  12. Digitised optical sky surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGillivray, H. T.

    1990-12-01

    Contents: 1. The Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. 2. The status of the UKST surveys. 3. A proposal for the construction of a 150/220-cm Schmidt Telescope and processing facilities in China. 4. The measuring machines - a world roundup. 5. Reports from the individual machine groups. 6. A progress report on the APS catalog of POSS I. 7. The ROE/NRL collaborative effort on the COSMOS/UKST survey material. 8. Automated optical identification of IRAS Faint Source Survey Objects. 9. A catalogue of the North Galactic Pole. 10. The need for standard data sets. 11. Programmes on plate calibration. 12. Automated image measuring system. 13. Astronomical image data compression. 14. Opportunities for image compression in astronomy. 15. The Loiano 152 cm telescope CCD images archive. 16. PPM: a reference star catalogue for sky surveys. 17. Announcement: Second Meeting on Digitised Optical Sky Surveys.

  13. Dark skies for all

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mark E.

    2006-12-01

    More than 100 people including members of the British Astronomical Association Campaign for Dark Skies (CfDS), representatives from local and central government, lighting professionals, environmentalists, astronomers and journalists, met in Portsmouth for the Sixth European Dark-Skies Symposium, on 15 and 16 September 2006. The meeting covered the adverse impacts of light pollution on various fields, for example health, the environment and the economy, as well as astronomy. With support from the Campaign for the Protection of Rural England, the publication in 2003 of a comprehensive report by the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee, and the recent rise in energy costs, light pollution has become a subject of growing public concern. Professional astronomers have an important role to play in commending the argument for a return to darker skies.

  14. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  15. Dark-Skies Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2009-05-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's natural heritage. More than one fifth of the world population, two thirds of the United States population and one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs that: 1. Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking on Facebook and MySpace, a Second Life presence) 2. Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy) 3. Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4. Involve citizen-scientists in naked-eye and digital-meter star hunting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?", the Great World Wide Star Count and the radio frequency interference equivalent: "Quiet Skies") and 5. Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy (e.g., The Starlight Initiative, World Night in Defense of Starlight, International Dark Sky Week, International Dark-Sky Communities, Earth Hour, The Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, downloadable posters and brochures). The presentation will provide an update, describe how people can become involved and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For more information, visit www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  16. Ochoa on Sky Genie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa, wearing a Launch and Entry Suit (LES) and Launch and Entry Helmet (LEH), simulates an emergency egress procedure at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL). Having exited the crew compartment trainer (CCT) a shuttle mockup, through an overhead aft flight deck window; Ochoa lowers herself to the ground using the sky-genie. Training instructor Kenneth D. Trujillo assumes the role of a crewmate assisting from a position on the ground. The sky-genie is carried on all Space Shuttle flights for emergency egress purposes.

  17. Kaurna Night Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnow, Paul

    2006-06-01

    Before Europeans first came to colonise the Adelaide Plains in 1836, the night skies would have been truly dark by today's standards. There was no street lighting, no security lighting and no industrial pollution to obscure the view of our galaxy. However, within a short period of time of just over 150 years we have managed to create a large metropolis of approximately 1 million people with industries, communities and lots of street lighting. Although, Adelaide's skies are still quite good by world standards this light pollution has managed to obscure the faint light, which has often been travelling for aeons from reaching the Earth and the Adelaide Plains.

  18. Lustre on Red Sky.

    SciTech Connect

    Monk, Stephen Todd; Mervini, Joe

    2010-04-01

    The goals of Lustre on Red Sky are: (1) provide home/projects/scratch Lustre file systems; (2) adhere to the Sun HPC stack; (3) implement software RAID on Sun provided JBODs; and (4) design for easy administration. Conclusions are: (1) software RAID includes additional risks and administration vs. hardware RAID solutions; (2) limited testing of hardware in these configurations make it ill-suited for rapid deployment in a production environment; and (3) Lustre has been a shining star on this machine, Red Sky users are pleased with its performance.

  19. Big Bang, Big Data, Big Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conference website: http://www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/APC/Conferences/Workshop_Big3/Home.html Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation have transformed modern cosmology propelling it into high-precision, data-driven science it is today. CMB data analysis has been a cornerstone of this transformation and it continues in this role preparing currently to meet its possibly ultimate challenge as posed by ever-growing in size and complexity forthcoming data sets required by new science goals posed for the field. These include providing key pieces of information about the very early Universe: Gaussianity of the initial conditions, the presence of the primordial gravity waves, as well as constraints on the large-scale structure formation and possibly properties of dark energy. The sophistication of the involved data models is matched by precision levels, which have to be attained to deliver robust detections and result in firm conclusions. The overall challenge is indeed breathtaking and, without a doubt, the success will be only possible if the data analysis effort becomes truly interdisciplinary and capitalizes on the latest advances in statistics, applied mathematics, and computer science - all of which constitute veritable foundations of the contemporary data analysis work.

  20. Future Sky Surveys: New Discovery Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. Anthony; Borne, Kirk D.

    2012-03-01

    Driven by the availability of new instrumentation, there has been an evolution in astronomical science toward comprehensive investigations of new phenomena. Major advances in our understanding of the Universe over the history of astronomy have often arisen from dramatic improvements in our capability to observe the sky to greater depth, in previously unexplored wavebands, with higher precision, or with improved spatial, spectral, or temporal resolution. Substantial progress in the important scientific problems of the next decade (determining the nature of dark energy and dark matter, studying the evolution of galaxies and the structure of our own Milky Way, opening up the time domain to discover faint variable objects, and mapping both the inner and outer Solar System) can be achieved through the application of advanced data mining methods and machine learning algorithms operating on the numerous large astronomical databases that will be generated from a variety of revolutionary future sky surveys. Over the next decade, astronomy will irrevocably enter the era of big surveys and of really big telescopes. New sky surveys (some of which will produce petabyte-scale data collections) will begin their operations, and one or more very large telescopes (ELTs = Extremely Large Telescopes) will enter the construction phase. These programs and facilities will generate a remarkable wealth of data of high complexity, endowed with enormous scientific knowledge discovery potential. New parameter spaces will be opened, in multiple wavelength domains as well as the time domain, across wide areas of the sky, and down to unprecedented faint source flux limits. The synergies of grand facilities, massive data collections, and advanced machine learning algorithms will come together to enable discoveries within most areas of astronomical science, including Solar System, exo-planets, star formation, stellar populations, stellar death, galaxy assembly, galaxy evolution, quasar evolution

  1. September in the Skies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2004-01-01

    This school year begins with no planets visible in the evenings, and it will remain this way until November when Mercury returns to the evening skies. For a period of several days, starting on September 8, you can follow the waning crescent Moon in the early morning as it passes Saturn, Venus, the bright star Regulus, and Mercury. On the morning…

  2. A night sky model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpylev, N. P.; Smirnov, M. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    A night sky model is proposed. It includes different components of light polution, such as solar twilight, moon scattered light, zodiacal light, Milky Way, air glow and artificial light pollution. The model is designed for calculating the efficiency of astronomical installations.

  3. The Quiet Skies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Steve

    2008-01-01

    To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and radio frequency interference (RFI), an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project--the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space…

  4. Discovering the Sky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1997-01-01

    An astronomer gives teachers tips on learning how to look at the night sky then on passing along personal instruction to students. Presents ideas for finding information through astronomers at colleges, science museums, planetariums, research observatories, and on the World Wide Web. Contains a resource list and foldout poster of galaxies with…

  5. The Infrared Sky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habing, Harm J.; Neugebauer, Gerry

    1984-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) is a survey instrument that has provided an overall view of the infrared sky and identified objects that merit further investigation. A description of the IRAS and examples of the types of astronomical data collected are presented. (JN)

  6. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada: An alkaline, meromictic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Des Marais, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution and isotopic composition (??13C) of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases were studied in Big Soda Lake (depth = 64 m), an alkaline, meromictic lake with permanently anoxic bottom waters. Methane increased with depth in the anoxic mixolimnion (depth = 20-35 m), reached uniform concentrations (55 ??M/l) in the monimolimnion (35-64 m) and again increased with depth in monimolimnion bottom sediments (>400 ??M/kg below 1 m sub-bottom depth). The ??13C[CH4] values in bottom sediment below 1 m sub-bottom depth (<-70 per mil) increased with vertical distance up the core (??13C[CH4] = -55 per mil at sediment surface). Monimolimnion ??13C[CH4] values (-55 to -61 per mil) were greater than most ??13C[CH4] values found in the anoxic mixolimnion (92% of samples had ??13C[CH4] values between -20 and -48 per mil). No significant concentrations of ethylene or propylene were found in the lake. However ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth, with respective maximum concentrations of 260, 80, 23 and 22 nM/l encountered between 50-60 m depth. Concentrations of ethane, propane and butanes decreased with depth in the bottom sediments. Ratios of CH4 [C2H6 + C3H8] were high (250-620) in the anoxic mixolimnion, decreased to ~161 in the monimolimnion and increased with depth in the sediment to values as high as 1736. We concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in ??13C[CH4] and CH4 (C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sediments are probably caused by bacteria] processes. These might include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis and C2 to C4 alkane production by microorganisms. ?? 1983.

  7. Volatile fluxes through the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault, California: helium and carbon-dioxide systematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Hilton, David R.; Barry, Peter H.; Esser, Bradley K.; Hillegonds, Darren; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the source of volatiles and their relationship to the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS), 18 groundwater samples were collected from wells near the Big Bend section of the SAFS in southern California and analyzed for helium and carbon abundance and isotopes. Concentrations of 4He, corrected for air-bubble entrainment, vary from 4.15 to 62.7 (× 10− 8) cm3 STP g− 1 H2O. 3He/4He ratios vary from 0.09 to 3.52 RA (where RA = air 3He/4He), consistent with up to 44% mantle helium in samples. A subset of 10 samples was analyzed for the major volatile phase (CO2) — the hypothesized carrier phase of the helium in the mantle–crust system: CO2/3He ratios vary from 0.614 to 142 (× 1011), and δ13C (CO2) values vary from − 21.5 to − 11.9‰ (vs. PDB). 3He/4He ratios and CO2 concentrations are highest in the wells located in the Mil Potrero and Cuddy valleys adjacent to the SAFS. The elevated 3He/4He ratios are interpreted to be a consequence of a mantle volatile flux though the SAFS diluted by radiogenic He produced in the crust. Samples with the highest 3He/4He ratios also had the lowest CO2/3He ratios. The combined helium isotope, He–CO2 elemental relationships, and δ13C (CO2) values of the groundwater volatiles reveal a mixture of mantle and deep crustal (metamorphic) fluid origins. The flux of fluids into the seismogenic zone at high hydrostatic pressure may cause fault rupture, and transfer volatiles into the shallow crust. We calculate an upward fluid flow rate of 147 mm a− 1 along the SAFS, up to 37 times higher than previous estimates (Kennedy et al., 1997). However, using newly identified characteristics of the SAFS, we calculate a total flux of 3He along the SAFS of 7.4 × 103 cm3 STP a− 1 (0.33 mol 3He a− 1), and a CO2 flux of 1.5 × 1013 cm3STP a− 1 (6.6 × 108 mol a− 1), ~ 1% of previous estimates. Lower fluxes along the Big Bend section of the SAFS suggest that the flux of mantle volatiles alone is insufficient to cause the

  8. Pictures in the Sky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brako, Elisa; Fout, James; Peltz, William H.

    2005-01-01

    The authors teach an astronomy unit in their seventh-grade course that they find never fails to motivate and stretch the imagination. The questions students ask are wonder-full: "What was here before the universe?" "If there was nothing before the Big Bang, where did energy and matter come from?" "Does the universe have a boundary, and if it does,…

  9. Seasonality and Disturbance Events in the Carbon Isotope Record of Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii) Tree Rings from Big Pine Key, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebenack, C.; Anderson, W. T.; Cherubini, P.

    2011-12-01

    , and disturbance events. Because slash pine growth is dependent on water availability, a chronology developed using carbon isotopes may provide greater insight into plant stress over time and ultimately may lead to better correlations with climate oscillations. The work presented here is the preliminary result of a carbon-isotope study of four slash pine trees from Big Pine Key, Florida. Initial δ13C data show seasonal stomatal activity in the trees and indicate the timing of possible disturbance events.

  10. Dark Skies Rangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Creating awareness about the importance of the protection of our dark skies is the main goal of the Dark Skies Rangers project, a joint effort from the NOAO and the Galileo Teacher Training Program. Hundreds of schools and thousands of students have been reached by this program. We will focus in particular on the experience being developed in Portugal where several municipalities have now received street light auditing produced by students with suggestions on how to enhance the energy efficiency of illumination of specific urban areas. In the International Year of Light we are investing our efforts in exporting the successful Portuguese experience to other countries. The recipe is simple: train teachers, engage students, foster the participation of local community and involve local authorities in the process. In this symposium we hope to draft the cookbook for the near future.

  11. Low Frequency Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose to survey the sky from 10-100 GHz covering greater than 50% of the sky in intensity and polarizatiton. This will allow us to mep out the synchrotron and free - free background as well as the spinning dust component to sufficient sensitivity to allow detailed modeling and removal of the galactic foregrounds allowing for deeper polarization surveys searching for signatures of inflation. While most measurements have concentrated on the region above 100 GHz this reggion is more complex in dust contmination that originally thought. Dust is best measured at high frequencies but the atmosphere greatly hinders extremely deep dust surveys due to water vapor. Surveys ar low frequency will be complimentary to the higher frequency measurements.

  12. Point Source All Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky as seen by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The measured brightnesses of half a billion stars (points) have been combined into colors representing three distinct wavelengths of infrared light: blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns. This image is centered on the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, toward the constellation of Sagittarius. The reddish stars seemingly hovering in the middle of the Milky Way's disc -- many of them never observed before -- trace the densest dust clouds in our galaxy. The two faint smudges seen in the lower right quadrant are our neighboring galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

  13. Sacred Sky and Cyberspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clynes, F.

    2011-06-01

    The concept of the sacred world beyond the stars found expression in the works of Plato, into Gnosticism and was incorporated into Christianity where medieval images of the cosmos pictured the heavenly domain as beyond the stars. Today cyberspace literature abounds with descriptions of a transmundane space, a great Beyond. This talk looks at current views of cyberspace and asks if they are a re-packaging of the age-old concept of a sacred sky in a secular and technological format?

  14. Carbon catabolite repressor gene BbCre1 influences carbon source uptake but does not have a big impact on virulence in Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Luo, Zhibing; Jiang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhou, Yonghong; Pei, Yan

    2011-03-01

    A gene (BbCre1, GenBank accession number EF108309) encoding a carbon catabolite repressor (CreA) with two Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger regions and a nuclear localization signal was cloned from the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Overexpression and antisense strategies were used to investigate the biological functions of this gene. Compared with the wild type, the conidial yield and colony growth of BbCre1-overexpression transformants were significantly decreased on the plates with xylose or ethanol as the sole carbon source. With glucose as the sole carbon source, a significant difference was observed in the activity of Pr1A-like protease among BbCre1-overexpression transformants, antisense-BbCre1 transformants and the wild type. However, bioassays showed that knockdown or overexpression of BbCre1 did not have a significant impact on the virulence of B. bassiana to aphids. These results imply that the fungus remains virulent, even when simpler, less expensive nutrients are available, i.e. glucose. PMID:21130770

  15. Tropical rainforest response to marine sky brightening climate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muri, Helene; Niemeier, Ulrike; Kristjánsson, Jón Egill

    2015-04-01

    Tropical forests represent a major atmospheric carbon dioxide sink. Here the gross primary productivity (GPP) response of tropical rainforests to climate engineering via marine sky brightening under a future scenario is investigated in three Earth system models. The model response is diverse, and in two of the three models, the tropical GPP shows a decrease from the marine sky brightening climate engineering. Partial correlation analysis indicates precipitation to be important in one of those models, while precipitation and temperature are limiting factors in the other. One model experiences a reversal of its Amazon dieback under marine sky brightening. There, the strongest partial correlation of GPP is to temperature and incoming solar radiation at the surface. Carbon fertilization provides a higher future tropical rainforest GPP overall, both with and without climate engineering. Salt damage to plants and soils could be an important aspect of marine sky brightening.

  16. Google Sky: A Digital View of the Night Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, A. Scranton, R.; Ornduff, T.

    2008-11-01

    From its inception Astronomy has been a visual science, from careful observations of the sky using the naked eye, to the use of telescopes and photographs to map the distribution of stars and galaxies, to the current era of digital cameras that can image the sky over many decades of the electromagnetic spectrum. Sky in Google Earth (http://earth.google.com) and Google Sky (http://www.google.com/sky) continue this tradition, providing an intuitive visual interface to some of the largest astronomical imaging surveys of the sky. Streaming multi-color imagery, catalogs, time domain data, as well as annotating interesting astronomical sources and events with placemarks, podcasts and videos, Sky provides a panchromatic view of the universe accessible to anyone with a computer. Beyond a simple exploration of the sky Google Sky enables users to create and share content with others around the world. With an open interface available on Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, and translations of the content into over 20 different languages we present Sky as the embodiment of a virtual telescope for discovery and sharing the excitement of astronomy and science as a whole.

  17. Under the Same Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Milena

    2016-07-01

    Sharing the same sky provides the unique opportunity to use it as a tool to inspire pupils and encourage them to develop an interest in science and technology. Excitement of space can also serve as introduction to the idea of global citizenship and tolerance. A wide spectrum of educational activities dedicated to children and teenagers, especially those from less privileged backgrounds, carried out under several projects in Poland will be presented. We will also introduce the way we follow to support teachers and educators in discovering our wonderful cosmos.

  18. Bargaining for Open Skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojahn, Oliver W.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the bargaining problem between countries when negotiating bilateral air service agreements. To do so, we use the methods of bargaining and game theory. We give special attention to the case where a liberal minded country is trying to convince a less liberal country to agree to bilateral open skies, and the liberal country might also unilaterally open up its market. The following analysis is positive in the sense that the results help explain and predict the outcome of negotiations under different payoffs and structures of the bargaining process. They are normative in the sense that adequate manipulation of the bargaining conditions can ensure a desired outcome.

  19. SkyView Virtual Telescope:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Thomas A.; McDonald, Laura M.; Scollick, Keith A.

    2015-11-01

    The SkyView Virtual telescope provides access to survey datasets ranging from radio through the gamma-ray regimes. Over 100 survey datasets are currently available. The SkyView library referenced here is used as the basis for the SkyView web site (at http://skvyiew.gsfc.nasa.gov) but is designed for individual use by researchers as well. SkyView's approach to access surveys is distinct from most other toolkits. Rather than providing links to the original data, SkyView attempts to immediately re-render the source data in the user-requested reference frame, projection, scaling, orientation, etc. The library includes a set of geometry transformation and mosaicking tools that may be integrated into other applications independent of SkyView.

  20. Diamonds in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherton, M.

    2004-12-01

    My first science fiction novel, Star Dragon, just recently available in paperback from Tor, features a voyage to the cataclysmic variable star system SS Cygni. My second novel, Spider Star, to appear early in 2006, takes place in and around a dark matter ``planet'' orbiting a neutron star. Both novels are ``hard'' science fiction, relying on accurate physics to inform the tales. It's possible to bring to life abstract concepts like special relativity, and alien environments like accretion disks, by using science fiction. Novels are difficult to use in a science class, but short stories offer intriguing possibilities. I'm planning to edit an anthology of hard science fiction stories that contain accurate science and emphasize fundamental ideas in modern astronomy. The working title is Diamonds in the Sky. The collection will be a mix of original stories and reprints, highlighting challenging concepts covered in a typical introductory astronomy course. Larry Niven's classic story, ``Neutron Star," is an excellent demonstration of extreme tidal forces in an astronomical context. Diamonds in the Sky will include forewards and afterwards to the stories, including discussion questions and mathematical formulas/examples as appropriate. I envision this project will be published electronically or through a print-on-demand publisher, providing long-term availabilty and keeping low cost. I encourage interested parties to suggest previously published stories, or to suggest which topics must be included.

  1. Ring Around the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croswell, Ken

    2005-07-01

    Gould's Belt, the most prominent starry feature in the Sun's neighborhood, is a zone of large supergiant stars including the Orion constellation; the bright stars of Canis Major, the Southern Cross, Centaurus, and Lupus; and the brightest stars of the Pupis, Vela, and Carina constellations. Its most prominent feature is its 20-degree tilt to the plane of the Milky Way. Gould's Belt was first noticed in 1847 by Englishman John F. W. Herschel while observing from the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa. Later, Benjamin A. Gould, the first American to earn a doctoral degree in astronomy and the founder of The Astronomical Journal, traced the belt around the entire sky. More recent studies of Gould's Belt show evidence of more than just superstars. When massive stars like those in Gould's Belt explode, they leave behind pulsars and black holes. In the 1990's several dozen gamma-ray sources were discovered to track along the path of Gould's Belt around the sky, possible evidence of the explosion of brilliant stars at an earlier time. X-ray studies suggest that the belt may actually be a disk.

  2. A Violet Martian Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These clouds from Sol 15 have a new look. As water ice clouds cover the sky, the sky takes on a more bluish cast. This is because small particles (perhaps a tenth the size of the martian dust, or one-thousandth the thickness of a human hair) are bright in blue light, but almost invisible in red light. Thus, scientists expect that the ice particles in the clouds are very small. The clouds were imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  3. The Other Dark Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazmino, John

    In previous demonstrations of New York's elimination of luminous graffiti from its skies, I focused attention on large-scale projects in the showcase districts of Manhattan. Although these works earned passionate respect in the dark sky movement, they by the same token were disheartening. New York was in some quarters of the movement regarded more as an unachievable Shangri-La than as a role model to emulate. This presentation focuses on scenes of light abatement efforts in parts of New York which resemble other towns in scale and density. I photographed these scenes along a certain bus route in Brooklyn on my way home from work during October 2001. This route circulates through various "bedroom communities," each similar to a mid-size to large town elsewhere in the United States. The sujbects included individual structures - stores, banks, schools - and streetscapes mimicking downtowns. The latter protrayed a mix of atrocious and excellent lighting practice, being that these streets are in transition by the routine process of replacement and renovation. The fixtures used - box lamps, fluted or Fresnel globes, subdued headsigns, indirect lighting - are casually obtainable by property managers at local outlets for lighting apparatus. They are routinely offered to the property managers by storefront designers, security services, contractors, and the community improvement or betterment councils.

  4. A Multi-Institutional Big Data Collaboration to Estimate Long Term Terrestrial Net Carbon Uptake from Remote Sensing and Hydrological Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halem, M.; Dorband, J.; Rao, R.; Lomonaco, S.; Chapman, D. R.; LeMoigne, J.; Nearing, G. S.; Pelissier, C. S.; Simpson, D. G.; Clune, T.

    2014-12-01

    Recent aircraft measurements from scattered records have shown long-term, global, seasonal photosynthetic CO2 uptake over land accelerating over the past 50 years. The successful launch of the sun-synchronous Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) on July 2, 2014 is expected to provide global, high spatial and spectral resolution datasets of vertical CO2 concentrations with surface spectral resolutions capable of yielding accurate CO2 flux profiles. It is unclear whether the biosphere will continue to act as a sink for anthropogenic CO2 loading of the atmosphere. Since current climate models with detailed terrestrial ecosystems are unable to simulate the observed increase in net ecosystem production (NEP), we will conduct assimilation studies with the derived CO2 fluxes in the GSFC Land Information System hydrological model to validate the generated NEP uptake. Further, we plan to use the OCO-2 CO2 concentrations to train a neural network to enable the calculation of long term trends from a decade of AIRS CO2 concentration data to produce regional NEP. To address this important Big Data science issue, a multi-institutional collaboration was formed to leverage their combined resources and the expertise of the researchers at the NASA GSFC, the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory and UMBC. We will employ a high speed 10Gb network to connect the collaborating researchers and provide them with remote access to dedicated computational hybrid multicore resources at UMBC, as well as access to an archive containing more than a decade of readily accessible continuous daily gridded AIRS data and ten years of daily MODIS data for each September. The status of the following research efforts is planned to be presented; (i) acquisition and processing of the expected CO2 profile data from OCO-2 for two test sites, a low latitude region over the Amazon and a Boral forest at high latitude, (ii) initial impact of 3-D data assimilation of CO2 fluxes with the advanced Goddard LIS

  5. Exploring Relationships in Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Crichton, D. J.; Cinquini, L.; Kelly, S.; Colbert, M. A.; Kincaid, H.

    2015-12-01

    Big Data are characterized by several different 'V's. Volume, Veracity, Volatility, Value and so on. For many datasets inflated Volumes through redundant features often make the data more noisy and difficult to extract Value out of. This is especially true if one is comparing/combining different datasets, and the metadata are diverse. We have been exploring ways to exploit such datasets through a variety of statistical machinery, and visualization. We show how we have applied it to time-series from large astronomical sky-surveys. This was done in the Virtual Observatory framework. More recently we have been doing similar work for a completely different domain viz. biology/cancer. The methodology reuse involves application to diverse datasets gathered through the various centers associated with the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) for cancer, an initiative of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Application to Geo datasets is a natural extension.

  6. Preserving our sky heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonavitacola, Michel; Le Gué, Alain

    2011-06-01

    We briefly relate the story of the fight against light pollution in France and make a projection into the future. Following the steps of Jean Kovalevsky who was the initiator of the protection of the astronomical sites in France, a few French amateur astronomers began the fight against light pollution in the 1990s. After a first conference for the night environmental protection in 1995 in Rodez, the second conference in 1998 creates the national association which will become in 2007 the National association for the Protection of the Sky and the Night Environment (ANPCEN). In 2008 light pollution is formally identified, by law, as a problem. Since 2005 the LICORNESS association continues to promote research on the impacts of light on the biotopes while protecting the astronomical sites.

  7. Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth's surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.

  8. Close to the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Today, a new ALMA outreach and educational book was publicly presented to city officials of San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, as part of the celebrations of the anniversary of the Andean village. ESO PR Photo 50a/07 ESO PR Photo 50a/07 A Useful Tool for Schools Entitled "Close to the sky: Biological heritage in the ALMA area", and edited in English and Spanish by ESO in Chile, the book collects unique on-site observations of the flora and fauna of the ALMA region performed by experts commissioned to investigate it and to provide key initiatives to protect it. "I thank the ALMA project for providing us a book that will surely be a good support for the education of children and youngsters of San Pedro de Atacama. Thanks to this publication, we expect our rich flora and fauna to be better known. I invite teachers and students to take advantage of this educational resource, which will be available in our schools", commented Ms. Sandra Berna, the Mayor of San Pedro de Atacama, who was given the book by representatives of the ALMA global collaboration project. Copies of the book 'Close to the sky' will be donated to all schools in the area, as a contribution to the education of students and young people in northern Chile. "From the very beginning of the project, ALMA construction has had a firm commitment to environment and local culture, protecting unique flora and fauna species and preserving old estancias belonging to the Likan Antai culture," said Jacques Lassalle, who represented ALMA at the hand-over. "Animals like the llama, the fox or the condor do not only live in the region where ALMA is now being built, but they are also key elements of the ancient Andean constellations. In this sense they are part of the same sky that will be explored by ALMA in the near future." ESO PR Photo 50c/07 ESO PR Photo 50c/07 Presentation of the ALMA book The ALMA Project is a giant, international observatory currently under construction on the high-altitude Chajnantor site in Chile

  9. Astronomical surveys and big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    Recent all-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their catalogued data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum, from γ -rays to radio waves, are reviewed, including such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in γ -ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and POSS II-based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in the optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio range, and many others, as well as the most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS), and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). An overall understanding of the coverage along the whole wavelength range and comparisons between various surveys are given: galaxy redshift surveys, QSO/AGN, radio, Galactic structure, and Dark Energy surveys. Astronomy has entered the Big Data era, with Astrophysical Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics playing an important role in using and analyzing big data for new discoveries.

  10. Five Big Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    Designing quality continuing professional development (CPD) for those teaching mathematics in primary schools is a challenge. If the CPD is to be built on the scaffold of five big ideas in mathematics, what might be these five big ideas? Might it just be a case of, if you tell me your five big ideas, then I'll tell you mine? Here, there is…

  11. No evidence for anomalously low variance circles on the sky

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas; Zibin, James P. E-mail: dscott@phas.ubc.ca

    2011-04-01

    In a recent paper, Gurzadyan and Penrose claim to have found directions on the sky centred on which are circles of anomalously low variance in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These features are presented as evidence for a particular picture of the very early Universe. We attempted to repeat the analysis of these authors, and we can indeed confirm that such variations do exist in the temperature variance for annuli around points in the data. However, we find that this variation is entirely expected in a sky which contains the usual CMB anisotropies. In other words, properly simulated Gaussian CMB data contain just the sorts of variations claimed. Gurzadyan and Penrose have not found evidence for pre-Big Bang phenomena, but have simply re-discovered that the CMB contains structure.

  12. THEMIS / All-Sky Imagers

    NASA Video Gallery

    A collection of ground-based All-Sky Imagers (ASI) make up another important component of the THEMIS mission. It is sometimes referred to as the sixth THEMIS satellite. Imagery from each camera is ...

  13. Sky cover from MFRSR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J. C.; Berg, L. K.; Flynn, C.; Long, C. N.

    2011-07-01

    The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their modeled clear-sky counterparts are the main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumuli. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from a ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumuli. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  14. Sky Cover from MFRSR Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

    2011-07-01

    The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  15. Pi in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, W. P.

    2008-12-01

    Pi In The Sky (PITS) consists of a loose collection of virtual globe (VG) activities with a slight mathematical twist, wherein students search for interesting circular structures on the surface of Earth (Moon or other planets) and measure the circumference C and diameter D of each structure, using the built-in VG measure tool, in order to determine experimental values of pi from the C/D ratios. Examples of man-made circular structures visible using VG browsers include Fermilab and l"Arc de Triomphe roundabout; quasi-circular natural structures include certain volcano calderas and impact craters. Since a circle is but a special case of an ellipse, a natural extension of the activity involves making similar measurements of perimeter P, semi-major axis a, and semi-minor axis b of a visible elliptical structure (such as one of the thousands of elliptical Carolina bays, enigmatic depressions on the Atlantic Coast of North America) and solving for pi using Ramanujan's first approximation for the dependence of the perimeter of an ellipse on a and b. PITS exercises can be adapted to a wide range of student ages and teaching goals. For instance, K-6 students could measure C and D of the huge irrigation circles near Circle, Texas, to discover pi in the same way they might infer pi from measurements of coffee-can lids in math class. Middle school and high school students could move beyond man-made circles to consider the near-circularity of certain volcano calderas and impact craters in earth science units, make measurements for Olympus Mons on Mars or Crater Kepler on the moon in astronomy units, or search for circularity among Arctic thermokarst lakes as an introduction to climate change in tundra environments in environmental science units; such studies might ignite student curiosity about planetary processes. High school students of analytic geometry could examine several elliptical Carolina bays and calculate not only values of pi (as noted above) but also determine the

  16. Dark Sky Protection and Education - Izera Dark Sky Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Kolomanski, Sylwester; Mrozek, Tomasz; Zakowicz, Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    Darkness of the night sky is a natural component of our environment and should be protected against negative effects of human activities. The night darkness is necessary for balanced life of plants, animals and people. Unfortunately, development of human civilization and technology has led to the substantial increase of the night-sky brightness and to situation where nights are no more dark in many areas of the World. This phenomenon is called "light pollution" and it can be rank among such problems as chemical pollution of air, water and soil. Besides the environment, the light pollution can also affect e.g. the scientific activities of astronomers - many observatories built in the past began to be located within the glow of city lights making the night observations difficult, or even impossible.In order to protect the natural darkness of nights many so-called "dark sky parks" were established, where the darkness is preserved, similar to typical nature reserves. The role of these parks is not only conservation but also education, supporting to make society aware of how serious the problem of the light pollution is.History of the dark sky areas in Europe began on November 4, 2009 in Jizerka - a small village situated in the Izera Mountains, when Izera Dark Sky Park (IDSP) was established - it was the first transboundary dark sky park in the World. The idea of establishing that dark sky park in the Izera Mountains originated from a need to give to the society in Poland and Czech Republic the knowledge about the light pollution. Izera Dark Sky Park is a part of the astro-tourism project "Astro Izery" that combines tourist attraction of Izera Valley and astronomical education under the wonderful starry Izera sky. Besides the IDSP, the project Astro Izery consists of the set of simple astronomical instruments (gnomon, sundial), natural educational trail "Solar System Model", and astronomical events for the public. In addition, twice a year we organize a 3-4 days

  17. Night sky luminance under clear sky conditions: Theory vs. experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2014-05-01

    Sky glow is caused by both natural phenomena and factors of anthropogenic origin, and of the latter ground-based light sources are the most important contributors for they emit the spatially linked spectral radiant intensity distribution of artificial light sources, which are further modulated by local atmospheric optics and perceived as the diffuse light of a night sky. In other words, sky glow is closely related to a city's shape and pattern of luminaire distribution, in practical effect an almost arbitrary deployment of random orientation of heterogeneous electrical light sources. Thus the luminance gradation function measured in a suburban zone or near the edges of a city is linked to the City Pattern or vice versa. It is shown that clear sky luminance/radiance data recorded in an urban area can be used to retrieve the bulk luminous/radiant intensity distribution if some a-priori information on atmospheric aerosols is available. For instance, the single scattering albedo of aerosol particles is required under low turbidity conditions, as demonstrated on a targeted experiment in the city of Frýdek-Mistek. One of the main advantages of the retrieval method presented in this paper is that the single scattering approximation is satisfactorily accurate in characterizing the light field near the ground because the dominant contribution to the sky glow has originated from beams propagated along short optical paths.

  18. Exmoor - Europe's first International Dark Sky Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, S.

    2011-12-01

    On 2011 October 9 Exmoor National Park in the southwest of England was designated as Europe's first International Dark Sky Reserve by the International Dark Skies Association. This is a huge achievement, and follows three years of work by park authorities, local astronomers, lighting engineers and the resident community. Exmoor Dark Sky Reserve follows in the footsteps of Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park, set up in 2009, and Sark Dark Sky Island, established in January 2011.

  19. Dark Skies are a Universal Resource. So are Quiet Skies!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.; Heatherly, S.

    2008-05-01

    You've just purchased your first telescope. But where to set it up? Certainly not a WalMart parking lot. Too much light pollution! In the same way that man-made light obscures our night sky and blinds ground-based optical telescopes, man-made radio signals blind radio telescopes as well. NRAO developed the Quiet Skies project to increase awareness of radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy in general by engaging students in local studies of RFI. To do that we created a sensitive detector which measures RFI. We produced 20 of these, and assembled kits containing detectors and supplementary materials for loan to schools. Students conduct experiments to measure the properties of RFI in their area, and input their measurements into a web-based data base. The Quiet Skies project is a perfect complement to the IYA Dark Skies Awareness initiative. We hope to place 500 Quiet Skies detectors into the field through outreach to museums and schools around the world. Should we be successful, we will sustain this global initiative via a continuing loan program. One day we hope to have a publicly generated image of the Earth which shows RFI much as the Earth at Night image illustrates light pollution. The poster will present the components of the project in detail, including our plans for IYA, and various low-cost alternative strategies for introducing RFI and radio astronomy to the public. We will share the results of some of the experiments already being performed by high school students. Development of the Quiet Skies project was funded by a NASA IDEAS grant. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  20. Dark Skies Rangers - Fighting light pollution and simulating dark skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa; Correia, Nelson; Guerra, Rita; Costa, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Dark Skies Rangers is an awareness program aimed at students of all ages to stimulate them to make an audit of light pollution in their school/district. The young light pollution fighters evaluate the level of light pollution, how much energy is being wasted, and produce a report to be delivered to the local authorities. They are also advised to promote a light pollution awareness campaign to the local community targeting not only the dark skies but also other implications such as effects in our health, to the flora and fauna, etc.

  1. Network based sky Brightness Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Dan; Pulvermacher, R.; Davis, D. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and are currently testing an autonomous 2 channel photometer designed to measure the night sky brightness in the visual wavelengths over a multi-year campaign. The photometer uses a robust silicon sensor filtered with Hoya CM500 glass. The Sky brightness is measured every minute at two elevation angles typically zenith and 20 degrees to monitor brightness and transparency. The Sky Brightness monitor consists of two units, the remote photometer and a network interface. Currently these devices use 2.4 Ghz transceivers with a free space range of 100 meters. The remote unit is battery powered with day time recharging using a solar panel. Data received by the network interface transmits data via standard POP Email protocol. A second version is under development for radio sensitive areas using an optical fiber for data transmission. We will present the current comparison with the National Park Service sky monitoring camera. We will also discuss the calibration methods used for standardization and temperature compensation. This system is expected to be deployed in the next year and be operated by the International Dark Sky Association SKYMONITOR project.

  2. LSST Site: Sky Brightness Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Jamison; Claver, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an upcoming robotic survey telescope. At the telescope site on Cerro Pachon in Chile there are currently three photodiodes and a Canon camera with a fisheye lens, and both the photodiodes and Canon monitor the night sky continuously. The NIST-calibrated photodiodes directly measure the flux from the sky, and the sky brightness can also be obtained from the Canon images via digital aperture photometry. Organizing and combining the two data sets gives nightly information of the development of sky brightness across a swath of the electromagnetic spectrum, from blue to near infrared light, and this is useful for accurately predicting the performance of the LSST. It also provides data for models of moonlight and twilight sky brightness. Code to accomplish this organization and combination was successfully written in Python, but due to the backlog of data not all of the nights were processed by the end of the summer.Burke was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  3. Sky subtraction with fiber spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissandrini, C.; Cristiani, S.; La Franca, F.

    1994-11-01

    The sky-subtraction performance of multifiber spectrographs is discussed, analyzing in detail the case of the OPTOPUS system at the 3.6-m European Space Observatory (ESO) telescope at La Silla. A standard technique, based on flat fields obtained with a uniformly illuminated screen on the dome, provides poor results. A new method has been developed, using the (O I) emission line at 5577 A as a calibrator of the fiber transmittance, taking into account the diffuse light and the influence of each fiber on the adjacent ones, and correcting for the effects of the image distortions on the sky sampling. In this way the accuracy of the sky subtraction improves from 2%-8% to 1.3%-1.6%.

  4. Experiences in the "Sky Classroom"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A. T.

    2006-08-01

    The "Aula del Cel" (valencian for "Sky Classroom") is a project carried out by the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Valencia, Spain. Its aim is teaching and spreading Astronomy to students with ages ranging from 10 to 17. In some cases we also prepare sessions for audiences with special needs, 5 year-old or more than 55 year-old students, or autistic children, for example. In this work we will show different experiences that we have carried out with standard and special groups, not only in our "Sky Classroom" but also in their own educational establishments, used resources and positive (or negative) results we have obtained.

  5. Dark sky enters the lexicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    “Basketbrawl,” “cloud music,” “humblebrag,” and “occupy Wall Street.” These are some of the catchwords and phrases that lexicographer Grant Barrett included in a year-end newspaper column, “Which words will live on?,” in the New York Times on 31 December 2011. Among the couple dozen examples of new language was “dark sky.” Barrett wrote that it “designates a place free of nighttime light pollution. For example, the island of Sark in the English Channel is a dark-sky island.”

  6. The solan digital sky suvey

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.

    1996-01-01

    A description is provided for the planned Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) designed to replace and supplement the Palomar Sky Survey used broadly in cosmology for the past four decades. The SDSS will employ CCD detectors to achieve orders of magnitude increases sensitivity over photographic plates used in the Palomar survey. Described herein are plans for and expected results to be gained from the survey. Detailed descriptions of the design and construction of the SDSS Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, NM. and the spectrographs to be used are also provided.

  7. Dual of big bang and big crunch

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, Dongsu

    2007-01-15

    Starting from the Janus solution and its gauge theory dual, we obtain the dual gauge theory description of the cosmological solution by the procedure of double analytic continuation. The coupling is driven either to zero or to infinity at the big-bang and big-crunch singularities, which are shown to be related by the S-duality symmetry. In the dual Yang-Mills theory description, these are nonsingular as the coupling goes to zero in the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. The cosmological singularities simply signal the failure of the supergravity description of the full type IIB superstring theory.

  8. Implementing Big History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welter, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Contends that world history should be taught as "Big History," a view that includes all space and time beginning with the Big Bang. Discusses five "Cardinal Questions" that serve as a course structure and address the following concepts: perspectives, diversity, change and continuity, interdependence, and causes. (CMK)

  9. Big Ideas in Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how she was able to discover some big ideas about art education. She relates how she found great ideas to improve her teaching from the book "Rethinking Curriculum in Art." She also shares how she designed a "Big Idea" unit in her class.

  10. ATLAS: Big Data in a Small Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denneau, Larry; Tonry, John

    2015-08-01

    For even small telescope projects, the petabyte scale is now upon us. The Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS; Tonry 2011) will robotically survey the entire visible sky from Hawaii multiple times per night to search for near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) on impact trajectories. While the ATLAS optical system is modest by modern astronomical standards -- two 0.5 m F/2.0 telescopes -- each year the ATLAS system will obtain ~103 measurements of 109 astronomical sources to a photometric accuracy of <5%. This ever-growing dataset must be searched in real-time for moving objects then archived for further analysis, and alerts for newly discovered near-Earth NEAs disseminated within tens of minutes from detection. ATLAS's all-sky coverage ensures it will discover many ``rifle shot'' near-misses moving rapidly on the sky as they shoot past the Earth, so the system will need software to automatically detect highly-trailed sources and discriminate them from the thousands of satellites and pieces of space junk that ATLAS will see each night. Additional interrogation will identify interesting phenomena from beyond the solar system occurring over millions of transient sources per night. The data processing and storage requirements for ATLAS demand a ``big data'' approach typical of commercial Internet enterprises. We describe our approach to deploying a nimble, scalable and reliable data processing infrastructure, and promote ATLAS as steppingstone to eventual processing scales in the era of LSST.

  11. Big data for health.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Perez, Javier; Poon, Carmen C Y; Merrifield, Robert D; Wong, Stephen T C; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent developments in big data in the context of biomedical and health informatics. It outlines the key characteristics of big data and how medical and health informatics, translational bioinformatics, sensor informatics, and imaging informatics will benefit from an integrated approach of piecing together different aspects of personalized information from a diverse range of data sources, both structured and unstructured, covering genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, as well as imaging, clinical diagnosis, and long-term continuous physiological sensing of an individual. It is expected that recent advances in big data will expand our knowledge for testing new hypotheses about disease management from diagnosis to prevention to personalized treatment. The rise of big data, however, also raises challenges in terms of privacy, security, data ownership, data stewardship, and governance. This paper discusses some of the existing activities and future opportunities related to big data for health, outlining some of the key underlying issues that need to be tackled. PMID:26173222

  12. Bernhard Schmidt and the Schmidt Telescope for Mapping the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, G.

    Bernhard Voldemar Schmidt (1879--1935) was born in Estonia. He ran an optical workshop in Mittweida, Saxonia, between 1901 and 1927. Astronomers appreciated the quality of his telescopes. Starting in 1925, working freelance in Hamburg Observatory, he developed a short focal length optical system with a large field of view. He succeeded in inventing the ``Schmidt Telescope'' in 1930, which allows the imaging a large field of the sky without any distortions. Shortly after Schmidt's death, the director of the observatory published details on the invention and production of the Schmidt Telescope. After World War II, Schmidt telescopes have been widely used. The first large Schmidt telescope was built in 1948, the ``Big Schmidt'' (126 cm), Mount Palomar, USA. Schmidt telescopes are also important tools for cosmology. The result of the Palomar Observatory Sky Surveys (1949--1958, 1985--1999) is a data base of about 20 million galaxies and over 100 million stars, supplemented in 1971 by the ESO Schmidt for the southern sky. Also high resolution spectrometers can be fitted to the Schmidt telescope. The 80 cm Schmidt telescope of Hamburg Observatory, planned since 1936, finished 1955, is on Calar Alto, Spain, since 1975. Combined with two objective prisms, it was used for a Quasar survey project.

  13. The "All Sky Camera Network"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Andy

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the "All Sky Camera Network" came to life as an outreach program to connect the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS) exhibit "Space Odyssey" with Colorado schools. The network is comprised of cameras placed strategically at schools throughout Colorado to capture fireballs--rare events that produce meteorites. Meteorites have great…

  14. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  15. Sky Observations by the Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Sackes, Mesut

    2008-01-01

    The "National Science Education Standards (NSES)" state that students in grades K-4 are expected to understand that astronomical objects in the sky, including the Sun, Moon, and stars--have properties, locations, and patterns of movement that can be observed and described. They further suggest using an inquiry-based approach to teach these science…

  16. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  17. Big data, big knowledge: big data for personalized healthcare.

    PubMed

    Viceconti, Marco; Hunter, Peter; Hose, Rod

    2015-07-01

    The idea that the purely phenomenological knowledge that we can extract by analyzing large amounts of data can be useful in healthcare seems to contradict the desire of VPH researchers to build detailed mechanistic models for individual patients. But in practice no model is ever entirely phenomenological or entirely mechanistic. We propose in this position paper that big data analytics can be successfully combined with VPH technologies to produce robust and effective in silico medicine solutions. In order to do this, big data technologies must be further developed to cope with some specific requirements that emerge from this application. Such requirements are: working with sensitive data; analytics of complex and heterogeneous data spaces, including nontextual information; distributed data management under security and performance constraints; specialized analytics to integrate bioinformatics and systems biology information with clinical observations at tissue, organ and organisms scales; and specialized analytics to define the "physiological envelope" during the daily life of each patient. These domain-specific requirements suggest a need for targeted funding, in which big data technologies for in silico medicine becomes the research priority. PMID:26218867

  18. The "Ocean" and the Night-Sky: Relations Between the Five-Factor Model of Personality and Noctcaelador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, William E.

    2004-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between noctcaelador, psychological attachment to the night-sky, and the Five-Factor Model of Personality. University students (N = 108) were administered the Noctcaelador Inventory and Saucier's Big-Five Mini-Markers of Personality. Noctcaelador was significantly positively related to Openness to Experience…

  19. BigDog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Playter, R.; Buehler, M.; Raibert, M.

    2006-05-01

    BigDog's goal is to be the world's most advanced quadruped robot for outdoor applications. BigDog is aimed at the mission of a mechanical mule - a category with few competitors to date: power autonomous quadrupeds capable of carrying significant payloads, operating outdoors, with static and dynamic mobility, and fully integrated sensing. BigDog is about 1 m tall, 1 m long and 0.3 m wide, and weighs about 90 kg. BigDog has demonstrated walking and trotting gaits, as well as standing up and sitting down. Since its creation in the fall of 2004, BigDog has logged tens of hours of walking, climbing and running time. It has walked up and down 25 & 35 degree inclines and trotted at speeds up to 1.8 m/s. BigDog has walked at 0.7 m/s over loose rock beds and carried over 50 kg of payload. We are currently working to expand BigDog's rough terrain mobility through the creation of robust locomotion strategies and terrain sensing capabilities.

  20. Big Data in industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latinović, T. S.; Preradović, D. M.; Barz, C. R.; Latinović, M. T.; Petrica, P. P.; Pop-Vadean, A.

    2016-08-01

    The amount of data at the global level has grown exponentially. Along with this phenomena, we have a need for a new unit of measure like exabyte, zettabyte, and yottabyte as the last unit measures the amount of data. The growth of data gives a situation where the classic systems for the collection, storage, processing, and visualization of data losing the battle with a large amount, speed, and variety of data that is generated continuously. Many of data that is created by the Internet of Things, IoT (cameras, satellites, cars, GPS navigation, etc.). It is our challenge to come up with new technologies and tools for the management and exploitation of these large amounts of data. Big Data is a hot topic in recent years in IT circles. However, Big Data is recognized in the business world, and increasingly in the public administration. This paper proposes an ontology of big data analytics and examines how to enhance business intelligence through big data analytics as a service by presenting a big data analytics services-oriented architecture. This paper also discusses the interrelationship between business intelligence and big data analytics. The proposed approach in this paper might facilitate the research and development of business analytics, big data analytics, and business intelligence as well as intelligent agents.

  1. The Big Bang Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-09-30

    The Big Bang is the name of the most respected theory of the creation of the universe. Basically, the theory says that the universe was once smaller and denser and has been expending for eons. One common misconception is that the Big Bang theory says something about the instant that set the expansion into motion, however this isn’t true. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln tells about the Big Bang theory and sketches some speculative ideas about what caused the universe to come into existence.

  2. The new World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Kyba, Christopher C. M.; Portnov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    I present the main steps toward the completion of the new World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness (WA II) and some results. The computational technique has been updated, in comparison to the first World Atlas, to take into account both sources and sites elevation. The elevation data are from USGS GTOPO30 global digital elevation model, with the same pixel size as the WA II maps. The upward emission function used to compute the Atlas is a three parameters function. The parameters can be constrained to the database of Earth based night sky brightness measurements. In this way we can use the better fitting upward function for the final map’s calibration. We maintained constant atmosphere parameters over the entire Earth, identical to those used for the first Atlas (Garstang atmospheric clarity coefficient k=1, equivalent to a vertical extinction at sea level of 0.33 magnitude in the V band). This was done in order to avoid introducing a local bias due to different conditions that may confound the light pollution propagation effects. The radiance data used are those from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day-Night Band (DNB) on board the Suomi NPP satellite. The use of this newly available radiance data allows for an increased real resolution, even while maintaining the same 30"x30" lat-lon pixel size. Anyway, a higher resolution is really appreciable only in the immediate proximity of sources of light pollution (e.g. inside a big city). The VIIRS DNB data used for the input data were chosen from the months ranging from May to September in order to avoid introducing bias from the variable snow coverage in mid to high northern latitudes. In the southern hemisphere this problem is far less pronounced. The WA II takes advantage of the now enormous database of Earth based sky brightness measurements obtained mainly with Sky Quality Meters, but also with CCD measurements.

  3. Sulfur isotope analysis of bitumen and pyrite associated with thermal sulfate reduction in reservoir carbonates at the Big Piney-La Barge production complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Hubert E.; Walters, Clifford C.; Horn, William C.; Zimmer, Mindy; Heines, Maureen M.; Lamberti, William A.; Kliewer, Christine; Pottorf, Robert J.; Macleod, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur isotopes of solid bitumen and associated pyrite from the Madison Limestone in the Big Piney-La Barge production complex were measured using a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method. The solid bitumens, a product of thermochemical sulfate reduction, yielded δ34S values of +18.9 ± 3.9 that are consistent with inferred values for native Mississippian sulfate. In contrast, coarse and fine grain pyrite grains were found to be 34S depleted, with values similar to that of the produced H2S (δ34S ∼ +10‰). We interpret these results to indicate that two different sources of sulfate were involved with TSR within the Madison Limestone-autochthonous anhydrite, which is now completely replaced with calcite, and Permian age sulfate dissolved in the aquifer. While checking for inclusions within the bitumen that could lead to erroneous measurement, we found the bitumen possesses a ∼5 μm rim and internal “worm-like” features enriched in organic sulfur. We hypothesize that the rim is the result of back reaction of the late forming H2S with the solid bitumen and that the <1 μm diameter wormy features may result from liquid-liquid immiscibility occurring at the high temperatures of formation.

  4. Putting Together a Blue Sky: Laying the Foundation for Staff Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searcy, Jeny

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation time can be like putting together a 5,000-piece jigsaw puzzle that is all sky--what, exactly, is the point? When all is said and done, one ends up with a big blue blob--nothing to show for all the effort. However, it doesn't have to be that way. Performance reviews can and should be an effective means of communication for both parties…

  5. The Big Bang Singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Eric

    The big bang theory is a model of the universe which makes the striking prediction that the universe began a finite amount of time in the past at the so called "Big Bang singularity." We explore the physical and mathematical justification of this surprising result. After laying down the framework of the universe as a spacetime manifold, we combine physical observations with global symmetrical assumptions to deduce the FRW cosmological models which predict a big bang singularity. Next we prove a couple theorems due to Stephen Hawking which show that the big bang singularity exists even if one removes the global symmetrical assumptions. Lastly, we investigate the conditions one needs to impose on a spacetime if one wishes to avoid a singularity. The ideas and concepts used here to study spacetimes are similar to those used to study Riemannian manifolds, therefore we compare and contrast the two geometries throughout.

  6. The Alphabet and the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeuf, A.

    2011-06-01

    Since the beginning of the 17th century the letters of the Greek alphabet are used to identify the stars of constellation by order of magnitude. This was simply a practical means of astronomical classification. In several instances the Bible uses such metaphors as "The sky rolled up like a scroll". The idea of associating letters of different alphabets with stars, constellations and the sky in general can be found to day in the marginal subculture. The persistence of such an association of writing with astronomy or cosmology is at least of interest for cultural reasons, but the problem might be of good interest as well for the history of astronomy and cosmology. I present here two examples of this tradition in works of art. The first a painted representation of the Revelation of Saint John in the Orthodox church tradition, and the other in the construction of the late bronze age sacred well at Santa Cristina in Sardinia, Italy.

  7. Eyeing the Sky's Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, and many like it, are one way NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is measuring trace amounts of water vapor in the atmosphere over far-northern Mars. Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) uses solar filters, or filters designed to image the sun, to make these images. The camera is aimed at the sky for long exposures.

    SSI took this image as a test on June 9, 2008, which was the Phoenix mission's 15th Martian day, or sol, since landing, at 5:20 p.m. local solar time. The camera was pointed about 38 degrees above the horizon. The white dots in the sky are detector dark current that will be removed during image processing and analysis.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space

  8. Update on Dark Sky Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, D. L.

    1998-12-01

    The efforts to protect dark skies for astronomy and for the public are accelerating. An increasing number of cities and states are considering and enacting outdoor lighting control ordinances. Examples of such lighting codes and a model code are available from the International Dark-Sky Association's Web page, at www.darksky.org. There will be a major meeting on Preserving the Astronomical Environment, IAU Symposium #196, co-sponsored by the United Nations, IDA, and others, to be held the week of 12 July 1999 in Vienna, Austria. Further information on this meeting (and others) can also be found on the IDA Web site, which also contains many other resources (and links to other web sites) for those interested in the issues.

  9. The Citizen Sky Planetarium Trailer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R.; Price, A.; Wyatt, R.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) Citizen Sky is a multi-year, citizen science project focusing on the bright variable star e Aurigae. We have developed a six-minute video presentation describing eclipsing binary stars, light curves, and the Citizen Sky project. Designed like a short movie trailer, the video can be shown at planetariums before their regular, feature shows or integrated into a longer presentation. The trailer is available in a wide range of formats for viewing on laptops all the way up to state-of-the-art planetariums. The show is narrated by Timothy Ferris and was produced by the Morrison Planetarium and Visualization Studio at the California Academy of Sciences. This project has been made possible by the National Science Foundation.

  10. Simplified night sky display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A portable structure, simply constructed with inexpensive and generally lightweight materials, for displaying a selected portion of the night sky and selected planets, satellites, comets and other astronomically observable objects that are visually perceptible within that portion of the night sky. The structure includes a computer having stored signals representing the observable objects, an image projector that converts and projects the stored signals as visually perceptible images, a first curvilinear light-reflecting surface to receive and reflect the visually perceptible images, and a second curvilinear surface to receive and display the visually perceptible images reflected from the first surface. The images may be motionless or may move with passage of time. In one embodiment, the structure includes an inflatable screen surface that receives gas in an enclosed volume, supports itself without further mechanical support, and optionally self-regulates pressure of the received gas within the enclosed volume.

  11. A New Sky Brightness Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, David L.; McKenna, D.

    2006-12-01

    A good estimate of sky brightness and its variations throughout the night, the months, and even the years is an essential bit of knowledge both for good observing and especially as a tool in efforts to minimize sky brightness through local action. Hence a stable and accurate monitor can be a valuable and necessary tool. We have developed such a monitor, with the financial help of Vatican Observatory and Walker Management. The device is now undergoing its Beta test in preparation for production. It is simple, accurate, well calibrated, and automatic, sending its data directly to IDA over the internet via E-mail . Approximately 50 such monitors will be ready soon for deployment worldwide including most major observatories. Those interested in having one should enquire of IDA about details.

  12. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380-760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  13. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  14. Astronomy Education Under Dark Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecylia Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    We have been providing professional support for the high school students and the astronomy teachers since 2007. Our efforts include organizing astronomy events that take from several hours, like, e.g., watching the transit of Venus, to several days, like the workshops organized in the framework of the projects 'School Workshops on Astronomy' (SWA) and 'Wygasz'.The SWA and Wygasz workshops include presentations by experts in astronomy and space science research, presentations prepared by students being supervised by those experts, hands-on interactive experience in the amateur astrophotography, various pencil-and-paper exercises, and other practical activities. We pay particular attention to familiarize the teachers and students with the idea and the necessity of protecting the dark sky. The format of these events allows also for some time for teachers to share ideas and best practices in teaching astronomy.All those activities are organized either in the Izera Dark-Sky Park in Poland or in other carefuly selected locations in which the beauty of the dark night sky can be appreciated.

  15. The all sky automated survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pojmański, G.

    2014-03-01

    The All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) is a realization of a Bohdan Paczynski idea of using small and inexpensive telescopes to survey and monitor bright objects in the sky. ASAS uses off-the-shelf telephoto lenses and CCD cameras attached to the custom made parallactic mounts to investigate as many objects in the sky as feasible with current technology and the available funds. We have demonstrated that among stars brighter than 13 magnitude 80% of variable stars remained unknown. Most of these stars are too bright for a 1-meter class telescopes, so 7-15 cm diameter lenses are ideal tools for detecting and monitoring them. During over ten years of observations a huge number of photometric measurements of almost 40,000,000 stars has been collected. Only part of this dataset has been analyzed so far - we have released catalogs of 50,000 variable stars south of declination +28. Recently, we have expanded ASAS towards fainter objects - the ASAS-SN project aims for detecting in real time supernovae in nearby galaxies as well as many transient events in the Milky Way.

  16. The ADS All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Alyssa

    We will create the first interactive sky map of astronomers' understanding of the Universe over time. We will accomplish this goal by turning the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), widely known for its unrivaled value as a literature resource, into a data resource. GIS and GPS systems have made it commonplace to see and explore information about goings-on on Earth in the context of maps and timelines. Our proposal shows an example of a program that lets a user explore which countries have been mentioned in the New York Times, on what dates, and in what kinds of articles. By analogy, the goal of our project is to enable this kind of exploration-on the sky-for the full corpus of astrophysical literature available through ADS. Our group's expertise and collaborations uniquely position us to create this interactive sky map of the literature, which we call the "ADS All-Sky Survey." To create this survey, here are the principal steps we need to follow. First, by analogy to "geotagging," we will "astrotag," the ADS literature. Many "astrotags" effectively already exist, thanks to curation efforts at both CDS and NED. These efforts have created links to "source" positions on the sky associated with each of the millions of articles in the ADS. Our collaboration with ADS and CDS will let us automatically extract astrotags for all existing and future ADS holdings. The new ADS Labs, which our group helps to develop, includes the ability for researchers to filter article search results using a variety of "facets" (e.g. sources, keywords, authors, observatories, etc.). Using only extracted astrotags and facets, we can create functionality like what is described in the Times example above: we can offer a map of the density of positions' "mentions" on the sky, filterable by the properties of those mentions. Using this map, researchers will be able to interactively, visually, discover what regions have been studied for what reasons, at what times, and by whom. Second, where

  17. Beyond the Big Leaf: Quantifying Interactions between Canopy Structure and Canopy Photosynthesis Using Isotopic Partitioning of Net Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of CO2 in a Temperate Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asirwatham, J.; Wehr, R. A.; Saleska, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of the forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon isotopes can be used to partition the net total carbon exchange (measured by standard eddy covariance) into its photosynthetic and respiratory components. This partitioning requires an estimate of the isotopic signature of canopy-scale photosynthesis, which has been obtained to date by assuming that the canopy behaves like a single 'big leaf'. This assumption neglects the heterogeneity of the canopy both vertically and with respect to leaf angles: leaves at various heights and angles experience different sunlight, temperature, and wind, and are physiologically different as well. In order to explore errors associated with the big leaf assumption, we applied a big leaf isotopic partitioning algorithm to canopy-scale net fluxes of 13CO2, 12CO2, heat, and water generated by a multi-leaf isotopic canopy simulation. The simulation included micro-environmental heterogeneity produced by the canopy geometry (leaf angles and arrangement) as well as physiological variation among leaves, invoking leaf-level energy balance to determine leaf temperatures. Leaf behavior in the simulation was parameterized by leaf-level gas-exchange measurements of the relevant characteristics of a range of leaves in the canopy (e.g. limiting photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance, daytime respiration). These measurements indicated that photosynthetic capacity increased with height in the canopy, but that within a given canopy layer, leaf behavior showed surprisingly little variability. They also indicated that stomatal conductance did not relate quasi-linearly to light or photosynthetic rate, but was instead roughly constant with light at all photosynthetic photon flux densities above 100 μE m-2 s-1. The multi-leaf simulation incorporating these leaf behaviors suggested that the big leaf assumption is valid under diffuse light conditions but can lead to significant errors under clear sky conditions.

  18. How Big Are "Martin's Big Words"? Thinking Big about the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." tells of King's childhood determination to use "big words" through biographical information and quotations. In this lesson, students in grades 3 to 5 explore information on Dr. King to think about his "big" words, then they write about their own "big" words and dreams. During the one…

  19. The big data-big model (BDBM) challenges in ecological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The field of ecology has become a big-data science in the past decades due to development of new sensors used in numerous studies in the ecological community. Many sensor networks have been established to collect data. For example, satellites, such as Terra and OCO-2 among others, have collected data relevant on global carbon cycle. Thousands of field manipulative experiments have been conducted to examine feedback of terrestrial carbon cycle to global changes. Networks of observations, such as FLUXNET, have measured land processes. In particular, the implementation of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), which is designed to network different kinds of sensors at many locations over the nation, will generate large volumes of ecological data every day. The raw data from sensors from those networks offer an unprecedented opportunity for accelerating advances in our knowledge of ecological processes, educating teachers and students, supporting decision-making, testing ecological theory, and forecasting changes in ecosystem services. Currently, ecologists do not have the infrastructure in place to synthesize massive yet heterogeneous data into resources for decision support. It is urgent to develop an ecological forecasting system that can make the best use of multiple sources of data to assess long-term biosphere change and anticipate future states of ecosystem services at regional and continental scales. Forecasting relies on big models that describe major processes that underlie complex system dynamics. Ecological system models, despite great simplification of the real systems, are still complex in order to address real-world problems. For example, Community Land Model (CLM) incorporates thousands of processes related to energy balance, hydrology, and biogeochemistry. Integration of massive data from multiple big data sources with complex models has to tackle Big Data-Big Model (BDBM) challenges. Those challenges include interoperability of multiple

  20. Derivation of sky quality indicators from photometrically calibrated all-sky image mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.; Moore, Chadwick A.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.

    2015-08-01

    A large database of high resolution all-sky measurements of V-band night sky brightness at sites in U.S. National Parks and astronomical observatories is utilized to describe sky quality over a wide geographic area. Mosaics of photometrically calibrated V-band imagery are processed with a semi-automated procedure to reveal the effects of artificial sky glow through graphical presentation and numeric indicators of artificial sky brightness. Comparison with simpler methods such as the use of the Unihedron SQM and naked eye limiting magnitude reveal that areas near the horizon, which are not typically captured with single-channel measurements, contribute significantly to the indicators maximum vertical illuminance, maximum sky luminance, and average all-sky luminance. Distant sources of sky glow may represent future threats to areas of the sky nearer the zenith. Timely identification and quantification of these threats may allow mitigating strategies to be implemented.

  1. The NRAO VLA Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Greisen, E. W.; Perley, R. A.; Yin, Q. F.; Broderick, J. J.

    1993-12-01

    The NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) is mapping the entire sky north of delta = -40deg at nu = 1.4GHz. A grid of over 2*E(5) partially overlapping snapshot maps will be mosaiced to yield sets of 2326 4deg times 4deg corrected sky images in each of the Stokes parameters I, Q, and U with theta = 45'' FWHM resolution and a nearly uniform 6sigma detection limit S_P ~ 2mJybeam(-1) ~ 0.6K. These images should contain about 2*E(6) extragalactic sources, including luminous radio galaxies and quasars, most of the galaxies found by IRAS at lambda = 60microns, ultraluminous starburst galaxies and protogalaxies even at cosmological distances, as well as statistically useful numbers N >> sqrt {N} of nearby (z << 1) normal galaxies and low-luminosity AGN. Their rms position uncertainties will range from <1'' for S > 10mJy to ~ 5'' at S=2mJy. The NVSS is being made as a service to the astronomical community. We claim no proprietary rights to either the raw data or the finished products because we believe that the full scientific potential of such a large survey will not be realized until all astronomers can use it. The principal data products will be the 4deg times4 deg mosaiced images in FITS format plus ASCII tables of discrete source parameters. They will be released via anonymous ftp (ftp 192.33.115.53, login anonymous, password = your name, cd vlass) as soon as they are made. To guarantee equal access for all users, we will use only those images that have been placed in this open directory for our own research. The NRAO is operated by Associated Universities, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  2. Simplified Night Sky Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    A document describes a simple night sky display system that is portable, lightweight, and includes, at most, four components in its simplest configuration. The total volume of this system is no more than 10(sup 6) cm(sup 3) in a disassembled state, and weighs no more than 20 kilograms. The four basic components are a computer, a projector, a spherical light-reflecting first surface and mount, and a spherical second surface for display. The computer has temporary or permanent memory that contains at least one signal representing one or more images of a portion of the sky when viewed from an arbitrary position, and at a selected time. The first surface reflector is spherical and receives and reflects the image from the projector onto the second surface, which is shaped like a hemisphere. This system may be used to simulate selected portions of the night sky, preserving the appearance and kinesthetic sense of the celestial sphere surrounding the Earth or any other point in space. These points will then show motions of planets, stars, galaxies, nebulae, and comets that are visible from that position. The images may be motionless, or move with the passage of time. The array of images presented, and vantage points in space, are limited only by the computer software that is available, or can be developed. An optional approach is to have the screen (second surface) self-inflate by means of gas within the enclosed volume, and then self-regulate that gas in order to support itself without any other mechanical support.

  3. NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies' In this animation we see how the ear converts pressure waves into something the brain can perceive as 'sound' NASA engineers and scientists are trying to design airplanes to run as quietly as cars. In this program, students will learn the basics: what sound is, what makes sound, how sound affects us and the environment, and how we measure sound. They will also learn some of the techniques being used by NASA to reduce aircraft noise. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the creation, visualization, and measurement of sound.

  4. NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies' Brenda Sullivan, a psychoacoustician, explains how she researces peoples responses to noise with the help of binaural recordings made inside aircraft. NASA engineers and scientists are trying to design airplanes to run as quietly as cars. In this program, students will learn the basics: what sound is, what makes sound, how sound affects us and the environment, and how we measure sound. They will also learn some of the techniques being used by NASA to reduce aircraft noise. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the creation, visualization, and measurement of sound.

  5. Big Questions: Missing Antimatter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    Einstein's equation E = mc2 is often said to mean that energy can be converted into matter. More accurately, energy can be converted to matter and antimatter. During the first moments of the Big Bang, the universe was smaller, hotter and energy was everywhere. As the universe expanded and cooled, the energy converted into matter and antimatter. According to our best understanding, these two substances should have been created in equal quantities. However when we look out into the cosmos we see only matter and no antimatter. The absence of antimatter is one of the Big Mysteries of modern physics. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains the problem, although doesn't answer it. The answer, as in all Big Mysteries, is still unknown and one of the leading research topics of contemporary science.

  6. Big Questions: Missing Antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-08-27

    Einstein's equation E = mc2 is often said to mean that energy can be converted into matter. More accurately, energy can be converted to matter and antimatter. During the first moments of the Big Bang, the universe was smaller, hotter and energy was everywhere. As the universe expanded and cooled, the energy converted into matter and antimatter. According to our best understanding, these two substances should have been created in equal quantities. However when we look out into the cosmos we see only matter and no antimatter. The absence of antimatter is one of the Big Mysteries of modern physics. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains the problem, although doesn't answer it. The answer, as in all Big Mysteries, is still unknown and one of the leading research topics of contemporary science.

  7. Big data in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fabricio F

    2014-04-01

    The increasing availability and growth rate of biomedical information, also known as 'big data', provides an opportunity for future personalized medicine programs that will significantly improve patient care. Recent advances in information technology (IT) applied to biomedicine are changing the landscape of privacy and personal information, with patients getting more control of their health information. Conceivably, big data analytics is already impacting health decisions and patient care; however, specific challenges need to be addressed to integrate current discoveries into medical practice. In this article, I will discuss the major breakthroughs achieved in combining omics and clinical health data in terms of their application to personalized medicine. I will also review the challenges associated with using big data in biomedicine and translational science. PMID:24183925

  8. Bayesian big bang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2011-09-01

    We show that the flow of particles corresponding to Bayes' rule has a number of striking similarities with the big bang, including cosmic inflation and cosmic acceleration. We derive a PDE for this flow using a log-homotopy from the prior probability density to the posteriori probability density. We solve this PDE using the gradient of the solution to Poisson's equation, which is computed using an exact Green's function and the standard Monte Carlo approximation of integrals. The resulting flow is analogous to Coulomb's law in electromagnetics. We have used no physics per se to derive this flow, but rather we have only used Bayes' rule and the definition of normalized probability and a loghomotopy parameter that could be interpreted as time. The details of this big bang resemble very recent theories much more closely than the so-called new inflation models, which postulate enormous inflation immediately after the big bang.

  9. MSDS sky reference and preamplifier study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, L.; Stewart, S.; Lambeck, P.

    1974-01-01

    The major goals in re-designing the Multispectral Scanner and Data System (MSDS) sky reference are: (1) to remove the sun-elevation angle and aircraft-attitude angle dependence from the solar-sky illumination measurement, and (2) to obtain data on the optical state of the atmosphere. The present sky reference is dependent on solar elevation and provides essentially no information on important atmospheric parameters. Two sky reference designs were tested. One system is built around a hyperbolic mirror and the reflection approach. A second approach to a sky reference utilizes a fish-eye lens to obtain a 180 deg field of view. A detailed re-design of the present sky reference around the fish-eye approach, even with its limitations, is recommended for the MSDS system. A preamplifier study was undertaken to find ways of improving the noise-equivalent reflectance by reducing the noise level for silicon detector channels on the MSDS.

  10. Nightscape Photography Reclaims the Natural Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafreshi, Babak

    2015-08-01

    Nightscape photos and timelapse videos, where the Earth & sky are framed together with an astronomical purpose, support the dark skies activities by improving public awareness. TWAN or The World at Night program (www.twanight.org) presents the world's best collection of such landscape astrophotos and aims to introduce the night sky as a part of nature, an essential element of our living environment besides being the astronomers lab. The nightscape images also present views of our civilizations landmarks, both natural and historic sites, against the night-time backdrop of stars, planets, and celestial events. In this context TWAN is a bridge between art, science and culture.TWAN images contribute to programs such as the Dark Sky Parks by the International Dark Sky Association or Starlight reserves by assisting local efforts in better illustrating their dark skies and by producing stunning images that not only educate the local people on their night sky heritage also communicate with the governments that are responsible to support the dark sky area.Since 2009 TWAN organizes the world's largest annual photo contest on nightscape imaging, in collaboration with the Dark Skies Awareness, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and Astronomers Without Borders. The International Earth & Sky Photo Contest promotes the photography that documents the beauty of natural skies against the problem of light pollution. In 2014 the entries received from about 50 countries and the contest result news was widely published in the most popular sources internationally.*Babak A. Tafreshi is a photographer and science communicator. He is the creator of The World At Night program, and a contributing photographer to the National Geographic, Sky&Telescope magazine, and the European Southern Observatory. http://twanight.org/tafreshi

  11. Far infrared all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    An all-sky survey at submillimeter waves is examined. Far-infrared all-sky surveys were performed using high-thoroughput bolometric detectors from a one-meter balloon telescope. Based on the large-bodied experience obtained with the original all-sky survey telescope, a number of radically different approaches were implemented. Continued balloon measurements of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background were performed.

  12. ATLAS: Big Data in a Small Package?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denneau, Larry

    2016-01-01

    For even small astronomy projects, the petabyte scale is now upon us. The Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (Tonry 2011) will survey the entire visible sky from Hawaii multiple times per night to search for near-Earth asteroids on impact trajectories. While the ATLAS optical system is modest by modern astronomical standards - two 0.5 m F/2.0 telescopes - each night the ATLAS system will measure nearly 109 astronomical sources to a photometric accuracy of <5%, totaling 1012 individual observations over its initial 3-year mission. This ever-growing dataset must be searched in real-time for moving objects and transients then archived for further analysis, and alerts for newly discovered near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) disseminated within tens of minutes from detection. ATLAS's all-sky coverage ensures it will discover many `rifle shot' near-misses moving rapidly on the sky as they shoot past the Earth, so the system will need software to automatically detect highly-trailed sources and discriminate them from the thousands of low-Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites ATLAS will see each night. Additional interrogation will identify interesting phenomena from millions of transient sources per night beyond the solar system. The data processing and storage requirements for ATLAS demand a `big data' approach typical of commercial internet enterprises. We describe our experience in deploying a nimble, scalable and reliable data processing infrastructure, and suggest ATLAS as steppingstone to data processing capability needed as we enter the era of LSST.

  13. Finesky -- removing higher order sky residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Grumm, David

    2010-07-01

    We report on a new IRAF task called finesky that removes higher order sky residuals in NICMOS images by creating a masked median image of the observed sky. This median sky image is thereafter subtracted from the science images. A residual signal after image processing using the calibration software calnica may be present due to reference files that do not sufficiently match the conditions of the observations. This includes a slight mismatch in the dark current or the flat-field corrections. The task described here can also used to create sky flat-field images.

  14. Daytime Water Detection Based on Sky Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo; Matthies, Larry; Bellutta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    A water body s surface can be modeled as a horizontal mirror. Water detection based on sky reflections and color variation are complementary. A reflection coefficient model suggests sky reflections dominate the color of water at ranges > 12 meters. Water detection based on sky reflections: (1) geometrically locates the pixel in the sky that is reflecting on a candidate water pixel on the ground (2) predicts if the ground pixel is water based on color similarity and local terrain features. Water detection has been integrated on XUVs.

  15. Thinking Big, Aiming High

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Viv

    2010-01-01

    What do teachers, providers and policymakers need to do in order to support disabled learners to "think big and aim high"? That was the question put to delegates at NIACE's annual disability conference. Some clear themes emerged, with delegates raising concerns about funding, teacher training, partnership-working and employment for disabled…

  16. The Big Empty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Richard; Smith, Shelley; Tisdale, Mary

    1995-01-01

    Discusses "The Big Empty" or, the Great Basin. Suggests that it is not empty but rather a great ecosystem rich in plants, animals, and minerals. Presents information and activities to guide students in exploring the Great Basin in order to understand the ways in which such an arid and seemingly harsh environment can support so many living things.…

  17. A Sobering Big Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wineburg, Sam

    2006-01-01

    Since Susan Adler, Alberta Dougan, and Jesus Garcia like "big ideas," the author offers one to ponder: young people in this country can not read with comprehension. The saddest thing about this crisis is that it is no secret. The 2001 results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) for reading, published in every major newspaper,…

  18. The Big Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLisle, Rebecca; Hargis, Jace

    2005-01-01

    The Killer Whale, Shamu jumps through hoops and splashes tourists in hopes for the big fish, not because of passion, desire or simply the enjoyment of doing so. What would happen if those fish were obsolete? Would this killer whale be able to find the passion to continue to entertain people? Or would Shamu find other exciting activities to do…

  19. Big Bang Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theory which asserts that the universe originated a finite time ago by expanding from an infinitely compressed state. According to this model, space, time and matter originated together, and the universe has been expanding ever since. Key stages in the history of the Big Bang universe are summarized below....

  20. A Big Bang Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  1. Big-City Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to implementing innovative classroom technology programs, urban school districts face significant challenges stemming from their big-city status. These range from large bureaucracies, to scalability, to how to meet the needs of a more diverse group of students. Because of their size, urban districts tend to have greater distance…

  2. Big Enough for Everyone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coote, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The UK's coalition government wants to build a "Big Society." The Prime Minister says "we are all in this together" and building it is the responsibility of every citizen as well as every government department. The broad vision is welcome, but everything depends on how the vision is translated into policy and practice. The government aims to put…

  3. The big bang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    Our universe was born billions of years ago in a hot, violent explosion of elementary particles and radiation - the big bang. What do we know about this ultimate moment of creation, and how do we know it? Drawing upon the latest theories and technology, this new edition of The big bang, is a sweeping, lucid account of the event that set the universe in motion. Joseph Silk begins his story with the first microseconds of the big bang, on through the evolution of stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, quasars, and into the distant future of our universe. He also explores the fascinating evidence for the big bang model and recounts the history of cosmological speculation. Revised and updated, this new edition features all the most recent astronomical advances, including: Photos and measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE), and Infrared Space Observatory; the latest estimates of the age of the universe; new ideas in string and superstring theory; recent experiments on neutrino detection; new theories about the presence of dark matter in galaxies; new developments in the theory of the formation and evolution of galaxies; the latest ideas about black holes, worm holes, quantum foam, and multiple universes.

  4. Business and Science - Big Data, Big Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, A.

    2013-12-01

    Data Science is more than the creation, manipulation, and transformation of data. It is more than Big Data. The business world seems to have a hold on the term 'data science' and, for now, they define what it means. But business is very different than science. In this talk, I address how large datasets, Big Data, and data science are conceptually different in business and science worlds. I focus on the types of questions each realm asks, the data needed, and the consequences of findings. Gone are the days of datasets being created or collected to serve only one purpose or project. The trick with data reuse is to become familiar enough with a dataset to be able to combine it with other data and extract accurate results. As a Data Curator for the Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS), my specialty is communication. Our team enables Arctic sciences by ensuring datasets are well documented and can be understood by reusers. Previously, I served as a data community liaison for the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP). Again, my specialty was communicating complex instructions and ideas to a broad audience of data users. Before entering the science world, I was an entrepreneur. I have a bachelor's degree in economics and a master's degree in environmental social science. I am currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Geography. Because my background has embraced both the business and science worlds, I would like to share my perspectives on data, data reuse, data documentation, and the presentation or communication of findings. My experiences show that each can inform and support the other.

  5. Big Data and Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pence, Harry E.; Williams, Antony J.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of computerized information that organizations collect and process is growing so large that the term Big Data is commonly being used to describe the situation. Accordingly, Big Data is defined by a combination of the Volume, Variety, Velocity, and Veracity of the data being processed. Big Data tools are already having an impact in…

  6. For Spacious Skies: A Teacher's Guide. An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Sky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    For Spacious Skies, Inc., Lexington, MA.

    Despite the fact that the sky is the most dominant feature of our surroundings, it plays the role of an unseen background for many objects. It is the intent of this guide to bring about an awareness of the sky to young people. Topics for activities include: (1) "Sky Awareness"; (2) "Compass"; (3) "Hand Lens"; (4) "Prism"; (5) "Binoculars"; (6)…

  7. For Spacious Skies Activity Guide. An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Sky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, C. Whitney; Borden, Jack

    Despite the fact that the sky is the most dominant feature of our surroundings, it plays the role of an unseen background for may objects. It is the intent of this guide to bring about an awareness of the sky to young people. Topics for activities include: (1) "Sky Awareness"; (2) "Compass"; (3) "Hand Lens"; (4) "Prism"; (5) "Binoculars"; (6)…

  8. The High Time Resolution Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, D.

    2013-11-01

    each orbit, PSR J1729-2117 which is an unusual isolated recycled pulsar, and PSR J2322-2650 which has a companion of very low mass - just 7 × 10^{-4} {M}_{⊙}, amongst others. I begin this thesis with the study of these pulsars and discuss their histories. In addition, I demonstrate that optical observations of the companions to some of the newly discovered pulsars in the High Time Resolution Universe survey may result in a measurement of their age and that of the pulsar. I have discovered five new extragalactic single radio bursts, confirming them as an astronomical population. These appear to occur frequently, with a rate of 1.0^{+0.6}_{-0.5} × 10^4 sky^{-1} day^{-1}. The sources are likely at cosmological distances - with redshifts between 0.45 and 1.45, making them more than half way to the Big Bang in the most distant case. This implies their luminosities must be enormous, 10^{31} to 10^{33} J emitted in just a few milliseconds. Their source is unknown but I present an analysis of the options. I also perform a population simulation of the bursts which demonstrates how their intrinsic spectrum could be measured, even for unlocalised FRBs: early indications are that the spectral index of FRBs < 0.

  9. AmeriFlux US-SO4 Sky Oaks- New Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, Walt

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SO4 Sky Oaks- New Stand. Site Description - The Sky Oaks New site is located near the Sky Oaks Field station, owned and operated by San Diego State University. Chaparral vegetation, associated with a Mediterranean climate, covers nearly half of the rough and rocky terrain. Precipitation is almost exclusively confined to the winter months. During the summer and early fall, hot and dry Santa Ana winds from the northeast bring desert heat to the site. A high intensity natural wildfire occurred in approximately 1905. Physical characteristics prior to the 1905 burn are unknown, including stand age and canopy height. Currently, the Sky Oaks New site is an excellent representation of an old-growth chaparral ecosystem, with a canopy height of 2.3 m and chamise-dominated overstory.

  10. Photometric indicators of visual night sky quality derived from all-sky brightness maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2016-09-01

    Wide angle or fisheye cameras provide a high resolution record of artificial sky glow, which results from the scattering of escaped anthropogenic light by the atmosphere, over the sky vault in the moonless nocturnal environment. Analysis of this record yields important indicators of the extent and severity of light pollution. The following indicators were derived through numerical analysis of all-sky brightness maps: zenithal, average all-sky, median, brightest, and darkest sky brightness. In addition, horizontal and vertical illuminance, resulting from sky brightness were computed. A natural reference condition to which the anthropogenic component may be compared is proposed for each indicator, based upon an iterative analysis of a high resolution natural sky model. All-sky brightness data, calibrated in the V band by photometry of standard stars and converted to luminance, from 406 separate data sets were included in an exploratory analysis. Of these, six locations representing a wide range of severity of impact from artificial sky brightness were selected as examples and examined in detail. All-sky average brightness is the most unbiased indicator of impact to the environment, and is more sensitive and accurate in areas of slight to moderate light pollution impact than zenith brightness. Maximum vertical illuminance provides an excellent indicator of impacts to wilderness character, as does measures of the brightest portions of the sky. Zenith brightness, the workhorse of field campaigns, is compared to the other indicators and found to correlate well with horizontal illuminance, especially at relatively bright sites. The median sky brightness describes a brightness threshold for the upper half of the sky, of importance to telescopic optical astronomy. Numeric indicators, in concert with all-sky brightness maps, provide a complete assessment of visual sky quality at a site.

  11. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  12. Bright Meteor Lights Up Atlanta Skies

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a very bright meteor that streaked over the skies of Atlanta, Ga., on the night of Aug. 28, 2011. The view is from an all sky camera in Cartersville, Ga., operated by NASA’s Mars...

  13. SkyMapper Early Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Christian; Onken, Christopher; Schmidt, Brian; Bessell, Michael; Da Costa, Gary; Luvaul, Lance; Mackey, Dougal; Murphy, Simon; White, Marc; SkyMapper Team

    2016-05-01

    The SkyMapper Early Data Release (EDR) is the initial data release from the SkyMapper Southern Survey, which aims to create a deep, multi-epoch, multi-band photometric data set for the entire southern sky. EDR covers approximately 6700 sq. deg. (one-third) of the southern sky as obtained by the Short Survey component of the project. All included fields have at least two visits in good conditions in all six SkyMapper filters (uvgriz). Object catalogues are complete to magnitude 17-18, depending on filter. IVOA-complaint table access protocol (TAP), cone search and simple image access protocol (SIAP) services are available from the SkyMapper website (http://skymapper.anu.edu.au/), as well as through tools such as TOPCAT. Data are restricted to Australian astronomers and their collaborators for twelve months from the release date. Further details on the reduction of SkyMapper data, along with data quality improvements, will be released in late 2016 as part of SkyMapper Data Release 1 (DR1).

  14. A holographic big bang?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshordi, N.; Mann, R. B.; Pourhasan, R.

    2015-11-01

    We present a cosmological model in which the Universe emerges out of the collapse of a five-dimensional (5D) star as a spherical three-brane. The initial singularity of the big bang becomes hidden behind a causal horizon. Near scale-invariant primordial curvature perturbations can be induced on the brane via a thermal atmosphere that is in equilibrium with the brane, circumventing the need for a separate inflationary process and providing an important test of the model.

  15. DARPA's Big Mechanism program.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Paul R

    2015-07-01

    Reductionist science produces causal models of small fragments of complicated systems. Causal models of entire systems can be hard to construct because what is known of them is distributed across a vast amount of literature. The Big Mechanism program aims to have machines read the literature and assemble the causal fragments found in individual papers into huge causal models, automatically. The current domain of the program is cell signalling associated with Ras-driven cancers. PMID:26178259

  16. DARPA's Big Mechanism program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Paul R.

    2015-07-01

    Reductionist science produces causal models of small fragments of complicated systems. Causal models of entire systems can be hard to construct because what is known of them is distributed across a vast amount of literature. The Big Mechanism program aims to have machines read the literature and assemble the causal fragments found in individual papers into huge causal models, automatically. The current domain of the program is cell signalling associated with Ras-driven cancers.

  17. Big3. Editorial

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christoph U.; Séroussi, Brigitte; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To provide an editorial introduction into the 2014 IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics with an overview of the content, the new publishing scheme, and upcoming 25th anniversary. Methods A brief overview of the 2014 special topic, Big Data - Smart Health Strategies, and an outline of the novel publishing model is provided in conjunction with a call for proposals to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Yearbook. Results ‘Big Data’ has become the latest buzzword in informatics and promise new approaches and interventions that can improve health, well-being, and quality of life. This edition of the Yearbook acknowledges the fact that we just started to explore the opportunities that ‘Big Data’ will bring. However, it will become apparent to the reader that its pervasive nature has invaded all aspects of biomedical informatics – some to a higher degree than others. It was our goal to provide a comprehensive view at the state of ‘Big Data’ today, explore its strengths and weaknesses, as well as its risks, discuss emerging trends, tools, and applications, and stimulate the development of the field through the aggregation of excellent survey papers and working group contributions to the topic. Conclusions For the first time in history will the IMIA Yearbook be published in an open access online format allowing a broader readership especially in resource poor countries. For the first time, thanks to the online format, will the IMIA Yearbook be published twice in the year, with two different tracks of papers. We anticipate that the important role of the IMIA yearbook will further increase with these changes just in time for its 25th anniversary in 2016. PMID:24853037

  18. Small turbines, big unknown

    SciTech Connect

    Gipe, P.

    1995-07-01

    While financial markets focus on the wheeling and dealing of the big wind companies, the small wind turbine industry quietly keeps churning out its smaller but effective machines. Some, the micro turbines, are so small they can be carried by hand. Though worldwide sales of small wind turbines fall far short of even one large windpower plant, figures reach $8 million to $10 million annually and could be as much as twice that if batteries and engineering services are included.

  19. The Next Big Idea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract George S. Eisenbarth will remain in our memories as a brilliant scientist and great collaborator. His quest to discover the cause and prevention of type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes started from building predictive models based on immunogenetic markers. Despite his tremendous contributions to our understanding of the natural history of pre-type 1 diabetes and potential mechanisms, George left us with several big questions to answer before his quest is completed. PMID:23786296

  20. Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) is located at the end of a causeway in a mountain lake more than 2 km above sea level. The site has more than 300 sunny days a year and a natural inversion caused by the lake which makes for very clean images. BBSO is the only university observatory in the US making high-resolution observations of the Sun. Its daily images are posted at http://www.bbso.njit.e...

  1. Big Bang Circus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosini, C.

    2011-06-01

    Big Bang Circus is an opera I composed in 2001 and which was premiered at the Venice Biennale Contemporary Music Festival in 2002. A chamber group, four singers and a ringmaster stage the story of the Universe confronting and interweaving two threads: how early man imagined it and how scientists described it. Surprisingly enough fancy, myths and scientific explanations often end up using the same images, metaphors and sometimes even words: a strong tension, a drumskin starting to vibrate, a shout…

  2. Identifying Red Variables in the Northern Sky Variability Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźniak, P. R.; Williams, S. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Gupta, V.

    2004-12-01

    We present a catalog of 8678 slowly varying stars with near-infrared colors corresponding to the evolved asymptotic giant branch population. Objects were selected from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) covering the entire sky above declination δ=-38deg in a single unfiltered photometric band corresponding to a V-band magnitude range of ~8-15.5 mag. After quality cuts, the number of measurements for a typical star is approximately 150, but it ranges up to ~1000 for high-declination stars. We show that the use of support vector machines, a modern machine-learning algorithm, can reliably distinguish Mira variables from other types of red variables, namely, semiregular and irregular. We also identify a region of parameter space that is dominated by carbon stars. Our classification is based on period, amplitude, and three independent colors possible with photometry from the NSVS and the Two Micron All Sky Survey. The overall classification accuracy is ~90% despite the relatively short survey baseline of 1 yr and limited set of features. There are 6474 stars in our sample without identifications in the General Catalogue of Variable Stars, which, as such, are most likely new discoveries. Period-amplitude and period-color diagrams of both our previously known and newly identified Mira stars are in good agreement with published studies based on smaller samples. Based on observations obtained with the ROTSE-I Robotic Telescope operated at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  3. Big Data Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bellazzi, Riccardo; Dagliati, Arianna; Sacchi, Lucia; Segagni, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The so-called big data revolution provides substantial opportunities to diabetes management. At least 3 important directions are currently of great interest. First, the integration of different sources of information, from primary and secondary care to administrative information, may allow depicting a novel view of patient’s care processes and of single patient’s behaviors, taking into account the multifaceted nature of chronic care. Second, the availability of novel diabetes technologies, able to gather large amounts of real-time data, requires the implementation of distributed platforms for data analysis and decision support. Finally, the inclusion of geographical and environmental information into such complex IT systems may further increase the capability of interpreting the data gathered and extract new knowledge from them. This article reviews the main concepts and definitions related to big data, it presents some efforts in health care, and discusses the potential role of big data in diabetes care. Finally, as an example, it describes the research efforts carried on in the MOSAIC project, funded by the European Commission. PMID:25910540

  4. SIMULATIONS OF THE MICROWAVE SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Neelima; Bode, Paul; Das, Sudeep; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Huffenberger, Kevin; Lin, Yen-Ting; Trac, Hy

    2010-02-01

    We create realistic, full-sky, half-arcminute resolution simulations of the microwave sky matched to the most recent astrophysical observations. The primary purpose of these simulations is to test the data reduction pipeline for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) experiment; however, we have widened the frequency coverage beyond the ACT bands and utilized the easily accessible HEALPix map format to make these simulations applicable to other current and near future microwave background experiments. Some of the novel features of these simulations are that the radio and infrared galaxy populations are correlated with the galaxy cluster and group populations, the primordial microwave background is lensed by the dark matter structure in the simulation via a ray-tracing code, the contribution to the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signals from galaxy clusters, groups, and the intergalactic medium has been included, and the gas prescription to model the SZ signals has been refined to match the most recent X-ray observations. The cosmology adopted in these simulations is also consistent with the WMAP 5-year parameter measurements. From these simulations we find a slope for the Y{sub 200}-M{sub 200} relation that is only slightly steeper than self-similar, with an intrinsic scatter in the relation of approx14%. Regarding the contamination of cluster SZ flux by radio galaxies, we find for 148 GHz (90 GHz) only 3% (4%) of halos have their SZ decrements contaminated at a level of 20% or more. We find the contamination levels higher for infrared galaxies. However, at 90 GHz, less than 20% of clusters with M{sub 200} > 2.5 x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun} and z < 1.2 have their SZ decrements filled in at a level of 20% or more. At 148 GHz, less than 20% of clusters with M{sub 200} > 2.5 x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun} and z < 0.8 have their SZ decrements filled in at a level of 50% or larger. Our models also suggest that a population of very high flux infrared galaxies, which are

  5. Simulations of the Microwave Sky

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Neelima; Bode, Paul; Das, Sudeep; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Huffenberger, Kevin; Lin, Yen-Ting; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Trac, Hy; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2009-12-16

    We create realistic, full-sky, half-arcminute resolution simulations of the microwave sky matched to the most recent astrophysical observations. The primary purpose of these simulations is to test the data reduction pipeline for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) experiment; however, we have widened the frequency coverage beyond the ACT bands and utilized the easily accessible HEALPix map format to make these simulations applicable to other current and near future microwave background experiments. Some of the novel features of these simulations are that the radio and infrared galaxy populations are correlated with the galaxy cluster and group populations, the primordial microwave background is lensed by the dark matter structure in the simulation via a ray-tracing code, the contribution to the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signals from galaxy clusters, groups, and the intergalactic medium has been included, and the gas prescription to model the SZ signals has been refined to match the most recent X-ray observations. The cosmology adopted in these simulations is also consistent with the WMAP 5-year parameter measurements. From these simulations we find a slope for the Y{sub 200} - M{sub 200} relation that is only slightly steeper than self-similar, with an intrinsic scatter in the relation of {approx} 14%. Regarding the contamination of cluster SZ flux by radio galaxies, we find for 148 GHz (90 GHz) only 3% (4%) of halos have their SZ decrements contaminated at a level of 20% or more. We find the contamination levels higher for infrared galaxies. However, at 90 GHz, less than 20% of clusters with M{sub 200} > 2.5 x 10{sup 14}M{sub {circle_dot}} and z < 1.2 have their SZ decrements filled in at a level of 20% or more. At 148 GHz, less than 20% of clusters with M{sub 200} > 2.5 x 10{sup 14}M{sub {circle_dot}} and z < 0.8 have their SZ decrements filled in at a level of 50% or larger. Our models also suggest that a population of very high flux infrared

  6. The NRAO VLA Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Greisen, E. W.; Yin, Q. F.; Perley, R. A.; Broderick, J. J.

    1996-03-01

    Observations for the 1.4 GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) began in 1993 September and should cover the sky north of -40 deg declination (82% of the celestial sphere) before the end of 1996. The principal data products will be: (1) A set of 2326 continuum map "cubes," each covering 4 deg X 4 deg with three planes containing Stokes I, Q, and U images. These maps were made with a relatively large restoring beam (45 arcsec FWHM) to yield the high surface-brightness sensitivity needed for completeness and photometric accuracy. Their rms brightness fluctuations are about 0.45 mJy/beam = 0.14 K (Stokes I) and 0.29 mJy/beam = 0.09 K (Stokes Q and U). The rms uncertainties in right ascension and declination vary from 0.3 arcsec for strong (S > 30 mJy) point sources to 5 arcsec for the faintest (S = 2.5 mJy) detectable sources. (2) Lists of discrete sources. (3) Processed (u,v) data sets. Every large map was constructed from more than 100 smaller "snapshot" maps. All of the edited and calibrated single-source (u,v) data sets used to make the snapshot maps contributing to each large map have been combined into a single multisource (u,v) file for users who want to investigate the data underlying the large maps. The NVSS is being made as a service to the astronomical community, and the principal data products are being released into a directory accessible by anonymous FTP (nvss.cv.nrao.edu) as soon as they are produced and verified. To ensure equal access for everyone, the NVSS team members have agreed to use only these electronically released results for their own research. Users should read the postscript file "paper.ps" containing a detailed description of the NVSS. Unprocessed data are available on request. If you have any questions, comments, or special requests, please contact Jim Condon by email at Internet address "jcondon@nrao.edu" or by telephone at (804) 296-0322.

  7. Fire in the Sky--From Big Bang to Big Money: Outdoor Education and Sustainable Development. Part One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rod

    1998-01-01

    Within diverse outdoor educational activities, a core experience of connection with the earth balances self, others, and nature with elements of ritual. Most effective when experiential, integrated, and technologically simple, the core experience's educative power lies in awakening awareness of interconnectedness between human and nonhuman life.…

  8. Teaching Chemistry Using October Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goll, James G.; Wilkinson, Lindsay J.; Snell, Dolores M.

    2009-02-01

    The first artificial satellite, Sputnik, was launched over fifty years ago, on October 4, 1957, marking the beginning of the space age. The launch of Sputnik inspired coal miners’ sons in Coalwood, West Virginia, to form a rocket research program. The story of these coal miners’ sons was told by Homer Hickham, Jr., in the book Rocket Boys: A Memoir, and later in the movie adaptation October Sky. Both the book and the movie show the importance of mentoring from a teacher, Frieda Riley, who encouraged the Rocket Boys in their endeavors. The story of the Rocket Boys can be used in science classrooms as a means to teach the scientific process and to create what is termed in both the book and movie as a body of knowledge. Several chemical principles important in the development of rocket propellant systems were depicted in the book and movie. These propellant systems are comparable to those used for the solid rocket boosters used to launch the space shuttles. The use of popular media in the classroom can engage and inspire students and teachers alike.

  9. Pre-Dawn Martian Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    On Sol 39 there were wispy blue clouds in the pre-dawn sky of Mars, as seen by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). The color image was made by taking blue, green, and red images and then combining them into a single color image. The clouds appear to have a bluish side and a greenish side because they moved (in the wind from the northeast) between images. This picture was made an hour and twenty minutes before sunrise -- the sun is not shining directly on the water ice clouds, but they are illuminated by the dawn twilight.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  10. The Sky Brightness Data Archive (SBDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Eric R.; Craine, Erin M.; Craine, Brian L.

    2011-05-01

    Although many astronomers have long been sensitive to issues of light pollution and deteriorating sky quality it is only in recent years that such interest has extended to other groups including, among others, ecologists, health professionals, and urban planners. Issues of light pollution and loss of dark skies are starting to appear in the scientific literature in the context of health and behavior impacts on both human and animal life. Nonetheless, a common deficiency in most such studies is the absence of historical or baseline data against which to compare sky brightness trends and temporal changes. To address this deficiency we have begun to collect a variety of types of quantitative sky brightness data for insertion in an international sky brightness archive that can be accessed for research projects which are dependent upon an understanding of the nature of local light pollution issues. To aid this process we have developed a mobile sky brightness meter which automatically logs sky brightness and observation location. The device can be stationary for long periods of time or can be easily transported for continuous sky brightness measurement from ground vehicles, boats, or aircraft. The sampling rate is typically about 0.25Hz. We present here examples of different modes of sky brightness measurement, various means of displaying and analyzing such data, ways to interpret natural astronomical phenomena apparent in the data, and suggest a number of complementary scientific projects that may capture the interest of both professional and amateur scientists. Finally, we discuss the status of the archive and ways that potential contributors may submit their observations for publication in the archive.

  11. NASA Science Engagement Through "Sky Art"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethea, K. L.; Damadeo, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sky Art is a NASA-funded online community where the public can share in the beauty of nature and the science behind it. At the center of Sky Art is a gallery of amateur sky photos submitted by users that are related to NASA Earth science mission research areas. Through their submissions, amateur photographers from around the world are engaged in the process of making observations, or taking pictures, of the sky just like many NASA science instruments. By submitting their pictures and engaging in the online community discussions and interactions with NASA scientists, users make the connection between the beauty of nature and atmospheric science. Sky Art is a gateway for interaction and information aimed at drawing excitement and interest in atmospheric phenomena including sunrises, sunsets, moonrises, moonsets, and aerosols, each of which correlates to a NASA science mission. Educating the public on atmospheric science topics in an informal way is a central goal of Sky Art. NASA science is included in the community through interaction from scientists, NASA images, and blog posts on science concepts derived from the images. Additionally, the website connects educators through the formal education pathway where science concepts are taught through activities and lessons that align with national learning standards. Sky Art was conceived as part of the Education and Public Outreach program of the SAGE III on ISS mission. There are currently three other NASA mission involved with Sky Art: CALIPSO, GPM, and CLARREO. This paper will discuss the process of developing the Sky Art online website, the challenges of growing a community of users, as well as the use of social media and mobile applications in science outreach and education.

  12. BIG SAGEBRUSH LEAF AREA DYNAMICS ON A BURNED, GRAZED AND CONTROL SITE IN THE SAGEBRUSH STEPPE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) is an important shrub for wildlife habitat and carbon sequestration in the western U.S. The effects of fire and grazing on leaf area development of big sagebrush were investigated in plots established on a 16-ha burned site, a 12-ha grazed site and 16-ha c...

  13. The trashing of Big Green

    SciTech Connect

    Felten, E.

    1990-11-26

    The Big Green initiative on California's ballot lost by a margin of 2-to-1. Green measures lost in five other states, shocking ecology-minded groups. According to the postmortem by environmentalists, Big Green was a victim of poor timing and big spending by the opposition. Now its supporters plan to break up the bill and try to pass some provisions in the Legislature.

  14. How Big is Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  15. Teachable Fiction Comes to Yellow Sky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tietz, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Proposes that teachable fiction is efficient, strategically sound, and very visual. Analyzes Stephen Crane's "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" to show it fulfills these three characteristics. Suggests the story should be taught later in the semester. (PM)

  16. Sky cover from MFRSR observations: cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Berg, L. K.; Flynn, C.; Long, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  17. Sky-High Temperatures Inside 'Bounce Houses'

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160408.html Sky-High Temperatures Inside 'Bounce Houses' Hot party toys may pose ... similar to closed cars. During hot summer weather, temperatures inside these play structures may climb to levels ...

  18. The high energy sky with INTEGRAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; De Rosa, A.; Fiocchi, M. T.

    2007-07-12

    INTEGRAL is continuing the deep observations of the Galactic Plane and, at level of a mCrab, of the whole sky in the soft Gamma ray range. The new IBIS catalogue contains more than 420 sources detected in 20-40 and 40-100 keV range. We present a view of the INTEGRAL high energy sky with particular regard to sources emitting beyond 100 keV, including Blazar and HESS couterpart.0.

  19. The Mythology of the Night Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkner, David E.

    The word "planet" comes from the Latin word planeta and the Greek word planes, which means "wanderer." When the ancient Greeks studied the night sky they noticed that most of the stars remained in the same position relative to all the other stars, but a few stars seem to move in the sky from day to day, week to week, and month to month. The Greeks called these rogue stars "wanderers" because they wandered through the starry background.

  20. All Sky Observations with BATSE and GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2008-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) monitored the entire sky from 1991-2000. I will review highlights of BATSE observations including gamma ray bursts, black hole candidates, accreting pulsars, and active galaxies. On 2008 June 11, the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope was launched. The Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi continues the all-sky monitoring legacy started with BATSE. I will review early results and planned observations with GBM.

  1. Aladin Lite: Lightweight sky atlas for browsers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boch, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Aladin Lite is a lightweight version of the Aladin tool, running in the browser and geared towards simple visualization of a sky region. It allows visualization of image surveys (JPEG multi-resolution HEALPix all-sky surveys) and permits superimposing tabular (VOTable) and footprints (STC-S) data. Aladin Lite is powered by HTML5 canvas technology and is easily embeddable on any web page and can also be controlled through a Javacript API.

  2. Using Virtual Observatory Services in Sky View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGlynn, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    For over a decade Skyview has provided astronomers and the public with easy access to survey and imaging data from all wavelength regimes. SkyView has pioneered many of the concepts that underlie the Virtual Observatory. Recently SkyView has been released as a distributable package which uses VO protocols to access image and catalog services. This chapter describes how to use the Skyview as a local service and how to customize it to access additional VO services and local data.

  3. Build Your Own SkyNode!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purger, N.; Budavári, T.; Szalay, A. S.; Thakar, A.; Csabai, I.

    2004-07-01

    SkyQuery is an excellent VO prototype application that marries Web Services technology with emerging VO standards to enable dynamic cross-matching queries between different VO-enabled archives. The archive data is stored in databases that are published online as SkyNodes. As the available data from Sky Surveys and new digital archives rapidly multiplies every year, more than 80 percent of the data will exist outside of large data centers at any given moment, making it very important to have dynamic cross-identification tools like SkyQuery. Loading an entire survey like 2MASS or SDSS into a database involves making decisions about issues like data formats and indices for tables. We describe the process of loading such a large amount of data into a relational DBMS (SQL Server) and generating a sky index using the Hierarchical Triangular Mesh (HTM), which provides a really fast way to find objects. This can be easily done even for a large survey like the 2MASS All-Sky Data Release (150GB uncompressed, 471M objects) in as little as 2 days including the required computation time for HTM.

  4. The dropped big toe.

    PubMed

    Satku, K; Wee, J T; Kumar, V P; Ong, B; Pho, R W

    1992-03-01

    Surgical procedures for exposure of the upper third of the fibula have been known to cause weakness of the long extensor of the big toe post-operatively. The authors present three representative cases of surgically induced dropped big toe. From cadaveric dissection, an anatomic basis was found for this phenomenon. The tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles have their origin at the proximal end of the leg and receive their first motor innervation from a branch that arises from the common peroneal or deep peroneal nerve at about the level of the neck of the fibula. However, the extensor hallucis longus muscle originates in the middle one-third of the leg and the nerves innervating this muscle run a long course in close proximity to the fibula for up to ten centimeters from a level below the neck of the fibula before entering the muscle. Surgical intervention in the proximal one-third of the fibula just distal to the origin of the first motor branch to the tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles carries a risk of injury to the nerves innervating the extensor hallucis longus. PMID:1519891

  5. Roses in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    The two best known satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, the Magellanic Clouds, are located in the southern sky at a distance of about 170,000 light-years. They host many giant nebular complexes with very hot and luminous stars whose intense ultraviolet radiation causes the surrounding interstellar gas to glow. The intricate and colourful nebulae are produced by ionised gas [1] that shines as electrons and positively charged atomic nuclei recombine, emitting a cascade of photons at well defined wavelengths. Such nebulae are called "H II regions", signifying ionised hydrogen, i.e. hydrogen atoms that have lost one electron (protons). Their spectra are characterized by emission lines whose relative intensities carry useful information about the composition of the emitting gas, its temperature, as well as the mechanisms that cause the ionisation. Since the wavelengths of these spectral lines correspond to different colours, these alone are already very informative about the physical conditions of the gas. N44 [2] in the Large Magellanic Cloud is a spectacular example of such a giant H II region. Having observed it in 1999 (see ESO PR Photos 26a-d/99), a team of European astronomers [3] again used the Wide-Field-Imager (WFI) at the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope of the La Silla Observatory, pointing this 67-million pixel digital camera to the same sky region in order to provide another striking - and scientifically extremely rich - image of this complex of nebulae. With a size of roughly 1,000 light-years, the peculiar shape of N44 clearly outlines a ring that includes a bright stellar association of about 40 very luminous and bluish stars. These stars are the origin of powerful "stellar winds" that blow away the surrounding gas, piling it up and creating gigantic interstellar bubbles. Such massive stars end their lives as exploding supernovae that expel their outer layers at high speeds, typically about 10,000 km/sec. It is quite likely that some supernovae have already

  6. Frequency of College Students' Night-Sky Watching Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, William E.; Kelly, Kathryn E.; Batey, Jason

    2006-01-01

    College students (N = 112) completed the Noctcaelador Inventory, a measure of psychological attachment to the night-sky, and estimated various night-sky watching related activities: frequency and duration of night-sky watching, astro-tourism, ownership of night-sky viewing equipment, and attendance of observatories or planetariums. The results…

  7. Dark Skies are a Universal Resource: IYA Programs on Dark Skies Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; Bueter, C.; Pompea, S. M.; Berglund, K.; Mann, T.; Gay, P.; Crelin, B.; Collins, D.; Sparks, R.

    2008-05-01

    The loss of a dark night sky as a natural resource is a growing concern. It impacts not only astronomical research, but also health, ecology, safety, economics and energy conservation. Because of its relevance, "Dark Skies” is a theme of the US Node for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people involved in a variety of dark skies-related programs. To reach this goal, the ASP session will immerse participants in hands-on, minds-on activities, events and resources on dark skies awareness. These include a planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking, a digital photography contest, The Great Switch Out, Earth Hour, National Dark Skies Week, a traveling exhibit, a 6-minute video tutorial, Dark Skies Teaching Sites, Astronomy Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy Nights, and unaided-eye and digital-meter star counting programs like GLOBE at Night. The ASP "Dark Skies” session is offered to provide IYA dark skies-related programs to a variety of attendees. Participants include professional or amateur astronomers, education and public outreach professionals, science center/museum/planetarium staff and educators who want to lead activities involving dark skies awareness in conjunction with IYA. During the session, each participant will be given a package of educational materials on the various dark skies programs. We will provide the "know-how” and the means for session attendees to become community leaders in promoting these dark skies programs as public events at their home institutions during IYA. Participants will be able to jump-start their education programs through the use of well-developed instructional materials and kits sent later if they commit to leading IYA dark skies activities. For more information about the IYA Dark Skies theme, visit http://astronomy2009.us/darkskies/.

  8. Whole Language Using Big Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Sarah

    Designed as thematic units around Wright Company Big Books, the lessons in this guide demonstrate ways that Big Books can be used in a whole language first grade program. Each lesson indicates skill focus, needed materials, procedures, and additional thoughts or suggestions about the lesson. Units consist of: "Bedtime" (five lessons); "Monsters…

  9. Think Big, Bigger ... and Smaller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbett, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    One important principle of social psychology, writes Nisbett, is that some big-seeming interventions have little or no effect. This article discusses a number of cases from the field of education that confirm this principle. For example, Head Start seems like a big intervention, but research has indicated that its effects on academic achievement…

  10. The International Big History Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Michael; Duffy, D'Neil

    2013-01-01

    IBHA, the International Big History Association, was organized in 2010 and "promotes the unified, interdisciplinary study and teaching of history of the Cosmos, Earth, Life, and Humanity." This is the vision that Montessori embraced long before the discoveries of modern science fleshed out the story of the evolving universe. "Big History" is a…

  11. The Big Read: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Arts, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Big Read evaluation included a series of 35 case studies designed to gather more in-depth information on the program's implementation and impact. The case studies gave readers a valuable first-hand look at The Big Read in context. Both formal and informal interviews, focus groups, attendance at a wide range of events--all showed how…

  12. Big Sisters: An Experimental Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidl, Fredrick W.

    1982-01-01

    Assessed the effects of participation in a Big Sisters' Program. The first part consisted of interviews (N=20) with pairs of Big Sisters-Little Sisters. The second part evaluated program effectiveness experimentally. Findings indicated positive relationships between pairs, and improved behavior of experimental girls versus controls. (RC)

  13. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  14. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  15. Dark Skies: Local Success, Global Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, G. W.

    2009-01-01

    The Flagstaff, Arizona 1987 lighting code reduced the growth rate of man-made sky glow by a third. Components of the code include requirements for full cutoff lighting, lumens per acre limits in radial zones around observatories, and use of low-pressure sodium monochromatic lighting for roadways and parking lots. Broad public acceptance of Flagstaff's lighting code demonstrates that dark sky preservation has significant appeal and few visibility or public safety negatives. An inventory by C. Luginbuhl et al. of the light output and shielding of a sampling of various zoning categories (municipal, commercial, apartments, single-family residences, roadways, sports facilities, industrial, etc.), extrapolated over the entire city, yields a total output of 139 million lumens. Commercial and industrial sources account for 62% of the total. Outdoor sports lighting increases the total by 24% on summer evenings. Flagstaff's per capita lumen output is 2.5 times greater than the nominal 1,000 lumens per capita assumed by R. Garstang in his early sky glow modeling work. We resolved the discrepancy with respect to Flagstaff's measured sky glow using an improved model that includes substantial near ground attenuation by foliage and structures. A 2008 university study shows that astronomy contributes $250M annually to Arizona's economy. Another study showed that the application of lighting codes throughout Arizona could reduce energy consumption significantly. An ongoing effort led by observatory directors statewide will encourage lighting controls in currently unregulated metropolitan areas whose growing sky glow threatens observatory facilities more than 100 miles away. The national press (New York Times, the New Yorker, the Economist, USA Today, etc.) have publicized dark sky issues but frequent repetition of the essential message and vigorous action will be required to steer society toward darker skies and less egregious waste.

  16. The Rise of Big Data in Neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen

    2016-02-01

    In some fields, Big Data has been instrumental in analyzing, predicting, and influencing human behavior. However, Big Data approaches have so far been less central in speech-language pathology. This article introduces the concept of Big Data and provides examples of Big Data initiatives pertaining to adult neurorehabilitation. It also discusses the potential theoretical and clinical contributions that Big Data can make. The article also recognizes some impediments in building and using Big Data for scientific and clinical inquiry. PMID:26882360

  17. yourSky: Custom Sky-Image Mosaics via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    yourSky (http://yourSky.jpl.nasa.gov) is a computer program that supplies custom astronomical image mosaics of sky regions specified by requesters using client computers connected to the Internet. [yourSky is an upgraded version of the software reported in Software for Generating Mosaics of Astronomical Images (NPO-21121), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 4 (April 2001), page 16a.] A requester no longer has to engage in the tedious process of determining what subset of images is needed, nor even to know how the images are indexed in image archives. Instead, in response to a requester s specification of the size and location of the sky area, (and optionally of the desired set and type of data, resolution, coordinate system, projection, and image format), yourSky automatically retrieves the component image data from archives totaling tens of terabytes stored on computer tape and disk drives at multiple sites and assembles the component images into a mosaic image by use of a high-performance parallel code. yourSky runs on the server computer where the mosaics are assembled. Because yourSky includes a Web-interface component, no special client software is needed: ordinary Web browser software is sufficient.

  18. Cloudy Sky Version of Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.

    2006-08-01

    Presentation on Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model given by NREL's Daryl Myers at SOLAR 2006. The objective of this report is to produce ''all sky'' modeled hourly solar radiation. This is based on observed cloud cover data using a SIMPLE model.

  19. Big cat genomics.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E

    2005-01-01

    Advances in population and quantitative genomics, aided by the computational algorithms that employ genetic theory and practice, are now being applied to biological questions that surround free-ranging species not traditionally suitable for genetic enquiry. Here we review how applications of molecular genetic tools have been used to describe the natural history, present status, and future disposition of wild cat species. Insight into phylogenetic hierarchy, demographic contractions, geographic population substructure, behavioral ecology, and infectious diseases have revealed strategies for survival and adaptation of these fascinating predators. Conservation, stabilization, and management of the big cats are important areas that derive benefit from the genome resources expanded and applied to highly successful species, imperiled by an expanding human population. PMID:16124868

  20. Big-bounce genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changhong; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the possibility of using dark matter particle's mass and its interaction cross section as a smoking gun signal of the existence of a big bounce at the early stage in the evolution of our currently observed universe. A model independent study of dark matter production in the pre-bounce contraction and the post-bounce expansion epochs of the bounce universe reveals a new venue for achieving the observed relic abundance of our present universe, in which a significantly smaller amount of dark matter with a smaller cross section—as compared to the prediction of standard cosmology—is produced and the information about the bounce universe evolution is preserved by the out-of-thermal-equilibrium process. Once the value of dark matter mass and interaction cross section are obtained by direct detection in laboratories, this alternative route becomes a signature prediction of the bounce universe scenario.

  1. A total sky cloud detection method using real clear sky background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Min, Qilong; Lu, Weitao; Ma, Ying; Yao, Wen; Lu, Tianshu; Du, Juan; Liu, Guangyi

    2016-02-01

    The brightness distribution of sky background is usually non-uniform, which creates many problems for traditional cloud detection methods, including the failure of thin cloud detection in total sky images and significantly reducing retrieval accuracy in the circumsolar and near-horizon regions. This paper describes the development of a new cloud detection algorithm, named "clear sky background differencing (CSBD)", which is accomplished by differencing the original image and the corresponding clear sky background image using the images' green channel. First, a library of clear sky background images with a variety of solar elevation angles needs to be developed. The image rotation and image brightness adjustment algorithms are applied to ensure the two images being differenced have the same solar position and similar brightness distribution. Sensitivity tests show that the cloud detection results are satisfactory when the two images have the same solar positions. Several experimental cases show that the CSBD algorithm obtains good cloud recognition results visually, especially for thin clouds.

  2. Sky coverage modeling for the whole sky for laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianqi; Andersen, David; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2012-06-01

    The scientific productivity of laser guide star adaptive optics systems strongly depends on the sky coverage, which describes the probability of finding natural guide stars for the tip/tilt wavefront sensor(s) to achieve a certain performance. Knowledge of the sky coverage is also important for astronomers planning their observations. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute the sky coverage for the laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics system, the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), being designed for the Thirty Meter Telescope project. We show that NFIRAOS can achieve more than 70% sky coverage over most of the accessible sky with the requirement of 191 nm total rms wavefront. PMID:22695611

  3. Globe at Night - Sky Brightness Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Sze Leung; Pun, Jason Chun Shing; SO, Chu-wing; Shibata, Yukiko; Walker, Constance Elaine; Agata, Hidehiko

    2015-08-01

    The Global at Night - Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (GaN-MN) is an international project for long-term monitoring of night sky conditions around the world. The GaN-MN consists of fixed monitoring stations each equipped with a Sky Quality Meter - Lensed Ethernet (SQM-LE), which is a specialized light sensor for night sky brightness (NSB) measurement. NSB data are continuously collected at high sampling frequency throughout the night, and these data will be instantly made available to the general public to provide a real-time snapshot of the global light pollution condition. A single data collection methodology, including data sampling frequency, data selection criteria, device design and calibration, and schemes for data quality control, was adopted to ensure uniformity in the data collected. This is essential for a systematic and global study of the level of light pollution. The data collected will also provide the scientific backbone in our efforts to contribute to dark sky conservation through education to the general public and policy makers. The GaN-MN project is endorsed by the IAU IYL Executive Committee Working Group as a major Cosmic Light program in the International Year of Light.

  4. Daytime Water Detection Based on Sky Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Matthies, Larry H.; Bellutta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Robust water detection is a critical perception requirement for unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) autonomous navigation. This is particularly true in wide-open areas where water can collect in naturally occurring terrain depressions during periods of heavy precipitation and form large water bodies. One of the properties of water useful for detecting it is that its surface acts as a horizontal mirror at large incidence angles. Water bodies can be indirectly detected by detecting reflections of the sky below the horizon in color imagery. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has implemented a water detector based on sky reflections that geometrically locates the pixel in the sky that is reflecting on a candidate water pixel on the ground and predicts if the ground pixel is water based on color similarity and local terrain features. This software detects water bodies in wide-open areas on cross-country terrain at mid- to far-range using imagery acquired from a forward-looking stereo pair of color cameras mounted on a terrestrial UGV. In three test sequences approaching a pond under a clear, overcast, and cloudy sky, the true positive detection rate was 100% when the UGV was beyond 7 meters of the water's leading edge and the largest false positive detection rate was 0.58%. The sky reflection based water detector has been integrated on an experimental unmanned vehicle and field tested at Ft. Indiantown Gap, PA, USA.

  5. The Two Micron All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinmann, S. G.; Lysaght, M. G.; Pughe, W. L.; Schneider, S. E.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Weinberg, M. D.; Price, S. D.; Matthews, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Huchra, J. P.

    1994-07-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) will provide a uniform survey of the entire sky at three near-infrared wavebands: J(lambdaeff = 1.25 micrometers), H(lambdaeff = 1.65 micrometers), and Ks(lambdaeff = 2.16 micrometers). A major goal of the survey is to probe large scale structures in the Milky Way and in the Local Universe, exploiting the relatively high transparency of the interstellar medium in the near-infrared, and the high near-infrared luminosities of evolved low- and intermediate-mass stars. A sensitive overview of the near-infrared sky is also an essential next step to maximize the gains achievable with infrared array technology. Our assessment of the astrophysical questions that might be addressed with these new arrays is currently limited by the very bright flux limit of the only preceding large scale near-infrared sky survey, the Two Micron Sky Survey carried out at Caltech in the late 1960's. Near-infrared instruments based on the new array technology have already obtained spectra of objects 1 million times fainter than the limit of the TMSS] This paper summarizes the essential parameters of the 2MASS project and the rationale behind those choices, and gives an overview of results obtained with a prototype camera that has been in operation since May 1992. We conclude with a list of expected data products and a statement of the data release policy.

  6. Big bang and big crunch in matrix string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, J.; Papageorgakis, C.; Rodríguez-Gómez, D.; Ward, J.

    2007-04-01

    Following the holographic description of linear dilaton null cosmologies with a big bang in terms of matrix string theory put forward by Craps, Sethi, and Verlinde, we propose an extended background describing a universe including both big bang and big crunch singularities. This belongs to a class of exact string backgrounds and is perturbative in the string coupling far away from the singularities, both of which can be resolved using matrix string theory. We provide a simple theory capable of describing the complete evolution of this closed universe.

  7. Big bang and big crunch in matrix string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, J.; Ward, J.; Papageorgakis, C.; Rodriguez-Gomez, D.

    2007-04-15

    Following the holographic description of linear dilaton null cosmologies with a big bang in terms of matrix string theory put forward by Craps, Sethi, and Verlinde, we propose an extended background describing a universe including both big bang and big crunch singularities. This belongs to a class of exact string backgrounds and is perturbative in the string coupling far away from the singularities, both of which can be resolved using matrix string theory. We provide a simple theory capable of describing the complete evolution of this closed universe.

  8. 75 FR 3948 - Big Sky Energy Corp., Biomedical Waste Systems, Inc., Biometrics Security Technology, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ..., Inc., Bolder Technologies Corp., Boyds Wheels, Inc., Breakaway Solutions, Inc., and BRE-X Minerals... accurate information concerning the securities of BRE-X Minerals, Ltd. because it has not filed...

  9. Laser Safety and Hazardous Analysis for the ARES (Big Sky) Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.

    2003-01-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the ARES laser system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1,for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.

  10. Changes in Skiing and Snowboarding Injury Epidemiology and Attitudes to Safety in Big Sky, Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Edward; Cooper, Jamie G.; Daniels, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite a risk of harm, the past 20 years have seen dramatically increased participation in snow sports such as skiing, and particularly, snowboarding. This period has also seen revolutions in piste maintenance and paradigm developments in the use of safety equipment. Consequently, the numbers and characteristics of injury may be very different from those traditionally quoted. Purpose To compare and evaluate the injury patterns among skiers and snowboarders in a North American ski resort in 1996 and 2013. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Questionnaire-based cross-sectional studies were carried out independently in a North American ski resort between the dates of March 6 and April 11 in both 1996 and 2013. Demographic data and information about incident circumstances were collected from injured patients who visited the local on-site clinic. Data were compared statistically to assess for significant changes in injury characteristics between the 2 time periods. Results The 1996 report consisted of 148 injured participants, and the 2013 study included 156 participants. Results from 2013 demonstrated significant increases in helmet use, the number of snowboarders injured, and shoulder injuries. Injury was also more likely in those aged 46 to 55 years, those never having had professional instruction, or those with rented equipment. Significant reductions were seen in those injured with other people close by and in the 36- to 45-year age group. Overall, the knee was the most commonly injured body part in both periods (1996: 31%, n = 38; 2013: 33%, n = 36), although upper limb injuries were predominant in snowboarders. Conclusion Snow sports injury characteristics of patients presenting to a ski resort medical clinic have changed between 1996 and 2013. These findings can be used to further inform safety recommendations and areas to target with further research. PMID:26665097