Science.gov

Sample records for billion electron volts

  1. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Baertling, Y.; Hoppe, D.; Kuksanov, N.; Fadeev, S.; Salimov, R.

    2012-09-15

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  2. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K. Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  3. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Centurion, M.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; Nguyen, M. N.; Reid, A. H.; Shen, X.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Vecchione, T.; Vetter, S. L.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Dürr, H. A.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  4. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Weathersby, S P; Brown, G; Centurion, M; Chase, T F; Coffee, R; Corbett, J; Eichner, J P; Frisch, J C; Fry, A R; Gühr, M; Hartmann, N; Hast, C; Hettel, R; Jobe, R K; Jongewaard, E N; Lewandowski, J R; Li, R K; Lindenberg, A M; Makasyuk, I; May, J E; McCormick, D; Nguyen, M N; Reid, A H; Shen, X; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Vecchione, T; Vetter, S L; Wu, J; Yang, J; Dürr, H A; Wang, X J

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability. PMID:26233391

  5. Ultralow Energy Electron Attachment at Sub-Millielectron Volt Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Kortyna, A.; Darrach, M. R.; Howe, P. -T.

    1999-01-01

    The technique of rare-gas photoionization has been extended by use of direct laser ionization to electron energies epsilon in the range 0-100 meV, with a resolution Delta(epsilon) of 0.4-0.5 meV (FWHM). Tunable UV light at (Lambda)276 nm is produced using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and nonlinear mixing techniques. The beam is frequency tripled in a pulsed jet of xenon. The VUV radiation, tunable at (Lambda)92 nm, is then used to photoionize Xe at its 2P(sub 1/2) threshold (single-photon ionization). The photoelectrons produced interact with admixed target gas to generate negative ions through the s-wave capture process. Recent results in electron attachment to SF(sub 6) will be reported which show resonance structure at the opening of the ground-state vibrational channels. This structure corresponds to the process of vibrational excitation + attachment, which is superimposed on the underlying s-wave (direct) capture process. It should be a general phenomenon, present in a wide variety of zero-energy electron attaching molecules.

  6. Fast Variability of Tera-Electron Volt ? Rays from the Radio Galaxy M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berge, D.; Bernlhr, K.; Boisson, C.; Bolz, O.; Borrel, V.; Braun, I.; Brown, A. M.; Bhler, R.; Bsching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chounet, L.-M.; Coignet, G.; Cornils, R.; Costamante, L.; Degrange, B.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ata, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Egberts, K.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Espigat, P.; Feinstein, F.; Ferrero, E.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, Seb.; Funk, S.; Fling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Goret, P.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Hauser, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Kendziorra, E.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khlifi, B.; Komin, Nu.; Konopelko, A.; Kosack, K.; Lamanna, G.; Latham, I. J.; Le Gallou, R.; Lemire, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Martin, J. M.; Martineau-Huynh, O.; Marcowith, A.; Masterson, C.; Maurin, G.; McComb, T. J. L.; Moulin, E.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nolan, S. J.; Noutsos, A.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Ouchrif, M.; Panter, M.; Pelletier, G.; Pita, S.; Phlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Ranchon, S.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, A.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rolland, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Saug, L.; Schlenker, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schrder, R.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sol, H.; Spangler, D.; Spanier, F.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Superina, G.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Vincent, P.; Vlk, H. J.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.

    2006-12-01

    The detection of fast variations of the tetra-electron volt (TeV) (1012 eV) ?-ray flux, on time scales of days, from the nearby radio galaxy M87 is reported. These variations are about 10 times as fast as those observed in any other wave band and imply a very compact emission region with a dimension similar to the Schwarzschild radius of the central black hole. We thus can exclude several other sites and processes of the ?-ray production. The observations confirm that TeV ? rays are emitted by extragalactic sources other than blazars, where jets are not relativistically beamed toward the observer.

  7. Direct Observation of Radiation-Belt Electron Acceleration from Electron-Volt Energies to Megavolts by Nonlinear Whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozer, F. S.; Agapitov, O.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Lejosne, S.; Reeves, G. D.; Roth, I.

    2014-07-01

    The mechanisms for accelerating electrons from thermal to relativistic energies in the terrestrial magnetosphere, on the sun, and in many astrophysical environments have never been verified. We present the first direct observation of two processes that, in a chain, cause this acceleration in Earth's outer radiation belt. The two processes are parallel acceleration from electron-volt to kilovolt energies by parallel electric fields in time-domain structures (TDS), after which the parallel electron velocity becomes sufficiently large for Doppler-shifted upper band whistler frequencies to be in resonance with the electron gyration frequency, even though the electron energies are kilovolts and not hundreds of kilovolts. The electrons are then accelerated by the whistler perpendicular electric field to relativistic energies in several resonant interactions. TDS are packets of electric field spikes, each spike having duration of a few hundred microseconds and containing a local parallel electric field. The TDS of interest resulted from nonlinearity of the parallel electric field component in oblique whistlers and consisted of ˜0.1 msec pulses superposed on the whistler waveform with each such spike containing a net parallel potential the order of 50 V. Local magnetic field compression from remote activity provided the free energy to drive the two processes. The expected temporal correlations between the compressed magnetic field, the nonlinear whistlers with their parallel electric field spikes, the electron flux and the electron pitch angle distributions were all observed.

  8. Direct observation of radiation-belt electron acceleration from electron-volt energies to megavolts by nonlinear whistlers.

    PubMed

    Mozer, F S; Agapitov, O; Krasnoselskikh, V; Lejosne, S; Reeves, G D; Roth, I

    2014-07-18

    The mechanisms for accelerating electrons from thermal to relativistic energies in the terrestrial magnetosphere, on the sun, and in many astrophysical environments have never been verified. We present the first direct observation of two processes that, in a chain, cause this acceleration in Earth's outer radiation belt. The two processes are parallel acceleration from electron-volt to kilovolt energies by parallel electric fields in time-domain structures (TDS), after which the parallel electron velocity becomes sufficiently large for Doppler-shifted upper band whistler frequencies to be in resonance with the electron gyration frequency, even though the electron energies are kilovolts and not hundreds of kilovolts. The electrons are then accelerated by the whistler perpendicular electric field to relativistic energies in several resonant interactions. TDS are packets of electric field spikes, each spike having duration of a few hundred microseconds and containing a local parallel electric field. The TDS of interest resulted from nonlinearity of the parallel electric field component in oblique whistlers and consisted of ∼ 0.1 msec pulses superposed on the whistler waveform with each such spike containing a net parallel potential the order of 50 V. Local magnetic field compression from remote activity provided the free energy to drive the two processes. The expected temporal correlations between the compressed magnetic field, the nonlinear whistlers with their parallel electric field spikes, the electron flux and the electron pitch angle distributions were all observed. PMID:25083648

  9. Image plate characterization and absolute calibration to low kilo-electron-volt electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Busold, S.; Philipp, K.; Otten, A.; Roth, M.

    2014-11-15

    We report on the characterization of an image plate and its absolute calibration to electrons in the low keV energy range (1–30 keV). In our case, an Agfa MD4.0 without protection layer was used in combination with a Fuji FLA7000 scanner. The calibration data are compared to other published data and a consistent picture of the sensitivity of image plates to electrons is obtained, which suggests a validity of the obtained calibration up to 100 keV.

  10. FOREWORD: VI Workshop in Electron Volt Neutron Spectroscopy: Frontiers and Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seel, A. G.; Senesi, R.; Fernandez-Alonso, F.

    2014-12-01

    January 2014 saw the congregation in Abingdon (UK) of scientists from across the world, to discuss the current state and future of spectroscopy using epithermal neutrons. This meeting was the sixth in a series of workshops held in collaboration between the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK) and the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy), aimed at bringing together researchers with an interest in the use of electron-volt neutrons in spectroscopic studies [1]. This technique is termed Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS), and also Neutron Compton Scattering (NCS) in reference to the analogy with Compton scattering of X-rays from electrons. In particular, this meeting centred jointly around experimentalists and theoreticians, formulating animated discussions as to the current overview of DINS and future horizons facing the field. The use of electron Volt neutrons for spectroscopic measurements dates back to the advent of proton-driven spallation neutron sources in the 1970s and 1980s. Following an initial scientific meeting in Los Alamos (USA) [2], the first two meetings in this series were held in Abingdon (UK) in 1995 and 1998, with subsequent meetings held in Santa Fe (USA) in 2005 [3], Oak Ridge National Laboratory (USA) in 2006 [4], and Rome, Italy; in 2010 [5]. The flagship instrument serving a continual user-programme for DINS measurements, and the main focus of this meeting, has been the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS [6, 7]. Subsequent instruments like SEQUOIA in the USA [8, 9] and a newer spectrometer in the Bariloche LINAC in Argentina [10, 11] have also been commissioned and began serving a growing user community. The availability of DINS measurements has extended the range of possible spectroscopic techniques that utilise neutrons into the kinematic region of high energy and momentum transfers, shown schematically in Figure 1. Spectroscopic instrument suites such as that of ISIS are thus able to probe processes on timescales across nine orders of magnitude, from quantum tunnelling and molecular diffusion up to nuclear recoil under the impulse approximation. DINS is one of the most direct techniques for probing nuclear quantum dynamics in condensed matter, with the ability to measure nuclear kinetic energies and momentum distributions of light nuclei. A major theme for current DINS research relates to the study of nuclear quantum effects, particularly regarding the non-classical behaviour of hydrogen or deuterium. This emphasis was reflected by the meeting's opening session dealing with the measurement of momentum distributions in hydrogen-bonded and aqueous systems (see Table 1). Whilst concentrating on experimental studies, data were presented from the outset alongside state-of-the-art path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) calculations, affording an animated discussion as to the interpretation of measured neutron Compton profiles in spatially disordered systems. The extension of DINS to heavier nuclei was visited in the second session of the meeting, under the over-arching theme of MAss-selective Neutron SpEctroscopy (MANSE). The ability of DINS to examine atomically distinct species in condensed matter has garnered interest from the chemistry and materials communities, with both binary systems and more complex materials being presented in this session. Nuclei of interest in applied materials research were highlighted, including oxygen, lithium and fluorine, alongside an assessment of current capabilities and future developments in their examination by DINS. The concluding session of the first day of the meeting was concerned with instrumentation. The detection of epithermal neutrons requires technologies unique relative to their lower-energy counterparts, and the first talk of this session outlined how detector capabilities on existing instruments has been revolutionised in recent years. Resonance detectors and techniques involving analyser-foil cycling were detailed, explaining how they have improved not only the count-rate but also the spectral resolution of instruments such as VESUVIO. Beyond NCS, the detection of nuclear resonances were also considered. An overview of VESUVIO (a time-of-flight instrument operating in so-called indirect geometry) was then given, alongside ways it could be improved upon in light of growing demands from the user community. This discussion was complemented by a presentation of the use of direct-geometry instruments such as SEQUOIA for DINS measurements, highlighting the complementarity with parallel studies on VESUVIO. The second day of the meeting was given over to the theoretical aspects of nuclear momentum distributions. Delegates were presented with the manner in which we can computationally incorporate nuclear quantum effects, along with their output in terms of 'measureables', relating to a varied range of systems. Results were presented from hydrogen-bonded liquids, ferroelectric materials, biological systems, and mixed bosonic-fermionic calculations. The ability to now approach experimental measurement with theoretical insight, and vice versa, is a sea-change in research into nuclear quantum effects. This field is a high-profile area in chemical physics and materials research, and a concerted approach by theory and experimentation allows us to explore and explain the dynamical state of matter at the atomic level in a manner previously unobtainable. Concluding each session throughout the meeting were periods of open discussion, wherein all present could comment or expand upon themes arising from the preceding talks. These discussions were then further distilled and clarified during the final section of the meeting, the 'Frontiers and Horizons' discussion, open to all present to delineate the next steps in DINS as a whole. Experimentalists and theoreticians were able to present their views on how each community could move forward to complement each other, not only separately but with specific projects and milestones in mind. These discussions have been included within these proceedings to highlight the future outlook of DINS. It is the hope of these editors that this meeting will allow spectroscopy with epithermal neutrons to further develop, explaining the very quantum nature of dynamics in condensed matter. Bringing together, as it did, international researchers in fields at the frontiers of their respective experimental and theoretical communities, we hope that the next meeting in this series will see the fruition of concepts and projects instigated by this one.

  11. Coherent kilo-electron-volt backscattering from plasma-wave boosted relativistic electron mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F. Y.; Chen, M. Liu, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sheng, Z. M. E-mail: zmsheng@sjtu.edu.cn; Wu, H. C.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Mori, W. B.

    2014-10-20

    A different parameter regime of laser wakefield acceleration driven by sub-petawatt femtosecond lasers is proposed, which enables the generation of relativistic electron mirrors further accelerated by the plasma wave. Integrated particle-in-cell simulation, including both the mirror formation and Thomson scattering, demonstrates that efficient coherent backscattering up to keV photon energy can be obtained with moderate driving laser intensities and high density gas targets.

  12. Absolute differential cross sections for electron capture and loss by kilo-electron-volt hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. J.; Johnson, L. K.; Gao, R. S.; Smith, K. A.; Stebbings, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of absolute differential cross sections for electron capture and loss for fast hydrogen atoms incident on H2, N2, O2, Ar, and He. Cross sections have been determined in the 2.0- to 5.0-keV energy range over the laboratory angular range 0.02-2 deg, with an angular, resolution of 0.02 deg. The high angular resolution allows observation of the structure at small angles in some of the cross sections. Comparison of the present results with those of other authors generally shows very good agreement.

  13. Backscattering and electron microscopy study of mega-electron volt gold implantation into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, T. L.; Theodore, N. David

    1994-12-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and cross-section transmission electron microscopy have been used to study implantation of MeV Au(+) ions into silicon. Measured range (Rp) and straggle (Delta Rp) values for MeV Au(+) implanted silicon are found to be consistently larger than values predicted by TRIM simulations. The magnitude of the discrepancies are such that the differences cannot be attributed to implantation effects alone. We conclude that the TRIM computer program does not accurately predict Rp and Delta Rp values for MeV Au(+) implantation into crystalline Si. Experimental results show that for low-current low-energy implants a single Gaussian Au profile is achieved. Low-power implants produce a single band of damage consisting of simple point defects. High-current high-energy implants lead to the creation of more complex defect structures such as dislocation networks; these arise as a result of dynamic beam recrystallization. Multiple layers of precipitation are observed in silicon implanted with MeV Au(+) ions in those samples where dynamic recrystallization occurred. Precipitation occurs as a result of the local Au concentration exceeding the solid-solubility during beam-induced recrystallization. Different mechanisms operate in conjunction to cause anomalous Au motion which results in formation of multiple precipitate layers. A first mechanism has the implanted Au segregating into a densely defected region; when the concentration exceeds the local solid solubility Au precipitates out of the matrix. A second mechanism has motion of Au along dislocations in a network; the diffusing Au reaches a dislocation-node where it exceeds the local threshold for precipitation and the Au therefore precipitates. Enhanced Au diffusion is dependent upon the magnitude of dynamic recrystallization occurring during the implantation.

  14. 9-Volt Battery Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... and negative posts are close together. If a metal object touches the two posts of a 9- ... 9-volt batteries were thrown away with other metal items. Storing 9-volt batteries KKK Keep batteries ...

  15. Tailoring structure and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes using kilo-electron-volt ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, B. Q.; D'Arcy-Gall, J.; Ajayan, P. M.; Ramanath, G.

    2003-10-01

    We report the effects of 30 and 50 keV Ga+ ion irradiation on the structure and electrical properties of arc-evaporated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). For 50 keV ions with doses of ˜1013 ions/cm2 the outer shells of the MWNTs remain intact, while the inner layers reorganize into highly ordered pillbox-like ˜5-nm-diam nanocompartments of varying lengths between 2 and 20 nm. Increasing the dose to ˜1014 ions cm-2 results in the gradual disordering of the graphitic shells and destroys the nanocapsules, while at doses of 1015 ions cm-2 the graphitic shells collapse into the hollow, resulting in the formation a homogenous amorphous rod. Irradiating nanotubes with 30 keV ions yields similar results, but at higher doses. Irradiated nanotubes exhibit a decrease in electron activation energy from 194 to 112 meV, while the semiconducting behavior is essentially preserved for ion doses up to 5×1015 ions cm-2. Ion irradiation could be a useful tool to locally modify nanotube structure and tailor properties for device applications.

  16. Fragmentation of Na+2 dimer ions in kilo-electron-volt collisions with He: A coupled wave-packet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babikov, D.; Aguillon, F.; Sizun, M.; Sidis, V.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of the fragmentation of Na+2 dimer ions in keV collisions with He is investigated theoretically in the framework of the semiclassical coupled wave-packet method. The fast collisional motion is treated classically, whereas both the electronic motion and the vibrational or dissociative motion of the dimer are treated quantally. The frozen vibrational and rotational approximations are used to lighten the computational effort. The method is able to describe both the impulsive and electronic fragmentation mechanisms. The calculations are undertaken in a basis of 14 electronic states of the Na+2-He system. Aside from the entrance Σg3s channel, the main contributions to the Na+2 fragmentation are those of the Σu3s, Σg3p, and Πu3p channels. For each electronic state dissociation probabilities as functions of the impact parameter are presented for various dimer orientations to extract physical insight in the fragmentation mechanism. This analysis shows in particular that the contribution of the electronic mechanism is due to collisions where the He atom passes between the two Na nuclei. Doubly differential cross sections for dissociation are calculated for the v=0 initial state of the dimer and for the distribution of vibrational states. Good agreement with experiment is obtained assuming a small amount of initial vibrational excitation of the dimer.

  17. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J. T.; Scoby, C. M.; Gutierrez, M. S.; Bender, H. A.; Wilcox, N. S.

    2010-01-15

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  18. High Quality Single Shot Diffraction Patterns Using Ultrashort Megaelectron Volt Electron Beams from a Radio Frequency Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    P. Musumeci, J. T. Moody, C. M. Scoby, M. S. Gutierrez, H. A. Bender, N. S. Wilcox

    2010-01-01

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250 fs long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the RF photoinjector off a 100 nm thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction

  19. Generation of high-quality mega-electron volt proton beams with intense-laser-driven nanotube accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Tanaka, M.

    2013-04-22

    An ion acceleration scheme using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is proposed, in which embedded fragments of low-Z materials are irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser to eject substantial numbers of electrons. Due to the resultant characteristic electrostatic field, the nanotube and embedded materials play the roles of the barrel and bullets of a gun, respectively, to produce highly collimated and quasimonoenergetic ion beams. Three-dimensional particle simulations, that take all the two-body Coulomb interactions into account, demonstrate generation of quasimonoenergetic MeV-order proton beams using nanometer-size CNT under a super-intense electrostatic field {approx}10{sup 14} V m{sup -1}.

  20. Missing billions.

    PubMed

    Conly, S

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses funding of population programs that support the Cairo International Conference on Population and Development's Plan of Action. The Plan of Action calls for a quadrupling of annual financial commitments for population programs to $17 billion by the year 2000 and $22 billion by 2015. The increased expenditures would cover the increased demand for services from unmet need and population growth. Donor countries are expected to increase their share from the current 25% to about 33%, or $5.7 billion by the year 2000. The estimates are in 1993 constant dollars. $17 billion is less than the $40 billion that is spent worldwide on playing golf. During 1993-94, general donor support increased to $1.2 billion. Denmark, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States increased their support. The United States doubled its support for population programs during 1992-95 to $583 million. During 1996-97 the US Congress cut funding back to the 1995 level. France, Italy, Spain, Belgium, and Austria have lagged in support for population programs in the present and the past. Equal burden sharing would require the US to increase funding to $1.9 billion. Developed country assistance declined to the lowest share of combined gross national product since 1970. This shifts the burden to multilateral sources. The European Union is committed to increasing its funding, and the World Bank increased funding for population and reproductive health to about $600 million in 1996 from $424 million in 1994. Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, South Africa, and Turkey spent 85% of all government expenditures on family planning in developing countries. External donors in Africa are the main support of family planning. Private consumers in Latin America pay most of the costs of family planning. External assistance will be needed for some time. PMID:12321013

  1. Constraint on a varying proton-electron mass ratio 1.5 billion years after the big bang.

    PubMed

    Bagdonaite, J; Ubachs, W; Murphy, M T; Whitmore, J B

    2015-02-20

    A molecular hydrogen absorber at a lookback time of 12.4 billion years, corresponding to 10% of the age of the Universe today, is analyzed to put a constraint on a varying proton-electron mass ratio, μ. A high resolution spectrum of the J1443+2724 quasar, which was observed with the Very Large Telescope, is used to create an accurate model of 89 Lyman and Werner band transitions whose relative frequencies are sensitive to μ, yielding a limit on the relative deviation from the current laboratory value of Δμ/μ=(-9.5 ± 5.4(stat)± 5.3(syst))×10(-6). PMID:25763949

  2. Braking formula for electrons of relativistic speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethe, H.

    2014-11-01

    From the theory of Møller [Møller, Chr. 1931. Über den Stoß zweier Teilchen unter Berücksichtigung der Retardation der Kräfte. Zeitschrift f. Phys. 70: 786-795] the energy loss of electrons with relativistic speeds passing through matter is derived. The energy loss per centimeter of distance reaches a minimum at about 96% of the speed of light and increases again at higher speeds; for electrons of several billion Volt it is about 4 million Volt per centimeter of water. A table of the theoretical energy loss for electrons and protons of various speeds is given.

  3. Steady State Load Characterization Fact Sheet: 2012 Chevy Volt

    SciTech Connect

    Don Scoffield

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet characterizes the steady state charging behavior of a 2012 Chevy Volt. Both level 1 charging (120 volt) and level 2 charging (208 volts) is investigated. This fact sheet contains plots of efficiency, power factor, and current harmonics as vehicle charging is curtailed. Prominent current harmonics are also displayed in a histogram for various charge rates.

  4. FRONTAL VIEW OF #3 GENERATOR, 6600 VOLT OIL CIRCUIT BREAKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONTAL VIEW OF #3 GENERATOR, 6600 VOLT OIL CIRCUIT BREAKER, LOCATED BEHIND SLATE SWITCHBOARD. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Elwha Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  5. A Method for Evaluating Volt-VAR Optimization Field Demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Weaver, T. F.

    2014-08-31

    In a regulated business environment a utility must be able to validate that deployed technologies provide quantifiable benefits to the end-use customers. For traditional technologies there are well established procedures for determining what benefits will be derived from the deployment. But for many emerging technologies procedures for determining benefits are less clear and completely absent in some cases. Volt-VAR Optimization is a technology that is being deployed across the nation, but there are still numerous discussions about potential benefits and how they are achieved. This paper will present a method for the evaluation, and quantification of benefits, for field deployments of Volt-VAR Optimization technologies. In addition to the basic methodology, the paper will present a summary of results, and observations, from two separate Volt-VAR Optimization field evaluations using the proposed method.

  6. Feeding six billion.

    PubMed

    Brown, L R

    1989-01-01

    Between 1986-88 drought damage to crops caused the grain supply to decrease and the price of grain worldwide increased 50%. However, in 1989 higher prices and better weather did not result in a rebuilding of reserves lost in previous years. According to the US Agriculture Department, the 1989 harvest will be 13 million tons short of the projected 1684 million tons of consumption. If grain stock cannot be replenished this year, then when will they be replenished? There are a variety of problems causing this situation. Lack of crop land and irrigation water prevent expansion. Diminishing returns from fertilizer inputs, deforestation, soil erosion, and pollution are all decreasing yields. Growth in food production worldwide has stabilized. Between 1950-84 world grain harvest increased 2.6 times or 3%/year. But between 1985-90 that same growth was only 0.2%/year. While this is too short a time to establish a trend, it does suggest a slowdown in worldwide food production. Every year 24 billion tons of topsoil are lost to water and wind erosion, and the world population grows by 88 million annually. Together, these 2 trends indicate a pending disaster. There is no reason to believe that food production is going to continue to grow as fast as the population, thus, population growth must be drastically curtailed. The UN has changes its projected level of population stabilization from 10 billion to 14 billion based on the fact that worldwide population growth has dropped only to 1.7%. Family planning programs have not been as successful as was hoped, partly because the US has withdrawn a large amount of funding due to political pressure from conservatives. The outlook is not good, as the per capita food share shrinks, malnutrition and starvation will continue to grow. Food prices will rise sharply and many more people will be unable to afford food. In many developing countries, people spend 70% of their income on food. This is already occurring as measured by a worldwide increase in infant mortality. PMID:12283531

  7. Plant Generator driven by a small Delco 32 volt DC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plant Generator driven by a small Delco 32 volt DC steam engine with a maximum output of 17.6 kilowatts - East Broad Top Railroad & Coal Company, Machine Shop, State Route 994, West of U.S. Route 522, Rockhill Furnace, Huntingdon County, PA

  8. 59. View of high voltage (4160 volts alternating current) electric ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. View of high voltage (4160 volts alternating current) electric load center and motor control center at mezzanine level in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. Zero Volt Paper Spray Ionization and Its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wleklinski, Michael; Li, Yafeng; Bag, Soumabha; Sarkar, Depanjan; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, T; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-07-01

    The analytical performance and a suggested mechanism for zero volt paper spray using chromatography paper are presented. A spray is generated by the action of the pneumatic force of the mass spectrometer (MS) vacuum at the inlet. Positive and negative ion signals are observed, and comparisons are made with standard kV paper spray (PS) ionization and nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI). While the range of analytes to which zero volt PS is applicable is very similar to kV PS and nESI, differences in the mass spectra of mixtures are interpreted in terms of the more significant effects of analyte surface activity in the gentler zero volt experiment than in the other methods due to the significantly lower charge. The signal intensity of zero volt PS is also lower than in the other methods. A Monte Carlo simulation based on statistical fluctuation of positive and negative ions in solution has been implemented to explain the production of ions from initially uncharged droplets. Uncharged droplets first break up due to aerodynamics forces until they are in the 2-4 μm size range and then undergo Coulombic fission. A model involving statistical charge fluctuations in both phases predicts detection limits similar to those observed experimentally and explains the effects of binary mixture components on relative ionization efficiencies. The proposed mechanism may also play a role in ionization by other voltage-free methods. PMID:26024306

  10. 50. PARTIAL FLOOR PLAN SHOWING INDOOR 750 VOLT SWITCHRACK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. PARTIAL FLOOR PLAN SHOWING INDOOR 750 VOLT SWITCHRACK AND MISC. EQUIPMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 11, 1951; REVISIONS, DEC. 14, 1951. SCE drawing no. 534985-1. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Particle physicist's dreams about PetaelectronVolt laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Vesztergombi, G.

    2012-07-09

    Present day accelerators are working well in the multi TeV energy scale and one is expecting exciting results in the coming years. Conventional technologies, however, can offer only incremental (factor 2 or 3) increase in beam energies which does not follow the usual speed of progress in the frontiers of high energy physics. Laser plasma accelerators theoretically provide unique possibilities to achieve orders of magnitude increases entering the PetaelectronVolt (PeV) energy range. It will be discussed what kind of new perspectives could be opened for the physics at this new energy scale. What type of accelerators would be required?.

  12. Matter-antimatter gigaelectron volt gamma ray laser rocket propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2012-12-01

    It is shown that the idea of a photon rocket through the complete annihilation of matter with antimatter, first proposed by Snger, is not a utopian scheme as it is widely believed. Its feasibility appears to be possible by the radiative collapse of a relativistic high current pinch discharge in a hydrogen-antihydrogen ambiplasma down to a radius determined by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. Through this collapse to ultrahigh densities the proton-antiproton pairs in the center of the pinch can become the upper gigaelectron volt laser level for the transition into a coherent gamma ray beam by proton-antiproton annihilation, with the magnetic field of the collapsed pinch discharge absorbing the recoil momentum of the beam and transmitting it by the Moessbauer effect to the spacecraft. The gamma ray laser beam is launched as a photon avalanche from one end of the pinch discharge channel. Because of the enormous technical problems to produce and store large amounts of anti-matter, such a propulsion concept may find its first realization in small unmanned space probes to explore nearby solar systems. The laboratory demonstration of a gigaelectron volt gamma ray laser by comparison requiring small amounts of anti-matter may be much closer.

  13. What kind of charging infrastructure do Chevrolet Volts Drivers in The EV Project use?

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes key conclusions from analysis of data collected from Chevrolet Volts participating in The EV Project. Topics include how much Volt drivers charge at level 1 vs. level 2 rates and how much they charge at home vs. away from home.

  14. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  15. Investigation of Changing Volt-Ampere Characteristics of AlGalnP Heterostructures with Multiple Quantum Wells under Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradoboev, A. V.; Orlova, K. N.

    2016-02-01

    The results of research into degradation of volt-ampere characteristics of light emitting diodes produced on the base of AlGaInP heterostructures with multiple quantum wells are presented on the example of light emitting diodes (emission wavelengths 623 nm and 590 nm) under gamma quantum and fast neutron radiation in passive powering mode. The shifts of volt-ampere characteristics into the higher voltage range have been observed in conditions of increasing neutron fluence and radiation dose. The observed increase in the resistance of ohmic contacts is caused by the rising resistance of adjacent area, which in its turn results from the changing mobility of charge carriers. The latter varies with the growth of introduced defects under irradiation. Two different areas of current generation have been identified. A mechanism of current generation depends on injected charge carriers in the range of mid-level electron injection. Moreover, the range of high electron injection is distinguished by changing resistance of light emitting diode cores alongside with current generation conditioned by charge carrier injection.

  16. Life with Four Billion Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Thomas

    2013-04-10

    Today it is commonplace to design and construct single silicon chips with billions of transistors. These are complex systems, difficult (but possible) to design, test, and fabricate. Remarkably, simple living systems can be assembled from a similar number of atoms, most of them in water molecules. In this talk I will present the current status of our attempts at full understanding and complexity reduction of one of the simplest living systems, the free-living bacterial species Mesoplasma florum. This 400 nm diameter cell thrives and replicates every 40 minutes with a genome of only 800 kilobases. Our recent experiments using transposon gene knockouts identified 354 of 683 annotated genes as inessential in laboratory culture when inactivated individually. While a functional redesigned genome will certainly not remove all of those genes, this suggests that roughly half the genome can be removed in an intentional redesign. I will discuss our recent knockout results and methodology, and our future plans for Genome re-engineering using targeted knock-in/knock-out double recombination; whole cell metabolic models; comprehensive whole cell metabolite measurement techniques; creation of plug-and-play metabolic modules for the simplified organism; inherent and engineered biosafety control mechanisms. This redesign is part of a comprehensive plan to lay the foundations for a new discipline of engineering biology. Engineering biological systems requires a fundamentally different viewpoint from that taken by the science of biology. Key engineering principles of modularity, simplicity, separation of concerns, abstraction, flexibility, hierarchical design, isolation, and standardization are of critical importance. The essence of engineering is the ability to imagine, design, model, build, and characterize novel systems to achieve specific goals. Current tools and components for these tasks are primitive. Our approach is to create and distribute standard biological parts, organisms, assembly techniques, and measurement techniques as a way of enabling this new field.

  17. Spend Billions and They Will Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee

    2004-01-01

    People look at one billion dollars in one of two ways: if it is the result of the long, hard effort of years of fundraising, they rejoice; if it signifies an astronomical budget deficit, they cringe. How, then, should people respond as a community to reaching the $1 billion mark ($1,242,436,438, to be exact) in this year's spending for public…

  18. Countdown to Six Billion Teaching Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This teaching kit features six activities focused on helping students understand the significance of the world population reaching six billion for our society and our environment. Featured activities include: (1) History of the World: Part Six Billion; (2) A Woman's Place; (3) Baby-O-Matic; (4) Earth: The Apple of Our Eye; (5) Needs vs. Wants; and…

  19. Automation of Coordinated Planning Between Observatories: The Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maks, Lori; Koratkar, Anuradha; Kerbel, Uri; Pell, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Fulfilling the promise of the era of great observatories, NASA now has more than three space-based astronomical telescopes operating in different wavebands. This situation provides astronomers with the unique opportunity of simultaneously observing a target in multiple wavebands with these observatories. Currently scheduling multiple observatories simultaneously, for coordinated observations, is highly inefficient. Coordinated observations require painstaking manual collaboration among the observatory staff at each observatory. Because they are time-consuming and expensive to schedule, observatories often limit the number of coordinated observations that can be conducted. In order to exploit new paradigms for observatory operation, the Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a tool called the Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT). The main objective of VOLT is to provide a visual tool to automate the planning of coordinated observations by multiple astronomical observatories. Four of NASA's space-based astronomical observatories - the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Chandra - are enthusiastically pursuing the use of VOLT. This paper will focus on the purpose for developing VOLT, as well as the lessons learned during the infusion of VOLT into the planning and scheduling operations of these observatories.

  20. Volt-VAR Optimization on American Electric Power Feeders in Northeast Columbus

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Weaver, T. F.

    2012-05-10

    In 2007 American Electric Power launched the gridSMART® initiative with the goals of increasing efficiency of the electricity delivery system and improving service to the end-use customers. As part of the initiative, a coordinated Volt-VAR system was deployed on eleven distribution feeders at five substations in the Northeast Columbus Ohio Area. The goal of the coordinated Volt-VAR system was to decrease the amount of energy necessary to provide end-use customers with the same quality of service. The evaluation of the Volt-VAR system performance was conducted in two stages. The first stage was composed of simulation, analysis, and estimation, while the second stage was composed of analyzing collected field data. This panel paper will examine the analysis conducted in both stages and present the estimated improvements in system efficiency.

  1. Modelling pesticide volatilization after soil application using the mechanistic model Volt'Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedos, Carole; Génermont, Sophie; Le Cadre, Edith; Garcia, Lucas; Barriuso, Enrique; Cellier, Pierre

    Volatilization of pesticides participates in atmospheric contamination and affects environmental ecosystems including human welfare. Modelling at relevant time and spatial scales is needed to better understand the complex processes involved in pesticide volatilization. Volt'Air-Pesticides has been developed following a two-step procedure to study pesticide volatilization at the field scale and at a quarter time step. Firstly, Volt'Air-NH 3 was adapted by extending the initial transfer of solutes to pesticides and by adding specific calculations for physico-chemical equilibriums as well as for the degradation of pesticides in soil. Secondly, the model was evaluated in terms of 3 pesticides applied on bare soil (atrazine, alachlor, and trifluralin) which display a wide range of volatilization rates. A sensitivity analysis confirmed the relevance of tuning to K h. Then, using Volt'Air-Pesticides, environmental conditions and emission fluxes of the pesticides were compared to fluxes measured under 2 environmental conditions. The model fairly well described water temporal dynamics, soil surface temperature, and energy budget. Overall, Volt'Air-Pesticides estimates of the order of magnitude of the volatilization flux of all three compounds were in good agreement with the field measurements. The model also satisfactorily simulated the decrease in the volatilization rate of the three pesticides during night-time as well as the decrease in the soil surface residue of trifluralin before and after incorporation. However, the timing of the maximum flux rate during the day was not correctly described, thought to be linked to an increased adsorption under dry soil conditions. Thanks to Volt'Air's capacity to deal with pedo-climatic conditions, several existing parameterizations describing adsorption as a function of soil water content could be tested. However, this point requires further investigation. Practically speaking, Volt'Air-Pesticides can be a useful tool to make decision about agricultural practices such as incorporation or for the estimation of overall pesticide volatilization rates, and it holds promise for time specific dynamics.

  2. Battery Test Manual For 12 Volt Start/Stop Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Belt, Jeffrey R.

    2015-05-01

    This manual was prepared by and for the United Stated Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) Electrochemical Energy Storage Team. It is based on the targets established for 12 Volt Start/Stop energy storage development and is similar (with some important changes) to an earlier manual for the former FreedomCAR program. The specific procedures were developed primarily to characterize the performance of energy storage devices relative to the USABC requirements. However, it is anticipated that these procedures will have some utility for characterizing 12 Volt Start/Stop hybrid energy storage device behavior in general.

  3. Actual Versus Estimated Utility Factor of a Large Set of Privately Owned Chevrolet Volts

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart; Thomas Bradley; Stephen Schey

    2014-04-01

    In order to determine the overall fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the amount of operation in charge depleting (CD) versus charge sustaining modes must be determined. Mode of operation is predominantly dependent on customer usage of the vehicle and is therefore highly variable. The utility factor (UF) concept was developed to quantify the distance a group of vehicles has traveled or may travel in CD mode. SAE J2841 presents a UF calculation method based on data collected from travel surveys of conventional vehicles. UF estimates have been used in a variety of areas, including the calculation of window sticker fuel economy, policy decisions, and vehicle design determination. The EV Project, a plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure demonstration being conducted across the United States, provides the opportunity to determine the real-world UF of a large group of privately owned Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicles. Using data collected from Volts enrolled in The EV Project, this paper compares the real-world UF of two groups of Chevrolet Volts to estimated UF's based on J2841. The actual observed fleet utility factors (FUF) for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups studied were observed to be 72% and 74%, respectively. Using the EPA CD ranges, the method prescribed by J2841 estimates a FUF of 65% and 68% for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups, respectively. Volt drivers achieved higher percentages of distance traveled in EV mode for two reasons. First, they had fewer long-distance travel days than drivers in the national travel survey referenced by J2841. Second, they charged more frequently than the J2841 assumption of once per day - drivers of Volts in this study averaged over 1.4 charging events per day. Although actual CD range varied widely as driving conditions varied, the average CD ranges for the two Volt groups studied matched the EPA CD range estimates, so CD range variation did not affect FUF results.

  4. 39. NORTH WALL OF MST AT STATION 124. 480VOLT MASTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. NORTH WALL OF MST AT STATION 124. 480-VOLT MASTER POWER SHUTOFF AND CIRCUIT BREAKERS FOR CRANE NORTH DOORS/CRANE SOUTH DOORS ON LEFT; FOR BRIDGE CRANE AND DUCT HEATER 122 ON RIGHT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  5. 33 CFR 183.430 - Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts. 183.430 Section 183.430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.430 Conductors in...

  6. 33 CFR 183.430 - Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts. 183.430 Section 183.430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems...

  7. 33 CFR 183.430 - Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts. 183.430 Section 183.430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems...

  8. 33 CFR 183.430 - Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts. 183.430 Section 183.430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems...

  9. 33 CFR 183.435 - Conductors in circuits of 50 volts or more.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conductors in circuits of 50 volts or more. 183.435 Section 183.435 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.435 Conductors in circuits...

  10. 33 CFR 183.430 - Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts. 183.430 Section 183.430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems...

  11. How much are Chevrolet Volts in The EV Project driven in EV Mode?

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart

    2013-08-01

    This report summarizes key conclusions from analysis of data collected from Chevrolet Volts participating in The EV Project. Topics include how many miles are driven in EV mode, how far vehicles are driven between charging events, and how much energy is charged from the electric grid per charging event.

  12. How many electric miles do Nissan Leafs and Chevrolet Volts in The EV Project travel?

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents travel statistics and metrics describing the driving behavior of Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt drivers in the EV Project. It specifically quantifies the distance each group of vehicles drives each month. This paper will be published to INL's external website and will be accessible by the general public.

  13. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Cold Weather On-road Testing of the Chevrolet Volt

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, John

    2015-03-01

    This report details cold weather on-road testing of a Chevrolet Volt. It quantifies changes in efficiency and electric range as ambient temperature changes. It will be published to INL's AVTA website as an INL technical report and will be accessible to the general public.

  14. 5. Photocopy of photograph, c. 1904. VIEW OF 12,000 VOLT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph, c. 1904. VIEW OF 12,000 VOLT TRANSMISSION LINE BETWEEN THE ORIGINAL POWER HOUSE AT DAM NO. 5 AND MARTINSBURG. (From the collection of Mr. Charles Morrison, Hagerstown, MD) - Dam No. 5 Hydroelectric Plant, On Potomac River, Hedgesville, Berkeley County, WV

  15. 29. INDUCTION MOTOR (6600 VOLTS, 5750 H.P.) DRIVES THE 21INCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INDUCTION MOTOR (6600 VOLTS, 5750 H.P.) DRIVES THE 21-INCH AND 18-INCH BILLET MILLS. MOTOR WAS MANUFACTURED BY THE GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. An optimization approach for online identification of harmonic resonance due to pending Volt/VAr operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, Kerry D.

    The emphasis on creating a more efficient distribution system has led many utility companies to employ dynamic voltage and VAr compensation (Volt/VAr) applications that reduce energy demand, generation, and losses associated with the transmission and distribution of energy. To achieve these benefits, Volt/VAr applications rely upon algorithms to control voltage support equipment, such as transformer load tap changers, voltage regulators, and capacitor banks. The majority of these algorithms utilize metaheuristic programming methods to determine the Volt/VAr scheme that produces the most energy efficient operating conditions. It has been well documented that the interaction between capacitor bank reactance and the inductive reactance of a distribution system can produce parallel harmonic resonance that can damage utility and customer equipment. The Volt/VAr controlling algorithms that account for harmonics do so in an indirect manner that can mask harmonic resonance conditions. Unlike previous research endeavors, the primary focus of the method described within this dissertation is to identify Volt/VAr schemes that prevent harmonic resonance due to capacitor bank operation. Instead of a metaheuristic approach, the harmonic resonance identification algorithm relies upon constrained mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP), which is more suited for analyzing impedance characteristics created by the energized states of a system of capacitor banks. Utilizing a numerical approach improves the accuracy of identifying harmonic resonance conditions, while also reducing the complexity of the process by exclusively relying upon the system's admittance characteristics. The novel harmonic resonance identification method is applicable to distribution systems that are dynamically reconfigured, which can result in a number of unknown harmonic resonance producing conditions, a feature unavailable with existing controlling algorithms. The ability to identify all harmonic resonance producing configurations based upon a required compensation level also provides a utility company with a means to determine if voltage support shall be purchased from an outside source. Documentation within this dissertation describes the engineering and mathematical theories that support the MINLP dependent harmonic resonance identification algorithm.

  17. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Sean A; Døssing, Lasse N; Beukes, Nicolas J; Bau, Michael; Kruger, Stephanus J; Frei, Robert; Canfield, Donald E

    2013-09-26

    It is widely assumed that atmospheric oxygen concentrations remained persistently low (less than 10(-5) times present levels) for about the first 2 billion years of Earth's history. The first long-term oxygenation of the atmosphere is thought to have taken place around 2.3 billion years ago, during the Great Oxidation Event. Geochemical indications of transient atmospheric oxygenation, however, date back to 2.6-2.7 billion years ago. Here we examine the distribution of chromium isotopes and redox-sensitive metals in the approximately 3-billion-year-old Nsuze palaeosol and in the near-contemporaneous Ijzermyn iron formation from the Pongola Supergroup, South Africa. We find extensive mobilization of redox-sensitive elements through oxidative weathering. Furthermore, using our data we compute a best minimum estimate for atmospheric oxygen concentrations at that time of 3 × 10(-4) times present levels. Overall, our findings suggest that there were appreciable levels of atmospheric oxygen about 3 billion years ago, more than 600 million years before the Great Oxidation Event and some 300-400 million years earlier than previous indications for Earth surface oxygenation. PMID:24067713

  18. Billion shot flashlamp for spaceborne lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Linda; Schuda, Felix; Degnan, John

    1990-01-01

    A billion-shot flashlamp developed under a NASA contract for spaceborne laser missions is presented. Lifetime-limiting mechanisms are identified and addressed. Two energy loadings of 15 and 44 Joules were selected for the initial accelerated life testing. A fluorescence-efficiency test station was used for measuring the useful-light output degradation of the lamps. The design characteristics meeting NASA specifications are outlined. Attention is focused on the physical properties of tungsten-matrix cathodes, the chemistry of dispenser cathodes, and anode degradation. It is reported that out of the total 83 lamps tested in the program, 4 lamps reached a billion shots and one lamp is beyond 1.7 billion shots, while at 44 Joules, 4 lamps went beyond 100 million shots and one lamp reached 500 million shots.

  19. Thirteen billion years in half an hour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Bruce A.

    2005-10-01

    We take a high-speed tour of the approximately thirteen billion-year history of our universe focusing on unsolved mysteries and the key events that have sculpted and shaped it - from inflation in the first split second to the dark energy which is currently causing the expansion of the cosmos to accelerate.

  20. Where Have All the Billions Gone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Linda; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Providing a basis to help Alaskans determine future spending levels and priorities, this report traces how the state spent more than $26 billion in general funds from fiscal years 1981 through 1986 before oil prices crashed and brought state revenues tumbling down with them. Figures indicate that cumulative general fund expenditures over the…

  1. Evaluation of Multiple Inverter Volt-VAR Control Interactions with Realistic Grid Impedances

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Hoke, Anderson; Lundstrom, Blake

    2015-07-03

    Integration of large numbers of distributed photovoltaic (PV) systems in electric distribution circuits often requires advanced functions (e.g. volt-VAR, frequency-Watt etc.). However, significant concerns have been raised about potential for PV inverters with such controls to interact with one another in a way that could cause grid instability. The lack of standardized inverter models makes it hard to simulate such transient interactions in software. Similarly it is very hard to test these dynamic inverter interactions in the laboratory. In this paper, unique Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) techniques are presented to experimentally test for interactions of multiple PV inverters connected to multiple points-of-common-coupling (PCCs) with grid impedances between them. Sample test results are provided from simulation-only scenarios and PHIL testing. Though simulation results indicated possible harmful interactions between inverters' volt-VAR controllers; no such interactions were found in the limited hardware testing.

  2. Volt-time characteristics of short air gaps under nonstandard lightning voltage waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.; Mishra, A.K.; McConnell, B.W.

    1996-02-01

    The breakdown voltage level of a dielectric system under a transient voltage of a given waveshape is not a constant parameter. When transient voltages of the same waveshape but of increasing amplitude are applied to a dielectric system, the dielectric breaks down at higher voltage levels at shorter time delays for the higher applied voltages. This characteristic, known as the volt-time or time-lag characteristic, significantly influences the insulation coordination of an electric power system. The volt-time characteristics of 5-cm long rod-plane and rod-rod air gaps were experimentally determined with five different waveshapes of the applied impulse voltage. The front time of the waves was varied from 25 ns to 10 {micro}s, and the time to half value was varied from 0.5 {micro}s to 100 {micro}s. The volt-time characteristics were also checked analytically using the concept of disruptive effect. The parameters for the disruptive effect were experimentally determined.

  3. Four billion people facing severe water scarcity.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Mesfin M; Hoekstra, Arjen Y

    2016-02-01

    Freshwater scarcity is increasingly perceived as a global systemic risk. Previous global water scarcity assessments, measuring water scarcity annually, have underestimated experienced water scarcity by failing to capture the seasonal fluctuations in water consumption and availability. We assess blue water scarcity globally at a high spatial resolution on a monthly basis. We find that two-thirds of the global population (4.0 billion people) live under conditions of severe water scarcity at least 1 month of the year. Nearly half of those people live in India and China. Half a billion people in the world face severe water scarcity all year round. Putting caps to water consumption by river basin, increasing water-use efficiencies, and better sharing of the limited freshwater resources will be key in reducing the threat posed by water scarcity on biodiversity and human welfare. PMID:26933676

  4. Four billion people facing severe water scarcity

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Mesfin M.; Hoekstra, Arjen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater scarcity is increasingly perceived as a global systemic risk. Previous global water scarcity assessments, measuring water scarcity annually, have underestimated experienced water scarcity by failing to capture the seasonal fluctuations in water consumption and availability. We assess blue water scarcity globally at a high spatial resolution on a monthly basis. We find that two-thirds of the global population (4.0 billion people) live under conditions of severe water scarcity at least 1 month of the year. Nearly half of those people live in India and China. Half a billion people in the world face severe water scarcity all year round. Putting caps to water consumption by river basin, increasing water-use efficiencies, and better sharing of the limited freshwater resources will be key in reducing the threat posed by water scarcity on biodiversity and human welfare. PMID:26933676

  5. The nonprofit sector's $100 billion opportunity.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Bill; Jansen, Paul; Silverman, Les

    2003-05-01

    Imagine what an extra $100 billion a year could do for philanthropic and other nonprofit institutions. According to a new study, the nonprofit sector could free that amount--maybe even more--by making five changes in the way it operates. The study asked two central questions: Does the sector's money flow from its source to its ultimate use as efficiently and effectively as possible? If not, where are the big opportunities to increase social benefit? According to former senator Bill Bradley and McKinsey's Paul Jansen and Les Silverman, nonprofits could save roughly $25 billion a year by changing the way they raise funds. By distributing funds more quickly, they could put an extra $30 billion to work. Organizations could generate more than $60 billion a year by streamlining and restructuring the way in which they provide services and by reducing administrative costs. And they could free up even more money--an amount impossible to estimate--by better allocating funds among service providers. The authors admit that making those changes won't be easy. The nonprofit world, historically seen as a collection of locally focused charities, has become an enormous sector, but it lacks the managerial processes and incentives that help keep the for-profit world on track. And when the baby boomers start to retire in less than a decade, public budgets will be squeezed even more than they are today. If the nonprofit sector is to help the nation cope with the stresses ahead, it must become more efficient and challenge its traditional concepts of stewardship. PMID:12747166

  6. Charge Transfer Between Ground-State Si(3+) and He at Electron-Volt Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The charge-transfer rate coefficient for the reaction Si(3+)(3s(sup 2)S) + He yields products is measured by means of a combined technique of laser ablation and ion storage. A cylindrical radio-frequency ion trap was used to store Si(3+) ions produced by laser ablation of solid silicon targets. The rate coefficient of the reaction was derived from the decay rate of the ion signal. The measured rate coefficient is 6.27(exp +0.68)(sub -0.52) x 10(exp -10)cu cm/s at T(sub equiv) = 3.9 x 10(exp 3)K. This value is about 30% higher than the Landau-Zener calculation of Butler and Dalgarno and is larger by about a factor of 3 than the recent full quantal calculation of Honvault et al.

  7. Absolute differential cross sections for the scattering of kilo-electron-volt O atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.J.; Gao, R.S.; Lindsay, B.G.; Smith, K.A.; Stebbings, R.F.

    1996-03-01

    This paper reports measurements of absolute differential cross sections for the direct scattering of oxygen atoms by He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, CF{sub 4}, and SF{sub 6} targets. The measured cross sections include contributions from all elastic and inelastic processes that result in a fast neutral oxygen atom product. Cross sections are presented for 0.5- and 1.5-keV projectile energies over the laboratory angular range 0.2{degree}{endash}5{degree}. When compared in the center-of-mass reference frame, these cross sections exhibit a high degree of similarity in both amplitude and angular dependence. The cross sections for N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O are inverted using a partial-wave analysis to yield empirical interaction potentials, which can then be used to extrapolate the measurements down to lower energies. Using these potentials, cross sections are evaluated at 0.1 keV. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. X-ray laser resonator for the kilo-electron-volt range

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jie; Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 ; Tomov, Ivan V.; Er, Ali O.; Rentzepis, Peter M.

    2013-04-29

    We have designed, constructed, and tested an x-ray laser resonator operating in the hard x-ray, keV energy region. This ring x-ray laser cavity is formed by four highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals. The crystals are set at the Bragg angles that allow for the complete 360 Degree-Sign round trip of the 2.37 A, 5.23 keV L{sub {alpha}} line of neodymium. In addition, we also present experimental data of a similar ring laser resonator that utilizes the Cr K{sub {alpha}}, 5.41 keV, x-ray line to propagate through the four mirrors of the cavity. The specific properties of these x-ray laser resonator mirrors, including reflection losses and cavity arrangement, are presented.

  9. TOU' rates hold out $13-billion prize

    SciTech Connect

    Slaboszewicz, C.

    1994-03-15

    By 2000, U.S. electric utilities will add 90,000 MW of generating capacity to meet peaking needs. Rather than spend $45 billion on these power plants, which will be used only a couple of hundred hours each year, electric utilities could use incentive pricing-residential time-of-use (TOU) rates-to save consumers up to $13 billion. The combination of market forces and new technology to support automatic meter reading and other applications makes these savings not only possible but practical. Unlike prices at other capacity-constrained industries such as airlines or telephone companies, electric utility prices usually do not vary by time of day. The result is average capacity factors of 43.8 percent (based on 1989 data), compared to a U.S. airlines average of 63.2 percent. Significantly, the airline average use to be below 50 percent in 1970, when they, like electric utilities, were closely regulated. Through incentive pricing, airlines were able to achieve almost a 30-percent increase in efficiency. According to studies by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Edison Electric Institute (EEI), TOU pricing could increase the efficiency of U.S. power plant use by nearly 15 percent. Power plant needs for the next seven years offer an excellent opportunity to use TOU pricing to save consumers billions of dollars. According to Burns McDonnell, an engineering firm, new electric generation resources will not be needed before the turn of the century to prevent to projected deficit of peaking capacity. Indeed, Burns McDonnell estimates a current excess of 152,000 MW in nation-wide baseload capacity. TOU pricing, according to EPRI and EEI, causes residential consumers to reduce their onpeak electricity consumption by 20 percent. With a residential peak load of 183,000 MW, this reduction translates into over 36,000 MW of capacity.

  10. Connectivity-Enhanced Route Selection and Adaptive Control for the Chevrolet Volt: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Wood, E.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2014-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors evaluated connectivity-enabled efficiency enhancements for the Chevrolet Volt. A high-level model was developed to predict vehicle fuel and electricity consumption based on driving characteristics and vehicle state inputs. These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes between tens of thousands of real-world origin/destination pairs. The overall energy savings potential of green routing and intelligent mode scheduling was estimated at 5% and 3% respectively. These represent substantial opportunities considering that they only require software adjustments to implement.

  11. Connectivity-enhanced route selection and adaptive control for the Chevrolet Volt

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gonder, Jeffrey; Wood, Eric; Rajagopalan, Sai

    2016-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors evaluated connectivity-enabled efficiency enhancements for the Chevrolet Volt. A high-level model was developed to predict vehicle fuel and electricity consumption based on driving characteristics and vehicle state inputs. These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes between tens of thousands of real-world origin/destination pairs. The overall energy savings potential of green routing and intelligent mode scheduling was estimated at 5% and 3%, respectively. Furthermore, these represent substantial opportunities considering that they only require software adjustments to implement.

  12. Delivering on Obama's renewables promise will cost billions

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-15

    For wind energy in the eastern half of the U.S., costs would be $50 billion to $80 billion for transmission lines, in addition to the $700 billion to $1.1 trillion to build the wind farms to generate power.

  13. Simulating Billion-Task Parallel Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S; Park, Alfred J

    2014-01-01

    In simulating large parallel systems, bottom-up approaches exercise detailed hardware models with effects from simplified software models or traces, whereas top-down approaches evaluate the timing and functionality of detailed software models over coarse hardware models. Here, we focus on the top-down approach and significantly advance the scale of the simulated parallel programs. Via the direct execution technique combined with parallel discrete event simulation, we stretch the limits of the top-down approach by simulating message passing interface (MPI) programs with millions of tasks. Using a timing-validated benchmark application, a proof-of-concept scaling level is achieved to over 0.22 billion virtual MPI processes on 216,000 cores of a Cray XT5 supercomputer, representing one of the largest direct execution simulations to date, combined with a multiplexing ratio of 1024 simulated tasks per real task.

  14. Performance criteria guideline for three explosion protection methods of electrical equipment rated up to 15,000 volts AC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linley, L. J.; Luper, A. B.; Dunn, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, is reviewing explosion protection methods for use in gassy coal mines. This performance criteria guideline is an evaluation of three explosion protection methods of machines electrically powered with voltages up to 15,000 volts ac. A sufficient amount of basic research has been accomplished to verify that the explosion proof and pressurized enclosure methods can provide adequate explosion protection with the present state of the art up to 15,000 volts ac. This routine application of the potted enclosure as a stand alone protection method requires further investigation or development in order to clarify performance criteria and verification certification requirements. An extensive literature search, a series of high voltage tests, and a design evaluation of the three explosion protection methods indicate that the explosion proof, pressurized, and potted enclosures can all be used to enclose up to 15,000 volts ac.

  15. Assessing the ability of mechanistic volatilization models to simulate soil surface conditions: a study with the Volt'Air model.

    PubMed

    Garcia, L; Bedos, C; Génermont, S; Braud, I; Cellier, P

    2011-09-01

    Ammonia and pesticide volatilization in the field is a surface phenomenon involving physical and chemical processes that depend on the soil surface temperature and water content. The water transfer, heat transfer and energy budget sub models of volatilization models are adapted from the most commonly accepted formalisms and parameterizations. They are less detailed than the dedicated models describing water and heat transfers and surface status. The aim of this work was to assess the ability of one of the available mechanistic volatilization models, Volt'Air, to accurately describe the pedo-climatic conditions of a soil surface at the required time and space resolution. The assessment involves: (i) a sensitivity analysis, (ii) an evaluation of Volt'Air outputs in the light of outputs from a reference Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model (SiSPAT) and three experimental datasets, and (iii) the study of three tests based on modifications of SiSPAT to establish the potential impact of the simplifying assumptions used in Volt'Air. The analysis confirmed that a 5 mm surface layer was well suited, and that Volt'Air surface temperature correlated well with the experimental measurements as well as with SiSPAT outputs. In terms of liquid water transfers, Volt'Air was overall consistent with SiSPAT, with discrepancies only during major rainfall events and dry weather conditions. The tests enabled us to identify the main source of the discrepancies between Volt'Air and SiSPAT: the lack of gaseous water transfer description in Volt'Air. They also helped to explain why neither Volt'Air nor SiSPAT was able to represent lower values of surface water content: current classical water retention and hydraulic conductivity models are not yet adapted to cases of very dry conditions. Given the outcomes of this study, we discuss to what extent the volatilization models can be improved and the questions they pose for current research in water transfer modeling and parameterization. PMID:21700320

  16. Laboratory testing of chloride 3ET205 6 volt traction battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Jasper E.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the testing performed on the Chloride 3ET205 6 volt traction battery by the INEL Battery Laboratory, to present the results and conclusions of this testing, and to make appropriate recommendations. The Chloride 3ET205 is a tubular plate lead-acid battery made in England by the Chloride Battery Company and imported into the U.S. The traction battery division of Chloride has been sold, although Chloride assured its customers that the 3ET205 would continue to be available for their consumption. The new owners of the factory are Tudor and Fulman of France. The joint venture company name is C. E. Ac. It is our understanding that all orders are to be sent to the factory at Salford Rd., Bolton, Lancashire, England BL5 1DD.

  17. 2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN 0815 Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), including testing the PHEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 12,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Chevrolet Volt PHEV (VIN 1G1RD6E48BU100815). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  18. Electric shock and the human body - or 'Is it amps or volts that kill you, sir?'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Colin

    1986-11-01

    One of the experiences that children seem to find most exciting in the school science laboratory is the hair raising one of being charged up using a van de Graaf generator and receiving small electric shocks. Children are quite rightly concerned about when electricity might hurt them and what its effects are. They are motivated by science directly concerned with the human body, with obvious impact on their lives. This is particularly important for girls, who often seem to find other aspects of electricity amongst the least interesting topics in science. Here is an opportunity for the teacher to build on immediate and genuine curiosity. Pupils are already well aware that mains electricity at 240 V can be lethal, yet the teacher seems strangely happy to expose them here to what he claims is tens of thousands of volts! They ask questions such as 'Is it amps of volts that kill you?' with a genuine desire to try and resolve the paradox. When young pupils see an oscilloscope for the first time, they often immediately associate it with the heart monitor seen on a TV hospital drama. ('He's dead sir!' they say, as you show them the timebase operating in the absence of an input signal). They use a microphone to try and detect an ECG signal without success. The real heart monitor works in a totally different way, and that it is in fact quite closely related to the action of electric shocks. The article is a summary of the reading the author undertook to try and cure his ignorance of the interaction between electricity and the human body, so that he could make something of this spontaneous interest on the part of the pupils. It also provides background material for A-level potential medical students, who often study physics without seeing its direct relevance to medicine.

  19. Uranium in Canada: A billion dollar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzicka, V. )

    1989-12-01

    In 1988, Canada maintained its position as the world's leading producer of uranium with an output of more than 12,400 MT of uranium in concentrates, worth $1.1 billion Canadian. As domestic requirements represent only 15% of current Canadian production, most of the output was exported. With current implementation of the Canada/US Free Trade Agreement, the US has become Canada's major uranium export customer. With a large share of the world's known uranium resources, Canada remains the focus of international uranium exploration activity. In 1988, the uranium exploration expenditures in Canada exceeded $58 million Canadian. The principal exploration targets were deposits associated with Proterozoic unconformities in Saskatchewan and Northwest Territories, particularly those in the Athabasca and Thelon basin regions of the Canadian Shield. Major attention was also paid to polymetallic deposits in which uranium is associated with precious metals, such as gold and platinum group elements. Conceptual genetic models for these deposit types represent useful tools to guide exploration.

  20. Agroecohydrology: Key to Feeding 9 Billion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, J.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural production necessary to feed 9 billion people in 2050 depends on increased production on existing croplands, and expanding onto 'marginal' lands. A high proportion of these lands are marginal because they are too steep or too dry to reliably support crop production. These same characteristics increase their susceptibility to accelerated erosion, leading (for most soil profiles) to further reductions in plant available water as infiltration and soil profile water holding capacity decline. Sustaining production on these marginal lands will require careful land use planning. In this paper, we present a land use planning framework that integrates 4 elements: (1) potential production (based on soil profile characteristics), (2) edaphic, topographic and climatic limitations to production, (3) soil resistance to degradation, and (4) resilience. This framework expands existing land capability classification systems through the integration of biophysical feedbacks and thresholds. State and transition models, similar to those currently applied to rangelands in the United States and other countries, are used to organize and communicate knowledge about the sustainability of different land use changes and management actions at field to regional scales. This framework emphasizes hydrologic characteristics of soil profiles and landscapes over fertility because fertility declines are more easily addressed through increased inputs. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of how research in ecohydrology can be more effectively focused to support sustainable food production in the context of increasingly rapid social and economic changes throughout the world.

  1. 75 FR 21353 - Intel Corporation, Fab 20 Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Volt Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Intel Corporation, Fab 20 Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Volt Technical Resources, Staff Finders Technical, Kelly Services, Retronix International, Manpower-Oregon and Nikon Precision, Inc.,...

  2. 75 FR 11920 - Agilent Technologies, Eesof Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Volt and Managed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Agilent Technologies, Eesof Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Volt and Managed Business Solutions (MBS), Westlake Village, CA, Santa Rosa, CA, Santa Clara, CA, Everett, WA; Amended Certification...

  3. What Kind of Charging Infrastructure Do Chevrolet Volt Drivers in The EV Project Use and When Do They Use It?

    SciTech Connect

    Shawn Salisbury

    2014-09-01

    This document will present information describing the charging behavior of Chevrolet Volts that were enrolled in the EV Project. It will included aggregated data from more than 1,800 vehicles regarding locations, power levels, and time-of-day of charging events performed by those vehicles. This document will be published to the INL AVTA website.

  4. Colleges Angle for Billions to Build Obama's Broadband Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2009-01-01

    As the federal government prepares to pour billions of stimulus dollars into increased broadband Internet access, colleges are trying to claim much of the money and shape the emerging national networking policy. Their focus is $4.7-billion that will be doled out under a new grant program administered by a small Commerce Department agency called…

  5. ZnO Nanowire-Based Corona Discharge Devices Operated Under Hundreds of Volts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenming; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2016-12-01

    Minimizing the voltage of corona discharges, especially when using nanomaterials, has been of great interest in the past decade or so. In this paper, we report a new corona discharge device by using ZnO nanowires operated in atmospheric air to realize continuous corona discharge excited by hundreds of volts. ZnO nanowires were synthesized on microelectrodes using electric-field-assisted wet chemical method, and a thin tungsten film was deposited on the microchip to enhance discharging performance. The testing results showed that the corona inception voltages were minimized greatly by using nanowires compared to conventional dischargers as a result of the local field enhancement of nanowires. The corona could be continuously generated and self-sustaining. It was proved that the law of corona inception voltage obeyed the conventional Peek's breakdown criterion. An optimal thickness of tungsten film coated over ZnO nanowires was figured out to obtain the lowest corona inception voltage. The ion concentration of the nanowire-based discharger attained 10(17)/m(3) orders of magnitude, which is practicable for most discharging applications. PMID:26880727

  6. ZnO Nanowire-Based Corona Discharge Devices Operated Under Hundreds of Volts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenming; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2016-02-01

    Minimizing the voltage of corona discharges, especially when using nanomaterials, has been of great interest in the past decade or so. In this paper, we report a new corona discharge device by using ZnO nanowires operated in atmospheric air to realize continuous corona discharge excited by hundreds of volts. ZnO nanowires were synthesized on microelectrodes using electric-field-assisted wet chemical method, and a thin tungsten film was deposited on the microchip to enhance discharging performance. The testing results showed that the corona inception voltages were minimized greatly by using nanowires compared to conventional dischargers as a result of the local field enhancement of nanowires. The corona could be continuously generated and self-sustaining. It was proved that the law of corona inception voltage obeyed the conventional Peek's breakdown criterion. An optimal thickness of tungsten film coated over ZnO nanowires was figured out to obtain the lowest corona inception voltage. The ion concentration of the nanowire-based discharger attained 1017/m3 orders of magnitude, which is practicable for most discharging applications.

  7. Gaia: how to map a billion stars with a billion pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, J. H. J.

    2008-07-01

    Gaia, ESA's ambitious star-mapper mission due for launch late-2011, will provide multi-epoch micro-arcsecond astrometric and milli-magnitude photometric data for the brightest one billion objects in the sky, down to at least magnitude 20. Spectroscopic data will simultaneously be collected for the subset of the brightest 100 million stars, down to about magnitude 17. This massive data volume will allow astronomers to reconstruct the structure, evolution and formation history of the Milky Way. It will also revolutionize studies of the solar system and stellar physics and will contribute to diverse research areas, ranging from extra-solar planets to general relativity. Underlying Gaia's scientific harvest will lie in a Catalogue, built on the fundamental space-based measurements. During the 5-year nominal operational lifetime, Gaia's payload, with its CCD mosaic containing 1 billion pixels, will autonomously detect all objects of interest and observe them throughout their passage of the focal plane. This paper discusses the workings of the Gaia instrument, details its payload, and discusses in depth how the scientific measurements will be collected. It addresses issues like maintenance of the scanning law, on-board data processing, the detection and confirmation of objects (single and multiple stars), the detection and rejection of cosmic rays and solar protons, the fundamental science measurements themselves composed of windows of CCD samples (pixels), and special strategies employed to maximize the science return for moving (i.e., solar-system) objects. The paper also explains how an on-board priority scheme will ensure catalogue completeness down to the faintest magnitudes possible, despite the limited ground-station availability and the enormous data volume that will be sent to the ground.

  8. Development of an Enhanced GenVARR™ (Generator Volt Ampere Reactive Reserve) System

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Joe E.

    2009-03-12

    Transmission system operators require near real time knowledge of reactive power capability to reliably operate large electric power transmission systems. Reactive power produced by, or capable of being produced by, a power generator is often estimated based on a series of mega volt amperes (MVA) capability curves for the generator. These curves indicate the ability of the generator to produce real and reactive power under a variety of conditions. In transmission planning and operating studies, it is often assumed, based on estimates for these capability curves, that the generator can provide its rated MVA capability output when needed for system stability However, generators may not always operate at levels depicted by the maximum MVA capability curve due to present constraints. Transmission system operators utilizing the generators’ capability curves for operation decisions regarding transmission system stability or for planning horizons may overestimate the capability of the generators to supply reactive power when required. Southern Company has enhanced GenVARR(TM), the system of plant data query, retrieval, and analysis and calculates the actual – not estimated -- remaining reactive power output capability. The remaining reactive output is considered spinning reserve and is displayed graphically to transmission control center and generating plant operators to identify real time VAR limits. GenVARR is capable of aggregating generators from a defined region, or other user selectable combinations, to represent the available reserves that the operators are specifically interested in. GenVARR(TM) has been put into live production operation and is expected to significantly improve the overall visibility of the reactive reserve capability of the system. This new version of GenVARR(TM) significantly enhances the products structure and performance, and enables links to other key transmission system operation tools.

  9. Design of a Versatile and Low Cost μVolt Level A to D Conversion System for Use in Medical Instrumentation Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kerry; Robinson, Neil

    2008-12-01

    Modern medical facilities place considerable reliance on electronic instrumentation for purposes of calibration and monitoring of therapeutic processes, many of which employ electrical and electronic apparatus that itself generates considerable levels of interference in the form of background electromagnetic radiation (EMR). Additionally diverse ambient conditions in the clinical environment such as uncontrolled temperature, humidity, noise, and vibration place added stress on sensitive instrumentation. In order to obtain accurate, repeatable, and reliable data in such environments, instrumentation used must be largely immune to these factors. Analogue instrumentation is particularly susceptible to unstable environmental conditions. Sensors typically output an analogue current or voltage and it can be demonstrated that considerable overall benefit to the measuring process would result if sensor outputs could be converted to a robust digital format at the earliest possible stage. A practical and low cost system for A to D conversion at μVolt signal levels is described in this work. It has been successfully employed in portable radiation dosimetry instrumentation and used under diverse clinical conditions and it affords an improvement in signal resolution in excess of an order of magnitude over commonly used analogue techniques.

  10. Academic Pork Barrel Tops $2-Billion for the First Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey; Borrego, Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    Describes how, despite the growing budget deficit, Congress directed a record $2 billion to college projects in 2003, many of them dealing with security and bioterrorism. Includes data tables on the earmarks. (EV)

  11. Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People

    ScienceCinema

    Daniel Nocera

    2013-07-19

    Daniel Nocera, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor whose recent research focuses on solar-powered fuels, presents a Brookhaven Science Associates Distinguished Lecture, titled "Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People -- One at a Time."

  12. Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Nocera

    2011-09-12

    Daniel Nocera, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor whose recent research focuses on solar-powered fuels, presents a Brookhaven Science Associates Distinguished Lecture, titled "Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People -- One at a Time."

  13. $3.4 Billion Remains in Race to Top Fund

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.; McNeil, Michele

    2010-01-01

    By selecting just two states as first-round Race to the Top winners, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is leaving $3.4 billion on the table for the remaining states to vie for in round two. Delaware and Tennessee beat out 14 other finalists last week to win the first grants awarded in the $4 billion Race to the Top Fund competition. Mr.

  14. $3.4 Billion Remains in Race to Top Fund

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.; McNeil, Michele

    2010-01-01

    By selecting just two states as first-round Race to the Top winners, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is leaving $3.4 billion on the table for the remaining states to vie for in round two. Delaware and Tennessee beat out 14 other finalists last week to win the first grants awarded in the $4 billion Race to the Top Fund competition. Mr.…

  15. Early Archean (3.3-billion to 3.5-billion-year-old) microfossils from Warrawoona Group, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopf, J. W.; Packer, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    Cellularly preserved filamentous and colonial fossil microorganisms have been discovered in bedded carbonaceous cherts from the Early Archean Apex Basalt and Towers Formation of northwestern Western Australia. The cell types detected suggest that cyanobacteria, and therefore oxygen-producing photosynthesis, may have been extant as early as 3.3 billion to 3.5 billion years ago. These fossils are among the oldest now known from the geologic record; their discovery substantiates previous reports of Early Archean microfossils in Warrawoona Group strata.

  16. Optimization of Solar Cell Design for Use with GreenVolts CPV System: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00281

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, S.

    2011-05-01

    GreenVolts, a Bay area start-up, was developing a CPV system that was based on a unique reflective optical design. They were interested in adapting the inverted GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs cell structure designed at NREL for use in their system. The purpose of this project was to optimize the inverted GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs cell for operation in the GreenVolts optical system.

  17. Multimillion to billion atom simulations of nanosystems under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, P.

    2008-12-01

    Advanced materials and devices with nanometer grain/feature sizes are being developed to achieve higher strength and toughness in ceramic materials and greater speeds in electronic devices. Below 100 nm, however, continuum description of materials and devices must be supplemented by atomistic descriptions. Current state of the art atomistic simulations involve 10 million - 1 billion atoms. We investigate initiation, growth and healing of wing cracks in confined silica glass by multimillion atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Under dynamic compression, frictional sliding of pre-crack surfaces nucleates nanovoids, which evolve into nanocrack columns at the pre-crack tip. Nanocrack columns merge to form a wing crack, which grows via coalescence with nanovoids in the direction of maximum compression. Lateral confinement arrests the growth and partially heals the wing crack. Growth and arrest of the wing crack occur repeatedly, as observed in dynamic compression experiments on brittle solids under lateral confinement. MD simulation of hypervelocity projectile impact in aluminum nitride and alumina has also been studied. The simulations reveal strong interplay between shock- induced structural phase transformation, plastic deformation and brittle cracks. The shock wave splits into an elastic precursor and a wurtzite-to-rocksalt structural transformation wave. When the elastic wave reflected from the boundary of the sample interacts with the transformation wave front, nanocavities are generated along the penetration path of the projectile and dislocations in adjacent regions. The nanocavities coalesce to form mode I brittle cracks while dislocations generate kink bands that give rise to mode II cracks. These simulations provide a microscopic view of defects associated with simultaneous tensile and shear cracking at the structural phase transformation boundary due to shock impact in high-strength ceramics. Initiation of chemical reactions at shock fronts prior to detonation and dynamic transition in the shock structure of an energetic material (RDX) and reaction of aluminium nanoparticles in oxygen atmosphere followed by explosive burning is also discussed.

  18. Energy spectra of a number of celestial x-ray sources in the energy range from 2 to 60 kiloelectron volts.

    PubMed

    McCracken, K G

    1966-11-25

    The emission of 20 to 60 kev x-rays by an astronomical object in the constellation of Cygnus has been observed with a balloon-borne x-ray telescope flown from Hyderabad, India. The balloon data, used in conjunction with data pertaining to the flux in the wavelength range from 2 to 10 A can be fitted by a power law in photon energy varying as (h(v))-(1.7). The Cygnus object is the brightest object in the sky in the hard x-ray wavelength range and has the hardest spectrum of all observed objects that emit x-rays. The astronomical object should be capable of accelerating protons up to energies of the order of 10(18) electron volts. Upper limits to the hard x-ray fluxes from Sco XR-1, Cyg XR-2, Oph XR-1, and Ser XR-1 are established; it is shown that the Sco XR-1 spectrum is very soft. PMID:17752800

  19. Winglets Save Billions of Dollars in Fuel Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    The upturned ends now featured on many airplane wings are saving airlines billions of dollars in fuel costs. Called winglets, the drag-reducing technology was advanced through the research of Langley Research Center engineer Richard Whitcomb and through flight tests conducted at Dryden Flight Research Center. Seattle-based Aviation Partners Boeing -- a partnership between Aviation Partners Inc., of Seattle, and The Boeing Company, of Chicago -- manufactures Blended Winglets, a unique design featured on Boeing aircraft around the world. These winglets have saved more than 2 billion gallons of jet fuel to date, representing a cost savings of more than $4 billion and a reduction of almost 21.5 million tons in carbon dioxide emissions.

  20. Causal Analysis of the Inadvertent Contact with an Uncontrolled Electrical Hazardous Energy Source (120 Volts AC)

    SciTech Connect

    David E. James; Dennis E. Raunig; Sean S. Cunningham

    2014-10-01

    On September 25, 2013, a Health Physics Technician (HPT) was performing preparations to support a pneumatic transfer from the HFEF Decon Cell to the Room 130 Glovebox in HFEF, per HFEF OI 3165 section 3.5, Field Preparations. This activity involves an HPT setting up and climbing a portable ladder to remove the 14-C meter probe from above ball valve HBV-7. The HPT source checks the meter and probe and then replaces the probe above HBV-7, which is located above Hood ID# 130 HP. At approximately 13:20, while reaching past the HBV-7 valve position indicator switches in an attempt to place the 14-C meter probe in the desired location, the HPT’s left forearm came in contact with one of the three sets of exposed terminals on the valve position indication switches for HBV 7. This resulted in the HPT receiving an electrical shock from a 120 Volt AC source. Upon moving the arm, following the electrical shock, the HPT noticed two exposed electrical connections on a switch. The HPT then notified the HFEF HPT Supervisor, who in turn notified the MFC Radiological Controls Manager and HFEF Operations Manager of the situation. Work was stopped in the area and the hazard was roped off and posted to prevent access to the hazard. The HPT was escorted by the HPT Supervisor to the MFC Dispensary and then preceded to CFA medical for further evaluation. The individual was evaluated and released without any medical restrictions. Causal Factor (Root Cause) A3B3C01/A5B2C08: - Knowledge based error/Attention was given to wrong issues - Written Communication content LTA, Incomplete/situation not covered The Causal Factor (root cause) was attention being given to the wrong issues during the creation, reviews, verifications, and actual performance of HFEF OI-3165, which covers the need to perform the weekly source check and ensure placement of the probe prior to performing a “rabbit” transfer. This resulted in the hazard not being identified and mitigated in the procedure. Work activities with in HFEF-OI-3165 placed the HPT in proximity of an unmitigated hazard directly resulting in this event. Contributing Factor A3B3C04/A4B5C04: - Knowledge Based Error, LTA Review Based on Assumption That Process Will Not Change - Change Management LTA, Risks/consequences associated with change not adequately reviewed/assessed Prior to the pneumatic system being out of service, the probe and meter were not being source checked together. The source check issue was identified and addressed during the period of time when the system was out of service. The corrective actions for this issue resulted in the requirement that a meter and probe be source checked together as it is intended to be used. This changed the activity and required an HPT to weekly, when in use, remove and install the probe from above HBV-7 to meet the requirement of LRD 15001 Part 5 Article 551.5. Risks and consequences associated with this change were not adequately reviewed or assessed. Failure to identify the hazard associated with this change directly contributed to this event.

  1. Mega-electron-volt proton irradiation on supported and suspended graphene: A Raman spectroscopic layer dependent study

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Thong, John T. L.; Chan, T. K.; Breese, M. B. H.; Zhan, D.; Shen, Z. X.; Gopinadhan, K.; Dhar, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Roy Barman, A.

    2011-10-15

    Graphene samples with 1, 2, and 4 layers and 1 + 1 folded bi-layers and graphite have been irradiated with 2 MeV protons at fluences ranging from 1 x 10{sup 15} to 6 x 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. The samples were characterized using visible and UV Raman spectroscopy and Raman microscopy. The ion-induced defects were found to decrease with increasing number of layers. Graphene samples suspended over etched holes in SiO{sub 2} have been fabricated and used to investigate the influence of the substrate SiO{sub 2} for defect creation in graphene. While Raman vibrational modes at 1460 cm{sup -1} and 1555 cm{sup -1} have been observed in the visible Raman spectra of substantially damaged graphene samples, these modes were absent in the irradiated-suspended monolayer graphene.

  2. Investigating fusion plasma instabilities in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak using mega electron volt proton emissions (invited).

    PubMed

    Perez, R V; Boeglin, W U; Darrow, D S; Cecconello, M; Klimek, I; Allan, S Y; Akers, R J; Keeling, D L; McClements, K G; Scannell, R; Turnyanskiy, M; Angulo, A; Avila, P; Leon, O; Lopez, C; Jones, O M; Conway, N J; Michael, C A

    2014-11-01

    The proton detector (PD) measures 3 MeV proton yield distributions from deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions within the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The PD's compact four-channel system of collimated and individually oriented silicon detectors probes different regions of the plasma, detecting protons (with gyro radii large enough to be unconfined) leaving the plasma on curved trajectories during neutral beam injection. From first PD data obtained during plasma operation in 2013, proton production rates (up to several hundred kHz and 1 ms time resolution) during sawtooth events were compared to the corresponding MAST neutron camera data. Fitted proton emission profiles in the poloidal plane demonstrate the capabilities of this new system. PMID:25430211

  3. Investigating fusion plasma instabilities in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak using mega electron volt proton emissions (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, R. V. Boeglin, W. U.; Angulo, A.; Avila, P.; Leon, O.; Lopez, C.; Darrow, D. S.; Cecconello, M.; Klimek, I.; Allan, S. Y.; Akers, R. J.; Keeling, D. L.; McClements, K. G.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N. J.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Jones, O. M.; Michael, C. A.

    2014-11-15

    The proton detector (PD) measures 3 MeV proton yield distributions from deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions within the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The PD’s compact four-channel system of collimated and individually oriented silicon detectors probes different regions of the plasma, detecting protons (with gyro radii large enough to be unconfined) leaving the plasma on curved trajectories during neutral beam injection. From first PD data obtained during plasma operation in 2013, proton production rates (up to several hundred kHz and 1 ms time resolution) during sawtooth events were compared to the corresponding MAST neutron camera data. Fitted proton emission profiles in the poloidal plane demonstrate the capabilities of this new system.

  4. Charge Transfer Between Ground-State N(2+) and H2, N2, and CO at Electron-Volt Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The charge-transfer rate coefficients for reactions of N(2+)(2 S(sup 2)2p(sup 2)P(sup 0)) with H2, N2, and CO are measured using ion storage. A cylindrical rf ion trap was used to store N(2+) ions produced by laser ablation of a solid titanium nitride target. The rate coefficients were derived from the decay rate of the ion signal. The rate coefficients for the above three reactions are 3.38(0.35) x 10(exp -11)sq sm/s at T(sub equiv.)=2.9 x 10(exp 3) K, 2.10(0.18) x 10(exp -9)sq sm/s at T(sub equiv.) = 1.3 x 10(exp 4) K, and 3.37(0.29) x 10(exp -9)sq cm/s at T(sub equiv.) = 1.3 x 10(exp 4) K, respectively. No theoretical or other experimental values are available at this energy range.

  5. Measurement of Charge Transfer Rate Coefficient Between Ground-State N(2+) Ion and He at Electron-Volt Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The charge transfer rate coefficient for the reaction N(2+)(2p(sup 2)P(sup 0)) + He yields products is measured by recording the time dependence of the N(2+) ions stored in an ion trap. A cylindrical radio-frequency ion trap was used to store N(2+) ions produced by laser ablation of a solid titanium nitride target. The decay of the ion signals was analyzed by single exponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured rate coefficient is 8.67(0.76) x 10(exp -11)sq cm/s. The N(2+) ions were at a mean energy of 2.7 eV while He gas was at room temperature, corresponding to an equivalent temperature of 3.9 x 10(exp 3) K. The measured value is in good agreement with a recent calculation.

  6. Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158020.html Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds Researchers consider ways to manage patients' ... 29, 2016 TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic kidney disease affects nearly 14 percent of Americans and costs ...

  7. The BIA As Banker: "Trust" Is Hard When Billions Disappear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    The federal government's trust responsibility toward Native Americans involves protection of their lands, resources, and right to self-government and provision of services (including education). However, the Bureau of Indian Affairs has misplaced billions of dollars owed Native American individuals and tribes and now faces class-action litigation.…

  8. Colleges' Billion-Dollar Campaigns Feel the Economy's Sting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterson, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The economy's collapse has caught up with the billion-dollar campaign. In the past 12 months, the amount of money raised by a dozen of the colleges engaged in higher education's biggest fund-raising campaigns fell 32 percent from the year before. The decline, which started before the worst of the recession, has forced colleges to postpone…

  9. Conservation of protein structure over four billion years

    PubMed Central

    Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Delgado-Delgado, Asuncion; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Fernandez, Julio M.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.; Gavira, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known with certainty about the evolution of protein structures in general and the degree of protein structure conservation over planetary time scales in particular. Here we report the X-ray crystal structures of seven laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins dating back up to ~4 billion years before present. Despite considerable sequence differences compared with extant enzymes, the ancestral proteins display the canonical thioredoxin fold while only small structural changes have occurred over 4 billion years. This remarkable degree of structure conservation since a time near the last common ancestor of life supports a punctuated-equilibrium model of structure evolution in which the generation of new folds occurs over comparatively short periods of time and is followed by long periods of structural stasis. PMID:23932589

  10. Ubiquitous Supercritical Wing Design Cuts Billions in Fuel Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    A Langley Research Center engineer’s work in the 1960s and ’70s to develop a wing with better performance near the speed of sound resulted in a significant increase in subsonic efficiency. The design was shared with industry. Today, Renton, Washington-based Boeing Commercial Airplanes, as well as most other plane manufacturers, apply it to all their aircraft, saving the airline industry billions of dollars in fuel every year.

  11. Emergence of modern continental crust about 3 billion years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuime, Bruno; Wuestefeld, Andreas; Hawkesworth, Chris J.

    2015-07-01

    The continental crust is the principal record of conditions on the Earth during the past 4.4 billion years. However, how the continental crust formed and evolved through time remains highly controversial. In particular, the composition and thickness of juvenile continental crust are unknown. Here we show that Rb/Sr ratios can be used as a proxy for both the silica content and the thickness of the continental crust. We calculate Rb/Sr ratios of the juvenile crust for over 13,000 samples, with Nd model ages ranging from the Hadean to Phanerozoic. The ratios were calculated based on the evolution of Sr isotopes in the period between the TDM Nd model age and the crystallization of the samples analysed. We find that the juvenile crust had a low silica content and was largely mafic in composition during the first 1.5 billion years of Earth’s evolution, consistent with magmatism on a pre-plate tectonics planet. About 3 billion years ago, the Rb/Sr ratios of the juvenile continental crust increased, indicating that the newly formed crust became more silica-rich and probably thicker. This transition is in turn linked to the onset of plate tectonics and an increase of continental detritus into the oceans.

  12. Monochromatic electron photoemission from diamondoidmonolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.L.; Fabbri, J.D.; Willey, T.M.; Lee, J.R.I.; Dahl, J.E.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Schreiner, P.R.; Fokin, A.A.; Tkachenko, B.A.; Fokina,N.A.; Meev asana, W.; Mannella, N.; Tanaka, K.; Zhou, X.J.; van Buuren,T.; Kelly, M.A.; Hussain, Z.; Melosh, N.A.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2007-08-13

    We found monochromatic electron photoemission fromlarge-area self-assembled monolayers of a functionalized diamondoid,[121]tetramantane-6-thiol. Photoelectron spectra of the diamondoidmonolayers exhibited a peak at the low-kinetic energy threshold; up to 68percent of all emitted electrons were emitted within this single energypeak. The intensity of the emission peak is indicative of diamondoidsbeing negative electron affinity materials. With an energy distributionwidth of less than 0.5 electron volts, this source of monochromaticelectrons may find application in technologies such as electronmicroscopy, electron beam lithography, and field-emission flatpaneldisplays.

  13. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  14. Obama Asks Congress for $1.9 Billion to Battle Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asks Congress for $1.9 Billion to Battle Zika Virus Money would go toward mosquito-control programs, ... billion to help stem the spread of the Zika virus. The mosquito-borne disease has been linked ...

  15. Five-volt vertically-stacked, single-cell GaAs photonic power converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Christopher E.; Wilkins, Matthew M.; Bouzazi, Boussairi; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard; Masson, Denis P.; Fafard, Simon; Hinzer, Karin

    2015-03-01

    The high-efficiency conversion of photonic power into electrical power is of broad-range applicability to many industries due to its electrical isolation from the surrounding environment and immunity to electromagnetic interference which affects the performance and reliability of sensitive electronics. A photonic power converter, or phototransducer, can absorb several watts of infrared laser power transmitted through a multimode fiber and convert this to electrical power for remote use. To convert this power into a useful voltage, we have designed, simulated, and fabricated a photovoltaic phototransducer that generates >5 V using a monolithic, lattice-matched, vertically-stacked, single-cell device that eliminates complex fabrication and assembly steps. Experimental measurements have demonstrated a conversion efficiency of up to 60.1% under illumination of ~11 W/cm2 at a wavelength of 835 nm, while simulations indicate that efficiencies reaching 70% should be realistically achievable using this novel design.

  16. An Interface Converter with Reduced Volt-Ampere Ratings for Battery-Supercapacitor Mixed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Giuseppe; Undeland, Tore M.; Hori, Yoichi

    This paper presents a converter topology used to interface a bank of Supercapacitors (SC) to a stiff DC-Link, like the one constituted by a typical battery. Main feature of the proposed converter is the reduced ratings of the power electronics switches compared to standard topologies. The capabilities of the proposed system in terms of energy storage and controllability of the power flow in and out the SC bank are identical to those of a conventional system, making the solution very attractive in terms of cost and efficiency in a wide number of applications. Theoretical principles underlying the converter operation are given, along with an experimental evaluation of the proposed solution, showing its practical feasibility.

  17. Monochromatic Electron Photoemission From Diamondoid Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.L.; Fabbri, J.D.; Willey, T.M.; Lee, J.R.I.; Dahl, J.E.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Schreiner, P.R.; Fokin, A.A.; Tkachenko, B.A.; Fokina, N.A.; Meevasana, W.; Mannella, N.; Tanaka, K.; Zhou, X.J.; van Buuren, T.; Kelly, M.A.; Hussain, Z.; Melosh, N.A.; Shen, Z.-X.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /LBNL, ALS /LLNL, Livermore /Giessen U. /Kiev Polytechnic Inst.

    2007-07-13

    We found monochromatic electron photoemission from large-area self-assembled monolayers of a functionalized diamondoid, [121]tetramantane-6-thiol. Photoelectron spectra of the diamondoid monolayers exhibited a peak at the low-kinetic energy threshold; up to 68% of all emitted electrons were emitted within this single energy peak. The intensity of the emission peak is indicative of diamondoids being negative electron affinity materials. With an energy distribution width of less than 0.5 electron volts, this source of monochromatic electrons may find application in technologies such as electron microscopy, electron beam lithography, and field-emission flat-panel displays.

  18. Monochromatic electron photoemission from diamondoid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wanli; Yang, Wanli L.; Fabbri, J.D.; Willey, T.M.; Lee, J.R.I.; Dahl, J.E.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Schreiner, P.R.; Fokin, A.A.; Tkachenko, B.A.; Fokina, N.A.; Meevasana, W.; Mannella, N.; Tanaka, K.; Zhou, X.J.; van Buuren, T.; Kelly, M.A.; Hussain, Z.; Melosh, N.A.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2007-02-27

    We found monochromatic electron photoemission from large-area self-assembled monolayers of a functionalized diamondoid, [121]tetramantane-6-thiol. Photoelectron spectra of the diamondoid monolayers exhibited a peak at the low-kinetic energy threshold; up to 68percent of all emitted electrons were emitted within this single energy peak. The intensity of the emission peak is indicative of diamondoids being negative electron affinity materials. With an energy distribution width of less than 0.5 electron volts, this source of monochromatic electrons may find application in technologies such as electron microscopy, electron beam lithography, and field-emission flatpanel displays.

  19. Scalable in-memory RDFS closure on billions of triples.

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Eric L.; Mizell, David

    2010-06-01

    We present an RDFS closure algorithm, specifically designed and implemented on the Cray XMT supercomputer, that obtains inference rates of 13 million inferences per second on the largest system configuration we used. The Cray XMT, with its large global memory (4TB for our experiments), permits the construction of a conceptually straightforward algorithm, fundamentally a series of operations on a shared hash table. Each thread is given a partition of triple data to process, a dedicated copy of the ontology to apply to the data, and a reference to the hash table into which it inserts inferred triples. The global nature of the hash table allows the algorithm to avoid a common obstacle for distributed memory machines: the creation of duplicate triples. On LUBM data sets ranging between 1.3 billion and 5.3 billion triples, we obtain nearly linear speedup except for two portions: file I/O, which can be ameliorated with the additional service nodes, and data structure initialization, which requires nearly constant time for runs involving 32 processors or more.

  20. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology.

  1. Impacts of Varying Penetration of Distributed Resources with & without Volt/Var Control: Case Study of Varying Load Types

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom; Li, Huijuan; Li, Fangxing; Xu, Yan; Adhikari, Sarina; Irminger, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a follow-up to an earlier one on impacts of distributed energy resources (DR) on distribution feeders. As DR penetration level on the feeder increases, there can be impacts to distribution system/feeder capacity, line losses, and voltage regulation. These can vary as the penetration level reaches the capacity of the distribution feeder/system or loading. The question is how high of a DR level can be accommodated without any major changes to system operation, system design and protection. Our objective for this work was to address the question of how the DR impacts vary in regards to both DR voltage regulation capability and load mix. A dynamic analysis was used to focus on the impacts of DR with and without volt/var control with different load composition on the distribution feeder. The study considered an example 10MVA distribution feeder in which two inverter-based DRs were used to provide voltage regulation. The results due to DR without voltage regulation capability are compared with DR capable of providing local (at its bus) voltage regulation. The analysis was repeated for four different feeder load compositions consisting of (1) constant power, (2) constant impedance, (3) constant current and (4) ZIP (equal combination of previous three).

  2. Electron energy deposition in CO2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawada, T.; Strickland, D. J.; Green, A. E. S.

    1972-01-01

    Semiempirical cross sections of Strickland and Green (1969) are compared with and supplemented by more recent data. The composite set is used in the energy degradation calculation of electrons with emphasis on energies below 100 ev. Good agreements are obtained with accepted values of the loss function and the average electron volts per ion pair at high energies. Efficiencies associated with various loss channels are obtained. The relationship with the recent Mariner UV data is discussed.

  3. Western Australia updates $A4 billion North West Shelf scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.E.

    1980-02-01

    A four billion (Australian) dollar scheme to produce natural gas from the North West Shelf will bring a growth boom to an area rich in energy and mineral resources. The project will begin with production at the offshore North Rankin field, process liquified natural gas (LNG) onshore, and transport it to three closed link inland markets at a competitive cost. Woodside Petroleum Ltd. is responsible for planning the joint venture. Engineering plans are outlined for the two production platforms and the pipeline, and liquefaction facility. Australian expertise in the project is welcome, but the joint venturers will use the best professionals regardless of nationality to meet the demands of a competitive technology and market. (DCK)

  4. European cogeneration market estimated at $12 billion by 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    A new study by an international market research firm projects that European companies will install some $12 billion worth of cogeneration equipment by 1995. Products for waste heat recovery, steam and turbine generators made up a $993 million cogeneration market in 1986 in Europe. West Germany is expected to account for nearly a quarter of all volume throughout the 1986-95 period. In 1986, industry there spent some $218 million on cogeneration equipment. France and the U.K. are expected to account for another 17% and 16% of sales, respectively. The report discusses the various industrial end users, and on average finds that commercial/institutional establishments; food, beverage and tobacco producers; fuels processors; and the pulp and paper industry each represent between 10% and 15% of cogeneration purchases.

  5. Bigger, Better Catalog Unveils Half a Billion Celestial Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These frames are samples from the photographic sky surveys, which have been digitized by a technical team at the Space Telescope Science Institute to support the Hubble Space Telescope operations. The team processed these images to create a new astronomical catalog, called the Guide Star Catalog II. This project was undertaken by the Space Telescope Science Institute as an upgrade to an earlier sky survey and catalog (DSS-I and GSC-I), initially done to provide guide stars for pointing the Hubble Space Telescope. By virtue of its sheer size, the DSS-II and GSC-II have many research applications for both professional and amateur astronomers. [Top] An example from the DSS-II shows the Rosette Nebula, (originally photographed by the Palomar Observatory) as digitized in the DSS-I (left) and DSS-II (right). The DSS-II includes views of the sky at both red and blue wavelengths, providing invaluable color information on about one billion deep-sky objects. [Bottom] This blow-up of the inset box in the raw DSS-I scan shows examples of the GSC-I and the improved GSC-II catalogs. Astronomers extracted the stars from the scanned plate of the Rosette and listed them in the catalogs. The new GSC-II catalog provides the colors, positions, and luminosities of nearly half a billion stars -- over 20 times as many as the original GSC-I. The GSC-II contains information on stars as dim as the 19th magnitude. Credit: NASA, the DSS-II and GSC-II Consortia (with images from the Palomar Observatory-STScI Digital Sky Survey of the northern sky, based on scans of the Second Palomar Sky Survey are copyright c 1993-1999 by the California Institute of Technology)

  6. Inventory Control. Easily Made Electronic Device for Conductivity Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadek, Frank J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes how to construct an electronic device to be used in conductivity experiments using a 35 millimeter film canister, nine volt battery replacement snaps, a 200-300 ohm resistor, and a light-emitting diode. Provides a diagram and photographs of the device. (TW)

  7. Searching for Organics Preserved in 4.5 Billion Year Old Salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Fries, M.; Steele, A.; Bodnar, R.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of early solar system fluids took a dramatic turn a decade ago with the discovery of fluid inclusion-bearing halite (NaCl) crystals in the matrix of two freshly fallen brecciated H chondrite falls, Monahans and Zag. Both meteorites are regolith breccias, and contain xenolithic halite (and minor admixed sylvite -- KCl, crystals in their regolith lithologies. The halites are purple to dark blue, due to the presence of color centers (electrons in anion vacancies) which slowly accumulated as 40K (in sylvite) decayed over billions of years. The halites were dated by K-Ar, Rb-Sr and I-Xe systematics to be 4.5 billion years old. The "blue" halites were a fantastic discovery for the following reasons: (1) Halite+sylvite can be dated (K is in sylvite and will substitute for Na in halite, Rb substitutes in halite for Na, and I substitutes for Cl). (2) The blue color is lost if the halite dissolves on Earth and reprecipitates (because the newly-formed halite has no color centers), so the color serves as a "freshness" or pristinity indicator. (3) Halite frequently contains aqueous fluid inclusions. (4) Halite contains no structural oxygen, carbon or hydrogen, making them ideal materials to measure these isotopic systems in any fluid inclusions. (5) It is possible to directly measure fluid inclusion formation temperatures, and thus directly measure the temperature of the mineralizing aqueous fluid. In addition to these two ordinary chondrites halite grains have been reliably reported in several ureilites, an additional ordinary chondrite (Jilin), and in the carbonaceous chondrite (Murchison), although these reports were unfortunately not taken seriously. We have lately found additional fluid inclusions in carbonates in several additional carbonaceous chondrites. Meteoritic aqueous fluid inclusions are apparently relatively widespread in meteorites, though very small and thus difficult to analyze.

  8. Fuel efficient stoves for the poorest two billion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2012-03-01

    About 2 billion people cook their daily meals on generally inefficient, polluting, biomass cookstoves. The fuels include twigs and leaves, agricultural waste, animal dung, firewood, and charcoal. Exposure to resulting smoke leads to acute respiratory illness, and cancers, particularly among women cooks, and their infant children near them. Resulting annual mortality estimate is almost 2 million deaths, higher than that from malaria or tuberculosis. There is a large diversity of cooking methods (baking, boiling, long simmers, brazing and roasting), and a diversity of pot shapes and sizes in which the cooking is undertaken. Fuel-efficiency and emissions depend on the tending of the fire (and thermal power), type of fuel, stove characteristics, and fit of the pot to the stove. Thus, no one perfect fuel-efficient low-emitting stove can suit all users. Affordability imposes a further severe constraint on the stove design. For various economic strata within the users, a variety of stove designs may be appropriate and affordable. In some regions, biomass is harvested non-renewably for cooking fuel. There is also increasing evidence that black carbon emitted from stoves is a significant contributor to atmospheric forcing. Thus improved biomass stoves can also help mitigate global climate change. The speaker will describe specific work undertaken to design, develop, test, and disseminate affordable fuel-efficient stoves for internally displaced persons (IDPs) of Darfur, Sudan, where the IDPs face hardship, humiliation, hunger, and risk of sexual assault owing to their dependence on local biomass for cooking their meals.

  9. Orbital forcing of climate 1.4 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Xiaomei; Hammarlund, Emma U; Wang, Huajian; Costa, M Mafalda; Bjerrum, Christian J; Connelly, James N; Zhang, Baomin; Bian, Lizeng; Canfield, Donald E

    2015-03-24

    Fluctuating climate is a hallmark of Earth. As one transcends deep into Earth time, however, both the evidence for and the causes of climate change become difficult to establish. We report geochemical and sedimentological evidence for repeated, short-term climate fluctuations from the exceptionally well-preserved ∼1.4-billion-year-old Xiamaling Formation of the North China Craton. We observe two patterns of climate fluctuations: On long time scales, over what amounts to tens of millions of years, sediments of the Xiamaling Formation record changes in geochemistry consistent with long-term changes in the location of the Xiamaling relative to the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. On shorter time scales, and within a precisely calibrated stratigraphic framework, cyclicity in sediment geochemical dynamics is consistent with orbital control. In particular, sediment geochemical fluctuations reflect what appear to be orbitally forced changes in wind patterns and ocean circulation as they influenced rates of organic carbon flux, trace metal accumulation, and the source of detrital particles to the sediment. PMID:25775605

  10. Orbital forcing of climate 1.4 billion years ago

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Xiaomei; Hammarlund, Emma U.; Wang, Huajian; Costa, M. Mafalda; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Connelly, James N.; Zhang, Baomin; Bian, Lizeng; Canfield, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuating climate is a hallmark of Earth. As one transcends deep into Earth time, however, both the evidence for and the causes of climate change become difficult to establish. We report geochemical and sedimentological evidence for repeated, short-term climate fluctuations from the exceptionally well-preserved ∼1.4-billion-year-old Xiamaling Formation of the North China Craton. We observe two patterns of climate fluctuations: On long time scales, over what amounts to tens of millions of years, sediments of the Xiamaling Formation record changes in geochemistry consistent with long-term changes in the location of the Xiamaling relative to the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. On shorter time scales, and within a precisely calibrated stratigraphic framework, cyclicity in sediment geochemical dynamics is consistent with orbital control. In particular, sediment geochemical fluctuations reflect what appear to be orbitally forced changes in wind patterns and ocean circulation as they influenced rates of organic carbon flux, trace metal accumulation, and the source of detrital particles to the sediment. PMID:25775605

  11. Deep space communication - A one billion mile noisy channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    Deep space exploration is concerned with the study of natural phenomena in the solar system with the aid of measurements made at spacecraft on deep space missions. Deep space communication refers to communication between earth and spacecraft in deep space. The Deep Space Network is an earth-based facility employed for deep space communication. It includes a network of large tracking antennas located at various positions around the earth. The goals and achievements of deep space exploration over the past 20 years are discussed along with the broad functional requirements of deep space missions. Attention is given to the differences in space loss between communication satellites and deep space vehicles, effects of the long round-trip light time on spacecraft autonomy, requirements for the use of massive nuclear power plants on spacecraft at large distances from the sun, and the kinds of scientific return provided by a deep space mission. Problems concerning a deep space link of one billion miles are also explored.

  12. Negative-ion formation in the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT using the Reversal Electron Attachment Detection (READ) technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutijian, Ara; Boumsellek, S.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the search for high sensitivity and direct atmospheric sampling of trace species, techniques have been developed such as atmospheric-sampling, glow-discharge ionization (ASGDI), corona discharge, atmospheric pressure ionization (API), electron-capture detection (ECD), and negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) that are capable of detecting parts-per-billion to parts-per-trillion concentrations of trace species. These techniques are based on positive- or negative-ion formation via charge-transfer to the target, or electron capture under multiple-collision conditions in a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies at the source temperature. One drawback of the high-pressure, corona- or glow-discharge devices is that they are susceptible to interferences either through indistinguishable product masses, or through undesired ion-molecule reactions. The ASGDI technique is relatively immune from such interferences, since at target concentrations of less than 1 ppm the majority of negative ions arises via electron capture rather than through ion-molecule chemistry. A drawback of the conventional ECD, and possibly of the ASGDI, is that they exhibit vanishingly small densities of electrons with energies in the range 0-10 millielectron volts (meV), as can be seen from a typical Maxwellian electron energy distribution function at T = 300 K. Slowing the electrons to these subthermal (less than 10 meV) energies is crucial, since the cross section for attachment of several large classes of molecules is known to increase to values larger than 10(exp -12) sq cm at near-zero electron energies. In the limit of zero energy these cross sections are predicted to diverge as epsilon(exp -1/2), where epsilon is the electron energy. In order to provide a better 'match' between the electron energy distribution function and attachment cross section, a new concept of attachment in an electrostatic mirror was developed. In this scheme, electrons are brought to a momentary halt by reversing their direction with electrostatic fields. At this turning point the electrons have zero or near-zero energy. A beam of target molecules is introduced, and the resultant negative ions extracted. This basic idea has been recently improved to allow for better reversal geometry, higher electron currents, lower backgrounds, and increased negative-ion extraction efficiency. We present herein application of the so-called reversal electron attachment detector (READ) to the study of negative-ion formation in the explosives molecules RDX, PETN, and TNT under single-collision conditions.

  13. 3.5 billion years of reshaped Moho, southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Jacek; de Wit, Maarten

    2013-12-01

    According to some previous studies, Archean continental crust is, on global average, apparently thinner than Proterozoic crust. Subsequently, the validity of this statement has been questioned. To provide an additional perspective on this issue, we present analyses of Moho signatures derived from recent seismic data along swaths 2000 km in length across southern Africa and its flanking ocean. The imaged crust has a near continuous age range between ca. 0.1 and 3.7 billion years, and the seismic data allow direct comparison of Moho depths between adjacent Archean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic crust. We find no simple secular change in depth to Moho over this time period. In contrast, there is significant variation in depth to Moho beneath both Archean and Proterozoic crust; Archean crust of southern Africa displays as much crustal diversity in thickness as the adjacent Proterozoic crust. The Moho beneath all crustal provinces that we have analysed has been severely altered by tectono-metamorphic and igneous processes, in many cases more than once, and cannot provide unequivocal data for geodynamic models dealing with secular changes in continental crust formation. These results and conclusions are similar to those documented along ca. 2000 km swaths across the Canadian Shield recorded by Lithoprobe. Tying the age and character of the Precambrian crust of southern Africa to their depth diversities is clearly related to manifold processes of tectono-thermal ‘surgery’ subsequent to their origin, the details of which are still to be resolved, as they are in most Precambrian terranes. Reconstructing pristine Moho of the early Earth therefore remains a formidable challenge. In South Africa, better knowledge of ‘fossilised’ Archean crustal sections ‘turned-on-edge’, such as at the Vredefort impact crater (for the continental crust), and from the Barberton greenstone belt (for oceanic crust) is needed to characterize potential pristine Archean Moho transitions.

  14. Family planning saves lives and P303 billion for the Philippine government.

    PubMed

    1993-12-01

    This pamphlet gives a description of how family planning benefits the population in the Philippines. Benefits are identified as lower child and maternal mortality, avoidance of unwanted pregnancies and illegal abortions, and savings in a variety of government sectors. The following predictions are based on the estimated population size if government expenditures for the Philippine family planning program continue to expand as projected, rather than remain at 1970 levels. In the education sector during 1970-2000, the total cumulative savings would amount to 229 billion pesos in 1991 prices. If family planning use continues in the expected direction, the savings would be greatest during 1990-2000. Total health expenditures rose from 3 billion pesos in 1970 to about 8 billion pesos in 1990. Expenditures are expected to rise to 12 billion pesos by 2000. The savings accrued through family planning would amount to about 31 billion pesos during 1970-2000. Social services expenditures are expected to increase to almost 15 billion pesos by the year 2000. The savings in social services expenditures would amount to about 43 billion pesos during 1970-2000. For each pesos spent on family planning there has been a savings of 9.6 pesos in education, health, and social services. Expected family planning costs to the year 2000 are about 16 billion pesos, which is handily covered by savings in the health sector of 31 billion. Total savings from all three sectors after deducting family planning expenditures would amount to 287 billion pesos. The investment in family planning is an excellent financial investment. A Social Weather Stations Survey of public opinion indicates that 76% desire a slowing of population growth (79% in urban and 73% in rural areas). 15% support an increase in growth, and 9% would do nothing about it. The lowest support for slowing population growth was recorded in the Visayas, particularly in rural areas (66%). PMID:12179225

  15. A SWIRE Picture is Worth Billions of Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: SWIRE View of Distant Galaxies [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2Figure 3 Figure 4

    These spectacular images, taken by the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Legacy project, encapsulate one of the primary objectives of the Spitzer mission: to connect the evolution of galaxies from the distant, or early, universe to the nearby, or present day, universe.

    The Tadpole galaxy (main image) is the result of a recent galactic interaction in the local universe. Although these galactic mergers are rare in the universe's recent history, astronomers believe that they were much more common in the early universe. Thus, SWIRE team members will use this detailed image of the Tadpole galaxy to help understand the nature of the 'faint red-orange specks' of the early universe.

    The larger picture (figure 2) depicts one-sixteenth of the SWIRE survey field called ELAIS-N1. In this image, the bright blue sources are hot stars in our own Milky Way, which range anywhere from 3 to 60 times the mass of our Sun. The fainter green spots are cooler stars and galaxies beyond the Milky Way whose light is dominated by older stellar populations. The red dots are dusty galaxies that are undergoing intense star formation. The faintest specks of red-orange are galaxies billions of light-years away in the distant universe.

    Figure 3 features an unusual ring-like galaxy called CGCG 275-022. The red spiral arms indicate that this galaxy is very dusty and perhaps undergoing intense star formation. The star-forming activity could have been initiated by a near head-on collision with another galaxy.

    The most distant galaxies that SWIRE is able to detect are revealed in a zoom of deep space (figure 4). The colors in this feature represent the same objects as those in the larger field image of ELAIS-N1.

    The observed SWIRE fields were chosen on the basis of being 'empty' or as free as possible from the obscuring dust, gas, and stars of our own Milky Way. Because Earth is located within the Milky Way galaxy, there is always a screen of Milky Way objects blocking our view of the rest of the universe. In some places, our view of the larger universe is less obscured than others and for the most part is considered 'empty.' These are prime observing spots for astronomers interested in studying objects beyond the Milky Way. ELAIS-N1 is only one of six SWIRE survey fields. The full survey covers 49 square degrees of the sky, equivalent to the area covered by about 250 full moons.

    The SWIRE images are 3-channel false-color composites, where blue represents visible green light (light that would appear to be blue/green to the human eye), green captures infrared light of 3.6 microns, and red represents infrared emissions of 8 microns. The infrared data are from Spitzer's infrared array camera and the visible-light data are from the Isaac Newton Telescope, Spain.

  16. A one billion determinant full CI benchmark on the Cray T3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, Stefano; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Ansaloni, Roberto; Durì, Francesca; Rossi, Elda

    1996-04-01

    The implementation of an out-of-core version of a full CI algorithm on the Cray T3D is described. The introduction of heavy I/O activity, necessary to handle larger problems, required particular attention in order to maintain good performance. As an application, the FCI energy of the Be 2 molecule with a [9s2p1d] basis set (all electrons), whose FCI space has a dimension of more than one billion (10 9) of symmetry-adapted determinants in D 2h symmetry was computed. A single iteration on the Cray T3D at CINECA (64 processors) required about four hours, 30 minutes of which were spent in I/O operations. 27 iterations were performed and a precision of at least one μhartree in the energy was achieved. Due to the scalability of the code, substantially larger calculations could be performed provided that more processors and a larger amount of disk space were available.

  17. A large neutral fraction of cosmic hydrogen a billion years after the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Loeb, Abraham

    2004-02-26

    The fraction of ionized hydrogen left over from the Big Bang provides evidence for the time of formation of the first stars and quasar black holes in the early Universe; such objects provide the high-energy photons necessary to ionize hydrogen. Spectra of the two most distant known quasars show nearly complete absorption of photons with wavelengths shorter than the Lyman alpha transition of neutral hydrogen, indicating that hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) had not been completely ionized at a redshift of z approximately 6.3, about one billion years after the Big Bang. Here we show that the IGM surrounding these quasars had a neutral hydrogen fraction of tens of per cent before the quasar activity started, much higher than the previous lower limits of approximately 0.1 per cent. Our results, when combined with the recent inference of a large cumulative optical depth to electron scattering after cosmological recombination therefore suggest the presence of a second peak in the mean ionization history of the Universe. PMID:14985754

  18. Electron beams and ion composition measured at Io and in its torus.

    PubMed

    Williams, D J; Mauk, B H; McEntire, R E; Roelof, E C; Armstrong, T P; Wilken, B; Roederer, J G; Krimigis, S M; Fritz, T A; Lanzerotti, L J

    1996-10-18

    Intense, magnetic field-aligned, bidirectional, energetic (>15 kiloelectron volts) electron beams were discovered by the Galileo energetic particles detector during the flyby of Io. These beams can carry sufficient energy flux into Jupiter's atmosphere to produce a visible aurora at the footprint of the magnetic flux tube connecting Io to Jupiter. Composition measurements through the torus showed that the spatial distributions of protons, oxygen, and sulfur are different, with sulfur being the dominant energetic (> approximately 10 kiloelectron volts per nucleon) ion at closest approach. PMID:8832885

  19. 77 FR 15052 - Dataset Workshop-U.S. Billion Dollar Disasters Dataset (1980-2011): Assessing Dataset Strengths...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... be considered to enhance the robustness of the Billion Dollar Disasters dataset; Examination of... data set addresses; What steps should be taken to enhance the robustness of the billion-dollar...

  20. White House Seeks $1.8 Billion to Fight Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... White House Seeks $1.8 Billion to Fight Zika Virus Emergency funds from Congress would combat the global ... to combat the threat of the mosquito-borne Zika virus, the White House announced Monday. The funding will ...

  1. NASA Now Minute: Earth and Space Science: 100 Billion Planets - Duration: 62 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Stephen Kane, co-author of the article, “Study Shows Our Galaxy has 100Billion Planets” reveals details about this incredible study explainsjust how common planets are in our Milky Way galaxy...

  2. Rules Set for $4 Billion Race to Top Contest: Final Rules Give States Detailed Map in Quest for $4 Billion in Education Stimulus Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2009-01-01

    For a good shot at $4 billion in grants from the federal Race to the Top Fund, states will need to make a persuasive case for their education reform agendas, demonstrate significant buy-in from local school districts, and devise plans to evaluate teachers and principals based on student performance, according to final regulations released last

  3. Corporations Give Record $1.6 Billion to Colleges and Universities in 1984-85; Total Giving Reaches $6.3 Billion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CFAE Newsletter, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Findings from the publication, "Voluntary Support of Education 1984-85," are summarized. The survey report includes contributions to 1,114 colleges and universities. Highlights of findings show that: total estimated voluntary support was $6.32 billion in 1984-1985; for the first time, corporations contributed more than any other donor group ($1.57…

  4. Indian farmers need help to feed over 1.5 billion people in 2030.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Mittur N

    2012-01-01

    In view of the enormous challenge and pressure on farmers to feed 9 billion plus people and billions of animals who are going to be living in our planet in 2050, new technologies must be invented, assessed and adapted. Farmer welfare and provision of resources required for their work is of paramount importance. India has benefited from Bt cotton technology and will certainly benefit from other biotech crops that have been carefully developed and assessed for consumption and environmental safety. PMID:22538225

  5. Nonlinear Optics in Relativistic Plasmas and Laser Wake Field Acceleration of Electrons

    PubMed

    Umstadter; Chen; Maksimchuk; Mourou; Wagner

    1996-07-26

    When a terawatt-peak-power laser beam is focused into a gas jet, an electron plasma wave, driven by forward Raman scattering, is observed to accelerate a naturally collimated beam of electrons to relativistic energies (up to 10(9) total electrons, with an energy distribution maximizing at 2 megaelectron volts, a transverse emittance as low as 1 millimeter-milliradian, and a field gradient of up to 2 gigaelectron volts per centimeter). Electron acceleration and the appearance of high-frequency modulations in the transmitted light spectrum were both found to have sharp thresholds in laser power and plasma density. A hole in the center of the electron beam may indicate that plasma electrons were expelled radially. PMID:8662531

  6. Electron beam activated diamond devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Sverdrup, L.H.

    1995-12-31

    Natural type IIa diamond wafers of various thicknesses and active areas were used to construct several electron beam activated diamond devices. The electron bombardment yields a current-voltage characteristic very similar to that of a bipolar transistor. The device on-state resistance is consistent with a simple carrier drift and space charge model. The diamond conduction to bombarding current gain ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 depending upon the target thickness and the bombarding electron energy. Average voltage gradients in diamond targets on the order of a mega-volt per centimeter were obtained. This enabled switch demonstration with delivery of 26kW to a resistive load. Using short duration electron pulses, high-repetition-rate sub-nanosecond switching speed consistent with the circuit time constant is demonstrated.

  7. Development and testing of a 180-volt dc electronic circuit breaker with a 335-ampere carry and 1200-ampere interrupt rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brush, A. S.; Phillips, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and associated contractors have conducted a program to assess the potential requirements for a high-current switch to conceptually design a switch using the best existing technology, and to build and demonstrate a breadboard which meets the requirements. The result is the high current remote bus isolator (HRBI). The HRBI is rated at 180 V dc, 335 A continuous with a 1200 A interrupt rating. It also incorporates remote-control and protective features called for by the Space Station Freedom PMAD dc test bed design. Two breadboard 335 A circuit breakers were built and tested that demonstrate a promising concept of paralleled current-limiting modules. The units incorporated all control and protective features required by advanced aerospace power systems. Component stresses in each unit were determined by design, and are consistent with a life of many thousands of fault operations.

  8. Submicron mass spectrometry imaging of single cells by combined use of mega electron volt time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning transmission ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siketić, Zdravko; Bogdanović Radović, Ivančica; Jakšić, Milko; Popović Hadžija, Marijana; Hadžija, Mirko

    2015-08-01

    In order to better understand biochemical processes inside an individual cell, it is important to measure the molecular composition at the submicron level. One of the promising mass spectrometry imaging techniques that may be used to accomplish this is Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), using MeV energy heavy ions for excitation. MeV ions have the ability to desorb large intact molecules with a yield that is several orders of magnitude higher than conventional SIMS using keV ions. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the MeV TOF-SIMS system, we propose an independent TOF trigger using a STIM (scanning transmission ion microscopy) detector that is placed just behind the thin transmission target. This arrangement is suitable for biological samples in which the STIM detector simultaneously measures the mass distribution in scanned samples. The capability of the MeV TOF-SIMS setup was demonstrated by imaging the chemical composition of CaCo-2 cells.

  9. 3.4-Billion-year-old biogenic pyrites from Barberton, South Africa: sulfur isotope evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmoto, H.; Kakegawa, T.; Lowe, D. R.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ablation mass spectroscopy analyses of sulfur isotopic compositions of microscopic-sized grains of pyrite that formed about 3.4 billion years ago in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa, show that the pyrite formed by bacterial reduction of seawater sulfate. These data imply that by about 3.4 billion years ago sulfate-reducing bacteria had become active, the oceans were rich in sulfate, and the atmosphere contained appreciable amounts (>>10(-13) of the present atmospheric level) of free oxygen.

  10. 3.4-Billion-year-old biogenic pyrites from Barberton, South Africa: sulfur isotope evidence.

    PubMed

    Ohmoto, H; Kakegawa, T; Lowe, D R

    1993-10-22

    Laser ablation mass spectroscopy analyses of sulfur isotopic compositions of microscopic-sized grains of pyrite that formed about 3.4 billion years ago in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa, show that the pyrite formed by bacterial reduction of seawater sulfate. These data imply that by about 3.4 billion years ago sulfate-reducing bacteria had become active, the oceans were rich in sulfate, and the atmosphere contained appreciable amounts (>10(-13) of the present atmospheric level) of free oxygen. PMID:11539502

  11. NOAA Budget Increases to $4.1 Billion, But Some Key Items Are Reduced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-02-01

    The Bush administration has proposed a US$4.1 billion budget for fiscal year (FY) 2009 for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The proposed budget, which would be the agency's largest ever, is $202.6 million, or 5.2%, above the FY 2008 enacted budget. By topping $4 billion and the amount Congress passed for FY 2008, the budget proposal crosses into ``a new threshold,'' according Navy Vice Admiral Conrad Lautenbacher, undersecretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator.

  12. Trends of population growth in China: maximum number will exceed 1.5 billion.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Liu, J

    1996-02-01

    Population estimates are generated to the end of the year 2000 for China based on the urbanization method, the fertility transition method, and the regional projection method. The urbanization method uses a fitting function of the total fertility rate at a medium variant with the provincial level of urbanization. The urbanization rate is set at 65% at the mid-21st century point. The fertility transition method uses the medium variant of the total fertility rate (2.0) until the year 2000 and then applies a declining rate to 1.8 children per woman. The regional projection method uses a variety of rates of fertility decline. Total population by the year 2000 is expected to be 1.302 billion based on the urbanization method, 1.288 billion based on the fertility transition method, and 1.300 billion based on the regional projection method. Estimated potential maximum size would be, respectively, 1.544 billion by 2035, 1.519 billion by 2033, and 1.539 billion by 2034. It is considered reasonable that the annual growth rate of China's population of 12.5 per thousand can be maintained. With such a growth rate and a medium variant projection, it is estimated that maximum population size would be 1.554 billion by the mid-2030s. Zero population growth would be reached in 2035. Negative growth would occur thereafter. Under the low variant, estimated population size during 1995 and every 10 years during 2000-2040 would be, respectively, 1.212, 1.272, 1.352, 1.419, 1.441, and 1.415 in billions. The low variant would maintain a total fertility rate at 1.7 until the year 2000 and thereafter. Figures are provided for the same period for the medium and high variant estimates. It is anticipated that the total working age population would reach 774.23 million by the year 2000 (410.97 million males aged 16-59 years and 363.55 million females aged 16-54 years) and exceed 893 million by 2020 (483.55 million males and 409.50 million females). The aged population over 65 years of age would become 20% of total population. Persons aged 60 years and older would constitute 25% of total population. The dependency ratios would put pressure on society. PMID:12291336

  13. Electron acceleration from contracting magnetic islands during reconnection.

    PubMed

    Drake, J F; Swisdak, M; Che, H; Shay, M A

    2006-10-01

    A long-standing problem in the study of space and astrophysical plasmas is to explain the production of energetic electrons as magnetic fields 'reconnect' and release energy. In the Earth's magnetosphere, electron energies reach hundreds of thousands of electron volts (refs 1-3), whereas the typical electron energies associated with large-scale reconnection-driven flows are just a few electron volts. Recent observations further suggest that these energetic particles are produced in the region where the magnetic field reconnects. In solar flares, upwards of 50 per cent of the energy released can appear as energetic electrons. Here we show that electrons gain kinetic energy by reflecting from the ends of the contracting 'magnetic islands' that form as reconnection proceeds. The mechanism is analogous to the increase of energy of a ball reflecting between two converging walls--the ball gains energy with each bounce. The repetitive interaction of electrons with many islands allows large numbers to be efficiently accelerated to high energy. The back pressure of the energetic electrons throttles reconnection so that the electron energy gain is a large fraction of the released magnetic energy. The resultant energy spectra of electrons take the form of power laws with spectral indices that match the magnetospheric observations. PMID:17024088

  14. Front-end electronics for Micro Pattern Gas Detectors with integrated input protection against discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiutowski, T.; Dąbrowski, W.; Koperny, S.; Wiącek, P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major problems that have to be addressed in the design of the front-end electronics for readout of MPGDs, is its resistance to possible random discharges inside active detector volume. This issue becomes particularly critical for the electronics built as ASICs implemented in a modern CMOS technology, for which the breakdown voltages are in the range of a few Volts, while the discharges may result in voltage spikes of even thousands Volts. The paper presents test results of input protection structures integrated with a specific design of the front-end electronics manufactured in the 350 nm CMOS process. The structures were tested using an electrical circuit to mimic discharges in the detectors for different voltage and current parameters of the sparks. Accomplished measurements showed no degradation in the front-end electronics performance even after very excessive discharge tests.

  15. Universities Report $1.8-Billion in Earnings on Inventions in 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    Universities and their inventors earned more than $1.8-billion from commercializing their academic research in the 2011 fiscal year, collecting royalties from new breeds of wheat, from a new drug for the treatment of HIV, and from longstanding arrangements over enduring products like Gatorade. Northwestern University earned the most of any

  16. Conservation in a World of Six Billion: A Grassroots Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hren, Benedict J.

    This grassroots action guide features a conservation initiative working to bring the impacts of human population growth, economic development, and natural resource consumption into balance with the limits of nature for the benefit of current and future generations. Contents include information sheets entitled "Six Billion People and Growing,""The…

  17. Universities Report $1.8-Billion in Earnings on Inventions in 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    Universities and their inventors earned more than $1.8-billion from commercializing their academic research in the 2011 fiscal year, collecting royalties from new breeds of wheat, from a new drug for the treatment of HIV, and from longstanding arrangements over enduring products like Gatorade. Northwestern University earned the most of any…

  18. Two Billion Cars: What it Means for Climate and Energy Policy

    ScienceCinema

    Daniel Sperling

    2010-01-08

    April 13, 2009: Daniel Sperling, director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis, presents the next installment of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Divisions Distinguished Lecture series. He discusses Two Billion Cars and What it Means for Climate and Energy Policy.

  19. Cancer costs projected to reach at least $158 billion in 2020

    Cancer.gov

    Based on growth and aging of the U.S. population, medical expenditures for cancer in the year 2020 are projected to reach at least $158 billion (in 2010 dollars) – an increase of 27 percent over 2010. If newly developed tools for cancer diagnosis, treatme

  20. Bullish Stock Market Pushes Endowments Up 21.9% in 1997, to More Than $150-Billion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strosnider, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Investment returns on college and university endowments for 1997 was the sixth double-digit gain in the 1990s and the highest since 1986. Fiscal year 1998 is experiencing greater market volatility, with more modest returns predicted. Institutions with endowments of over $1 billion have increased from 20 to 25 in one year; this group holds nearly

  1. Two Billion Cars: What it Means for Climate and Energy Policy

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Sperling

    2009-04-15

    April 13, 2009: Daniel Sperling, director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis, presents the next installment of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Divisions Distinguished Lecture series. He discusses Two Billion Cars and What it Means for Climate and Energy Policy.

  2. High-Stakes Hustle: Public Schools and the New Billion Dollar Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baines, Lawrence A.; Stanley, Gregory Kent

    2004-01-01

    High-stakes testing costs up to $50 billion per annum, has no impact on student achievement, and has changed the focus of American public schools. This article analyzes the benefits and costs of the accountability movement, as well as discusses its roots in the eugenics movements of the early 20th century.

  3. Cutting Brand-Name Drug Use Could Save U.S. $73 Billion

    MedlinePlus

    ... with their generic equivalents whenever possible. For the study, the researchers reviewed self-reported prescription drug use by more than 107,000 Americans who were part of the 2010-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The study authors found that $760 billion was spent on ...

  4. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium requirements to support a multi-billion gallon biofuel industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To accomplish the goals for biofuel and bioenergy production, 1 billion tons of biomass will need to be produced annually by the year 2030. Crop production data from a joint study by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) demonstrated how this goal could...

  5. Multi-Billion Shot, High-Fluence Exposure of Cr(4+): YAG Passive Q-Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Dallas, Joseph L.; Afzal, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) employing a diode pumped, Q-Switched, ND:YAG laser operating at 40 Hz repetition rate. To meet the five-year mission lifetime goal, a single transmitter would accumulate over 6.3 billion shots. Cr(4+):YAG is a promising candidate material for passively Q-switching the laser. Historically, the performance of saturable absorbers has degraded over long-duration usage. To measure the multi-billion shot performance of Cr(4+):YAG, a passively Q-switched GLAS-like oscillator was tested at an accelerated repetition rate of 500 Hz. The intracavity fluence was calculated to be approximately 2.5 J/cm(exp 2). The laser was monitored autonomously for 165 days. There was no evidence of change in the material optical properties during the 7.2 billion shot test.. All observed changes in laser operation could be attributed to pump laser diode aging. This is the first demonstration of multi-billion shot exposure testing of Cr(4+):YAG in this pulse energy regime

  6. Electron energy loss and diffraction of backscattered electrons from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Aizel, Koceila; Vos, Maarten

    2010-05-01

    Electrons backscattered from crystals can show Kikuchi patterns: variations in intensity for different outgoing directions due to diffraction by the lattice. Here, we measure these effects as a function of their energy loss for 30 keV electrons backscattered from silicon. The change in diffraction contrast with energy loss depends strongly on the scattering geometry. At steep incidence on the sample, diffraction contrast in the observed Kikuchi bands decreases rapidly with energy loss. For an energy loss larger than about 150 eV the contrast is more than 5 times less than the contrast due to electrons near zero energy loss. However, for grazing incidence angles, maximum Kikuchi band contrast is observed for electrons with an energy loss near 60 eV, where the contrast is more than 2.5 larger than near zero energy loss. In addition, in this grazing incidence geometry, the Kikuchi diffraction effects stay significant even for electrons that have lost hundreds of electron volts. For the maximum measured energy loss of 440 eV, the electrons still show a contrast that is 1.5 larger than that of the electrons near zero energy loss. These geometry-dependent observations of Kikuchi band diffraction contrast are interpreted based on the elastic and inelastic scattering properties of electrons and dynamical diffraction simulations.

  7. Suprathermal electrons produced by beam-plasma-discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments conducted with a low energy plasma lens, HARP, in the electron beam of the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center indicate that an enhanced population of 50 to 300 volt electrons appear when the beam goes into the Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) mode. Below the BPD instability the electron distribution appears to be characterized as non-energized single particle scattering and energy loss. At 100 cm from the beam core in the BPD mode the fluxes parallel to the beam are reduced by a factor of 20 with respect to the fluxes at 25 cm. Some evidence for isotropy near the beam core is presented.

  8. Space processing of electronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    The bulk growth of solid solution alloys of mercury telluride and cadmium telluride is discussed. These alloys are usually described by the formula Hg1-xCdxTe, and are useful for the construction of infrared detectors. The electronic energy band gap can be controlled between zero and 1.6 electron volts by adjusting the composition x. The most useful materials are at x approximately 20%, suitable for detection wavelengths of about 10 micrometers. The problems of growing large crystals are rooted in the wide phase diagram of the HgTe-CdTe pseudobinary system which leads to exaggerate segregation in freezing, constitutional supercooling, and other difficulties, and in the high vapor pressure of mercury at the growth temperatures, which leads to loss of stoichiometry and to the necessity of working in strong, pressure resistant sealed containers.

  9. Program Calculates Power Demands Of Electronic Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    CURRENT computer program calculates power requirements of electronic designs. For given design, CURRENT reads in applicable parts-list file and file containing current required for each part. Program also calculates power required for circuit at supply potentials of 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5 volts. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. Sun version of program (NPO-19590). PC version of program (NPO-19111).

  10. Selective generation and extraction of low emittance electrons from plasmas: A new concept for E-beam cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1991-09-19

    It is shown that hollow cathode discharges can operate in a mode characterized by a two-component electron energy distribution: bulk electrons with a thermal distribution with a temperature of a few electron volts, and a component of fast electrons with an energy of about 30 eV and a thermal spread of about 0.1 eV. Measurements of both parallel and perpendicular energy spreads confirm the existence of fast, low energy spread electrons. Selective extraction of these electrons can form the basis of a high current, high brightness electron gun which could be well suited for EBIS applications. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. LLNL's Big Science Capabilities Help Spur Over $796 Billion in U.S. Economic Activity Sequencing the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Jeffrey S.

    2015-07-28

    LLNL’s successful history of taking on big science projects spans beyond national security and has helped create billions of dollars per year in new economic activity. One example is LLNL’s role in helping sequence the human genome. Over $796 billion in new economic activity in over half a dozen fields has been documented since LLNL successfully completed this Grand Challenge.

  12. Limiting Superluminal Electron and Neutrino Velocities Using the 2010 Crab Nebula Flare and the IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of two PetaelectronVolt (PeV)-scale neutrino events reported by Ice Cube allows one to place constraints on Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) in the neutrino sector. After first arguing that at least one of the PetaelectronVolt IceCube events was of extragalactic origin, I derive an upper limit for the difference between putative superluminal neutrino and electron velocities of less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19) in units where c = 1, confirming that the observed PetaelectronVolt neutrinos could have reached Earth from extragalactic sources. I further derive a new constraint on the superluminal electron velocity, obtained from the observation of synchrotron radiation from the Crab Nebula flare of September, 2010. The inference that the greater than 1 GigaelectronVolt gamma-rays from synchrotron emission in the flare were produced by electrons of energy up to approx. 5.1 PetaelectronVolt indicates the nonoccurrence of vacuum Cerenkov radiation by these electrons. This implies a new, strong constraint on superluminal electron velocities delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 5 x 10(exp -21). It immediately follows that one then obtains an upper limit on the superluminal neutrino velocity alone of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19), many orders of magnitude better than the time-of-flight constraint from the SN1987A neutrino burst. However, if the electrons are subluminal the constraint on the absolute value of delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17), obtained from the Crab Nebula gamma-ray spectrum, places a weaker constraint on superluminal neutrino velocity of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17).

  13. Billions for biodefense: federal agency biodefense funding, FY2009-FY2010.

    PubMed

    Franco, Crystal

    2009-09-01

    Since 2001, the United States government has spent substantial resources on preparing the nation against a bioterrorist attack. Earlier articles in this series analyzed civilian biodefense funding by the federal government for fiscal years (FY) 2001 through 2009. This article updates those figures with budgeted amounts for FY2010, specifically analyzing the budgets and allocations for biodefense at the Departments of Health and Human Services, Defense, Homeland Security, Agriculture, and State; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the National Science Foundation. This year's article also provides an assessment of the proportion of the biodefense budget that serves multiple programmatic goals and benefits, including research into infectious disease pathogenesis and immunology, public health planning and preparedness, and disaster response efforts. The FY2010 federal budget for civilian biodefense totals $6.05 billion. Of that total, $4.96 billion is budgeted for programs that serve multiple goals and provide manifold benefits. PMID:19772453

  14. Site geotechnical considerations for expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to one billion barrels

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T. ); Whittington, D.W. ); Magorian, T.R. , Amherst, NY )

    1991-01-01

    Eight Gulf Coast salt domes have emerged as candidate sites for possible expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to one billion barrels. Two existing SPR sites, Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA, are among the eight that are being considered. To achieve the billion barrel capacity, some 25 new leached caverns would be constructed, and would probably be established in two separate sites in Louisiana and Texas because of distribution requirements. Geotechnical factors involved in siting studies have centered first and foremost on cavern integrity and environmental acceptability, once logistical suitability is realized. Other factors have involved subsidence and flooding potential, loss of coastal marshlands, seismicity, brine injection well utility, and co-use by multiple operators. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The Effects of a Highly Secondary Electron Emissive Boundary on the Plasma Potential and Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2011-10-01

    In a multi-dipole chamber with a thin layer of dielectric coating the wall, the plasma potential is observed to be negative with respect to the grounded wall in the tens of volts. The dielectric affects the plasma potential in two ways: by charging negative on the surface in contact with the plasma and by emitting significant numbers of secondary electrons. The secondary electron emission coefficient due to electrons (the ratio of secondary electron current to incident electron current) is larger than 1 and at low enough densities a virtual cathode can be observed near the wall. The potential structure of the virtual cathode is affected primarily by the electron temperature and the energy of the ionizing electrons (tens of eV). The secondary electrons enter the bulk plasma and enhance the high energy tail of the electron energy distribution function. In a multi-dipole chamber with a thin layer of dielectric coating the wall, the plasma potential is observed to be negative with respect to the grounded wall in the tens of volts. The dielectric affects the plasma potential in two ways: by charging negative on the surface in contact with the plasma and by emitting significant numbers of secondary electrons. The secondary electron emission coefficient due to electrons (the ratio of secondary electron current to incident electron current) is larger than 1 and at low enough densities a virtual cathode can be observed near the wall. The potential structure of the virtual cathode is affected primarily by the electron temperature and the energy of the ionizing electrons (tens of eV). The secondary electrons enter the bulk plasma and enhance the high energy tail of the electron energy distribution function. This work was supported by US Department of Energy grants No. DE-FG02-97ER54437 and No. DE-SC0001939 and the Fusion Energy Sciences Fellowship Program administered by Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

  16. Analyzer for determining helium-4 in the part-per-billion range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, P. W.

    A trace helium analyzer for determining helium-4 in the parts-per-billion range has been developed. The instrument is used for anayzing pure gases, laboratory-prepared standards, and atmospheric samples. The analyzer consists of a modified helium leak detector mass spectrometer, a laboratory-built sample inlet system, and a liquid nitrogen cooled charcoal trap. A programmable integrator and event control module make automatic operation possible. The portability of the analyzer allows it to be used in the field.

  17. How to Bring Solar Energy to Seven Billion People (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Wadia, Cyrus

    2011-04-28

    By exploiting the powers of nanotechnology and taking advantage of non-toxic, Earth-abundant materials, Berkeley Lab's Cyrus Wadia has fabricated new solar cell devices that have the potential to be several orders of magnitude less expensive than conventional solar cells. And by mastering the chemistry of these materials-and the economics of solar energy-he envisions bringing electricity to the 1.2 billion people now living without it.

  18. How to Bring Solar Energy to Seven Billion People (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Wadia, Cyrus

    2009-04-06

    By exploiting the powers of nanotechnology and taking advantage of non-toxic, Earth-abundant materials, Berkeley Lab's Cyrus Wadia has fabricated new solar cell devices that have the potential to be several orders of magnitude less expensive than conventional solar cells. And by mastering the chemistry of these materials-and the economics of solar energy-he envisions bringing electricity to the 1.2 billion people now living without it.

  19. U.S. Wind projected to Be $60 billion business by 2013

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-15

    A recent U.S. Department of Energy report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to meeting 20 percent of U.S. electricity generation from wind by 2030, but identified upgrading of the transmission grid as a major challenge, requiring a $60+ billion investment. One major obstacle is the highly fragmented ownership of the 200,000-mile network among some 500 diverse, intensely territorial entities.

  20. Aid to families with dependent children: who receives more than $22 billion and why?

    PubMed

    Waldman, H B

    1996-01-01

    A general outline of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program is provided. The $22 billion program provides financial support to 14 million persons (including more than 9 million children). The changing character of the family structure is considered in terms of efforts to control AFDC spending. Additional programs to assist children (Social Security, Supplemental Security Insurance and Food Stamps) are reviewed. PMID:8708125

  1. [Six billion people: how the continents were populated--yesterday, today, and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Dupaquier, J

    1998-01-01

    World population growth from settlement of the continents to future population size is broadly traced in this work. Population growth has accelerated greatly in the past two centuries and especially since 1950. The first billion was reached only in 1850, while the fifth billion, in 1986, required only 11 years. Past population growth was slow, irregular, and variable from continent to continent. Population estimates for prehistory have a margin of error of around 50%. Modern man first appeared in Africa or possibly the Middle East around 100,000 BC. The three great centers of population in China, India, and the Middle East and Mediterranean area developed during the Neolithic Revolution and have maintained their importance. At least 500,000 years ago, humans began using fire and clothing to escape the limits of their biotype and geographic area of origin. The peopling of the continents was not achieved by massive displacement of surplus population, but by movement of small groups into empty space where they proliferated. World population was an estimated 460-510 million in 1500, with probably 135 million in China, 95 million in India, and 80 million in Europe. The balance between fertility and mortality postulated by transition theory has not occurred in Europe. World population is projected to increase from 2.5 billion to 6 billion between 1950 and 2000, with 61% in Asia, 12% in Africa, 9% in Latin America, and 5% in Europe. The world rate of population growth is still about 1.4% annually. The demographic explosion will have been a transitory episode in human history, but revolutionary in its impact. PMID:12179517

  2. Low-energy electron flux and its reaction to active experimentation of Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.

    1981-01-01

    An instrument capable of observing the natural electron flux in the energy range from 0.1 to 12.0 kiloelectron volts is discussed for use in an experiment intended as a forerunner of a method that will utilize artificially accelerated electrons as tracer particles for electron fields parallel to the magnetic field. Effects that are of importance either as means of detecting the echo beam or as causes of beam perturbations (e.g., spacecraft charging effects and electron background) are to be studied. The use of electron accelerators as a tool to probe magnetospheric processes rather than to modify them is planned.

  3. Planet Earth 2025. A look into a future world of 8 billion humans.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D; Rowley, J

    1999-01-01

    Population projections for the next quarter century are reasonably predictable, and related resource challenges are quite visible. The world's population is expected to grow to around 8 billion by 2025. According to the International Food Policy Research Institute, if current levels of investments in agriculture and social welfare continue, food grain production will increase by about 1.5% and livestock production by 2.7% a year over the next 2 decades. These levels are much lower now compared to previous decades, and population could outstrip supply unless there is a big increase in developing country imports. The continued destruction of the earth's forest mantle as a result of human activities is another desperate concern. By 2025, some 3 billion people will live in land-short countries and another 2 billion will be living in urban areas with high levels of air pollution. In addition, coastal ecosystems, which are already exposed to unbridled coastal development and mounting pollution loads, will experience more pressures as the number of people living near them increases in the next 25 years. One final challenge is the unprecedented rate of habitat loss and species extinction. Ecosystem destruction is so severe that as many as 60,000 plant species could be lost by the year 2025. PMID:12295546

  4. Severe Obesity In Adults Cost State Medicaid Programs Nearly $8 Billion In 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Claire; Pamplin, John; Long, Michael W; Ward, Zachary J; Gortmaker, Steven L; Andreyeva, Tatiana

    2015-11-01

    Efforts to expand Medicaid while controlling spending must be informed by a deeper understanding of the extent to which the high medical costs associated with severe obesity (having a body mass index of [Formula: see text] or higher) determine spending at the state level. Our analysis of population-representative data indicates that in 2013, severe obesity cost the nation approximately $69 billion, which accounted for 60 percent of total obesity-related costs. Approximately 11 percent of the cost of severe obesity was paid for by Medicaid, 30 percent by Medicare and other federal health programs, 27 percent by private health plans, and 30 percent out of pocket. Overall, severe obesity cost state Medicaid programs almost $8 billion a year, ranging from $5 million in Wyoming to $1.3 billion in California. These costs are likely to increase following Medicaid expansion and enhanced coverage of weight loss therapies in the form of nutrition consultation, drug therapy, and bariatric surgery. Ensuring and expanding Medicaid-eligible populations' access to cost-effective treatment for severe obesity should be part of each state's strategy to mitigate rising obesity-related health care costs. PMID:26526251

  5. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes. PMID:27049949

  6. Spatial variability in oceanic redox structure 1.8billion years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulton, Simon W.; Fralick, Philip W.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2010-07-01

    The evolution of ocean chemistry during the Proterozoic eon (2.5-0.542 billion years ago) is thought to have played a central role in both the timing and rate of eukaryote evolution. The timing of the deposition of iron formations implies that, early in the Earth's history, oceans were predominantly anoxic and rich in dissolved iron. However, global deposition of iron formations ceased about 1.84 billion years ago. This termination indicates a major upheaval in ocean chemistry, but the precise nature of this change remains debated. Here we use iron and sulphur systematics to reconstruct oceanic redox conditions from the 1.88- to 1.83-billion-year-old Animikie group from the Superior region, North America. We find that surface waters were oxygenated, whereas at mid-depths, anoxic and sulphidic (euxinic) conditions extended over 100km from the palaeoshoreline. The spatial extent of euxinia varied through time, but deep ocean waters remained rich in dissolved iron. Widespread euxinia along continental margins would have removed dissolved iron from the water column through the precipitation of pyrite, which would have reduced the supply of dissolved iron and resulted in the global cessation of the deposition of `Superior-type' iron formations. We suggest that incursions of sulphide from the mid-depths into overlying oxygenated surface waters may have placed severe constraints on eukaryotic evolution.

  7. Two ten-billion-solar-mass black holes at the centres of giant elliptical galaxies.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Nicholas J; Ma, Chung-Pei; Gebhardt, Karl; Wright, Shelley A; Murphy, Jeremy D; Lauer, Tod R; Graham, James R; Richstone, Douglas O

    2011-12-01

    Observational work conducted over the past few decades indicates that all massive galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centres. Although the luminosities and brightness fluctuations of quasars in the early Universe suggest that some were powered by black holes with masses greater than 10 billion solar masses, the remnants of these objects have not been found in the nearby Universe. The giant elliptical galaxy Messier 87 hosts the hitherto most massive known black hole, which has a mass of 6.3 billion solar masses. Here we report that NGC 3842, the brightest galaxy in a cluster at a distance from Earth of 98 megaparsecs, has a central black hole with a mass of 9.7 billion solar masses, and that a black hole of comparable or greater mass is present in NGC 4889, the brightest galaxy in the Coma cluster (at a distance of 103 megaparsecs). These two black holes are significantly more massive than predicted by linearly extrapolating the widely used correlations between black-hole mass and the stellar velocity dispersion or bulge luminosity of the host galaxy. Although these correlations remain useful for predicting black-hole masses in less massive elliptical galaxies, our measurements suggest that different evolutionary processes influence the growth of the largest galaxies and their black holes. PMID:22158244

  8. Pioneer Venus Orbiter Electron Temperature Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krehbiel, J. P.; Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Cutler, J. R.; Pinkus, W. H.; Kaplan, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The Orbiter Electron Temperature Probe (OETP) instrumentation and measurement technique has been designed to perform in-situ measurements of electron temperature and electron and ion density in the ionosphere of Venus. Adaptive sweep voltage circuitry continuously tracks the changing electron temperature and spacecraft potential while auto-ranging electrometers adjust their gain in response to the changing plasma density. Control signals used in the instrument to achieve this automatic tracking provide a continuous monitor of the ionospheric parameters without telemetering each volt-ampere curve. Internal data storage permits high data rate sampling of selected raw characteristic curves for low rate transmission to earth. These curves are used to verify or correct the inflight processed data. Sample in orbit measurements are presented to demonstrate instrument performance.

  9. Titan's Spectacular Volte-Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2013-10-01

    Like Earth, Titan sports lakes, storms and rainfall. These features derive from a methane cycle, reminiscent of Earth's hydrological cycle; methane exists as an ice, liquid and gas and transfers between the surface and atmosphere, according to the seasonal weather. Titan's seasons contrast Earth’s. Imagine a summer trip to 70 latitude, where hurricane-sized storms burst forth out of a clear sky every few months for about 15 years. Then they vanish for another 15 years. Envision a trip to the winter polar region. Here the sky is perhaps clear except that the high haze, which filters sunlight like a translucent globe, is somewhat thicker than it is in the summer. Imperceptibly, you are blocking the diffuse organic matter, which is slowly settling out of the hazy orb, and accumulating on the polar surface. These effects are a few of the many that derive from Titan’s circulation and its seasonal changes during the satellite's 29.5 Earth year orbit about the Sun. In particular, and as indicated in recent observations, Titan's circulation flip-flopped. Before equinox in 2009, on average, air rose in the southern polar region and downwelled in the northern polar region. Now the reverse appears to be happening. Here we discuss the observations ranging from the surface to ~500 km altitude that reveal the symphony of responses of Titan's surface and atmosphere to this dramatic shift. In addition we discuss the syntheses of these effects, from theoretical efforts involving microphysical models, local cloud models and general circulation models, with the question of why Titan's seasonal changes are so much more spectacular compared to those of Earth.

  10. Evidence for Oxygenic Photosynthesis Half a Billion Years Before the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planavsky, Noah; Reinhard, Chris; Asael, Dan; Lyons, Tim; Hofmann, Axel; Rouxel, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Despite detailed investigations over the past 50 years, there is still intense debate about when oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. Current estimates span over a billion years of Earth history, ranging from prior to 3.7 Ga, the age of the oldest sedimentary rocks, to 2.4-2.3 Ga, coincident with the rise of atmospheric oxygen ("The Great Oxidation Event" or GOE). As such, a new, independent perspective is needed. We will provide such a perspective herein by using molybdenum (Mo) isotopes in a novel way to track the onset of manganese(II)oxidation and thus biological oxygen production. The oxidation of Mn(II) in modern marine setting requires free dissolved oxygen. Mn is relatively unique in its environmental specificity for oxygen as an electron acceptor among the redox-sensitive transition metals, many of which, like Fe, can be oxidized under anoxic conditions either through a microbial pathway and/or with alternative oxidants such as nitrate. There are large Mo isotope fractionations associated with the sorption of Mo (as a polymolybdate complex) onto Mn-oxyhydroxides, with an approximately -2.7‰ fractionation in d98Mo associated with Mo sorption onto Mn-oxyhydroxides (e.g., birnessite, vernadite). In contrast, sorption of Mo onto the Fe-oxyhydroxide (e.g., ferrihydrite) results in a fractionation of only -1.1‰ or less. Because of this difference in Mo isotope fractionation, Mo isotope values should become lighter with increasing Mn content, if Mn oxidation occurred during deposition and is an important vector of Mo transfer to the sediment. We find a strong positive correlation between d98Mo values and Fe/Mn ratios in iron formations deposited before and after the Great Oxidation Event. Most strikingly, Mo isotope data and Fe/Mn ratios correlate over a 2.5‰ range in d98Mo values in the Mn-rich (0.1 - 6%) iron formation of the 2.95 Ga Sinqeni Formation, South Africa. The large isotopic shifts occur over a relatively thin (3 meter thick) horizon, reflecting short-term variations in the degree of Mn oxidation that are consistent with localized oxygen generation and rapid consumption in a geochemical backdrop that was otherwise reducing. The observed range in d98Mo values and the correlation between d98Mo values and Fe/Mn ratios is statistically identical to that found in the ca. 1.89 Ga iron formations from the Lake Superior region, Animikie basin, which were deposited well after the rise of atmospheric oxygen. Our work and other recent geochemical work on the Pongola Supergroup reconcile geochemical and molecular records for the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and provide strong evidence that there was biological oxygen production well before its permanent accumulation in the atmosphere around 2.4-2.3 Ga.

  11. Mobile hydrocarbon microspheres from >2-billion-year-old carbon-bearing seams in the South African deep subsurface.

    PubMed

    Wanger, G; Moser, D; Hay, M; Myneni, S; Onstott, T C; Southam, G

    2012-11-01

    By ~2.9 Ga, the time of the deposition of the Witwatersrand Supergroup, life is believed to have been well established on Earth. Carbon remnants of the microbial biosphere from this time period are evident in sediments from around the world. In the Witwatersrand Supergroup, the carbonaceous material is often concentrated in seams, closely associated with the gold deposits and may have been a mobile phase 2 billion years ago. Whereas today the carbon in the Witwatersrand Supergroup is presumed to be immobile, hollow hydrocarbon spheres ranging in size from <1 μm to >50 μm were discovered emanating from a borehole drilled through the carbon-bearing seams suggesting that a portion of the carbon may still be mobile in the deep subsurface. ToF-SIMS and STXM analyses revealed that these spheres contain a suite of alkane, alkenes, and aromatic compounds consistent with the described organic-rich carbon seams within the Witwatersrand Supergroup's auriferous reef horizons. Analysis by electron microscopy and ToF-SIMS, however, revealed that these spheres, although most likely composed of biogenic carbon and resembling biological organisms, do not retain any true structural, that is, fossil, information and were formed by an abiogenic process. PMID:22901282

  12. Secondary Electron Emission and the Exploration of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2006-01-01

    The emission of secondary electrons from surfaces exposed to the space plasma and radiation environment is a process of great importance to space system engineering design and operations. A spacecraft will collect charge until it reaches an equilibrium potential gov,erned by the balance of incoming electron and ion currents from the space environment with outgoing secondary, backscattered, and photoelectron currents. Laboratory measurements of secondary electron yields are an important parameter for use in spacecraft charging analyses because the magnitude and sign of the equilibrium potential depends on both the energy spectrum of electrons and ions in the space environment and the electrical properties of the surface materials (including the energy dependent secondary electron yields). Typical benign equilibrium potentials range &om a few tens of volts positive in interplanetary space to a few volts negative in low Earth orbit. However, spacecraft are known to charge to negative potentials exceeding one to ten kilovolts in some environments and anomalies or system failures due to electrostatic discharges originating from highly charged surfaces becomes a serious concern. This presentation will provide a review of the spacecraft charging process with special emphasis on the role of secondary electrons in controlling the current balance process. Charging examples will include spacecraft in Earth orbit and interplanetary space as well as dust charging on the lunar surface, a phenomenon of importance to future lunar surface operations.

  13. [The year 2000: one billion couples of child-bearing age].

    PubMed

    Lintong, L J

    1988-04-01

    Out of 1 billion couples there are only 124 million who use modern and effective contraceptives. World abortions number 33 million/year. 250 million sexually active women of child-bearing age in developing countries outside China do not use modern and effective contraceptives. Fertility control costs on the average US$2.5 billion a year in each developing country, 20% of which is assistance from developed countries. Expanding the family planning service to the 250 million sexually active child-bearing aged women costs an additional U.S. $5 billion yearly. A family planning accessibility survey was conducted by the Population Crisis Committee. PCC divided the countries into 2 categories: Developed and developing countries. The 110 countries (15 developed and 95 developing) covered 96% of the world population. The survey placed the countries in 5 classes according to accessibility levels: Excellent, good, fair, poor, very poor. The developed countries were analyzed according to effective contraceptive methods, service to the poor and minorities, sex education in the schools, and family planning information and advertisement. The developing countries were analyzed according to effective contraceptive methods, performance of service and distribution, public information and education, private sector participation, government finance and policies. Of the 15 developed countries, 43% were excellent, 22% good, 24% fair, and 2% poor. Of the 95 developing countries, 5 were excellent, 10 good, 16 fair, and 64 either poor or very poor countries in respect to family planning accessibility. In the face of a population explosion in the year 2000, many countries lack of government support for family planning programs. After 30 years of world effort in population control, half of the world population still has no effective family planning services. PMID:12343749

  14. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day ‘dormant’ descendants of this population of ‘active’ black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall—the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600—a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  15. Monte Carlo approach to the spatial deposition of energy by electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Green, A. E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) and continuous slowdown approximation (CSDA) approaches to the spatial deposition of energy by electrons are compared using the same detailed atomic cross section (DACS). It is found that the CSDA method overestimates the amount of energy that is deposited near the end of the path for electrons above a few hundred electron volts. The MC results are in approximate agreement with experimental data in such a way as to be relatively independent of the actual gas used. Our MC results are extended to obtain the three-dimensional deposition of energy by sub-keV electrons in molecular hydrogen.

  16. Monopole-dipole spacecraft potential: observations and effects on electron moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulupa, M.; Bale, S. D.; Salem, C. S.; Horaites, K. I.

    2013-05-01

    Using the 3DP electron analyzers on the Wind spacecraft, we have analyzed several years of solar wind electron data. We find an anomalous core electron drift of roughly 40 km/s in the sunward xGSE direction, regardless of the direction of the magnetic field. We interpret this drift as an effect of non-isotropic monopole-dipole spacecraft floating potential structure. For typical solar wind conditions, the amplitude of the dipole potential term is a fraction of a volt. The dipole term has negligible effects on the even electron moments (density and temperature) but noticeable effects on the odd moments (bulk velocity and heat flux).

  17. The $1. 5 billion question: Can the US Global Change Research Program deliver on its promises

    SciTech Connect

    Monastersky, R.

    1993-09-04

    President Clinton has continued the funding for scientific investigations of global climatic change, increasing funds to a total of $1.5 billion spread amoung 11 different agencies. However, a growing number of critics warn that the program appears heading toward failure. The main issue is relevancy. Almost every agrees that the research effort will support important scientific work over the next decade, but it will not necessarily provide the information policymakers need to address the threat of climatic change, ozone depletion, deforestation, desertification, and similiar issues. This article summarizes the concerns and comments of critics, and the gap between the climate scientists and governmental policymakers.

  18. The First Billion Years: The Growth of Galaxies in the Reionization Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Garth

    2015-08-01

    Detection and measurement of the earliest galaxies in the first billion years only became possible after the Hubble Space Telescope was updated in 2009 with the infrared WFC3/IR camera during Shuttle servicing mission SM4. The first billion years is a fascinating epoch, not just because of the earliest galaxies known from about 450 Myr after the Big Bang, but also because it encompasses the reionization epoch that peaked around z~9, as Planck has recently shown, and ended around redshift z~6 at 900 Myr. Before 2009 just a handful of galaxies were known in the reionization epoch at z>6. But within the last 5 years, with the first HUDF09 survey, the HUDF12, CANDELS and numerous other surveys on the GOODS and CANDELS fields, as well as detections from the cluster lensing programs like CLASH and the Frontier Fields, the number of galaxies at redshifts 7-10 has exploded, with some 700 galaxies being found and characterized. The first billion years was a period of extraordinary growth in the galaxy population with rapid growth in the star formation rate density and global mass density in galaxies. Spitzer observations in the infrared of these Hubble fields are establishing masses as well as giving insights into the nature and timescales of star formation from the very powerful emission lines being revealed by the Spitzer IRAC data. I will discuss what we understand about the growth of galaxies in this epoch from the insights gained from remarkable deep fields like the XDF, as well as the wide-area GOODS/CANDELS fields, the detection of unexpectedly luminous galaxies at redshifts 8-10, the impact of early galaxies on reionization, confirmation of a number of galaxies at z~7-8 from ground-based spectroscopic measurements, and the indications of a change in the growth of the star formation rate around 500 Myr. The first billion years was a time of dramatic growth and change in the early galaxy population.

  19. A massive galaxy in its core formation phase three billion years after the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Schreiber, Natascha Förster; da Cunha, Elisabete; Tacconi, Linda; Bezanson, Rachel; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Leja, Joel; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-09-18

    Most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores in early cosmic epochs. Previous studies have found galaxies with high gas velocity dispersions or small apparent sizes, but so far no objects have been identified with both the stellar structure and the gas dynamics of a forming core. Here we report a candidate core in the process of formation 11 billion years ago, at redshift z = 2.3. This galaxy, GOODS-N-774, has a stellar mass of 100 billion solar masses, a half-light radius of 1.0 kiloparsecs and a star formation rate of solar masses per year. The star-forming gas has a velocity dispersion of 317 ± 30 kilometres per second. This is similar to the stellar velocity dispersions of the putative descendants of GOODS-N-774, which are compact quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 (refs 8-11) and giant elliptical galaxies in the nearby Universe. Galaxies such as GOODS-N-774 seem to be rare; however, from the star formation rate and size of this galaxy we infer that many star-forming cores may be heavily obscured, and could be missed in optical and near-infrared surveys. PMID:25162527

  20. Evidence for arsenic metabolism and cycling by microorganisms 2.7 billion years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforna, Marie Catherine; Philippot, Pascal; Somogyi, Andrea; van Zuilen, Mark A.; Medjoubi, Kadda; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Visscher, Pieter T.

    2014-11-01

    The ability of microbes to metabolize arsenic may have emerged more than 3.4 billion years ago. Some of the modern environments in which prominent arsenic metabolism occurs are anoxic, as were the Precambrian oceans. Early oceans may also have had a relatively high abundance of arsenic. However, it is unclear whether arsenic cycling occurred in ancient environments. Here we assess the chemistry and nature of cell-like globules identified in salt-encrusted portions of 2.72-billion-year-old fossil stromatolites from Western Australia. We use Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence to show that the globules are composed of organic carbon and arsenic (As). We argue that our data are best explained by the occurrence of a complete arsenic cycle at this site, with As(III) oxidation and As(V) reduction by microbes living in permanently anoxic conditions. We therefore suggest that arsenic cycling could have occurred more widely in marine environments in the several hundred million years before the Earth’s atmosphere and shallow oceans were oxygenated.

  1. The evolution in the stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies over the past 10 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Lidman, Chris; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Guatelli, Susanna; Hill, Allison R.; Hoekstra, Henk; Kurinsky, Noah; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Marsan, Z. Cemile; Safavi-Naeini, Mitra; Sifón, Cristóbal; Stefanon, Mauro; van de Sande, Jesse; van Dokkum, Pieter; Weigel, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Using a sample of 98 galaxy clusters recently imaged in the near infra-red with the ESO NTT, WIYN and WHT telescopes, supplemented with 33 clusters from the ESO archive, we measure how the stellar mass of the most massive galaxies in the universe, namely Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG), increases with time. Most of the BCGs in this new sample lie in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.6, which has been noted in recent works to mark an epoch over which the growth in the stellar mass of BCGs stalls. From this sample of 132 clusters, we create a subsample of 102 systems that includes only those clusters that have estimates of the cluster mass. We combine the BCGs in this subsample with BCGs from the literature, and find that the growth in stellar mass of BCGs from 10 billion years ago to the present epoch is broadly consistent with recent semi-analytic and semi-empirical models. As in other recent studies, tentative evidence indicates that the stellar mass growth rate of BCGs may be slowing in the past 3.5 billion years. Further work in collecting larger samples, and in better comparing observations with theory using mock images is required if a more detailed comparison between the models and the data is to be made.

  2. As its R D budget nears $2 billion Bayer rethinks priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1993-03-17

    With a planned 1993 research and development budget of roughly DM3.2 billion ($1.95 billion), Bayer (Leverkusen) is the industry's biggest R D spender. But while the German giant lays out a healthy 7% of sales on R D, caution is clearly replacing the heady spending spurts of several years ago. And faced with an increasingly rigorous corporate business restructuring, Bayer - like others in the chemical industry - is rethinking its R D strategies. While Bayer's R D stress is clearly on life sciences, the company remains bullish on certain new materials, particularly inorganics. It has developed several engineering ceramics for use in automotive engines, with the most advanced - a silicon nitride - being road tested in Mercedes models. [open quotes]We have the materials and know their properties,[close quotes] says Hauke Fuerstenwerth, Bayer's head of R D coordination. The challenge now, he says, is to demonstrate a commercially attractive process for large-scale production. Bayer is also pursuing new silicon wafer technology. Already in small-scale production, the firm is testing an amorphous silicon that is intended to be far cheaper than existing crystalline silicon wafers, while maintaining suitable properties for applications such as solar collectors.

  3. Parametrization and Classification of 20 Billion LSST Objects: Lessons from SDSS

    SciTech Connect

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Becker, A.C.; Becla, J.; Borne, K.; Burke, David L.; Claver, C.F.; Cook, K.H.; Connolly, A.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jones, R.L.; Juric, M.; Kahn, Steven M.; Lim, K-T.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Sesar, B.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC, Davis

    2011-11-10

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain, starting in 2015, multiple images of the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times during the anticipated 10 years of operations (distributed over six bands, ugrizy). Each 30-second long visit will deliver 5{sigma} depth for point sources of r {approx} 24.5 on average. The co-added map will be about 3 magnitudes deeper, and will include 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars. We discuss various measurements that will be automatically performed for these 20 billion sources, and how they can be used for classification and determination of source physical and other properties. We provide a few classification examples based on SDSS data, such as color classification of stars, color-spatial proximity search for wide-angle binary stars, orbital-color classification of asteroid families, and the recognition of main Galaxy components based on the distribution of stars in the position-metallicity-kinematics space. Guided by these examples, we anticipate that two grand classification challenges for LSST will be (1) rapid and robust classification of sources detected in difference images, and (2) simultaneous treatment of diverse astrometric and photometric time series measurements for an unprecedentedly large number of objects.

  4. The Value Of The Nonprofit Hospital Tax Exemption Was $24.6 Billion In 2011.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Sara; Kindig, David A; Bao, Jie; Byrnes, Maureen K; O'Laughlin, Colin

    2015-07-01

    The federal government encourages public support for charitable activities by allowing people to deduct donations to tax-exempt organizations on their income tax returns. Tax-exempt hospitals are major beneficiaries of this policy because it encourages donations to the hospitals while shielding them from federal and state tax liability. In exchange, these hospitals must engage in community benefit activities, such as providing care to indigent patients and participating in Medicaid. The congressional Joint Committee on Taxation estimated the value of the nonprofit hospital tax exemption at $12.6 billion in 2002--a number that included forgone taxes, public contributions, and the value of tax-exempt bond financing. In this article we estimate that the size of the exemption reached $24.6 billion in 2011. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) brings a new focus on community benefit activities by requiring tax-exempt hospitals to engage in communitywide planning efforts to improve community health. The magnitude of the tax exemption, coupled with ACA reforms, underscores the public's interest not only in community benefit spending generally but also in the extent to which nonprofit hospitals allocate funds for community benefit expenditures that improve the overall health of their communities. PMID:26085486

  5. A Fifteen-billion Solar Mass Black Hole at the End of Reionzation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Mcgreer, Ian; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Bian, Fuyan; Wang, Ran

    2014-08-01

    The existence of luminous quasars at z>6 indicates a rapid growth of supermasive black holes (BHs) in the early universe. Here we request to carry out GNIRS Near-IR spectroscopy of a newly discovered ultra-luminous quasar J0100+2802 at z=6.30. At z_AB=18.4, it is the most luminous object ever discovered at z>6 and ten times brighter than an average SDSS quasar at this redshift. We find a lower limit on the BH mass of fifteen billion solar masses, derived from its bolometric luminosity assuming Eddington accretion. Because of the quasar's high luminosity, with only one hour of integration using GNIRS, we will be able to detect and measure the properties of all major board emission lines. The CIV and MgII line width will allow us to accurate determine the quasar BH mass and Eddington ratio. The new observation will confirm whether we have discovered the first BH exceeding 10 billion solar masses at z>6, thus shed light on the nature of extreme BH accretion at the end of reionization. Emission line ratios will also be used the determine the chemical abundance within quasar broad emission line region and constrain star formation and chemical enrichment in the quasar environment.

  6. Evidence for Early Life in ˜3.5 Billion-Year-Old Pillow Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, N. R.; Furnes, H.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Staudigel, H.; de Wit, M.

    2004-12-01

    Recently discovered biosignatures in the formerly glassy rims of ˜3.5 billion-year-old pillow lavas from the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB) in South Africa suggest they were colonized by microbes early in Earth's history. These subaqueous volcanic rocks represent a new geological setting in the search for early life on Earth. This is not entirely surprising since microbial alteration of basaltic glass in pillow lavas and volcaniclastic rocks has been well documented from recent oceanic crust and well-preserved ophiolites. The BGB magmatic sequence contains exceptionally well-preserved mafic to ultramafic pillow lavas, sheet flows, and intrusions interpreted to represent 3.48 to 3.22 billion-year-old oceanic crust and island arc assemblages. We observed micron-sized tubular structures mineralized by titanite in the formerly glassy rims of the BGB pillow lavas. Based on their similarity to textures observed in recent glassy pillow basalts we interpret these structures to represent ancient traces of microbial activity formed during biogenic etching of the originally glassy pillow rims as microbes colonized the glass surface. Petrographic observations coupled with overlapping metamorphic and magmatic dates indicate this process occurred soon after eruption of the pillow lavas. Subsequent greenschist facies seafloor hydrothermal alteration caused the structures to be mineralized by titanite; a process also observed in ophiolitic pillow lavas of much younger age. X-ray mapping reveals the presence of carbon along the margins of the tubular structures interpreted as residual organic material. Disseminated carbonates within the microbially-altered BGB pillow rims have low carbon isotope values consistent with microbial oxidation of organic matter. In contrast, disseminated carbonate in the crystalline pillow interiors have carbon isotope values bracketed between Archean marine carbonate and mantle carbon dioxide. It remains to be seen how deep into the Archean oceanic crust these microbes penetrated. In modern oceanic crust their highest activity occurs near 300m subsurface at temperatures around 70 degrees Celsius. If, as some suggest, the Archean ocean was relatively hot, then the depth distribution of the microborings should be biased to pillows shallower in the crust than in the modern seafloor. Based on the observed petrographic and geochemical features we propose the glassy rims of the BGB pillow lavas hosted microbial life that left behind biomarkers ˜3.5 billion years ago. Remnants of Archean oceanic crust may thus be one of the most promising places to search for vestiges of early life on Earth.

  7. Enumeration of 166 billion organic small molecules in the chemical universe database GDB-17.

    PubMed

    Ruddigkeit, Lars; van Deursen, Ruud; Blum, Lorenz C; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-26

    Drug molecules consist of a few tens of atoms connected by covalent bonds. How many such molecules are possible in total and what is their structure? This question is of pressing interest in medicinal chemistry to help solve the problems of drug potency, selectivity, and toxicity and reduce attrition rates by pointing to new molecular series. To better define the unknown chemical space, we have enumerated 166.4 billion molecules of up to 17 atoms of C, N, O, S, and halogens forming the chemical universe database GDB-17, covering a size range containing many drugs and typical for lead compounds. GDB-17 contains millions of isomers of known drugs, including analogs with high shape similarity to the parent drug. Compared to known molecules in PubChem, GDB-17 molecules are much richer in nonaromatic heterocycles, quaternary centers, and stereoisomers, densely populate the third dimension in shape space, and represent many more scaffold types. PMID:23088335

  8. An exhumation history of continents over billion-year time scales.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Terrence J; Bowring, Samuel A; Perron, J Taylor; Mahan, Kevin H; Dudas, Francis O; Barnhart, Katherine R

    2012-01-01

    The continental lithosphere contains the oldest and most stable structures on Earth, where fragments of ancient material have eluded destruction by tectonic and surface processes operating over billions of years. Although present-day erosion of these remnants is slow, a record of how they have uplifted, eroded, and cooled over Earth's history can provide insight into the physical properties of the continents and the forces operating to exhume them over geologic time. We constructed a continuous record of ancient lithosphere cooling with the use of uranium-lead (U-Pb) thermochronology on volcanically exhumed lower crustal fragments. Combining these measurements with thermal and Pb-diffusion models constrains the range of possible erosion histories. Measured U-Pb data are consistent with extremely low erosion rates persisting over time scales approaching the age of the continents themselves. PMID:22223803

  9. Atmospheric carbon dioxide: a driver of photosynthetic eukaryote evolution for over a billion years?

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Exciting evidence from diverse fields, including physiology, evolutionary biology, palaeontology, geosciences and molecular genetics, is providing an increasingly secure basis for robustly formulating and evaluating hypotheses concerning the role of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. Such studies span over a billion years of evolutionary change, from the origins of eukaryotic algae through to the evolution of our present-day terrestrial floras, and have relevance for plant and ecosystem responses to future global CO2 increases. The papers in this issue reflect the breadth and depth of approaches being adopted to address this issue. They reveal new discoveries pointing to deep evidence for the role of CO2 in shaping evolutionary changes in plants and ecosystems, and establish an exciting cross-disciplinary research agenda for uncovering new insights into feedbacks between biology and the Earth system. PMID:22232760

  10. Geodynamo, solar wind, and magnetopause 3.4 to 3.45 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, John A; Cottrell, Rory D; Watkeys, Michael K; Hofmann, Axel; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Mamajek, Eric E; Liu, Dunji; Sibeck, David G; Neukirch, Levi P; Usui, Yoichi

    2010-03-01

    Stellar wind standoff by a planetary magnetic field prevents atmospheric erosion and water loss. Although the early Earth retained its water and atmosphere, and thus evolved as a habitable planet, little is known about Earth's magnetic field strength during that time. We report paleointensity results from single silicate crystals bearing magnetic inclusions that record a geodynamo 3.4 to 3.45 billion years ago. The measured field strength is approximately 50 to 70% that of the present-day field. When combined with a greater Paleoarchean solar wind pressure, the paleofield strength data suggest steady-state magnetopause standoff distances of < or = 5 Earth radii, similar to values observed during recent coronal mass ejection events. The data also suggest lower-latitude aurora and increases in polar cap area, as well as heating, expansion, and volatile loss from the exosphere that would have affected long-term atmospheric composition. PMID:20203044

  11. A change in the geodynamics of continental growth 3 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Dhuime, Bruno; Hawkesworth, Chris J; Cawood, Peter A; Storey, Craig D

    2012-03-16

    Models for the growth of continental crust rely on knowing the balance between the generation of new crust and the reworking of old crust throughout Earth's history. The oxygen isotopic composition of zircons, for which uranium-lead and hafnium isotopic data provide age constraints, is a key archive of crustal reworking. We identified systematic variations in hafnium and oxygen isotopes in zircons of different ages that reveal the relative proportions of reworked crust and of new crust through time. Growth of continental crust appears to have been a continuous process, albeit at variable rates. A marked decrease in the rate of crustal growth at ~3 billion years ago may be linked to the onset of subduction-driven plate tectonics. PMID:22422979

  12. Extraterrestrial demise of banded iron formations 1.85 billion years ago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Cannon, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    In the Lake Superior region of North America, deposition of most banded iron formations (BIFs) ended abruptly 1.85 Ga ago, coincident with the oceanic impact of the giant Sudbury extraterrestrial bolide. We propose a new model in which this impact produced global mixing of shallow oxic and deep anoxic waters of the Paleoproterozoic ocean, creating a suboxic redox state for deep seawater. This suboxic state, characterized by only small concentrations of dissolved O2 (???1 ??M), prevented transport of hydrothermally derived Fe(II) from the deep ocean to continental-margin settings, ending an ???1.1 billion-year-long period of episodic BIF mineralization. The model is supported by the nature of Precambrian deep-water exhalative chemical sediments, which changed from predominantly sulfide facies prior to ca. 1.85 Ga to mainly oxide facies thereafter. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  13. Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters Over the Past 10 Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the universe and include the most massive galaxies in the universe; this makes galaxy clusters ideal laboratories for disentangling the nature versus nurture aspect of how galaxies evolve. Understanding how galaxies form and evolve in clusters continues to be a fundamental question in astronomy. The ages and assembly histories of galaxies in rich clusters test both stellar population models and hierarchical formation scenarios. Is star formation in cluster galaxies simply accelerated relative to their counterparts in the lower density field, or do cluster galaxies assemble their stars in a fundamentally different manner? To answer this question, I review multi-wavelength results on star formation in galaxy clusters from Coma to the most distant clusters yet discovered at look-back times of 10 billion years (z 2).

  14. Billion-atom synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of critical 3D Ising systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, E.; Monasterio, P.R.; Marian, J.

    2011-02-20

    An extension of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (spkMC) algorithm developed by Martinez et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 227 (2008) 3804] to discrete lattices is presented. The method solves the master equation synchronously by recourse to null events that keep all processors' time clocks current in a global sense. Boundary conflicts are resolved by adopting a chessboard decomposition into non-interacting sublattices. We find that the bias introduced by the spatial correlations attendant to the sublattice decomposition is within the standard deviation of serial calculations, which confirms the statistical validity of our algorithm. We have analyzed the parallel efficiency of spkMC and find that it scales consistently with problem size and sublattice partition. We apply the method to the calculation of scale-dependent critical exponents in billion-atom 3D Ising systems, with very good agreement with state-of-the-art multispin simulations.

  15. Low sample volume part-per-billion level ion chromatographic analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    The author has developed an ion chromatographic method which enables low part-per-billion levels of analysis while minimizing liquid waste generation. This method incorporates several recent technical improvements in ion chromatographic instrumentation to achieve a hundred-fold increase in sensitivity over existing ion chromatographic methods without additional analysis time or sample pre-concentration. This paper outlines the method, establishes the precision and accuracy levels, and discusses the applicability of the method to waste minimization and radiation exposure reduction. The author`s laboratory provides analytical support for many different types of research programs within SRTC and throughout the Savannah River Site. A wide variety of sample types including ground water, organics, laboratory waste, process control, sludge, soils, and others are received for many different analyses. These samples are both radioactive and non-radioactive and may contain hazardous materials such as RCRA metals, organics, and flammable solvents.

  16. IRON AND {alpha}-ELEMENT PRODUCTION IN THE FIRST ONE BILLION YEARS AFTER THE BIG BANG

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, George D.; Carswell, Robert F.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Rauch, Michael E-mail: acalver@ast.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mr@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2012-01-10

    We present measurements of carbon, oxygen, silicon, and iron in quasar absorption systems existing when the universe was roughly one billion years old. We measure column densities in nine low-ionization systems at 4.7 < z < 6.3 using Keck, Magellan, and Very Large Telescope optical and near-infrared spectra with moderate to high resolution. The column density ratios among C II, O I, Si II, and Fe II are nearly identical to sub-damped Ly{alpha} systems (sub-DLAs) and metal-poor ([M/H] {<=} -1) DLAs at lower redshifts, with no significant evolution over 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 6. The estimated intrinsic scatter in the ratio of any two elements is also small, with a typical rms deviation of {approx}< 0.1 dex. These facts suggest that dust depletion and ionization effects are minimal in our z > 4.7 systems, as in the lower-redshift DLAs, and that the column density ratios are close to the intrinsic relative element abundances. The abundances in our z > 4.7 systems are therefore likely to represent the typical integrated yields from stellar populations within the first gigayear of cosmic history. Due to the time limit imposed by the age of the universe at these redshifts, our measurements thus place direct constraints on the metal production of massive stars, including iron yields of prompt supernovae. The lack of redshift evolution further suggests that the metal inventories of most metal-poor absorption systems at z {approx}> 2 are also dominated by massive stars, with minimal contributions from delayed Type Ia supernovae or winds from asymptotic giant branch stars. The relative abundances in our systems broadly agree with those in very metal-poor, non-carbon-enhanced Galactic halo stars. This is consistent with the picture in which present-day metal-poor stars were potentially formed as early as one billion years after the big bang.

  17. An anoxic, Fe(II)-rich, U-poor ocean 3.46 billion years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqiang; Czaja, Andrew D.; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.; Beard, Brian L.; Roden, Eric E.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2013-11-01

    The oxidation state of the atmosphere and oceans on the early Earth remains controversial. Although it is accepted by many workers that the Archean atmosphere and ocean were anoxic, hematite in the 3.46 billion-year-old (Ga) Marble Bar Chert (MBC) from Pilbara Craton, NW Australia has figured prominently in arguments that the Paleoarchean atmosphere and ocean was fully oxygenated. In this study, we report the Fe isotope compositions and U concentrations of the MBC, and show that the samples have extreme heavy Fe isotope enrichment, where δ56Fe values range between +1.5‰ and +2.6‰, the highest δ56Fe values for bulk samples yet reported. The high δ56Fe values of the MBC require very low levels of oxidation and, in addition, point to a Paleoarchean ocean that had high aqueous Fe(II) contents. A dispersion/reaction model indicates that O2 contents in the photic zone of the ocean were less than 10-3 μM, which suggests that the ocean was essentially anoxic. An independent test of anoxic conditions is provided by U-Th-Pb isotope systematics, which show that U contents in the Paleoarchean ocean were likely below 0.02 ppb, two orders-of-magnitude lower than the modern ocean. Collectively, the Fe and U data indicate a reduced, Fe(II)-rich, U-poor environment in the Archean oceans at 3.46 billion years ago. Given the evidence for photosynthetic communities provided by broadly coeval stromatolites, these results suggests that an important photosynthetic pathway in the Paleoarchean oceans may have been anoxygenic photosynthetic Fe(II) oxidation.

  18. ELF noise bands associated with auroral electron precipitation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    Observation of a new type of ELF noise band that is closely associated with low-energy auroral electron precipitation. These observations have been made at relatively low altitudes (less than 3000 km) with the polar-orbiting satellite Injun 5. The noise bands typically have a center frequency of 100 to 300 Hz and often appear to consist of many nearly monochromatic bursts, typically of a few seconds' duration, superimposed to produce the observed noise band. These ELF noise bands are observed only in a relatively narrow range of latitudes (a few degrees) in the auroral zone and are almost always associated with intense fluxes of precipitating electrons with energies from a few hundred electron volts to several kiloelectron volts. On the dayside of the magnetosphere the region where the ELF noise bands and the associated low-energy electron precipitation are observed has been identified as the polar cusp. In considering the possible explanations of these ELF noise bands, it is noted that the spectral characteristics of this noise are very similar to a type of narrowband electromagnetic noise called 'lion's roar,' which has been observed at much higher altitudes in the magnetosheath with the satellite Ogo 5. It is suggested that the ELF noise bands observed at low altitudes with Injun 5 are caused by lion's roar emissions that have propagated down 'open' magnetic-field lines to low altitudes from the magnetosheath region.

  19. Parity Nonconservation in Electron-Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Emlyn Willard

    2004-12-01

    Low-energy precision measurements of fundamental parameters in the electroweak theory provide information on new physics at high mass scales, beyond the reach of present-day colliders. We report on a first measurement of the electroweak mixing angle from the observation of a parity-violating asymmetry in the scattering of high energy polarized electrons by unpolarized electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. The parityviolating asymmetry is very small, on the order of 100 parts per billion. The experiment was performed in the fixed target program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We also compare the results to other low energy tests of the electroweak theory and summarize the status of this field of study. The present experiment gives sensitivity to new physics at the TeV energy scale.

  20. 405th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Vadim Ptitsyn

    2010-09-01

    "E-RHIC - Future Electron-Ion Collider at BNL. While RHIC scientists continue their quest to look deep into nuclear phenomena resulting from collisions of ion beams and beams of polarized protons, new design work is under way for a possible extension of RHIC to include e-RHIC, a 10-billion electron volt, high-intensity polarized proton beam.

  1. Evidence for global electron transportation into the jovian inner magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, K; Murakami, G; Yamazaki, A; Tsuchiya, F; Kimura, T; Kagitani, M; Sakanoi, T; Uemizu, K; Kasaba, Y; Yoshikawa, I; Fujimoto, M

    2014-09-26

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is a strong particle accelerator that contains ultrarelativistic electrons in its inner part. They are thought to be accelerated by whistler-mode waves excited by anisotropic hot electrons (>10 kiloelectron volts) injected from the outer magnetosphere. However, electron transportation in the inner magnetosphere is not well understood. By analyzing the extreme ultraviolet line emission from the inner magnetosphere, we show evidence for global inward transport of flux tubes containing hot plasma. High-spectral-resolution scanning observations of the Io plasma torus in the inner magnetosphere enable us to generate radial profiles of the hot electron fraction. It gradually decreases with decreasing radial distance, despite the short collisional time scale that should thermalize them rapidly. This indicates a fast and continuous resupply of hot electrons responsible for exciting the whistler-mode waves. PMID:25258073

  2. Evidence for global electron transportation into the jovian inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kimura, T.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Uemizu, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Yoshikawa, I.; Fujimoto, M.

    2014-09-01

    Jupiters magnetosphere is a strong particle accelerator that contains ultrarelativistic electrons in its inner part. They are thought to be accelerated by whistler-mode waves excited by anisotropic hot electrons (>10 kiloelectron volts) injected from the outer magnetosphere. However, electron transportation in the inner magnetosphere is not well understood. By analyzing the extreme ultraviolet line emission from the inner magnetosphere, we show evidence for global inward transport of flux tubes containing hot plasma. High-spectral-resolution scanning observations of the Io plasma torus in the inner magnetosphere enable us to generate radial profiles of the hot electron fraction. It gradually decreases with decreasing radial distance, despite the short collisional time scale that should thermalize them rapidly. This indicates a fast and continuous resupply of hot electrons responsible for exciting the whistler-mode waves.

  3. Studying Atomic Structures by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Knut W.

    2008-07-01

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations.

  4. How Measuring the Planck Constant gets to an Electronic Kilogram Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Richard

    2007-08-01

    The best measurement of the Planck constant is now derived from the watt balance method. This method measures mechanical power, in reference units of the kilogram (artifact mass standard), second (atomic clocks), and meter (lasers), in ratio to electrical power, in reference units of the volt (Josephson effect) and ohm (quantum Hall effect). Of these reference standards, only the kilogram is still an artifact standard. Thus a high precision measurement of the Planck constant is equivalent to monitoring the SI kilogram artifact, and may be used to redefine the kilogram. This talk will summarize the complexity of making a Planck constant measurement, where there are interesting aspects of basic physics that appear when the ultimate precision of the standards laboratory is applied to obtain an uncertainty of 20 parts in a billion.

  5. Switching To Less-Expensive Blindness Drug Could Save Medicare Part B $18 Billion Over A Ten-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, DW; Newman-Casey, PA; Tavag, M; Zacks, DN; Stein, JD

    2014-01-01

    The biologic drugs bevacizumab and ranibizumab have revolutionized treatment of diabetic macular edema and macular degeneration, leading causes of blindness. Ophthalmologic use of these drugs has increased, now accounting for roughly one-sixth of the Medicare Part B drug budget. Ranibizumab and bevacizumab have similar efficacy and potentially minor differences in adverse event rates, but at $2,023 per dose, ranibizumab costs forty times more than bevacizumab. Using modeling methods, we predict ten-year (2010–2020) population-level costs and health benefits of using bevacizumab and ranibizumab. Our results show that if all patients were treated with the less-expensive bevacizumab instead of current usage patterns, Medicare Part B, patients, and the health care system would save $18 billion, $4.6 billion, and $29 billion, respectively. Altering patterns of use with these therapies by encouraging bevacizumab use and hastening approval of biosimilar therapies would dramatically reduce spending without substantially affecting patient outcomes. PMID:24889941

  6. Galaxy evolution. Evidence for mature bulges and an inside-out quenching phase 3 billion years after the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Tacchella, S; Carollo, C M; Renzini, A; Förster Schreiber, N M; Lang, P; Wuyts, S; Cresci, G; Dekel, A; Genzel, R; Lilly, S J; Mancini, C; Newman, S; Onodera, M; Shapley, A; Tacconi, L; Woo, J; Zamorani, G

    2015-04-17

    Most present-day galaxies with stellar masses ≥10(11) solar masses show no ongoing star formation and are dense spheroids. Ten billion years ago, similarly massive galaxies were typically forming stars at rates of hundreds solar masses per year. It is debated how star formation ceased, on which time scales, and how this "quenching" relates to the emergence of dense spheroids. We measured stellar mass and star-formation rate surface density distributions in star-forming galaxies at redshift 2.2 with ~1-kiloparsec resolution. We find that, in the most massive galaxies, star formation is quenched from the inside out, on time scales less than 1 billion years in the inner regions, up to a few billion years in the outer disks. These galaxies sustain high star-formation activity at large radii, while hosting fully grown and already quenched bulges in their cores. PMID:25883353

  7. Evidence for mature bulges and an inside-out quenching phase 3 billion years after the Big Bang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacchella, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Renzini, A.; Schreiber, N. M. Förster; Lang, P.; Wuyts, S.; Cresci, G.; Dekel, A.; Genzel, R.; Lilly, S. J.; Mancini, C.; Newman, S.; Onodera, M.; Shapley, A.; Tacconi, L.; Woo, J.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-04-01

    Most present-day galaxies with stellar masses ≥1011 solar masses show no ongoing star formation and are dense spheroids. Ten billion years ago, similarly massive galaxies were typically forming stars at rates of hundreds solar masses per year. It is debated how star formation ceased, on which time scales, and how this “quenching” relates to the emergence of dense spheroids. We measured stellar mass and star-formation rate surface density distributions in star-forming galaxies at redshift 2.2 with ~1-kiloparsec resolution. We find that, in the most massive galaxies, star formation is quenched from the inside out, on time scales less than 1 billion years in the inner regions, up to a few billion years in the outer disks. These galaxies sustain high star-formation activity at large radii, while hosting fully grown and already quenched bulges in their cores.

  8. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil prices topped $70 per barrel (bbl) and catastrophic hurricanes in the Gulf Coast shut down a significant fraction of U.S. refinery capacity. The following year, oil approached $80 per bbl due to supply concerns, as well as continued political tensions in the Middle East. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was enacted in December of that year. By the end of December 2007, oil prices surpassed $100 per bbl for the first time, and by mid-summer 2008, prices approached $150 per bbl because of supply concerns, speculation, and weakness of the U.S. dollar. As fast as they skyrocketed, oil prices fell, and by the end of 2008, oil prices dropped below $50 per bbl, falling even more a month later due to the global economic recession. In 2009 and 2010, oil prices began to increase again as a result of a weak U.S. dollar and the rebounding of world economies.

  9. Sub-parts-per-billion level detection of NO2 using room-temperature quantum cascade lasers

    PubMed Central

    Pushkarsky, Michael; Tsekoun, Alexei; Dunayevskiy, Ilya G.; Go, Rowel; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2006-01-01

    We report the sub-parts-per-billion-level detection of NO2 using tunable laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy where the laser radiation is obtained from a room-temperature continuous-wave high-power quantum cascade laser operating in an external grating cavity configuration. The continuously tunable external grating cavity quantum cascade laser produces maximum single-frequency output of ≈300 mW tunable over ≈350 nm centered at 6.25 μm. We demonstrate minimum detection level of ≈0.5 parts per billion of NO2 in the presence of humidified air. PMID:16829569

  10. The First Billion Years project: dark matter haloes going from contraction to expansion and back again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Andrew J.; Khochfar, Sadegh; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of baryons on the inner dark matter profile of the first galaxies using the First Billion Years simulation between z = 16 and 6 before secular evolution sets in. Using a large statistical sample from two simulations of the same volume and cosmological initial conditions, one with and one without baryons, we are able to directly compare haloes with their baryon-free counterparts, allowing a detailed study of the modifications to the dark matter density profile due to the presence of baryons during the first billion years of galaxy formation. For each of the ≈5000 haloes in our sample (3 × 107 M⊙ ≤ Mtot ≤ 5 × 109 M⊙), we quantify the impact of the baryons using η, defined as the ratio of dark matter mass enclosed in 100 pc in the baryonic run to its counterpart without baryons. During this epoch of rapid growth of galaxies, we find that many haloes of these first galaxies show an enhancement of dark matter in the halo centre compared to the baryon-free simulation, while many others show a deficit. We find that the mean value of η is close to unity, but there is a large dispersion, with a standard deviation of 0.677. The enhancement is cyclical in time and tracks the star formation cycle of the galaxy; as gas falls to the centre and forms stars, the dark matter moves in as well. Supernova (SN) feedback then removes the gas, and the dark matter again responds to the changing potential. We study three physical models relating the motion of baryons to that of the dark matter: adiabatic contraction, dynamical friction, and rapid outflows. We find that dynamical friction plays only a very minor role, while adiabatic contraction and the rapid outflows due to feedback describe well the enhancement (or decrement) of dark matter. For haloes which show significant decrements of dark matter in the core, we find that to remove the dark matter requires an energy input between 1051 and 1053 erg. For our SN feedback proscription, this requires as a lower limit a constant star formation rate between 0.002 and 0.2 M⊙ yr-1 for the previous 5 Myr. We also find that heating due to reionization is able to prevent the formation of strong cusps for haloes which at z ˜ 12 have ≤108 M⊙. The lack of a strong cusp in these haloes remains down to z = 6, the end of our simulation.

  11. A redox-stratified ocean 3.2 billion years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satkoski, Aaron M.; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2015-11-01

    Before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) 2.4-2.2 billion years ago it has been traditionally thought that oceanic water columns were uniformly anoxic due to a lack of oxygen-producing microorganisms. Recently, however, it has been proposed that transient oxygenation of shallow seawater occurred between 2.8 and 3.0 billion years ago. Here, we present a novel combination of stable Fe and radiogenic U-Th-Pb isotope data that demonstrate significant oxygen contents in the shallow oceans at 3.2 Ga, based on analysis of the Manzimnyama Banded Iron Formation (BIF), Fig Tree Group, South Africa. This unit is exceptional in that proximal, shallow-water and distal, deep-water facies are preserved. When compared to the distal, deep-water facies, the proximal samples show elevated U concentrations and moderately positive δ56Fe values, indicating vertical stratification in dissolved oxygen contents. Confirmation of oxidizing conditions using U abundances is robustly constrained using samples that have been closed to U and Pb mobility using U-Th-Pb geochronology. Although redox-sensitive elements have been commonly used in ancient rocks to infer redox conditions, post-depositional element mobility has been rarely tested, and U-Th-Pb geochronology can constrain open- or closed-system behavior. The U abundances and δ56Fe values of the Manzimnyama BIF suggest the proximal, shallow-water samples record precipitation under stronger oxidizing conditions compared to the distal deeper-water facies, which in turn indicates the existence of a discrete redox boundary between deep and shallow ocean waters at this time; this work, therefore, documents the oldest known preserved marine redox gradient in the rock record. The relative enrichment of O2 in the upper water column is likely due to the existence of oxygen-producing microorganisms such as cyanobacteria. These results provide a new approach for identifying free oxygen in Earth's ancient oceans, including confirming the age of redox proxies, and indicate that cyanobacteria evolved prior to 3.2 Ga.

  12. What is the global economic impact of Neospora caninum in cattle - the billion dollar question.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Michael P; Alejandra Ayanegui-Alcérreca, M; Gondim, Luís F P; Ellis, John T

    2013-02-01

    Neospora caninum is regarded as one of the most important infectious causes of abortions in cattle worldwide, yet the global economic impact of the infection has not been established. A systematic review of the economic impact of N. caninum infections/abortions was conducted, searching PubMed with the terms 'cattle' and 'Neospora'. This yielded 769 publications and the abstracts were screened for economically relevant information (e.g. abortion prevalence and risk, serological prevalence). Further analysis was restricted to countries with at least five relevant publications. In total, 99 studies (12.9%) from 10 countries contained data from the beef industry (25 papers (25.3%)) and 72 papers (72.8%) from the dairy industry (with the remaining two papers (2.0%) describing general abortion statistics). The total annual cost of N. caninum infections/abortions was estimated to range from a median US $1.1 million in the New Zealand beef industry to an estimated median total of US $546.3 million impact per annum in the US dairy population. The estimate for the total median N. caninum-related losses exceeded US $1.298 billion per annum, ranging as high as US $2.380 billion. Nearly two-thirds of the losses were incurred by the dairy industry (US $842.9 million). Annual losses on individual dairy farms were estimated to reach a median of US $1,600.00, while on beef farms these costs amounted to just US $150.00. Pregnant cows and heifers were estimated to incur, on average, a loss due to N. caninum of less than US $20.00 for dairy and less than US $5.00 for beef. These loss estimates, however, rose to ∼US $110.00 and US $40.00, respectively, for N. caninum-infected pregnant dairy and beef cows. This estimate of global losses due to N. caninum, with the identification of clear target markets (countries, as well as cattle industries), should provide an incentive to develop treatment options and/or vaccines. PMID:23246675

  13. How to make a billion-barrel oil field in offshore California commercial

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.C.; Ballard, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The major obstacles and challenges involved in exploration and development of a giant deep-water low-gravity oil field are exemplified in the undeveloped Sword field of offshore southern California. In 1979, Conoco Exploration identified a northeast-southwest-trending basement high in the 800 to 2,000-ft deep federal waters 12 mi southwest of Pt. Conception at the western end of the Santa Barbara Channel. The intended reservoir was fractured Miocene Monterey chert, silicic shales/siltstones,m and dolomites that are draped over the axially faulted structure. Drilling of the initial well in OCS P-0322 in 1982 resulted in discovering the giant Sword field. A confirmation well drilled in OCS P-0320 indicates in-place reserves of well over 1 billion bbl. while the discovered potential is significant, the low gravity (8.5/sup 0/-10.5/sup 0/ API) of the oils discovered to data, along with water depths in excess of 1,500 ft, currently pose economic challenges to successful field development.

  14. How to make a billion-barrel oil field in offshore California commercial

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.C.; Ballard, J.H.

    1988-02-01

    The major obstacles and challenges involved in exploration and development of a giant deep-water low-gravity oil field are exemplified in the undeveloped Sword field of offshore southern California. In 1979, Conoco Exploration identified a northeast-southwest-trending basement high in the 800 to 2000-ft deep federal waters 12 mi southwest of Pt. Conception at the western end of the Santa Barbara Channel. The intended reservoir was fractured Miocene Monterey chert, silicic shales/siltstones, and dolomites that are draped over the axially faulted structure. Drilling of the initial well in OCS P-0322 in 1982 resulted in discovering the giant Sword field. A confirmation well drilled in OCS P-0320 indicates in-place reserves of well over 1 billion bbl. While the discovered potential is significant, the low gravity (8.5/degree/-10.5/degree/ API) of the oils discovered to date, along with water depths in excess of 1500 ft, currently pose economic challenges to successful field development. Conoco and its partners are addressing the current economic barriers on a number of fronts. Three-dimensional seismic surveys are being conducted to better delineate reservoir geometry and to define probable variations in lithology, fracturing, and oil gravity. A market feasibility study will be undertaken to assess the demand for low-gravity crude from offshore California.

  15. A Massive Galaxy in Its Core Formation Phase Three Billion Years After the Big Bang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Erica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Schreiber, Natascha M. Forster; da Cunha, Elisabete; Tacconi, Linda; Bezanson, Rachel; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Leja, Joel; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    Most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores at early cosmic epochs. However, cores in their formation phase have not yet been observed. Previous studies have found galaxies with high gas velocity dispersions or small apparent sizes but so far no objects have been identified with both the stellar structure and the gas dynamics of a forming core. Here we present a candidate core in formation 11 billion years ago, at z = 2.3. GOODS-N-774 has a stellar mass of 1.0 × 10 (exp 11) solar mass, a half-light radius of 1.0 kpc, and a star formation rate of 90 (sup +45 / sub -20) solar mass/yr. The star forming gas has a velocity dispersion 317 plus or minus 30 km/s, amongst the highest ever measured. It is similar to the stellar velocity dispersions of the putative descendants of GOODS-N-774, compact quiescent galaxies at z is approximately equal to 2 (exp 8-11) and giant elliptical galaxies in the nearby Universe. Galaxies such as GOODS-N-774 appear to be rare; however, from the star formation rate and size of the galaxy we infer that many star forming cores may be heavily obscured, and could be missed in optical and near-infrared surveys.

  16. Broadcasts for a billion: the growth of commercial television in China.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, C

    1987-01-01

    At present, Chinese television reaches 35% of the population (80-90% in urban areas) and is used by the government as a source of education and information. In recognition of the potential market represented by 1.1 billions consumers, Western advertisers have commissioned elaborate market research studies. Drama, sports, news, and movies are consistently identified as the favorite type of programming among Chinese television viewers. About 75% of Beijing adults watch television daily, making the medium both an important target for advertising campaigns and a way for Westerners to influence Chinese business and government leaders. Western advertisers have tended to concentrate their investments in the more urban, affluent regions where products have the greatest likelihood of being sold. There has been a recent trend, however, toward industrial commercials, with British and French companies buying television time to promote their image as partners in China's modernization. Key to the future of commercial advertising on Chinese Television. In many provinces, local television stations have developed a unique character and portray different sociocultural values than the national channel. Outside advertisers have sometimes experienced problems with local networks that substitute local advertising without informing the network. To correct this situation, the government is enacting pro-sponsor regulations that forbid the preemption of the national channel and its advertisements. At the same time, efforts are being made to improve relationships with local television stations by either paying them a fee or airing local commercials on the national network. PMID:12342936

  17. Sharing global CO2 emission reductions among one billion high emitters

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Shoibal; Chikkatur, Ananth; de Coninck, Heleen; Pacala, Stephen; Socolow, Robert; Tavoni, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    We present a framework for allocating a global carbon reduction target among nations, in which the concept of “common but differentiated responsibilities” refers to the emissions of individuals instead of nations. We use the income distribution of a country to estimate how its fossil fuel CO2 emissions are distributed among its citizens, from which we build up a global CO2 distribution. We then propose a simple rule to derive a universal cap on global individual emissions and find corresponding limits on national aggregate emissions from this cap. All of the world's high CO2-emitting individuals are treated the same, regardless of where they live. Any future global emission goal (target and time frame) can be converted into national reduction targets, which are determined by “Business as Usual” projections of national carbon emissions and in-country income distributions. For example, reducing projected global emissions in 2030 by 13 GtCO2 would require the engagement of 1.13 billion high emitters, roughly equally distributed in 4 regions: the U.S., the OECD minus the U.S., China, and the non-OECD minus China. We also modify our methodology to place a floor on emissions of the world's lowest CO2 emitters and demonstrate that climate mitigation and alleviation of extreme poverty are largely decoupled. PMID:19581586

  18. Large data analysis: automatic visual personal identification in a demography of 1.2 billion persons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugman, John

    2014-05-01

    The largest biometric deployment in history is now underway in India, where the Government is enrolling the iris patterns (among other data) of all 1.2 billion citizens. The purpose of the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) is to ensure fair access to welfare benefits and entitlements, to reduce fraud, and enhance social inclusion. Only a minority of Indian citizens have bank accounts; only 4 percent possess passports; and less than half of all aid money reaches its intended recipients. A person who lacks any means of establishing their identity is excluded from entitlements and does not officially exist; thus the slogan of UIDAI is: To give the poor an identity." This ambitious program enrolls a million people every day, across 36,000 stations run by 83 agencies, with a 3-year completion target for the entire national population. The halfway point was recently passed with more than 600 million persons now enrolled. In order to detect and prevent duplicate identities, every iris pattern that is enrolled is first compared against all others enrolled so far; thus the daily workflow now requires 600 trillion (or 600 million-million) iris cross-comparisons. Avoiding identity collisions (False Matches) requires high biometric entropy, and achieving the tremendous match speed requires phase bit coding. Both of these requirements are being delivered operationally by wavelet methods developed by the author for encoding and comparing iris patterns, which will be the focus of this Large Data Award" presentation.

  19. Ballography: A Billion Nanosecond History of the Bee Bluff Impact Crater of South Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, R. A.

    2006-07-01

    The Bee Bluff Structure of South Texas in Zavala County near Uvalde has been found to exhibit unusual features permitting study of impactites and meteorite impact processes from the standpoint of grain-level, nanosecond shock-compression science. The site is characterized by a thin cap of Carrizo Sandstone covering a thin hard Indio fm calcareous siltstone. A soft calcareous silt lies below the hard cap. Calculations based on the Earth Impact Effects web-based program indicate that the site is best described by a 60 m diameter iron meteorite striking the ground at 11 km/sec. Such an impact into sandstone is expected to produce a shock pressure of 250 GPa. A large release wave originates from the bottom of the hard target with upward moving melt-vaporization waves of solid, liquid and vapor products that become trapped at the impact interface. Numerous distinctive types of impactites result from this `bottom-up' release behavior. Evidence for hydrodynamic instabilities and resulting density gradients are abundant at the impact interface. An unusually valuable breccia sample called `The Uvalde Crater Rosetta Stone' contains at least seven types of impactites in a well defined arrangement that can be used to read the billion nanosecond history of the impact and identify scattered impactites relative to their place in that history.

  20. Biologic agents in rheumatology: unmet issues after 200 trials and $200 billion sales.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A; Karassa, Fotini B; Druyts, Eric; Thorlund, Kristian; Mills, Edward J

    2013-11-01

    Anti-TNF agents and other biologic therapies are widely prescribed for a variety of indications, with total sales that exceed $200 billion to date. In rheumatic diseases, biologic agents have now been studied in more than 200 randomized clinical trials and over 100 subsequent meta-analyses; however, the information obtained does not always meet the needs of patients and clinicians. In this Review, we discuss the current issues concerning the evidence derived from such studies: potential biases favouring positive results; a paucity of head-to-head comparisons between biologically active agents; overwhelming involvement of manufacturer sponsors in trials and in the synthesis of the evidence; the preference for trials with limited follow-up; and the potential for spurious findings on adverse events, leading to endless debates about malignancy risk. We debate the responsibilities of regulatory authorities, the pharmaceutical industry and academia in attempting to solve these shortcomings and challenges. We propose that improvements in the evidence regarding biologic treatments that are continually being added to the therapeutic armamentarium for rheumatic diseases might require revisiting the design and conduct of studies. For example, trials with long-term follow-up that are independent of the pharmaceutical industry, head-to-head comparisons of therapeutic agents and the use of rigorous clinical outcomes should be considered, and public availability of raw data endorsed. PMID:23999553

  1. Potentially biogenic carbon preserved in a 4.1 billion-year-old zircon

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Elizabeth A.; Harrison, T. Mark; Mao, Wendy L.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of life on Earth is manifestly preserved in the rock record. However, the microfossil record only extends to ∼3.5 billion years (Ga), the chemofossil record arguably to ∼3.8 Ga, and the rock record to 4.0 Ga. Detrital zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia range in age up to nearly 4.4 Ga. From a population of over 10,000 Jack Hills zircons, we identified one >3.8-Ga zircon that contains primary graphite inclusions. Here, we report carbon isotopic measurements on these inclusions in a concordant, 4.10 ± 0.01-Ga zircon. We interpret these inclusions as primary due to their enclosure in a crack-free host as shown by transmission X-ray microscopy and their crystal habit. Their δ13CPDB of −24 ± 5‰ is consistent with a biogenic origin and may be evidence that a terrestrial biosphere had emerged by 4.1 Ga, or ∼300 My earlier than has been previously proposed. PMID:26483481

  2. Biomolecular electrostatics using a fast multipole BEM on up to 512 GPUs and a billion unknowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Rio; Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Knepley, Matthew G.; Barba, L. A.; Hamada, Tsuyoshi

    2011-06-01

    We present teraflop-scale calculations of biomolecular electrostatics enabled by the combination of algorithmic and hardware acceleration. The algorithmic acceleration is achieved with the fast multipole method ( FMM) in conjunction with a boundary element method ( BEM) formulation of the continuum electrostatic model, as well as the BIBEE approximation to BEM. The hardware acceleration is achieved through graphics processors, GPUs. We demonstrate the power of our algorithms and software for the calculation of the electrostatic interactions between biological molecules in solution. The applications demonstrated include the electrostatics of protein-drug binding and several multi-million atom systems consisting of hundreds to thousands of copies of lysozyme molecules. The parallel scalability of the software was studied in a cluster at the Nagasaki Advanced Computing Center, using 128 nodes, each with 4 GPUs. Delicate tuning has resulted in strong scaling with parallel efficiency of 0.8 for 256 and 0.5 for 512 GPUs. The largest application run, with over 20 million atoms and one billion unknowns, required only one minute on 512 GPUs. We are currently adapting our BEM software to solve the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for dilute ionic solutions, and it is also designed to be flexible enough to be extended for a variety of integral equation problems, ranging from Poisson problems to Helmholtz problems in electromagnetics and acoustics to high Reynolds number flow.

  3. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone.

    PubMed

    Lowenstern, J B; Evans, W C; Bergfeld, D; Hunt, A G

    2014-02-20

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions. PMID:24553240

  4. Could organic matter have been preserved on Mars for 3.5 billion years?

    PubMed

    Kanavarioti, A; Mancinelli, R L

    1990-03-01

    3.5 billion years (byr) ago, when it is thought that Mars and Earth had similar climates, biological evolution on Earth had made considerable progress, such that life was abundant. It is therefore surmised that prior to this time period the advent of chemical evolution and subsequent origin of life occurred on Earth and may have occurred on Mars. Analysis for organic compounds in the soil buried beneath the Martian surface may yield useful information regarding the occurrence of chemical evolution and possibly biological evolution. Calculations based on the stability of amino acids lead to the conclusion that remnants of these compounds, if they existed on Mars 3.5 byr ago, might have been preserved buried beneath the surface oxidizing layer. For example, if phenylalanine, an amino acid of average stability, existed on Mars 3.5 byr ago, then 1.6% would remain buried today, or 25 pg-2.5 ng of C g-1 Martian soil may exist from remnants of meteoritic and cometary bombardment, assuming that 1% of the organics survived impact. PMID:11538399

  5. Providing safe drinking water to 1.2 billion unserved people

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, Ashok J.; Derby, Elisabeth A.

    2003-06-01

    Despite substantial advances in the past 100 years in public health, technology and medicine, 20% of the world population, mostly comprised of the poor population segments in developing countries (DCs), still does not have access to safe drinking water. To reach the United Nations (UN) Millennium Goal of halving the number of people without access to safe water by 2015, the global community will need to provide an additional one billion urban residents and 600 million rural residents with safe water within the next twelve years. This paper examines current water treatment measures and implementation methods for delivery of safe drinking water, and offers suggestions for making progress towards the goal of providing a timely and equitable solution for safe water provision. For water treatment, based on the serious limitations of boiling water and chlorination, we suggest an approach based on filtration coupled with ultraviolet (UV) disinfection, combined with public education. Additionally, owing to the capacity limitations for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to take on this task primarily on their own, we suggest a strategy based on financially sustainable models that include the private sector as well as NGOs.

  6. Enhanced cellular preservation by clay minerals in 1 billion-year-old lakes.

    PubMed

    Wacey, David; Saunders, Martin; Roberts, Malcolm; Menon, Sarath; Green, Leonard; Kong, Charlie; Culwick, Timothy; Strother, Paul; Brasier, Martin D

    2014-01-01

    Organic-walled microfossils provide the best insights into the composition and evolution of the biosphere through the first 80 percent of Earth history. The mechanism of microfossil preservation affects the quality of biological information retained and informs understanding of early Earth palaeo-environments. We here show that 1 billion-year-old microfossils from the non-marine Torridon Group are remarkably preserved by a combination of clay minerals and phosphate, with clay minerals providing the highest fidelity of preservation. Fe-rich clay mostly occurs in narrow zones in contact with cellular material and is interpreted as an early microbially-mediated phase enclosing and replacing the most labile biological material. K-rich clay occurs within and exterior to cell envelopes, forming where the supply of Fe had been exhausted. Clay minerals inter-finger with calcium phosphate that co-precipitated with the clays in the sub-oxic zone of the lake sediments. This type of preservation was favoured in sulfate-poor environments where Fe-silicate precipitation could outcompete Fe-sulfide formation. This work shows that clay minerals can provide an exceptionally high fidelity of microfossil preservation and extends the known geological range of this fossilization style by almost 500 Ma. It also suggests that the best-preserved microfossils of this time may be found in low-sulfate environments. PMID:25068404

  7. Constraints on the first billion years of the geodynamo from paleointensity studies of zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, John; Cottrell, Rory; Davis, William

    2014-05-01

    Several lines of reasoning, including new ideas on core thermal conductivity, suggest that onset of a strong geomagnetic field might have been delayed by one billion years (or more) after the lunar forming event. Here we extend the Proterozoic/Archean to Paleoarchean record of the geomagnetic field constrained by single crystal paleointensity (SCP) analyses (Tarduno et al., Science, 2010) to older times using zircons containing minute magnetic inclusions. Specifically, we focus on samples from the Jack Hills (Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia). We employ a CO2 laser demagnetization system and a small bore (6.3 mm) 3-component DC SQUID magnetometer; the latter offers the highest currently available moment resolution. Sample age is analyzed using SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology. Preliminary data support the presence of a relatively strong Paleoarchean field produced by a core dynamo, extending the known record by at least 100 million years, to approximately 3.55 Ga. These data only serve to exacerbate the apparent problem posed by the presence of a Paleoarchean dynamo. Alternative dynamo driving mechanisms, or efficient core/lowermost mantle heat loss processes unique to the Paleoarchean (and older times) might have been at work. We will discuss these processes, and our efforts to study even older Eoarchean-Hadean zircons.

  8. Analysis of precious metals at parts-per-billion levels in industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tickner, James; O'Dwyer, Joel; Roach, Greg; Smith, Michael; Van Haarlem, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Precious metals, including gold and the platinum group metals (notable Pt, Pd and Rh), are mined commercially at concentrations of a few parts-per-million and below. Mining and processing operations demand sensitive and rapid analysis at concentrations down to about 100 parts-per-billion (ppb). In this paper, we discuss two technologies being developed to meet this challenge: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and gamma-activation analysis (GAA). We have designed on-stream XRF analysers capable of measuring targeted elements in slurries with precisions in the 35-70 ppb range. For the past two years, two on-stream analysers have been in continuous operation at a precious metals concentrator plant. The simultaneous measurement of feed and waste stream grades provides real-time information on metal recovery, allowing changes in operating conditions and plant upsets to be detected and corrected more rapidly. Separately, we have been developing GAA for the measurement of gold as a replacement for the traditional laboratory fire-assay process. High-energy Bremsstrahlung X-rays are used to excite gold via the 197Au(γ,γ‧)197Au-M reaction, and the gamma-rays released in the decay of the meta-state are then counted. We report on work to significantly improve accuracy and detection limits.

  9. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents1. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot2. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions.

  10. GERLUMPH Data Release 2: 2.5 Billion Simulated Microlensing Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.; Bate, N. F.; Croton, D.; Vohl, D.

    2015-04-01

    In the upcoming synoptic all-sky survey era of astronomy, thousands of new multiply imaged quasars are expected to be discovered and monitored regularly. Light curves from the images of gravitationally lensed quasars are further affected by superimposed variability due to microlensing. In order to disentangle the microlensing from the intrinsic variability of the light curves, the time delays between the multiple images have to be accurately measured. The resulting microlensing light curves can then be analyzed to reveal information about the background source, such as the size of the quasar accretion disk. In this paper we present the most extensive and coherent collection of simulated microlensing light curves; we have generated \\gt 2.5 billion light curves using the GERLUMPH high resolution microlensing magnification maps. Our simulations can be used to train algorithms to measure lensed quasar time delays, plan future monitoring campaigns, and study light curve properties throughout parameter space. Our data are openly available to the community and are complemented by online eResearch tools, located at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au.

  11. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Evans, W. C.; Bergfeld, D.; Hunt, A. G.

    2014-02-01

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions.

  12. Potentially biogenic carbon preserved in a 4.1 billion-year-old zircon.

    PubMed

    Bell, Elizabeth A; Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T Mark; Mao, Wendy L

    2015-11-24

    Evidence of life on Earth is manifestly preserved in the rock record. However, the microfossil record only extends to ∼ 3.5 billion years (Ga), the chemofossil record arguably to ∼ 3.8 Ga, and the rock record to 4.0 Ga. Detrital zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia range in age up to nearly 4.4 Ga. From a population of over 10,000 Jack Hills zircons, we identified one >3.8-Ga zircon that contains primary graphite inclusions. Here, we report carbon isotopic measurements on these inclusions in a concordant, 4.10 ± 0.01-Ga zircon. We interpret these inclusions as primary due to their enclosure in a crack-free host as shown by transmission X-ray microscopy and their crystal habit. Their δ(13)CPDB of -24 ± 5‰ is consistent with a biogenic origin and may be evidence that a terrestrial biosphere had emerged by 4.1 Ga, or ∼ 300 My earlier than has been previously proposed. PMID:26483481

  13. Precambrian crustal evolution of Peninsular India: A 3.0 billion year odyssey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meert, Joseph G.; Pandit, Manoj K.; Pradhan, Vimal R.; Banks, Jonathan; Sirianni, Robert; Stroud, Misty; Newstead, Brittany; Gifford, Jennifer

    2010-11-01

    The Precambrian geologic history of Peninsular India covers nearly 3.0 billion years of time. India is presently attached to the Eurasian continent although it remains (for now) a separate plate. It comprises several cratonic nuclei namely, Aravalli-Bundelkhand, Eastern Dharwar, Western Dharwar, Bastar and Singhbhum Cratons along with the Southern Granulite Province. Cratonization of India was polyphase, but a stable configuration between the major elements was largely complete by 2.5 Ga. Each of the major cratons was intruded by various age granitoids, mafic dykes and ultramafic bodies throughout the Proterozoic. The Vindhyan, Chhattisgarh, Cuddapah, Pranhita-Godavari, Indravati, Bhima-Kaladgi, Kurnool and Marwar basins are the major Meso to Neoproterozoic sedimentary repositories. In this paper we review the major tectonic and igneous events that led to the formation of Peninsular India and provide an up to date geochronologic summary of the Precambrian. India is thought to have played a role in a number of supercontinental cycles including (from oldest to youngest) Ur, Columbia, Rodinia, Gondwana and Pangea. This paper gives an overview of the deep history of Peninsular India as an introduction to this special TOIS volume.

  14. A billion years of environmental stability and the emergence of eukaryotes: new data from northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Brasier, M D; Lindsay, J F

    1998-06-01

    Carbon isotopes through 6km of fully cored drill holes in 1.7 to 1.5 Ga carbonates of the Mount Isa and McArthur basins, Australia (which host the earliest known eukaryote biomarkers) provide the most comprehensive and best-dated delta 13C stratigraphy yet obtained from such ancient rocks. Both basins reveal remarkably stable temporal delta 13C trends (mean of -0.6% +/- 2% PDB [Peedee belemnite]) and confirm the impression of delta 13C stasis between 2.0 and 1.0 Ga, which, together with other evidence, suggest a prolonged period of stability in crustal dynamics, redox state of surface environments, and planetary climate. This delta 13C stasis is consistent with great stability in the carbon cycle controlled, we suggest, by P limitation of primary productivity. Recent evidence shows that P depletion is a major factor in obligate associations between photosymbionts and host cells. We argue that a billion years of stability in the carbon and nutrient cycles may have been the driving force that propelled prokaryotes toward photosymbiosis and the emergence of the autotrophic eukaryote cell. PMID:11541449

  15. Search by mariner 10 for electrons and protons accelerated in association with venus.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J A; Eraker, J H; Lamport, J E; Walpole, P H

    1974-03-29

    The University of Chicago instrumnents on board the Mariner 10 spacecraft bound for Mercury have measured energy spectra and fluxes of electrons from 0.18 to 30 million electron volts and protons from 0.5 to 68 million electron volts along the plasma wake and in the bow shock regions associated with Venus. Unusually quiet solar conditions and improved instrumentation made it possible to search for much lower fluxes of protons and electrons in similar energy regions as compared to earlier Mariner missions to Venus-that is, lower by a factor of 10(2) for protons and 10(3) for electrons. We found no evidence for electrons or protons either in the form of increases of intensity or energy spectral changes in the vicinity of the planet, nor any evidence of bursts of radiation in or near the observed bow shock where bursts of electrons might have been expected in analogy with the bow shock at the earth. The importance of these null results for determining the necessary and sufficient conditions for particle acceleration is discussed with respect to magnetometer evidence that Venus does not have a magnetosphere. PMID:17791375

  16. $100 Billion: For Reform...or to Subsidize the Status Quo? Education Stimulus Watch. Special Report 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smarick, Andy

    2009-01-01

    This is the first in a quarterly series of special reports on the K-12 education implications of the federal government's economic stimulus package, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). That the ARRA, which was signed into law in February, will pump nearly $100 billion--an unprecedented sum of federal money--into K-12 education is

  17. Industrial R&D Expenditures Rise to $22 Billion in 1974. Science Resources Studies Highlights, January 14, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Reported in this newsletter in narrative, graphical, and tabular form are data related to industrial research and development expenditures in 1974, showing a seven percent increase over 1973. It is noted that more than 80 percent of a total of $22.3 billion was spent by five industries; these included electrical equipment and communication,…

  18. US Physician Practices Spend More Than $15.4 Billion Annually To Report Quality Measures.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Gans, David; Weber, Rachel; Cea, Meagan; Tuchovsky, Amber; Bishop, Tara F; Miranda, Yesenia; Frankel, Brittany A; Ziehler, Kristina B; Wong, Meghan M; Evenson, Todd B

    2016-03-01

    Each year US physician practices in four common specialties spend, on average, 785 hours per physician and more than $15.4 billion dealing with the reporting of quality measures. While much is to be gained from quality measurement, the current system is unnecessarily costly, and greater effort is needed to standardize measures and make them easier to report. PMID:26953292

  19. Switching to less expensive blindness drug could save medicare part B $18 billion over a ten-year period.

    PubMed

    Hutton, David; Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Tavag, Mrinalini; Zacks, David; Stein, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    The biologic drugs bevacizumab and ranibizumab have revolutionized treatment of diabetic macular edema and neovascular age-related macular degeneration, leading causes of blindness. Ophthalmologic use of these drugs has increased and now accounts for roughly one-sixth of the Medicare Part B drug budget. The two drugs have similar efficacy and potentially minor differences in adverse-event rates; however, at $2,023 per dose, ranibizumab costs forty times more than bevacizumab. Using modeling methods, we predict ten-year (2010-20) population-level costs and health benefits of using bevacizumab and ranibizumab. Our results show that if all patients were treated with the less expensive bevacizumab instead of current usage patterns, savings would amount to $18 billion for Medicare Part B and nearly $5 billion for patients. With an additional $6 billion savings in other health care expenses, the total savings would be almost $29 billion. Altering patterns of use with these therapies by encouraging bevacizumab use and hastening approval of biosimilar therapies would dramatically reduce spending without substantially affecting patient outcomes. PMID:24889941

  20. Industrial R&D Spending Reached $26.6 Billion in 1976. Science Resources Studies Highlights, May 5, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    This report presents data compiled as part of a comprehensive program to measure and analyze the nation's resources expended for research and development (R&D). Industry, which carries out 69% of the R&D in the United States, spent $26.6 billion on these activities in 1976, 10% above the 1975 level. In constant dollars, this presents an increase

  1. $100 Billion: For Reform...or to Subsidize the Status Quo? Education Stimulus Watch. Special Report 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smarick, Andy

    2009-01-01

    This is the first in a quarterly series of special reports on the K-12 education implications of the federal government's economic stimulus package, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). That the ARRA, which was signed into law in February, will pump nearly $100 billion--an unprecedented sum of federal money--into K-12 education is…

  2. Preliminary tests of vulnerability of typical aircraft electronics to lightning-induced voltages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumer, J. A.; Walko, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Tests made on two pieces of typical aircraft electronics equipment to ascertain their vulnerability to simulated lightning-induced transient voltages representative of those which might occur in flight when the aircraft is struck by lightning were conducted. The test results demonstrated that such equipment can be interfered with or damaged by transient voltages as low as 21 volts peak. Greater voltages can cause failure of semiconductor components within the equipment. The results emphasize a need for establishment of coordinated system susceptibility and component vulnerability criteria to achieve lightning protection of aerospace electrical and electronic systems.

  3. Ten Billion Years of Growth: Massive Galaxy Evolution from Structures and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Rachel

    Once thought to be relies of a much earlier epoch, the most massive local galaxies are red and dead ellipticals, with little ongoing star formation or organized rotation. In the last decade, observations of their assumed progenitors have demonstrated that billions of years ago, massive galaxies were more compact and morphologically different, possibly with more disklike structures. The details of this observed evolution can place constraints on the physical processes that have driven massive galaxy evolution through cosmic time. The work presented in this thesis provides observational constraints on the dynamical and structural evolution of massive galaxies since z ~ 1.5 - 2 using a variety of photometric and spectroscopic surveys, including OBEY, SDSS, NMBS, and UDS. First, we find that although overall densities of these galaxies have decreased with time, the central densities of massive galaxies at high and low redshifts, are quite similar. This suggests that massive galaxies grow "inside-out": compact cores form early and then gradually build a more diffuse envelope of stars in their outskirts. Balancing the need for efficient size growth and consistent number densities of progenitor and descendent galaxies, we conclude that minor-merging is the best physical explanation for the observed size evolution. The remainder of this dissertation focuses on the inferred and measured dynamical evolution of massive galaxies since z ~ 2. Using velocity dispersions inferred by galaxy stellar masses and morphologies, we find that the number density of galaxies at a given velocity dispersion, or velocity dispersion function , is quite stable with redshift since z ~ 1.5, with a weak evolution at the low dispersion end due to a growing population of quenched galaxies. The constancy provides evidence in favor of inside-out growth of galaxies and is consistent with theoretical predictions that the central potentials of massive galaxies are set early. We suggest a toy model that requires that galaxy quenching must be extremely efficient at high velocity dispersions and quenching must be combined with rapidly increasing dispersions. We present two large spectroscopic studies of high-redshift massive galaxies using the Keck Telescopes: directly measuring absorption line kinematics for eight galaxies at z ~ 1.5 and ~ 100 galaxies at z ~ 0.7. Using a collection of cutting edge photometric and spectroscopic data, we verify that the z ~ 1.5 galaxies are dynamically massive and compact, with high measured velocity dispersions. Surprisingly, the spectra of many of the galaxies in this sample have extremely strong Balmer absorption lines, in contrast with massive galaxies in the Universe. These observations can only be explained by recently quenched star-formation within ~ 1 Gyr. Finally, we collect all spectroscopic data from these two surveys and ~ 6000 galaxies from the literature and examine the structural and dynamical evolution of galaxies in the Fundamental Plane since z ~ 2. We find that although the zeropoint of the luminosity fundamental plane evolves dramatically in the last 10 billion years, the mass fundamental plane exhibits very little redshift evolution. We note that a stable mass fundamental plane was predicted by simulations of merging galaxies. Finally, these results imply that galaxies must undergo evolution in their velocity dispersions, in addition to growing in size in order to remain on the Fundamental Plane. Overall, these results provide strong evidence for inside-out growth, minimal, but non-negligible, dynamical evolution and efficient quenching of massive galaxies since z ~ 2.

  4. The First Billion Years project: the escape fraction of ionizing photons in the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Khochfar, Sadegh; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    Protogalaxies forming in low-mass dark matter haloes are thought to provide the majority of ionizing photons needed to reionize the Universe, due to their high escape fractions of ionizing photons. We study how the escape fraction in high-redshift galaxies relates to the physical properties of the halo in which the galaxies form, by computing escape fractions in more than 75 000 haloes between redshifts 27 and 6 that were extracted from the First Billion Years project, high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation. We find that the main constraint on the escape fraction is the gas column density in a radius of 10 pc around the stellar populations, causing a strong mass dependence of the escape fraction. The lower potential well in haloes with M200 ≲ 108 M⊙ results in low column densities that can be penetrated by radiation from young stars (age <5 Myr). In haloes with M200 ≳ 108 M⊙ supernova feedback is important, but only ˜30 per cent of the haloes in this mass range have an escape fraction higher than 1 per cent. We find a large range of escape fractions in haloes with similar properties, caused by different distributions of the dense gas in the halo. This makes it very hard to predict the escape fraction on the basis of halo properties and results in a highly anisotropic escape fraction. The strong mass dependence, the large spread and the large anisotropy of the escape fraction may strongly affect the topology of reionization and is something current models of cosmic reionization should strive to take into account.

  5. Atmospheric sulfur rearrangement 2.7 billion years ago: Evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, Florian; Claire, Mark; Thomazo, Christophe; Peters, Marc; Hannington, Mark; Strauss, Harald

    2013-03-01

    Mass-independently fractionated sulfur isotopes (MIF-S) provide strong evidence for an anoxic atmosphere during the Archean. Moreover, the temporal evolution of MIF-S shows increasing magnitudes between 2.7 and 2.5 Ga until the start of the Great Oxidation Event (G.O.E.) at around 2.4 Ga. The conclusion of a completely anoxic atmosphere up to the G.O.E. is in contrast to recent studies on redox-sensitive elements, which suggest slightly oxidizing conditions during continental weathering already several hundred million years prior to the G.O.E. In order to investigate this apparent inconsistency, we present multiple sulfur isotopes for 2.71 Ga pyritic black shales derived from the Kidd Creek area, Ontario, Canada. These samples display high positive Δ33S values up to 3.8‰ and the typical late Archean slope in Δ36S/Δ33S of -0.9. In contrast, the time period before (3.2-2.73 Ga) is characterized by greatly attenuated MIF-S magnitudes and a slope in Δ36S/Δ33S of -1.5. We attribute the increase in Δ33S magnitude as well as the contemporaneous change in the slope of Δ36S/Δ33S to changes in the relative reaction rate of different MIF-S source reactions and changes in atmospheric sulfur exit channels. Both of these are dependent on atmospheric CH4:CO2 and O2 mixing ratios. We propose a distinct change in atmospheric composition at 2.7 Ga resulting from increased fluxes of oxygen and methane as the best explanation for the observed Neoarchean MIF-S record. Our data and modeling results suggest that oxygenic photosynthesis was a major contributor to primary productivity 2.7 billion years ago.

  6. Searching for the birthplaces of open clusters with ages of several billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharova, I. A.; Shevtsova, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of finding the birthplaces of open clusters (OC) with ages of several billion years. The proposed method is based on the comparison of the results of the chemical evolution modeling of the Galactic disk with the parameters of the cluster. Five OCs older than 7 Gyr are known: NGC6791, BH176, Collinder 261, Berkeley 17, and Berkeley 39. The oxygen and iron abundances in NGC6791 and the oxygen abundance in BH176 are twice the solar level, the heavy-element abundances in other clusters are close to the corresponding solar values. According to chemical evolution models, at the time of the formation of the objects considered the regions where the oxygen and iron abundances reached the corresponding levels extended out to 5 kpc from the Galactic center.At present time theOCs considered are located several kpc from the Galactic center. Some of these clusters are located extremely high, about 1 kpc above the disk midplane, i.e., they have been subject to some mechanism that has carried them into orbits uncharacteristic of this type of objects. It follows from a comparison with the results of chemical evolution that younger clusters with ages of 4-5 Gyr, e.g., NGC1193,M67, and others, may have formed in a broad range of Galactocentric distances. Their large heights above the disk midplane is sufficient to suggest that these clusters have moved away from their likely birthplaces. Clusters are carried far away from the Galactic disk until the present time: about 40 clusters with ages from 0 to 2 Gyr are observed at heights ranging from 300 to 750 pc.

  7. Preservation of hydrocarbons and biomarkers in oil trapped inside fluid inclusions for >2 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Simon C.; Volk, Herbert; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Ridley, John; Buick, Roger

    2008-02-01

    Oil-bearing fluid inclusions occur in a ca. 2.45 Ga fluvial metaconglomerate of the Matinenda Formation at Elliot Lake, Canada. The oil, most likely derived from the conformably overlying deltaic McKim Formation, was trapped in quartz and feldspar during diagenesis and early metamorphism of the host rock, probably before ca. 2.2 Ga. Molecular geochemical analyses of the oil reveal a wide range of compounds, including CH 4, CO 2, n-alkanes, isoprenoids, monomethylalkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, low molecular weight cyclic hydrocarbons, and trace amounts of complex multi-ring biomarkers. Maturity ratios show that the oil was generated in the oil window, with no evidence of extensive thermal cracking. This is remarkable, given that the oils were exposed to upper prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism (280-350 °C) either during migration or after entrapment. The fluid inclusions are closed systems, with high fluid pressures, and contain no clays or other minerals or metals that might catalyse oil-to-gas cracking. These three attributes may all contribute to the thermal stability of the included oil and enable survival of biomarkers and molecular ratios over billions of years. The biomarker geochemistry of the oil in the Matinenda Formation fluid inclusions enables inferences about the organisms that contributed to the organic matter deposited in the Palaeoproterozoic source rocks from which the analysed oil was generated and expelled. The presence of biomarkers produced by cyanobacteria and eukaryotes that are derived from and trapped in rocks deposited before ca. 2.2 Ga is consistent with an earlier evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis and suggests that some aquatic settings had become sufficiently oxygenated for sterol biosynthesis by this time. The extraction of biomarker molecules from Palaeoproterozoic oil-bearing fluid inclusions thus establishes a new method, using low detection limits and system blank levels, to trace evolution through Earth's early history that avoids the potential contamination problems affecting shale-hosted hydrocarbons.

  8. Survival of Pure Disk Galaxies over the Last 8 Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, Sonali; Saha, Kanak

    2016-03-01

    Pure disk galaxies without any bulge component, i.e., bulges that are neither classical nor pseudo, seem to have escaped the effects of merger activity that are inherent to hierarchical galaxy formation models as well as strong internal secular evolution. We discover that a significant fraction (˜15%-18%) of disk galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field (0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.0) and in the local universe (0.02\\lt z\\lt 0.05) are such pure disk systems (PDSs). The spatial distribution of light in these PDSs is well-described by a single exponential function from the outskirts to the center and appears to have remained intact over the last 8 billion years, keeping the mean central surface brightness and scale-length nearly constant. These two disk parameters of PDSs are brighter and shorter, respectively, than those of disks which are part of disk galaxies with bulges. Since the fraction of PDSs, as well as their profile-defining parameters, do not change, this indicates that these galaxies have not witnessed either major mergers or multiple minor mergers since z˜ 1. However, there is a substantial increase in their total stellar mass and total size over the same time range. This suggests that smooth accretion of cold gas via cosmic filaments is the most probable mode of their evolutions. We speculate that PDSs are dynamically hotter and cushioned in massive dark matter halos, which may prevent them from undergoing strong secular evolution.

  9. The formation of submillimetre-bright galaxies from gas infall over a billion years.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Desika; Turk, Matthew; Feldmann, Robert; Robitaille, Thomas; Hopkins, Philip; Thompson, Robert; Hayward, Christopher; Ball, David; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2015-09-24

    Submillimetre-bright galaxies at high redshift are the most luminous, heavily star-forming galaxies in the Universe and are characterized by prodigious emission in the far-infrared, with a flux of at least five millijanskys at a wavelength of 850 micrometres. They reside in haloes with masses about 10(13) times that of the Sun, have low gas fractions compared to main-sequence disks at a comparable redshift, trace complex environments and are not easily observable at optical wavelengths. Their physical origin remains unclear. Simulations have been able to form galaxies with the requisite luminosities, but have otherwise been unable to simultaneously match the stellar masses, star formation rates, gas fractions and environments. Here we report a cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation that is able to form a submillimetre galaxy that simultaneously satisfies the broad range of observed physical constraints. We find that groups of galaxies residing in massive dark matter haloes have increasing rates of star formation that peak at collective rates of about 500-1,000 solar masses per year at redshifts of two to three, by which time the interstellar medium is sufficiently enriched with metals that the region may be observed as a submillimetre-selected system. The intense star formation rates are fuelled in part by the infall of a reservoir gas supply enabled by stellar feedback at earlier times, not through major mergers. With a lifetime of nearly a billion years, our simulations show that the submillimetre-bright phase of high-redshift galaxies is prolonged and associated with significant mass buildup in early-Universe proto-clusters, and that many submillimetre-bright galaxies are composed of numerous unresolved components (for which there is some observational evidence). PMID:26399829

  10. No Photon Left Behind: How Billions of Spectral Lines are Transforming Planetary Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-06-01

    With the advent of realistic potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment surface (DMS) descriptions, theoretically computed linelists can now synthesize accurate spectral parameters for billions of spectral lines sampling the untamed high-energy molecular domain. Being the initial driver for these databases the characterization of stellar spectra, these theoretical databases, in combination with decades of precise experimental studies (nicely compiled in community databases such as HITRAN and GEISA), are leading to unprecedented precisions in the characterization of planetary atmospheres. Cometary sciences are among the most affected by this spectroscopic revolution. Even though comets are relatively cold bodies (T˜100 K), their infrared molecular emission is mainly defined by non-LTE solar fluorescence induced by a high-energy source (Sun, T˜5600 K). In order to interpret high-resolution spectra of comets acquired with extremely powerful telescopes (e.g., Keck, VLT, NASA-IRTF), we have developed advanced non-LTE fluorescence models that integrate the high-energy dynamic range of ab-initio databases (e.g., BT2, VTT, HPT2, BYTe, TROVE) and the precision of laboratory and semi-empirical compilations (e.g., HITRAN, GEISA, CDMS, WKMC, SELP, IUPAC). These new models allow us to calculate realistic non-LTE pumps, cascades, branching-ratios, and emission rates for a broad range of excitation regimes for H2O, HDO, HCN, HNC and NH3. We have implemented elements of these compilations to the study of Mars spectra, and we are now exploring its application to modeling non-LTE emission in exoplanets. In this presentation, we present application of these advanced models to interpret highresolution spectra of comets, Mars and exoplanets.

  11. A sawtooth-like timeline for the first billion years of lunar bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, A.; Marchi, S.; Bottke, W. F.; Kring, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    We revisit the early evolution of the Moon's bombardment. Our work combines modeling (based on plausible projectile sources and their dynamical decay rates) with constraints from the lunar crater record, radiometric ages of the youngest lunar basins, and the abundance of highly siderophile elements in the lunar crust and mantle. We deduce that the evolution of the impact flux did not decline exponentially over the first billion years of lunar history, but also there was no prominent and narrow impact spike ˜3.9Gy ago, unlike that typically envisioned in the lunar cataclysm scenario. Instead, we show the timeline of the lunar bombardment has a sawtooth-like profile, with an uptick in the impact flux near ˜4.1Gy ago. The impact flux at the beginning of this weaker cataclysm was 5-10 times higher than the immediately preceding period. The Nectaris basin should have been one of the first basins formed at the sawtooth. We predict the bombardment rate since ˜4.1Gy ago declined slowly and adhered relatively close to classic crater chronology models (Neukum and Ivanov, 1994). Overall we expect that the sawtooth event accounted for about one-fourth of the total bombardment suffered by the Moon since its formation. Consequently, considering that ˜12-14 basins formed during the sawtooth event, we expect that the net number of basins formed on the Moon was ˜45-50. From our expected bombardment timeline, we derived a new and improved lunar chronology suitable for use on pre-Nectarian surface units. According to this chronology, a significant portion of the oldest lunar cratered terrains has an age of 4.38-4.42 Gyr. Moreover, the largest lunar basin, South Pole Aitken, is older than 4.3 Gy, and therefore was not produced during the lunar cataclysm.

  12. Layout finishing of a 28nm, 3 billions transistors, multi-core processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey-Chaisemartin, Philippe; Beisser, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Designing a fully new 256 cores processor is a great challenge for a fabless startup. In addition to all architecture, functionalities and timing issues, the layout by itself is a bottleneck due to all the process constraints of a 28nm technology. As developers of advanced layout finishing solutions, we were involved in the design flow of this huge chip with its 3 billions transistors. We had to face the issue of dummy patterns instantiation with respect to design constraints. All the design rules to generate the "dummies" are clearly defined in the Design Rule Manual, and some automatic procedures are provided by the foundry itself, but these routines don't take care of the designer requests. Such a chip, embeds both digital parts and analog modules for clock and power management. These two different type of designs have each their own set of constraints. In both cases, the insertion of dummies should not introduce unexpected variations leading to malfunctions. For example, on digital parts were signal race conditions are critical on long wires or bus, introduction of uncontrolled parasitic along these nets are highly critical. For analog devices such as high frequency and high sensitivity comparators, the exact symmetry of the two parts of a current mirror generator should be guaranteed. Thanks to the easily customizable features of our dummies insertion tool, we were able to configure it in order to meet all the designer requirements as well as the process constraints. This paper will present all these advanced key features as well as the layout tricks used to fulfill all requirements.

  13. The formation of submillimetre-bright galaxies from gas infall over a billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika; Turk, Matthew; Feldmann, Robert; Robitaille, Thomas; Hopkins, Philip; Thompson, Robert; Hayward, Christopher; Ball, David; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2015-09-01

    Submillimetre-bright galaxies at high redshift are the most luminous, heavily star-forming galaxies in the Universe and are characterized by prodigious emission in the far-infrared, with a flux of at least five millijanskys at a wavelength of 850 micrometres. They reside in haloes with masses about 1013 times that of the Sun, have low gas fractions compared to main-sequence disks at a comparable redshift, trace complex environments and are not easily observable at optical wavelengths. Their physical origin remains unclear. Simulations have been able to form galaxies with the requisite luminosities, but have otherwise been unable to simultaneously match the stellar masses, star formation rates, gas fractions and environments. Here we report a cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation that is able to form a submillimetre galaxy that simultaneously satisfies the broad range of observed physical constraints. We find that groups of galaxies residing in massive dark matter haloes have increasing rates of star formation that peak at collective rates of about 500-1,000 solar masses per year at redshifts of two to three, by which time the interstellar medium is sufficiently enriched with metals that the region may be observed as a submillimetre-selected system. The intense star formation rates are fuelled in part by the infall of a reservoir gas supply enabled by stellar feedback at earlier times, not through major mergers. With a lifetime of nearly a billion years, our simulations show that the submillimetre-bright phase of high-redshift galaxies is prolonged and associated with significant mass buildup in early-Universe proto-clusters, and that many submillimetre-bright galaxies are composed of numerous unresolved components (for which there is some observational evidence).

  14. CESR Conversion Damping Ring Studies of Electron Cloud Instabilities (CESR-TA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, David L.; Palmer, Mark A.

    2011-08-02

    In the International Linear Collider, two linear accelerators will accelerate bunches of positrons and electrons to over a hundred billion electron volts and collide them in a central detector. In order to obtain useful collision rates, the bunches, each containing twenty billion particles, must be compressed to a cross section of a few nanometers by a few hundred nanometers. In order to prepare these ultra high density bunches, damping rings (DRs) are employed before the linear accelerators. The DRs take the high emittance bunches that are provided by the electron and positron sources and, through the process of radiation damping, squeeze them into ultra low emittance beams that are ready for the main linear accelerators. In the damping rings, a number of effects can prevent the successful preparation of the beams. In the electron ring, an effect known as the fast ion instability can lead to beam growth and, in the positron ring, the build-up of an electron cloud (EC), which interacts with the circulating bunches, can produce the same effect. EC build-up and the subsequent interaction of the cloud with the positron beam in the DR have been identified as major risks for the successful construction of a linear collider. The CESRTA research program at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was developed in order to study the build-up of the EC, the details of its impact on ultra low emittance beams, as well as methods to mitigate the impact of the cloud. In the DR, the EC forms when synchrotron photons radiated from the circulating beam strike the walls of the vacuum chamber, resulting in the emission of photoelectrons. These low energy electrons can be accelerated across the vacuum chamber by the electric field of the beam, and strike the walls, causing the emission of secondary electrons. The secondary electrons are subsequently accelerated into the walls yet again via the same mechanism. The result is that the EC can rapidly begin to fill the vacuum chamber. In an electron DR, the EC build-up is limited by the Coulomb repulsion. But in a positron ring, the electrons are pulled into the potential well of the beam. The resulting interaction of the circulating bunches of positrons with the EC that ultimately limits DR performance. Typically we store long trains of closely space bunches in the damping ring. The interaction of stored beam and the EC that is generated by the long train is manifested by different mechanisms: (1) The cloud focuses the beam, which causes a tune shift that increases along the bunch train as the cloud density increases. (2) The cloud electrons couple the motion of bunches along a train. Transverse motion of a leading bunch is transferred to the cloud, and subsequently to a trailing bunch which can result in a multi-bunch instability. (3) The cloud couples the positrons in the head of the bunch to those in the tail of the same bunch, which can excite a 'head-tail' instability. (4) The nonlinear fields of the EC can lead to emittance growth before the onset of instabilities. The CESRTA collaboration, which includes researchers from Cornell University's Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics as well as more than 50 senior staff members from over a dozen accelerator laboratories and universities around the world, has operated CESR as a damping ring for the past three years to study these EC effects. A range of specialized instrumentation has been deployed to study the local build-up of the cloud in the vacuum chambers as well as the complicated dynamics exhibited when the beam and the EC interact. The program has significantly advanced our understanding of these issues and has helped identify the most promising methods to mitigate the impact of the EC on the DR beams. It has pointed the way towards a DR design that can meet the stringent specifications of the ILC.

  15. Propulsion using the electron spiral toroid

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, Clint

    1998-01-15

    A new propulsion method is proposed which could potentially reduce propellant needed for space travel by three orders of magnitude. It uses the newly patented electron spiral toroid (EST), which stores energy as magnetic field energy. The EST is a hollow toroid of electrons, all spiraling in parallel paths in a thin outer shell. The electrons satisfy the coupling condition, forming an electron matrix. Stability is assured as long as the coupling condition is satisfied. The EST is held in place with a small external electric field; without an external magnetic field. The EST system is contained in a vacuum chamber. The EST can be thought of as an energetic entity, with electrons at 10,000 electron volts. Propulsion would not use combustion, but would heat propellant through elastic collisions with the EST surface and eject them for thrust. Chemical rocket combustion heats propellant to 4000 deg. C; an EST will potentially heat the propellant 29,000 times as much, reducing propellant needs accordingly. The thrust can be turned ON and OFF. The EST can be recharged as needed.

  16. Research Frontier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Teacher, 1971

    1971-01-01

    New research topics have been brought about by the acceleration of nitrogen nuclei to the energy of 36 billion electron volts. Describes experiments on tumor cells, cosmic rays, and nuclear fission performed with the Bevatron at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (TS)

  17. The Other Inconvenient Truth: Feeding 9 Billion While Sustaining the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    As the international community focuses on climate change as the great challenge of our era, we have been largely ignoring another looming problem — the global crisis in agriculture, food security and the environment. Our use of land, particularly for agriculture, is absolutely essential to the success of the human race: we depend on agriculture to supply us with food, feed, fiber, and, increasingly, biofuels. Without a highly efficient, productive, and resilient agricultural system, our society would collapse almost overnight. But we are demanding more and more from our global agricultural systems, pushing them to their very limits. Continued population growth (adding more than 70 million people to the world every year), changing dietary preferences (including more meat and dairy consumption), rising energy prices, and increasing needs for bioenergy sources are putting tremendous pressure on the world’s resources. And, if we want any hope of keeping up with these demands, we’ll need to double the agricultural production of the planet in the next 30 to 40 years. Meeting these huge new agricultural demands will be one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. At present, it is completely unclear how (and if) we can do it. If this wasn’t enough, we must also address the massive environmental impacts of our current agricultural practices, which new evidence indicates rival the impacts of climate change. Simply put, providing for the basic needs of 9 billion-plus people, without ruining the biosphere in the process, will be one of the greatest challenges our species has ever faced. In this presentation, I will present a new framework for evaluating and assessing global patterns of agriculture, food / fiber / fuel production, and their relationship to the earth system, particularly in terms of changing stocks and flows of water, nutrients and carbon in our planetary environment. This framework aims to help us manage the challenges of increasing global food security -- in the fact of dramatically increasing demand -- while greatly reducing the impact of agriculture on the earth system.

  18. China strives to limit population to 1.294 billion by 2000.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W

    1991-10-01

    Mme. Peng Peiyun, minister of the State Family Planning Commission, said that China must strive to limit its total population to 1.294 billion by the end of the century as set by the 8th 5-Year Population Plan and the 10-Year Population Program. The average annual net increase of population in the country in this decade will need to drop to 15.1 million with an annual rate of natural increase of no more than 12.49/1000. According to these goals, the total fertility rate of women at childbearing age must be reduced from 2.3 in 1990 to 2.1 in 1995 and continue to decline below the present average in developed countries. These figures were announced at the National Conference for Commending Advanced Units and Model Individuals for Publicity on Family Planning held in Beijing on September 25, 1991. It is very arduous to reach the goals, admitted Minister Peng, because: First,China has a large population base and is at present confronted with the 3rd baby boom since 1949. There will be 19 million planned births each year during the 8th 5-Year Plan (1991-95). Second, the implementation of the family planning program is uneven in the country. During the 1980s, the total fertility rate of urban women was kept below 1.5 while that of rural women was around 2.8. The 1990 national population census shows that the proportion of 3rd and higher parity births is still as high as 19.32%. Facing the present grave situation of population growth, we have to increase the emphasis on publicity and education about population and family planning to better facilitate implementation of the family planning program. At the conference 365 advanced units and 485 model individuals were commended. Mr. Wang Renzhi, head of the Publicity Department of the Party's Central Committee, and Mme. Peng Peiyun attended the awarding ceremony for commendation. PMID:12285203

  19. Molecular dynamics beyonds the limits: Massive scaling on 72 racks of a BlueGene/P and supercooled glass dynamics of a 1 billion particles system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsopp, Nicholas; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    We report scaling results on the world's largest supercomputer of our recently developed Billions-Body Molecular Dynamics (BBMD) package, which was especially designed for massively parallel simulations of the short-range atomic dynamics in structural glasses and amorphous materials. The code was able to scale up to 72 racks of an IBM BlueGene/P, with a measured 89% efficiency for a system with 100 billion particles. The code speed, with 0.13 s per iteration in the case of 1 billion particles, paves the way to the study of billion-body structural glasses with a resolution increase of two orders of magnitude with respect to the largest simulation ever reported. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our code by studying the liquid-glass transition of an exceptionally large system made by a binary mixture of 1 billion particles.

  20. The continuing cost of privatization: extra payments to Medicare Advantage plans jump to $11.4 billion in 2009.

    PubMed

    Biles, Brian; Pozen, Jonah; Guterman, Stuart

    2009-05-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 explicitly increased Medicare payments to private Medicare Advantage (MA) plans. As a result, MA plans have, for the past six years, been paid more for their enrollees than they would be expected to cost in traditional fee-for-service Medicare. Payments to MA plans in 2009 are projected to be 13 percent greater than the corresponding costs in traditional Medicare--an average of $1,138 per MA plan enrollee, for a total of $11.4 billion. Although the extra payments are used to provide enrollees additional benefits, those benefits are not available to all beneficiaries-- but they are financed by general program funds. If payments to MA plans were instead equal to the spending level under traditional Medicare, the more than $150 billion in savings over 10 years could be used to finance improved benefits for the low-income elderly and disabled, or for expanding health-insurance coverage. PMID:19449498

  1. Reducing the staggering costs of environmental disease in children, estimated at $76.6 billion in 2008.

    PubMed

    Trasande, Leonardo; Liu, Yinghua

    2011-05-01

    A 2002 analysis documented $54.9 billion in annual costs of environmentally mediated diseases in US children. However, few important changes in federal policy have been implemented to prevent exposures to toxic chemicals. We therefore updated and expanded the previous analysis and found that the costs of lead poisoning, prenatal methylmercury exposure, childhood cancer, asthma, intellectual disability, autism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were $76.6 billion in 2008. To prevent further increases in these costs, efforts are needed to institute premarket testing of new chemicals; conduct toxicity testing on chemicals already in use; reduce lead-based paint hazards; and curb mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. PMID:21543421

  2. Set-up and demonstration of a Low Energy Electron Magnetometer (LEEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayborn, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Described are the design, construction and test results of a Low Energy Electron Magnetometer (LEEM). The electron source is a commercial electron gun capable of providing several microamperes of electron beam. These electrons, after acceleration through a selected potential difference of 100-300 volts, are sent through two 30 degree second-order focussing parallel plate electrostatic analyzers. The first analyzer acts as a monochromator located in the field-free space. It is capable of providing energy resolution of better than 10 to the -3 power. The second analyzer, located in the test field region, acts as the detector for electrons deflected by the test field. The entire magnetometer system is expected to have a resolution of 1 part in 1000 or better.

  3. Interface control of semiconducting metal oxide layers for efficient and stable inverted polymer solar cells with open-circuit voltages over 1.0 volt.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhigang; Zheng, Qingdong; Chen, Shan-Ci; Cai, Dongdong

    2013-09-25

    Inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) with high open-circuit voltages of 1.00-1.06 V are fabricated by using an indenofluorene-containing copolymer (PIFTBT8) as an electron donor material and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as an electron acceptor material. To improve the photovoltaic performance, interface control of various low-temperature processed ZnO films as cathode buffer layers is systematically investigated for effective electron transportation, while transition metal oxides including MoO3, WO3, NiO, and Cu2O are employed as anode buffer layers for hole-extraction. Incorporation of optimized semiconducting metal oxide interlayers can minimize interfacial power losses, which thus affords large open-circuit voltages (Voc), increased short-circuit current densities (Jsc), and fill factors (FF), eventually contributing to higher power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) as well as better device stability. Due to the improved interfacial contacts and fine-matching energy levels, inverted PSCs with a device configuration of ITO/ZnO/PIFTBT8:PC71BM/MoO3/Ag exhibit a high PCE of 5.05% with a large Voc of 1.04 V, a Jsc of 9.74 mA cm(-2), and an FF of 50.1%. For the single junction inverted PSCs with efficiencies over 5.0%, 1.04 V is the largest Voc ever achieved. By controlling the processing conditions of the active layer, the Voc can further be improved to 1.05 and 1.06 V, with PCEs of 4.70% and 4.18%, respectively. More importantly, the inverted PSCs are ascertained to maintain a PCE of 4.55% (>90% of its initial efficiency) and a Voc of 1.05 V over 180 days, demonstrating good long-term stability, which is much better than that of the conventional devices. The results suggest that the interface engineering of metal oxide interlayers is an important strategy to develop PSCs with good performance. PMID:23984993

  4. The use of electron beams for pasteurization of meats

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, K.R.; Kaye, R.J.; Turman, B.N.; Neau, E.L.

    1994-12-01

    Electron beam accelerators can be used for electronic pasteurization of meat products by: (1) using the electrons directly impacting the products, or (2) optimizing the conversion of electron energy to x-rays and treating the product with these x-rays. The choice of process depends on the configuration of the product when it is treated. For electron treatment, ten million electron volt (MeV) kinetic energy is the maximum allowed by international agreement. The depth of penetration of electrons with that energy into a product with density of meat is about five centimeters (cm). Two-sided treatment can be done on products up to 10 cm thick with a two-to-one ratio between minimum and maximum dose. Ground beef patties are about 1.25 cm (0.5 inch thick). Beams with 2.5 MeV electron energy could be used to treat these products. Our calculations show that maximum to minimum dose ratios less than 1.2 can be achieved with this energy if the transverse beam energy is small. If the product thickness is greater than 10 cm, x-rays can provide the needed dose uniformity. Uniform doses can be supplied for pallets with dimensions greater than 1.2 m on each side using x-rays from a 5 MeV electron beam. The efficiency of converting the electron beam to x-rays and configurations to achieve dose uniformity are discussed.

  5. Evidence for Oxygenic Photosynthesis Half a Billion Years Before the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planavsky, N.; Asael, D.; Reinhard, C.; Hofmann, A.; Lyons, T. W.; Rouxel, O.

    2012-12-01

    Despite detailed investigations over the past 50 years, there is still intense debate about when oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. Current estimates span over a billion years of Earth history, ranging from prior to 3.8 Ga, the age of the oldest sedimentary rocks, to 2.5-2.3 Ga, coincident with the rise of atmospheric oxygen ("The Great Oxidation Event" or GOE). Hitherto, geochemical and biomarker evidence for the development of oxygenic photosynthesis prior to the GOE has been inconclusive and so a new, independent perspective is needed to constrain when oxygenesis evolved. Through the use of molybdenum (Mo) isotopes, we can track the onset of manganese(II) (Mn2+) oxidation, which requires free oxygen. It is only through photosynthesis that free oxygen is produced in significant quantities, allowing local oxygen build up in aqueous environments. Therefore, if we find a clear signal for appreciable Mn oxidation in the sedimentary rock record, oxygenic photosynthesis must have evolved by that time. There are large Mo isotope fractionations associated with the sorption of Mo onto Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides, with an approximately -2.7‰ δ98Mo fractionation associated with Mo sorption onto Mn oxyhydroxides. In contrast, sorption of Mo onto the common Fe oxyhydroxide ferrihydrite results in a fractionation of only ca. -1.1‰. Because of these differences in Mo isotope fractionations, Mo isotope values should become lighter with increasing Mn content if Mn oxidation occurs during deposition and is an important vector of Mo transfer to the sediment. In other words, a negative correlation between Fe/Mn ratios and Mo isotope values in chemical sediments is an unambiguous signal for Mn oxidation. Importantly, this Mo isotope approach holds up regardless of the original isotopic composition of seawater. We found a strong negative correlation between δ98Mo values and Fe/Mn ratios in iron formations deposited before and after the Great Oxidation Event. Most strikingly, Mo isotope data and Fe/Mn ratios correlate over a 2.5‰ range in δ98Mo in iron formations of the 2.95 Ga Sinqeni Formation, South Africa. In the Sinqeni Formation, we find this signal for Mn(II) oxidation despite Mn being predominantly reduced (Mn2+) and associated with Fe-Mn carbonates, pointing to retention of the primary δ98Mo despite subsequent reduction of the Mn host. The iron formations of the Sinqeni Formation were deposited in an epicontinental sea that was likely restricted at times. There would have been a limited supply of deep-water-sourced reductants (e.g. methane, ammonium, ferrous iron) to this depositional setting, which likely allowed for local, perhaps anomalous oxygen accumulation to levels supporting Mn oxidation beneath a globally anoxic atmosphere. Our Mo isotope data establish that there was biological oxygen production well before its first appreciable accumulation in the atmosphere (the GOE).

  6. Measurements of the volt-ampere characteristics and the breakdown voltages of direct-current helium and hydrogen discharges in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Klas, M.; Matejčik, Š.; Radjenović, B.; Radmilović-Radjenović, M.

    2014-10-15

    The discharge phenomena for micro meter gap sizes include many interesting problems from engineering and physical perspectives. In this paper, the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical results of the breakdown voltage and current-voltage characteristics of the direct-current helium and hydrogen discharges. The measurements were performed at a constant pressure of around one atmosphere, while varying the gap size between two parallel plane tungsten electrodes between 1 μm and 100 μm. From the measured breakdown voltage curves, the effective yields and the ionization coefficients were derived for both gases. Present data for the ionization coefficients correlate with the data obtained for the breakdown voltage curves measured for fixed 100 μm interelectrode separation. The current-voltage characteristics were plotted for the various gap sizes illustrating the role of the field emission effects in the microgaps. Based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory, the enhancement factors were determined. The gap spacing dependence of the field emission current can be explained by the introduction of two ideas, the first being a space charge effect by emitted electrons, and the second a change in the breakdown mechanism. Experimental results, presented here, demonstrate that Townsend phenomenology breaks down when field emission becomes the key mechanism affecting the breakdown and deforming the left hand side of the breakdown voltage curves.

  7. Engineering design of the interaction waveguide for high-power accelerator-driven microwave free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D.B.; Clay, H.W.; Stallard, B.W.; Throop, A.L.; Listvinsky, G.; Makowski, M.A.

    1989-03-16

    Linear induction accelerators (LIAs) operating at beam energies of a few million electron volts and currents of a few thousand amperes are suitable drivers for free-electron lasers (FELs). Such lasers are capable of producing gigawatts of peak power and megawatts of average power at microwave frequencies. Such devices are being studied as possible power sources for future high-gradient accelerators and are being constructed for plasma heating applications. At high power levels, the engineering design of the interaction waveguide presents a challenge. This paper discusses several concerns, including electrical breakdown and metal fatigue limits, choice of material, and choice of operating propagation mode. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Radiative charge transfer in He+ + H2 collisions in the milli- to nano-electron-volt range: A theoretical study within state-to-state and optical potential approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrugała, Felicja; Kraemer, Wolfgang P.

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the low-energy dynamics of the radiative charge transfer (RCT) reaction He+(^{2}S) + H2(X ^{1}Σ +g) rArr He(^{1}S) + H2+(X 2Σ +g)+hν extending our previous studies on radiative association of HeH2+ [F. Mrugała, V. Špirko, and W. P. Kraemer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 10547 (2003), 10.1063/1.1573184; F. Mrugała and W. P. Kraemer, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 224321 (2005), 10.1063/1.1924453]. The calculations account for the vibrational and rotational motions of the H2/H_2^+ diatomics and for the atom-diatom complex formation in the reactant and the product channels of the RCT reaction. Continuum states of He+ + H2(v = 0, j = 0) in the collision energy range ˜10-7-18.6 meV and all quasi-bound states of the He+ - H2(para; v = 0) complex formed in this range are taken into account. Close-coupling calculations are performed to determine rates of radiative transitions from these states to the continuum and quasi-bound states of the He + H+2 system in the energy range extending up to ˜0.16 eV above the opening of the HeH+ + H arrangement channel. From the detailed state-to-state calculated characteristics global functions of the RCT reaction, such as cross-section σ(E), emission intensity I(ν, T), and rate constant k(T) are derived, and are presented together with their counterparts for the radiative association (RA) reaction He+(2S) + H_2(X ^{1}Σ +g) rArr HeH2+(X ^{2}A^' })+ hν. The rate constant kRCT is approximately 20 times larger than kRA at the considered temperatures, 0.1 μK-50 K. Formation of rotational Feshbach resonances in the reactant channel plays an important role in both reactions. Transitions mediated by these resonances contribute more than 70% to the respective rates. An extension of the one-dimensional optical potential model is developed to allow inclusion of all three vibrational modes in the atom-diatom system. This three-dimensional optical potential model is used to check to which extent the state-to-state RCT rate constant is influenced by the possibility to access ground state continuum levels well above the opening of the HeH++ H arrangement channel. The results indicate that these transitions contribute about 30% to the "true" rate constant kRCT whereas their impact on the populations of the vibration-rotational states of the product H2+ ion is only minor. Present theoretical rate constant functions kRCT(T) obtained at different approximation levels are compared to experimental data: 1-1.1 × 10-14 s-1 cm3 at T = 15-35 K and ˜7.5 × 10-15 s-1 cm3 at 40 K [M. M. Schauer, S. R. Jefferts, S. E. Barlow, and G. H. Dunn, J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4593 (1989), 10.1063/1.456748]. The most reliable theoretical values of kRCT, obtained by combining results from the state-to-state and the optical potential calculations, are between 2.5 and 3.5 times larger than these experimental numbers. Possible sources for discrepancies are discussed.

  9. Radiative charge transfer in He{sup +}+ H{sub 2} collisions in the milli- to nano-electron-volt range: A theoretical study within state-to-state and optical potential approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Mrugala, Felicja; Kraemer, Wolfgang P.

    2013-03-14

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the low-energy dynamics of the radiative charge transfer (RCT) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}He({sup 1}S)+H{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +})+h{nu} extending our previous studies on radiative association of HeH{sub 2}{sup +} [F. Mrugala, V. Spirko, and W. P. Kraemer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 10547 (2003); F. Mrugala and W. P. Kraemer, ibid. 122, 224321 (2005)]. The calculations account for the vibrational and rotational motions of the H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}{sup +} diatomics and for the atom-diatom complex formation in the reactant and the product channels of the RCT reaction. Continuum states of He{sup +}+ H{sub 2}(v= 0, j= 0) in the collision energy range {approx}10{sup -7}-18.6 meV and all quasi-bound states of the He{sup +}- H{sub 2}(para;v= 0) complex formed in this range are taken into account. Close-coupling calculations are performed to determine rates of radiative transitions from these states to the continuum and quasi-bound states of the He +H{sub 2}{sup +} system in the energy range extending up to {approx}0.16 eV above the opening of the HeH{sup +}+ H arrangement channel. From the detailed state-to-state calculated characteristics global functions of the RCT reaction, such as cross-section {sigma}(E), emission intensity I({nu}, T), and rate constant k(T) are derived, and are presented together with their counterparts for the radiative association (RA) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S) +H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields} HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}A{sup Prime })+h{nu}. The rate constant k{sup RCT} is approximately 20 times larger than k{sup RA} at the considered temperatures, 0.1 {mu}K-50 K. Formation of rotational Feshbach resonances in the reactant channel plays an important role in both reactions. Transitions mediated by these resonances contribute more than 70% to the respective rates. An extension of the one-dimensional optical potential model is developed to allow inclusion of all three vibrational modes in the atom-diatom system. This three-dimensional optical potential model is used to check to which extent the state-to-state RCT rate constant is influenced by the possibility to access ground state continuum levels well above the opening of the HeH{sup +}+ H arrangement channel. The results indicate that these transitions contribute about 30% to the 'true' rate constant k{sup RCT} whereas their impact on the populations of the vibration-rotational states of the product H{sub 2}{sup +} ion is only minor. Present theoretical rate constant functions k{sup RCT}(T) obtained at different approximation levels are compared to experimental data: 1-1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} s{sup -1} cm{sup 3} at T= 15-35 K and {approx}7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s{sup -1} cm{sup 3} at 40 K [M. M. Schauer, S. R. Jefferts, S. E. Barlow, and G. H. Dunn, J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4593 (1989)]. The most reliable theoretical values of k{sup RCT}, obtained by combining results from the state-to-state and the optical potential calculations, are between 2.5 and 3.5 times larger than these experimental numbers. Possible sources for discrepancies are discussed.

  10. Radiative charge transfer in He(+) + H2 collisions in the milli- to nano-electron-volt range: a theoretical study within state-to-state and optical potential approaches.

    PubMed

    Mrugała, Felicja; Kraemer, Wolfgang P

    2013-03-14

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the low-energy dynamics of the radiative charge transfer (RCT) reaction He(+)((2)S)+H2(X(1)Σg (+))→He((1)S)+H2 (+)(X(2)Σg (+))+hν extending our previous studies on radiative association of HeH2 (+) [F. Mrugała, V. Špirko, and W. P. Kraemer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 10547 (2003); F. Mrugała and W. P. Kraemer, ibid. 122, 224321 (2005)]. The calculations account for the vibrational and rotational motions of the H2/H2 (+) diatomics and for the atom-diatom complex formation in the reactant and the product channels of the RCT reaction. Continuum states of He(+) + H2(v = 0, j = 0) in the collision energy range ~10(-7)-18.6 meV and all quasi-bound states of the He(+) - H2(para; v = 0) complex formed in this range are taken into account. Close-coupling calculations are performed to determine rates of radiative transitions from these states to the continuum and quasi-bound states of the He + H2 (+) system in the energy range extending up to ~0.16 eV above the opening of the HeH(+) + H arrangement channel. From the detailed state-to-state calculated characteristics global functions of the RCT reaction, such as cross-section σ(E), emission intensity I(ν, T), and rate constant k(T) are derived, and are presented together with their counterparts for the radiative association (RA) reaction He(+)((2)S) + H2(X(1)Σg (+))→ HeH2 (+)(X(2)A('))+hν. The rate constant k(RCT) is approximately 20 times larger than k(RA) at the considered temperatures, 0.1 μK-50 K. Formation of rotational Feshbach resonances in the reactant channel plays an important role in both reactions. Transitions mediated by these resonances contribute more than 70% to the respective rates. An extension of the one-dimensional optical potential model is developed to allow inclusion of all three vibrational modes in the atom-diatom system. This three-dimensional optical potential model is used to check to which extent the state-to-state RCT rate constant is influenced by the possibility to access ground state continuum levels well above the opening of the HeH(+)+ H arrangement channel. The results indicate that these transitions contribute about 30% to the "true" rate constant k(RCT) whereas their impact on the populations of the vibration-rotational states of the product H2 (+) ion is only minor. Present theoretical rate constant functions k(RCT)(T) obtained at different approximation levels are compared to experimental data: 1-1.1 × 10(-14) s(-1) cm(3) at T = 15-35 K and ∼7.5 × 10(-15) s(-1) cm(3) at 40 K [M. M. Schauer, S. R. Jefferts, S. E. Barlow, and G. H. Dunn, J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4593 (1989)]. The most reliable theoretical values of k(RCT), obtained by combining results from the state-to-state and the optical potential calculations, are between 2.5 and 3.5 times larger than these experimental numbers. Possible sources for discrepancies are discussed. PMID:23514497

  11. Macroencapsulation of electronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. F.

    1983-04-01

    Macroencapsulation of airborne electronic circuits has been developed to prevent moisture and contamination damage. Aircraft corrosion damage to circuitry causes $8 billion in losses in the U.S. each year. Particle impact noise detection testing is used to screen out new defective parts before installation. Coating materials presently used are normally application-specific. An all-purpose conformal coating was needed that was low cost, pinhole free, fast-drying, easily applied, moisture-proof, strong, and could be removed with common solvents. An organic polymer was evaluated for encapsulation of circuits for military use and tested for tensile strength, outgassing, thermal properties, resistance, dielectric breakdown, humidity, sealing, and bond strength in thermal cycling. The existing encapsulent, Parylene, was found to be superior or equivalent overall, but not in the areas of repairability and cost. The macroencapsulation did perform to military specifications.

  12. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high-dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second. PMID:27124455

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance of individual atoms on a surface.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Susanne; Paul, William; Choi, Taeyoung; Lutz, Christopher P; Ardavan, Arzhang; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2015-10-23

    We combined the high-energy resolution of conventional spin resonance (here ~10 nano-electron volts) with scanning tunneling microscopy to measure electron paramagnetic resonance of individual iron (Fe) atoms placed on a magnesium oxide film. We drove the spin resonance with an oscillating electric field (20 to 30 gigahertz) between tip and sample. The readout of the Fe atom's quantum state was performed by spin-polarized detection of the atomic-scale tunneling magnetoresistance. We determine an energy relaxation time of T1 ≈ 100 microseconds and a phase-coherence time of T2 ≈ 210 nanoseconds. The spin resonance signals of different Fe atoms differ by much more than their resonance linewidth; in a traditional ensemble measurement, this difference would appear as inhomogeneous broadening. PMID:26494753

  14. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high–dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second.

  15. Inverse volt-ampere characteristics of an Ag-n-InP junction with taking account of the resonance tunneling through deep centers in InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulyarsky, S. V.; Gaina, A.; Evseyev, E. P.

    Presence of an impurity state in the region of the potential barrier leads to increase of its general transmission probability and, thereafter, to increase of the resonance current through the barrier [1]. Resonance tunnel current could be greater than the over barrier one [2]. We examine the resonance tunneling through deep centers in the region of Space charge with taking account of the phonon ionization of the deep impurity center.The contribution of the electron-phonon interaction in the total value of the current has been calculated. It has been shown that in the region of high temperatures the phonons contribution is dominant. Depending on the position of the deep impurity center on the energies scale Et three distinct cases could occur: a) Zf) J=e^2hbarNF(E+Shbarw)^3/2/exp[-(E+Shbarw)^2/4kTShbarw] A calculation has been given for the contact Ag-n-InP and a comparison with experiment has been done.

  16. Mathematical model and software complex for computer simulation of field emission electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Konstantin

    2015-03-10

    The software complex developed in MATLAB allows modelling of function of diode and triode structures based on field emission electron sources with complex sub-micron geometry, their volt-ampere characteristics, calculating distribution of electric field for educational and research needs. The goal of this paper is describing the physical-mathematical model, calculation methods and algorithms the software complex is based on, demonstrating the principles of its function and showing results of its work. For getting to know the complex, a demo version with graphical user interface is presented.

  17. Proportional Drivewheel Power And Steering Electronics For A 3-Wheel Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1987-02-01

    A power electronics system for a mobile robot with ±12 volt batteries was developed, starting with a basic 3-wheel chassis with on-off drive motors, pneumatic tires, and manu-ally steered nosewheel. Power steering was provided by installing a suitable motor, gearbox, roller-chain, and sprockets. A steering servo was realized by adding a differential power amplifier and feedback potentiometer. Using an input pulse train of variable duty cycle, an independently controllable power module for each of the two drivewheel motors was designed for proportional no-load speed response. Circuit details and test results are presented.

  18. NREL Helps Clean Cities Displace Billions of Gallons of Petroleum, One Vehicle at a Time (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    With more than 15 years and nearly 3 billion gallons of displaced petroleum under its belt, the Clean Cities program relies on the support and expertise of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). An initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Clean Cities creates public-private partnerships with a common mission: to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector. Since the inception of Clean Cities in 1993, NREL has played a central role in supporting the program, an effort that stems from the laboratory's strategy to put scientific innovation into action in the marketplace.

  19. Interaction and coalescence of nanovoids and dynamic fracture in silica glass: multimillion-to-billion atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Chen, Yi-Chun; Weiqiang, Wang; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Yang, Lin H.

    2009-11-01

    In this review, we present our recent results for atomistic mechanisms of damage nucleation and growth and dynamic fracture in silica glass. These results have been obtained with multimillion-to-billion atom, parallel, molecular dynamics simulations of (1) the interaction and coalescence of nanovoids in amorphous silica subjected to dilatational strain and (2) the nucleation, growth and healing of wing cracks and damage nanocavities in silica glass under impact loading. We also give an overview of our current efforts to perform dynamic fracture simulations over microsecond time scales and multiscale simulations of stress corrosion cracking in silica glass.

  20. Single-shot compressed ultrafast photography at one hundred billion frames per second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-12-01

    The capture of transient scenes at high imaging speed has been long sought by photographers, with early examples being the well known recording in 1878 of a horse in motion and the 1887 photograph of a supersonic bullet. However, not until the late twentieth century were breakthroughs achieved in demonstrating ultrahigh-speed imaging (more than 105 frames per second). In particular, the introduction of electronic imaging sensors based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology revolutionized high-speed photography, enabling acquisition rates of up to 107 frames per second. Despite these sensors' widespread impact, further increasing frame rates using CCD or CMOS technology is fundamentally limited by their on-chip storage and electronic readout speed. Here we demonstrate a two-dimensional dynamic imaging technique, compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), which can capture non-repetitive time-evolving events at up to 1011 frames per second. Compared with existing ultrafast imaging techniques, CUP has the prominent advantage of measuring an x-y-t (x, y, spatial coordinates; t, time) scene with a single camera snapshot, thereby allowing observation of transient events with temporal resolution as tens of picoseconds. Furthermore, akin to traditional photography, CUP is receive-only, and so does not need the specialized active illumination required by other single-shot ultrafast imagers. As a result, CUP can image a variety of luminescent--such as fluorescent or bioluminescent--objects. Using CUP, we visualize four fundamental physical phenomena with single laser shots only: laser pulse reflection and refraction, photon racing in two media, and faster-than-light propagation of non-information (that is, motion that appears faster than the speed of light but cannot convey information). Given CUP's capability, we expect it to find widespread applications in both fundamental and applied sciences, including biomedical research.

  1. Single-shot compressed ultrafast photography at one hundred billion frames per second.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-12-01

    The capture of transient scenes at high imaging speed has been long sought by photographers, with early examples being the well known recording in 1878 of a horse in motion and the 1887 photograph of a supersonic bullet. However, not until the late twentieth century were breakthroughs achieved in demonstrating ultrahigh-speed imaging (more than 10(5) frames per second). In particular, the introduction of electronic imaging sensors based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology revolutionized high-speed photography, enabling acquisition rates of up to 10(7) frames per second. Despite these sensors' widespread impact, further increasing frame rates using CCD or CMOS technology is fundamentally limited by their on-chip storage and electronic readout speed. Here we demonstrate a two-dimensional dynamic imaging technique, compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), which can capture non-repetitive time-evolving events at up to 10(11) frames per second. Compared with existing ultrafast imaging techniques, CUP has the prominent advantage of measuring an x-y-t (x, y, spatial coordinates; t, time) scene with a single camera snapshot, thereby allowing observation of transient events with temporal resolution as tens of picoseconds. Furthermore, akin to traditional photography, CUP is receive-only, and so does not need the specialized active illumination required by other single-shot ultrafast imagers. As a result, CUP can image a variety of luminescent--such as fluorescent or bioluminescent--objects. Using CUP, we visualize four fundamental physical phenomena with single laser shots only: laser pulse reflection and refraction, photon racing in two media, and faster-than-light propagation of non-information (that is, motion that appears faster than the speed of light but cannot convey information). Given CUP's capability, we expect it to find widespread applications in both fundamental and applied sciences, including biomedical research. PMID:25471883

  2. An ultraluminous quasar with a twelve-billion-solar-mass black hole at redshift 6.30.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yi, Weimin; Zuo, Wenwen; Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D; Wang, Ran; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Thompson, David; Beletsky, Yuri

    2015-02-26

    So far, roughly 40 quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 have been discovered. Each quasar contains a black hole with a mass of about one billion solar masses (10(9) M Sun symbol). The existence of such black holes when the Universe was less than one billion years old presents substantial challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the coevolution of black holes and galaxies. Here we report the discovery of an ultraluminous quasar, SDSS J010013.02+280225.8, at redshift z = 6.30. It has an optical and near-infrared luminosity a few times greater than those of previously known z > 6 quasars. On the basis of the deep absorption trough on the blue side of the Lyman-α emission line in the spectrum, we estimate the proper size of the ionized proximity zone associated with the quasar to be about 26 million light years, larger than found with other z > 6.1 quasars with lower luminosities. We estimate (on the basis of a near-infrared spectrum) that the black hole has a mass of ∼1.2 × 10(10) M Sun symbol, which is consistent with the 1.3 × 10(10) M Sun symbol derived by assuming an Eddington-limited accretion rate. PMID:25719667

  3. White Light Demonstration of One Hundred Parts per Billion Irradiance Suppression in Air by New Starshade Occulters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinton, Douglas B.; Cash, Webster C.; Gleason, Brian; Kaiser, Michael J.; Levine, Sara A.; Lo, Amy S.; Schindhelm, Eric; Shipley, Ann F.

    2007-01-01

    A new mission concept for the direct imaging of exo-solar planets called the New Worlds Observer (NWO) has been proposed. The concept involves flying a meter-class space telescope in formation with a newly-conceived, specially-shaped, deployable star-occulting shade several meters across at a separation of some tens of thousands of kilometers. The telescope would make its observations from behind the starshade in a volume of high suppression of incident irradiance from the star around which planets orbit. The required level of irradiance suppression created by the starshade for an efficacious mission is of order 0.1 to 10 parts per billion in broadband light. This paper discusses the experimental setup developed to accurately measure the suppression ratio of irradiance produced at the null position behind candidate starshade forms to these levels. It also presents results of broadband measurements which demonstrated suppression levels of just under 100 parts per billion in air using the Sun as a light source. Analytical modeling of spatial irradiance distributions surrounding the null are presented and compared with photographs of irradiance captured in situ behind candidate starshades.

  4. Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of sub-parts per billion level waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis (CSCIA and CSHIA) has been increasingly used to study the source, transport, and bioremediation of organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. In natural aquatic systems, dissolved contaminants represent the bioavailable fraction that generally is of the greatest toxicological significance. However, determining the isotopic ratios of waterborne hydrophobic contaminants in natural waters is very challenging because of their extremely low concentrations (often at sub-parts ber billion, or even lower). To acquire sufficient quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with 10 ng/L concentration for CSHIA, more than 1000 L of water must be extracted. Conventional liquid/liquid or solid-phase extraction is not suitable for such large volume extractions. We have developed a new approach that is capable of efficiently sampling sub-parts per billion level waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons for CSIA. We use semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to accumulate hydrophobic contaminants from polluted waters and then recover the compounds in the laboratory for CSIA. In this study, we demonstrate, under a variety of experimental conditions (different concentrations, temperatures, and turbulence levels), that SPMD-associated processes do not induce C and H isotopic fractionations. The applicability of SPMD-CSIA technology to natural systems is further demonstrated by determining the ??13C and ??D values of petroleum hydrocarbons present in the Pawtuxet River, RI. Our results show that the combined SPMD-CSIA is an effective tool to investigate the source and fate of hydrophobic contaminants in the aquatic environments.

  5. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster.

    PubMed

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L; Latham, David W; Mathieu, Robert D

    2015-01-29

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars. PMID:25539085

  6. Microfossils of sulphur-metabolizing cells in 3.4-billion-year-old rocks of Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacey, David; Kilburn, Matt R.; Saunders, Martin; Cliff, John; Brasier, Martin D.

    2011-10-01

    Sulphur isotope data from early Archaean rocks suggest that microbes with metabolisms based on sulphur existed almost 3.5 billion years ago, leading to suggestions that the earliest microbial ecosystems were sulphur-based. However, morphological evidence for these sulphur-metabolizing bacteria has been elusive. Here we report the presence of microstructures from the 3.4-billion-year-old Strelley Pool Formation in Western Australia that are associated with micrometre-sized pyrite crystals. The microstructures we identify exhibit indicators of biological affinity, including hollow cell lumens, carbonaceous cell walls enriched in nitrogen, taphonomic degradation, organization into chains and clusters, and δ13C values of -33 to -46‰ Vienna PeeDee Belemnite (VPDB). We therefore identify them as microfossils of spheroidal and ellipsoidal cells and tubular sheaths demonstrating the organization of multiple cells. The associated pyrite crystals have Δ33S values between -1.65 and +1.43‰ and δ34S values ranging from -12 to +6‰ Vienna Canyon Diablo Troilite (VCDT). We interpret the pyrite crystals as the metabolic by-products of these cells, which would have employed sulphate-reduction and sulphur-disproportionation pathways. These microfossils are about 200 million years older than previously described microfossils from Palaeoarchaean siliciclastic environments.

  7. An age difference of two billion years between a metal-rich and a metal-poor globular cluster.

    PubMed

    Hansen, B M S; Kalirai, J S; Anderson, J; Dotter, A; Richer, H B; Rich, R M; Shara, M M; Fahlman, G G; Hurley, J R; King, I R; Reitzel, D; Stetson, P B

    2013-08-01

    Globular clusters trace the formation history of the spheroidal components of our Galaxy and other galaxies, which represent the bulk of star formation over the history of the Universe. The clusters exhibit a range of metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium), with metal-poor clusters dominating the stellar halo of the Galaxy, and higher-metallicity clusters found within the inner Galaxy, associated with the stellar bulge, or the thick disk. Age differences between these clusters can indicate the sequence in which the components of the Galaxy formed, and in particular which clusters were formed outside the Galaxy and were later engulfed along with their original host galaxies, and which were formed within it. Here we report an absolute age of 9.9 ± 0.7 billion years (at 95 per cent confidence) for the metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tucanae, determined by modelling the properties of the cluster's white-dwarf cooling sequence. This is about two billion years younger than has been inferred for the metal-poor cluster NGC 6397 from the same models, and provides quantitative evidence that metal-rich clusters like 47 Tucanae formed later than metal-poor halo clusters like NGC 6397. PMID:23903747

  8. On the possible source of the ionization in the nighttime Martian ionosphere. I - Phobos 2 HARP electron spectrometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verigin, M. I.; Gringauz, K. I.; Shutte, N. M.; Haider, S. A.; Szego, K.; Kiraly, P.; Nagy, A. F.; Gombosi, T. I.

    1991-01-01

    The measurements of electron spectra in the Martian magnetosphere by the HARP instrument on board the Phobos 2 orbiter are presented. The energy of the electrons (a few tens of electron volts) is sufficient for the impact ionization of the planetary neutral gas, and the characteristic flux of electrons (about 10 exp 8/sq cm per sec) could produce the nightside ionospheric layer with a peak density of a few thousands of electrons per cubic centimeter, which corresponds to densities observed earlier during radio occultations of the Mars 4 and 5 and Viking 1 and 2 spacecraft. The possibility of magnetospheric electron precipitation into the nightside atmosphere of Mars is in agreement with the mainly induced nature of the magnetic field in the planetary magnetotail (as at Venus), while the variability of the Martian nightside ionosphere may be explained by the partial screening of the atmosphere by a weak intrinsic magnetic field of the planet.

  9. Transformational silicon electronics.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Torres Sevilla, Galo Andres; Ghoneim, Mohamed Tarek; Inayat, Salman Bin; Ahmed, Sally M; Hussain, Aftab Mustansir; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-02-25

    In today's traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry's most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. PMID:24476361

  10. MESSENGER observations of transient bursts of energetic electrons in Mercury's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Ho, George C; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Gold, Robert E; Baker, Daniel N; Slavin, James A; Anderson, Brian J; Korth, Haje; Starr, Richard D; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Solomon, Sean C

    2011-09-30

    The MESSENGER spacecraft began detecting energetic electrons with energies greater than 30 kilo-electron volts (keV) shortly after its insertion into orbit about Mercury. In contrast, no energetic protons were observed. The energetic electrons arrive as bursts lasting from seconds to hours and are most intense close to the planet, distributed in latitude from the equator to the north pole, and present at most local times. Energies can exceed 200 keV but often exhibit cutoffs near 100 keV. Angular distributions of the electrons about the magnetic field suggest that they do not execute complete drift paths around the planet. This set of characteristics demonstrates that Mercury's weak magnetic field does not support Van Allen-type radiation belts, unlike all other planets in the solar system with internal magnetic fields. PMID:21960629

  11. Spin-modulated spacecraft floating potential: Observations and effects on electron moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulupa, M. P.; Bale, S. D.; Salem, C.; Horaites, K.

    2014-02-01

    Using the Three-Dimensional Plasma electron analyzers on the Wind spacecraft, we have analyzed several years of solar wind electron data. We find an anomalous core electron drift of roughly 40 km/s in the sunward xGSEdirection, regardless of the direction of the magnetic field. We interpret this drift as an effect of a spin modulation in the spacecraft floating potential, which can be effectively modeled with the addition of a dipole term to the potential. For typical solar wind conditions, the amplitude of potential modulation is a fraction of a volt. The modulation has negligible effects on the even electron moments (density and temperature) but noticeable effects on the odd moments (bulk velocity and heat flux).

  12. Role of electronic localization in the phosphorescence of iridium sensitizing dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmetoglu, Burak; Marchenko, Alex; Dabo, Ismaila; Cococcioni, Matteo

    2013-03-01

    In this talk we present a recent systematic study[1] of three representative iridium dyes, namely, Ir(ppy)3, FIrpic and PQIr, which are commonly used as sensitizers in organic optoelectronic devices. We show that electronic correlations play a crucial role in determining the excited state energies in these systems, due to localization of electrons on Ir d orbitals in the ground state. Electronic localization is treated by employing hybrid functionals within time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and with Hubbard model based corrections within the ?-SCF approach. The performance of both methods are studied in a comparative fashion and shown to be in good agreement with experiments (within a few tenths of an electron-volt in predicting singlet-triplet splittings and optical resonances). The Hubbard corrected functionals provide further insights on the charge-transfer character of the excited states. The gained insight allows us to comment on envisioned functionalization strategies to improve the performance of these systems.

  13. Ion viscous heating in a magnetohydrodynamically unstable Z-pinch at over two billion Kelvin.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brent Manley; Coverdale, Christine Anne; LePell, Paul David; Haines, Malcolm G.; Deeney, Christopher

    2005-02-01

    Pulsed power driven metallic wire-array Z pinches are the most powerful and efficient laboratory x-ray sources. Furthermore, under certain conditions the soft x-ray energy radiated in a 5 ns pulse at stagnation can exceed the estimated kinetic energy of the radial implosion phase by a factor of 3 to 4. A theoretical model is developed here to explain this, allowing the rapid conversion of magnetic energy to a very high ion temperature plasma through the generation of fine scale, fast-growing m=0 interchange MHD instabilities at stagnation. These saturate nonlinearly and provide associated ion viscous heating. Next the ion energy is transferred by equipartition to the electrons and thus to soft x-ray radiation. Recent time-resolved iron spectra at Sandia confirm an ion temperature T{sub i} of over 200 keV (2 x 10{sup 9} degrees), as predicted by theory. These are believed to be record temperatures for a magnetically confined plasma.

  14. Reasons (Not) to Spend a Few Billions More on EHRs: How Human Factors Research Can Help

    PubMed Central

    Aimé, X.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To select best medical informatics research works published in 2013 on electronic health record (EHR) adoption, design, and impact, from the perspective of human factors and organizational issues (HFOI). Methods We selected 2,764 papers by querying PubMed (Mesh and TIAB) as well as using a manual search. Papers were evaluated based on pre-defined exclusion and inclusion criteria from their title, keywords, and abstract to select 15 candidate best papers, finally reviewed by 4 external reviewers using a standard evaluation grid. Results Five papers were selected as best papers to illustrate how human factors approaches can improve EHR adoption and design. Among other contributions, these works: (i) make use of the observational and analysis methodologies of social and cognitive sciences to understand clinicians’ attitudes towards EHRs, EHR use patterns, and impact on care processes, workflows, information exchange, and coordination of care; (ii) take into account macro- (environmental) and meso- (organizational) level factors to analyze EHR adoption or lack thereof; (iii) highlight the need for qualitative studies to analyze the unexpected side effects of EHRs on cognitive and work processes as well as the persistent use of paper. Conclusion Selected papers tend to demonstrate that HFOI approaches and methodologies are essential to bridge the gap between EHR systems and end users, and to reduce regularly reported adoption failures and unexpected consequences. PMID:25123727

  15. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of nifursol in frozen turkey tissues to ten parts per billion.

    PubMed

    Frahm, L J; George, G M; McDonnell, J P

    1975-07-01

    Nifursol (3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (5-nitrofurfurylidene) hydrazide) is extracted into ethyl acetate from 10 g tissue in the presence of sodium sulfate. Tissue interferences are removed from the tissue extract by washing with petroleum ether after the extract has been transferred into an aqueous solution by evaporation of ethyl acetate. The drug is hydrolyzed under acid conditions to form 5-nitro-2-furaldehyde (5NF). After partition of 5NF from the aqueous phase into benzene the extract is further cleaned up on a Florisil column. The 5NF is eluted from the Florisil column with benzeneethyl acetate. Electron capture gas-liquid chromatography of a 10 mul injection of the concentrated column eluate is the determinative step. Quantitation is accomplished by comparison of the peak height of the sample to the peak height of the standard which is carried through the method simultaneously. Studies of method performance on turkey muscle, liver, kidney, and skin tissues fortified to contain 10 ppb nifursol show a recovery range of 87.4-95.0% and a coefficent of variation range of 5.7-11.2%. PMID:1150608

  16. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2008-07-08

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  17. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2009-09-01

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  18. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  19. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2008-07-08

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  20. The Breakthrough Behind the Chevy Volt Battery

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lerner, Louise

    2011-03-28

    A revolutionary breakthrough cathode for lithium-ion batteries—the kind in your cell phone, laptop and new hybrid cars—makes them last longer, run more safely and perform better than batteries currently on the market.

  1. Taking out one billion tones of carbon: the magic of China's 11thFive-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark D.; Fridley, David

    2007-05-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious targetfor energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country sgross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20 percent from 2005 to2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and bindingtarget has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift inChina's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energydevelopment. The 20 percent energy intensity target also translates intoan annual reduction of over one billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making theChinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in theworld today. While it is still too early to tell whether China willachieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend inenergy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options towardmeeting the 20 percent target using a detailed endues energymodel.

  2. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  3. Vaccine Assistance To Low- And Middle-Income Countries Increased To $3.6 Billion In 2014.

    PubMed

    Haakenstad, Annie; Birger, Maxwell; Singh, Lavanya; Liu, Patrick; Lim, Stephen; Ng, Marie; Dieleman, Joseph L

    2016-02-01

    In the 2012 Global Vaccine Action Plan, development assistance partners committed to providing sustainable financing for vaccines and expanding vaccination coverage to all children in low- and middle-income countries by 2020. To assess progress toward these goals, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation produced estimates of development assistance for vaccinations. These estimates reveal major increases in the assistance provided since 2000. In 2014, $3.6 billion in development assistance for vaccinations was provided for low- and middle-income countries, up from $822 million in 2000. The funding increase was driven predominantly by the establishment of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the governments of the United States and United Kingdom. Despite stagnation in total development assistance for health from donors from 2010 onward, development assistance for vaccination has continued to grow. PMID:26858376

  4. 1.8 Billion Years of Detrital Zircon Recycling Calibrates a Refractory Part of Earth’s Sedimentary Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hadlari, Thomas; Swindles, Graeme T.; Galloway, Jennifer M.; Bell, Kimberley M.; Sulphur, Kyle C.; Heaman, Larry M.; Beranek, Luke P.; Fallas, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Detrital zircon studies are providing new insights on the evolution of sedimentary basins but the role of sedimentary recycling remains largely undefined. In a broad region of northwestern North America, this contribution traces the pathway of detrital zircon sand grains from Proterozoic sandstones through Phanerozoic strata and argues for multi-stage sedimentary recycling over more than a billion years. As a test of our hypothesis, integrated palynology and detrital zircon provenance provides clear evidence for erosion of Carboniferous strata in the northern Cordillera as a sediment source for Upper Cretaceous strata. Our results help to calibrate Earth's sedimentary cycle by showing that recycling dominates sedimentary provenance for the refractory mineral zircon. PMID:26658165

  5. The Archean Dongwanzi ophiolite complex, North China craton: 2.505-billion-year-old oceanic crust and mantle.

    PubMed

    Kusky, T M; Li, J H; Tucker, R D

    2001-05-11

    We report a thick, laterally extensive 2505 +/- 2.2-million-year-old (uranium-lead ratio in zircon) Archean ophiolite complex in the North China craton. Basal harzburgite tectonite is overlain by cumulate ultramafic rocks, a mafic-ultramafic transition zone of interlayered gabbro and ultramafic cumulates, compositionally layered olivine-gabbro and pyroxenite, and isotropic gabbro. A sheeted dike complex is rooted in the gabbro and overlain by a mixed dike-pillow lava section, chert, and banded iron formation. The documentation of a complete Archean ophiolite implies that mechanisms of oceanic crustal accretion similar to those of today were in operation by 2.5 billion years ago at divergent plate margins and that the temperature of the early mantle was not extremely elevated, as compared to the present-day temperature. Plate tectonic processes similar to those of the present must also have emplaced the ophiolite in a convergent margin setting. PMID:11349144

  6. 1.8 Billion Years of Detrital Zircon Recycling Calibrates a Refractory Part of Earth's Sedimentary Cycle.

    PubMed

    Hadlari, Thomas; Swindles, Graeme T; Galloway, Jennifer M; Bell, Kimberley M; Sulphur, Kyle C; Heaman, Larry M; Beranek, Luke P; Fallas, Karen M

    2015-01-01

    Detrital zircon studies are providing new insights on the evolution of sedimentary basins but the role of sedimentary recycling remains largely undefined. In a broad region of northwestern North America, this contribution traces the pathway of detrital zircon sand grains from Proterozoic sandstones through Phanerozoic strata and argues for multi-stage sedimentary recycling over more than a billion years. As a test of our hypothesis, integrated palynology and detrital zircon provenance provides clear evidence for erosion of Carboniferous strata in the northern Cordillera as a sediment source for Upper Cretaceous strata. Our results help to calibrate Earth's sedimentary cycle by showing that recycling dominates sedimentary provenance for the refractory mineral zircon. PMID:26658165

  7. Lamellar magnetism and exchange bias in billion-year-old titanohematite with nanoscale ilmenite exsolution lamellae: I. mineral and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, S. A.; Robinson, Peter; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Fabian, Karl; Dyar, Darby; Sklute, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Recent high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in South Norway have revealed numerous remanent anomalies over Mesoproterozoic metamorphic rocks. Studies on the nature of the minerals that are the remanent carriers has led to discoveries of titanohematite samples with unusual magnetic properties caused by nanoscale exsolution lamellae with their related lamellar magnetism. Here we focus on a rock unit dominated by quartz-plagioclase-biotite granulite containing titanohematite grains with a strong lattice-preferred orientation parallel to regional foliation. When samples with their natural remanent magnetization (NRM), acquired nearly 1 billion years ago, are cooled to 10 K and hysteresis loops measured, these loops show bi-modal exchange bias caused by the magnetism induced within the ilmenite by antiferromagnetic coupling with the adjacent lamellar NRM. By contrast when the samples are cooled in a strong magnetic field (1.5 Tesla), this results in unimodal lamellar magnetism, and, below the TN of ilmenite it adopts a consistent negative orientation, giving rise to unimodal negative exchange bias of >500 mT. The results presented here cover the chemical and magnetic properties, Mossbauer results and transmission electron microscopy of the titanohematite and ilmenite lamellae. Initial magnetic experiments indicated the shifts found in the exchange-bias experiments were directly related to the orientation of the sample to the applied field and the initial state of the NRM. In most samples with these unusual magnetic properties, ilmenite lamellae could not be seen in an optical or a scanning electron microscope. However magnetic experiments gave proof of the presence of ilmenite, later confirmed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Several attempts were made to identify ilmenite in TEM studies, finally successful in showing ilmenite lamellae parallel to (001) of hematite with thicknesses ˜1.2 to 1.7 nm and aspect ratios 7-13. Here we compare new TEM images and the magnetic behavior of these samples to the MOD2 samples that previously showed extraordinary exchange bias properties (McEnroe et al 2007a), and investigate further the nature of these magnetic minerals.

  8. Hot electron diagnostics using X-rays and Cerenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, J.; Fill, E.; Habs, D.; Pretzler, G.; Witte, K.

    2004-07-01

    The propagation of laser-generated hot electrons through matter and across narrow vacuum gaps is studied. We use the ATLAS titanium sapphire laser of Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik to irradiate aluminum and copper foils at intensities of up to 1019 W/cm2, generating electrons with temperatures in the megaelectron volt range. After propagating through the target the electrons are detected by means of visible Cerenkov radiation generated in a dielectric or hard X-rays emitted from an X-ray “fluor.” These diagnostics allow the electrons to be characterized with respect to their energy, number, and directionality. We also investigate the propagation of the hot electrons across narrow vacuum gaps, with a width ranging from 500 [mu]m down to 50 [mu]m. The effect of self-generated fields in preventing electrons from crossing the gap is demonstrated. Implications of these experiments with respect to fast ignitor physics, developing optics for fourth-generation light sources and X-ray lasers are indicated.

  9. Electron radiography

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  10. An empirical method for deriving RBE values associated with electrons, photons and radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, M; Puskin, J; Hertel, N; Eckerman, K

    2015-12-01

    There is substantial evidence to justify using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of >1 for low-energy electrons and photons. But, in the field of radiation protection, radiation associated with low linear energy transfer has been assigned a radiation weighting factor wR of 1. This value may be suitable for radiation protection but, for risk considerations, it is important to evaluate the potential elevated biological effectiveness of radiation to improve the quality of risk estimates. RBE values between 2 and 3 for tritium are implied by several experimental measurements. Additionally, elevated RBE values have been found for other similar low-energy radiation sources. In this work, RBE values are derived for electrons based upon the fractional deposition of absorbed dose of energies less than a few kiloelectron volts. Using this empirical method, RBE values were also derived for monoenergetic photons and 1070 radionuclides from ICRP Publication 107 for which photons and electrons are the primary emissions. PMID:25636403

  11. The dynamics of highly excited electronic systems: Applications of the electron force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Julius T.; Goddard, William A.

    2009-12-01

    Highly excited heterogeneous complex materials are essential elements of important processes, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to semiconductor device fabrication. Understanding the dynamics of these systems has been challenging because of the difficulty in extracting mechanistic information from either experiment or theory. We describe here the electron force field (eFF) approximation to quantum mechanics which provides a practical approach to simulating the dynamics of such systems. eFF includes all the normal electrostatic interactions between electrons and nuclei and the normal quantum mechanical description of kinetic energy for the electrons, but contains two severe approximations: first, the individual electrons are represented as floating Gaussian wave packets whose position and size respond instantaneously to various forces during the dynamics; and second, these wave packets are combined into a many-body wave function as a Hartree product without explicit antisymmetrization. The Pauli principle is accounted for by adding an extra spin-dependent term to the Hamiltonian. These approximations are a logical extension of existing approaches to simulate the dynamics of fermions, which we review. In this paper, we discuss the details of the equations of motion and potentials that form eFF, and evaluate the ability of eFF to describe ground-state systems containing covalent, ionic, multicenter, and/or metallic bonds. We also summarize two eFF calculations previously reported on electronically excited systems: (1) the thermodynamics of hydrogen compressed up to ten times liquid density and heated up to 200 000 K; and (2) the dynamics of Auger fragmentation in a diamond nanoparticle, where hundreds of electron volts of excitation energy are dissipated over tens of femtoseconds. These cases represent the first steps toward using eFF to model highly excited electronic processes in complex materials.

  12. The dynamics of highly excited electronic systems: applications of the electron force field.

    PubMed

    Su, Julius T; Goddard, William A

    2009-12-28

    Highly excited heterogeneous complex materials are essential elements of important processes, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to semiconductor device fabrication. Understanding the dynamics of these systems has been challenging because of the difficulty in extracting mechanistic information from either experiment or theory. We describe here the electron force field (eFF) approximation to quantum mechanics which provides a practical approach to simulating the dynamics of such systems. eFF includes all the normal electrostatic interactions between electrons and nuclei and the normal quantum mechanical description of kinetic energy for the electrons, but contains two severe approximations: first, the individual electrons are represented as floating Gaussian wave packets whose position and size respond instantaneously to various forces during the dynamics; and second, these wave packets are combined into a many-body wave function as a Hartree product without explicit antisymmetrization. The Pauli principle is accounted for by adding an extra spin-dependent term to the Hamiltonian. These approximations are a logical extension of existing approaches to simulate the dynamics of fermions, which we review. In this paper, we discuss the details of the equations of motion and potentials that form eFF, and evaluate the ability of eFF to describe ground-state systems containing covalent, ionic, multicenter, and/or metallic bonds. We also summarize two eFF calculations previously reported on electronically excited systems: (1) the thermodynamics of hydrogen compressed up to ten times liquid density and heated up to 200,000 K; and (2) the dynamics of Auger fragmentation in a diamond nanoparticle, where hundreds of electron volts of excitation energy are dissipated over tens of femtoseconds. These cases represent the first steps toward using eFF to model highly excited electronic processes in complex materials. PMID:20059073

  13. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the

  14. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  15. A One Billion Year Martian Climate Model: The Importance of Seasonally Resolved Polar Caps and the Role of Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. C.; Leovy, C. B.; Quinn, T. R.; Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Wind deflation and deposition are powerful agents of surface change in the present Mars climate regime. Recent studies indicate that, while the distribution of regions of potential deflation (or erosion) and deposition is remarkably insensitive to changes in orbital parameters (obliquity, timing of perihelion passage, etc.), rates of aeolian surface modification may be highly sensitive to these parameters even if the atmospheric mass remains constant. But previous work suggested the atmospheric mass is likely to be sensitive to obliquity, especially if a significant mass of carbon dioxide can be stored in the regolith or deposited in the form of massive polar caps. Deflation and erosion are highly sensitive to surface pressure, so feedback between orbit variations and surface pressure can greatly enhance the sensitivity of aeolian modification rates to orbital parameters. We used statistics derived from a 1 Gyr orbital integration of the spin axis of Mars, coupled with 3D general circulation models (GCMs) at a variety of orbital conditions and pressures, to explore this feedback. We also employed a seasonally resolved 1D energy balance model to illuminate the gross characteristics of the longterm atmospheric evolution, wind erosion and deposition over one billion years. We find that seasonal polar cycles have a critical influence on the ability for the regolith to release CO2 at high obliquities, and find that the atmospheric CO2 actually decreases at high obliquities due to the cooling effect of polar deposits at latitudes where seasonal caps form. At low obliquity, the formation of massive, permanent polar caps depends critically on the values of the frost albedo, A(sub frost), and frost emissivity, E(sub frost). Using our 1D model with values of A(sub frost) = 0.67 and E(sub frost) = 0.55, matched to the NASA Ames GCM results, we find that permanent caps only form at low obliquities (< 10 degrees). Thus, contrary to expectations, the Martian atmospheric pressure is remarkable static over time, and decreases both at high and low obliquity. Also, from our one billion year orbital model, we present new results on the fraction of time Mars is expected to experience periods of high and low obliquity. Finally, using GCM runs at a variety of pressures, we examine the likely role of wind erosion under an early more massive Martian atmosphere.

  16. Ambient Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2012-10-01

    We report the recent research progress and future prospects of flexible and printed electronics, focusing on molecular electronic material-based thin-film transistors, which are expected to usher in a new era of electronics.

  17. Electronic Prescribing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do you prescribe electronically?” For more information about electronic prescribing, call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633- ... to the pharmacy, and my prescription was ready. Electronic eRx Prescribing CMS Product No. 11382 Revised July ...

  18. Electron energy boosting in laser-wake-field acceleration with external magnetic field Bapprox1 T and laser prepulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Mizuta, Yoshio; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2010-03-22

    Hundred-mega-electron-volt electron beams with quasi-monoenergetic distribution, and a transverse geometrical emittance as small as approx0.02 pi mm mrad are generated by low power (7 TW, 45 fs) laser pulses tightly focused in helium gas jets in an external static magnetic field, Bapprox1 T. Generation of monoenergetic beams strongly correlates with appearance of a straight, at least 2 mm length plasma channel in a short time before the main laser pulse and with the energy of copropagating picosecond pedestal pulses (PPP). For a moderate energy PPP, the multiple or staged electron self-injection in the channel gives several narrow peaks in the electron energy distribution.

  19. Developing a Billion Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergen, Christopher; Rego, Lyndon; Wright, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Intentionally developing the leadership capacity of all students is a necessary requirement for schools around the world. The Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, N.C., has been at the center of this work and presents three schools as examples: Ravenscroft School in Raleigh, N.C., the African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, South…

  20. Developing a Billion Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergen, Christopher; Rego, Lyndon; Wright, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Intentionally developing the leadership capacity of all students is a necessary requirement for schools around the world. The Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, N.C., has been at the center of this work and presents three schools as examples: Ravenscroft School in Raleigh, N.C., the African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, South

  1. Electrons, Electronic Publishing, and Electronic Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownrigg, Edwin B.; Lynch, Clifford A.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a perspective on electronic publishing by distinguishing between "Newtonian" publishing and "quantum-mechanical" publishing. Highlights include media and publishing, works delivered through electronic media, electronic publishing and the printed word, management of intellectual property, and recent copyright-law issues and their…

  2. Sulfur isotopes of organic matter preserved in 3.45-billion-year-old stromatolites reveal microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bontognali, Tomaso R R; Sessions, Alex L; Allwood, Abigail C; Fischer, Woodward W; Grotzinger, John P; Summons, Roger E; Eiler, John M

    2012-09-18

    The 3.45-billion-year-old Strelley Pool Formation of Western Australia preserves stromatolites that are considered among the oldest evidence for life on Earth. In places of exceptional preservation, these stromatolites contain laminae rich in organic carbon, interpreted as the fossil remains of ancient microbial mats. To better understand the biogeochemistry of these rocks, we performed microscale in situ sulfur isotope measurements of the preserved organic sulfur, including both Δ(33)S and . This approach allows us to tie physiological inference from isotope ratios directly to fossil biomass, providing a means to understand sulfur metabolism that is complimentary to, and independent from, inorganic proxies (e.g., pyrite). Δ(33)S values of the kerogen reveal mass-anomalous fractionations expected of the Archean sulfur cycle, whereas values show large fractionations at very small spatial scales, including values below -15‰. We interpret these isotopic patterns as recording the process of sulfurization of organic matter by H(2)S in heterogeneous mat pore-waters influenced by respiratory S metabolism. Positive Δ(33)S anomalies suggest that disproportionation of elemental sulfur would have been a prominent microbial process in these communities. PMID:22949693

  3. Impacts of a 32-billion-gallon bioenergy landscape on land and fossil fuel use in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudiburg, Tara W.; Wang, Weiwei; Khanna, Madhu; Long, Stephen P.; Dwivedi, Puneet; Parton, William J.; Hartman, Melannie; Delucia, Evan H.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable transportation biofuels may require considerable changes in land use to meet mandated targets. Understanding the possible impact of different policies on land use and greenhouse gas emissions has typically proceeded by exploring either ecosystem or economic modelling. Here we integrate such models to assess the potential for the US Renewable Fuel Standard to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector through the use of cellulosic biofuels. We find that 2022 US emissions are decreased by 7.0 ± 2.5% largely through gasoline displacement and soil carbon storage by perennial grasses. If the Renewable Fuel Standard is accompanied by a cellulosic biofuel tax credit, these emissions could be reduced by 12.3 ± 3.4%. Our integrated approach indicates that transitioning to cellulosic biofuels can meet a 32-billion-gallon Renewable Fuel Standard target with negligible effects on food crop production, while reducing fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions. However, emissions savings are lower than previous estimates that did not account for economic constraints.

  4. Small increases to employer premiums could shift millions of people to the exchanges and add billions to federal outlays.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel R; Luan, Anna; Wang, Louise L; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2013-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act will expand insurance coverage to more than twenty-five million Americans, partly through subsidized private insurance available from newly created health insurance exchanges for people with incomes of 133-400 percent of the federal poverty level. The act will alter the financial incentive structure for employers and influence their decisions on whether or not to offer their employees coverage. These decisions, in turn, will affect federal outlays and revenues through several mechanisms. We model the sensitivity of federal costs for the insurance exchange coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act using the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data set. We assess revenues and subsidy outlays for premiums and cost sharing for individuals purchasing private insurance through exchanges. Our findings show that changing theoretical premium contribution levels by just $100 could induce 2.25 million individuals to transition to exchanges and increase federal outlays by $6.7 billion. Policy makers and analysts should pay especially careful attention to participation rates as the act's implementation continues. PMID:24019356

  5. Decimetre-scale multicellular eukaryotes from the 1.56-billion-year-old Gaoyuzhuang Formation in North China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shixing; Zhu, Maoyan; Knoll, Andrew H; Yin, Zongjun; Zhao, Fangchen; Sun, Shufen; Qu, Yuangao; Shi, Min; Liu, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Fossils of macroscopic eukaryotes are rarely older than the Ediacaran Period (635-541 million years (Myr)), and their interpretation remains controversial. Here, we report the discovery of macroscopic fossils from the 1,560-Myr-old Gaoyuzhuang Formation, Yanshan area, North China, that exhibit both large size and regular morphology. Preserved as carbonaceous compressions, the Gaoyuzhuang fossils have statistically regular linear to lanceolate shapes up to 30 cm long and nearly 8 cm wide, suggesting that the Gaoyuzhuang fossils record benthic multicellular eukaryotes of unprecedentedly large size. Syngenetic fragments showing closely packed ∼10 μm cells arranged in a thick sheet further reinforce the interpretation. Comparisons with living thalloid organisms suggest that these organisms were photosynthetic, although their phylogenetic placement within the Eukarya remains uncertain. The new fossils provide the strongest evidence yet that multicellular eukaryotes with decimetric dimensions and a regular developmental program populated the marine biosphere at least a billion years before the Cambrian Explosion. PMID:27186667

  6. Microfabricated gas chromatograph for the selective determination of trichloroethylene vapor at sub-parts-per-billion concentrations in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyu; Chang, Hungwei; Zellers, Edward T

    2011-09-15

    A complete field-deployable microfabricated gas chromatograph (?GC) is described, and its adaptation to the analysis of low- and subparts-per-billion (ppb) concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) vapors in complex mixtures is demonstrated through laboratory testing. The specific application being addressed concerns the problem of indoor air contamination by TCE vapor intrusion. The ?GC prototype employs a microfabricated focuser, dual microfabricated separation columns, and a microsensor array. These are interfaced to a nonmicrofabricated front-end pretrap and high-volume sampler module to reduce analysis time and limits of detection (LOD). Selective preconcentration and focusing are coupled with rapid chromatographic separation and multisensor detection for the determination of TCE in the presence of up to 45 interferences. Autonomous operation is possible via a laptop computer. Preconcentration factors as high as 500?000 are achieved. Sensitivities are constant over the range of captured TCE masses tested (i.e., 9-390 ng), and TCE is measured in a test atmosphere at 120 parts-per-trillion (ppt), with a projected LOD of 40 ppt (4.2 ng captured, 20 L sample) and a maximum sampling + analytical cycle time of 36 min. Short- and medium-term (1 month) variations in retention time, absolute responses, and response patterns are within acceptable limits. PMID:21859085

  7. Survival of LLSVPs for billions of years in a vigorously convecting mantle: Replenishment and destruction of chemical anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Steinberger, Bernhard; Dabrowski, Marcin; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-05-01

    We study segregation of the subducted oceanic crust (OC) at the core-mantle boundary and its ability to accumulate and form large thermochemical piles (such as the seismically observed Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs)). Our high-resolution numerical simulations of thermochemical mantle convection suggest that the longevity of LLSVPs for up to three billion years, and possibly longer, can be ensured by a balance in the rate of segregation of high-density OC material to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the rate of its entrainment away from the CMB by mantle upwellings. For a range of parameters tested in this study, a large-scale compositional anomaly forms at the CMB, similar in shape and size to the LLSVPs. Neutrally buoyant thermochemical piles formed by mechanical stirringwhere thermally induced negative density anomaly is balanced by the presence of a fraction of dense anomalous materialbest resemble the geometry of LLSVPs. Such neutrally buoyant piles tend to emerge and survive for at least 3 Gyr in simulations with quite different parameters. We conclude that for a plausible range of values of density anomaly of OC material in the lower mantleit is likely that it segregates to the CMB, gets mechanically mixed with the ambient material, and forms neutrally buoyant large-scale compositional anomalies similar in shape to the LLSVPs.

  8. Global resurfacing of Mercury 4.0-4.1 billion years ago by heavy bombardment and volcanism.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Simone; Chapman, Clark R; Fassett, Caleb I; Head, James W; Bottke, W F; Strom, Robert G

    2013-07-01

    The most heavily cratered terrains on Mercury have been estimated to be about 4 billion years (Gyr) old, but this was based on images of only about 45 per cent of the surface; even older regions could have existed in the unobserved portion. These terrains have a lower density of craters less than 100 km in diameter than does the Moon, an observation attributed to preferential resurfacing on Mercury. Here we report global crater statistics of Mercury's most heavily cratered terrains on the entire surface. Applying a recent model for early lunar crater chronology and an updated dynamical extrapolation to Mercury, we find that the oldest surfaces were emplaced just after the start of the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) about 4.0-4.1 Gyr ago. Mercury's global record of large impact basins, which has hitherto not been dated, yields a similar surface age. This agreement implies that resurfacing was global and was due to volcanism, as previously suggested. This activity ended during the tail of the LHB, within about 300-400 million years after the emplacement of the oldest terrains on Mercury. These findings suggest that persistent volcanism could have been aided by the surge of basin-scale impacts during this bombardment. PMID:23823793

  9. A large population of galaxies 9 to 12 billion years back in the history of the Universe.

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, O; Paltani, S; Arnouts, S; Charlot, S; Foucaud, S; Ilbert, O; McCracken, H J; Zamorani, G; Bottini, D; Garilli, B; Le Brun, V; Maccagni, D; Picat, J P; Scaramella, R; Scodeggio, M; Tresse, L; Vettolani, G; Zanichelli, A; Adami, C; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Cappi, A; Ciliegi, P; Contini, T; Franzetti, P; Gavignaud, I; Guzzo, L; Iovino, A; Marano, B; Marinoni, C; Mazure, A; Meneux, B; Merighi, R; Pellò, R; Pollo, A; Pozzetti, L; Radovich, M; Zucca, E; Arnaboldi, M; Bondi, M; Bongiorno, A; Busarello, G; Gregorini, L; Lamareille, F; Mathez, G; Mellier, Y; Merluzzi, P; Ripepi, V; Rizzo, D

    2005-09-22

    To understand the evolution of galaxies, we need to know as accurately as possible how many galaxies were present in the Universe at different epochs. Galaxies in the young Universe have hitherto mainly been identified using their expected optical colours, but this leaves open the possibility that a significant population remains undetected because their colours are the result of a complex mix of stars, gas, dust or active galactic nuclei. Here we report the results of a flux-limited I-band survey of galaxies at look-back times of 9 to 12 billion years. We find 970 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts between 1.4 and 5. This population is 1.6 to 6.2 times larger than previous estimates, with the difference increasing towards brighter magnitudes. Strong ultraviolet continua (in the rest frame of the galaxies) indicate vigorous star formation rates of more than 10-100 solar masses per year. As a consequence, the cosmic star formation rate representing the volume-averaged production of stars is higher than previously measured at redshifts of 3 to 4. PMID:16177783

  10. Multi million-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cavitation-Induced Damage on a Silica Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Cavitation bubble collapse causes severe damage to materials. For example, cavitation erosion is a major threat to the safety of nuclear power plants. The cavitation bubbles may also be utilized for preventing stress corrosion cracking with water jet peening technology. We have performed multi million-to-billion atoms molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the shock-induced cavitation damage mechanism on an amorphous silica slab in water. The system consists of a 60nm thick silica slab immersed in water in an MD box of dimension 285 x 200 x 200 nm3. A nanobubble is created by removing water molecules within a sphere of radius 100 nm. To apply a planar shock, we assign a uniform particle velocity vp on the entire system towards a planar momentum mirror. We have performed the simulation with two kinds of bubbles, an empty bubble and a bubble filled with inert gas. The simulation results reveal nanojet formation during bubble collapse causing damage on the silica surface; however, the damage was significantly reduced in the case of the filled bubble. We will discuss the effect of the presence of inter gas inside the nanobubble on the pressure distribution, the extent of damage, and collapse behavior corresponding the shock front.

  11. Sulfur isotopes of organic matter preserved in 3.45-billion-year-old stromatolites reveal microbial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Sessions, Alex L.; Allwood, Abigail C.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Grotzinger, John P.; Summons, Roger E.; Eiler, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The 3.45-billion-year-old Strelley Pool Formation of Western Australia preserves stromatolites that are considered among the oldest evidence for life on Earth. In places of exceptional preservation, these stromatolites contain laminae rich in organic carbon, interpreted as the fossil remains of ancient microbial mats. To better understand the biogeochemistry of these rocks, we performed microscale in situ sulfur isotope measurements of the preserved organic sulfur, including both Δ33S and . This approach allows us to tie physiological inference from isotope ratios directly to fossil biomass, providing a means to understand sulfur metabolism that is complimentary to, and independent from, inorganic proxies (e.g., pyrite). Δ33S values of the kerogen reveal mass-anomalous fractionations expected of the Archean sulfur cycle, whereas values show large fractionations at very small spatial scales, including values below -15‰. We interpret these isotopic patterns as recording the process of sulfurization of organic matter by H2S in heterogeneous mat pore-waters influenced by respiratory S metabolism. Positive Δ33S anomalies suggest that disproportionation of elemental sulfur would have been a prominent microbial process in these communities. PMID:22949693

  12. The controversial “Cambrian” fossils of the Vindhyan are real but more than a billion years older

    PubMed Central

    Bengtson, Stefan; Belivanova, Veneta; Rasmussen, Birger; Whitehouse, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The age of the Vindhyan sedimentary basin in central India is controversial, because geochronology indicating early Proterozoic ages clashes with reports of Cambrian fossils. We present here an integrated paleontologic–geochronologic investigation to resolve this conundrum. New sampling of Lower Vindhyan phosphoritic stromatolitic dolomites from the northern flank of the Vindhyans confirms the presence of fossils most closely resembling those found elsewhere in Cambrian deposits: annulated tubes, embryo-like globules with polygonal surface pattern, and filamentous and coccoidal microbial fabrics similar to Girvanella and Renalcis. None of the fossils, however, can be ascribed to uniquely Cambrian or Ediacaran taxa. Indeed, the embryo-like globules are not interpreted as fossils at all but as former gas bubbles trapped in mucus-rich cyanobacterial mats. Direct dating of the same fossiliferous phosphorite yielded a Pb–Pb isochron of 1,650 ± 89 (2σ) million years ago, confirming the Paleoproterozoic age of the fossils. New U–Pb geochronology of zircons from tuffaceous mudrocks in the Lower Vindhyan Porcellanite Formation on the southern flank of the Vindhyans give comparable ages. The Vindhyan phosphorites provide a window of 3-dimensionally preserved Paleoproterozoic fossils resembling filamentous and coccoidal cyanobacteria and filamentous eukaryotic algae, as well as problematic forms. Like Neoproterozoic phosphorites a billion years later, the Vindhyan deposits offer important new insights into the nature and diversity of life, and in particular, the early evolution of multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:19416859

  13. National expenditure for false-positive mammograms and breast cancer overdiagnoses estimated at $4 billion a year.

    PubMed

    Ong, Mei-Sing; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2015-04-01

    Populationwide mammography screening has been associated with a substantial rise in false-positive mammography findings and breast cancer overdiagnosis. However, there is a lack of current data on the associated costs in the United States. We present costs due to false-positive mammograms and breast cancer overdiagnoses among women ages 40-59, based on expenditure data from a major US health care insurance plan for 702,154 women in the years 2011-13. The average expenditures for each false-positive mammogram, invasive breast cancer, and ductal carcinoma in situ in the twelve months following diagnosis were $852, $51,837 and $12,369, respectively. This translates to a national cost of $4 billion each year. The costs associated with false-positive mammograms and breast cancer overdiagnoses appear to be much higher than previously documented. Screening has the potential to save lives. However, the economic impact of false-positive mammography results and breast cancer overdiagnoses must be considered in the debate about the appropriate populations for screening. PMID:25847639

  14. New Schools, Overcrowding Relief, and Achievement Gains in Los Angeles--Strong Returns from a $19.5 Billion Investment. Policy Brief 12-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, William; Coghlan, Erin; Fuller, Bruce; Dauter, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to relieve overcrowded schools operating on multiple tracks, the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) has invested more than $19 billion to build 130 new facilities over the past decade. District leaders asked researchers at Berkeley to estimate the achievement effects of this massive initiative--benefits that may stem from entering…

  15. STABILITY OF PARTS-PER-BILLION HAZARDOUS ORGANIC CYLINDER GASES AND PERFORMANCE AUDIT RESULTS OF SOURCE TEST AND AMBIENT AIR MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS. STATUS REPORT 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    A repository of 22 gaseous organic compounds at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels in compressed gas cylinders has been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The primary objectives of this ongoing project are: (1) to provide accurate gas mixtures to EPA, stat...

  16. STABILITY OF PARTS-PER-BILLION HAZARDOUS ORGANIC CYLINDER GASES AND PERFORMANCE AUDIT RESULTS OF SOURCE TEST AND AMBIENT AIR MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS. STATUS REPORT 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    A repository of 14 gaseous organic compounds at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels in compressed gas cylinders has been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The primary objectives of this on-going project are: (1) to provide accurate gas mixtures to EPA, sta...

  17. A Portable Electronic Nose For Hydrazine and Monomethyl Hydrazine Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Linnell, Bruce R.; Peterson, Barbara V.; Brooks, Kathy B.; Griffin, Tim P.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Program and military use large quantities Hydrazine (Hz) and monomethyl hydrazine (MMI-I) as rocket propellant. These substances are very toxic and are suspected human carcinogens. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienist set the threshold limit value to be 10 parts per billion (ppb). Current off-the-shelf portable instruments require 10 to 20 minutes of exposure to detect 10 ppb concentration. This shortcofriing is not acceptable for many operations. A new prototype instrument using a gas sensor array and pattern recognition software technology (i.e., an electronic nose) has demonstrated the ability to identify either Hz or MM}{ and quantify their concentrations at 10 parts per billion in 90 seconds. This paper describes the design of the portable electronic nose (e-nose) instrument, test equipment setup, test protocol, pattern recognition algorithm, concentration estimation method, and laboratory test results.

  18. Convoy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of the production and of the transport of convoy electrons through solids are reviewed. Similarities and differences to cusp electron emission in binary ion-atom collisions and to transport of free'' electrons through solids are highlighted. We also discuss recent observations of convoy electron emission in ion-surface collisions at small glancing angles. 36 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Electron acceleration by a tightly focused Hermite-Gaussian beam: higher-order corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Zhiguo; Yang Dangxiao; Lue Baida

    2008-03-15

    Taking the TEM{sub 1,0}-mode Hermite-Gaussian (H-G) beam as a numerical calculation example, and based on the method of the perturbation series expansion, the higher-order field corrections of H-G beams are derived and used to study the electron acceleration by a tightly focused H-G beam in vacuum. For the case of the off-axis injection the field corrections to the terms of order f{sup 3} (f=1/kw{sub 0}, k and w{sub 0} being the wavenumber and waist width, respectively) are considered, and for the case of the on-axis injection the contributions of the terms of higher orders are negligible. By a suitable optimization of injection parameters the energy gain in the giga-electron-volt regime can be achieved.

  20. Photographer : JPL Range : 4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Photographer : JPL Range : 4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This color image of the Sun, Earth, and Venus is one of the first, and maybe, only images that show are solar system from such a vantage point. The image is a portion of a wide angle image containing the sun and the region of space where the Earth and Venus were at the time, with narrow angle cameras centered on each planet. The wide angle was taken with the cameras darkest filter, a methane absorption band, and the shortest possible exposure, one two-hundredth of a second, to avoid saturating the camera's vidicon tube with scattered sunlight. The sun is not large in the sky, as seen from Voyager's perpective at the edge of the solar system. Yet, it is still 8xs brighter than the brightest star in Earth's sky, Sirius. The image of the sun you see is far larger than the actual dimension of the solar disk. The result of the brightness is a bright burned out image with multiple reflections from the optics of the camera. The rays around th sun are a diffraction pattern of the calibration lamp which is mounted in front of the wide angle lens. the 2 narrow angle frames containing the images of the Earth and Venus have been digitally mosaicked into the wide angle image at the appropriate scale. These images were taken through three color filters and recombined to produce the color image. The violet, green, and blue filters used , as well as exposure times of .72,.48, and .72 for Earth, and .36, .24, and .36 for Venus.The images also show long linear streaks resulting from scatering of sulight off parts of the camera and its shade.

  1. Evaluation testing of a portable vapor detector for Part-Per-Billion (PPB) level UDMH and N2H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Dan; Lueck, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    Trace level detection of hydrazine (N2H4), monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) has been receiving increased attention over the past several years. In May 1995 the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) lowered their acceptable threshold limit value (TLV) from 100 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 10 ppb. Several types of ppb-level detectors are being developed by the United States Air Force (USAF) Space and Missile Systems Center (SMSC). A breadboard version of a portable, lightweight hydrazine detection sensor was developed and produced by Giner Corp. for the USAF. This sensor was designed for ppb level UDMH and N2H4 vapor detection in near real-time. This instrument employs electrochemical sensing, utilizing a three electrode cell with an anion-exchange polymer electrolyte membrane as the only electrolyte in the system. The sensing, counter and reference electrodes are bonded to the membrane forming a single component. The only liquid required to maintain the sensor is deionized water which hydrates the membrane. At the request of the USAF SMSC, independent testing and evaluation of the breadboard instrument was performed at NASA's Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) for response to ppb-level N2H4 and UDMH and MMH. The TVDL, located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the unique ability to generate calibrated sample vapor streams of N2H4, UDMH, and MMH over a range from less than 10 ppb to thousands of parts per million (ppm) with full environmental control of relative humidity (0-90%) and temperature (0-50 C). The TVDL routinely performs these types of tests. Referenced sensors were subjected to extensive testing, including precision, linearity, response/recovery times, zero and span drift, humidity and temperature effects as well as ammonia interference. Results of these tests and general operation characteristics are reported.

  2. Air density 2.7 billion years ago limited to less than twice modern levels by fossil raindrop imprints.

    PubMed

    Som, Sanjoy M; Catling, David C; Harnmeijer, Jelte P; Polivka, Peter M; Buick, Roger

    2012-04-19

    According to the 'Faint Young Sun' paradox, during the late Archaean eon a Sun approximately 20% dimmer warmed the early Earth such that it had liquid water and a clement climate. Explanations for this phenomenon have invoked a denser atmosphere that provided warmth by nitrogen pressure broadening or enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations. Such solutions are allowed by geochemical studies and numerical investigations that place approximate concentration limits on Archaean atmospheric gases, including methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen. But no field data constraining ground-level air density and barometric pressure have been reported, leaving the plausibility of these various hypotheses in doubt. Here we show that raindrop imprints in tuffs of the Ventersdorp Supergroup, South Africa, constrain surface air density 2.7 billion years ago to less than twice modern levels. We interpret the raindrop fossils using experiments in which water droplets of known size fall at terminal velocity into fresh and weathered volcanic ash, thus defining a relationship between imprint size and raindrop impact momentum. Fragmentation following raindrop flattening limits raindrop size to a maximum value independent of air density, whereas raindrop terminal velocity varies as the inverse of the square root of air density. If the Archaean raindrops reached the modern maximum measured size, air density must have been less than 2.3 kg m(-3), compared to today's 1.2 kg m(-3), but because such drops rarely occur, air density was more probably below 1.3 kg m(-3). The upper estimate for air density renders the pressure broadening explanation possible, but it is improbable under the likely lower estimates. Our results also disallow the extreme CO(2) levels required for hot Archaean climates. PMID:22456703

  3. Global resurfacing of Mercury 4.0-4.1 billion years ago by heavy bombardment and volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Simone; Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Bottke, W. F.; Strom, R. G.

    2013-10-01

    Early work, based on Mariner 10 data, estimated that the most heavily cratered terrains on Mercury were about 4 billion years (Gyr) old. This conclusion was based on images of only about 45 per cent of the surface; even older regions could have existed in the unobserved portion. The most heavily cratered terrains have a lower density of craters less than 100 km in diameter than does the Moon, an observation attributed to preferential resurfacing on Mercury. In this work, we present global crater statistics of Mercury’s most heavily cratered terrains on the entire surface. Craters larger than 25 km diameter were measured on a global mosaic with a resolution of 500 meters per pixel based on MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) images obtained during its first year orbiting Mercury. Applying a recent model for early lunar crater chronology and an updated dynamical extrapolation to Mercury, we find that the oldest surfaces were emplaced just after the start of the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) about 4.0-4.1 Gyr ago. Mercury’s global record of large impact basins, which has hitherto not been dated, yields a similar surface age. This agreement implies that resurfacing was global and was due to volcanism, as previously suggested. This activity ended during the tail of the LHB, within about 300-400 million years after the emplacement of the oldest terrains on Mercury. These findings suggest that persistent volcanism could have been aided by the surge of basin-scale impacts during this bombardment.

  4. Defence electronics industry profile, 1990-1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The defense electronics industry profiled in this review comprises an estimated 150 Canadian companies that develop, manufacture, and repair radio and communications equipment, radars for surveillance and navigation, air traffic control systems, acoustic and infrared sensors, computers for navigation and fire control, signal processors and display units, special-purpose electronic components, and systems engineering and associated software. Canadian defense electronics companies generally serve market niches and end users of their products are limited to the military, government agencies, or commercial airlines. Geographically, the industry is concentrated in Ontario and Quebec, where about 91 percent of the industry's production and employment is found. In 1989, the estimated revenue of the industry was $2.36 billion, and exports totalled an estimated $1.4 billion. Strengths and weaknesses of the industry are discussed in terms of such factors as the relatively small size of Canadian companies, the ability of Canadian firms to access research and development opportunities and export markets in the United States, the dependence on foreign-made components, and international competition.

  5. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  6. Deposition of 1.88-billion-year-old iron formations as a consequence of rapid crustal growth.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Birger; Fletcher, Ian R; Bekker, Andrey; Muhling, Janet R; Gregory, Courtney J; Thorne, Alan M

    2012-04-26

    Iron formations are chemical sedimentary rocks comprising layers of iron-rich and silica-rich minerals whose deposition requires anoxic and iron-rich (ferruginous) sea water. Their demise after the rise in atmospheric oxygen by 2.32 billion years (Gyr) ago has been attributed to the removal of dissolved iron through progressive oxidation or sulphidation of the deep ocean. Therefore, a sudden return of voluminous iron formations nearly 500 million years later poses an apparent conundrum. Most late Palaeoproterozoic iron formations are about 1.88 Gyr old and occur in the Superior region of North America. Major iron formations are also preserved in Australia, but these were apparently deposited after the transition to a sulphidic ocean at 1.84 Gyr ago that should have terminated iron formation deposition, implying that they reflect local marine conditions. Here we date zircons in tuff layers to show that iron formations in the Frere Formation of Western Australia are about 1.88 Gyr old, indicating that the deposition of iron formations from two disparate cratons was coeval and probably reflects global ocean chemistry. The sudden reappearance of major iron formations at 1.88 Gyr ago--contemporaneous with peaks in global mafic-ultramafic magmatism, juvenile continental and oceanic crust formation, mantle depletion and volcanogenic massive sulphide formation--suggests deposition of iron formations as a consequence of major mantle activity and rapid crustal growth. Our findings support the idea that enhanced submarine volcanism and hydrothermal activity linked to a peak in mantle melting released large volumes of ferrous iron and other reductants that overwhelmed the sulphate and oxygen reservoirs of the ocean, decoupling atmospheric and seawater redox states, and causing the return of widespread ferruginous conditions. Iron formations formed on clastic-starved coastal shelves where dissolved iron upwelled and mixed with oxygenated surface water. The disappearance of iron formations after this event may reflect waning mafic-ultramafic magmatism and a diminished flux of hydrothermal iron relative to seawater oxidants. PMID:22538613

  7. Multimillion-to-billion atom molecular dynamics simulations of deformation, damage, nanoindentation, and fracture in silica glass and energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun

    Multimillion-to-billion molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to study atomistic mechanisms of deformation, damage and failure in silica glass and energetic materials. The simulations are based on experimentally validated interatomic potentials and employ highly efficiently algorithms for parallel architectures. The onset of void-void interaction is investigated by performing MD simulations of amorphous silica under hydrostatic tension. The simulations reveal that nanocavities in amorphous silica (a-SiO2), which are linked to Si-O rings, play an important role in void-void coalescence and inter-void ligament failure. Nanocracks nucleated by the migration of three-fold coordinated Si and nonbridging O on ---Si-O-Si-O--- rings are observed in the multimillion MD simulations of a single void in amorphous silica subjected to a high shear rate. With the increase in shear strain, nanocracks appear on void surfaces and the voids deform into a threadlike structure. At a strain of 40%, the voids break into fragments. The results are similar to experimental and theoretical studies of bubble deformation and breakup under shear. Defects such as voids are known to be important in the detonation of energetic materials. To investigate deformation of a void in an RDX crystal under high shear rate, we have performed million-atom reactive force field (ReaxFF) MD simulations. Simulations reveal that without breaking a bond, the excess strain energy leads to translational and rotational motion of RDX molecules. At a strain of 13%, molecules with high kinetic energy collapse inward without affecting the rest of the system. MD simulations of nanoindentation in amorphous silica reveal migration of defects and their recombination in the densified plastic region under and the material pileup region around the indenter. The plastic flow of silica glass is related to the defect transport mechanism where a defect migrates a considerable distance via a chain of bond-switching events[44]. We obtained a hardness value of 7.2 GPa using a sharp indenter and 8.0 GPa for a slightly blunt indenter. We have also performed nanoindentation simulation on a (100) alpha-RDX crystal surface using ReaxFF. Simulation reveals localized melting and decomposition of RDX molecular fragments. We have found a distinct (210) plane boundary, where molecules above the (210) plane have displaced dramatically and molecules below the plane remain intact. Simulation also shows the fragmented RDX molecules diffuse from the substrate and walk on the indenter surface.

  8. Survival of LLSVPs for Billions of Years in a Vigorously Convecting Mantle: Replenishment and Destruction of Chemical Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Steinberger, Bernhard; Dabrowski, Marcin; Sobolev, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    We study segregation of the subducted oceanic crust (OC) at the core mantle boundary, its ability to accumulate and form large-scale compositional anomaly (such as the LLSVPs), and its susceptibility to get entrained by the hot rising plumes. Based on the results from our high-resolution numerical simulations of 2D thermochemical mantle convection, we propose that the longevity of LLSVPs for up to three billion years, and possibly longer, can be ensured by a balance in the rate of segregation of high-density OC-material to the CMB, and the rate of its entrainment away from the CMB by mantle upwellings. For a range of parameters tested in this study, a large-scale compositional anomaly forms at the CMB, which is similar in shape and size to the seismically observed LLSVPs - high topography of over 1000 km, steep edges, and occupying a few % (~ 2%) of the total mantle volume. In our simulations, neutrally buoyant thermochemical piles - those in which the thermally induced negative density anomaly is balanced by the presence of a fraction of compositionally anomalous high density material - best resemble the geometry of LLSVPs. Such neutrally buoyant piles tend to emerge and survive for a long time (over 3Gyr) in simulations with quite different parameters. For moderate compositional density anomaly of oceanic crust, the neutrally buoyant piles form at the CMB and contain ~ 80% of dense OC material. For high compositional density anomaly, a dense layer forms at the base of the mantle, and a neutrally buoyant pile develops on top of it. In the latter case, the dense basal layer and the neutrally buoyant pile on top of it are clearly separated by a jump in the concentration of the compositionally anomalous material. We conclude from our numerical study that for a plausible range of values of density anomaly of OC material in the lower mantle - it is likely that it segregates to the CMB, gets mechanically mixed with the ambient material, and forms neutrally buoyant large scale compositional anomalies similar in shape to the LLSVPs. To perform this numerical study, we developed an efficient FEM code with dynamically adaptive time and space resolution, and marker-in-cell methodology. This enabled us to model thermochemical mantle convection at realistically high convective vigor, strong thermally induced viscosity variations, and long term evolution of compositional fields. Confidence in our numerical results was gained through thorough benchmarking of the code, together with the resolution studies, all in the light of the characteristic length and time scales of governing processes in our modeled system.

  9. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  10. Electronics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickett, Charlotte

    This document presents results of research conducted by industry representatives regarding tasks performed by electronic technicians and line manufacturing electro-mechanical technicians in Arizona electronics industries. Based on this research, a competency-based curriculum was developed for training entry-level electronics technicians. Twelve…

  11. The [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O ratio of 2-billion-year-old seawater inferred from ancient oceanic crust

    SciTech Connect

    Holmden, C.; Muehlenbachs, K. )

    1993-03-19

    An oxygen isotope profile of the 2-billion-year-old Purtuniq ophiolite overlaps with similar profiles of younger ophiolites and the modern oceanic crust. This overlap implies (i) that there was a similar style of seawater-ocean crust interaction during the past 2 billion years; (ii) that the oxygen isotope composition of early Proterozoic seawater was similar to the modern value; (iii) that early Proterozoic sea-floor spreading rates were similar to, or greater than, average modern rates; and (iv) that early Proterozoic carbonate rocks and cherts with low [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O ratios do not reflect global-scale [sup 18]O depletion of early Proterozoic oceans. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Betting big on doc ownership. 'Boutique' chain blasts off with $1 billion investment, plans for 10 hospitals, and hopes to create healthcare model of the future.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Jessica

    2006-12-11

    A new "boutique" chain is roaring out the gate with $1 billion to spend and plans for 10 hospitals. University General Hospital Systems, which aspires to offer the feel of a luxury hotel in its facilities, is wading into the thick of some of the most controversial issues in healthcare. All but one of its hospitals are planned for states without CON laws, according to W.J. "Bill" Burk, left. PMID:17212213

  13. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply, April 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country’s present petroleum consumption – the goal set by the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  14. Wave acceleration of electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Horne, Richard B; Thorne, Richard M; Shprits, Yuri Y; Meredith, Nigel P; Glauert, Sarah A; Smith, Andy J; Kanekal, Shrikanth G; Baker, Daniel N; Engebretson, Mark J; Posch, Jennifer L; Spasojevic, Maria; Inan, Umran S; Pickett, Jolene S; Decreau, Pierrette M E

    2005-09-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts are two regions encircling the Earth in which energetic charged particles are trapped inside the Earth's magnetic field. Their properties vary according to solar activity and they represent a hazard to satellites and humans in space. An important challenge has been to explain how the charged particles within these belts are accelerated to very high energies of several million electron volts. Here we show, on the basis of the analysis of a rare event where the outer radiation belt was depleted and then re-formed closer to the Earth, that the long established theory of acceleration by radial diffusion is inadequate; the electrons are accelerated more effectively by electromagnetic waves at frequencies of a few kilohertz. Wave acceleration can increase the electron flux by more than three orders of magnitude over the observed timescale of one to two days, more than sufficient to explain the new radiation belt. Wave acceleration could also be important for Jupiter, Saturn and other astrophysical objects with magnetic fields. PMID:16148927

  15. Wave acceleration of electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Thorne, Richard M.; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Glauert, Sarah A.; Smith, Andy J.; Kanekal, Shrikanth G.; Baker, Daniel N.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Posch, Jennifer L.; Spasojevic, Maria; Inan, Umran S.; Pickett, Jolene S.; Decreau, Pierrette M. E.

    2005-09-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts are two regions encircling the Earth in which energetic charged particles are trapped inside the Earth's magnetic field. Their properties vary according to solar activity and they represent a hazard to satellites and humans in space. An important challenge has been to explain how the charged particles within these belts are accelerated to very high energies of several million electron volts. Here we show, on the basis of the analysis of a rare event where the outer radiation belt was depleted and then re-formed closer to the Earth, that the long established theory of acceleration by radial diffusion is inadequate; the electrons are accelerated more effectively by electromagnetic waves at frequencies of a few kilohertz. Wave acceleration can increase the electron flux by more than three orders of magnitude over the observed timescale of one to two days, more than sufficient to explain the new radiation belt. Wave acceleration could also be important for Jupiter, Saturn and other astrophysical objects with magnetic fields.

  16. Superthermal electrons at Mars: Photoelectrons, solar wind electrons, and dust storm influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui

    Mars is unique in the solar system in terms of its interaction with solar wind because it lacks of a significant intrinsic global magnetic field but possesses localized strong crustal fields. This interaction results in a very complex magnetic topology at Mars so that superthermal electrons, mainly including photoelectrons and solar wind electrons, can be distinctively important for such a complicated planetary space environment. These energetic electrons (1-1000 electron volts) can carry and rapidly redistribute energy along the magnetic field lines. They are also a reliable tool to deduce the Martian magnetic topology, which is critical to understand the electromagnetic dynamics of the Martian space environment. The investigation methodology involves both data analysis and modeling. This dissertation mainly investigates three topics of superthermal electrons at Mars. (1) This dissertation confirms that the long-lived influence of Martian low-altitude dust storms on high-altitude photoelectron fluxes is common for a wide range of energy and pitch angles and determines that this effect originates from the thermosphere-ionosphere source region of the photoelectrons, rather than at exospheric altitudes at or above MGS. Through simulations, the results suggest that the global dust storm altered the photoelectron fluxes by causing CO2 to be the dominant species at a much larger altitude range than usual. (2) Because the integral of the production rate above the superthermal electron exobase is about the same for all solar zenith angles, quite counterintuitively, it is found, observationally and numerically/theoretically, that the high-altitude photoelectron fluxes are quite independent of solar zenith angle. (3) Based on the energy spectral (flux against energy) difference between photoelectrons and solar wind electrons, a statistical approach is taken to distinguish the two populations and also allows us to quantify the occurrence rate of solar wind electron precipitation and also these electrons' energy deposition. The broad impact and future work of this dissertation is also briefly discussed, especially with the comprehensive neutral and plasma measurements from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission to further our understanding of the Martian space environment.

  17. Gain degradation and efficiencies of spiral electron multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. J. R.; Palmer, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of spiral electron multipliers as functions of accumulated counts were investigated. The mean gain of the multipliers showed a steady decline from about 100 million when new, to about one million after 100 billion events when biased in a saturation mode. For prolonged use in a space environment, improved life expectancy might be obtained with a varying bias voltage adjusted to maintain the gain comfortably above a given discrimination level. Pulse-height distributions at various stages of the lifetime and variations of efficiency with energy of detected electrons are presented.

  18. Recrystallized Granite Surface Fissures Of The Wasatch Range, Produced Not Later Than 1/4 Billion Years Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Keith L.

    2000-05-01

    Our studies of numerous recrystallized fissures in 4 granite plutons of Wasatch Range, namely, Mount Tuscarora-Wolverine-Millicent,^1,6,7 Bonanza Peak-Midway,^2 Little Cottonwood Canyon and Ferguson Canyon plutons, all of which formed magma chambers reaching Earth-atmosphere interface, establish that they resulted from high thermal gradients rather than passages of earthquake waves. Magma chambers formed, solidified during Permo-Caroniferous Ice Age(roughly, 1/3...1/4 billion yr ago, a time interval preceding period of extrusion of Rocky Mountains, 10^8 yr ago), and while fluid, belched lava flows^5 extending over its reservoir walls to run hundred of meters. We have shown how the magma melts, dilutes and replaces overlying metamorphic rock^7 to reach Earth's surface so that a pluton containing large amounts of dross(Fe-ores, etc.) had a short fluid lifetime. We also described how offshoots from a long-running main fissure form acute angles with that fissure.^3 Such recrystallized fissures, reaching depths of perhaps 100 m, have initial fractures near time of solidification of their uppermost portion of magma chamber while still hot(<= 1600^oF), a time when max. stresses occur near granite surface due to high thermal gradients, owing to snow coverage, cold water contacts due to rain, stream flow over granite surface, partial coverage by ocean, etc., wherever heat sinks might occur, during P-C ice age--when region of Wasatch Range existed at sea level, Salt Lake Valley being covered entirely by ocean water and region east of Wasatch Bouleuard rising gently above Pacific Ocean to elevations of possibly 500-1000 ft, say, at a distance of 10-15 mi to east. This fact is implied by Chinese Wall of white limestone on Grandeur Peak, unequivocally, and similarly another in Neff's Canyon running e. from n. ridge of 9200 ft. saddle-summit, as well as a dozen other ancient calcified stream beds emptying into ocean to w., in Salt Lake Valley. This existed prior to regional uplift(with uncontorted topography) of over 4000 ft. Details of how earthquake wave passages form an epicenter from which propagate a stress field in diametrically opposite directions to open up, by a few meters, the surface granite in forming a long running fissure^1 of km length, are unknown. Several examples of thermal fissures of 3-4 ft widths are known but one of 6ft width at epicenter running both n and s for only 50-75m to terminations is located on w spur of Maybird Gulch, and is seen when viewing w from trail leading to upper 2 small lakes. In contrast, a 12 ft wide fissure, 50-100m s of White Pine Lake,^1 resulted from earthquake waves. ^1K.L.McDonald, Bul. Am. Phys. Soc., 32(4),1124; ^235(9),2132; ^333(3),485; ^433(9),1982-3; ^536(9),2466; ^637(5),1256-7; ^738(1),740.

  19. Recrystallized Granite Surface Fissures Of Wasatch Range, Produced Not Later Than 1/4 Billion Years Ago.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. L.

    2002-04-01

    Our studies of numerous recrystallized fissures in 4 granite plutons of Wasatch Range, i.e., Mount T-W-M^1,6,7 Bonanza Pk.-Midway,^2 Little Cottonwood and Ferguson Canyon plutons, all of which formed magma chambers reaching Earth-atm. interface, estab. that they resulted from high thermal gradients and not passages of earthquake waves.^4 Magma chambers formed, solidified during Permo-Carboniferous Ice Age (roughly 1/3...1/4 billion yr ago), a time interval preceding extrusion of Rocky Mts., 10^8 yr ago, and while fluid, some belched lava flows^5 extending over its reservoir walls to run hundreds of m. We have shown how the magma melts, dilutes and replaces overlying metamorphic rock^7 to reach Earth's surface, so that a pluton containing large amounts of dross (Fe-ores, etc.) had a short fluid lifetime. We also described how offshoots from a long-running main fissure form acute angles with that fissure^3. Recryst. fissures, reaching depths of perhaps 100 m, had initial fractures near time of solidification of top portion of magma chamber, while still hot (<= 1600^oF), a time when max. stresses occur near granite surface due to high thermal gradients, owing to snow coverage, rain water, stream flow over granite surface, partial coverage by ocean, etc., during P-C ice age - when region of Wasatch Range existed at sea level, S. L. Valley being covered entirely by ocean water and region east of Wasatch Boul. rising gently above Pac. Ocean to elev. of possibly 500-1000 ft, say, at a distance of 10-15 mi to e, as implied by Chinese wall of limestone on Grandeur Pk, another in Neff's Canyon running e from n ridge of her 9200 ft saddle-summit, as well as a dozen other ancient calcified stream beds emptying into ocean to w, in S.L. Valley. This existed prior to regional uplift (of similar topog.) of over 4000 ft. Details of how earthquake waves form an epicenter from which propagate 2 stress fields in diam. opp. directions to open up, by a few m, surface granite to form a long running fissure of km lengths, are unknown, e.g., the one 12 ft wide, 50-100 m s of White Pine Lake.^1 Many exs. of thermofissures of 1-2 ft widths are believed known but one of ques. of 6 ft width at epicenter running both n, s for only 50-75 m to term. is located on w spur of Maybird Gulch, and is seen when viewing w from trail leading to 2 upper small lakes. (This abstract corrects that e-mailed and printed in Bul. A.P.S., 45(9), 192, 2000.) raggedright ^1K.L. McDonald, Bul. A.P.S., 32(4), 1124; ^2 35(9), 2132; ^3 33(3),485; ^4 33(9), 1982-3; ^5 36(9),2466; ^6 37(5),1256-7; ^7 38(1),740. Submitted by Dr. Keith L. McDonald, APS Member MC402346

  20. Electronic Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, Meredith Lindsay

    1995-01-01

    The main objective was to assist in the production of electronic images in the Electronic Photography Lab (EPL). The EPL is a new facility serving the electronic photographic needs of the Langley community. The purpose of the Electronic Photography lab is to provide Langley with access to digital imaging technology. Although the EPL has been in operation for less than one year, almost 1,000 images have been produced. The decision to establish the lab was made after careful determination of the centers needs for electronic photography. The LaRC community requires electronic photography for the production of electronic printing, Web sites, desktop publications, and its increased enhancement capabilities. In addition to general use, other considerations went into the planning of the EPL. For example, electronic photography is much less of a burden on the environment compared to conventional photography. Also, the possibilities of an on-line database and retrieval system could make locating past work more efficient. Finally, information in an electronic image is quantified, making measurements and calculations easier for the researcher.

  1. Microfluidic electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field. PMID:22711057

  2. Electron bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Peters, John W; Miller, Anne-Frances; Jones, Anne K; King, Paul W; Adams, Michael Ww

    2016-04-01

    Electron bifurcation is the recently recognized third mechanism of biological energy conservation. It simultaneously couples exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions to circumvent thermodynamic barriers and minimize free energy loss. Little is known about the details of how electron bifurcating enzymes function, but specifics are beginning to emerge for several bifurcating enzymes. To date, those characterized contain a collection of redox cofactors including flavins and iron-sulfur clusters. Here we discuss the current understanding of bifurcating enzymes and the mechanistic features required to reversibly partition multiple electrons from a single redox site into exergonic and endergonic electron transfer paths. PMID:27016613

  3. Visual test of subparts per billion-level copper(ii) by Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction coupled with a functionalized gold nanoparticle probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jing-Fu; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2012-10-01

    By combining Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction with a gold nanoparticle-based visual test, a novel method was developed for the field assay of Cu(ii) in environmental water at subparts per billion-levels within 30 min. When a 200 mL water sample was treated with 12.5 mg L-1 Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the proposed procedure, the detection limit with the naked eye was 0.2 μg L-1 Cu(ii). The proposed method is very specific to Cu(ii), with tolerance against at least 100-fold amounts of other environmentally relevant metal ions except for Hg(ii) (25-fold), and was successfully applied to the detection of trace Cu(ii) in tap water, river water, and treated wastewater, and results agreed well with that determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).By combining Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle-based solid phase extraction with a gold nanoparticle-based visual test, a novel method was developed for the field assay of Cu(ii) in environmental water at subparts per billion-levels within 30 min. When a 200 mL water sample was treated with 12.5 mg L-1 Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the proposed procedure, the detection limit with the naked eye was 0.2 μg L-1 Cu(ii). The proposed method is very specific to Cu(ii), with tolerance against at least 100-fold amounts of other environmentally relevant metal ions except for Hg(ii) (25-fold), and was successfully applied to the detection of trace Cu(ii) in tap water, river water, and treated wastewater, and results agreed well with that determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, synthesis, and characterization of Cys-AuNPs and Fe3O4 NPs, magnetic-solid phase extraction and colorimetric test procedures, and effects of parameters on the extraction efficiency. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31753b

  4. Electron-emission yield of Al, Cu, and Au for the impact of swift bare light ions

    SciTech Connect

    Benka, O.; Schinner, A.; Fink, T.; Pfaffenlehner, M.

    1995-11-01

    The electron emission yield induced by mega-electron-volt H{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, Li{sup 3+}, B{sup 5+}, and C{sup 6+} impact on aluminum, copper, and gold targets was measured. We found a significant deviation of the results from a simple proportionality to the stopping power, especially for heavier ions and low projectile velocities. Using a slightly modified model by J. E. Borovsky and D. M. Suszcynsky [Phys. Rev. A {bold 43}, 1433 (1991)] our experiments could be well represented. In this model the collective electric field generated along the projectile`s path was taken into account. Consequently, the positive ion channel appears to be the dominant mechanism that leads beyond a projectile-independent yield--to--stopping power ratio.

  5. Microwave measurements of energy lost to longitudinal modes by single electron bunches traversing periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.; Weaver, J.N.; Wilson, P.B.

    1981-10-01

    In the design of future linear colliders, it will be important to minimize the loss of beam energy due to the excitation of higher-order modes in the accelerator structure by single bunches of electrons or positrons. This loss is not only detrimental in itself but also gives rise to energy spectrum widening and transverse emittance growth. Microwave measurements made on disk-loaded and alternating-spoke structures to determine the loss to the longitudinal modes are described. In these measurements the Gaussian bunch is simulated by a current pulse of the same shape transmitted through the structure on an axial center conductor. Results to date are presented for the total longitudinal loss parameter per period K in volts per picocoulomb.

  6. Printed Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel A. (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  7. Printed electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel A. (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  8. Communications Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorderstrasse, Ron; Siebert, Leo

    This module is the third in a series of electronics publications and serves as a supplement to "General Electronics Technician." It is designed to provide students with an overview of the broad field of communications. Included are those tasks above the basic skills level that allow students to progress to a higher level of competency in the…

  9. Printed Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  10. Exceptional preservation of aragonite in a circa 3.3 billion year old microbial mat from the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, Frances; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Lemelle, Laurence; Marrochhi, Yves; Rouzaud, Jean-Noel; Simionovici, Alexandre; Andreazza, Caroline; Foucher, Frédéric; Thiel, Volker; Hofmann, Axel

    2010-05-01

    Exceptional preservation of aragonite in a circa 3.3 billion year old microbial mat from the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa Frances Westall, Barbara Cavalazzi, Laurence Lemelle, Yves Marrocchi, Jean-Noël Rouzaud, Alexandre Simionovici, Murielle Salomé, Smail Mostefaoui, Caroline Andreazza, Frédéric Foucher, Jan Toporski, Andrea Jauss, Volker Thiel, Axel Hofmann, Anders Meibom, François Robert Aragonite occurs as a biologically-formed mineral precipitate within modern calcifying microbial mats. It is, however, rarely preserved in the geological record because, as one of the least stable polymorphs of calcium carbonate, it readily converts to calcite in present environmental conditions at the Earth's surface. In an in situ investigation at the micro- to nanometer-scale, we show that 5-10 nm sized nanocrystals of aragonite are preserved within the organic framework of a partially calcified microbial mat from the ~ 3.3 billion year-old Josefsdal Chert in the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa. Transformation of the aragonite to calcite was blocked by a combination of chemical inhibitors within the crystal lattice, organic molecules coating the nanocrystals and, in particular, to the precocious permeation of the mat by hydrothermal silica. Apart from its exceptional preservation for 3.3 billion years, the identification of aragonite in the Josefsdal microbial mat is the earliest evidence for in situ calcification of a microbial mat. Furthermore, the indications of associated sulphur-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity with calcification strongly support a photosynthetic origin for the mat. This is the most direct evidence for photosynthesis in early Archaean rocks.

  11. Design of power electronics for TVC EMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, R. Mark

    1993-08-01

    The Composite Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. This report presents the results of an investigation into the applicability of two new technologies, MOS-controlled thyristors (MCT's) and pulse density modulation (PDM), to the control of brushless dc motors in EMA systems. MCT's are new power semiconductor devices, which combine the high voltage and current capabilities of conventional thyristors and the low gate drive requirements of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's). The commanded signals in a PDM system are synthesized using a series of sinusoidal pulses instead of a series of square pulses as in a pulse width modulation (PWM) system. A resonant dc link inverter is employed to generate the sinusoidal pulses in the PDM system. This inverter permits zero-voltage switching of all semiconductors which reduces switching losses and switching stresses. The objectives of this project are to develop and validate an analytical model of the MCT device when used in high power motor control applications and to design, fabricate, and test a prototype electronic circuit employing both MCT and PDM technology for controlling a brushless dc motor.

  12. Design of power electronics for TVC EMA systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, R. Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Composite Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. This report presents the results of an investigation into the applicability of two new technologies, MOS-controlled thyristors (MCT's) and pulse density modulation (PDM), to the control of brushless dc motors in EMA systems. MCT's are new power semiconductor devices, which combine the high voltage and current capabilities of conventional thyristors and the low gate drive requirements of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's). The commanded signals in a PDM system are synthesized using a series of sinusoidal pulses instead of a series of square pulses as in a pulse width modulation (PWM) system. A resonant dc link inverter is employed to generate the sinusoidal pulses in the PDM system. This inverter permits zero-voltage switching of all semiconductors which reduces switching losses and switching stresses. The objectives of this project are to develop and validate an analytical model of the MCT device when used in high power motor control applications and to design, fabricate, and test a prototype electronic circuit employing both MCT and PDM technology for controlling a brushless dc motor.

  13. Ion Control of Electron Hopping in Conducting Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigodin, Vladimir; Epstein, Arthur

    2004-03-01

    Recently the observation of an "ion leverage field effect" was reported for conducting polymers [1]. Upon applying the gate voltage of a few volts the conductivity of the polymer film drops by a few orders of magnitude. This observation is in conflict with the fact that the electric field cannot penetrate into a conductor deeper than the "lattice constant", and therefore its effect on the polymer film of 100 nm thickness should be negligible. We suggest that the field effect in doped conducting polymers is related to their inhomogeneous structure and remaining mobile ions. The large free space within the polymer network enables ions to "easily" move into and out of the polymers. The electronic screening at the boundary transforms the external electric potential into the shift of the chemical potential for ions inside the sample. Because of electroneutrality the change of ionic charge inside the film is compensated by varying the Fermi level of electrons. The ion motion is breaking the conductivity percolation network by removing critical hoping sites and as a result producing the conductor-nonconductor transition. The evidences for the present mechanism of field effect in conducting polymers are presented. [1] A.J. Epstein, F.-C. Hsu, N.-R. Chiou, and V.N. Prigodin, Curr. Appl. Phys. 2, 339-343 (2002).

  14. Potential magnetofossils in ~3.4 billion-year-old cherts from the Barberton Greenstone Belt of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, Julia; Tarduno, John; Watkeys, Michael; Hofmann, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Previous reported paleointensity data from ~3.45 Ga dacites of the Barberton Greenstone Belt indicate the presence of a relatively strong geomagnetic field requiring the presence of a dynamo (Tarduno et al., Science, 2010). The ~3.40 Ga Buck Reef Chert from the same belt includes shallow water environments that may have been conducive for magnetotactic bacteria, if such forms were present in the Paleoarchean, as might be expected given the presence of the field. Here we use rock magnetism, electron microscopy, and ferromagnetic resonance to test for the presence of bacterial magnetite particles. Magnetic hysteresis properties of bulk samples show a variety of rock magnetic behaviors, including multi-domain, pseudo-single domain, single domain, and wasp-waisted curves; the latter indicate grain and/or compositional mixtures. Electron microscopy of magnetic separates and in-situ particles from the Buck Reef Chert show cubo-octahedral to quasi-rectangular and hexagonally shaped grains that fall within a stable single domain range typical of biogenic magnetite. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra from bulk samples appear asymmetrical and skew towards low fields, suggesting a magnetic anisotropy that is similar to the spectra seen from some strains of modern magnetotactic bacteria. Thus, while there is clearly a mixture of magnetic particles within the Buck Reef Chert, these data suggest one component could be ancient bacterial magnetite.

  15. Electronic prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopcroft, J.

    1987-01-01

    The potential benefits of automation in space are significant. The science base needed to support this automation not only will help control costs and reduce lead-time in the earth-based design and construction of space stations, but also will advance the nation's capability for computer design, simulation, testing, and debugging of sophisticated objects electronically. Progress in automation will require the ability to electronically represent, reason about, and manipulate objects. Discussed here is the development of representations, languages, editors, and model-driven simulation systems to support electronic prototyping. In particular, it identifies areas where basic research is needed before further progress can be made.

  16. Electronic Cigarettes

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Figures Tobacco and Nicotine Smoked Tobacco Products Smokeless Tobacco Products Electronic Cigarettes New FDA Regulations HEALTH EFFECTS ... Secondhand Smoke Effects of Smoking on Your Health Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health Tobacco Use and Fertility Tobacco ...

  17. Electronic plants.

    PubMed

    Stavrinidou, Eleni; Gabrielsson, Roger; Gomez, Eliot; Crispin, Xavier; Nilsson, Ove; Simon, Daniel T; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-11-01

    The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants' "circuitry" has never been directly merged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization. PMID:26702448

  18. Electronic Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Harry A.

    The conversion of a limited-use, "white elephant" auditorium into an electronic classroom to be used as a flexible instructional space with numerous potentials for enrichment of learning via utilization of electromechanical aids. (FS)

  19. Electronic plants

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinidou, Eleni; Gabrielsson, Roger; Gomez, Eliot; Crispin, Xavier; Nilsson, Ove; Simon, Daniel T.; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directly merged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization. PMID:26702448

  20. Electronic Prescribing

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1-877-486-2048 . I went to the pharmacy, and my prescription was ready. Electronic eRx Prescribing ... write and send your prescriptions directly to your pharmacy. This means no more prescriptions on paper and ...

  1. An efficient and comprehensive method for drainage network extraction from DEM with billions of pixels using a size-balanced binary search tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Rui; Li, Tiejian; Huang, Yuefei; Li, Jiaye; Wang, Guangqian

    2015-06-01

    With the increasing resolution of digital elevation models (DEMs), computational efficiency problems have been encountered when extracting the drainage network of a large river basin at billion-pixel scales. The efficiency of the most time-consuming depression-filling pretreatment has been improved by using the O(NlogN) complexity least-cost path search method, but the complete extraction steps following this method have not been proposed and tested. In this paper, an improved O(NlogN) algorithm was proposed by introducing a size-balanced binary search tree (BST) to improve the efficiency of the depression-filling pretreatment further. The following extraction steps, including the flow direction determination and the upslope area accumulation, were also redesigned to benefit from this improvement. Therefore, an efficient and comprehensive method was developed. The method was tested to extract drainage networks of 31 river basins with areas greater than 500,000 km2 from the 30-m-resolution ASTER GDEM and two sub-basins with areas of approximately 1000 km2 from the 1-m-resolution airborne LiDAR DEM. Complete drainage networks with both vector features and topographic parameters were obtained with time consumptions in O(NlogN) complexity. The results indicate that the developed method can be used to extract entire drainage networks from DEMs with billions of pixels with high efficiency.

  2. Microbially induced sedimentary structures recording an ancient ecosystem in the ca. 3.48 billion-year-old Dresser Formation, Pilbara, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Noffke, Nora; Christian, Daniel; Wacey, David; Hazen, Robert M

    2013-12-01

    Microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) result from the response of microbial mats to physical sediment dynamics. MISS are cosmopolitan and found in many modern environments, including shelves, tidal flats, lagoons, riverine shores, lakes, interdune areas, and sabkhas. The structures record highly diverse communities of microbial mats and have been reported from numerous intervals in the geological record up to 3.2 billion years (Ga) old. This contribution describes a suite of MISS from some of the oldest well-preserved sedimentary rocks in the geological record, the early Archean (ca. 3.48 Ga) Dresser Formation, Western Australia. Outcrop mapping at the meter to millimeter scale defined five sub-environments characteristic of an ancient coastal sabkha. These sub-environments contain associations of distinct macroscopic and microscopic MISS. Macroscopic MISS include polygonal oscillation cracks and gas domes, erosional remnants and pockets, and mat chips. Microscopic MISS comprise tufts, sinoidal structures, and laminae fabrics; the microscopic laminae are composed of primary carbonaceous matter, pyrite, and hematite, plus trapped and bound grains. Identical suites of MISS occur in equivalent environmental settings through the entire subsequent history of Earth including the present time. This work extends the geological record of MISS by almost 300 million years. Complex mat-forming microbial communities likely existed almost 3.5 billion years ago. PMID:24205812

  3. Microbially Induced Sedimentary Structures Recording an Ancient Ecosystem in the ca. 3.48 Billion-Year-Old Dresser Formation, Pilbara, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Daniel; Wacey, David; Hazen, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) result from the response of microbial mats to physical sediment dynamics. MISS are cosmopolitan and found in many modern environments, including shelves, tidal flats, lagoons, riverine shores, lakes, interdune areas, and sabkhas. The structures record highly diverse communities of microbial mats and have been reported from numerous intervals in the geological record up to 3.2 billion years (Ga) old. This contribution describes a suite of MISS from some of the oldest well-preserved sedimentary rocks in the geological record, the early Archean (ca. 3.48 Ga) Dresser Formation, Western Australia. Outcrop mapping at the meter to millimeter scale defined five sub-environments characteristic of an ancient coastal sabkha. These sub-environments contain associations of distinct macroscopic and microscopic MISS. Macroscopic MISS include polygonal oscillation cracks and gas domes, erosional remnants and pockets, and mat chips. Microscopic MISS comprise tufts, sinoidal structures, and laminae fabrics; the microscopic laminae are composed of primary carbonaceous matter, pyrite, and hematite, plus trapped and bound grains. Identical suites of MISS occur in equivalent environmental settings through the entire subsequent history of Earth including the present time. This work extends the geological record of MISS by almost 300 million years. Complex mat-forming microbial communities likely existed almost 3.5 billion years ago. Key Words: Archean—Biofilms—Microbial mats—Early Earth—Evolution. Astrobiology 13, 1103–1124. PMID:24205812

  4. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro; Fukasawa, Atsuhito; Arisaka, Katsushi; Wang, Hanguo

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  5. Electronic mail.

    PubMed Central

    Pallen, M.

    1995-01-01

    Electronic mail (email) has many advantages over other forms of communication: it is easy to use, free of charge, fast, and delivers information in a digital format. As a text only medium, email is usually less formal in style than conventional correspondence and may contain acronyms and other features, such as smileys, that are peculiar to the Internet. Email client programs that run on your own microcomputer render email powerful and easy to use. With suitable encoding methods, email can be used to send any kind of computer file, including pictures, sounds, programs, and movies. Numerous biomedical electronic mailing lists and other Internet services are accessible by email. PMID:8520343

  6. ELECTRONIC SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Robison, G.H. et al.

    1960-11-15

    An electronic system is described for indicating the occurrence of a plurality of electrically detectable events within predetermined time intervals. It is comprised of separate input means electrically associated with the events under observation: an electronic channel associated with each input means including control means and indicating means; timing means associated with each of the input means and the control means and adapted to derive a signal from the input means and apply it after a predetermined time to the control means to effect deactivation of each of the channels; and means for resetting the system to its initial condition after observation of each group of events.

  7. Electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Robison, G H; Dickson, J F

    1960-11-15

    An electronic system is designed for indicating the occurrence of a plurality of electrically detectable events within predetermined time intervals. The system comprises separate input means electrically associated with the events under observation an electronic channel associated with each input means, including control means and indicating means; timing means adapted to apply a signal from the input means after a predetermined time to the control means to deactivate each of the channels; and means for resetting the system to its initial condition after the observation of each group of events. (D.L.C.)

  8. Environmental TEM study of electron beam induced electro-chemistry of Pr????Ca????MnO? catalysts for oxygen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mildner, Stephanie; Beleggia, Marco; Mierwaldt, Daniel; Hansen, Thoma Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Ciston, Jim; Zhu, Yimei; Jooss, Christian

    2015-03-12

    Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy (ETEM) studies offer great potential for gathering atomic scale information on the electronic state of electrodes in contact with reactants but also pose big challenges due to the impact of the high energy electron beam. In this article, we present an ETEM study of a Pr????Ca????MnO? (PCMO) thin film electro-catalyst for water splitting and oxygen evolution in contact with water vapor. We show by means of off-axis electron holography and electrostatic modeling that the electron beam gives rise to a positive electric sample potential due to secondary electron emission. The value of the electric potential depends on the primary electron flux, the sample -conductivity and grounding, and gas properties. We present evidence that two observed electro-chemical reactions are driven by a beam induced electrostatic potential of the order of a volt. The first reaction is an anodic electrochemical oxidation reaction of oxygen depleted amorphous PCMO which results in recrystallization of the perovskite structure. The second reaction is oxygen evolution which can be detected by the oxidation of a silane additive and formation of SiO2x at catalytically active surfaces. Recently published in-situ XANES observation of subsurface oxygen vacancy formation during oxygen evolution at a positive potential [] is confirmed in this work. The quantification of beam induced potentials is an important step for future controlled electro-chemical experiments in an ETEM.

  9. Electronics Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 27 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of electronics technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and would…

  10. Electronic Portfolios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan C.

    1996-01-01

    Outlines three forms of electronic portfolio based on a student's work, a class project about a specific topic, and a class seminar on a broad topic. Discusses logistical problems of management, access, and cross-referencing; technical problems of input, access, and copying; and theoretical issues of the lack of realia, of ownership and copyright,…

  11. Electronic tongue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly (Inventor); Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An ion selective electrode (ISE) array is described, as well as methods for producing the same. The array can contain multiple ISE which are individually electronically addressed. The addressing allows simplified preparation of the array. The array can be used for water quality monitoring, for example.

  12. Electronic Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Tim

    Thirty years ago a cashless society was predicted for the near future; paper currency and checks would be an antiquated symbol of the past. Consumers would embrace a new alternative for making payments: electronic money. But currency is still used for 87% of payments, mainly for "nickel and dime" purchases. And checks are the payment choice for…

  13. Electron Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crompton, Robert W.

    1998-10-01

    Swarm experiments provide an invaluable link between gaseous electronics and atomic physics, that is, between the collective behavior of electrons in gases in electric and magnetic fields and the collision processes that determine that behavior. Early swarm experiments were made to gain an understanding of the basic physics of electrical conduction in gases and electrical breakdown. Subsequent peaks of activity have been associated with attempts to explain quantitatively electromagnetic wave propagation in the ionosphere and in high temperature air, and with applied research in such diverse areas as gas lasers, health physics, gas insulation for high voltage transmission lines, plasma processing, and particle detectors . Through improved experimental techniques and the application of numerical techniques to unravel the complex connection between the individual electron-neutral collisions and the transport coefficients that characterize the properties of the swarm, swarm experiments now contribute accurate, and sometimes unique, cross section data for low-energy electron-atom/molecule collisions. Alternatively they can provide self-consistent sets of cross sections that enable reliable forecasts of the collective behaviour to be made. In the talk I shall aim to provide an understanding of the basic principles underlying swarm experiments, and the interpratation of the results from them, through a description of their development and application up to the present day.

  14. Electronic Exams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushweller, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Computerized testing pioneers are forcing educators to consider scrapping paper-and-pencil tests in favor of electronic testing. Critics say standardized testing and curricula will produce standardized children for point-and-click work places. Benefits include immediate and sophisticated analyses to aid teaching adjustments. Equity questions…

  15. Electronic School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This issue of "The Electronic School" features a special forum on computer networking. Articles specifically focus on network operating systems, cabling requirements, and network architecture. Tom Wall argues that virtual reality is not yet ready for classroom use. B.J. Novitsky profiles two high schools experimenting with CD-ROM yearbooks. Bill…

  16. Basic Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Lonnie; Huston, Jane, Ed.

    The skills taught in these materials for a seven-unit course were those identified as necessary not only for entry-level electronic technicians but for those in other occupations as well, including appliance repair, heating and air conditioning, and auto mechanics. The seven units are on shop orientation and safety principles, introduction to

  17. Electronics Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 27 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of electronics technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and would

  18. Microwave radiation measurements near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallavarpu, R.; Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave emission near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma has been observed, and its relation to the average electron density and the dc toroidal magnetic field was examined. The emission was detected using a spectrum analyzer and a 50-ohm miniature coaxial probe. The radiation appeared as a broad amplitude peak that shifted in frequency as the plasma parameters were varied. The observed radiation scanned an average plasma density ranging from 20 billion to 800 billion per cu cm. A linear relation was observed between the density calculated from the emission frequency and the average plasma density measured with a microwave interferometer. With the aid of a relative density profile measurement of the plasma, it was determined that the emissions occurred from the outer periphery of the plasma.

  19. Utilizing Artificial Neural Networks in MATLAB to Achieve Parts-per-Billion Mass Measurement Accuracy with a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. Keith; Kovach, Alexander L.; Muddiman, David C.; Hanck, Kenneth W.

    2009-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry has the ability to realize exceptional mass measurement accuracy (MMA); MMA is one of the most significant attributes of mass spectrometric measurements as it affords extraordinary molecular specificity. However, due to space-charge effects, the achievable MMA significantly depends on the total number of ions trapped in the ICR cell for a particular measurement, as well as relative ion abundance of a given species. Artificial neural network calibration in conjunction with automatic gain control (AGC) is utilized in these experiments to formally account for the differences in total ion population in the ICR cell between the external calibration spectra and experimental spectra. In addition, artificial neural network calibration is used to account for both differences in total ion population in the ICR cell as well as relative ion abundance of a given species, which also affords mean MMA values at the parts-per-billion level. PMID:19362012

  20. Utilizing artificial neural networks in MATLAB to achieve parts-per-billion mass measurement accuracy with a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Williams, D Keith; Kovach, Alexander L; Muddiman, David C; Hanck, Kenneth W

    2009-07-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry has the ability to realize exceptional mass measurement accuracy (MMA); MMA is one of the most significant attributes of mass spectrometric measurements as it affords extraordinary molecular specificity. However, due to space-charge effects, the achievable MMA significantly depends on the total number of ions trapped in the ICR cell for a particular measurement, as well as relative ion abundance of a given species. Artificial neural network calibration in conjunction with automatic gain control (AGC) is utilized in these experiments to formally account for the differences in total ion population in the ICR cell between the external calibration spectra and experimental spectra. In addition, artificial neural network calibration is used to account for both differences in total ion population in the ICR cell as well as relative ion abundance of a given species, which also affords mean MMA values at the parts-per-billion level. PMID:19362012

  1. Six climate change-related events in the United States accounted for about $14 billion in lost lives and health costs.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Kim; Rotkin-Ellman, Miriam; Geballe, Linda; Max, Wendy; Solomon, Gina M

    2011-11-01

    The future health costs associated with predicted climate change-related events such as hurricanes, heat waves, and floods are projected to be enormous. This article estimates the health costs associated with six climate change-related events that struck the United States between 2000 and 2009. The six case studies came from categories of climate change-related events projected to worsen with continued global warming-ozone pollution, heat waves, hurricanes, infectious disease outbreaks, river flooding, and wildfires. We estimate that the health costs exceeded $14 billion, with 95 percent due to the value of lives lost prematurely. Actual health care costs were an estimated $740 million. This reflects more than 760,000 encounters with the health care system. Our analysis provides scientists and policy makers with a methodology to use in estimating future health costs related to climate change and highlights the growing need for public health preparedness. PMID:22068410

  2. Assessment of the Projected One Billion Ton Biomass for Cellulosic Biofuel Production and Its Potential Implications on Regional Water Quality and Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Y. K.; Yan, E.; Wu, M.

    2011-12-01

    The DOE and USDA joint study, also commonly referred as the "Billion-Ton" study, assessed the cellulosic feedstock resources potential in the U.S. for producing second generation biofuel to replace 30 percent of the country's transportation fuels by year 2030. The available resource is expected to come from changing cropping pattern, increasing crop yield, harvesting agricultural and forest wood residues, and developing energy crops. Such large-scale changes in land use and crop managements are likely to affect the associated water quality and resources at both regional and local scales. To address the water sustainability associated with the projected biomass production in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB), we have developed a SWAT watershed model that simulate the changes in water quality (nitrogen, phosphorus, and soil erosion) and resources (soil water content, evapotranspiration, and runoff) of the region due to future biomass production scenario estimated by the Billion-Ton study. The scenario is implemented by changing the model inputs and parameters at subbasin and hydrologic response unit levels, as well as by improving the SWAT model to represent spatially varying crop properties. The potential impacts on water quality and water availability were compared with the results obtained from a baseline simulation which represents current watershed conditions and existing level of feedstock production. The basin level results suggested mixed effects on the water quality. The projected large-scale biomass production scenario is expected to decrease loadings of total nitrogen and nitrate in the streams while increase total phosphorus and suspended sediment. Results indicate an increase in the rate of evapotranspiration and a decrease in the soil water content and in surface runoff. discharge to the streams. The impacts at the subbasin or local scale varies spatially and temporally depending on the types of land use change, their locations, and crop managements, suggesting needs to further optimize the sustainable biomass production from water resource perspective at both regional and local levels.

  3. On time variations of the intensity of galactic cosmic rays for the recent billion years from the data on exposure ages of iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain probable variations of the intensity of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) for the recent billion years, the distribution of exposure ages T of iron meteorites has been analyzed. We considered all ~80 values of ages from the data by Voshage and Feldmann (1979), Voshage et al. (1983), and Voshage (1984), as well as a set of values obtained from the correction for eliminating the meteorites formed in a single collision. To correct the data, the Akaike information criterion was used. For the distributions of the phase values Ph = T/t-int( T/t), the dependence of the criterion χ 2 on the presumable period t in the exposure age variations was analyzed. For t ~ 400-500 Myr and, partly, for t ~ 150 Myr, the significant deviations of this criterion from the corresponding mean values were found. To clear up the influence of the GCR intensity variations on the age distribution, the numerical models were calculated with an account of the set of ages randomly distributed in the interval of 0-1000 Myr with the presumptive mean lifetime of iron meteorites in outer space τ = 700 Myr. It has been ascertained that, for variations with a period of t = 450 Myr, the distribution of exposure ages of the model set is similar to that found for iron meteorites. The obtained data suggest that the GCR intensity variations with a period of approximately 400-500 Myr have probably existed during the recent billion years. These variations may be caused by periodic passages of the Solar System through spiral arms of the Galaxy. It has been shown that the earlier discussed changes in the GCR intensity with a period of ~150 Myr (Shaviv, 2002; 2003; Scherer et al., 2006) are less defined.

  4. (abstract) A Miniature, High-Sensitivity, Electron-Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabrielson, Thomas B.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Tang, Tony K.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype low-noise accelerometer has been fabricated with an electron-tunneling transducer. By measuring the tunneling current between an electrode on the proof mass and a feedback-controlled monitor electrode, very small accelerations can be detected with high responsivity. This particular prototype (10x10x1.5 mm) was designed for underwater acoustic measurement from a few hertz to 1 kHz. The measured responsivity below the fundamental device resonance at 100 Hz is roughly 1500 volts per m/s(sup 2) with a measured noise spectral density of 10(sup -6) m/s(sup 2) per root hertz or less between 30 and 300 Hz. The noise floor is controlled primarily by 1/f noise in the tunneling current although the noise floor reaches the theoretical molecular-agitation limit at 100 hertz. The responsivity and directivity of the device were measured in a standard gradient-hydrophone calibrator; the noise floor was determined in a vacuum-ionization chamber assembled from commercial off-the-shelf components; and the detailed dynamics of the proof-mass motion were examined using a heterodyne laser interferometer that was scanned across the surface and synchronously detected with respect to the excitation.

  5. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  6. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Reeves, G. D.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.

  7. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; et al

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations revealmore » an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.« less

  8. Understanding enhancements in outer radiation belt electrons through measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Quintin George

    Electrons in Earth's magnetosphere typically originate with energies below ten kiloelectron volts (keV). Electrons trapped in the radiation belts can have energies that exceed 10 MeV and must be naturally accelerated within Earth's magnetosphere. Still, the processes that govern this highly dynamic region are not fully understood. The outer radiation belt is not only a scientific puzzle but understanding it is an operational necessity, as these high energy electrons are capable of damaging spacecraft and can even result in spacecraft failure. In this work, we investigate our ability to observe these particles and understand the natural acceleration processes that generate them. We approach the problem on three fronts: (i) from an instrumentation perspective we develop a first-of-its- kind miniaturized particle telescope flown on a CubeSat platform, (ii) from an observational perspective we investigate in detail an outer belt enhancement case-study, and (iii) from a modeling perspective we develop a data assimilation model to better understand the mechanisms causing the acceleration. Finally, we construct an event-specific method to estimate electron lifetimes for diffusion models using CubeSat data, and use it to fully investigate the case study using the assimilative model, ultimately combining the three approaches. The ensuing results substantiate CubeSats as scientific observatories, demonstrate new data assimilation applications to the radiation belts, and strengthen our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics and the role of acceleration mechanisms.

  9. Neutral beamline with ion energy recovery based on magnetic blocking of electrons

    DOEpatents

    Stirling, William L.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with energy recovery of the full-energy ion ponent of the beam based on magnetic blocking of electrons is provided. Ions from a positive ion source are accelerated to the desired beam energy from a slightly positive potential level with respect to ground through a neutralizer cell by means of a negative acceleration voltage. The unneutralized full-energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer are retarded and slightly deflected and the electrons in the neutralizer are blocked by a magnetic field generated transverse to the beamline. An electron collector in the form of a coaxial cylinder surrounding and protruding axial a few centimeters beyond the neutralizer exit terminates the electrons which exit the neutralizer in an E x B drift to the collector when the collector is biased a few hundred volts positive with respect to the neutralizer voltage. The neutralizer is operated at the negative acceleration voltage, and the deflected full energy ions are decelerated and the charge collected at ground potential thereby expending none of their energy received from the acceleration power supply.

  10. Auroral precipitation flux of ions and electrons in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1990-10-01

    This paper examines particles and fields data obtained by Voyager in Saturn's outer magnetosphere with a view toward assessing the role that medium-energy ions and electrons have in stimulating the UV aurora. The magnetic field displays a high level of fluctuation of two characteristic types: large-scale coherent depressions in the field strength associated with the plumes of Titan and a small-scale incoherent turbulence presumed to be a consequence of the high-beta plasma environment. Electrons are assumed to interact strongly with lower hybrid waves and are accelerated to energies of a few kiloelectron volts. The available energy input to the aurora by protons is 5 x 10 to the 9th W, while an upper bound to that of N(+) ions is about 2 x 10 to the 10th W. Electrons in the range 1-10 keV can contribute upward of 5 x 10 to the 10th W and perhaps more if a field-aligned potential drop above the aurora is present. It is concluded that electrons are most likely the primary precipitation energy source for the aurora as a result of energy transfer from Titanogenic N(+) pickup ions in a corotation-dominated magnetosphere.

  11. Studies of Copper, Silver, and Gold Cluster Anions: Evidence of Electronic Shell Structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettiette, Claire Lynn

    A new Ultraviolet Magnetic Time-of-Flight Photoelectron Spectrometer (MTOFPES) has been developed for the study of the electronic structure of clusters produced in a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. This is the first technique which has been successful in probing the valence electronic states of metal clusters. The ultraviolet photoelectron spectra of negative cluster ions of the noble metals have been taken at several different photon energies. These are presented along with the electron affinity and HOMO-LUMO gap measurements for Cu_6^- to Cu_ {41}^-, using 4.66 eV and 6.42 eV detachment energies; Ag_3^- to Ag_{21}^-, using 6.42 eV detachment energy; and Au_3^ - to Au_{21}^-, using 6.42 eV and 7.89 eV detachment energies. The spectra provide the first detailed probes of the s valence electrons of the noble metal clusters. In addition, the 6.42 eV and 7.89 eV spectra probe the first one to two electron volts of the molecular orbitals of the d valence electrons of copper and gold clusters. The electron affinity and HOMO-LUMO gap measurements of the noble metal clusters agree with the predictions of the ellipsoidal shell model for mono-valent metal clusters. In particular, cluster numbers 8, 20, and 40--which correspond to the spherical shell closings of this model--have low electron affinities and large HOMO-LUMO gaps. The spectra of the gold cluster ions indicate that the molecular orbital energies of the cluster valence electrons are more widely spaced for gold than for copper or silver. This is to be expected for the heavy atom clusters when relativistic effects are taken into account.

  12. POLAR 5 - An electron accelerator experiment within an aurora. III - Evidence for significant spacecraft charging by an electron accelerator at ionospheric altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, T. A.; Maynard, N. C.

    1980-01-01

    The POLAR 5 rocket experiment carried an electron accelerator on a 'daughter' payload which injected a 0.1 A beam of 10 keV electrons in a pulsed mode every 410 ms. With spin and precession, injections were made over a wide range of pitch angles. Measurements from a double probe electric field instrument and from particle detectors on the 'mother' payload and from a crude RPA on the 'daughter' payload are interpreted to indicate that the 'daughter' charges to a potential between several hundred volts and 1 kV. The neutralizing return current to the 'daughter' is shown to be asymmetrically distributed with the majority being collected from the direction of the beam. The additional electrons necessary to neutralize the daughter are thought to be produced and heated through beam-plasma interactions postulated by Maehlum et al. (1980) and Grandal et al. (1980) to explain the particle and optical measurements. Significant electric fields emanating from the charged 'daughter' and the beam are seen at distances exceeding 100 m at the 'mother' payload.

  13. Electronic Nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Grace Industries, Inc.'s Electronic Nose is a vapor and gas detector, deriving from NASA's electronic circuitry, capable for sensing the presence of accelerants several days after a fire. The device is powered by rechargeable battery and no special training needed to operate. If an accelerant is present, device will emit a beeping sound and trigger a flashing light; the faster the beep rate, the more volatile the accelerant. Its sensitivity can also detect minute traces of accelerants. Unit saves investigators of fire causes time and expense by providing speedy detection of physical evidence for use in court. Device is also useful for detecting hazardous fumes, locating and detecting gas leaks in refineries and on oil drilling rigs.

  14. Electronic Nose and Electronic Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandhopadhyay, Rajib

    Human beings have five senses, namely, vision, hearing, touch, smell and taste. The sensors for vision, hearing and touch have been developed for several years. The need for sensors capable of mimicking the senses of smell and taste have been felt only recently in food industry, environmental monitoring and several industrial applications. In the ever-widening horizon of frontier research in the field of electronics and advanced computing, emergence of electronic nose (E-Nose) and electronic tongue (E-Tongue) have been drawing attention of scientists and technologists for more than a decade. By intelligent integration of multitudes of technologies like chemometrics, microelectronics and advanced soft computing, human olfaction has been successfully mimicked by such new techniques called machine olfaction (Pearce et al. 2002). But the very essence of such research and development efforts has centered on development of customized electronic nose and electronic tongue solutions specific to individual applications. In fact, research trends as of date clearly points to the fact that a machine olfaction system as versatile, universal and broadband as human nose and human tongue may not be feasible in the decades to come. But application specific solutions may definitely be demonstrated and commercialized by modulation in sensor design and fine-tuning the soft computing solutions. This chapter deals with theory, developments of E-Nose and E-Tongue technology and their applications. Also a succinct account of future trends of R&D efforts in this field with an objective of establishing co-relation between machine olfaction and human perception has been included.

  15. ELECTRONIC MULTIPLIER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1961-01-31

    S>An electronic multiplier is described for use in analog computers. Two electrical input signals are received; one controls the slope of a saw-tooth voltage wave while the other controls the time duration of the wave. A condenser and diode clamps are provided to sustain the crest voltage reached by the wave, and for storing that voltage to provide an output signal which is a steady d-c voltage.

  16. ELECTRON GUN

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1960-04-01

    A pulsed electron gun capable of delivering pulses at voltages of the order of 1 mv and currents of the order of 100 amperes is described. The principal novelty resides in a transformer construction which is disposed in the same vacuum housing as the electron source and accelerating electrode structure of the gun to supply the accelerating potential thereto. The transformer is provided by a plurality of magnetic cores disposed in circumferentially spaced relation and having a plurality of primary windings each inductively coupled to a different one of the cores, and a helical secondary winding which is disposed coaxially of the cores and passes therethrough in circumferential succession. Additional novelty resides in the disposition of the electron source cathode filament input leads interiorly of the transformer secondary winding which is hollow, as well as in the employment of a half-wave filament supply which is synchronously operated with the transformer supply such that the transformer is pulsed during the zero current portions of the half-wave cycle.

  17. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers.

    PubMed

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-02-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device. PMID:26933691

  18. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers

    PubMed Central

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device. PMID:26933691

  19. Glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons in a chamber bombarded by fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, A. S.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu. A.; Prudnikov, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    A metal substrate is immersed in plasma of glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons inside the vacuum chamber volume V ≈ 0.12 m3 filled with argon or nitrogen at pressures 0.005-5 Pa, and dependence of discharge characteristics on negative substrate potential is studied. Emitted by the substrate secondary electrons bombard the chamber walls and it results in electron emission growth of the chamber walls and rise of gas ionization intensity inside the chamber. Increase of voltage U between the chamber and the substrate up to 10 kV at a constant discharge current I d in the anode circuit results in a manifold rise of current I in the substrate circuit and decrease of discharge voltage U d between the anode and the chamber from hundreds to tens of volts. At pressure p < 0.05 Pa nonuniformity of plasma density does not exceed ˜10%. Using the Child-Langmuir law, as well as measurement results of sheath width d between homogeneous plasma and a lengthy flat substrate dependent on voltage U ion current density j i on the substrate surface and ion-electron emission coefficient γ i are calculated. After the current in circuit of a substrate made of the same material is measured, the γ i values may be used to evaluate the average dose of ion implantation. The rate of dose rise at a constant high voltage U is by an order of magnitude higher than in known systems equipped with generators of square-wave high-voltage pulses. Application to the substrate of 10-ms-wide sinusoidal high-voltage pulses, which follow each other with 100-Hz frequency, results in synchronous oscillations of voltage U and ion current I i in the substrate circuit. In this case variation of the sheath width d due to oscillations of U and Ii is insignificant and d does not exceed several centimeters thus enabling substrate treatment in a comparatively small vacuum chamber.

  20. Benzonitrile: Electron affinity, excited states, and anion solvation.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Andrew R; Khuseynov, Dmitry; Sanov, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    We report a negative-ion photoelectron imaging study of benzonitrile and several of its hydrated, oxygenated, and homo-molecularly solvated cluster anions. The photodetachment from the unsolvated benzonitrile anion to the X̃(1)A1 state of the neutral peaks at 58 ± 5 meV. This value is assigned as the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the valence anion and the upper bound of adiabatic electron affinity (EA) of benzonitrile. The EA of the lowest excited electronic state of benzonitrile, ã(3)A1, is determined as 3.41 ± 0.01 eV, corresponding to a 3.35 eV lower bound for the singlet-triplet splitting. The next excited state, the open-shell singlet Ã(1)A1, is found about an electron-volt above the triplet, with a VDE of 4.45 ± 0.01 eV. These results are in good agreement with ab initio calculations for neutral benzonitrile and its valence anion but do not preclude the existence of a dipole-bound state of similar energy and geometry. The step-wise and cumulative solvation energies of benzonitrile anions by several types of species were determined, including homo-molecular solvation by benzonitrile, hydration by 1-3 waters, oxygenation by 1-3 oxygen molecules, and mixed solvation by various combinations of O2, H2O, and benzonitrile. The plausible structures of the dimer anion of benzonitrile were examined using density functional theory and compared to the experimental observations. It is predicted that the dimer anion favors a stacked geometry capitalizing on the π-π interactions between the two partially charged benzonitrile moieties. PMID:26450313

  1. Benzonitrile: Electron affinity, excited states, and anion solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Andrew R.; Khuseynov, Dmitry; Sanov, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    We report a negative-ion photoelectron imaging study of benzonitrile and several of its hydrated, oxygenated, and homo-molecularly solvated cluster anions. The photodetachment from the unsolvated benzonitrile anion to the X ˜ 1 A 1 state of the neutral peaks at 58 ± 5 meV. This value is assigned as the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the valence anion and the upper bound of adiabatic electron affinity (EA) of benzonitrile. The EA of the lowest excited electronic state of benzonitrile, a ˜ 3 A 1 , is determined as 3.41 ± 0.01 eV, corresponding to a 3.35 eV lower bound for the singlet-triplet splitting. The next excited state, the open-shell singlet A ˜ 1 A 1 , is found about an electron-volt above the triplet, with a VDE of 4.45 ± 0.01 eV. These results are in good agreement with ab initio calculations for neutral benzonitrile and its valence anion but do not preclude the existence of a dipole-bound state of similar energy and geometry. The step-wise and cumulative solvation energies of benzonitrile anions by several types of species were determined, including homo-molecular solvation by benzonitrile, hydration by 1-3 waters, oxygenation by 1-3 oxygen molecules, and mixed solvation by various combinations of O2, H2O, and benzonitrile. The plausible structures of the dimer anion of benzonitrile were examined using density functional theory and compared to the experimental observations. It is predicted that the dimer anion favors a stacked geometry capitalizing on the π-π interactions between the two partially charged benzonitrile moieties.

  2. Empirical models of the electron temperature and density in the nightside venus ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Brace, L H; Theis, R F; Niemann, H B; Mayr, H G; Hoegy, W R; Nagy, A F

    1979-07-01

    Empirical models of the electron temperature and electron density of the late afternoon and nightside Venus ionosphere have been derived from Pioneer Venus measurements acquired between 10 December 1978 and 23 March 1979. The models describe the average ionosphere conditions near 18 degrees N latitude between 150 and 700 kilometers altitude for solar zenith angles of 80 degrees to 180 degrees . The average index of solar flux was 200. A major feature of the density model is the factor of 10 decrease beyond 90 degrees followed by a very gradual decrease between 120 degrees and 180 degrees . The density at 150 degrees is about five times greater than observed by Venera 9 and 10 at solar minimum (solar flux approximately 80), a difference that is probably related to the effects of increased solar activity on the processes that maintain the nightside ionosphere. The nightside electron density profile from the model (above 150 kilometers) can be reproduced theoretically either by transport of 0(+) ions from the dayside or by precipitation of low-energy electrons. The ion transport process would require a horizontal flow velocity of about 300 meters per second, a value that is consistent with other Pioneer Venus observations. Although currently available energetic electron data do not yet permit the role of precipitation to be evaluated quantitatively, this process is clearly involved to some extent in the formation of the nightside ionosphere. Perhaps the most surprising feature of the temperature model is that the electron temperature remains high throughout the nightside ionosphere. These high nocturnal temperatures and the existence of a well-defined nightside ionopause suggest that energetic processes occur across the top of the entire nightside ionosphere, maintaining elevated temperatures. A heat flux of 2 x 10(10) electron volts per square centimeter per second, introduced at the ionopause, is consistent with the average electron temperature profile on the nightside at a solar zenith angle of 140 degrees . PMID:17778917

  3. Rebalance electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blalock, T. V.; Kennedy, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Two basic types of strapdown gyroscope rebalance-electronics were analyzed and compared. These two types were a discrete-pulse ternary system and a width-modulated binary system. In the analyses, major emphasis was placed on the logic sections, the H-switches, the precision voltage reference loops, the noise performance, common-mode rejection, and loop compensation. Results of the analyses were used in identifying specific advantages and disadvantages of system details and in making accuracy and resolution comparisons. Sound engineering principles were applied in the development of both systems; however, it was concluded that each system has some disadvantages that are amenable to improvement.

  4. Electronic Router

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crusan, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Electronic Router (E-Router) is an application program for routing documents among the cognizant individuals in a government agency or other organization. E-Router supplants a prior 14 NASA Tech Briefs, May 2005 system in which paper documents were routed physically in packages by use of paper slips, packages could be lost, routing times were unacceptably long, tracking of packages was difficult, and there was a need for much photocopying. E-Router enables a user to create a digital package to be routed. Input accepted by E-Router includes the title of the package, the person(s) to whom the package is to be routed, attached files, and comments to reviewers. Electronic mail is used to notify reviewers of needed actions. The creator of the package can, at any time, see the status of the package in the routing structure. At the end of the routing process, E-Router keeps a record of the package and of approvals and/or concurrences of the reviewers. There are commercial programs that perform the general functions of E-Router, but they are more complicated. E-Router is Web-based, easy to use, and does not require the installation or use of client software.

  5. Glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Metel, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    This review presents a unified treatment of glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons. These discharges include hollow cathode discharges, wire and cage discharges, reflect discharges with brush and multirod cathodes, and discharges in crossed electric and magnetic fields. Fast electrons bouncing inside electrostatic traps provide efficient ionization of gas at very low gas pressures. The electrostatic trap effect (ETE) was first observed by Paschen in hollow cathode discharges almost a century ago. The key parameters that define fundamental characteristics of ETE discharges are the ionization length λN, the penetration range, Λ, and the diffusion length λ of the fast electrons, and two universal geometric parameters of the traps: effective width a and length L. Peculiarities of electron kinetics and ion collection mechanism explain experimental observations for different trap geometries. The ETE is observed only at Λ > a, when the penetration range of the γ-electrons emitted by the cathode exceeds the trap width. In the optimal pressure range, when λN > a, and Λ < L, the cathode potential fall Uc is independent of gas pressure p. With increasing current, Uc tends to its upper limit W/eβγ, where β is the percentage of ions arriving at the cathode and W is the gas ionization cost. In the low-pressure range, Λ > L, Uc rises from hundreds to thousands of volts. The sign of the anode potential fall, Ua, depends on the anode surface Sa and its position. When Sa is large compared to a critical value S*, Ua is negative and small. At Sa < S*, the value of Ua becomes positive and rises up to 0.5-1 kV with decreasing p ultimately causing discharge extinction. Scaling laws indicate common physics between vacuum discharges and atmospheric pressure micro-discharges. We discuss peculiarities of electron kinetics under different conditions using semi-analytical models. Recent experimental results and applications of glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons are described.

  6. Characteristics of warm dense matter produced by a relativistic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Thomas; Schmitt, Mark; Berninger, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Accurate equation-of-state theory on warm dense matter is a big challenge to model and good experimental data is difficult to obtain. One of the difficulties is the creation of a warm dense matter (WDM) suitable for experiments to examine its equation of state. We have performed calculations using MCNP and LASNEX to examine the warm dense matter created by a highly energetic electron beam such as the DARHT beam at LANL in a cylindrical sample confined by a collar. Energy deposition by the electron beam in the target and collar of different materials were calculated with different beam profiles. The energy deposition was sourced into LASNEX calculations to examine the dynamic evolution of the target and the generation of radially outward propagating shock waves. Our calculations indicated warm dense matter with a temperature of a few electron volts is achievable and the speed of the shock wave can be determined using photonic Doppler velocimetry technique. We will present results from our calculations for various materials of the target and collar and in different geometries.

  7. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's outer Van Allen belt.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Hoxie, V C; Henderson, M G; Li, X; Spence, H E; Elkington, S R; Friedel, R H W; Goldstein, J; Hudson, M K; Reeves, G D; Thorne, R M; Kletzing, C A; Claudepierre, S G

    2013-04-12

    Since their discovery more than 50 years ago, Earth's Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is composed predominantly of megaelectron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days, depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. The spatially separated inner zone is composed of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (>2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for more than 4 weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage. PMID:23450000

  8. System Miniaturization Via Heterogeneous Integration of Electronic Devices for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCastillo, L.; Schatzel, D. V.; Graber, R. W.; Mottiwala, A.

    2001-01-01

    The scientific devices designed for each of the Outer Planets Program Focuses will likely be groundbreaking not only with respect to their scientific role but also regarding the electronics required to perform such investigations. In the past, the performance of packaged electronics was limited by the components themselves, with minimal influence of the packaging technology. The rapid development of integrated circuit technology, however, has drastically increased the importance of packaging technology in the ultimate performance of devices. If not carefully considered in the overall design, the packaging may become the limiting factor in the operation of the system. Although industry is responsible for several significant accomplishments in the field of electronics packaging, deep space/outer planet missions must take into account additional requirements such as extremely low temperatures, high radiation levels, hermetic sealing, and severe size and weight limitations. Therefore, the present investigation has been designed to meet the needs of NASA's sensor intensive outer planets program by combining (using flip chip technology) an array of devices (including analog, digital, power volt-age, passives, and MEMS) into a miniaturized heterogeneous system and utilizing optical buses to enable autonomy. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Guide for preparing annual reports on radiation-safety testing of electronic products (general)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    For manufacturers of electronic products other than those for which a specific guide has been issued, the guide replaces the Guide for the Filing of Annual Reports (21 CFR Subchapter J, Section 1002.11), HHS Publication FDA 82-8127. The electronic product (general) annual reporting guide is applicable to the following products: products intended to produce x radiation (accelerators, analytical devices, therapy x-ray machines); microwave diathermy machines; cold-cathode discharge tubes; and vacuum switches and tubes operating at or above 15,000 volts. To carry out its responsibilities under Public Law 90-602, the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) has issued a series of regulations contained in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Part 1002 of 21 CFR deals with records and reports. Section 1002.61 categorizes electronic products into Groups A through C. Section 1002.30 requires manufacturers of products in Groups B and C to establish and maintain certain records, while Section 1002.11 requires such manufacturers to submit an Annual Report summarizing the contents of the required records. Section 1002.7 requires that reports conform to reporting guides issued by CDRH unless an acceptable justification for an alternate format is provided.

  10. Neutral beamline with ion energy recovery based on magnetic blocking of electrons

    DOEpatents

    Stirling, W.L.

    1980-07-01

    A neutral beamline generator with energy recovery of the full-energy ion component of the beam based on magnetic blocking of electrons is provided. Ions from a positive ion source are accelerated to the desired beam energy from a slightly positive potential level with respect to ground through a neutralizer cell by means of a negative acceleration voltage. The unneutralized full-energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer are retarded and slightly deflected and the elecrons in the neutralizer are blocked by a magnetic field generated transverse to the beamline. An electron collector in the form of a coaxial cylinder surrounding and protruding axial a few centimeters beyond the neutralizer exit terminates the electrons which exit the neutralizer in an E x B drift to the collector when the collector is biased a few hundred volts positive with respect to the neutralizer voltage. The neutralizer is operated at the negative acceleration voltage. The neutralizer is operated at the negative acceleration voltage, and the deflected full energy ions are decelerated and the charge collected at ground potential thereby expending none of their energy received from the acceleration power supply.

  11. Gated photocathode design for the P510 electron tube used in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) optical streak cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datte, P.; James, G.; Celliers, P.; Kalantar, D.; Vergel de Dios, G.

    2015-08-01

    The optical streak cameras currently used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) implement the P510 electron tube from Photonis1. The existing high voltage electronics provide DC bias voltages to the cathode, slot, and focusing electrodes. The sweep deflection plates are driven by a ramp voltage. This configuration has been very successful for the majority of measurements required at NIF. New experiments require that the photocathode be gated or blanked to reduce the effects of undesirable scattered light competing with low light level experimental data. The required ~2500V gate voltage is applied between the photocathode and the slot electrode in response to an external trigger to allow the electrons to flow. Otherwise the slot electrode is held approximately 100 Volts more negative than the potential of the photocathode, preventing electron flow. This article reviews the implementation and performance of the gating circuit that applies an electronic gate to the photocathode with a nominal 50ns rise and fall time, and a pulse width between 50ns and 2000ns.

  12. Detection of gamma rays from a starburst galaxy.

    PubMed

    Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Barres de Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L-M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füssling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Paz Arribas, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P-O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2009-11-20

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of approximately 10(15) electron volts. We report the detection of gamma rays--tracers of such cosmic rays--from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 billion electron volts is F = (5.5 +/- 1.0(stat) +/- 2.8(sys)) x 10(-13) cm(-2) s(-1), implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is five times as large as that in our Galaxy. PMID:19779150

  13. Epidermal electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lu, Nanshu; Ma, Rui; Kim, Yun-Soung; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Wang, Shuodao; Wu, Jian; Won, Sang Min; Tao, Hu; Islam, Ahmad; Yu, Ki Jun; Kim, Tae-il; Chowdhury, Raeed; Ying, Ming; Xu, Lizhi; Li, Ming; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Keum, Hohyun; McCormick, Martin; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Huang, Yonggang; Coleman, Todd; Rogers, John A

    2011-08-12

    We report classes of electronic systems that achieve thicknesses, effective elastic moduli, bending stiffnesses, and areal mass densities matched to the epidermis. Unlike traditional wafer-based technologies, laminating such devices onto the skin leads to conformal contact and adequate adhesion based on van der Waals interactions alone, in a manner that is mechanically invisible to the user. We describe systems incorporating electrophysiological, temperature, and strain sensors, as well as transistors, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, radio frequency inductors, capacitors, oscillators, and rectifying diodes. Solar cells and wireless coils provide options for power supply. We used this type of technology to measure electrical activity produced by the heart, brain, and skeletal muscles and show that the resulting data contain sufficient information for an unusual type of computer game controller. PMID:21836009

  14. Epidermal Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lu, Nanshu; Ma, Rui; Kim, Yun-Soung; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Wang, Shuodao; Wu, Jian; Won, Sang Min; Tao, Hu; Islam, Ahmad; Yu, Ki Jun; Kim, Tae-il; Chowdhury, Raeed; Ying, Ming; Xu, Lizhi; Li, Ming; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Keum, Hohyun; McCormick, Martin; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Huang, Yonggang; Coleman, Todd; Rogers, John A.

    2011-08-01

    We report classes of electronic systems that achieve thicknesses, effective elastic moduli, bending stiffnesses, and areal mass densities matched to the epidermis. Unlike traditional wafer-based technologies, laminating such devices onto the skin leads to conformal contact and adequate adhesion based on van der Waals interactions alone, in a manner that is mechanically invisible to the user. We describe systems incorporating electrophysiological, temperature, and strain sensors, as well as transistors, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, radio frequency inductors, capacitors, oscillators, and rectifying diodes. Solar cells and wireless coils provide options for power supply. We used this type of technology to measure electrical activity produced by the heart, brain, and skeletal muscles and show that the resulting data contain sufficient information for an unusual type of computer game controller.

  15. Millions and Billions of Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Darren; Horowitz, Paul

    The history of the Harvard SETI group is inextricably linked with the history of Paul Horowitz. Horowitz became enamored with SETI as a student at Harvard, reading Ed Purcell's paper "Radio Astronomy and Communication Through Space" (Purcell, 1960), discussing with his roommates a class that Carl Sagan was teaching there using a draft of Shklovskii and Sagan's "Intelligent Life in the Universe" (Shklovskii and Sagan, 1966) as a text, and finally attending a Loeb Lecture series at Harvard by Frank Drake (Drake, 1969). The series was officially about pulsars but Drake did manage to slip in one inspiring talk about SETI. Horowitz says that "It was this lecture that launched me into this field; it was a revelation that you could go beyond idle speculation - you could actually calculate stuff."

  16. A Billion Is How Big?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, John

    2008-01-01

    Place-value is a central, powerful mathematical concept. From the earliest years of school, students focus on developing strong understanding of the ideas, notation and computational use. Many times, however, they get as far as thousands and then resort to waving their hands--at least until they start a far more advanced and abstract treatment of…

  17. Positive spacecraft charging as measured by the Shuttle Potential and Return Electron Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oberhardt, M.R.; Hardy, D.A. ); Thompson, D.C.; Raitt, W.J. ); Melchioni, E. ); Bonifazi, C. ); Gough, M.P. . Space Science Centre)

    1993-12-01

    During the deployed phase of the Tethered Satellite System 1 Mission (TSS-1), the Orbiter was observed to charge positively on a number of occasions during operation of the 100 mA, 1 keV Fast Pulsed Electron Gun (FPEG) of the Shuttle Electrodynamic Tether System (SETS). The occurrence of positive charging was determined both through the measurement of the voltages in the system and through observation of the charging peaks in the electron spectra measured by the Shuttle Potential and Return Electron Experiment (SPREE). Here the authors present data from the two cases of highest positive charging during the deployed phase of the TSS-1 mission. These cases occurred in darkness during periods of depressed ambient plasma density. Positive Orbiter charging was observed from ten to a hundred volts. During the operation of the FPEG prior to Orbiter charging, the SPREE electrostatic analyzers measured intense fluxes of electrons at energies up to the energy of the emitted beam. During the charging periods, the SPREE electron spectra displayed a peak whose position in energy was consistent with the positive potential of the Orbiter as determined from SETS and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) Deployer and Satellite Core Equipment (DCORE and SCORE) measurements. At energies above the charging peak, the shape of the electron distribution function during charging was consistent with a simple acceleration of the precharging spectrum by the electric field produced by the positively charged Orbiter. At energies below the charging peak, intense, isotropic fluxes of electrons were measured either with a power law spectrum or with a spectrum peaked at 10 to 20 eV.

  18. An efficient probe for rapid detection of cyanide in water at parts per billion levels and naked-eye detection of endogenous cyanide.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Namita; Jha, Satadru; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-03-01

    A new molecular probe based on an oxidized bis-indolyl skeleton has been developed for rapid and sensitive visual detection of cyanide ions in water and also for the detection of endogenously bound cyanide. The probe allows the "naked-eye" detection of cyanide ions in water with a visual color change from red to yellow (Δλmax =80 nm) with the immediate addition of the probe. It shows high selectivity towards the cyanide ion without any interference from other anions. The detection of cyanide by the probe is ratiometric, thus making the detection quantitative. A Michael-type addition reaction of the probe with the cyanide ion takes place during this chemodosimetric process. In water, the detection limit was found to be at the parts per million level, which improved drastically when a neutral micellar medium was employed, and it showed a parts-per-billion-level detection, which is even 25-fold lower than the permitted limits of cyanide in water. The probe could also efficiently detect the endogenously bound cyanide in cassava (a staple food) with a clear visual color change without requiring any sample pretreatment and/or any special reaction conditions such as pH or temperature. Thus the probe could serve as a practical naked-eye probe for "in-field" experiments without requiring any sophisticated instruments. PMID:24449698

  19. Performance as Promised: How the Chandra X-ray Observatory Accomplished One of Nasa's Most Challenging Missions for Billions of Dollars Less than Originally Planned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Greg; Hefner, Keith

    2004-01-01

    As the nation looks toward bold new ventures in space, the Chandra X-ray Observatory program offers an example of how billion-dollar missions can be successfully developed within tightening fiscal constraints. Chandra experienced many of challenges facing bold space programs (state-of-the-art technical requirements and budget-induced slips and restructurings), and yet the Chandra team achieved nearly all the originally envisioned performance for dramatically lower cost. This was accomplished by a combination of team- work, systems engineering, advanced technology insertion, and effective approaches for program implementation. A thorough tradeoff of science utility vs. cost led to the selection of a highly elliptical orbit with uncrewed robotic delivery, deployment, and maintenance. Progressive, focused technology demonstrations were accomplished prior to commitment of major resources to critical elements of the system design, such as the high resolution mirror assembly (HRMA). Pathfinder hardware was developed to reduce risks. A variety of schedule risk reduction measures were implemented and resulted in the X-ray calibration taking place exactly within five days of its originally planned date after after five years of development. The team worked together in an effective manner to contain requirements creep. reductions such as the ACIS-2 chip device. It is estimated that the above combination of measures achieved the avoidance of over $4B in costs, while enabling a highly successful mission.

  20. Two-phase increase in the maximum size of life over 3.5 billion years reflects biological innovation and environmental opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Jonathan L.; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Finnegan, Seth; Kowalewski, Michał; Krause, Richard A.; Lyons, S. Kathleen; McClain, Craig R.; McShea, Daniel W.; Novack-Gottshall, Philip M.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stempien, Jennifer A.; Wang, Steve C.

    2009-01-01

    The maximum size of organisms has increased enormously since the initial appearance of life >3.5 billion years ago (Gya), but the pattern and timing of this size increase is poorly known. Consequently, controls underlying the size spectrum of the global biota have been difficult to evaluate. Our period-level compilation of the largest known fossil organisms demonstrates that maximum size increased by 16 orders of magnitude since life first appeared in the fossil record. The great majority of the increase is accounted for by 2 discrete steps of approximately equal magnitude: the first in the middle of the Paleoproterozoic Era (≈1.9 Gya) and the second during the late Neoproterozoic and early Paleozoic eras (0.6–0.45 Gya). Each size step required a major innovation in organismal complexity—first the eukaryotic cell and later eukaryotic multicellularity. These size steps coincide with, or slightly postdate, increases in the concentration of atmospheric oxygen, suggesting latent evolutionary potential was realized soon after environmental limitations were removed. PMID:19106296

  1. Environmental TEM study of electron beam induced electro-chemistry of Pr₀̣₆₄Ca₀̣₃₆MnO₃ catalysts for oxygen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mildner, Stephanie; Beleggia, Marco; Mierwaldt, Daniel; Hansen, Thoma Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Ciston, Jim; Zhu, Yimei; Jooss, Christian

    2015-03-12

    Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy (ETEM) studies offer great potential for gathering atomic scale information on the electronic state of electrodes in contact with reactants but also pose big challenges due to the impact of the high energy electron beam. In this article, we present an ETEM study of a Pr₀̣₆₄Ca₀̣₃₆MnO₃ (PCMO) thin film electro-catalyst for water splitting and oxygen evolution in contact with water vapor. We show by means of off-axis electron holography and electrostatic modeling that the electron beam gives rise to a positive electric sample potential due to secondary electron emission. The value of the electric potential depends on the primary electron flux, the sample -conductivity and grounding, and gas properties. We present evidence that two observed electro-chemical reactions are driven by a beam induced electrostatic potential of the order of a volt. The first reaction is an anodic electrochemical oxidation reaction of oxygen depleted amorphous PCMO which results in recrystallization of the perovskite structure. The second reaction is oxygen evolution which can be detected by the oxidation of a silane additive and formation of SiO2–x at catalytically active surfaces. Recently published in-situ XANES observation of subsurface oxygen vacancy formation during oxygen evolution at a positive potential [³²] is confirmed in this work. The quantification of beam induced potentials is an important step for future controlled electro-chemical experiments in an ETEM.

  2. Follow the money: how the billions of dollars that flow from smokers in poor nations to companies in rich nations greatly exceed funding for global tobacco control and what might be done about it.

    PubMed

    Callard, Cynthia

    2010-08-01

    The business of selling cigarettes is increasingly concentrated in the hands of five tobacco companies that collectively control almost 90% of the world's cigarette market, four of which are publicly traded corporations. The economic activities of these cigarette manufacturers can be monitored through their reports to shareholders and other public documents. Reports for 2008 show that the revenues of these five companies exceeded $300 billion, of which more than $160 billion was provided to governments as taxes, and that corporate earnings of the four publicly traded companies were over $25 billion, of which $14 billion was retained after corporate income taxes were paid. By contrast, funding for domestic and international tobacco control is not reliably reported. Estimated funding for global tobacco control in 2008, at $240 million, is significantly lower than resources provided to address other highmortality global health challenges. Tobacco control has not yet benefited from the innovative finance mechanisms that are in place for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. The Framework Convention On Tobacco Control (FCTC) process could be used to redirect some of the earnings from transnational tobacco sales to fund FCTC implementation or other global health efforts. PMID:20610436

  3. Discovery of a 12 billion solar mass black hole at redshift 6.3 and its challenge to the black hole/galaxy co-evolution at cosmic dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yi, Weimin; Zuo, Wenwen; Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Wang, Ran; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Thompson, David; Beletsky, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    To date about 40 quasars with redshifts z>6 have been discovered. Each quasar harbors a black hole with a mass of about one billion solar masses. The existence of such black holes when the Universe was less than one billion years after the Big Bang presents significant challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the black hole/galaxy co-evolution. I will report a recent discovery of an ultra-luminous quasar at redshift z=6.30, which has an observed optical and near-infrared luminosity a few times greater than those of previously known z>6 quasars. With near-infrared spectroscopy, we obtain a black hole mass of about 12 billion solar masses, which is well consistent with the mass derived by assuming an Eddington-limited accretion. This ultra-luminous quasar with a 12 billion solar mass black hole at z>6 provides a unique laboratory to the study of the mass assembly and galaxy formation around the most massive black holes in the early Universe. It raises further challenges to the black hole/galaxy co-evolution in the epoch of cosmic reionization because the black hole needs to grow much faster than the host galaxy.

  4. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the edge of chaos, where complex phenomena, including creativity and intelligence, may emerge'. Also in this issue R Stanley Williams and colleagues report results from simulations that demonstrate the potential for using Mott transistors as building blocks for scalable neuristor-based integrated circuits without transistors [5]. The scalability of neural chip designs is also tackled in the design reported by Narayan Srinivasa and colleagues in the US [6]. Meanwhile Carsten Timm and Massimiliano Di Ventra describe simulations of a molecular transistor in which electrons strongly coupled to a vibrational mode lead to a Franck-Condon (FC) blockade that mimics the spiking action potentials in synaptic memory behaviour [7]. The 'atomic switches' used to demonstrate synaptic behaviour by a collaboration of researchers in California and Japan also come under further scrutiny in this issue. James K Gimzewski and colleagues consider the difference between the behaviour of an atomic switch in isolation and in a network [8]. As the authors point out, 'The work presented represents steps in a unified approach of experimentation and theory of complex systems to make atomic switch networks a uniquely scalable platform for neuromorphic computing'. Researchers in Germany [9] and Sweden [10] also report on theoretical approaches to modelling networks of memristive elements and complementary resistive switches for synaptic devices. As Vincent Derycke and colleagues in France point out, 'Actual experimental demonstrations of neural network type circuits based on non-conventional/non-CMOS memory devices and displaying function learning capabilities remain very scarce'. They describe how their work using carbon nanotubes provides a rare demonstration of actual function learning with synapses based on nanoscale building blocks [11]. However, this is far from the only experimental work reported in this issue, others include: short-term memory of TiO2-based electrochemical capacitors [12]; a neuromorphic circuit composed of a nanoscale 1-kbit resistive random-access memory (RRAM) cross-point array of synapses and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) neuron circuits [13]; a WO3-x-based nanoionics device from Masakazu Aono's group with a wide scale of reprogrammable memorization functions [14]; a new spike-timing dependent plasticity scheme based on a MOS transistor as a selector and a RRAM as a variable resistance device [15]; a new hybrid memristor-CMOS neuromorphic circuit [16]; and a photo-assisted atomic switch [17]. Synaptic electronics evidently has many emerging facets, and Duygu Kuzum, Shimeng Yu, and H-S Philip Wong in the US provide a review of the field, including the materials, devices and applications [18]. In embracing the expertise acquired over thousands of years of evolution, biomimetics and bio-inspired design is a common, smart approach to technological innovation. Yet in successfully mimicking the physiological mechanisms of the human mind synaptic electronics research has a potential impact that is arguably unprecedented. That the quirks and eccentricities recently unearthed in the behaviour of nanomaterials should lend themselves so accommodatingly to emulating synaptic functions promises some very exciting developments in the field, as the articles in this special issue emphasize. References [1] von Neumann J (ed) 2012 The Computer and the Brain 3rd edn (Yale: Yale University Press) [2] Strukov D B, Snider G S, Stewart D R and Williams R S 2008 The missing memristor found Nature 453 80-3 [3] Chua L O 1971 Memristor—the missing circuit element IEEE Trans. Circuit Theory 18 507-19 [4] Chua L O 2013 Memristor, Hodgkin-Huxley, and Edge of Chaos Nanotechnology 24 383001 [5] Pickett M D and Williams R S 2013 Phase transitions enable computational universality in neuristor-based cellular automata Nanotechnology 24 384002 [6] Cruz-Albrecht J M, Derosier T and Srinivasa N 2013 Scalable neural chip with synaptic electronics using CMOS integrated memristors Nanotechnology 24 384011 [7] Timm C and Di Ventra M 2013 Molecular neuron based on the Franck-Condon blockade Nanotechnology 24 384001 [8] Sillin H O, Aguilera R, Shieh H-H, Avizienis A V, Aono M, Stieg A Z and Gimzewski J K 2013 A theoretical and experimental study of neuromorphic atomic switch networks for reservoir computing Nanotechnology 24 384004 [9] Linn E, Menzel S, Ferch S and Waser R 2013 Compact modeling of CRS devices based on ECM cells for memory, logic and neuromorphic applications Nanotechnology 24 384008 [10] Konkoli Z and Wendin G 2013 A generic simulator for large networks of memristive elements Nanotechnology 24 384007 [11] Gacem K, Retrouvey J-M, Chabi D, Filoramo A, Zhao W, Klein J-O and Derycke V 2013 Neuromorphic function learning with carbon nanotube-based synapses Nanotechnology 24 384013 [12] Lim H, Kim I, Kim J-S, Hwang C S and Jeong D S 2013 Short-term memory of TiO2-based electrochemical capacitors: empirical analysis with adoption of a sliding threshold Nanotechnology 24 384005 [13] Park S, Noh J, Choo M-L, Sheri A M, Chang M, Kim Y-B, Kim C J, Jeon M, Lee B-G, Lee B H and Hwang H 2013 Nanoscale RRAM-based synaptic electronics: toward a neuromorphic computing device Nanotechnology 24 384009 [14] Yang R, Terabe K, Yao Y, Tsuruoka T, Hasegawa T, Gimzewski J K and Aono M 2013 Synaptic plasticity and memory functions achieved in WO3-x-based nanoionics device by using principle of atomic switch operation Nanotechnology 24 384002 [15] Ambrogio S, Balatti S, Nardi F, Facchinetti S and Ielmini D 2013 Spike-timing dependent plasticity in a transistor-selected resistive switching memory Nanotechnology 24 384012 [16] Indiveria G, Linares-Barranco B, Legenstein R, Deligeorgis G and Prodromakise T 2013 Integration of nanoscale memristor synapses in neuromorphic computing architectures Nanotechnology 24 384010 [17] Hino T, Hasegawa T, Tanaka H, Tsuruoka T, Terabe K, Ogawa T and Aono M 2013 Volatile and nonvolatile selective switching of a photo-assited initialized atomic switch Nanotechnology 24 384006 [18] Kuzum D, Yu S and Wong H-S P 2013 Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications Nanotechnology 24 382001

  5. Neuromorphic adaptive plastic scalable electronics: analog learning systems.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Narayan; Cruz-Albrecht, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research to build programmable intelligent machines have demonstrated limited utility in complex, real-world environments. Comparing their performance with biological systems, these machines are less efficient by a factor of 1 million1 billion in complex, real-world environments. The Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics (SyNAPSE) program is a multifaceted Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) project that seeks to break the programmable machine paradigm and define a new path for creating useful, intelligent machines. Since real-world systems exhibit infinite combinatorial complexity, electronic neuromorphic machine technology would be preferable in a host of applications, but useful and practical implementations still do not exist. HRL Laboratories LLC has embarked on addressing these challenges, and, in this article, we provide an overview of our project and progress made thus far. PMID:22344953

  6. Logic-controlled solid state switchgear for 270 volts dc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.; Waddington, D.; Buchanan, E. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A feasibility study to design and demonstrate solid state switchgear in the form of circuit breakers and a power transfer switch is described. The switchgear operates on a nominal 270 V dc circuit and controls power to a load of up to 15 amperes. One circuit breaker may be interconnected to a second breaker to form a power transfer switch. On-off and transfer functions of the breakers or the transfer switch are remotely controlled. A number of reclosures with variable time delay between tripout and reclosure are programmed and controlled by integrated analog and COSMOS logic circuits. A unique commutation circuit, that generates only minimal transient disturbance to either source or load, was developed to interrupt current flow through the main SCR switching element. Laboratory tests demonstrated performance of the solid state circuit breakers over specified voltage and temperature ranges.

  7. Kiloelectron volt cluster impacts: prospects for cluster-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ronny D.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Schweikert, Emile A.

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes part of our continuing efforts in examining the ability of polyatomic or `cluster' projectiles to improve secondary ion yields in SIMS. Negative secondary ion yields resulting from keV bombardment of lanthanum and bismuth oxide projectiles (composition (M2O3)mMO+) were measured and compared for both organic and inorganic targets. Each metal oxide projectile produces an increase in secondary ion yield when compared to the same number of Cs+ projectiles at similar energies. In addition, the nonlinear increase in secondary ion yield per number of constituent atoms in the primary ion is compared for polyatomic projectiles within a given metal oxide series. The high secondary ion yields combined with efficient time-of-flight mass analysis translate into prospects for SIMS under `superstatic' conditions, which should be particularly attractive for the detection of organics. In considering analytical applications it must be recognized that when a projectile becomes more efficient at ejecting molecular or quasimolecular ions (intact emission), it may also become more efficient at `manufacturing' ions (recombination processes). Moreover, the number of molecules destroyed per analyte-specific secondary ions detected varies with projectile characteristics. The challenge for the practice of `cluster-SIMS' is to optimize the projectiles for maximizing sensitivity and eventually limit-of-detection.

  8. For the detection of subkiloelectron-volt X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, C. J.; Ku, W. H.-M.; Vartanian, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    A large-area, imaging gas scintillation proportional counter (IGSPC) has been constructed for use in X-ray astronomy. The IGSPC consists of a gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) with a 1-micron polypropylene window coupled to a multiwire proportional counter (MWPC) via a calcium fluoride window. The MWPC, filled with a mixture of argon, methane, and tetrakis (dimethylamino) ethylene, detects the UV photons emitted by the xenon gas in the GSPC. Over a sensitive area of 21 sq cm, the instrument has a measured energy resolution of 17.5% (FWHM) and 1.9 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution at 1.5 keV.

  9. Age-related degradation of Westinghouse 480-volt circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Subudhi, M.; Shier, W.; MacDougall, E. )

    1990-07-01

    An aging assessment of Westinghouse DS-series low-voltage air circuit breakers was performed as part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. The objectives of this study are to characterize age-related degradation within the breaker assembly and to identify maintenance practices to mitigate their effect. Since this study has been promulgated by the failures of the reactor trip breakers at the McGuire Nuclear Station in July 1987, results relating to the welds in the breaker pole lever welds are also discussed. The design and operation of DS-206 and DS-416 breakers were reviewed. Failure data from various national data bases were analyzed to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and mechanisms. Additional operating experiences from one nuclear station and two industrial breaker-service companies were obtained to develop aging trends of various subcomponents. The responses of the utilities to the NRC Bulletin 88-01, which discusses the center pole lever welds, were analyzed to assess the final resolution of failures of welds in the reactor trips. Maintenance recommendations, made by the manufacturer to mitigate age-related degradation were reviewed, and recommendations for improving the monitoring of age-related degradation are discussed. As described in Volume 2 of this NUREG, the results from a test program to assess degradation in breaker parts through mechanical cycling are also included. The testing has characterized the cracking of center-pole lever welds, identified monitoring techniques to determine aging in breakers, and provided information to augment existing maintenance programs. Recommendations to improve breaker reliability using effective maintenance, testing, and inspection programs are suggested. 13 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. ReVOLT: radiation-enhanced viral oncolytic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, Sunil J.; Mezhir, James J.; Roizman, Bernard; Weichselbaum, Ralph R. . E-mail: rrw@rover.uchicago.edu

    2006-11-01

    Viral oncolytic therapy has been pursued with renewed interest as the molecular basis of carcinogenesis and viral replication has been elucidated. Genetically engineered, attenuated viruses have been rationally constructed to achieve a therapeutic index in tumor cells compared with surrounding normal tissue. Many of these attenuated mutant viruses have entered clinical trials. Here we review the preclinical literature demonstrating the interaction of oncolytic viruses with ionizing radiation and provides a basis for future clinical trials.

  11. Trapped electron plasma formation and equilibrium with a low-power radio-frequency drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.

    2015-06-01

    Penning-Malmberg traps confining electron plasmas usually rely on external sources like thermo- and photocathodes. It has been already demonstrated that electron plasmas of comparable densities can be produced by applying a radio-frequency (RF) power to any inner electrode of the trap. Such excitation may result in significant electron heating and ionization of the residual gas with the formation of a plasma column when the RF frequency is of the order or larger than the typical axial bounce frequencies of few-eV electrons, even at RF amplitude of few volts. While discharges are common in plasma generation at higher pressures and RF power, this mechanism is not yet well explored in our working conditions, namely ultra-high vacuum and very low RF power. This plasma production mechanism is very sensitive to the experimental conditions. Interesting phenomena can be observed: transition from a diffuse to a narrow-section, denser plasma column; presence of low-order diocotron modes in transient and steady-state plasmas; modulation of the m=1 diocotron mode and suppression of its instability despite the presence of positive ions and resistive loads. These observations are reported here, and possible explanations are discussed. In addition, a possible electron heating mechanism is investigated with a single-particle, one-dimensional model described by an area-preserving map where an electron bounces within a square potential well and the RF excitation is modelled by a time-oscillating square barrier. The low-energy part of the Poincaré plot includes both quasi-periodic and chaotic regions, where heating up to ionization energies is achievable. Results of a systematic analysis of the map extracting its chaotic properties and scaling laws as a function of the control parameters are reported.

  12. A Novel Low Energy Electron Microscope for DNA Sequencing and Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mankos, M.; Shadman, K.; Persson, H.H.J.; N’Diaye, A.T.; Schmid, A.K.; Davis, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel technique that is directed towards imaging nanostructures and surfaces with sub-nanometer resolution. The technique combines a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, an energy filter, and dual beam illumination in a single instrument. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. Simulation results predict that the novel aberration corrector design will eliminate the second rank chromatic and third and fifth order spherical aberrations, thereby improving the resolution into the sub-nanometer regime at landing energies as low as one hundred electron-Volts. The energy filter produces a beam that can extract detailed information about the chemical composition and local electronic states of non-periodic objects such as nanoparticles, interfaces, defects, and macromolecules. The dual flood illumination eliminates charging effects that are generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which requires high resolution to distinguish the individual bases and high speed to reduce the cost. The MAD-LEEM approach images the DNA with low electron impact energies, which provides nucleobase contrast mechanisms without organometallic labels. Furthermore, the micron-size field of view when combined with imaging on the fly provides long read lengths, thereby reducing the demand on assembling the sequence. Experimental results from bulk specimens with immobilized single-base oligonucleotides demonstrate that base specific contrast is available with reflected, photo-emitted, and Auger electrons. Image contrast simulations of model rectangular features mimicking the individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed to translate measurements of contrast on bulk DNA to the detectability of individual DNA bases in a sequence. PMID:24524867

  13. Trapped electron plasma formation and equilibrium with a low-power radio-frequency drive

    SciTech Connect

    Romé, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Chen, S.

    2015-06-29

    Penning-Malmberg traps confining electron plasmas usually rely on external sources like thermo- and photocathodes. It has been already demonstrated that electron plasmas of comparable densities can be produced by applying a radio-frequency (RF) power to any inner electrode of the trap. Such excitation may result in significant electron heating and ionization of the residual gas with the formation of a plasma column when the RF frequency is of the order or larger than the typical axial bounce frequencies of few-eV electrons, even at RF amplitude of few volts. While discharges are common in plasma generation at higher pressures and RF power, this mechanism is not yet well explored in our working conditions, namely ultra-high vacuum and very low RF power. This plasma production mechanism is very sensitive to the experimental conditions. Interesting phenomena can be observed: transition from a diffuse to a narrow-section, denser plasma column; presence of low-order diocotron modes in transient and steady-state plasmas; modulation of the m=1 diocotron mode and suppression of its instability despite the presence of positive ions and resistive loads. These observations are reported here, and possible explanations are discussed. In addition, a possible electron heating mechanism is investigated with a single-particle, one-dimensional model described by an area-preserving map where an electron bounces within a square potential well and the RF excitation is modelled by a time-oscillating square barrier. The low-energy part of the Poincaré plot includes both quasi-periodic and chaotic regions, where heating up to ionization energies is achievable. Results of a systematic analysis of the map extracting its chaotic properties and scaling laws as a function of the control parameters are reported.

  14. Redox stratification of the ocean 2.7 billion years ago: Preliminary results from Fe speciation analysis of shallow- and deep-facies black shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, A.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Haraguchi, S.; Naraoka, H.; Yahagi, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Rise of atmospheric oxygen, or as known as GOE (Great Oxidation Event: e.g., Holland, 1994), has been widely believed to have occurred at around 2.4 billion years ago. Contrary, however, some studies have suggested that such oxygenation could have occurred much earlier (e.g., Hoashi et al., 2009). Geochemical behaviors of Fe, a redox-sensitive element, have played crucial roles in constraining past redox environments and the timing of the inferred GOE. In order to examine if there was intra-basinal heterogeneity in the redox conditions before the inferred GOE, we applied Fe speciation analysis to two contrasting sets of pyrite-bearing black shales; WRL1 (deeper facies) and RHDH2A (shallow facies). Both of these semi-contemporaneous black shales, deposited about 2.7 billion years ago and recovered as drillcores in Pilbara, northwestern Australia, have been previously used by Brocks et al. (1999), Yamaguchi et al. (2005), and Eigenbrode and Freeman (2006). Chemical compositions of major and some minor elements were measured by a standard XRF method, S content by elemental analysis, and Fe speciation by the method of Poulton et al. (2005) and Leventhal and Taylor (1990). Contrasting Fe/Al ratios of the examined samples suggest that Fe in WRL1 and RHDH2A is mostly from submarine hydrothermal activity and continental weathering, respectively. Relationships between organic carbon (Corg) and S contents suggest that oxic, normal marine setting is favored for WRL1 and euxinic environment for RHDH2A (S/Corg > 0.37). Oxygen in deep environment (WRL1) must have been supplied by sinking of O2-rich surface water through ocean circulation, because there was no source of oxygen in deep sea. In the 2.7 Ga surface ocean, oxygenic photosynthetic organisms (e.g., cyanobacteria) are considered to have been active. A large amount of organic matter was produced and sank, consuming a large amount of dissolved oxygen for decomposition/respiration. This led to the formation of euxinic environment in the shallow water, such as those seen in the modern ocean. In the euxinic environment, bacterial sulfate reduction became popular and induced pyrite formation. Abundance of reactive Fe and highly reactive Fe and DOP (degree of pyritization) is also contrasting between WRL1 and RHDH2A, i.e., deep and shallow ocean sediments. Contrasting heterogeneities in the above geochemical parameters between shallow and deep Archean ocean suggest that the chemical structure of the 2.7 Ga ocean was not homogeneously anoxic or reducing as have been commonly believed, but possibly more variable, i.e., relatively anoxic in shallow ocean and oxic in deep ocean. References: Brocks et al. (1999) Sciecne 285, 1033-1036; Eigenbrode and Freeman (2006) PNAS 103, 15759-15764; Hoashi et al. (2009) Nature Geoscience 2, 301-306, Holland (1994) In Early Life on Earth, Columbia Univ. Press; Leventhal and Taylor (1990) J. Sed. Petrol. 58, 812-819; Poulton and Canfield (2005) 214, 209- 221; Yamaguchi et al. (2005) Chem. Geol 218, 135-169.

  15. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo, Sergio; Nanni, Emilio A.; Wong, Liang Jie; Moriena, Gustavo; Keathley, Phillip D.; Laurent, Guillaume; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2016-02-01

    Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008)]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London) 431, 535 (2004); T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006); S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009)] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: "Making the molecular movie,", Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006)]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014)] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010); F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010); Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006); C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006); A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and compressed by radially polarized laser pulses and soft-x-ray pulses from optical undulators, J. Phys. B 47, 015601 (2014)] avoiding the need of a medium or guiding structure entirely to achieve strong longitudinal energy transfer. Here we present the first observation of direct longitudinal laser acceleration of nonrelativistic electrons that undergo highly directional multi-GeV /m accelerating gradients. This demonstration opens a new frontier for direct laser-driven particle acceleration capable of creating well collimated and relativistic attosecond electron bunches [C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006)] and x-ray pulses [A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and compressed by radially polarized laser pulses and soft-x-ray pulses from optical undulators, J. Phys. B 47, 015601 (2014)].

  16. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  18. Tall earthfill dam key to flood plan: California`s most hazardous basin scene of $1.3-billion Corps program

    SciTech Connect

    Soast, A.

    1994-11-07

    In semiarid Southern California, {open_quotes}The Big One{close_quotes} generally connotes a seismic even. For those near the usually docile Santa Ana River, however, the major destructive event could be a flood. The Corps of Engineers says it could cover 170 sq miles with about 3 ft of water, jeopardizing more than 3 million persons and 255,000 structures. To avert that, the agency launched a $1.3-billion program. Half of the total cost is for major construction. About $500 million will go for land acquisition and relocations, while some $170 million is for planning, engineering and project management. Seven Oaks will be a rock and earthfill embankment standing 550 ft above the streambed with a crest length of 3,000 ft. An excavated and grouted foundation trench will extend as far as 80 ft below the dam. The structure will contain 43 million cu yd. {open_quotes}It`s between two branches of the San Andreas Fault,{close_quotes} says Robert L. Hall, chief of the design branch in the Corps` Los Angeles district office. {open_quotes}We ended up with a criterion of 4 ft of displacement in any direction that the dam must withstand.{close_quotes} That could be produced by a quake of magnitude 8-plus resulting in maximum horizontal acceleration of 0.7 g. But Hall adds that the dam is in a geological compression zone. In the event of a quake there would be {open_quotes} just slippage. The dam would heal itself.{close_quotes}

  19. Stability of parts-per-billion hazardous organic cylinder gases and performance audit results of source test and ambient-air measurement systems. Status report 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jayanty, R.K.M.; Cooper, S.W.; Sokash, J.A.; Decker, C.E.

    1985-12-01

    A repository of 22 gaseous organic compounds at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels in compressed gas cylinders has been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The primary objectives of this ongoing project are: (1) to provide accurate gas mixtures to EPA, state/local agencies, or their contractors for performance audits to assess the relative accuracy of source measurement systems during hazardous-waste trial burn tests and ambient air-monitoring programs; (2) to verify the manufacturer's certified analysis of the multicomponent gas mixtures; (3) to determine the stability of gas mixtures with time; and (4) to develop new audit materials as requested by EPA. The repository consists of 3 mixtures of 5, 8, and 9 organic compounds each. These mixtures were blended by a commercial gas supplier in aluminum cylinders in a balance gas of nitrogen. The 5-component mixture (Group I) contains carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, perchloroethylene, vinyl chloride and benzene. The 9-component mixture (Group II) includes trichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane, acetonitrile, trichlorofluoromethane (F-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (F-12), bromomethane, methyl ethyl ketone and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. The 8-component mixture (Group III) includes pyridine, vinylidene chloride, 1,1,2-trichloro 1,2,2-trifluoroethane (F-113), 1,2-dichloro 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane (F-114), acetone, 1,4-dioxane, toluene, and chlorobenzene. To date 41 performance audits have been initiated and 35 are complete. The results of these audits and description of the experimental procedures used for analyses and available stability data are presented in this Status Report 2.

  20. Florida Vocational Program Guide for Electronics, Industrial Electronics, Electronic Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Raymond; And Others

    This guide is intended for local school district and community college administrators, instructors, and other advisory and coordinating groups charged with developing and offering courses in electronics, industrial electronics, and electronic technology. The following topics are covered: legal authority (program standards, planning, structure,…

  1. Florida Vocational Program Guide for Electronics, Industrial Electronics, Electronic Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Raymond; And Others

    This guide is intended for local school district and community college administrators, instructors, and other advisory and coordinating groups charged with developing and offering courses in electronics, industrial electronics, and electronic technology. The following topics are covered: legal authority (program standards, planning, structure,

  2. Whistler Wave generation by an electron beam in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Gabriel; Pribyl, Patrick; Gekelman, Walter; Thomas, Sam; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Wolman, Ben; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    A multi-grid pulsed electron beam (Ebeam = 1-4.8 KV, area =1.32 cm2, τ >5 μs) is inserted into a background plasma (He, n = 5X1010 cm3, B0z = 80 G, L = 1.5 m, dia = 40 cm). The pulsed electron beam power supply, can generate up to 4800 Volts at 10 Amps and was constructed by the LAPTAG high school students. The beam can be oriented at any angle with respect to the background magnetic field. The pulsed beam generates whistler waves by Cherenkov radiation. The waves are detected with 3 axis magnetic pickup probes which can be moved in planes transverse or parallel to the background magnetic field under computer control. The whistler wave pattern is used to determine the wavenumber k and Fourier analysis of the signal determines ω. The wave dispersion relation is compared to theory. Work done at BaPSF at UCLA and supported by NSF and DOE.

  3. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  4. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  5. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  6. Energy Doubling of 42 GeV Electrons in a Meter-scale Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas; Kirby, Neil; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-03-14

    The energy frontier of particle physics is several trillion electron volts, but colliders capable of reaching this regime (such as the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider) are costly and time-consuming to build; it is therefore important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators, a drive beam (either laser or particle) produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultrahigh accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. Here we show that an energy gain of more than 42 GeV is achieved in a plasma wakefield accelerator of 85 cm length, driven by a 42 GeV electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx} 52GV m{sup -1}. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3-km-long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. This is an important step towards demonstrating the viability of plasma accelerators for high-energy physics applications.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of novel electronic materials with volatile species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhizhong, Tang

    In this thesis, two novel electronic materials, including semiconductor ZnGeAs2 and dielectric Ba(Zn1/3Ta 2/3)O3 were studied. The growth, characterization and application of ZnGeAs2 in photovoltaics were explored. The structure, optic and electric properties of expitaxial Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O 3 films were also reported. ZnGeAs2 films were grown by pulsed laser deposition from the home-made target. The composition study showed that the Ge element incorporation rate remained constant, while the Zn and As incorporation rates decrease monotonically at elevated growth temperatures. Prototype of photovoltaic cell made with heterojunction p-ZnGeAs2/n-CdS/n+-SnO2 diode showed 0.14 Volt open circuit voltage under ˜100 mW/cm2 lab lamp illumination (1 sun) and 0.45 Volt Voc under 100 mW/cm 2 green LED illumination. Thermal decomposition studied of bulk ZnGeAs2 showed that the Zn and As dissociation rate from ZnGeAs2 approaches one monolayer per second at around 425 °C with activation energy of 1.08 eV. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis showed that synthesis of ZnGeAs2 thin film is a metastable process involving a competition between the forward reaction which depends on the arrival of reactants at the growth surface, and the reverse kinetically-limited decomposition reaction. Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 (100) dielectric thin films grown on MgO (100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The thin film structure, optic and electric properties were systematically characterized. Advanced electronic structure calculations were used to guide the interpretation of the experimental data. The Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 films have an indirect optical band gap of ˜3.0 eV and a refractive index of 1.91 in the visible spectral range, with dielectric constant of 25 and dissipation factor of 0.0025 at 100 kHz. The Ba(Zn1/3Ta 2/3)O3 films exhibit a small thermally-activated Ohmic leakage current at high fields (<250 KV/cm) and high temperatures (<200 °C) with an activation energy of 0.85 eV. Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 dielectric ceramics powder was used to synthesize Metallo-Dielectric Electromagnetic Band Gap structures by ceramic injection molding. Capacitive series and shunt defects were introduced in Metallo-Dielectric Electromagnetic Band Gap structures to generate sub-wavelength resonances. The frequency responses of both defect-free and defect-laden EBG structures were characterized at microwave frequencies and were found to agree with the results of electromagnetic simulations using the commercial HFSS modeling package.

  8. Nano-Electronics and Bio-Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viewgraph presentation on Nano-Electronics and Bio-Electronics is discussed. Topics discussed include: NASA Ames nanotechnology program, Potential Carbon Nanotube (CNT) application, CNT synthesis,Computational Nanotechnology, and protein nanotubes.

  9. Composition and syngeneity of molecular fossils from the 2.78 to 2.45 billion-year-old Mount Bruce Supergroup, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Logan, Graham A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2003-11-01

    Shales of very low metamorphic grade from the 2.78 to 2.45 billion-year-old (Ga) Mount Bruce Supergroup, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, were analyzed for solvent extractable hydrocarbons. Samples were collected from ten drill cores and two mines in a sampling area centered in the Hamersley Basin near Wittenoom and ranging 200 km to the southeast, 100 km to the southwest and 70 km to the northwest. Almost all analyzed kerogenous sedimentary rocks yielded solvent extractable organic matter. Concentrations of total saturated hydrocarbons were commonly in the range of 1 to 20 ppm (μg/g rock) but reached maximum values of 1000 ppm. The abundance of aromatic hydrocarbons was ˜1 to 30 ppm. Analysis of the extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-MS metastable reaction monitoring (MRM) revealed the presence of n-alkanes, mid- and end-branched monomethylalkanes, ω-cyclohexylalkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, diamondoids, tri- to pentacyclic terpanes, steranes, aromatic steroids and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Neither plant biomarkers nor hydrocarbon distributions indicative of Phanerozoic contamination were detected. The host kerogens of the hydrocarbons were depleted in 13C by 2 to 21‰ relative to n-alkanes, a pattern typical of, although more extreme than, other Precambrian samples. Acyclic isoprenoids showed carbon isotopic depletion relative to n-alkanes and concentrations of 2α-methylhopanes were relatively high, features rarely observed in the Phanerozoic but characteristic of many other Precambrian bitumens. Molecular parameters, including sterane and hopane ratios at their apparent thermal maxima, condensate-like alkane profiles, high mono- and triaromatic steroid maturity parameters, high methyladamantane and methyldiamantane indices and high methylphenanthrene maturity ratios, indicate thermal maturities in the wet-gas generation zone. Additionally, extracts from shales associated with iron ore deposits at Tom Price and Newman have unusual polyaromatic hydrocarbon patterns indicative of pyrolytic dealkylation. The saturated hydrocarbons and biomarkers in bitumens from the Fortescue and Hamersley Groups are characterized as 'probably syngenetic with their Archean host rock' based on their typical Precambrian molecular and isotopic composition, extreme maturities that appear consistent with the thermal history of the host sediments, the absence of biomarkers diagnostic of Phanerozoic age, the absence of younger petroleum source rocks in the basin and the wide geographic distribution of the samples. Aromatic hydrocarbons detected in shales associated with iron ore deposits at Mt Tom Price and Mt Whaleback are characterized as 'clearly Archean' based on their hypermature composition and covalent bonding to kerogen.

  10. Interface Electronic Circuitry for an Electronic Tongue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Electronic circuitry has been developed to serve as an interface between an electronic tongue and digital input/output boards in a laptop computer that is used to control the tongue and process its readings. Electronic tongues can be used for a variety of purposes, including evaluating water quality, analyzing biochemicals, analyzing biofilms, and measuring electrical conductivities of soils.

  11. Design of power electronics for TVC and EMA systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, R. Mark; Bell, J. Brett; Shepherd, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    The Component Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. A previous project performed by Auburn University examined the use of the resonant dc link (RDCL) inverter, pulse density modulation (PDM), and mos-controlled thyristors (MCT's) for speed control of a brushless dc motor. The speed of the brushless dc motor is proportional to the applied stator voltage. In a PDM system, the control system determines the number of resonant voltage pulses which must be applied to the stator to achieve a desired speed. The addition of a waveshaping circuit to the front end of a standard three-phase inverter yields a RDCL inverter; the resonant voltage pulses are produced through the action of this wave shaping circuit and the inverter. This project has focused on the implementation of a system which permits zero-voltage switching with the bus voltage clamped at the input voltage level. In the same manner as the RDCL inverter, the inverter selected for this implementation is a combination of waveshaping circuit and a standard three-phase inverter. In addition, this inverter allows a pulse-width modulated (PWM)-like control scheme instead of a PDM scheme. The operation of waveshaping circuit will be described through analysis and waveforms. Design relationships will also be presented.

  12. Design of power electronics for TVC and EMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, R. Mark; Bell, J. Brett; Shepherd, Michael T.

    1994-11-01

    The Component Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. A previous project performed by Auburn University examined the use of the resonant dc link (RDCL) inverter, pulse density modulation (PDM), and mos-controlled thyristors (MCT's) for speed control of a brushless dc motor. The speed of the brushless dc motor is proportional to the applied stator voltage. In a PDM system, the control system determines the number of resonant voltage pulses which must be applied to the stator to achieve a desired speed. The addition of a waveshaping circuit to the front end of a standard three-phase inverter yields a RDCL inverter; the resonant voltage pulses are produced through the action of this wave shaping circuit and the inverter. This project has focused on the implementation of a system which permits zero-voltage switching with the bus voltage clamped at the input voltage level. In the same manner as the RDCL inverter, the inverter selected for this implementation is a combination of waveshaping circuit and a standard three-phase inverter. In addition, this inverter allows a pulse-width modulated (PWM)-like control scheme instead of a PDM scheme. The operation of waveshaping circuit will be described through analysis and waveforms. Design relationships will also be presented.

  13. Effects of soft electron precipitation on the distribution of vibrational energy of N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, G. P.; Walker, J. C. G.; Mantas, G. P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper investigates the direct effect of soft electron precipitation on the nitrogen vibrational distribution and on the rate coefficient for the ion-atom interchange reaction between O(+) and N2, using a spectrum of the precipitating electrons characteristic of the dayside cusp region. Substantial increases in the nitrogen vibrational temperature and in the rate of the O(+) destruction reaction do not occur unless the flux of incident electrons is as large as 1 trillion per sq cm/sec. For such large fluxes, departures of the vibrational distribution from a Boltzmann distribution have a significant effect on the rate coefficient. Incident fluxes less than 100 billion per sq cm/sec, such as are usually observed, have little direct effect on nitrogen vibration, although the indirect effect resulting from enhanced electron temperatures might be important.

  14. A distributed axis electron beam system for high-speed lithography and defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Daniel S.

    Electron beam lithography can delineate features 10 nm and smaller. However the throughput is slow, limited by space charge blurring when writing with large currents. One way to overcome this limit is to employ multiple beamlets distributed over a large area. The approach described here employs a uniform axial magnetic field to focus thousands of electron beams simultaneously. The source must be at least as small as the beam at the wafer. Fabrication and operation of an aperture source with a diameter of 50nm or less was demonstrated. To prevent contamination, the beam heats the aperture to 200°C. Successful operation was demonstrated by building a test-bed featuring a region of uniform magnetic field and building, inside this region, a miniature scanning electron microscope. We observed resolution between 30nm and 50nm at 10kV and better than 75nm at 1kV. This SEM can image at landing energies as low as 260 Volts. The detection and separation of the secondary electrons generated by adjacent beamlets is achieved by spacing the beamlets by more than the cyclotron diameter of the secondary electrons (250 microns is sufficient). Detection was demonstrated with a custom-designed and built, monolithic, PIN detector with 40 detector elements. The system requires a sparse array of matched electron sources with current densities exceeding 10A/cm2, and electron energy spread less than 0.5 eV. Two new configurations were investigated to meet this requirement. The first, the electron bombardment source features a thin semiconductor membrane with a negative electron affinity emission surface. Free carriers are generated by high-energy electrons impinging on the back surface. We demonstrated the first scanning electron microscope images employing this cathode. The other configuration, the plasmon enhanced photocathode, couples the incident light to surface plasmons on a metallic film. This yields quantum efficiencies 100 times larger than conventional photoemission from a metallic film. A conservative estimate of a magnesium-coated, edge-polished, single-mode fiber yields a current density of 25 A/(cm2 mw) when surface plasmons are excited with a HeCd (325 nm) laser. While the initial motivation for our approach was lithography, it is also extendible to high-speed inspection of wafers and masks.

  15. Molecular Electronics - Current Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Vilan, Ayelet; Cahen, David

    2010-12-01

    Molecular electronics is a flourishing area of nano-science and -technology, with a promise for cheap electronics of novel functionality. Here we outline the major challenges for molecular electronics becoming an established scientific discipline, including models with predictive power.

  16. Electron microscope aperture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An electron microscope including an electron source, a condenser lens having either a circular aperture for focusing a solid cone of electrons onto a specimen or an annular aperture for focusing a hollow cone of electrons onto the specimen, and an objective lens having an annular objective aperture, for focusing electrons passing through the specimen onto an image plane are described. The invention also entails a method of making the annular objective aperture using electron imaging, electrolytic deposition and ion etching techniques.

  17. Attraction by Repulsion: Pairing Electrons using Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilani, Shahal

    One of the fundamental properties of electrons is their mutual Columbic repulsion. If electrons are placed in a solid, however, this basic property may change. A famous example is that of superconductors, where coupling to lattice vibrations makes electrons attractive and leads to the formation of bound pairs. But what if all the degrees of freedom in the solid are electronic? Is it possible to make electrons attract each other only by their repulsion to other electrons? Such an `excitonic' mechanism for attraction was proposed fifty years ago by W. A. Little, with the hope that it could lead to better and more exotic superconductivity. Yet, despite many efforts to synthesize materials that possess this unique property, to date there is still no evidence for electronic-based attraction. In this talk I will present our recent experiments that observe this unusual electronic attraction using a different, bottom-up approach. Our experiments are based on a new generation of quantum devices made from pristine carbon nanotubes, combined with precision cryogenic manipulation. Using this setup we can now assemble the fundamental building block of the excitonic attraction and demonstrate that two electrons that naturally repel each other can be made attractive using an independent electronic system as the binding glue. I will discuss the lessons learned from these experiments on what is achievable with plain electrostatics, and on the possibility to use the observed mechanism for creating exotic states of matter.

  18. Progress toward an aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope for DNA sequencing and surface analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Schmid, Andreas K.; Persson, Henrik H. J.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2012-01-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel imaging technique aimed at high resolution imaging of macromolecules, nanoparticles, and surfaces. MAD-LEEM combines three innovative electron–optical concepts in a single tool: a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, and dual electron beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector is needed to achieve subnanometer resolution at landing energies of a few hundred electronvolts. The dual flood illumination approach eliminates charging effects generated when a conventional, single-beam LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. The low landing energy of electrons in the range of 0 to a few hundred electronvolts is also critical for avoiding radiation damage, as high energy electrons with kilo-electron-volt kinetic energies cause irreversible damage to many specimens, in particular biological molecules. The performance of the key electron–optical components of MAD-LEEM, the aberration corrector combined with the objective lens and a magnetic beam separator, was simulated. Initial results indicate that an electrostatic electron mirror has negative spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients that can be tuned over a large parameter range. The negative aberrations generated by the electron mirror can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies and provide a path to achieving subnanometer spatial resolution. First experimental results on characterizing DNA molecules immobilized on Au substrates in a LEEM are presented. Images obtained in a spin-polarized LEEM demonstrate that high contrast is achievable at low electron energies in the range of 1–10 eV and show that small changes in landing energy have a strong impact on the achievable contrast. The MAD-LEEM approach promises to significantly improve the performance of a LEEM for a wide range of applications in the biosciences, material sciences, and nanotechnology where nanometer scale resolution and analytical capabilities are required. In particular, the microscope has the potential of delivering images of unlabeled DNA strands with nucleotide-specific contrast. This simplifies specimen preparation and significantly eases the computational complexity needed to assemble the DNA sequence from individual reads. PMID:23847748

  19. Atomic electron correlation in nuclear electron capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of electron-electron Coulomb correlation on orbital electron capture by the nucleus was treated by the multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock approach. The theoretical Be-7 L/K capture ratio was found to be 0.086, and the Ar-37 M/L ratio, 0.102. Both ratios were smaller than the independent particle predictions. Measurements exist for the Ar M/L ratio, and agreement between theory and experiment was excellent.

  20. Atomic electron correlation in nuclear electron capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of electron-electron Coulomb correlation on orbital-electron capture by the nucleus has been treated by the multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock approach. The theoretical Be-7 L/K capture ratio is found to be 0.086, and the Ar-37 M/L ratio, 0.102. Both ratios are smaller than the independent-particle predictions. Measurements exist for the Ar M/L ratio, and agreement between theory and experiment is excellent.