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Sample records for binary candidate slx1737-282

  1. MICROLENSING BINARIES WITH CANDIDATE BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during the 2004-2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found seven candidate events: OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the brown dwarf companions are 0.02 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} and 0.019 {+-} 0.002 M {sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low-mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well-covered light curves increases with new-generation searches.

  2. An Improved Catalog of Halo Wide Binary Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine; Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. and Chanamé & Gould, but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan and Zapatero-Osorio & Martín. All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries, we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, 150 of which have radial velocities available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law f(a) ~ a -1 (Oepik's relation) up to different limits. For the 50 most disk-like binaries, those that spend their entire lives within z = ±500 pc, this limit is found to be 19,000 AU (0.09 pc), while for the 50 most halo-like binaries, those that spend on average only 18% of their lives within z = ±500 pc, the limit is 63,000 AU (0.31 pc). In a companion paper, we employ this catalog to establish limits on the masses of the halo massive perturbers (massive compact halo objects).

  3. An improved catalog of halo wide binary candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Christine; Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. and Chanamé and Gould, but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan and Zapatero-Osorio and Martín. All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries, we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, 150 of which have radial velocities available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law f(a) ∼ a {sup –1} (Oepik's relation) up to different limits. For the 50 most disk-like binaries, those that spend their entire lives within z = ±500 pc, this limit is found to be 19,000 AU (0.09 pc), while for the 50 most halo-like binaries, those that spend on average only 18% of their lives within z = ±500 pc, the limit is 63,000 AU (0.31 pc). In a companion paper, we employ this catalog to establish limits on the masses of the halo massive perturbers (massive compact halo objects).

  4. TRIPLE-STAR CANDIDATES AMONG THE KEPLER BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, S.; Deck, K.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Levine, A.; Borkovits, T.; Carter, J.; El Mellah, I.; Kalomeni, B. E-mail: kdeck@mit.edu E-mail: aml@space.mit.edu E-mail: jacarter@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search through the photometric database of Kepler eclipsing binaries looking for evidence of hierarchical triple-star systems. The presence of a third star orbiting the binary can be inferred from eclipse timing variations. We apply a simple algorithm in an automated determination of the eclipse times for all 2157 binaries. The ''calculated'' eclipse times, based on a constant period model, are subtracted from those observed. The resulting O - C (observed minus calculated times) curves are then visually inspected for periodicities in order to find triple-star candidates. After eliminating false positives due to the beat frequency between the {approx}1/2 hr Kepler cadence and the binary period, 39 candidate triple systems were identified. The periodic O - C curves for these candidates were then fit for contributions from both the classical Roemer delay and so-called physical delay, in an attempt to extract a number of the system parameters of the triple. We discuss the limitations of the information that can be inferred from these O - C curves without further supplemental input, e.g., ground-based spectroscopy. Based on the limited range of orbital periods for the triple-star systems to which this search is sensitive, we can extrapolate to estimate that at least 20% of all close binaries have tertiary companions.

  5. Triple-star Candidates among the Kepler Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, S.; Deck, K.; Levine, A.; Borkovits, T.; Carter, J.; El Mellah, I.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Kalomeni, B.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search through the photometric database of Kepler eclipsing binaries looking for evidence of hierarchical triple-star systems. The presence of a third star orbiting the binary can be inferred from eclipse timing variations. We apply a simple algorithm in an automated determination of the eclipse times for all 2157 binaries. The "calculated" eclipse times, based on a constant period model, are subtracted from those observed. The resulting O - C (observed minus calculated times) curves are then visually inspected for periodicities in order to find triple-star candidates. After eliminating false positives due to the beat frequency between the ~1/2 hr Kepler cadence and the binary period, 39 candidate triple systems were identified. The periodic O - C curves for these candidates were then fit for contributions from both the classical Roemer delay and so-called physical delay, in an attempt to extract a number of the system parameters of the triple. We discuss the limitations of the information that can be inferred from these O - C curves without further supplemental input, e.g., ground-based spectroscopy. Based on the limited range of orbital periods for the triple-star systems to which this search is sensitive, we can extrapolate to estimate that at least 20% of all close binaries have tertiary companions.

  6. FRAGILE BINARY CANDIDATES IN THE SDSS DR8 SPECTROSCOPIC ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. K.; Oswalt, T. D.; Zhao, G. E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu

    2012-02-15

    We present a catalog of 80 very wide fragile binary candidates (projected separations >10,000 AU) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Eight spectral archive. The pairs were selected based on proper motion, radial velocity, metallicity, and photometric parallax criteria. The angular separations of these pairs range from 3'' to 250''. The peak in the metallicity distribution of these pairs is about -0.5 dex of solar metallicity. Space motions and reduced proper motion diagrams indicate that all these pairs are members of the disk. The chromospheric activity index S{sub HK} of each component in 38 binary candidates having spectra of high signal-to-noise ratio and member stars of three open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, and NGC 6791) were measured. The S{sub HK} versus color relation for these binary candidates is consistent with the trend seen in these open clusters. The ages implied by this relation suggest that fragile wide pairs can survive longer than 8 Gyr.

  7. Discovery of a nearby young brown dwarf binary candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Seifahrt, A.; Dreizler, S.

    2010-04-01

    In near-infrared NaCo observations of the young brown dwarf 2MASS J0041353-562112, we discovered a companion a little less than a magnitude fainter than the primary. The binary candidate has a separation of 143 mas, and the spectral types of the two components are M 6.5 and M 9.0. Colors and flux ratios of the components are consistent with their locations being at the same distance minimizing the probability of the secondary being a background object. The brown dwarf is known to exhibit Li absorption constraining the age to be younger than ~ 200 Myr, and has been suspected of experiencing ongoing accretion, which implies an age as young as ~ 10 Myr. We estimate distance and orbital parameters of the binary as a function of age. For an age of 10 Myr, the distance to the system is 50 pc, the orbital period is 126 yr, and the masses of the components are ~ 30 and ~ 15 MJup. The binary brown dwarf fills a so far unoccupied region in the parameters mass and age; it is a valuable new benchmark object for brown dwarf atmospheric and evolutionary models. Emmy Noether Fellow.

  8. BINARY CANDIDATES IN THE JOVIAN TROJAN AND HILDA POPULATIONS FROM NEOWISE LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnett, S.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Grav, T.

    2015-02-01

    Determining the binary fraction for a population of asteroids, particularly as a function of separation between the two components, helps describe the dynamical environment at the time the binaries formed, which in turn offers constraints on the dynamical evolution of the solar system. We searched the NEOWISE archival data set for close and contact binary Trojans and Hildas via their diagnostically large light curve amplitudes. We present 48 out of 554 Hilda and 34 out of 953 Trojan binary candidates in need of follow-up to confirm their large light curve amplitudes and subsequently constrain the binary orbit and component sizes. From these candidates, we calculate a preliminary estimate of the binary fraction without confirmation or debiasing of 14%-23% for Trojans larger than ∼12 km and 30%-51% for Hildas larger than ∼4 km. Once the binary candidates have been confirmed, it should be possible to infer the underlying, debiased binary fraction through estimation of survey biases.

  9. On Orbital Elements of Extrasolar Planetary Candidates and Spectroscopic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Black, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We estimate probability densities of orbital elements, periods, and eccentricities, for the population of extrasolar planetary candidates (EPC) and, separately, for the population of spectroscopic binaries (SB) with solar-type primaries. We construct empirical cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) in order to infer probability distribution functions (PDFs) for orbital periods and eccentricities. We also derive a joint probability density for period-eccentricity pairs in each population. Comparison of respective distributions reveals that in all cases EPC and SB populations are, in the context of orbital elements, indistinguishable from each other to a high degree of statistical significance. Probability densities of orbital periods in both populations have P(exp -1) functional form, whereas the PDFs of eccentricities can he best characterized as a Gaussian with a mean of about 0.35 and standard deviation of about 0.2 turning into a flat distribution at small values of eccentricity. These remarkable similarities between EPC and SB must be taken into account by theories aimed at explaining the origin of extrasolar planetary candidates, and constitute an important clue us to their ultimate nature.

  10. A candidate sub-parsec supermassive binary black hole system.

    PubMed

    Boroson, Todd A; Lauer, Tod R

    2009-03-01

    The role of mergers in producing galaxies, together with the finding that most large galaxies harbour black holes in their nuclei, implies that binary supermassive black hole systems should be common. Here we report that the quasar SDSS J153636.22+044127.0 is a plausible example of such a system. This quasar shows two broad-line emission systems, separated in velocity by 3,500 km s(-1). A third system of unresolved absorption lines has an intermediate velocity. These characteristics are unique among known quasars. We interpret this object as a binary system of two black holes, having masses of 10(7.3) and 10(8.9) solar masses separated by approximately 0.1 parsec with an orbital period of approximately 100 years. PMID:19262667

  11. Photometric CCD observations of four Pre-cataclysmic binary candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, R.; Vogt, N.; Colque, Juan Pablo

    We present preliminary results of differential photometric observations of Abell 65, HZ 9, GD 1401 and BPM 46460, obtained between September and December 2006 with the 42 cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Observatory which belongs to the Universidad Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta. All four stars are close red dwarf/white dwarf binaries which could have formed be recent common envelope events. In two of the four cases we detected (or confirmed) significant variability. In one of them, the central star of a planetary nebula Abell 65, we confirmed the rather strong photometric variability with a period very near to 24 hours (Bond and Livio, 1990). In the white dwarf binary HZ9 we detected, for the first time, photometric variations with a period near 0.58 days which corresponds to the known orbital period (Lanning and Pesch, 1981; Stauffer, 1987). The amplitude of this variation is 0.08 mag, it probably refers to reflection of the white dwarf radiation on the surface of the red companion. - These observations are part of a larger on-going project which pretends to identify and to study pre-cataclysmic binaries by means of photometric and spectroscopic methods and to improve, this way, the hitherto poor statistics on the properties of these interesting stars.

  12. Review of candidates of binary systems with an RR Lyrae component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarka, M.; Liska, J.; Zejda, M.; Mikulasek, Z.

    2016-05-01

    We present an overview and the current status of research on RR Lyrae stars in binary systems. In recent years the number of binary candidates has steeply increased and it was suggested that the occurrence of multiple stellar systems with an RR Lyrae component is much higher than previously thought. We discuss the probability of their detection using various observing methods, compare recent results regarding selection effects, period distribution, the proposed orbital parameters and the Blazhko effect.

  13. Database of candidates for RR Lyrae stars in binary systems - RRLyrBinCan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, J.; Skarka, M.

    2016-05-01

    A new on-line database with RR Lyrae stars bound in binary systems is presented. Its purpose is to give a quick overview about known and suspected RR Lyrae stars in binaries on the basis of available literature. The first released version of the catalogue contains information about 61 double-star candidates, their orbital periods, method of detection, comments and active links to published papers.

  14. Near-Earth Asteroid 2005 CR37: Radar Images and Photometry of a Candidate Contact Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Lance A. M.; Nolan, Michael C.; Ostro, Steven J.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Pray, Donald P.; Harris, Alan W.; Magri, Christopher; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    Arecibo (2380 MHz, 13 cm) radar observations of 2005 CR37 provide detailed images of a candidate contact binary: a 1.8-km-long, extremely bifurcated object. Although the asteroid's two lobes are round, there are regions of modest topographic relief, such as an elevated, 200-m-wide facet, that suggest that the lobes are geologically more complex than either coherent fragments or homogeneous rubble piles. Since January 1999, about 9% of NEAs larger than approx.200 m imaged by radar can be described as candidate contact binaries.

  15. Southern RS CVn systems - Candidate list. [spectral catalog of variable binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, E. J.; Stencel, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A list of 43 candidate RS CVn binary systems in the far southern hemisphere of the sky (south of -40 deg declination) is presented. The candidate systems were selected from the first two volumes of the Michigan Spectral Catalog (1975, 1978), which provides MK classifications for southern HD stars and identifies any unusual characteristics noted for individual stellar spectra. The selection criteria used were: (1) the occurrence of Ca II H and K emission; (2) known or suspected binary nature; (3) regular light variations of zero to one magnitude; and (4) spectral type between F0 and K2 and luminosity less than bright giant (II).

  16. Finding False Positives Planet Candidates Due To Background Eclipsing Binaries in K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey; DAVE team

    2016-06-01

    We adapt the difference image centroid approach, used for finding background eclipsing binaries, to vet K2 planet candidates. Difference image centroids were used with great success to vet planet candidates in the original Kepler mission, where the source of a transit could be identified by subtracting images of out-of-transit cadences from in-transit cadences. To account for K2's roll pattern, we reconstruct out-of-transit images from cadences that are nearby in both time and spacecraft roll angle. We describe the method and discuss some K2 planet candidates which this method suggests are false positives.

  17. High-Resolution Observations of a Binary Black Hole Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Jarrett, Thomas; Emonts, Bjorn; Cluver, Michelle; Eisenhardt, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    We propose a 12-hour 2.3 GHz continuum Long Baseline Array (LBA) observation of WISE J2332-5056, a newly discovered supermassive black hole (SMBH) merger candidate that is located in the nearby universe (z = 0.3447). Our recently acquired 9 GHz ATCA map shows unusual radio morphology: a one-sided, smaller (and likely younger) FR-I jet perpendicular to a larger, Doppler-boosted FR-II jet. Follow-up Gemini-S/GMOS spectroscopy of this WISE-selected radio galaxy reveals broad emission lines blue-shifted by > 3,500 km/s with respect to the narrow lines and host galaxy, hallmarks of a dual AGN system. Combined, the optical spectroscopy and radio morphology of this object are strongly suggestive of a black hole merger system. Even in the local universe these systems are extremely difficult to identify; yet the process of supermassive blackhole growth is vital toward understanding galaxy evolution from the early to the current universe. Moreover, nearby merging SMBHs may serve as outstanding targets for gravitational wave studies. The proposed high resolution LBA map, reaching 50 pc resolution at the source redshift will allow us to investigate the SMBH merger scenario hypothesis.

  18. Binary Candidates and Fractions in the Jovian Trojan and Hilda Populations from NEOWISE Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnett, Sarah M.; Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    Objects in orbital resonance with Jupiter, particularly Jovian Trojans (hereafter, Trojans) and Hildas, are some of the most diagnostic and accessible small body populations for constraining planetary migration patterns since their capture and physical state must be explained by dynamical evolution models. Different solar system formation models (e.g., gentle vs. rapid giant planet migration) predict different formation locations and dynamical histories for Trojans (and Hildas, which are likely fed from the Trojan region). Different dynamical environments can also produce different binary fractions as a function of separation between the two components. In order to explore whether the dynamical environment during early solar system evolution was mild or turbulent by helping discern which binary formation mechanism dominated for Trojans and Hildas, we searched the Trojan and Hilda thermal rotational lightcurves cataloged by NEOWISE for anomalously large lightcurve amplitudes indicative of close or contact binaries. These tight binary candidates are in need of dense follow-up observations to confirm their binarity. We also compared binary fractions between various Trojan subpopulations and for Trojans versus Hildas. We present binary fractions corrected for sampling and sensitivity biases and for survey efficiency at detecting tight binaries.

  19. The black hole candidate binary A0620-00

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haswell, Carole Ann

    The compact object in A0620-00 was previously established as a leading black hole candidate by observations implying a minimum compact object mass, M1 approx. = 3M solar magnitude. To exclude the possibility of a neutron star primary, the constraints on M1 need to be improved. Two avenues of investigation were pursued. The mass ratio of the system, q = M1/M sub 2, was determined by observations of the radial velocity variations of the H(alpha) emission from the accretion disk around the compact object. If the wavelength shifts give an unbiased estimate of the orbital motion of the compact object, q = 10.6 + or - 2.0. However contamination by nonaxisymmetric disk emission is indicated, so q is more uncertain than the reported formal errors. The orbital inclination of the system was examined by modelling of multicolor orbital light curves, which exhibit ellipsoidal variations. The ellipsoidal amplitudes imply a spectra type of K3-K4 for the mass donor. Light curves obtained in 1986/1987 exhibit a grazing eclipse of the mass donor star by the accretion disk, providing tight constraints on the orbital inclination and the radius of the accretion disk. The accretion disk radius is comparable to the tidal radius. Limits on the orbital inclination were derived which lead to limits on the mass of the compact object: 5.50 + or - 0.15 less than or + = M1 less than or = 6.26 + or - 0.17 for q = 5.0; 4.28 + or - 0.12 less than or = M1 less than or = 4.86 + or - 0.13 for q = 10.6; 3.79 + or - 0.10 less than or = M1 less than or = 4.68 + or - 0.13 for q = 15.0. A lower limit on the mass ratio, q greater than 6.47, is established by demanding that M2 less than or = 0.85 M solar magnitude, the mass of a Roche lobe-filling main sequence star. The spectral type of the mass donor implies that q is greater than 10.6 is unlikely. Hence the results imply M1 greater than or = 4.28 + or - 0.12, which is well above the upper limit on the mass of a neutron star. This is compelling evidence

  20. SpeX spectroscopy of unresolved very low mass binaries. II. Identification of 14 candidate binaries with late-M/early-L and T dwarf components

    SciTech Connect

    Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Nicholls, Christine P.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Looper, Dagny L.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cruz, Kelle; West, Andrew A.; Gizis, John E.; Metchev, Stanimir

    2014-10-20

    Multiplicity is a key statistic for understanding the formation of very low mass (VLM) stars and brown dwarfs. Currently, the separation distribution of VLM binaries remains poorly constrained at small separations (≤1 AU), leading to uncertainty in the overall binary fraction. We approach this problem by searching for late-M/early-L plus T dwarf spectral binaries whose combined light spectra exhibit distinct peculiarities, allowing for separation-independent identification. We define a set of spectral indices designed to identify these systems, and we use a spectral template fitting method to confirm and characterize spectral binary candidates from a library of 815 spectra from the SpeX Prism Spectral Libraries. We present 11 new binary candidates, confirm 3 previously reported candidates, and rule out 2 previously identified candidates, all with primary and secondary spectral types in the range M7-L7 and T1-T8, respectively. We find that subdwarfs and blue L dwarfs are the primary contaminants in our sample and propose a method for segregating these sources. If confirmed by follow-up observations, these systems may add to the growing list of tight separation binaries, whose orbital properties may yield further insight into brown dwarf formation scenarios.

  1. Timing of eclipsing binary V0873 Per: a third body candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomazov, A. I.; Ibrahimov, M. A.; Satovskii, B. L.; Kozyreva, V. S.; Irsmambetova, T. R.; Krushevska, V. N.; Kuznyetsova, Y. G.; Gaynullina, E. R.; Karimov, R. G.; Ehgamberdiev, S. A.; Tutukov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a set of moments of minima of eclipsing variable V0873 Per. V0873 Per is a short-period low-mass binary star. Data about moments of minima of V0873 Per were taken from the literature and our observations during 2013-2014. Our aim is to test the system on existence of new bodies using timing of minima of eclipses. We found a periodic variation of orbital period of V0873 Per. This variation can be explained by the gravitational influence of a third companion on the central binary star. The mass of the third body candidate is ≈ 0.2 M_{⊙}, and its orbital period is ≈300 days. The paper also includes a table with moments of minima calculated from our observations, which can be used in future investigations of V0873 Per.

  2. Observations of candidate oscillating eclipsing binaries and two newly discovered pulsating variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakos, A.; Niarchos, P.

    2009-03-01

    CCD observations of 24 eclipsing binary systems with spectral types ranging between A0-F0, candidate for containing pulsating components, were obtained. Appropriate exposure times in one or more photometric filters were used so that short-periodic pulsations could be detected. Their light curves were analyzed using the Period04 software in order to search for pulsational behaviour. Two new variable stars, namely GSC 2673-1583 and GSC 3641-0359, were discov- ered as by-product during the observations of eclipsing variables. The Fourier analysis of the observations of each star, the dominant pulsation frequencies and the derived frequency spectra are also presented.

  3. Giant Planet Candidates, Brown Dwarfs, and Binaries from the SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Neil; Ge, Jian; Li, Rui; de Lee, Nathan M.; Heslar, Michael; Ma, Bo; SDSS-Iii Marvels Team

    2015-01-01

    We report the discoveries of giant planet candidates, brown dwarfs, and binaries from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey. The finalized 1D pipeline has provided 18 giant planet candidates, 16 brown dwarfs, and over 500 binaries. An additional 96 targets having RV variability indicative of a giant planet companion are also reported for future investigation. These candidates are found using the advanced MARVELS 1D data pipeline developed at UF from scratch over the past three years. This pipeline carefully corrects most of the instrument effects (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition effects (such as illumination profile, fiber degradation, and tracking variations). The result is long-term RV precisions that approach the photon limits in many cases for the ~89,000 individual stellar observations. A 2D version of the pipeline that uses interferometric information is nearing completion and is demonstrating a reduction of errors to half the current levels. The 2D processing will be used to increase the robustness of the detections presented here and to find new candidates in RV regions not confidently detectable with the 1D pipeline. The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars with a well defined cadence of 27 RV measurements over 2 years. The MARVELS RV data and other follow-up data (photometry, high contrast imaging, high resolution spectroscopy and RV measurements) will explore the diversity of giant planet companion formation and evolution around stars with a broad range in metallicity (Fe/H -1.5-0.5), mass ( 0.6-2.5M(sun)), and environment (thin disk and thick disk), and will help to address the key scientific questions identified for the MARVELS survey including, but not limited to: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate-mass stars and binaries? Is the 'planet desert

  4. High-ionization accretion signatures in compact binary candidates from SOAR Telescope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. S.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Cieslinski, D.; Jablonski, F.; Silva, K. M. G.; Almeida, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The increasing number of synoptic surveys made by small robotic telescopes, like the photometric Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS - Drake et al., 2009, ApJ, 696, 870), represents a unique opportunity for the discovery of new variable objects and also to improve the samples of many classes of variables. Our goal in this work was the discovery of new polars, a subclass of magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs) with no accretion disk, and Close Binary Supersoft X-ray Sources (CBSS), strong candidates to Type Ia Supernova progenitors. Both are rare objects and probe interesting accretion scenarios. Finding spectral features associated to high-ionization mass accretion constrains the CBSS or magnetic CV nature for the candidates, expanding the hitherto small samples of these classes (specially CBSS) and allowing for detailed observational follow-up. We used the Goodman Spectrograph on SOAR 4.1 m Telescope to search for signatures of high-ionization mass accretion, as He II 468,6 nm emission line and inverted Balmer decrement, on 39 variable objects selected mostly from CRTS. In this sample we found 14 strong candidates to mCVs, 1 Nova in the final stages of eruption, 14 candidates to Dwarf Novae, 5 extragalactic sources (AGN), 1 object previously identified as a Black Hole Nova, 3 objects with pure absorption spectral features and 1 unidentified object with low S/N ratio. The mCVs candidates found in this work will be studied using time-resolved spectroscopic, polarimetric, and photometric observations in a follow-up project.

  5. SpeX SPECTROSCOPY OF UNRESOLVED VERY LOW MASS BINARIES. I. IDENTIFICATION OF 17 CANDIDATE BINARIES STRADDLING THE L DWARF/T DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Cushing, Michael; Looper, Dagny L.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Reid, I. Neill

    2010-02-20

    We report the identification of 17 candidate brown dwarf binaries whose components straddle the L dwarf/T dwarf transition. These sources were culled from a large near-infrared spectral sample of L and T dwarfs observed with the Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX spectrograph. Candidates were selected on the basis of spectral ratios which segregate known (resolved) L dwarf/T dwarf pairs from presumably single sources. Composite templates, constructed by combining 13,581 pairs of absolute flux-calibrated spectra, are shown to provide statistically superior fits to the spectra of our 17 candidates as compared to single templates. Ten of these candidates appear to have secondary components that are significantly brighter than their primaries over the 1.0-1.3 {mu}m band, indicative of rapid condensate depletion at the L dwarf/T dwarf transition. Our results support prior indications of enhanced multiplicity amongst early-type T dwarfs; 53% +- 7% of the T0-T4 dwarfs in our spectral sample are found to be either resolved or unresolved (candidate) pairs, although this is consistent with an intrinsic (volume complete) brown dwarf binary fraction of only 15%. If verified, this sample of spectral binaries more than doubles the number of known L dwarf/T dwarf transition pairs, enabling a broader exploration of this poorly understood phase of brown dwarf atmospheric evolution.

  6. Multi-filter Light Curves of 29 Very Short Period Candidate Contact Binaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koen, C.; Koen, T.; Gray, R. O.

    2016-06-01

    Light curves of 26 probable contact binary stars are made available, from a list of candidates with the shortest periods known. This is supplemented by sets of light curves of three previously studied systems. Photometry was obtained in the Johnson UBV, Cousins RI system. All stars but one were observed in four wavebands, either UBV RC or {BV}{({RI})}C, depending on brightness. Tentative spectral classifications are given for 23 of the stars. Effective temperatures are derived from infrared and optical photometric indices, and from spectral types. These are generally in good agreement. The multicolor photometry, spectral typing, and estimated effective temperatures can be used to model these systems in detail. A preliminary study, based on Fourier coefficients of the light curves, suggests that all the systems are indeed eclipsing stars, with all but a handful probably in contact configurations.

  7. THE WIDEST-SEPARATION SUBSTELLAR COMPANION CANDIDATE TO A BINARY T TAURI STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, M.; Tamura, M.; Kudo, T.; Kandori, R.; Ishii, M.; Nishiyama, S.

    2011-04-15

    The results of near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of a substellar companion (SR12 C), with a possible planetary mass, of a binary T Tauri star (SR12 AB) in the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region are presented. The object is separated by {approx}8.''7, corresponding to {approx}1100 AU at 125 pc, and has an H-band brightness of 15.2 mag and infrared spectra suggesting a spectral type of M9.0 {+-} 0.5. It is confirmed that SR12 C is physically related to the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region from its common proper motion with SR12 AB and its youth is confirmed by a gravity-sensitive spectral feature. Furthermore, based on the number of known members of the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region in the area in which SR12 AB exists, the probability of a chance alignment is {approx}1% and it is therefore likely that SR12 C is physically associated with SR12 AB. The mass of SR12 C is estimated by comparing its estimated luminosity and assumed age with the theoretical age-luminosity relation. SR12 C is identified as an extremely low-mass (0.013 {+-} 0.007 M{sub sun}) object, but its separation from its parent star is the widest among planetary-mass companion (PMC) candidates imaged to date. In addition, SR12 C is the first PMC candidate directly imaged around a binary star. This discovery suggests that PMCs form via multiple star formation processes including disk gravitational instability and cloud core fragmentation.

  8. Implications for planet formation from population inference of Kepler-planet-candidates and eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabram, Megan Iris

    The Kepler Space Science Mission has revolutionized our understanding of planetary system architectures, and the diversity of planet bulk densities. From Kepler, we now have a population of ˜4,700 planet candidates and ˜ 3000 eclipsing binaries with measured light curves, from which we can begin to characterize the distribution of stars and planets to tease out relationships between planet properties and host star properties in a robust statistical manner. The results of these investigations constrain proposed planet formation theories. This dissertation analyzes three particular sub-populations observed by Kepler that are well suited for hierarchical inference to characterize their population properties. First, we investigate the eccentricity distribution for a sample of short-period planet candidates from Kepler, where both the transit and occultation are observed for each system. This subsample lends a rare opportunity for tractable inference of its eccentricity distribution, exposing at least two populations within the eccentricity distribution and potential correlations of the eccentricity with host star metallicity and planet radius. Secondly, we investigate the mass-radius-eccentricity relation for a sample of near-resonant planet-pairs from Kepler. This study greatly improves upon previous research of constraining the mass-radius relation for small planets. Furthermore, we explore the period-eccentricity distribution of eclipsing binary stars from Kepler. We find that ˜ 72% of EBs below ˜ 11 days are very circularized, where as ˜ 87% of EBs above ˜ 11 days can take on a wide range in eccentricity values including some with significant eccentricities.

  9. Chandra and XMM-Newton identify ~50 black hole binary candidates in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Robin; Primini, F.; Murray, S. S.; Garcia, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified ~50 X-ray binaries (XBs) containing black hole candidates in M31, falling into two groups. The first group exhibited characteristic "hard state" properties at luminosities that exceed the upper threshold for neutron star (NS) XBs; furthermore, their long-term variability, proximity to a globular cluster, or particularly high flux meant that they were highly unlikely to be background galaxies. The second group consists of bright transient X-ray sources that resemble Galactic black hole binaries with low mass donors. A double thermal (disk blackbody + blackbody) emission model has successfully described the full gamut of NS XB spectra, with two exceptions: the hard state, and the horizontal branch of the "Z-source" subclass of NS XBs. Since many of our BHCs are apparently in the hard state, they exist outside the NS parameter space when fitted with the double thermal model. Furthermore, transient BH XBs often exhibit a "thermally dominated" state in outburst that is never observed in NS XBs. For each of our BHCs we estimate the probabiliy that its emission spectrum is consistent with the NS parameter space: BHCs with probability < 0.27% of being consistent with a NS spectrum (equivalent to 3σ difference) are rated as Strong BHCs, and the others are "plausible" BHCs.

  10. Fermi variability study of the candidate pulsar binary 2FGL J0523.3–2530

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Ng, C.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    The Fermi source 2FGL J0523.3–2530 has recently been identified as a candidate millisecond pulsar binary with an orbital period of 16.5 hr. We have carried out detailed studies of the source's emission properties by analyzing data taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the 0.2-300 GeV energy range. Long-term, yearly variability from the source has been found, with a factor of four flux variations in 1-300 GeV. From spectral analysis, we find an extra spectral component at 2-3 GeV that causes the source brightening. While no orbital modulations have been found from the Fermi data over the whole period of 2008-2014, orbital modulation in the source's >2 GeV emission is detected during the last 1.5 yr of the Fermi observation. Our results support the millisecond pulsar binary nature of 2FGL J0523.3–2530. Multi-wavelength observations of the source are warranted in order to find any correlated flux variations and thus help determine the origin of the long-term variability, which currently is not understood.

  11. Kepler eclipsing binary stars. IV. Precise eclipse times for close binaries and identification of candidate three-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Kyle E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-02-01

    We present a catalog of precise eclipse times and analysis of third-body signals among 1279 close binaries in the latest Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog. For these short-period binaries, Kepler's 30 minute exposure time causes significant smearing of light curves. In addition, common astrophysical phenomena such as chromospheric activity, as well as imperfections in the light curve detrending process, can create systematic artifacts that may produce fictitious signals in the eclipse timings. We present a method to measure precise eclipse times in the presence of distorted light curves, such as in contact and near-contact binaries which exhibit continuously changing light levels in and out of eclipse. We identify 236 systems for which we find a timing variation signal compatible with the presence of a third body. These are modeled for the light travel time effect and the basic properties of the third body are derived. This study complements J. A. Orosz et al. (in preparation), which focuses on eclipse timing variations of longer period binaries with flat out-of-eclipse regions. Together, these two papers provide comprehensive eclipse timings for all binaries in the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, as an ongoing resource freely accessible online to the community.

  12. RED GIANTS IN ECLIPSING BINARY AND MULTIPLE-STAR SYSTEMS: MODELING AND ASTEROSEISMIC ANALYSIS OF 70 CANDIDATES FROM KEPLER DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Gaulme, P.; McKeever, J.; Rawls, M. L.; Jackiewicz, J.; Mosser, B.; Guzik, J. A.

    2013-04-10

    Red giant stars are proving to be an incredible source of information for testing models of stellar evolution, as asteroseismology has opened up a window into their interiors. Such insights are a direct result of the unprecedented data from space missions CoRoT and Kepler as well as recent theoretical advances. Eclipsing binaries are also fundamental astrophysical objects, and when coupled with asteroseismology, binaries provide two independent methods to obtain masses and radii and exciting opportunities to develop highly constrained stellar models. The possibility of discovering pulsating red giants in eclipsing binary systems is therefore an important goal that could potentially offer very robust characterization of these systems. Until recently, only one case has been discovered with Kepler. We cross-correlate the detected red giant and eclipsing-binary catalogs from Kepler data to find possible candidate systems. Light-curve modeling and mean properties measured from asteroseismology are combined to yield specific measurements of periods, masses, radii, temperatures, eclipse timing variations, core rotation rates, and red giant evolutionary state. After using three different techniques to eliminate false positives, out of the 70 systems common to the red giant and eclipsing-binary catalogs we find 13 strong candidates (12 previously unknown) to be eclipsing binaries, one to be a non-eclipsing binary with tidally induced oscillations, and 10 more to be hierarchical triple systems, all of which include a pulsating red giant. The systems span a range of orbital eccentricities, periods, and spectral types F, G, K, and M for the companion of the red giant. One case even suggests an eclipsing binary composed of two red giant stars and another of a red giant with a {delta}-Scuti star. The discovery of multiple pulsating red giants in eclipsing binaries provides an exciting test bed for precise astrophysical modeling, and follow-up spectroscopic observations of many

  13. Investigation of the binary fraction among candidate A-F type hybrid stars detected by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampens, P.; Bognár, Zs.; Frémat, Y.; Sódor, Á.; Vermeylen, L.; De Nutte, R.; Lombaert, R.; De Cat, P.

    2015-09-01

    We are currently monitoring up to 40 Kepler candidate δ Scuti-γ Doradus (resp. γ Doradus-δ Scuti) hybrid stars in radial velocity in order to identify the physical cause behind the low frequencies observed in the periodograms based on the ultra-high accuracy Kepler space photometry. The presence of low frequency variability in unevolved or slightly evolved oscillating A/F-type stars can generally be explained in three ways: either 1) the star is an (un)detected binary or multiple system, or 2) the star is a g-mode pulsator (i.e. a genuine hybrid), or 3) the star's atmosphere displays an asymmetric intensity distribution (caused by spots, i.e. chemical anomalies, or by (very) high rotation), which is detected through rotational modulation. Our targets were selected from the globally characterized variable A/F-type stars of the Kepler mission [7]. We observe each star at least 4 times unevenly spread over a time lapse up to 2 months with the HERMES spectrograph [6]. In the case of composite, multiple-lined spectra, these observations also provide the atmospheric properties of each component. Our principal goal is to estimate the fraction of short-period, spectroscopic systems in the sample.

  14. WISE J061213.85-303612.5: a new T-dwarf binary candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huélamo, N.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kurtev, R.; Girard, J. H.; Borissova, J.; Mawet, D.; Mužić, K.; Cáceres, C.; Melo, C. H. F.; Sterzik, M. F.; Minniti, D.

    2015-06-01

    Context. T and Y dwarfs are among the coolest and least luminous objects detected, and they can help to understand the properties of giant planets. Up to now, there are more than 350 T dwarfs that have been identified thanks to large imaging surveys in the infrared, and their multiplicity properties can shed light on the formation process. Aims: The aim of this work is to look for companions around a sample of seven ultracoool objects. Most of them have been discovered by the WISE observatory and have not been studied before for multiplicity. Methods: We observed a sample six T dwarfs and one L9 dwarf with the Laser Guide Star (LGS) and NAOS-CONICA, the adaptive optics (AO) facility, and the near infrared camera at the ESO Very Large Telescope. We observed all the objects in one or more near-IR filters (JHKs). Results: From the seven observed objects, we have identified a subarcsecond binary system, WISE J0612-3036, composed of two similar components with spectral types of T6. We measure a separation of ρ = 350 ± 5 mas and a position angle of PA = 235 ± 1°. Using the mean absolute magnitudes of T6 dwarfs in the 2MASS JHKs bands, we estimate a distance of d = 31 ± 6 pc and derive a projected separation of ρ ~ 11 ± 2 au. Another target, WISE J2255-3118, shows a very faint object at 1.̋3 in the Ks image. The object is marginally detected in H, and we derive a near infrared color of H - Ks> 0.1 mag. HST/WFC3 public archival data reveals that the companion candidate is an extended source. Together with the derived color, this suggests that the source is most probably a background galaxy. The five other sources are apparently single, with 3-σ sensitivity limits between H = 19-21 for companions at separations ≥0.̋5. Conclusions: WISE 0612-3036 is probably a new T-dwarf binary composed of two T6 dwarfs. As in the case of other late T-dwarf binaries, it shows a mass ratio close to 1, although its projected separation, ~11 au, is larger than the average (~5 au

  15. Cataclysmic Variables and Other Compact Binaries in the Globular Cluster NGC 362: Candidates from Chandra and HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margon, B.; Beck-Winchatz, B.; Homer, L.; Pooley, D.; Bassa, C. G.; Anderson, S. F.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Verbunt, F.; Kong, A. K. H.; Plotkin, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Highly sensitive and precise X-ray imaging from Chandra, combined with the superb spatial resolution of HST optical images, dramatically enhances our empirical understanding of compact binaries such as cataclysmic variables and low mass X-ray binaries, their progeny, and other stellar X-ray source populations deep into the cores of globular clusters. Our Chandra X-ray images of the globular cluster NGC 362 reveal 100 X-ray sources, the bulk of which are likely cluster members. Using HST color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we quantitatively consider the optical content of the NGC 362 Chandra X-ray error circles, especially to assess and identify the compact binary population in this condensed-core globular cluster. Despite residual significant crowding in both X-rays and optical, we identify an excess population of Hα-emitting objects that is statistically associated with the Chandra X-ray sources. The X-ray and optical characteristics suggest that these are mainly cataclysmic variables, but we also identify a candidate quiescent low mass X-ray binary. A potentially interesting and largely unanticipated use of observations such as these may be to help constrain the macroscopic dynamic state of globular clusters.

  16. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF THREE PRE-LAUNCH EXOPLANET CANDIDATES: DISCOVERY OF TWO ECLIPSING BINARIES AND A NEW EXOPLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Steve B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Sherry, William; Von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R.; Feldmeier, John J.; Horch, Elliott; Van Belle, Gerard T.

    2010-12-20

    Three transiting exoplanet candidate stars were discovered in a ground-based photometric survey prior to the launch of NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler observations of them were obtained during Quarter 1 of the Kepler mission. All three stars are faint by radial velocity follow-up standards, so we have examined these candidates with regard to eliminating false positives and providing high confidence exoplanet selection. We present a first attempt to exclude false positives for this set of faint stars without high-resolution radial velocity analysis. This method of exoplanet confirmation will form a large part of the Kepler mission follow-up for Jupiter-sized exoplanet candidates orbiting faint stars. Using the Kepler light curves and pixel data, as well as medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy and speckle imaging, we find that two of our candidates are binary stars. One consists of a late-F star with an early M companion, while the other is a K0 star plus a late M-dwarf/brown dwarf in a 19 day elliptical orbit. The third candidate (BOKS-1) is an r = 15 G8V star hosting a newly discovered exoplanet with a radius of 1.12 R{sub Jupiter} in a 3.9 day orbit.

  17. Relativistic boost as the cause of periodicity in a massive black-hole binary candidate.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Daniel J; Haiman, Zoltán; Schiminovich, David

    2015-09-17

    Because most large galaxies contain a central black hole, and galaxies often merge, black-hole binaries are expected to be common in galactic nuclei. Although they cannot be imaged, periodicities in the light curves of quasars have been interpreted as evidence for binaries, most recently in PG 1302-102, which has a short rest-frame optical period of four years (ref. 6). If the orbital period of the black-hole binary matches this value, then for the range of estimated black-hole masses, the components would be separated by 0.007-0.017 parsecs, implying relativistic orbital speeds. There has been much debate over whether black-hole orbits could be smaller than one parsec (ref. 7). Here we report that the amplitude and the sinusoid-like shape of the variability of the light curve of PG 1302-102 can be fitted by relativistic Doppler boosting of emission from a compact, steadily accreting, unequal-mass binary. We predict that brightness variations in the ultraviolet light curve track those in the optical, but with a two to three times larger amplitude. This prediction is relatively insensitive to the details of the emission process, and is consistent with archival ultraviolet data. Follow-up ultraviolet and optical observations in the next few years can further test this prediction and confirm the existence of a binary black hole in the relativistic regime. PMID:26381982

  18. A search for binary candidates among the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Elisabeth; Steixner, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Although roughly half of all stars are considered to be part of binary or multiple systems, there are only two confirmed cases of RR Lyrae pulsators with companions. One of them is TU Uma [1] - a classical RR Lyrae star in a very eccentric orbit - and the other is OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792 [2]. Considering the wealth of well-studied RR Lyrae stars, this number is astoundingly low. Having more RR Lyrae stars in binary systems at hand would be extremely valuable to get independent measurements of the masses. The data from the Kepler mission with their unprecedented precision and the long time span of about four years offer a unique possibility to systematically search for the signatures of binarity in RR Lyrae stars. Using the pulsation as a clock, we studied the variations in the timing of maximum light to hunt for possible binary systems in the sample.

  19. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. V. CANDIDATE SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.; Hartkopf, William I.; Boss, Alan P.; Williamson, M. E-mail: blane@draper.co

    2010-12-15

    The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems monitored 51 subarcsecond binary systems to evaluate whether tertiary companions as small as Jovian planets orbited either the primary or secondary stars, perturbing their otherwise smooth Keplerian motions. Six binaries are presented that show evidence of substellar companions orbiting either the primary or secondary star. Of these six systems, the likelihoods of two of the detected perturbations to represent real objects are considered to be 'high confidence', while the remaining four systems are less certain and will require continued observations for confirmation.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Eclipsing binaries with candidate CP stars (North+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, P.; Studer, M.; Kunzli, M.

    1997-02-01

    Photometry in the Geneva systems and radial velocities are used to determine the fundamental parameters of three eclipsing binaries, two of which having been classified as chemically peculiar and the third having relatively narrow lines. For a description of the Geneva photometric system, see e.g. (3 data files).

  1. X-ray binaries and black hole candidates: a review of optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Jorge

    This chapter summarizes the optical properties of X-ray binaries, with special emphasis on the class of low mass X-ray binaries and soft X-ray transients. The latter provide the most compelling evidence for the existence of black holes in the Universe, with nine well-established dynamical studies. We review the techniques employed to extract the component masses and discuss the importance of systematic effects. Despite the growing number of black hole cases, the uncertainties involved are still too large to draw statistical conclusions on the mass distribution of collapsed objects. We also present new observational techniques which may help to improve the mass determinations and set constraints on the theory of supernovae and black hole formation.

  2. Recurring flares from supermassive black hole binaries: implications for tidal disruption candidates and OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L.

    2013-09-01

    I discuss the possibility that accreting supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries with sub-parsec separations produce periodically recurring luminous outbursts that interrupt periods of relative quiescence. This hypothesis is motivated by two characteristics found generically in simulations of binaries embedded in prograde accretion discs: (i) the formation of a central, low-density cavity around the binary and (ii) the leakage of gas into this cavity, occurring once per orbit via discrete streams on nearly radial trajectories. The first feature would reduce the emergent optical/UV flux of the system relative to active galactic nuclei powered by a single SMBH, while the second can trigger quasi-periodic fluctuations in luminosity. I argue that the quasi-periodic accretion signature may be much more dramatic than previously thought, because the infalling gas streams can strongly shock-heat via self-collision and tidal compression, thereby enhancing viscous accretion. Any optically thick gas that is circularized about either SMBH can accrete before the next pair of streams is deposited, fuelling transient, luminous flares that recur every orbit. Due to the diminished flux in between accretion episodes, such cavity-accretion flares could plausibly be mistaken for the tidal disruptions of stars in quiescent nuclei. The flares could be distinguished from tidal disruption events if their quasi-periodic recurrence is observed, or if they are produced by very massive (≳109 M⊙) SMBHs that cannot disrupt solar-type stars. They may be discovered serendipitously in surveys such as LSST or eROSITA. I present a heuristic toy model as a proof of concept for the production of cavity-accretion flares, and generate mock light curves and spectra. I also apply the model to the active galaxy OJ 287, whose production of quasi-periodic pairs of optical flares has long fuelled speculation that it hosts an SMBH binary.

  3. A CENSUS OF AM CVn STARS: THREE NEW CANDIDATES AND ONE CONFIRMED 48.3-MINUTE BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, A.; Roelofs, G. H. A.; Steeghs, D.; Groot, P. J.; Nelemans, G.; Marsh, T. R.; Salvato, M.; Kasliwal, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present three new candidate AM CVn binaries, and one confirmed new system, from a spectroscopic survey of color-selected objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All four systems were found from their helium emission lines in low-resolution spectra taken on the Hale telescope at Palomar, the Nordic Optical Telescope, and the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. The ultra-compact binary nature of SDSS J090221.35+381941.9 was confirmed using phase-resolved spectroscopy at the Keck-I telescope. From the characteristic radial velocity 'S-wave' observed in the helium emission lines, we measure an orbital period of 48.31 +- 0.08 minutes. The continuum emission can be described with a blackbody or a helium white dwarf atmosphere of T{sub eff} approx 15,000 K, in agreement with theoretical cooling models for relatively massive accretors and/or donors. The absence in the spectrum of broad helium absorption lines from the accreting white dwarf suggests that the accreting white dwarf cannot be much hotter than 15,000 K, or that an additional component such as the accretion disk contributes substantially to the optical flux. Two of the candidate systems, SDSS J152509.57+360054.5 and SDSS J172102.48+273301.2, do show helium absorption in the blue part of their spectra in addition to the characteristic helium emission lines. This in combination with the high effective temperatures of approx18,000 K and approx16,000 K suggests both to be at orbital periods below approx40 minutes. The third candidate, SDSS J164228.06+193410.0, exhibits remarkably strong helium emission on top of a relatively cool (T{sub eff} approx 12,000 K) continuum, indicating an orbital period above approx50 minutes.

  4. Photometric variability of candidate white dwarf binary systems from Palomar Transient Factory archival data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Wil; Kaplan, David L.; Prince, Thomas A.; Tang, Sumin; Ene, Irina; Kim, Kyu Bin; Levitan, David; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Laher, Russ R.

    2016-09-01

    We present a sample of 59 periodic variables from the Palomar Transient Factory, selected from published catalogues of white dwarf (WD) candidates. The variability can likely be attributed to ellipsoidal variation of the tidally distorted companion induced by the gravity of the primary (WD or hot subdwarf) or to the reflection of hot emission by a cooler companion. We searched 11 311 spectroscopically or photometrically selected WD candidates from three hot star/WD catalogues, using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram to single out promising sources. We present period estimates for the candidates, 45 of which were not previously identified as periodic variables, and find that most have a period shorter than a few days. Additionally, we discuss the eclipsing systems in our sample and present spectroscopic data on selected sources.

  5. A RADIO-SELECTED BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY CANDIDATE IN THE MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTER M62

    SciTech Connect

    Chomiuk, Laura; Ransom, Scott; Strader, Jay; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Heinke, Craig; Noyola, Eva; Seth, Anil C.

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery of a candidate stellar-mass black hole in the Milky Way globular cluster M62. We detected the black hole candidate, which we call M62-VLA1, in the core of the cluster using deep radio continuum imaging from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. M62-VLA1 is a faint source with a flux density of 18.7 ± 1.9 μJy at 6.2 GHz and a flat radio spectrum (α = –0.24 ± 0.42, for S{sub ν} = ν{sup α}). M62 is the second Milky Way cluster with a candidate stellar-mass black hole; unlike the two candidate black holes previously found in the cluster M22, M62-VLA1 is associated with a Chandra X-ray source, supporting its identification as a black hole X-ray binary. Measurements of its radio and X-ray luminosity, while not simultaneous, place M62-VLA1 squarely on the well-established radio-X-ray correlation for stellar-mass black holes. In archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, M62-VLA1 is coincident with a star near the lower red giant branch. This possible optical counterpart shows a blue excess, Hα emission, and optical variability. The radio, X-ray, and optical properties of M62-VLA1 are very similar to those for V404 Cyg, one of the best-studied quiescent stellar-mass black holes. We cannot yet rule out alternative scenarios for the radio source, such as a flaring neutron star or background galaxy; future observations are necessary to determine whether M62-VLA1 is indeed an accreting stellar-mass black hole.

  6. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGES AND KPNO SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BINARY BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE SDSS J153636.22+044127.0

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, Tod R.; Boroson, Todd A.

    2009-09-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2/PC images and KPNO 4 m long-slit spectroscopy of the QSO SDSS J153636.22+044127.0, which we advanced as a candidate binary supermassive black hole. The images reveal a close companion coincident with the radio source identified by Wrobel and Laor. It appears to be consistent with a M{sub g} {approx} -21.4 elliptical galaxy, if it is at the QSO redshift. The spectroscopy, however, shows no spatial offset between the red or blue Balmer lines. The companion is thus not the source of either the red or blue broad-line systems; SDSS J153636.22+044127.0 is highly unlikely to be a chance superposition of objects or an ejected black hole. Over the DELTAT = 0.75 yr difference between the rest-frame epoch of the present and SDSS spectroscopy, we find no velocity shift to within 40 km s{sup -1}, nor any amplitude change in either broad-line system. The lack of a shift can be admitted under the binary hypothesis, if the implied radial velocity is a larger component of the full orbital velocity than was assumed in our earlier work. A strong test of the binary hypothesis requires yet longer temporal baselines. The lack of amplitude variations is unusual for the alternative explanation of this object as a 'double-peaked' emitter; we further argue that SDSS J153636.22+044127.0 has unique spectral features that have no obvious analogue with other members of this class.

  7. Unveiling the radio counterparts of two binary AGN candidates: J1108+0659 and J1131-0204

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondi, M.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Piconcelli, E.; Fu, H.

    2016-04-01

    The sources SDSS J113126.08-020459.2 and SDSS J110851.04+065901.4 are two double-peaked [O III] emitting active galactic nuclei (AGNs), identified as candidate binary AGNs by optical and near infrared (NIR) observations. We observed the two sources with high resolution Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) using the European VLBI Network at 5 GHz, reduced VLA observations at three frequencies available for one of the sources, and used archival HST observations. For the source SDSS J113126.08-020459.2, the VLBI observations detected only one single compact component associated with the eastern NIR nucleus. In SDSS J110851.04+065901.4, the VLBI observations did not detect any compact components, but the VLA observations allowed us to identify a possible compact core in the region of the north-western optical/NIR nucleus. In this source we find kpc-scale extended radio emission that is spatially coincident to the ultraviolet continuum and to the extended emission narrow line region. The UV continuum is significantly obscured since the amount of extended radio emission yields a star formation rate of about 110 M⊙ yr-1, which is an order of magnitude larger than implied by the observed ultraviolet emission. Our analysis confirms the presence of only one AGN in the two candidate binary AGNs. FITS files of the reduced images are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A102

  8. VLBI DETECTION OF AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PAIR IN THE BINARY BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE SDSS J1536+0441

    SciTech Connect

    Bondi, M.; Perez-Torres, M.-A.

    2010-05-10

    We present the first pc-scale radio imaging of the radio-quiet candidate binary black hole system SDSS J1536+0441. The observations were carried out by the European VLBI Network at a frequency of 5 GHz, allowing the imaging of SDSS J1536+0441 with a resolution of {approx}10 mas ({approx}50 pc). Two compact radio cores are detected at the position of the kpc-scale components VLA-A and VLA-B, proving the presence of two compact active nuclei with radio luminosity L{sub R} {approx} 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, thus ruling out the possibility that both radio sources are powered by a 0.1 pc binary black hole. From a comparison with published 8.5 GHz flux densities, we derived an estimate of the radio spectral index of the two pc-scale cores. Both cores have a flat or an inverted spectral index, and at least for the case of VLA-A we can rule out the possibility that synchrotron self-absorption is responsible for the inverted radio spectrum. We suggest that thermal free-free emission from an X-ray-heated disk wind may be powering the radio emission in VLA-A.

  9. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRACOMPACT GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY CANDIDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Albert K. H.; Jin, Ruolan; Yen, T.-C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Lin, L. C. C.; Hu, C.-P.; Hui, C. Y.; Park, S. M.; Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.; Kim, C. L.

    2014-10-20

    We report multi-wavelength observations of the unidentified Fermi object 2FGL J1653.6-0159. With the help of high-resolution X-ray observations, we have identified an X-ray and optical counterpart to 2FGL J1653.6-0159. The source exhibits a periodic modulation of 75 minutes in the optical and possibly also in the X-ray. We suggest that 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is a compact binary system with an orbital period of 75 minutes. Combining the gamma-ray and X-ray properties, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is potentially a black-widow-/redback-type gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP). The optical and X-ray light curve profiles show that the companion is mildly heated by the high-energy emission and that the X-rays are from intrabinary shock. Although no radio pulsation has yet been detected, we estimated that the spin period of the MSP is ∼ 2 ms based on a theoretical model. If pulsation can be confirmed in the future, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 will become the first ultracompact rotation-powered MSP.

  10. Optical and UV spectroscopy of the black hole binary candidate LMC X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Crampton, D.; Cowley, A. P.; Bianchi, L.; Thompson, I. B.

    1987-01-01

    Both further optical spectroscopy of the binary star identified with LMC X-1, obtained between 1983 and 1985, and a series of IUE UV spectra taken during a 5 day interval in 1984 are presented. The optical data are used to refine the orbital period to 4.2288 days, and improved orbital parameters are derived. The velocity of the optical emission lines is antiphased with the absorption lines and has twice the velocity amplitude. These new results support the estimates of the masses in the system given earlier. The most probable component masses are approximately 20 solar masses for the primary and near 6 solar masses (for the x-ray star), suggesting the the latter may be a black hole. The UV spectra show very weak, low-velocity stellar-wind lines. It is suggested that much of the surrounding medium is highly ionized by the X-ray flux. The 'nonwind' UV spectral lines and the UV continuum temperature are consistent with the optical data, indicating a late O type star of M(bol) = -8.5. There is a weak modulation of absorption-line strengths with orbital phase, suggestive of a lack of axisymmetry in the X-irradiation of the primary star and indicative of a fairly low orbital inclination.

  11. Near-infrared survey of high mass X-ray binary candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrejón, J. M.; Negueruela, I.; Smith, D. M.; Harrison, T. E.

    2010-02-01

    Context. The INTEGRAL satellite is detecting a large population of new X-ray sources that were missed by previous missions because of high obscuration and, in some cases, very short duty cycles. The nature of these sources must be addressed by characterizing their optical and/or infrared counterparts. Aims: We investigate the nature of the optical counterparts to five of these newly discovered X-ray sources. Methods: We combine infrared spectra in the I, J,H, and K bands with JHK photometry to characterize the spectral type, luminosity class, and distance to the infrared counterparts to these systems. For IGR J19140+0951, we present spectroscopy from the red to the K band and new red and infrared photometry. For SAX J18186-1703 and IGR J18483-0311, we present the first intermediate-resolution spectroscopy to be published. Finally, for IGR J18027-2016, we present new I and K band spectra. Results: We find that four systems harbour early-type B supergiants. All of them are heavily obscured, with E(B-V) ranging between 3 and 5, implying visual extinctions of ~ 9 to 15 mag. We refine the published classifications of IGR J18027-2016 and IGR J19140+0951 by constraining their luminosity class. In the first case, we confirm the supergiant nature but exclude a class III. In the second case, we propose a slightly higher luminosity class (Ia instead of Iab) and provide an improved value of the distance based on new optical photometry. Two other systems, SAX J18186-1703 and IGR J18483-0311 are classified as supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs). XTE J1901+014, on the other hand, contains no bright infrared source in its error circle. Conclusions: Owing to their infrared and X-ray characteristics, IGR J18027-2016 and IGR J19140+0951, emerge as supergiant X-ray binaries with X-ray luminosities of the order of L_X˜ [1-2]× 1036 erg s-1, while SAX J1818.6-1703 and IGR J18483-0311, are found to be SFXTs at 2 and 3 kpc, respectively. Finally, XTE J1901+014 emerges as a puzzling

  12. A milliparsec supermassive black hole binary candidate in the galaxy SDSS J120136.02+300305.5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Li, Shuo; Komossa, S.

    2014-05-10

    Galaxy mergers play a key role in the evolution of galaxies and the growth of their central supermassive black holes (SMBHs). A search for (active) SMBH binaries (SMBHBs) at the centers of the merger remnants is currently ongoing. Perhaps the greatest challenge is to identify the inactive SMBHBs, which might be the most abundant, but are also the most difficult to identify. Liu et al. predicted characteristic drops in the light curves of tidal disruption events (TDEs), caused by the presence of a secondary SMBH. Here, we apply that model to the light curve of the optically inactive galaxy SDSS J120136.02+300305.5, which was identified as a candidate TDE with XMM-Newton. We show that the deep dips in its evolving X-ray light curve can be well explained by the presence of a SMBHB at its core. A SMBHB model with a mass of the primary of M {sub BH} = 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, a mass ratio q ≅ 0.08, and a semi-major axis a {sub b} ≅ 0.6 mpc is in good agreement with the observations. Given that primary mass, introducing an orbital eccentricity is needed, with e {sub b} ≅ 0.3. Alternatively, a lower mass primary of M {sub BH} = 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} in a circular orbit fits the light curve well. Tight binaries like this one, which have already overcome the 'final parsec problem', are prime sources of gravitational wave radiation once the two SMBHs coalesce. Future transient surveys, which will detect TDEs in large numbers, will place tight constraints on the SMBHB fraction in otherwise non-active galaxies.

  13. SDSS J0159+0105: A Radio-Quiet Quasar with a Centi-Parsec Supermassive Black Hole Binary Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Shen, Yue; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Jun-Xian; Chen, Xian; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    We report a candidate centi-parsec supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) in the radio-quiet quasar SDSS J0159+0105 at z = 0.217. With a modified Lomb–Scargle code (GLSdeDRW) and auto-correlation analysis, we detect two significant (at P > 99%) periodic signals at ˜741 day and ˜1500 day from the 8.1 yr Catalina V-band light curve of this quasar. The period ratio, which is close to 1:2, is typical of a black hole binary system with a mass ratio of 0.05 < q < 0.8 according to recent numerical simulations. SDSS J0159+0105 has two SDSS spectroscopic observations separated by ˜10 yr. There is a significant change in the broad Hβ profile between the two epochs, which can be explained by a single broad-line region (BLR) around the binary system illuminated by the aforementioned mini-disks, or a stream of gas flowing from the circumbinary disk to one of the SMBHs. From the single BLR assumption and the orbital period t orb ˜ 1500 day, we estimate the total virial masses of M SMBHB ˜ 1.3 × 108 M ⊙, the average distances of BLR of ˜0.04 pc (˜50 lt-day, with ±0.3 dex uncertainty), and an SMBHB separation of d = (0.01 pc){M}8,{tot}1/3 (T rest/3.3 yr)2/3 ˜ 0.013 pc (15 lt-day). Based on analytical work, the postulated circumbinary disk has an inner radius of 2d = 0.026 pc (30 lt-day). SDSS J0159+0105 also displays unusual spectral energy distribution. The unique properties of SDSS J0159+0105 are consistent with it being a centi-parsec SMBHB. This paper uses data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS), SWIFT, GALEX, 2MASS, and WISE archive.

  14. SDSS J0159+0105: A Radio-Quiet Quasar with a Centi-Parsec Supermassive Black Hole Binary Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Shen, Yue; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Jun-Xian; Chen, Xian; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    We report a candidate centi-parsec supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) in the radio-quiet quasar SDSS J0159+0105 at z = 0.217. With a modified Lomb–Scargle code (GLSdeDRW) and auto-correlation analysis, we detect two significant (at P > 99%) periodic signals at ∼741 day and ∼1500 day from the 8.1 yr Catalina V-band light curve of this quasar. The period ratio, which is close to 1:2, is typical of a black hole binary system with a mass ratio of 0.05 < q < 0.8 according to recent numerical simulations. SDSS J0159+0105 has two SDSS spectroscopic observations separated by ∼10 yr. There is a significant change in the broad Hβ profile between the two epochs, which can be explained by a single broad-line region (BLR) around the binary system illuminated by the aforementioned mini-disks, or a stream of gas flowing from the circumbinary disk to one of the SMBHs. From the single BLR assumption and the orbital period t orb ∼ 1500 day, we estimate the total virial masses of M SMBHB ∼ 1.3 × 108 M ⊙, the average distances of BLR of ∼0.04 pc (∼50 lt-day, with ±0.3 dex uncertainty), and an SMBHB separation of d = (0.01 pc){M}8,{tot}1/3 (T rest/3.3 yr)2/3 ∼ 0.013 pc (15 lt-day). Based on analytical work, the postulated circumbinary disk has an inner radius of 2d = 0.026 pc (30 lt-day). SDSS J0159+0105 also displays unusual spectral energy distribution. The unique properties of SDSS J0159+0105 are consistent with it being a centi-parsec SMBHB. This paper uses data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS), SWIFT, GALEX, 2MASS, and WISE archive.

  15. Robust high-contrast companion detection from interferometric observations. The CANDID algorithm and an application to six binary Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.; Monnier, J. D.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Breitfelder, J.; Le Bouquin, J. B.; Roettenbacher, R. M.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S.; Kraus, S.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Long-baseline interferometry is an important technique to spatially resolve binary or multiple systems in close orbits. By combining several telescopes together and spectrally dispersing the light, it is possible to detect faint components around bright stars in a few hours of observations. Aims: We provide a rigorous and detailed method to search for high-contrast companions around stars, determine the detection level, and estimate the dynamic range from interferometric observations. Methods: We developed the code CANDID (Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data), a set of Python tools that allows us to search systematically for point-source, high-contrast companions and estimate the detection limit using all interferometric observables, i.e., the squared visibilities, closure phases and bispectrum amplitudes. The search procedure is made on a N × N grid of fit, whose minimum needed resolution is estimated a posteriori. It includes a tool to estimate the detection level of the companion in the number of sigmas. The code CANDID also incorporates a robust method to set a 3σ detection limit on the flux ratio, which is based on an analytical injection of a fake companion at each point in the grid. Our injection method also allows us to analytically remove a detected component to 1) search for a second companion; and 2) set an unbiased detection limit. Results: We used CANDID to search for the companions around the binary Cepheids V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul. First, we showed that our previous discoveries of the components orbiting V1334 Cyg and AX Cir were detected at >25σ and >13σ, respectively. The astrometric positions and flux ratios provided by CANDID for these two stars are in good agreement with our previously published values. The companion around AW Per is detected at more than 15σ with a flux ratio of f = 1.22 ± 0.30%, and it is located at ρ = 32.16 ± 0.29 mas and PA = 67.1 ± 0.3°. We made a

  16. Finding binary active galactic nuclei candidates by the centroid shift in imaging surveys. II. Testing the method with SDSS J233635.75-010733.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    We have previously proposed selecting binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) candidates using the centroid shift of the images that is induced by the non-synchronous variations of the two nuclei. In this paper, a known binary AGN (SDSS J233635.75-010733.7) is employed to verify the functioning of this method. Using 162 exposures in the R band of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), an excess of dispersion in the positional distribution of the binary AGN is detected, although the two nuclei cannot be resolved in the images of PTF. We also propose a new method to compare the position of the binary AGN in PTF g and R band and find that the difference is highly significant even with only 20 exposures. This new method is efficient for two nuclei with different spectral energy distributions such as type I + type II AGN or an off-set AGN. Large-scale surveys such as the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope are expected to discover a large sample of binary AGN candidates with these methods.

  17. High-Energy Electromagnetic Offline Follow-Up of Ligo-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Binary Coalescence Candidate Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L.; Briggs, M. S.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Veitch, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present two different search methods for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave (GW) events from ground-based detectors using archival NASA high-energy data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and RXTE All-sky Monitor (ASM) instruments. To demonstrate the methods, we use a limited number of representative GW background noise events produced by a search for binary neutron star coalescence over the last two months of the LIGO-Virgo S6/VSR3 joint science run. Time and sky location provided by the GW data trigger a targeted search in the high-energy photon data. We use two custom pipelines: one to search for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in GBM, and the other to search for a variety of X-ray afterglow model signals in ASM. We measure the efficiency of the joint pipelines to weak gamma-ray burst counterparts, and a family of model X-ray afterglows. By requiring a detectable signal in either electromagnetic instrument coincident with a GW event, we are able to reject a large majority of GW candidates. This reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of the loudest surviving GW background event by around 15-20 percent.

  18. Planet Hunters. X. Searching for Nearby Neighbors of 75 Planet and Eclipsing Binary Candidates from the K2 Kepler extended mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Kristiansen, Martti H.; LaCourse, Daryll M.; Gagliano, Robert; Tan, Arvin Joseff V.; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Omohundro, Mark R.; Venner, Alexander; Terentev, Ivan; Schmitt, Allan R.; Jacobs, Thomas L.; Winarski, Troy; Sejpka, Johann; Jek, Kian J.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Brewer, John M.; Ishikawa, Sascha T.; Lintott, Chris; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; Weiksnar, Alex

    2016-06-01

    We present high-resolution observations of a sample of 75 K2 targets from Campaigns 1–3 using speckle interferometry on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope and adaptive optics imaging at the Keck II telescope. The median SOAR I-band and Keck Ks-band detection limits at 1\\prime\\prime were {{Δ }}{m}I=4.4 mag and {{Δ }}{m}{Ks}=6.1 mag, respectively. This sample includes 37 stars likely to host planets, 32 targets likely to be eclipsing binaries (EBs), and 6 other targets previously labeled as likely planetary false positives. We find nine likely physically bound companion stars within 3\\prime\\prime of three candidate transiting exoplanet host stars and six likely EBs. Six of the nine detected companions are new discoveries. One of these new discoveries, EPIC 206061524, is associated with a planet candidate. Among the EB candidates, companions were only found near the shortest period ones (P\\lt 3 days), which is in line with previous results showing high multiplicity near short-period binary stars. This high-resolution data, including both the detected companions and the limits on potential unseen companions, will be useful in future planet vetting and stellar multiplicity rate studies for planets and binaries.

  19. Investigation of a transiting planet candidate in Trumpler 37: An astrophysical false positive eclipsing spectroscopic binary star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errmann, R.; Torres, G.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Seeliger, M.; Howard, A. W.; Maciejewski, G.; Neuhäuser, R.; Meibom, S.; Kellerer, A.; Dimitrov, D. P.; Dincel, B.; Marka, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Ginski, Ch.; Adam, Ch.; Raetz, St.; Schmidt, J. G.; Hohle, M. M.; Berndt, A.; Kitze, M.; Trepl, L.; Moualla, M.; Eisenbeiß, T.; Fiedler, S.; Dathe, A.; Graefe, Ch.; Pawellek, N.; Schreyer, K.; Kjurkchieva, D. P.; Radeva, V. S.; Yotov, V.; Chen, W. P.; Hu, S. C.-L.; Wu, Z.-Y.; Zhou, X.; Pribulla, T.; Budaj, J.; Vaňko, M.; Kundra, E.; Hambálek, Ľ.; Krushevska, V.; Bukowiecki, Ł.; Nowak, G.; Marschall, L.; Terada, H.; Tomono, D.; Fernandez, M.; Sota, A.; Takahashi, H.; Oasa, Y.; Briceño, C.; Chini, R.; Broeg, C. H.

    We report our investigation of the first transiting planet candidate from the YETI project in the young (˜4 Myr old) open cluster Trumpler 37. The transit-like signal detected in the lightcurve of F8V star 2M21385603+5711345 repeats every 1.364894±0.000015 days, and has a depth of 54.5±0.8 mmag in R. Membership in the cluster is supported by its mean radial velocity and location in the color-magnitude diagram, while the Li diagnostic and proper motion are inconclusive in this regard. Follow-up photometric monitoring and adaptive optics imaging allow us to rule out many possible blend scenarios, but our radial-velocity measurements show it to be an eclipsing single-lined spectroscopic binary with a late-type (mid-M) stellar companion, rather than one of planetary nature. The estimated mass of the companion is 0.15-0.44 M⊙. The search for planets around very young stars such as those targeted by the YETI survey remains of critical importance to understand the early stages of planet formation and evolution. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Proposal ID H215Hr). The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC, Proposal IDs H10-3.5-015 and H10-2.2-004). Some of the observations reported here were obtained at

  20. Burying a binary: Dynamical mass loss and a continuous optically thick outflow explain the candidate stellar merger V1309 Scorpii

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej

    2014-06-10

    V1309 Sco was proposed to be a stellar merger and a common envelope transient based on the pre-outburst light curve of a contact eclipsing binary with a rapidly decaying orbital period. Using published data, I show that the period decay timescale P/ P-dot of V1309 Sco decreased from ∼1000 to ∼170 yr in ≲ 6 yr, which implies a very high value of P{sup ¨}. I argue that V1309 Sco experienced an onset of dynamical mass loss through the outer Lagrange point, which eventually obscured the binary. The photosphere of the resulting continuous optically thick outflow expands as the mass-loss rate increases, explaining the ∼200 day rise to optical maximum. The model yields the mass-loss rate of the binary star as a function of time and fits the observed light curve remarkably well. It is also possible to observationally constrain the properties of the surface layers undergoing the dynamical mass loss. V1309 Sco is thus a prototype of a new class of stellar transients distinguished by a slow rise to optical maximum that are driven by dynamical mass loss from a binary. I discuss the implications of these findings for stellar transients and other suggested common envelope events.

  1. IRAS 16253–2429: The First Proto-brown Dwarf Binary Candidate Identified through the Dynamics of Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping; Belloche, Arnaud; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2016-07-01

    The formation mechanism of brown dwarfs (BDs) is one of the long-standing problems in star formation because the typical Jeans mass in molecular clouds is too large to form these substellar objects. To answer this question, it is crucial to study a BD in the embedded phase. IRAS 16253–2429 is classified as a very low-luminosity object (VeLLO) with an internal luminosity of <0.1 L ⊙. VeLLOs are believed to be very low-mass protostars or even proto-BDs. We observed the jet/outflow driven by IRAS 16253–2429 in CO (2–1), (6–5), and (7–6) using the IRAM 30 m and Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescopes and the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in order to study its dynamical features and physical properties. Our SMA map reveals two protostellar jets, indicating the existence of a proto-binary system as implied by the precessing jet detected in H2 emission. We detect a wiggling pattern in the position–velocity diagrams along the jet axes, which is likely due to the binary orbital motion. Based on this information, we derive the current mass of the binary as ∼0.032 M⊙. Given the low envelope mass, IRAS 16253–2429 will form a binary that probably consist of one or two BDs. Furthermore, we found that the outflow force as well as the mass accretion rate are very low based on the multi-transition CO observations, which suggests that the final masses of the binary components are at the stellar/substellar boundary. Since IRAS 16253 is located in an isolated environment, we suggest that BDs can form through fragmentation and collapse, similar to low-mass stars. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  2. IRAS 16253–2429: The First Proto-brown Dwarf Binary Candidate Identified through the Dynamics of Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping; Belloche, Arnaud; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2016-07-01

    The formation mechanism of brown dwarfs (BDs) is one of the long-standing problems in star formation because the typical Jeans mass in molecular clouds is too large to form these substellar objects. To answer this question, it is crucial to study a BD in the embedded phase. IRAS 16253–2429 is classified as a very low-luminosity object (VeLLO) with an internal luminosity of <0.1 L ⊙. VeLLOs are believed to be very low-mass protostars or even proto-BDs. We observed the jet/outflow driven by IRAS 16253–2429 in CO (2–1), (6–5), and (7–6) using the IRAM 30 m and Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescopes and the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in order to study its dynamical features and physical properties. Our SMA map reveals two protostellar jets, indicating the existence of a proto-binary system as implied by the precessing jet detected in H2 emission. We detect a wiggling pattern in the position–velocity diagrams along the jet axes, which is likely due to the binary orbital motion. Based on this information, we derive the current mass of the binary as ˜0.032 M⊙. Given the low envelope mass, IRAS 16253–2429 will form a binary that probably consist of one or two BDs. Furthermore, we found that the outflow force as well as the mass accretion rate are very low based on the multi-transition CO observations, which suggests that the final masses of the binary components are at the stellar/substellar boundary. Since IRAS 16253 is located in an isolated environment, we suggest that BDs can form through fragmentation and collapse, similar to low-mass stars. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  3. First Long-term Optical Spectral Monitoring of a Binary Black Hole Candidate E1821+643. I. Variability of Spectral Lines and Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalova, A. I.; Popović, L. Č.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Burenkov, A. N.; Ilić, D.; Kollatschny, W.; Kovačević, A.; Valdés, J. R.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; León-Tavares, J.; Torrealba, J.; Zhdanova, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    We report the results of the first long-term (1990-2014) optical spectrophotometric monitoring of a binary black hole candidate QSO E1821+643, a low-redshift, high-luminosity, radio-quiet quasar. In the monitored period, the continua and Hγ fluxes changed about two times, while the Hβ flux changed about 1.4 times. We found periodical variations in the photometric flux with periods of 1200, 1850, and 4000 days, and 4500-day periodicity in the spectroscopic variations. However, the periodicity of 4000-4500 days covers only one cycle of variation and should be confirmed with a longer monitoring campaign. There is an indication of the period around 1300 days in the spectroscopic light curves, buts with small significance level, while the 1850-day period could not be clearly identified in the spectroscopic light curves. The line profiles have not significantly changed, showing an important red asymmetry and broad line peak redshifted around +1000 km s-1. However, Hβ shows a broader mean profile and has a larger time lag (τ ˜ 120 days) than Hγ (τ ˜ 60 days). We estimate that the mass of the black hole is ˜2.6 × 109 M⊙. The obtained results are discussed in the frame of the binary black hole hypothesis. To explain the periodicity in the flux variability and high redshift of the broad lines, we discuss a scenario where dense, gas-rich, cloudy-like structures are orbiting around a recoiling black hole.

  4. CXOGBS J173620.2-293338: A candidate symbiotic X-ray binary associated with a bulge carbon star

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, C. T.; Johnson, C. B.; Torres, M. A. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Maccarone, T. J.; Mikles, V. J.; Knigge, C.; Greiss, S.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide but shallow X-ray survey of regions above and below the Plane in the Galactic Bulge. It was performed using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS camera. The survey is primarily designed to find and classify low luminosity X-ray binaries. The combination of the X-ray depth of the survey and the accessibility of optical and infrared counterparts makes this survey ideally suited to identification of new symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) in the Bulge. We consider the specific case of the X-ray source CXOGBS J173620.2-293338. It is coincident to within 1 arcsec with a very red star, showing a carbon star spectrum and irregular variability in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data. We classify the star as a late C-R type carbon star based on its spectral features, photometric properties, and variability characteristics, although a low-luminosity C-N type cannot be ruled out. The brightness of the star implies it is located in the Bulge, and its photometric properties are overall consistent with the Bulge carbon star population. Given the rarity of carbon stars in the Bulge, we estimate the probability of such a close chance alignment of any GBS source with a carbon star to be ≲ 10{sup –3}, suggesting that this is likely to be a real match. If the X-ray source is indeed associated with the carbon star, then the X-ray luminosity is around 9 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}. Its characteristics are consistent with a low luminosity SyXB, or possibly a low accretion rate white dwarf symbiotic.

  5. CXOGBS J173620.2-293338: A Candidate Symbiotic X-Ray Binary Associated with a Bulge Carbon Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Torres, M. A. P.; Heinke, C. O.; Maccarone, T. J.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Knigge, C.; Greiss, S.; Jonker, P. G.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; Johnson, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide but shallow X-ray survey of regions above and below the Plane in the Galactic Bulge. It was performed using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS camera. The survey is primarily designed to find and classify low luminosity X-ray binaries. The combination of the X-ray depth of the survey and the accessibility of optical and infrared counterparts makes this survey ideally suited to identification of new symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) in the Bulge. We consider the specific case of the X-ray source CXOGBS J173620.2-293338. It is coincident to within 1 arcsec with a very red star, showing a carbon star spectrum and irregular variability in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data. We classify the star as a late C-R type carbon star based on its spectral features, photometric properties, and variability characteristics, although a low-luminosity C-N type cannot be ruled out. The brightness of the star implies it is located in the Bulge, and its photometric properties are overall consistent with the Bulge carbon star population. Given the rarity of carbon stars in the Bulge, we estimate the probability of such a close chance alignment of any GBS source with a carbon star to be <~ 10-3, suggesting that this is likely to be a real match. If the X-ray source is indeed associated with the carbon star, then the X-ray luminosity is around 9 × 1032 erg s-1. Its characteristics are consistent with a low luminosity SyXB, or possibly a low accretion rate white dwarf symbiotic.

  6. A TRANSIENT SUB-EDDINGTON BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY CANDIDATE IN THE DUST LANES OF CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Evans, Daniel A.; Jordan, Andres; Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Goodger, Joanna L.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Woodley, Kristin A.; Kainulainen, Jouni; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M.; Croston, Judith H.; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarazin, Craig L.; Voss, Rasmus [Department of Astrophysics and others

    2012-04-20

    We report the discovery of a bright X-ray transient CXOU J132527.6-430023 in the nearby early-type galaxy NGC 5128. The source was first detected over the course of five Chandra observations in 2007, reaching an unabsorbed outburst luminosity of (1-2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.5-7.0 keV band before returning to quiescence. Such luminosities are possible for both stellar-mass black hole and neutron star (NS) X-ray binary transients. Here, we attempt to characterize the nature of the compact object. No counterpart has been detected in the optical or radio sky, but the proximity of the source to the dust lanes allows for the possibility of an obscured companion. The brightness of the source after a >100-fold increase in X-ray flux makes it either the first confirmed transient non-ultraluminous X-ray black hole system in outburst to be subject to detailed spectral modeling outside the Local Group, or a bright (>10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}) transient NS X-ray binary, which are very rare. Such a large increase in flux would appear to lend weight to the view that this is a black hole transient. X-ray spectral fitting of an absorbed power law yielded unphysical photon indices, while the parameters of the best-fit absorbed disk blackbody model are typical of an accreting {approx}10 M{sub Sun} black hole in the thermally dominant state.

  7. 1RXS J180408.9-342058: An ultra compact X-ray binary candidate with a transient jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Goldoni, P.; Masetti, N.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present a detailed near-infrared/optical/UV study of the transient low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 performed during its 2015 outburst, which is aimed at determining the nature of its companion star. Methods: We obtained three optical spectra (R ~ 1000) at the 2.1 m San Pedro Mártir Observatory telescope (México). We performed optical and NIR photometric observations with both the REM telescope and the New Technology Telescope (NTT) in La Silla. We obtained optical and UV observations from the Swift archive. Finally, we performed optical polarimetry of the source using the EFOSC2 instrument mounted on the NTT. Results: The optical spectrum of the source is almost featureless since the hydrogen and He I emissions lines, typically observed in LMXBs, are not detected. Similarly, carbon and oxygen lines are not observed either. We marginally detect the He II 4686 Å emission line, suggesting the presence of helium in the accretion disc. No significant optical polarisation level was observed. Conclusions: The lack of hydrogen and He I emission lines in the spectrum implies that the companion is likely not a main-sequence star. Driven by the tentative detection of the He II 4686 Å emission line, we suggest that the system could harbour a helium white dwarf. If this is the case, 1RXS J180408.9-342058 would be an ultra-compact X-ray binary. By combining an estimate of the mass accretion rate together with evolutionary tracks for a He white dwarf, we obtain a tentative orbital period of ~40 min. We also built the NIR-optical-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source at two different epochs. One SED was gathered when the source was in the soft X-ray state and this SED is consistent with the presence of a single thermal component. The second SED, obtained when the source was in the hard X-ray state, shows a thermal component along with a tail in the NIR, which likely indicates the presence of a (transient) jet. Based on observations made with

  8. PARSEC-SCALE LOCALIZATION OF THE QUASAR SDSS J1536+0441A, A CANDIDATE BINARY BLACK HOLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J. M.; Laor, A. E-mail: laor@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-05-10

    The radio-quiet quasar (RQQ) SDSS J1536+0441A shows two broad-line emission systems, recently interpreted as a binary black hole (BBH) system with a subparsec separation; as a double-peaked emitter; or as both types of systems. The NRAO Very Long Baseline Array was used to search for 8.4 GHz emission from SDSS J1536+0441A, focusing on the optical localization region for the broad-line emission, of area 5400 mas{sup 2} (0.15 kpc{sup 2}). One source was detected, with a diameter of less than 1.63 mas (8.5 pc) and a brightness temperature T{sub b} >1.2 x 10{sup 7} K. New NRAO Very Large Array photometry at 22.5 GHz, and earlier photometry at 8.5 GHz, gives a rising spectral slope of {alpha} = 0.35 {+-} 0.08. The slope implies an optically thick synchrotron source, with a radius of about 0.04 pc, and thus T{sub b} {approx} 5 x 10{sup 10} K. The implied radio sphere at the rest frequency 31.2 GHz has a radius of 800 gravitational radii, just below the size of the broad-line region in this object. Observations at higher frequencies can probe whether or not the radio sphere is as compact as expected from the coronal framework for the radio emission of RQQs.

  9. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  10. Broad-band monitoring tracing the evolution of the jet and disc in the black hole candidate X-ray binary MAXI J1659-152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, A. J.; Curran, P. A.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Linford, J. D.; Gorosabel, J.; Russell, D. M.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Lundgren, A. A.; Taylor, G. B.; Maitra, D.; Guziy, S.; Belloni, T. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Jonker, P. G.; Kamble, A.; Paragi, Z.; Homan, J.; Kuulkers, E.; Granot, J.; Altamirano, D.; Buxton, M. M.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Fender, R. P.; Garrett, M. A.; Gehrels, N.; Hartmann, D. H.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Mangano, V.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Romano, P.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Yang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    MAXI J1659-152 was discovered on 2010 September 25 as a new X-ray transient, initially identified as a gamma-ray burst, but was later shown to be a new X-ray binary with a black hole as the most likely compact object. Dips in the X-ray light curves have revealed that MAXI J1659-152 is the shortest period black hole candidate identified to date. Here we present the results of a large observing campaign at radio, submillimetre, near-infrared (nIR), optical and ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. We have combined this very rich data set with the available X-ray observations to compile a broad-band picture of the evolution of this outburst. We have performed broad-band spectral modelling, demonstrating the presence of a spectral break at radio frequencies and a relationship between the radio spectrum and X-ray states. Also, we have determined physical parameters of the accretion disc and put them into context with respect to the other parameters of the binary system. Finally, we have investigated the radio-X-ray and nIR/optical/UV-X-ray correlations up to ˜3 yr after the outburst onset to examine the link between the jet and the accretion disc, and found that there is no significant jet contribution to the nIR emission when the source is in the soft or intermediate X-ray spectral state, consistent with our detection of the jet break at radio frequencies during these states.

  11. DIRECT IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF A CANDIDATE COMPANION BELOW/NEAR THE DEUTERIUM-BURNING LIMIT IN THE YOUNG BINARY STAR SYSTEM, ROXs 42B

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Daemgen, Sebastian; Jayawardhana, Ray; Debes, John; Lafreniere, David; Itoh, Yoichi; Ratzka, Thorsten; Correia, Serge

    2014-01-10

    We present near-infrared high-contrast imaging photometry and integral field spectroscopy of ROXs 42B, a binary M0 member of the 1-3 Myr old ρ Ophiuchus star-forming region, from data collected over 7 years. Each data set reveals a faint companion—ROXs 42Bb—located ∼1.''16 (r {sub proj} ≈ 150 AU) from the primaries at a position angle consistent with a point source identified earlier by Ratzka et al.. ROXs 42Bb's astrometry is inconsistent with a background star but consistent with a bound companion, possibly one with detected orbital motion. The most recent data set reveals a second candidate companion at ∼0.''5 of roughly equal brightness, though preliminary analysis indicates it is a background object. ROXs 42Bb's H and K{sub s} band photometry is similar to dusty/cloudy young, low-mass late M/early L dwarfs. K band VLT/SINFONI spectroscopy shows ROXs 42Bb to be a cool substellar object (M8-L0; T {sub eff} ≈ 1800-2600 K), not a background dwarf star, with a spectral shape indicative of young, low surface gravity planet-mass companions. We estimate ROXs 42Bb's mass to be 6-15 M{sub J} , either below the deuterium-burning limit and thus planet mass or straddling the deuterium-burning limit nominally separating planet-mass companions from other substellar objects. Given ROXs 42b's projected separation and mass with respect to the primaries, it may represent the lowest mass objects formed like binary stars or a class of planet-mass objects formed by protostellar disk fragmentation/disk instability, the latter slightly blurring the distinction between non-deuterium-burning planets like HR 8799 bcde and low-mass, deuterium-burning brown dwarfs.

  12. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4–112820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4‑112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6‑1125. The system is detected up to ˜30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270‑4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  13. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4–112820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4‑112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6‑1125. The system is detected up to ∼30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270‑4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  14. Search for Binary Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Grundy, W. M.; Ryan, E. L.; Benecchi, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    We have reexamined 41 Trojan asteroids observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to search for unresolved binaries. We have identified one candidate binary with a separation of 53 milliarcsec, about the width of the diffraction limited point-spread function (PSF). Sub-resolution-element detection of binaries is possible with HST because of the high signal-to-noise ratio of the observations and the stability of the PSF. Identification and confirmation of binary Trojans is important because a Trojan Tour is one of five possible New Frontiers missions. A binary could constitute a potentially high value target because of the opportunity to study two objects and to test models of the primordial nature of binaries. The potential to derive mass-based physical information from the binary orbit could yield more clues to the origin of Trojans.

  15. Very Large Telescope/X-shooter Spectroscopy of the Candidate Black Hole X-Ray Binary MAXI J1659-152 in Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Kaper, Lex; Ellerbroek, Lucas E.; Russell, David M.; Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy; Yang, Yi-Jung; D'Avanzo, Paolo; de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Flores, Hector; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Goldoni, Paolo; Thöne, Christina C.; van der Horst, Alexander; van der Klis, Michiel; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wiersema, Klaas; Kuulkers, Erik

    2012-02-01

    We present the optical to near-infrared spectrum of MAXI J1659-152 during the onset of its 2010 X-ray outburst. The spectrum was obtained with X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope early in the outburst simultaneous with high-quality observations at both shorter and longer wavelengths. At the time of the observations, the source was in the low-hard state. The X-shooter spectrum includes many broad (~2000 km s-1), double-peaked emission profiles of H, He I, and He II, characteristic signatures of a low-mass X-ray binary during outburst. We detect no spectral signatures of the low-mass companion star. The strength of the diffuse interstellar bands results in a lower limit to the total interstellar extinction of AV ~= 0.4 mag. Using the neutral hydrogen column density obtained from the X-ray spectrum we estimate AV ~= 1 mag. The radial velocity structure of the interstellar Na I D and Ca II H&K lines results in a lower limit to the distance of ~4 ± 1 kpc, consistent with previous estimates. With this distance and AV , the dereddened spectral energy distribution represents a flat disk spectrum. The two 10 minute X-shooter spectra show significant variability in the red wing of the emission-line profiles, indicating a global change in the density structure of the disk, though on a timescale much shorter than the typical viscous timescale of the disk. Based on ESO-VLT/X-shooter observations obtained using the X-shooter guaranteed time GRB program (086.A-0073).

  16. New RR Lyrae variables in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdu, G.; Catelan, M.; Jurcsik, J.; Dékány, I.; Drake, A. J.; Marquette, J.-B.

    2015-04-01

    Despite their importance, very few RR Lyrae (RRL) stars have been known to reside in binary systems. We report on a search for binary RRL in the OGLE-III Galactic bulge data. Our approach consists in the search for evidence of the light-travel time effect in so-called observed minus calculated (O-C) diagrams. Analysis of 1952 well-observed fundamental-mode RRL in the OGLE-III data revealed an initial sample of 29 candidates. We used the recently released OGLE-IV data to extend the baselines up to 17 yr, leading to a final sample of 12 firm binary candidates. We provide O-C diagrams and binary parameters for this final sample, and also discuss the properties of eight additional candidate binaries whose parameters cannot be firmly determined at present. We also estimate that ≳ 4 per cent of the RRL reside in binary systems.

  17. Binary Plutinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    2015-08-01

    The Pluto-Charon binary was the first trans-neptunian binary to be identified in 1978. Pluto-Charon is a true binary with both components orbiting a barycenter located between them. The Pluto system is also the first, and to date only, known binary with a satellite system consisting of four small satellites in near-resonant orbits around the common center of mass. Seven other Plutinos, objects in 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune, have orbital companions including 2004 KB19 reported here for the first time. Compared to the Cold Classical population, the Plutinos differ in the frequency of binaries, the relative sizes of the components, and their inclination distribution. These differences point to distinct dynamical histories and binary formation processes encountered by Plutinos.

  18. Is there a blackhole among the black-hole candidates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang; Fischer, Daniel

    1989-03-01

    None of the tentative black-hole identifications has remained without serious difficulties. As a class, the black-hole candidates differ in no obvious property from neutron-star binaries other than in their estimated high mass. An interpretation of the black-hole candidates as binary neutron stars surrounded by a more or less massive accretion disk is favored.

  19. Close binary stars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Although close binary stars are thought theoretically to play a major role in globular cluster dynamics, virtually no non-degenerate close binaries are known in clusters. We review the status of observations in this area, and report on two new programs which are finally yielding candidate systems suitable for further study. One of the objects, a close eclipsing system in omega Cen, is also a big straggler, thus finally proving firm evidence that globular cluster blue stragglers really are binary stars.

  20. Microlensing Signature of Binary Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Sahu, Kailash; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the light curves of galactic bulge stars magnified via microlensing by stellar-mass binary black holes along the line-of-sight. We show the sensitivity to measuring various lens parameters for a range of survey cadences and photometric precision. Using public data from the OGLE collaboration, we identify two candidates for massive binary systems, and discuss implications for theories of star formation and binary evolution.

  1. Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan W.; Pravec, P.

    2006-06-01

    There are now nearly 100 binary asteroids known. In the last year alone, 30 binary asteroids have been discovered, half of them by lightcurves showing eclipse events. Similar to eclipsing binary stars, such observations allow determination of orbit period and sizes and shapes of the primary and secondary relative to the orbital dimension. From these parameters one can estimate the mean density of the system, and a number of dynamical properties such as total specific angular momentum, tidal evolution time scales of spins and orbit, and precession frequencies of the orbit about the primary and of the solar induced "general precession" of the system. We have extracted parameters for all systems with enough observations to allow meaningful determinations. Some preliminary results include: (1) Binaries are roughly as prevalent among small main-belt asteroids as among Near-Earth Asteroids. (2) Most binaries are partially asynchronous, with the secondary synchronized to the orbit period, but the primary still spinning much faster. This is consistent with estimated tidal damping time scales. (3) Most systems have near the critical maximum angular momentum for a single "rubble pile" body, but not much more, and some less. Thus fission appears not to be a viable formation mechanism for all binaries, although near-critical spin rate seems to play a role. (4) Orbits of the secondaries are essentially in the equatorial plane of the primary. Since most primary spins are still fast, the satellites must have been formed into low inclination orbits. (5) Precession frequencies are in the range of the shorter resonance frequencies in the solar system (tens of thousands of years), thus resonance interactions can be expected to have altered spin orientations as systems evolved slowly by tidal friction or other processes. (6) Primaries are unusually spheroidal, which is probably necessary for stability of the binary once formed.

  2. Planets in Evolved Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai B.

    2011-03-01

    Exo-planets are typically thought to form in protoplanetary disks left over from protostellar disk of their newly formed host star. However, additional planetary formation and evolution routes may exist in old evolved binary systems. Here we discuss the implications of binary stellar evolution on planetary systems in such environments. In these binary systems stellar evolution could lead to the formation of symbiotic stars, where mass is lost from one star and could be transferred to its binary companion, and may form an accretion disk around it. This raises the possibility that such a disk could provide the necessary environment for the formation of a new, second generation of planets in both circumstellar or circumbinary configurations. Pre-existing first generation planets surviving the post-MS evolution of such systems would be dynamically effected by the mass loss in the systems and may also interact with the newly formed disk. Such planets and/or planetesimals may also serve as seeds for the formation of the second generation planets, and/or interact with them, possibly forming atypical planetary systems. Second generation planetary systems should be typically found in white dwarf binary systems, and may show various observational signatures. Most notably, second generation planets could form in environment which are inaccessible, or less favorable, for first generation planets. The orbital phase space available for the second generation planets could be forbidden (in terms of the system stability) to first generation planets in the pre-evolved progenitor binaries. In addition planets could form in metal poor environments such as globular clusters and/or in double compact object binaries. Observations of exo-planets in such forbidden or unfavorable regions could possibly serve to uniquely identify their second generation character. Finally, we point out a few observed candidate second generation planetary systems, including Gl 86, HD 27442 and all of the

  3. New binary systems: beaming binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, J. C.; Weingrill, J.; Mazeh, T.; Ribas, I.

    2011-11-01

    Exoplanet missions such as COROT and Kepler are providing precise photometric follow-up data of new kinds of variable stars undetected till now. Beaming binaries are among these objects. On these binary systems, the orbital motion of their components is fast enough to produce a detectable modulation on the received flux due to relativistic effects (Zucker et al. 2007). The great advantage of these systems is that it is possible to reconstruct the radial velocity curve of the system from this photometric modulation and thus, orbital parameters such as the mass ratio and the semi-major axis can be estimated from photometry without the necessity of spectroscopic follow-up. In this poster, we briefly introduce the analysis of this kind of binary systems and in particular, the eclipsing cases.

  4. Binary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Keegan; Nakajima, Miki; Stevenson, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Can a bound pair of similar mass terrestrial planets exist? We are interested here in bodies with a mass ratio of ~ 3:1 or less (so Pluto/Charon or Earth/Moon do not qualify) and we do not regard the absence of any such discoveries in the Kepler data set to be significant since the tidal decay and merger of a close binary is prohibitively fast well inside of 1AU. SPH simulations of equal mass “Earths” were carried out to seek an answer to this question, assuming encounters that were only slightly more energetic than parabolic (zero energy). We were interested in whether the collision or near collision of two similar mass bodies would lead to a binary in which the two bodies remain largely intact, effectively a tidal capture hypothesis though with the tidal distortion being very large. Necessarily, the angular momentum of such an encounter will lead to bodies separated by only a few planetary radii if capture occurs. Consistent with previous work, mostly by Canup, we find that most impacts are disruptive, leading to a dominant mass body surrounded by a disk from which a secondary forms whose mass is small compared to the primary, hence not a binary planet by our adopted definition. However, larger impact parameter “kissing” collisions were found to produce binaries because the dissipation upon first encounter was sufficient to provide a bound orbit that was then rung down by tides to an end state where the planets are only a few planetary radii apart. The long computational times for these simulation make it difficult to fully map the phase space of encounters for which this outcome is likely but the indications are that the probability is not vanishingly small and since planetary encounters are a plausible part of planet formation, we expect binary planets to exist and be a non-negligible fraction of the larger orbital radius exoplanets awaiting discovery.

  5. Properties OF M31. V. 298 eclipsing binaries from PAndromeda

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-H.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Seitz, S.; Bender, R.; Riffeser, A.; Kodric, M.; Hopp, U.; Snigula, J.; Gössl, C.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Burgett, W.; Chambers, K.; Hodapp, K.; Kaiser, N.; Waters, C.

    2014-12-10

    The goal of this work is to conduct a photometric study of eclipsing binaries in M31. We apply a modified box-fitting algorithm to search for eclipsing binary candidates and determine their period. We classify these candidates into detached, semi-detached, and contact systems using the Fourier decomposition method. We cross-match the position of our detached candidates with the photometry from Local Group Survey and select 13 candidates brighter than 20.5 mag in V. The relative physical parameters of these detached candidates are further characterized with the Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter (DEBiL) by Devor. We will follow up the detached eclipsing binaries spectroscopically and determine the distance to M31.

  6. Binary classification of items of interest in a repeatable process

    DOEpatents

    Abell, Jeffrey A.; Spicer, John Patrick; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Chakraborty, Debejyo

    2014-06-24

    A system includes host and learning machines in electrical communication with sensors positioned with respect to an item of interest, e.g., a weld, and memory. The host executes instructions from memory to predict a binary quality status of the item. The learning machine receives signals from the sensor(s), identifies candidate features, and extracts features from the candidates that are more predictive of the binary quality status relative to other candidate features. The learning machine maps the extracted features to a dimensional space that includes most of the items from a passing binary class and excludes all or most of the items from a failing binary class. The host also compares the received signals for a subsequent item of interest to the dimensional space to thereby predict, in real time, the binary quality status of the subsequent item of interest.

  7. The Kepler Q1-Q12 Planet Candidate Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Jason; Kepler Team

    2014-01-01

    An update on the Kepler Planetary Candidate Catalogue (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/docs/Kepler_KOI_docs.html) will be presented that incorporates results of three years of nearly continuous, high precision photometry. Through a series of tests to exclude false-positives, primarily caused by eclipsing binary stars, over 900 additional planetary candidates have been discovered. Approximately 50 of the new candidates have equilibrium temperatures less than 300 K. More than 400 of the new planetary candidates have a radius less that 1.5 Rearth. A handful of the new candidates meet both criteria, roughly doubling the number of near Earth analogs.

  8. Hunting for brown dwarf binaries with X-Shooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavacas, E.; Goldman, B.; Alcalá, J. M.; Zapatero-Osorio, M. R.; Béjar, B. J. S.; Homeier, D.; Bonnefoy, M.; Smart, R. L.; Henning, T.; Allard, F.

    2015-05-01

    The refinement of the brown dwarf binary fraction may contribute to the understanding of the substellar formation mechanisms. Peculiar brown dwarf spectra or discrepancy between optical and near-infrared spectral type classification of brown dwarfs may indicate unresolved brown dwarf binary systems. We obtained medium-resolution spectra of 22 brown dwarfs of potential binary candidates using X-Shooter at the VLT. We aimed to select brown dwarf binary candidates. We also tested whether BT-Settl 2014 atmospheric models reproduce the physics in the atmospheres of these objects. To find different spectral type spectral binaries, we used spectral indices and we compared the selected candidates to single spectra and composition of two single spectra from libraries, to try to reproduce our X-Shooter spectra. We also created artificial binaries within the same spectral class, and we tried to find them using the same method as for brown dwarf binaries with different spectral types. We compared our spectra to the BT-Settl models 2014. We selected six possible candidates to be combination of L plus T brown dwarfs. All candidates, except one, are better reproduced by a combination of two single brown dwarf spectra than by a single spectrum. The one-sided F-test discarded this object as a binary candidate. We found that we are not able to find the artificial binaries with components of the same spectral type using the same method used for L plus T brown dwarfs. Best matches to models gave a range of effective temperatures between 950 K and 1900 K, a range of gravities between 4.0 and 5.5. Some best matches corresponded to supersolar metallicity.

  9. Binary classification of items of interest in a repeatable process

    DOEpatents

    Abell, Jeffrey A; Spicer, John Patrick; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Chakraborty, Debejyo

    2015-01-06

    A system includes host and learning machines. Each machine has a processor in electrical communication with at least one sensor. Instructions for predicting a binary quality status of an item of interest during a repeatable process are recorded in memory. The binary quality status includes passing and failing binary classes. The learning machine receives signals from the at least one sensor and identifies candidate features. Features are extracted from the candidate features, each more predictive of the binary quality status. The extracted features are mapped to a dimensional space having a number of dimensions proportional to the number of extracted features. The dimensional space includes most of the passing class and excludes at least 90 percent of the failing class. Received signals are compared to the boundaries of the recorded dimensional space to predict, in real time, the binary quality status of a subsequent item of interest.

  10. TeV emission from close binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, I. V.

    1995-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that candidates for very high energy γ-ray sources are neutron stars, binary systems, black holes etc. Close binary systems containing a normal hot star and a neutron star (or a black hole) form an important class of very high energy γ-ray sources. Such systems are variable in any region of the electromagnetic spectrum and they enable us to study various stages of stellar evolution, accretion processes, mechanisms of particle acceleration, etc. Phenomena connected with this class of very high energy γ-ray sources are discussed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the TeV energy region.

  11. Ultra-short period binaries from the Catalina Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A. A.; Donalek, C.; Williams, R.; García-Álvarez, D.; Catelan, M.; Torrealba, G.; Prieto, J. L.; Abraham, S.; Larson, S.; Christensen, E.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the properties of 367 ultra-short period binary candidates selected from 31,000 sources recently identified from Catalina Surveys data. Based on light curve morphology, along with WISE, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and GALEX multi-color photometry, we identify two distinct groups of binaries with periods below the 0.22 day contact binary minimum. In contrast to most recent work, we spectroscopically confirm the existence of M dwarf+M dwarf contact binary systems. By measuring the radial velocity variations for five of the shortest-period systems, we find examples of rare cool white dwarf (WD)+M dwarf binaries. Only a few such systems are currently known. Unlike warmer WD systems, their UV flux and optical colors and spectra are dominated by the M-dwarf companion. We contrast our discoveries with previous photometrically selected ultra-short period contact binary candidates and highlight the ongoing need for confirmation using spectra and associated radial velocity measurements. Overall, our analysis increases the number of ultra-short period contact binary candidates by more than an order of magnitude.

  12. A strip search for new very wide halo binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, D. P.; Smith, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a search for new wide halo binary stars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82. A list of new halo wide binary candidates which satisfy common proper motion and photometric constraints is provided. The projected separations of the sample lie between 0.007 and 0.25 pc. Although the sample is not large enough to improve constraints on dark matter in the halo, we find the wide binary angular separation function is broadly consistent with past work. We discuss the significance of the new sample for a number of astrophysical applications, including as a testbed for ideas about wide binary formation. For the subset of candidates which have radial velocity information, we make use of integrals of motion to investigate one such scheme in which the origin of Galactic wide binaries is associated with the accretion/disruption of stellar systems in the Galaxy. Additional spectroscopic observations of these candidate binaries will strengthen their usefulness in many of these respects. Based on our search experience in Stripe 82 we estimate that the upcoming Pan-STARRS survey will increase the sample size of wide halo binaries by over an order of magnitude.

  13. A search for binary hot subdwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, William Thomas

    2001-12-01

    The hot subdwarfs are evolved stars intermediate between the hydrogen burning main sequence and the white dwarfs. As the immediate precursors of white dwarfs they are essential to a complete understanding of the end points of stellar evolution, and as exemplars of extreme mass- loss stars they may be windows on one of astronomy's least understood problems. But the origins of the hot subdwarfs are obscure. Duplicity may play a role in the enhanced mass-loss hot subdwarfs must suffer, and it is known that the hydrogen-rich sdB hot subdwarfs show a high binary fraction. The helium-rich hot subdwarfs, the putative descendants of the sdB stars, are only weakly characterized with respect to binarity. The helium-rich hot subdwarfs are the subject of this research, and the question of their duplicity is its focus. Sixty-four helium-rich hot subdwarfs drawn from the Palomar-Green Survey of UV-Excess Stellar Objects were observed on the Cousins BV RI photometric system. A subset of twenty-five of the 64 program stars were observed in the IR J and K pass-bands. Spectroscopic data were obtained for thirty-two members of the sample, including seven that have not been observed in either the BV RI or the JK filter sets. A total of sixteen binary candidates were identified, twelve for the first time. Binary candidates were identified by their intrinsic color excesses in two-color plots of the extinction-corrected BV RI and JK data, and by comparison to synthetic binary system colors. Spectrophotometric color indices were derived from the spectroscopic data and used to identify binary candidates by their excess color in two color plots. The binary fraction of the sdOC stars in the sample is predicted to be at least 64% and potentially 100%. A binary fraction for the whole sample of sdOs may have limited meaning, given the probable inhomogeneity of the sample. However, performing the calculation for the whole sample again produces the estimate that at least 64% and at most 100% of

  14. The Reflection Effect in Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gropp, Jeffrey D.; Prsa, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Using a database of eclipsing binaries (EBs) from the Kepler space telescope, we identified star systems which displayed characteristics corresponding to the reflection effect. The reflection effect is the brightening of one star due to irradiation by its companion. We found 40 candidates amongst the nearly 2,800 EBs in the database. We analyze these candidates and derive parameters and properties of each system using the PHOEBE modeling program. We examine each model fit using probabilistic inference in order to statistically evaluate the best fit model. The model critically tests the reflection effect and provides physical constraints on the principal parameters.

  15. MARVELS Radial Velocity Solutions to Seven Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, Michael Francis; Thomas, Neil B.; Ge, Jian; Ma, Bo; Herczeg, Alec; Reyes, Alan; SDSS-III MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve momentous purposes to improve the basis of understanding aspects of stellar astrophysics, such as the accurate calculation of the physical parameters of stars and the enigmatic mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. We report the investigation results of 7 eclipsing binary candidates, initially identified by the Kepler mission, overlapped with the radial velocity observations from the SDSS-III Multi-Object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS). The RV extractions and spectroscopic solutions of these eclipsing binaries were generated by the University of Florida's 1D data pipeline with a median RV precision of ~60-100 m/s, which was utilized for the DR12 data release. We performed the cross-reference fitting of the MARVELS RV data and the Kepler photometric fluxes obtained from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (V2) and modelled the 7 eclipsing binaries in the BinaryMaker3 and PHOEBE programs. This analysis accurately determined the absolute physical and orbital parameters of each binary. Most of the companion stars were determined to have masses of K and M dwarf stars (0.3-0.8 M⊙), and allowed for an investigation into the mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. Among the cases are KIC 9163796, a 122.2 day period "heartbeat star", a recently-discovered class of eccentric binaries known for tidal distortions and pulsations, with a high eccentricity (e~0.75) and KIC 11244501, a 0.29 day period, contact binary with a double-lined spectrum and mass ratio (q~0.45). We also report on the possible reclassification of 2 Kepler eclipsing binary candidates as background eclipsing binaries based on the analysis of the flux measurements, flux ratios of the spectroscopic and photometric solutions, the differences in the FOVs, the image processing of Kepler, and RV and spectral analysis of MARVELS.

  16. PHOEBE: PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Matijevic, Gal; Latkovic, Olivera; Vilardell, Francesc; Wils, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program (Wilson & Devinney 1971). This introductory paper overviews most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvements to WD's Differential Corrections method, the new Nelder & Mead's downhill Simplex method) and technical aspects (back-end scripter structure, graphical user interface). While PHOEBE retains 100% WD compatibility, its add-ons are a powerful way to enhance WD by encompassing even more physics and solution reliability.

  17. Globular Clusters Hosting Intermediate-Mass Black Holes: No Mass-Segregation Based Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquato, Mario; Miocchi, Paolo; Won, Sohn Bong; Lee, Young-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Recently, both stellar mass segregation and binary fractions were uniformly measured on relatively large samples of Galactic globular clusters (GCs). Simulations show that both sizable binary-star populations and intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) quench mass segregation in relaxed GCs. Thus mass segregation in GCs with a reliable binary-fraction measurement is a valuable probe to constrain IMBHs. In this paper we combine mass-segregation and binary-fraction measurements from the literature to build a sample of 33 GCs (with measured core binary fractions), and a sample of 43 GCs (with binary-fraction measurements in the area between the core radius and the half-mass radius). Within both samples we try to identify IMBH-host candidates. These should have relatively low mass segregation, a low binary fraction (<5%), and a short (<1 Gyr) relaxation time. Considering the core-binary-fraction sample, no suitable candidates emerge. If the binary fraction between the core and the half-mass radius is considered, two candidates are found, but this is likely due to statistical fluctuations. We also consider a larger sample of 54 GCs where we obtained an estimate of the core binary fraction using a predictive relation based on metallicity and integrated absolute magnitude. Also in this case no suitable candidates are found. Finally, we consider the GC core- to half-mass radius ratio, which is expected to be larger for GCs containing either an IMBH or binaries. We find that GCs with large core- to half-mass radius ratios are less mass-segregated (and show a larger binary fraction), confirming the theoretical expectation that the energy sources responsible for the large core are also quenching mass segregation.

  18. Multiples Among Detached Eclipsing Binaries from the ASAS Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.; Ratajczak, M.; Jordán, A.; Espinoza, N.; Brahm, R.; Kambe, E.; Ukita, N.

    2015-07-01

    We have been conducting a spectroscopic survey of detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) from the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) database for more than three years. Thousands of high-resolution spectra of >300 systems have been secured, and used for radial velocity measurements and spectral analysis. We have found a zoo of multiple systems in our sample, such as spectroscopic triples and quadruples, visual binaries with eclipsing components, and circumbinary low-mass companions, including sub-stellar-mass candidates.

  19. Substellar objects around the sdB eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liying; Qian, Shengbang; Liao, Wenping; Zhao, Ergang; Li, Linjia

    2016-07-01

    The sdB-type eclipsing binary consists a very hot subdwarf B (sdB) type primary and a low mass secondary with short period. They are detached binaries and show very narrow eclipse profiles, which benefits the determination of the precise eclipse times. With the precise times of light minimum, we can detected small mass objects around them by analyzing the observed-calculated (O-C) curve based on the light time effect. For searching the substellar objects orbiting around the binaries, we have monitored sdB-type eclipsing binaries for decades. A group of brown dwarfs and planets have been detected since then. In the present paper, we focus on the target NSVS07826147, which may be another exoplanet host candidate among the group of the sdB-type eclipsing binaries.

  20. Lifetime of binary asteroids versus gravitational encounters and collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauvineau, Bertrand; Farinella, Paolo; Mignard, F.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the effect on the dynamics of a binary asteroid in the case of a near encounter with a third body. The dynamics of the binary is modeled as a two-body problem perturbed by an approaching body in the following ways: near encounters and collisions with a component of the system. In each case, the typical value of the two-body energy variation is estimated, and a random walk for the cumulative effect is assumed. Results are applied to some binary asteroid candidates. The main conclusion is that the collisional disruption is the dominant effect, giving lifetimes comparable to or larger than the age of the solar system.

  1. Case A Binary Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C A; Eggleton, P P

    2001-03-28

    We undertake a comparison of observed Algol-type binaries with a library of computed Case A binary evolution tracks. The library consists of 5500 binary tracks with various values of initial primary mass M{sub 10}, mass ratio q{sub 0}, and period P{sub 0}, designed to sample the phase-space of Case A binaries in the range -0.10 {le} log M{sub 10} {le} 1.7. Each binary is evolved using a standard code with the assumption that both total mass and orbital angular momentum are conserved. This code follows the evolution of both stars until the point where contact or reverse mass transfer occurs. The resulting binary tracks show a rich variety of behavior which we sort into several subclasses of Case A and Case B. We present the results of this classification, the final mass ratio and the fraction of time spent in Roche Lobe overflow for each binary system. The conservative assumption under which we created this library is expected to hold for a broad range of binaries, where both components have spectra in the range G0 to B1 and luminosity class III - V. We gather a list of relatively well-determined observed hot Algol-type binaries meeting this criterion, as well as a list of cooler Algol-type binaries where we expect significant dynamo-driven mass loss and angular momentum loss. We fit each observed binary to our library of tracks using a {chi}{sup 2}-minimizing procedure. We find that the hot Algols display overall acceptable {chi}{sup 2}, confirming the conservative assumption, while the cool Algols show much less acceptable {chi}{sup 2} suggesting the need for more free parameters, such as mass and angular momentum loss.

  2. Teaching "Candide": A Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Theodore E. D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two different approaches to teaching Voltaire's "Candide", one deriving meaning from the textual fabric or "inside" of the story and the other focusing on the author's "external" intent in writing the story, are presented and compared. (MSE)

  3. Extrasolar Binary Planets II: Detectability by Transit Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K. M.; Ochiai, H.; Nagasawa, M.; Ida, S.

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the detectability of gravitationally bound pairs of gas-giant planets (which we call “binary planets”) in extrasolar planetary systems that are formed through orbital instability followed by planet-planet dynamical tides during their close encounters, based on the results of N-body simulations by Ochiai et al. (Paper I). Paper I showed that the formation probability of a binary is as much as ˜10% for three giant planet systems that undergo orbital instability, and after post-capture long-term tidal evolution, the typical binary separation is three to five times the sum of the physical radii of the planets. The binary planets are stable during the main-sequence lifetime of solar-type stars, if the stellarcentric semimajor axis of the binary is larger than 0.3 AU. We show that detecting modulations of transit light curves is the most promising observational method to detect binary planets. Since the likely binary separations are comparable to the stellar diameter, the shape of the transit light curve is different from transit to transit, depending on the phase of the binary’s orbit. The transit durations and depth for binary planet transits are generally longer and deeper than those for the single planet case. We point out that binary planets could exist among the known inflated gas-giant planets or objects classified as false positive detections at orbital radii ≳0.3 AU, propose a binary planet explanation for the CoRoT candidate SRc01 E2 1066, and show that binary planets are likely to be present in, and could be detected using, Kepler-quality data.

  4. Candidate CDTI procedures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ace, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A concept with potential for increasing airspace capacity by involving the pilot in the separation control loop is discussed. Some candidate options are presented. Both enroute and terminal area procedures are considered and, in many cases, a technologically advanced Air Traffic Control structure is assumed. Minimum display characteristics recommended for each of the described procedures are presented. Recommended sequencing of the operational testing of each of the candidate procedures is presented.

  5. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  6. SMC3 As a Test To The Binary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iłkiewicz, K.; Mikołajewska, J.; Belczyński, K.

    2015-12-01

    SMC 3 is one of the most interesting symbiotic stars. This binary contains a bright K-type giant transferring mass to a massive white dwarf comanion, which makes it is a very promising SN Ia candidate. We discuss the evolutionary status of the system using results of population synthesis code.

  7. Binary Populations and Stellar Dynamics in Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.; Belkus, H.; Van Bever, J.; Mennekens, N.

    2008-06-01

    We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, η Car, ζ Pup, γ2 Velorum and WR 140.

  8. Radio-selected Binary Active Galactic Nuclei from the Very Large Array Stripe 82 Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai; Myers, A. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin; Wrobel, J. M.; Stockton, A.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. However, determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 deg2 covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5'' (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the Hα-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ~60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. RADIO-SELECTED BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE VERY LARGE ARRAY STRIPE 82 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Hai; Myers, A. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin; Wrobel, J. M.; Stockton, A.

    2015-01-20

    Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. However, determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 deg{sup 2} covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5'' (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the Hα-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ∼60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion.

  10. WHITE-DWARF-MAIN-SEQUENCE BINARIES IDENTIFIED FROM THE LAMOST PILOT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Juanjuan; Luo Ali; Li Yinbi; Wei Peng; Zhao Jingkun; Zhao Yongheng; Song Yihan; Zhao Gang E-mail: lal@nao.cas.cn

    2013-10-01

    We present a set of white-dwarf-main-sequence (WDMS) binaries identified spectroscopically from the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called the Guo Shou Jing Telescope) pilot survey. We develop a color selection criteria based on what is so far the largest and most complete Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 WDMS binary catalog and identify 28 WDMS binaries within the LAMOST pilot survey. The primaries in our binary sample are mostly DA white dwarfs except for one DB white dwarf. We derive the stellar atmospheric parameters, masses, and radii for the two components of 10 of our binaries. We also provide cooling ages for the white dwarf primaries as well as the spectral types for the companion stars of these 10 WDMS binaries. These binaries tend to contain hot white dwarfs and early-type companions. Through cross-identification, we note that nine binaries in our sample have been published in the SDSS DR7 WDMS binary catalog. Nineteen spectroscopic WDMS binaries identified by the LAMOST pilot survey are new. Using the 3{sigma} radial velocity variation as a criterion, we find two post-common-envelope binary candidates from our WDMS binary sample.

  11. Binary synchronous simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R., III

    1980-01-01

    Flexible simulator for trouble-shooting data transmission system uses binary synchronous communications protocol to produce error-free transmission of data between two points. Protocol may be used to replace display generator or be directly fed to display generator.

  12. Double Degenerate Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K.

    2011-09-21

    In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

  13. Binary pattern deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Butel, Guillaume P; Smith, Greg A; Burge, James H

    2014-02-10

    Deflectometry is widely used to accurately calculate the slopes of any specular reflective surface, ranging from car bodies to nanometer-level mirrors. This paper presents a new deflectometry technique using binary patterns of increasing frequency to retrieve the surface slopes. Binary Pattern Deflectometry allows almost instant, simple, and accurate slope retrieval, which is required for applications using mobile devices. The paper details the theory of this deflectometry method and the challenges of its implementation. Furthermore, the binary pattern method can also be combined with a classic phase-shifting method to eliminate the need of a complex unwrapping algorithm and retrieve the absolute phase, especially in cases like segmented optics, where spatial algorithms have difficulties. Finally, whether it is used as a stand-alone or combined with phase-shifting, the binary patterns can, within seconds, calculate the slopes of any specular reflective surface. PMID:24663273

  14. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  15. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  16. Binary-Symmetry Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Hiram

    1987-01-01

    Transmission errors for zeros and ones tabulated separately. Binary-symmetry detector employs psuedo-random data pattern used as test message coming through channel. Message then modulo-2 added to locally generated and synchronized version of test data pattern in same manner found in manufactured test sets of today. Binary symmetrical channel shows nearly 50-percent ones to 50-percent zeroes correspondence. Degree of asymmetry represents imbalances due to either modulation, transmission, or demodulation processes of system when perturbed by noise.

  17. Monitoring spectroscopic binaries in anticipation of Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbaix, Dimitri; Halbwachs, Jean-Louis; Arenou, Frederic

    2015-08-01

    For several already known spectroscopic binaries, it is anticipated that Gaia will provide an exquisite astrometric orbit of the photocenter. In case of double-lined spectroscopic binaries, the orbital inclination supplied by Gaia will lead to the mass of both components.. For those masses to be useful, an accuracy of 2-3% is required. This can only be achieved if the spectroscopic orbit is very accurate too. A long term monitoring of good spectroscopic candidates in on going on Sophie at the Observatory of Haute Provence and on Hermes on the Mercator telescope in La Palma. For some of these systems, we have already derived a definitive SB2 orbital solution while, for others, the secondary remains unreachable. We present these new solutions in conjunction with the possible impact on the Hipparcos astrometric solution.

  18. The Cool Surfaces of Binaries Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbo, Marco; Walsh, K.; Mueller, M.

    2008-09-01

    We present results from thermal-infrared observations of binary near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). These objects, in general, have surface temperatures cooler than the average values for non-binary NEAs. We discuss how this may be evidence of higher-than-average surface thermal inertia. The comparison of these binary NEAs with all NEAs and rapidly rotating NEAs suggests a binary formation mechanism capable of altering surface properties, possibly removing regolith: an obvious candidate is the YORP effect. --- Acknowledgments This research was carried out while Marco Delbo and Kevin Walsh were Henri Poincare Fellows at the Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur. The Henri Poincare Fellowship is funded by the CNRS-INSU, the Conseil General des Alpes-Maritimes and the Rotary International -- District 1730.

  19. A search for cataclysmic binaries containing strongly magnetic white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, H. E.; Chanmugam, G.

    1982-01-01

    The AM Herculis type binaries which contain accreting white dwarfs with surface magnetic fields of a few times 10 to the seventh power gauss were studied. If white dwarfs in cataclysmic binaries have a range of field strengths similar to that among single white dwarfs. AM Her like systems should exist with fields as high as 3 x 10 to the eighth power gauss. It is suggested that such objects will not have the strong optical polarization of the AM Her variables; however, they exhibit high harmonic cyclotron emission, making them spectacular UV sources. We made IUE observations of seven candidate cataclysmic variables selected for optical similarity to AM Her binaries. Although all seven objects were detected in the UV, none display unusually strong UV continua. It is suggested that the distribution of magnetic field strengths among single white dwarfs may be different from that among binaries.

  20. ALA Candidates: Presidential Timbre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an interview with two effective spokespeople, notable school librarian Sara Kelly Johns and retired public library administrator Molly Raphael, who compete to be American Library Association (ALA) president. One of them will be elected president of ALA for a year's term beginning in July 2011. Each candidate comes from a…

  1. Binary Cepheids From High-Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.

    2015-12-01

    Optical interferometry is the only technique giving access to milli-arcsecond (mas) spatial resolution. This is a powerful and unique tool to detect the close orbiting companions of Cepheids, and offers an unique opportunity to make progress in resolving the Cepheid mass discrepancy. Our goal in studying binary Cepheids is to measure the astrometric position of the high-contrast companion, and then combine them with spectroscopic measurements to derive the orbital elements, distances, and dynamical masses. In the course of this program, we developed a new tool, CANDID, to search for high-contrast companions and set detection limits from interferometric observations

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in binary condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, S.; Angom, D.

    2010-05-15

    We propose a well-controlled experimental scheme to initiate and examine the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in two-species Bose-Einstein condensates. We identify the {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb mixture as an excellent candidate to observe experimentally. The instability is initiated by tuning the {sup 85}Rb-{sup 85}Rb interaction through a magnetic Feshbach resonance. We show that the observable signature of the instability is the damping of the radial oscillations. We also propose a semianalytic scheme to determine the stationary state of binary condensates with the Thomas-Fermi approximation for axisymmetric traps.

  3. ALMOST ALL OF KEPLER'S MULTIPLE-PLANET CANDIDATES ARE PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Adams, Elisabeth; Fressin, Francois; Geary, John; Holman, Matthew J.; Ragozzine, Darin; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Morehead, Robert C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; and others

    2012-05-10

    We present a statistical analysis that demonstrates that the overwhelming majority of Kepler candidate multiple transiting systems (multis) indeed represent true, physically associated transiting planets. Binary stars provide the primary source of false positives among Kepler planet candidates, implying that false positives should be nearly randomly distributed among Kepler targets. In contrast, true transiting planets would appear clustered around a smaller number of Kepler targets if detectable planets tend to come in systems and/or if the orbital planes of planets encircling the same star are correlated. There are more than one hundred times as many Kepler planet candidates in multi-candidate systems as would be predicted from a random distribution of candidates, implying that the vast majority are true planets. Most of these multis are multiple-planet systems orbiting the Kepler target star, but there are likely cases where (1) the planetary system orbits a fainter star, and the planets are thus significantly larger than has been estimated, or (2) the planets orbit different stars within a binary/multiple star system. We use the low overall false-positive rate among Kepler multis, together with analysis of Kepler spacecraft and ground-based data, to validate the closely packed Kepler-33 planetary system, which orbits a star that has evolved somewhat off of the main sequence. Kepler-33 hosts five transiting planets, with periods ranging from 5.67 to 41 days.

  4. SEARCH FOR SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SPECTROSCOPIC SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Wenhua; Greene, Jenny E.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Badenes, Carles

    2013-11-01

    Supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries are expected in a ΛCDM cosmology given that most (if not all) massive galaxies contain a massive black hole (BH) at their center. So far, however, direct evidence for such binaries has been elusive. We use cross-correlation to search for temporal velocity shifts in the Mg II broad emission lines of 0.36 < z < 2 quasars with multiple observations in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For ∼10{sup 9} M{sub ☉} BHs in SMBH binaries, we are sensitive to velocity drifts for binary separations of ∼0.1 pc with orbital periods of ∼100 yr. We find seven candidate sub-parsec-scale binaries with velocity shifts >3.4σ ∼ 280 km s{sup –1}, where σ is our systematic error. Comparing the detectability of SMBH binaries with the number of candidates (N ≤ 7), we can rule out that most 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉} BHs exist in ∼0.03-0.2 pc scale binaries, in a scenario where binaries stall at sub-parsec scales for a Hubble time. We further constrain that ≤16% (one-third) of quasars host SMBH binaries after considering gas-assisted sub-parsec evolution of SMBH binaries, although this result is very sensitive to the assumed size of the broad line region. We estimate the detectability of SMBH binaries with ongoing or next-generation surveys (e.g., Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph), taking into account the evolution of the sub-parsec binary in circumbinary gas disks. These future observations will provide longer time baselines for searches similar to ours and may in turn constrain the evolutionary scenarios of SMBH binaries.

  5. Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez, Alvaro; Rucinski, Slavek; Szkody, P.; Gies, D.; Kang, Y.-W.; Linsky, J.; Livio, M.; Morrell, N.; Hilditch, R.; Nordström, B.; Ribas, I.; Sion, E.; Vrielman, S.

    2007-03-01

    The triennial report from Commission 42 covers various topics like massive binaries, contact systems, cataclysmic variables and low-mass binary stars. We try in a number of sections to provide an update on the current status of the main research areas in the field of close binaries. It is not a formal review, even complete or comprehensive, but an attempt to bring the main topics on recent research to astronomers working in other fields. References are also not comprehensive and simply added to the text to help the reader looking for deeper information on the subject. For this reason, we have chosen to include references (sometimes incomplete for ongoing work) not in a list at the end but integrated with the main text body. Complete references and additional sources can be easily obtained through web access of ADS or SIMBAD. Furthermore, the summary of papers on close-binary research contained in the Bibliography of Close Binaries (BCB) can be accessed from the web site of Commission 42. I would like to express the gratitude of the commission for the careful work of Colin Scarfe as Editor-in-Chief of BCB and Andras Holl and Attila Sragli for maintaining the web pages of the Commission within the structure of Division V. Finally, K. Olah and J. Jurcsik are gratefully acknowledged for their continued support as editors of the Information Bulletin on Variable Stars (IBVS), also accessible through the commission web page.

  6. Interim results from the ongoing hunt for supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnoe, Jessie C.; Mathes, Gavin; Pennell, Alison; Brown, Stephanie Meghan; Eracleous, Michael; Boroson, Todd A.; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Halpern, Jules P.; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries seem to be an inevitable product of the prevailing galaxy evolution scenarios in which most massive galaxies play host to a central black hole and undergo a history of mergers and accretion over the course of cosmic time. The early stages of this process have been observed in the form of interacting galaxy pairs as well dual active galactic nuclei with kilo-parsec separations, but detections of the close, bound binaries that are expected to follow have proven elusive. With this motivation, we have been conducting a systematic observational search for sub-parsec separation supermassive black hole binaries. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that the secondary black hole in the system is active and the resulting broad emission lines are doppler shifted due to orbital motion in the binary (analogous to a single-line spectroscopc binary star). Our sample includes 88 binary candidates selected from z<0.7 Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars based on substantial offsets (>1000 km/s) of their broad Hβ emission lines relative to their systemic redshifts. I will present the latest results from the spectroscopic monitoring campaign that we are conducting to constrain the nature of the binary candidates. These include the radial velocity curves, which now use observations made through 2015, and the constraints that can be placed on the physical properties of the binary based on the radial velocity curves and observed flux variability of the binaries.

  7. Searching for pulsations in Kepler eclipsing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulme, Patrick; Guzik, Joyce A.

    2014-02-01

    Eclipsing binaries can in principle provide additional constraints to facilitate asteroseismology of one or more pulsating components. We have identified 94 possible eclipsing binary systems in a sample of over 1800 stars observed in long cadence as part of the Kepler Guest Observer Program to search for γ Doradus and δ Scuti star candidates. We show the results of a procedure to fold the light curve to identify the potential binary period, subtract a fit to the binary light curve, and perform a Fourier analysis on the residuals to search for pulsation frequencies that may arise in one or both of the stellar components. From this sample, we have found a large variety of light curve types; about a dozen stars show frequencies consistent with δ Sct or γ Dor pulsations, or light curve features possibly produced by stellar activity (rotating spots). For several stars, the folded candidate `binary' light curve resembles more closely that of an RR Lyr, Cepheid, or high-amplitude δ Sct star. We show highlights of our results and discuss the potential for asteroseismology of the most interesting objects.

  8. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  9. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  10. Simulating Contact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Frank, Juhan; Tohline, Joel E.; Staff, Jan E.; Motl, Patrick M.; Marcello, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    About one in every 150 stars is a contact binary system of WUMa type and it was thought for a long time that such a binary would naturally proceed towards merger, forming a single star. In September 2008 such a merger was observed in the eruption of a “red nova", V1309 Sco. We are developing a hydrodynamics simulation for contact binaries using Self Consistent Field (SCF) techniques, so that their formation, structural, and merger properties could be studied. This model can also be used to probe the stability criteria such as the large-scale equatorial circulations and the minimum mass ratio. We also plan to generate light curves from the simulation data in order to compare with the observed case of V1309 Sco. A comparison between observations and simulations will help us better understand the nova-like phenomena of stellar mergers.

  11. Identification list of binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov,, O.; Karchevsky,, A.; Kaygorodov, P.; Kovaleva, D.

    The Identification List of Binaries (ILB) is a star catalogue constructed to facilitate cross-referencing between different catalogues of binary stars. As of 2015, it comprises designations for approximately 120,000 double/multiple systems. ILB contains star coordinates and cross-references to the Bayer/Flemsteed, DM (BD/CD/CPD), HD, HIP, ADS, WDS, CCDM, TDSC, GCVS, SBC9, IGR (and some other X-ray catalogues), PSR designations, as well as identifications in the recently developed BSDB system. ILB eventually became a part of the BDB stellar database.

  12. Dark matter candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of. Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs.

  13. Planetary Dynamics and Evolution in Evolved Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai; Kratter, K.; Kenyon, S.

    2011-09-01

    Exo-planets typically form in protoplanetary disks left over from the formation of their host star. We discuss additional evolutionary routes which may may exist in old evolved binary systems. Stellar evolution in binaries could lead to the formation of symbiotic stars, where mass is lost from one star and (partially) transferred to its binary companion, forming an accretion disk. Planetary orbits around the mass losing star can expand and destabilize, and may result in chaotic evolution. Possible outcomes include exchange of the planet to the companion star, ejection, collision, or tidal capture by one of the binary components. We show that the conditions in the newly formed accretion disk could be very similar to protoplanetary disks. Planets around the accreting companion may interact with the disk, leading to (re)growth and (re)migration of the planets. The disk may also provide the necessary environment for the formation of a new, second generation of planets in both circumstellar or circumbinary configurations. Pre-existing planets and/or planetesimals may serve as seeds for the formation of the second generation planets. Such systems should be found in white dwarf binary systems, and may show various unique observational signatures. Most notably, second generation planets could form in environments which are unfavorable for first generation planets. The phase space available for these planets could be forbidden (unstable) to first generation planets in the pre-evolved progenitor binaries. Planets may also form in double compact object binaries and in metal poor environments. Observations of exo-planets in such unfavorable regions could possibly serve to uniquely identify their second generation character. Finally, we point out a few observed candidate second generation planetary systems (Gl 86, HD 27442 and observed circumbinary planet candidates). A second generation origin for these systems could explain their unique configurations.

  14. Binary coding for hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chang, Chein-I.; Chang, Chein-Chi; Lin, Chinsu

    2004-10-01

    Binary coding is one of simplest ways to characterize spectral features. One commonly used method is a binary coding-based image software system, called Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) for remotely sensed imagery developed by Mazer et al. For a given spectral signature, the SPAM calculates its spectral mean and inter-band spectral difference and uses them as thresholds to generate a binary code word for this particular spectral signature. Such coding scheme is generally effective and also very simple to implement. This paper revisits the SPAM and further develops three new SPAM-based binary coding methods, called equal probability partition (EPP) binary coding, halfway partition (HP) binary coding and median partition (MP) binary coding. These three binary coding methods along with the SPAM well be evaluated for spectral discrimination and identification. In doing so, a new criterion, called a posteriori discrimination probability (APDP) is also introduced for performance measure.

  15. Accreting Binary Populations in the Earlier Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2010-01-01

    It is now understood that X-ray binaries dominate the hard X-ray emission from normal star-forming galaxies. Thanks to the deepest (2-4 Ms) Chandra surveys, such galaxies are now being studied in X-rays out to z approximates 4. Interesting X-ray stacking results (based on 30+ galaxies per redshift bin) suggest that the mean rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity from z=3-4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), is comparable to the most powerful starburst galaxies in the local Universe. This result possibly indicates a similar production mechanism for accreting binaries over large cosmological timescales. To understand and constrain better the production of X-ray binaries in high-redshift LBGs, we have utilized XMM-Newton observations of a small sample of z approximates 0.1 GALEX-selected Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs); local analogs to high-redshift LBGs. Our observations enable us to study the X-ray emission from LBG-like galaxies on an individual basis, thus allowing us to constrain object-to-object variances in this population. We supplement these results with X-ray stacking constraints using the new 3.2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (completed spring 2010) and LBG candidates selected from HST, Swift UVOT, and ground-based data. These measurements provide new X-ray constraints that sample well the entire z=0-4 baseline

  16. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  17. Binary concatenated coding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, L. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Coding, using 3-bit binary words, is applicable to any measurement having integer scale up to 100. System using 6-bit data words can be expanded to read from 1 to 10,000, and 9-bit data words can increase range to 1,000,000. Code may be ''read'' directly by observation after memorizing simple listing of 9's and 10's.

  18. Binary primitive alternant codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helgert, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    In this note we investigate the properties of two classes of binary primitive alternant codes that are generalizations of the primitive BCH codes. For these codes we establish certain equivalence and invariance relations and obtain values of d and d*, the minimum distances of the prime and dual codes.

  19. Interacting binaries. Lecture notes 1992.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, H.; Orr, A.

    These lecture notes represent a unique collection of information and references on current research on interacting binaries: S. N. Shore puts the emphasis on observations and their connection to relevant physics. He also discusses symbiotic stars. Cataclysmic variables are the subject of M. Livio's course, whereas E. P. J. van den Heuvel concentrates on more massive binaries and X-ray binaries.

  20. MICROLENSING BINARIES DISCOVERED THROUGH HIGH-MAGNIFICATION CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, S.-Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Hung, L.-W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-02-20

    Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a 3{sigma} confidence level for three events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretical prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is q {approx} 0.1, making the companion of the lens a strong brown dwarf candidate.

  1. UNUSUALLY WIDE BINARIES: ARE THEY WIDE OR UNUSUAL?

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Adam L.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. E-mail: lah@astro.caltech.ed

    2009-10-01

    We describe an astrometric and spectroscopic campaign to confirm the youth and association of a complete sample of candidate wide companions in Taurus and Upper Sco. Our survey found 15 new binary systems (three in Taurus and 12 in Upper Sco) with separations of 3''-30'' (500-5000 AU) among all of the known members with masses of 2.5-0.012 M {sub sun}. The total sample of 49 wide systems in these two regions conforms to only some expectations from field multiplicity surveys. Higher mass stars have a higher frequency of wide binary companions, and there is a marked paucity of wide binary systems near the substellar regime. However, the separation distribution appears to be log-flat, rather than declining as in the field, and the mass ratio distribution is more biased toward similar-mass companions than the initial mass function or the field G-dwarf distribution. The maximum separation also shows no evidence of a limit at approx<5000 AU until the abrupt cessation of any wide binary formation at system masses of approx0.3 M {sub sun}. We attribute this result to the post-natal dynamical sculpting that occurs for most field systems; our binary systems will escape to the field intact, but most field stars are formed in denser clusters and undergo significant dynamical evolution. In summary, only wide binary systems with total masses approx<0.3 M {sub sun} appear to be 'unusually wide'.

  2. Follow-up of Kepler candidates transiting hot-Jupiter with ground based photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Clement; Stephens, D.; Larson, J.; Ranquist, E.; Stoker, E.; Rawlins, J.

    2013-10-01

    We have selected a group of planetary candidates from the Kepler field with short transiting times and observed them at the West Mountain Observatory (WMO) with the objective to confirm or find their nature. The resulting light curves showed that KOI667 is a diluted eclipsing binary. Further observations at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) and the use of Point Spread Function (PSF) photometry resolved the eclipsing binary. We present the techniques used to obtain the light curves and the identification of the eclipsing binary.

  3. Apparent horizons in binary black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre Marie

    Over the last decade, advances in computing technology and numerical techniques have lead to the possible theoretical prediction of astrophysically relevant waveforms in numerical simulations. With the building of gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory, we stand at the epoch that will usher in the first experimental study of strong field general relativity. One candidate source for ground based detection of gravitational waveforms, the orbit and merger of two black holes, is of great interest to the relativity community. The binary black hole problem is the two-body problem in general relativity. It is a stringent dynamical test of the theory. The problem involves the evolution of the Einstein equation, a complex system of non-linear, dynamic, elliptic-hyperbolic equations intractable in closed form. Numerical relativists are now developing the technology to evolve the Einstein equation using numerical simulations. The generation of these numerical I codes is a ``theoretical laboratory'' designed to study strong field phenomena in general relativity. This dissertation reports the successful development and application of the first multiple apparent horizon tracker applied to the generic binary black hole problem. I have developed a method that combines a level set of surfaces with a curvature flow method. This method, which I call the level flow method, locates the surfaces of any apparent horizons in the spacetime. The surface location then is used to remove the singularities from the computational domain in the evolution code. I establish the following set of criteria desired in an apparent horizon tracker: (1)The robustness of the tracker due to its lack of dependence on small changes to the initial guess; (2)The generality of the tracker in its applicability to generic spacetimes including multiple back hole spacetimes; and (3)The efficiency of the tracker algorithm in CPU time. I demonstrate the apparent

  4. The Internal-Candidate Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Dennis M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author explains the complications involved when an internal candidate is included in an open search for a leadership position in an academic institution. Internal-candidate syndrome is a dilemma faced by institutions when they have to choose between an internal candidate and an external one. There are two reasons why…

  5. Pulsar candidates towards Fermi unassociated sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frail, D. A.; Mooley, K. P.; Jagannathan, P.; Intema, H. T.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a search for steep spectrum radio sources within the 95 per cent confidence error ellipses of the Fermi unassociated sources from the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Using existing catalogues and the newly released Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope all-sky survey at 150 MHz, we identify compact radio sources that are bright at MHz frequencies but faint or absent at GHz frequencies. Such steep spectrum radio sources are rare and constitute a sample of pulsar candidates, selected independently of period, dispersion measure, interstellar scattering and orbital parameters. We find point-like, steep spectrum candidates towards 11 Fermi sources. Based on the gamma-ray/radio positional coincidence, the rarity of such radio sources, and the properties of the 3FGL sources themselves, we argue that many of these sources could be pulsars. They may have been missed by previous radio periodicity searches due to interstellar propagation effects or because they lie in an unusually tight binary. If this hypothesis is correct, then renewed gamma-ray and radio periodicity searches at the positions of the steep spectrum radio sources may reveal pulsations.

  6. Elemental abundances of solar sibling candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez, I.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.; Wittenmyer, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  7. Electromagnetic and Gravitational Outputs from Binary-Neutron-Star Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Ponce, Marcelo; Liebling, Steven L.; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    The late stage of an inspiraling neutron-star binary gives rise to strong gravitational wave emission due to its highly dynamic, strong gravity. Moreover, interactions between the stellar magnetospheres can produce considerable electromagnetic radiation. We study this scenario using fully general relativistic, resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We show that these interactions extract kinetic energy from the system, dissipate heat, and power radiative Poynting flux, as well as develop current sheets. Our results indicate that this power can (i) outshine pulsars in binaries, (ii) display a distinctive angular- and time-dependent pattern, and (iii) radiate within large opening angles. These properties suggest that some binary neutron-star mergers are ideal candidates for multimessenger astronomy.

  8. X-ray observations of possible binary clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Many studies of superclusters of galaxies have been conducted, taking into account also superclusters representing candidate binary cluster systems. The present investigation is concerned with further studies of potential binary cluster systems, giving attention to a sample of six cluster pairs, in which the redshifts and X-ray luminosities of each member of a pair have been measured. One of the objectives of the investigation was related to a search for X-ray evidence that the clusters interact in these potentially binary systems. A second objective was to provide a measure of the mass of hot gas in the clusters. Two new systems in which the two clusters may have a physical association were found.

  9. Spectroscopic orbits for 16 more binaries in the Hyades field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. F.; Griffin, R. E. M.; Gunn, J. E.; Zimmerman, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    A photoelectric survey of the radial velocities of Hyades candidates has provided data for 16 spectroscopic binary orbits, in addition to the 11 known binaries in the Hyades field. The majority of photoelectric observations in the survey were carried out at the Cambridge and Palomar Observatories using different data reduction techniques for determining radial velocities. It is found that two of the objects, vB 164 and J336, are definitely not members of the Hyades cluster; two other objects, HD 16909 and J301, appear to be located far from the center of the cluster, but still deserve classification as Hyades members. The gamma-velocity of HD 16909 differed slightly from the value expected for a member of the Hyades cluster. An additional twelve systems were definitely identified as members of the Hyades. The radial velocity values for all the candidate stars are given in a series of tables.

  10. Superluminal Jets and Other Properties of Black Holes Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Discoveries in the past few years of radio jets in Galactic black hole candidates have provided a link between active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and the compact stars in binary systems. The availability of binary systems relatively close by is an opportunity to learn about the jet production mechanism on a timescale a million times shorter than that of an AGN. Evidence is clearly seen of correlated high energy X-ray and gamma ray emission to radio emission from jets, linking the accretion and jet production mechanisms. objects such as GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40 and Cyg X-3 show striking properties which distinguish them from other black hole candidates. Our theoretical understanding of these systems is still in the formative stages. I review some of the most recent multiwavelength data and point out questions raised by these observations.

  11. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  12. Binary Love relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2016-07-01

    When in a tight binary, the mutual tidal deformations of neutron stars get imprinted onto observables, encoding information about their internal structure at supranuclear densities and gravity in the extreme-gravity regime. Gravitational wave (GW) observations of their late binary inspiral may serve as a tool to extract the individual tidal deformabilities, but this is made difficult by degeneracies between them in the GW model. We here resolve this problem by discovering approximately equation-of-state (EoS)-insensitive relations between dimensionless combinations of the individual tidal deformabilities. We show that these relations break degeneracies in the GW model, allowing for the accurate extraction of both deformabilities. Such measurements can be used to better differentiate between EoS models, and improve tests of general relativity and cosmology.

  13. Contact binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochnacki, S. W.

    1981-04-01

    Densities, corrected primary colors, minimum periods, inferred masses, luminosities, and specific angular momenta are computed from data on 37 W Ursae Majoris systems. A-type systems, having lower densities and angular momenta than the W-type systems, are shown to be evolved, and a new class of contact binary is identified, the OO Aquilae systems, whose members have evolved into contact. Evolutionary grids based on the contact condition agree with observation, except in that the evolved A-type systems have lost more angular momentum than predicted by gravitational radiation alone. This is accounted for by stellar wind magnetic braking, which is shown to be effective on a shorter time scale and to be important in other kinds of binaries containing a cool, tidally coupled component.

  14. Eclipsing Binary Stars in the OGLE-III Fields of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, M.; Graczyk, D.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.

    2013-09-01

    We present a large sample of eclipsing binary stars detected in the Small Magellanic Cloud fields covering about 14 square degrees that have been monitored for eight years during the third phase of the OGLE survey. This is the largest set of such variables containing 6138 objects, of which 777 are contact and 5361 non-contact binaries. The estimated completeness of this sample is around 82%. We analyze the statistical properties of the sample and present selected interesting objects: 32 systems having eccentric orbit with visible apsidal motion, one Transient Eclipsing Binary, ten RS CVn type stars, 22 still unexplained Double-Periodic Variable stars, and 15 candidates for doubly eclipsing quadruple systems. Based on the OGLE-III proper motions, we classified 47 binaries from our sample as foreground Galactic stars. We also list candidates suitable for the SMC distance determination.

  15. Candidate Assembly Statistical Evaluation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-07-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) receives aluminum clad spent Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel from all over the world for storage and eventual reprocessing. There are hundreds of different kinds of MTR fuels and these fuels will continue to be received at SRS for approximately ten more years. SRS''s current criticality evaluation methodology requires the modeling of all MTR fuels utilizing Monte Carlo codes, which is extremely time consuming and resource intensive. Now that amore » significant number of MTR calculations have been conducted it is feasible to consider building statistical models that will provide reasonable estimations of MTR behavior. These statistical models can be incorporated into a standardized model homogenization spreadsheet package to provide analysts with a means of performing routine MTR fuel analyses with a minimal commitment of time and resources. This became the purpose for development of the Candidate Assembly Statistical Evaluation (CASE) program at SRS.« less

  16. Binary Optics Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-04-02

    This software is a set of tools for the design and analysis of binary optics. It consists of a series of stand-alone programs written in C and some scripts written in an application-specific language interpreted by a CAD program called DW2000. This software can be used to optimize the design and placement of a complex lens array from input to output and produce contours, mask designs, and data exported for diffractive optic analysis.

  17. Parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.; Crockett, Thomas W.; Nicol, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Binary dissection is widely used to partition non-uniform domains over parallel computers. This algorithm does not consider the perimeter, surface area, or aspect ratio of the regions being generated and can yield decompositions that have poor communication to computation ratio. Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm in which each cut is chosen to minimize load + lambda x(shape). In a 2 (or 3) dimensional problem, load is the amount of computation to be performed in a subregion and shape could refer to the perimeter (respectively surface) of that subregion. Shape is a measure of communication overhead and the parameter permits us to trade off load imbalance against communication overhead. When A is zero, the algorithm reduces to plain binary dissection. This algorithm can be used to partition graphs embedded in 2 or 3-d. Load is the number of nodes in a subregion, shape the number of edges that leave that subregion, and lambda the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. An algorithm is presented that finds the depth d parametric dissection of an embedded graph with n vertices and e edges in O(max(n log n, de)) time, which is an improvement over the O(dn log n) time of plain binary dissection. Parallel versions of this algorithm are also presented; the best of these requires O((n/p) log(sup 3)p) time on a p processor hypercube, assuming graphs of bounded degree. How PBD is applied to 3-d unstructured meshes and yields partitions that are better than those obtained by plain dissection is described. Its application to the color image quantization problem is also discussed, in which samples in a high-resolution color space are mapped onto a lower resolution space in a way that minimizes the color error.

  18. Evolutionary models of binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rensbergen, Walter; Mennekens, Nicki; de Greve, Jean-Pierre; Jansen, Kim; de Loore, Bert

    2011-07-01

    We have put on CDS a catalog containing 561 evolutionary models of binaries: J/A+A/487/1129 (Van Rensbergen+, 2008). The catalog covers a grid of binaries with a B-type primary at birth, different values for the initial mass ratio and a wide range of initial orbital periods. The evolution was calculated with the Brussels code in which we introduced the spinning up and the creation of a hot spot on the gainer or its accretion disk, caused by impacting mass coming from the donor. When the kinetic energy of fast rotation added to the radiative energy of the hot spot exceeds the binding energy, a fraction of the transferred matter leaves the system: the evolution is liberal during a short lasting era of rapid mass transfer. The spin-up of the gainer was modulated using both strong and weak tides. The catalog shows the results for both types. For comparison, we included the evolutionary tracks calculated with the conservative assumption. Binaries with an initial primary below 6 Msolar show hardly any mass loss from the system and thus evolve conservatively. Above this limit differences between liberal and conservative evolution grow with increasing initial mass of the primary star.

  19. The Signature of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Black hole-neutron star (BHNS) binaries are key gravitational wave sources, merging in the frequency band to which Earth-based GW detectors are most sensitive. Furthermore, as possible candidates for short-hard gamma ray bursts, combined observations in both gravitational and electromagnetic bands of BHNS mergers is thus an exciting possibility. This talk will discuss results from simulations that account for gravitational and magnetic effects as well as connections with processes capable of explaining key features of gamma ray bursts.

  20. NIP of Stars: early results and new eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaque Arancibia, M.; Barba, R.; Morrell, N.; Roman Lopes, A.; Torres Robledo, S.; Gunthardt, G.; Soto, M.; Ferrero, G.; Arias, J. I.; Gamen, R.; Fernadez Lajus, E.

    2014-10-01

    We have performed a near-infrared photometric monitoring of 39 galactic young star clusters and star-forming regions, known as NIP of Stars, between the years 2009-2011, using the Swope telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (Chile) and the RetroCam camera, in H- and Y-bands. This monitoring program is complementary to the Vista Variables in the Via Láctea (VVV), as the brightest sources observed in NIP of Stars are saturated in VVV. The aim of this campaign is to perform a census of photometric variability of such clusters and star-forming regions, with the main goal of discovering massive eclipsing binary stars. In this work, we present a preliminary analysis of this photometric monitoring program with the discovery of tens of candidates for variable stars, among them candidates for massive eclipsing binaries. We included also to the analysis of variability, a small set of images obtained in the Ks with the VISTA telescope in the framework of VVV survey (Minniti et al. 2010). In special, we announce the infrared discovering of four massive eclipsing binaries in the massive young cluster NGC 3603. The stars have been classified spectroscopically as O-type stars, and one of them, MTT 58, has a rare star with a spectral type of O2 If*/WN6, as one of its components. We present a preliminary analysis of the light-curves of these binaries.

  1. Loud and Bright: Gravitational and possible electromagnetic signals induced by binary neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Ponce, Marcelo; Thompson, Chris; Liebling, Steve; Neilsen, Dave; Hirschmann, Eric; Anderson, Matt; Motl, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Our main goal is to investigate how the strongly gravitating and highly dynamical behavior of magnetized binary neutron stars can affect the plasma in the magnetosphere in such a way that powerful electromagnetic emissions can be induced, as well as stressing its connection with gravitational waves produced by the system. Such phenomena is a natural candidate for bright (EM) and loud (GW) emissions, as pulsars are strong electromagnetic emitters on one hand, and merging binary neutron stars are powerful sources of gravitational radiation.

  2. Binary-Signal Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griebeler, Elmer L.

    2011-01-01

    Binary communication through long cables, opto-isolators, isolating transformers, or repeaters can become distorted in characteristic ways. The usual solution is to slow the communication rate, change to a different method, or improve the communication media. It would help if the characteristic distortions could be accommodated at the receiving end to ease the communication problem. The distortions come from loss of the high-frequency content, which adds slopes to the transitions from ones to zeroes and zeroes to ones. This weakens the definition of the ones and zeroes in the time domain. The other major distortion is the reduction of low frequency, which causes the voltage that defines the ones or zeroes to drift out of recognizable range. This development describes a method for recovering a binary data stream from a signal that has been subjected to a loss of both higher-frequency content and low-frequency content that is essential to define the difference between ones and zeroes. The method makes use of the frequency structure of the waveform created by the data stream, and then enhances the characteristics related to the data to reconstruct the binary switching pattern. A major issue is simplicity. The approach taken here is to take the first derivative of the signal and then feed it to a hysteresis switch. This is equivalent in practice to using a non-resonant band pass filter feeding a Schmitt trigger. Obviously, the derivative signal needs to be offset to halfway between the thresholds of the hysteresis switch, and amplified so that the derivatives reliably exceed the thresholds. A transition from a zero to a one is the most substantial, fastest plus movement of voltage, and therefore will create the largest plus first derivative pulse. Since the quiet state of the derivative is sitting between the hysteresis thresholds, the plus pulse exceeds the plus threshold, switching the hysteresis switch plus, which re-establishes the data zero to one transition

  3. WISE Detection of Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-08-01

    I will report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries. Among 187 catalogued binaries, we find 13 counterparts and two candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, two (4 0614+091 and G 339-4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and one (GR 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broad-band optical and near-infrared data in literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that three (A0620-00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, four (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and three (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5-0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. Discussion of the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution will be provided, which suggests that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or the both.

  4. Hunting for brown dwarf binaries and testing atmospheric models with X-Shooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavacas, E.; Goldman, B.; Alcalá, J. M.; Zapatero-Osorio, M. R.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Homeier, D.; Bonnefoy, M.; Smart, R. L.; Henning, T.; Allard, F.

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the brown dwarf binary fraction may contribute to the understanding of the substellar formation mechanisms. Unresolved brown dwarf binaries may be revealed through their peculiar spectra or the discrepancy between optical and near-infrared spectral-type classification. We obtained medium-resolution spectra of 22 brown dwarfs with these characteristics using the X-Shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. We aimed to identify brown dwarf binary candidates, and to test if the BT-Settl 2014 atmospheric models reproduce their observed spectra. To find binaries spanning the L-T boundary, we used spectral indices and compared the spectra of the selected candidates to single spectra and synthetic binary spectra. We used synthetic binary spectra with components of same spectral type to determine as well the sensitivity of the method to this class of binaries. We identified three candidates to be combination of L plus T brown dwarfs. We are not able to identify binaries with components of similar spectral type. In our sample, we measured minimum binary fraction of 9.1^{+9.9}_{-3.0} per cent. From the best fit of the BT-Settl models 2014 to the observed spectra, we derived the atmospheric parameters for the single objects. The BT-Settl models were able to reproduce the majority of the spectral energy distributions from our objects, and the variation of the equivalent width of the Rb I (794.8 nm) and Cs I (852.0 nm) lines with the spectral type. None the less, these models did not reproduce the evolution of the equivalent widths of the Na I (818.3 and 819.5 nm) and K I (1253 nm) lines with the spectral type.

  5. PLANET HUNTERS: NEW KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES FROM ANALYSIS OF QUARTER 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lintott, Chris J.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Schwainski, Kevin; and others

    2013-06-15

    We present new planet candidates identified in NASA Kepler Quarter 2 public release data by volunteers engaged in the Planet Hunters citizen science project. The two candidates presented here survive checks for false positives, including examination of the pixel offset to constrain the possibility of a background eclipsing binary. The orbital periods of the planet candidates are 97.46 days (KIC 4552729) and 284.03 (KIC 10005758) days and the modeled planet radii are 5.3 and 3.8 R{sub Circled-Plus }. The latter star has an additional known planet candidate with a radius of 5.05 R{sub Circled-Plus} and a period of 134.49 days, which was detected by the Kepler pipeline. The discovery of these candidates illustrates the value of massively distributed volunteer review of the Kepler database to recover candidates which were otherwise uncataloged.

  6. The CoRoT transit candidate catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, S.; Deleuil, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present a full catalog of all the candidate transiting planets identified by the CoRoT space mission during its first 5 years of operations, including homogeneously derived transit parameters, validation diagnostics and a summary of the outcome of follow-up observations, where available.The catalog includes confirmed planets, clear false alarms (mainly blended or grazing eclipsing binaries), but also dozens of unconfirmed cases, where the follow-up was either inconclusive (hot stars, fast rotators) or incomplete (owing to limited telescope time and the relatively faint nature of the CoRoT targets). The catalog is intended primarily as a resource for the community, for example as a starting point for completeness and population studies. The candidate detection and selection processes have evolved significantly over the course of the mission. Several teams independently analyse the light curves from each observing run, searching for transits and providing ranked candidate lists, which are subsequently merged and ranked manually. This enables the use of some specialist methods, which are better suited to the detection of only certain types of transits, but makes it difficult to provide an overall assessment of the sensitivity of the mission to transits of different depths and periods. However, we note the transit search methods used by the different teams have gradually converged since launch, and there are now fewer teams actively involved in the transit search, with more overlap between the resulting candidate lists. For each CoRoT observing run, one team member coordinates the selection of candidates for followup, with input from the other team members. The set of criteria used to perform this selection have also evolved over the years, becoming more homogeneous. In particular, the light curve fitting tools used to produce the transit parameters and other diagnostics, which are included in the present catalog, are now routinely used to validate candidates and

  7. Binary optics: Trends and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farn, Michael W.; Veldkamp, Wilfrid B.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the current state of binary optics, addressing both the technology and the industry (i.e., marketplace). With respect to the technology, the two dominant aspects are optical design methods and fabrication capabilities, with the optical design problem being limited by human innovation in the search for new applications and the fabrication issue being limited by the availability of resources required to improve fabrication capabilities. With respect to the industry, the current marketplace does not favor binary optics as a separate product line and so we expect that companies whose primary purpose is the production of binary optics will not represent the bulk of binary optics production. Rather, binary optics' more natural role is as an enabling technology - a technology which will directly result in a competitive advantage in a company's other business areas - and so we expect that the majority of binary optics will be produced for internal use.

  8. The Search for Trojan Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merline, William J.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Dumas, C.; Close, L. M.; Chapman, C. R.; Durda, D. D.; Levison, H. F.; Hamilton, D. P.; Nesvorny, D.; Storrs, A.; Enke, B.; Menard, F.

    2007-10-01

    We report on observations of Jupiter Trojan asteroids in search of binaries. We made observations using HST/ACS of 35 small (V = 17.5-19.5) objects in Cycle 14, without detecting any binaires. We have also observed a few dozen Trojans in our ground-based study of larger Trojans, discovering only one binary. The result is that the frequency of moderately-separated binaries among the Trojans seem rather low, likely less than 5%. Although we have only statistics of small numbers, it appears that the binary frequencies are more akin to the larger Main-Belt asteroids, than to the frequency in the TNO region, which probably exceeds 10%. The low frequency is inconsistent with the projections based on Trojan contact binaries by Mann et al. (2006, BAAS 38, 6509), although our work cannot detect very close or contact binaries. We discovered and characterized the orbit and density of the first Trojan binary, (617) Patroclus using the Gemini AO system (Merline et al. 2001 IAUC 7741). A second binary, (624) Hecktor, has now been reported by Marchis et al. (2006, IAUC 8732). In a broad survey of Main Belt asteroids, we found that, among the larger objects, the binary fraction is about 2%, while we are finding that the fraction is significantly higher among smaller asteroids (and this is even more apparent from lightcurve discoveries). Further, characteristics of these smaller systems indicate a distinctly different formation mechanism the the larger MB binaries. Because the Trojans have compositions that are more like the KBOs, while they live in a collisional environment much more like the Main Belt than the KBOs, these objects should hold vital clues to binary formation mechanics. And because there seems to be a distinct difference in larger and smaller main-belt binaries, we sought to detect such differences among the Trojans as well.

  9. A Combined Astrometric and Spectroscopic Study of Metal-Poor Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamati, L.; Sozzetti, A.; Santos, N. C.; Latham, D. W.

    2013-11-01

    In this work we present a study of binary systems in a metal-poor sample of solar type stars. The stars analyzed were rejected from two planet search samples because they were found to be binaries. Using available radial velocity and Hipparcos astrometric data, we apply different methods to find, for every binary system, a possible range of solutions for the mass of the companion and its orbital period. In one case we find that the solution depends on the Hipparcos data used: the old and new reductions give different results. Some candidate low-mass companions are found, including some close to the brown dwarf regime.

  10. Formation of the wide asynchronous binary asteroid population

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, Daniel J.; McMahon, Jay

    2014-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new mechanism for the formation of the wide asynchronous binary population. These binary asteroids have wide semimajor axes relative to most near-Earth and main belt asteroid systems. Confirmed members have rapidly rotating primaries and satellites that are not tidally locked. Previously suggested formation mechanisms from impact ejecta, from planetary flybys, and directly from rotational fission events cannot satisfy all of the observations. The newly hypothesized mechanism works as follows: (1) these systems are formed from rotational fission, (2) their satellites are tidally locked, (3) their orbits are expanded by the binary Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (BYORP) effect, (4) their satellites desynchronize as a result of the adiabatic invariance between the libration of the secondary and the mutual orbit, and (5) the secondary avoids resynchronization because of the YORP effect. This seemingly complex chain of events is a natural pathway for binaries with satellites that have particular shapes, which define the BYORP effect torque that acts on the system. After detailing the theory, we analyze each of the wide asynchronous binary members and candidates to assess their most likely formation mechanism. Finally, we suggest possible future observations to check and constrain our hypothesis.

  11. Modeling AGN outbursts from supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    2012-12-01

    When galaxies merge to assemble more massive galaxies, their nuclear supermassive black holes (SMBHs) should form bound binaries. As these interact with their stellar and gaseous environments, they will become increasingly compact, culminating in inspiral and coalescence through the emission of gravitational radiation. Because galaxy mergers and interactions are also thought to fuel star formation and nuclear black hole activity, it is plausible that such binaries would lie in gas-rich environments and power active galactic nuclei (AGN). The primary difference is that these binaries have gravitational potentials that vary - through their orbital motion as well as their orbital evolution - on humanly tractable timescales, and are thus excellent candidates to give rise to coherent AGN variability in the form of outbursts and recurrent transients. Although such electromagnetic signatures would be ideally observed concomitantly with the binary's gravitational-wave signatures, they are also likely to be discovered serendipitously in wide-field, high-cadence surveys; some may even be confused for stellar tidal disruption events. I discuss several types of possible "smoking gun" AGN signatures caused by the peculiar geometry predicted for accretion disks around SMBH binaries.

  12. Evolution of Close Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K; Eggleton, P

    2005-01-24

    We collected data on the masses, radii, etc. of three classes of close binary stars: low-temperature contact binaries (LTCBs), near-contact binaries (NCBs), and detached close binaries (DCBs). They restrict themselves to systems where (1) both components are, at least arguably, near the Main Sequence, (2) the periods are less than a day, and (3) there is both spectroscopic and photometric analysis leading to reasonably reliable data. They discuss the possible evolutionary connections between these three classes, emphasizing the roles played by mass loss and angular momentum loss in rapidly-rotating cool stars.

  13. Eclipsing Binaries From the CSTAR Project at Dome A, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Songhu; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Lingzhi; Wang, Lifan; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Liu, Hui-Gen; Meng, Zeyang; Ashley, M. C. B.; Storey, J. W. V.; Bayliss, D.; Tinney, Chris; Wang, Ying; Wu, Donghong; Liang, Ensi; Yu, Zhouyi; Fan, Zhou; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, J. S.; Liu, Qiang; Luong-Van, D. M.; Ma, Jun; Wu, Zhenyu; Yan, Jun; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhu, Zhenxi; Zou, Hu

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) has observed an area around the Celestial South Pole at Dome A since 2008. About 20,000 light curves in the i band were obtained during the observation season lasting from 2008 March to July. The photometric precision achieves about 4 mmag at i = 7.5 and 20 mmag at i = 12 within a 30 s exposure time. These light curves are analyzed using Lomb-Scargle, Phase Dispersion Minimization, and Box Least Squares methods to search for periodic signals. False positives may appear as a variable signature caused by contaminating stars and the observation mode of CSTAR. Therefore, the period and position of each variable candidate are checked to eliminate false positives. Eclipsing binaries are removed by visual inspection, frequency spectrum analysis, and a locally linear embedding technique. We identify 53 eclipsing binaries in the field of view of CSTAR, containing 24 detached binaries, 8 semi-detached binaries, 18 contact binaries, and 3 ellipsoidal variables. To derive the parameters of these binaries, we use the Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence method. The primary and secondary eclipse timing variations (ETVs) for semi-detached and contact systems are analyzed. Correlated primary and secondary ETVs confirmed by false alarm tests may indicate an unseen perturbing companion. Through ETV analysis, we identify two triple systems (CSTAR J084612.64-883342.9 and CSTAR J220502.55-895206.7). The orbital parameters of the third body in CSTAR J220502.55-895206.7 are derived using a simple dynamical model.

  14. Low autocorrelation binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packebusch, Tom; Mertens, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Binary sequences with minimal autocorrelations have applications in communication engineering, mathematics and computer science. In statistical physics they appear as groundstates of the Bernasconi model. Finding these sequences is a notoriously hard problem, that so far can be solved only by exhaustive search. We review recent algorithms and present a new algorithm that finds optimal sequences of length N in time O(N {1.73}N). We computed all optimal sequences for N≤slant 66 and all optimal skewsymmetric sequences for N≤slant 119.

  15. BINARY STORAGE ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Chu, J.C.

    1958-06-10

    A binary storage device is described comprising a toggle provided with associsted improved driver circuits adapted to produce reliable action of the toggle during clearing of the toggle to one of its two states. or transferring information into and out of the toggle. The invention resides in the development of a self-regulating driver circuit to minimize the fluctuation of the driving voltages for the toggle. The disclosed driver circuit produces two pulses in response to an input pulse: a first or ''clear'' pulse beginning nt substantially the same time but endlrg slightly sooner than the second or ''transfer'' output pulse.

  16. The ζ Aurigae Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. Elizabeth; Ake, Thomas B.

    This opening chapter provides a brief historical overview of the ζ Aur stars, with a focus on what K.O. Wright, his predecessors and colleagues at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, and his contemporaries further afield, achieved during the era of pre-electronic data. It places the topic within the framework of modern observing, data management and computing, outlines the principal features of the chromospheric-eclipse phenomena which single out the ζ Aur binaries for special study, and describes the considerable potential which this remarkable yet very select group of stars offers for increasing our understanding of stellar physics.

  17. Likely Planet Candidates Identified by Machine Learning Applied to Four Years of Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; McCauliff, S. D.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Twicken, J. D.; Klaus, T. C.; SOC, Kepler; SO, Kepler

    2013-10-01

    Over 3,200 transiting planet candidates, 134 confirmed planets, and ~2,400 eclipsing binaries have been identified by the Kepler Science pipeline since launch in March 2009. Compiling the list of candidates is an intensive manual effort as over 18,000 transit-like signatures are identified for a run across 34 months. The vast majority are caused by artifacts that mimic transits. While the pipeline provides diagnostics that can reduce the initial list down to ~5,000 light curves, this effort can overlook valid planetary candidates. The large number of diagnostics 100) makes it difficult to examine all the information available in identifying planetary candidates. The effort required for vetting all threshold-crossing events (TCEs) takes several months by many individuals associated with the Kepler Threshold Crossing Event Review Team (TCERT). We have developed a random-forest classifier that decides whether a TCE should be called `planet candidate’, `astrophysical false positive’, or `non-transiting phenomena’. Ideally a machine learning algorithm will generate a list of candidates that approximates those generated by human review, thereby allowing the humans to focus on the most interesting cases. By using a machine learning-based auto-vetting process, we have the opportunity to identify the most important metrics and diagnostics for separating signatures of transiting planets and eclipsing binaries from instrument-induced features, thereby improving the efficiency of the manual effort. We report the results of a applying a random forest classifier to four years of Kepler data. We present characteristics of the likely planet candidates identified by the auto-vetter as well as those objects classified as astrophysical false positives (eclipsing binaries and background eclipsing binaries). We examine the auto-vetter's performance through receiver operating characteristic curves for each of three classes: planet candidate, astrophysical false positive, and

  18. The Impact of Stellar Multiplicity on Planetary Systems. I. The Ruinous Influence of Close Binary Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Huber, Daniel; Mann, Andrew W.; Dupuy, Trent J.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamical influence of binary companions is expected to profoundly influence planetary systems. However, the difficulty of identifying planets in binary systems has left the magnitude of this effect uncertain; despite numerous theoretical hurdles to their formation and survival, at least some binary systems clearly host planets. We present high-resolution imaging of 382 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) obtained using adaptive-optics imaging and nonredundant aperture-mask interferometry on the Keck II telescope. Among the full sample of 506 candidate binary companions to KOIs, we super-resolve some binary systems to projected separations of <5 au, showing that planets might form in these dynamically active environments. However, the full distribution of projected separations for our planet-host sample more broadly reveals a deep paucity of binary companions at solar-system scales. For a field binary population, we should have found 58 binary companions with projected separation ρ < 50 au and mass ratio q > 0.4 we instead only found 23 companions (a 4.6σ deficit), many of which must be wider pairs that are only close in projection. When the binary population is parametrized with a semimajor axis cutoff a cut and a suppression factor inside that cutoff S bin, we find with correlated uncertainties that inside {a}{cut}={47}-23+59 au, the planet occurrence rate in binary systems is only {S}{bin}={0.34}-0.15+0.14 times that of wider binaries or single stars. Our results demonstrate that a fifth of all solar-type stars in the Milky Way are disallowed from hosting planetary systems due to the influence of a binary companion.

  19. Koronis binaries and the role of families in binary frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merline, W. J.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Nesvorny, D.; Durda, D. D.; Chapman, C. R.; Dumas, C.; Owen, W. M.; Storrs, A. D.; Close, L. M.; Menard, F.

    2005-08-01

    Our ground-based adaptive optics observations of many larger Koronis members show no binaries, while our HST survey of smaller Koronis members (say smaller than 10 km) shows a surprising 20% binary fraction. Admittedly, this is from small-number statistics, but we nonetheless calculate a 99% confidence that the binary fraction is different from the 2% we observe among the larger (over 20km) main belt asteroids as a whole. In addition, we estimate that among the two young families (Karin and Veritas) that we surveyed for binaries in our HST Cy 13 program, the binary fraction appears to be less than 5%. These young families both have significantly smaller progenitors than the Koronis family. We have speculated that progenitor size may be a more important factor than age in determination of binary frequency. But here we suggest an alternative idea, that the binary fraction may be more related to what part of the family's size distribution is sampled. Our HST program targeted objects of the same physical sizes, but was clearly sampling further down the size distribution (to smaller sizes, relative to the largest remnant) in the Koronis sample than was the case for Karin and Veritas, which we sampled mostly at the larger sizes, relatively. Our SPH collision models are estimating the typical size-frequency distributions to be expected from catastrophic and non-catastrophic impact events. But they are also appear to be showing that the largest fragments from a collision are less likely to form binaries (as co-orbiting ejecta pairs) than are the smaller fragments. Thus, it might be expected that we would have found fewer binaries among Karin and Veritas than among the Koronis sample. In fact, models of the Karin breakup show binary formation to be unlikely in the size range measured. It some might be tempted to tie the small end of the main-belt binary population to the binaries seen among the NEAs (also small and also showing about 20% fraction), given the 20% fraction

  20. Conjugating binary systems for spacecraft thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, Philomena G.; Dean, William G.; Sisk, Lori A.; Karu, Zain S.

    1989-01-01

    The materials search was directed to liquid pairs which can form hydrogen bonds of just the right strength, i.e., strong enough to give a high heat of mixing, but weak enough to enable phase change to occur. The cursory studies performed in the area of additive effects indicate that Conjugating Binary (CB) performance can probably be fine-tuned by this means. The Fluid Loop Test Systems (FLTS) tests of candidate CBs indicate that the systems Triethylamine (TEA)/water and propionaldehyde/water show close to the ideal, reversible behavior, at least initially. The Quick Screening Tests QSTs and FLTS tests, however, both suffer from rather severe static due either to inadequate stirring or temperature control. Thus it is not possible to adequately evaluate less than ideal CB performers. Less than ideal performers, it should be noted, may have features that make them better practical CBs than ideal performers. Improvement of the evaluation instrumentation is thus indicated.

  1. Modeling Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Conner; Read, Jocelyn; Flynn, Eric; Lockett-Ruiz, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein's Theory of Relativity, are a new frontier in astronomical observation we can use to observe phenomena in the universe. Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) is currently searching for gravitational wave signals, and requires accurate predictions in order to best extract astronomical signals from all other sources of fluctuations. The focus of my research is in increasing the accuracy of Post-Newtonian models of binary neutron star coalescence to match the computationally expensive Numerical models. Numerical simulations can take months to compute a couple of milliseconds of signal whereas the Post-Newtonian can generate similar signals in seconds. However the Post-Newtonian model is an approximation, e.g. the Taylor T4 Post-Newtonian model assumes that the two bodies in the binary neutron star system are point charges. To increase the effectiveness of the approximation, I added in tidal effects, resonance frequencies, and a windowing function. Using these observed effects from simulations significantly increases the Post-Newtonian model's similarity to the Numerical signal.

  2. Generic Phase Diagram of Binary Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Alexei

    Emergence of a large variety of self-assembled superlattices is a dramatic recent trend in the fields of nanoparticle and colloidal sciences. Motivated by this development, we propose a model that combines simplicity with a remarkably rich phase behavior, applicable to a wide range of such self-assembled systems. Those include nanoparticle and colloidal assemblies driven by DNA-mediated interactions, electrostatics, and possibly, by controlled drying. In our model, a binary system of Large and Small hard sphere (L and S)interact via selective short-range (''sticky'') attraction. In its simplest version, this Binary Sticky Sphere model features attraction only between 'S' and 'L' particles, respectively. We demonstrate that in the limit when this attraction is sufficiently strong compared to kT, the problem becomes purely geometrical: the thermodynamically preferred state should maximize the number of S-L contacts. A general procedure for constructing the phase diagram as a function of system composition f, and particle size ratio r, is outlined. In this way, the global phase behavior can be calculated very efficiently, for a given set of plausible candidate phases. Furthermore, the geometric nature of the problem enables us to generate those candidate phases through a well defined and intuitive construction. We calculate the phase diagrams both for 2D and 3D systems, and compare the results with existing experiments. Most of the 3D superlattices observed to date are featured in our phase diagram, while several more are yet to be discovered. The research was carried out at the CFN, DOE Office of Science Facility, at BNL, under Contract No. DE-SC0012704.

  3. 2009 Elections: The Candidates Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TechTrends: Linking Research and Practice to Improve Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the candidates for the 2009 Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) election and their statements. The candidates are: (1) Andy Gibbons (President-Elect); (2) Barbara B. Lockee (President-Elect); (3) Mary Jean Bishop (At-Large Representative); and (4) Deepak Subramony (At-Large Representative). In…

  4. Masses and Luminosities of X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Frink, Sabine; Tomsick, John

    2004-01-01

    Using SIM, we will perform narrow-angle observations of several X-ray binaries to determine their orbits, and we will observe about 50 X-ray binary systems in wide-angle mode to measure their distances and proper motions. Sources with mass estimates for the compact component of greater than 3 solar masses are generally called black hole candidates since this mass is above the theoretical neutron star limit. Narrow-angle observations of these sources provide a direct test of the dynamical mass estimates on which the black hole evidence is based. Better measurements of the black hole masses will provide constraints on possible evolutionary paths that lead to black hole formation. When combined with X-ray data, mass measurements may provide additional constraints on the black hole spin. Precise mass determinations of neutron star systems can address the question of whether neutron stars can be significantly more massive than 1.4 solar masses, which would eliminate soft models of the neutron star equations of state. The wide-angle observations will probe the Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries through parallaxes and proper motions. They will also eliminate the uncertainties in the luminosities of individual sources, which is currently up to a full order of magnitude. This will enable more detailed comparisons of X-ray observations to physical models such as advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). We intend to carry out the following measurements: 1) Determine the orbits of two black hole candidates to measure the black hole masses; 2) Obtain precise mass measurements for two neutron star systems to constrain neutron star equations of state; 3) Determine the distances and thus luminosities of selected representatives of various classes of X-ray binaries (black hole candidates, neutron stars, jet sources); 4) In the process of distance determination, proper motions will also be measured, from which the age of the population can be estimated.

  5. Multilevel Models for Binary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The methods and models for categorical data analysis cover considerable ground, ranging from regression-type models for binary and binomial data, count data, to ordered and unordered polytomous variables, as well as regression models that mix qualitative and continuous data. This article focuses on methods for binary or binomial data, which are…

  6. GX339-4 - A new black hole candidate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimi, J.; Share, G. H.; Wood, K.; Yentis, D.; Meekins, J.; Evans, W. D.; Shulman, S.; Byram, E. T.; Chubb, T. A.; Friedman, H.

    1979-01-01

    HEAO-1 observations of aperiodic variability in the galactic X-ray source GX339-4 (4U 1658-48) on time scales of tens of milliseconds to a few seconds are reported. It is shown that the overall characteristics of GX339-4 place it in the same class of X-ray sources as Cyg X-1 and Cir X-1, which are candidates for black holes in binary systems. The detection of X-ray flares from GX339-4 is discussed, particularly a series of five sequential flares with separations of about 250 ms.

  7. SLoWPoKES-II: 100,000 Wide Binaries Identified in SDSS without Proper Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhital, Saurav; West, Andrew A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Schluns, Kyle J.; Massey, Angela P.

    2015-08-01

    We present the Sloan Low-mass Wide Pairs of Kinematically Equivalent Stars (SLoWPoKES)-II catalog of low-mass visual binaries identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by matching photometric distances. The candidate pairs are vetted by comparing the stellar information. The candidate pairs are vetted by comparing the stellar density at their respective Galactic positions to Monte Carlo realizations of a simulated Milky Way. In this way, we are able to identify large numbers of bona fide wide binaries without the need for proper motions. Here, 105,537 visual binaries with angular separations of ˜1-20″ were identified, each with a probability of chance alignment of ≤5%. This is the largest catalog of bona fide wide binaries to date, and it contains a diversity of systems—in mass, mass ratios, binary separations, metallicity, and evolutionary states—that should facilitate follow-up studies to characterize the properties of M dwarfs and white dwarfs. There is a subtle but definitive suggestion of multiple populations in the physical separation distribution, supporting earlier findings. We suggest that wide binaries are composed of multiple populations, most likely representing different formation modes. There are 141 M7 or later wide binary candidates, representing a seven-fold increase over the number currently known. These binaries are too wide to have been formed via the ejection mechanism. Finally, we found that 6% of spectroscopically confirmed M dwarfs are not included in the SDSS STAR catalog; they are misclassified as extended sources due to the presence of a nearby or partially resolved companion. The SLoWPoKES-II catalog is publicly available to the entire community on the World Wide Web via the Filtergraph data visualization portal.

  8. Signature Visualization of Software Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Panas, T

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present work on the visualization of software binaries. In particular, we utilize ROSE, an open source compiler infrastructure, to pre-process software binaries, and we apply a landscape metaphor to visualize the signature of each binary (malware). We define the signature of a binary as a metric-based layout of the functions contained in the binary. In our initial experiment, we visualize the signatures of a series of computer worms that all originate from the same line. These visualizations are useful for a number of reasons. First, the images reveal how the archetype has evolved over a series of versions of one worm. Second, one can see the distinct changes between version. This allows the viewer to form conclusions about the development cycle of a particular worm.

  9. Contact Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Samantha

    2015-05-01

    Recent observations have found that some contact binaries are oriented such that the secondary impacts with the primary at a high inclination. This research investigates the evolution of how such contact binaries came to exist. This process begins with an asteroid pair, where the secondary lies on the Laplace plane. The Laplace plane is a plane normal to the axis about which the pole of a satellites orbit precesses, causing a near constant inclination for such an orbit. For the study of the classical Laplace plane, the secondary asteroid is in circular orbit around an oblate primary with axial tilt. This system is also orbiting the Sun. Thus, there are two perturbations on the secondarys orbit: J2 and third body Sun perturbations. The Laplace surface is defined as the group of orbits that lie on the Laplace plane at varying distances from the primary. If the secondary is very close to the primary, the inclination of the Laplace plane will be near the equator of the asteroid, while further from the primary the inclination will be similar to the asteroid-Sun plane. The secondary will lie on the Laplace plane because near the asteroid the Laplace plane is stable to large deviations in motion, causing the asteroid to come to rest in this orbit. Assuming the secondary is asymmetrical in shape and the bodys rotation is synchronous with its orbit, the secondary will experience the BYORP effect. BYORP can cause secular motion such as the semi-major axis of the secondary expanding or contracting. Assuming the secondary expands due to BYORP, the secondary will eventually reach the unstable region of the Laplace plane. The unstable region exists if the primary has an obliquity of 68.875 degrees or greater. The unstable region exists at 0.9 Laplace radius to 1.25 Laplace radius, where the Laplace radius is defined as the distance from the central body where the inclination of the Laplace plane orbit is half the obliquity. In the unstable region, the eccentricity of the orbit

  10. Binaries and distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbaix, D.; Arenou, F.; Halbwachs, J.-L.; Siopis, C.

    2013-02-01

    Gaia's five-year observation baseline might naively lead to the expectation that it will be possible to fit the parallax of any sufficiently nearby object with the default five-parameter model (position at a reference epoch, parallax and proper motion). However, simulated Gaia observations of a `model Universe' composed of nearly 107 objects, 50% of which turn out to be multiple stars, show that the single-star hypothesis can severely affect parallax estimation and that more sophisticated models must be adopted. In principle, screening these spurious single-star solutions is rather straightforward, for example by evaluating the quality of the fits. However, the simulated Gaia observations also reveal that some seemingly acceptable single-star solutions can nonetheless lead to erroneous distances. These solutions turn out to be binaries with an orbital period close to one year. Without auxiliary (e.g., spectroscopic) data, they will remain unnoticed.

  11. VLSI binary updown counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Trieu-Kie (Inventor); Hsu, In-Shek (Inventor); Reed, Irving S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pipeline binary updown counter is comprised of simple stages that may be readily replicated. Each stage is defined by the Boolean logic equation: A(sub n)(t) = A(sub n)(t - 1) exclusive OR (U AND P(sub n)) inclusive OR (D AND Q(sub n)), where A(sub n)(t) denotes the value of the nth bit at time t. The input to the counter has three values represented by two binary signals U and D such that if both are zero, the input is zero, if U = 0 and D = 1, the input is -1 and if U = 1 and D = 0, the input is +1. P(sub n) represents a product of A(sub k)'s for 1 is less than or equal to k is less than or equal to -1, while Q(sub n) represents the product of bar A's for 1 is less than or equal to K is less than or equal to n - 1, where bar A(sub k) is the complement of A(sub k) and P(sub n) and Q(sub n) are expressed as the following two equations: P(sub n) = A(sub n - 1) A(sub n - 2)...A(sub 1) and Q(sub n) = bar A(sub n - 1) bar A(sub n - 2)...bar A(sub 1), which can be written in recursive form as P(sub n) = P(sub n - 1) AND bar A(sub n - 1) and Q(sub n) = Q(sub n - 1) AND bar A(sub n - 1) with the initial values P(sub 1) = 1 and Q(sub 1) = 1.

  12. Likely Planet Candidates Identified by Machine Learning Applied to Four Years of Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; McCauliff, S. D.; Catanzarite, J.; Twicken, J. D.; Burke, C. J.; Campbell, J.; Seader, S.

    2014-01-01

    Over 3200 transiting planet candidates, 134 confirmed planets, and ~2,400 eclipsing binaries have been identified by the Kepler Science pipeline since launch in March 2009. Compiling the list of candidates is an intensive manual effort as over 18,000 transit-like signatures are identified for a run across 34 months. The vast majority are caused by artifacts that mimic transits. While the pipeline provides diagnostics that can reduce the initial list down to ~5,000 light curves, this effort can overlook valid planetary candidates. The large number of diagnostics 100) makes it difficult to examine all the information available. The effort required for vetting all threshold-crossing events (TCEs) takes several months by many individuals associated with the Kepler Threshold Crossing Event Review Team (TCERT). We have developed a random-forest classifier that classifies each TCE as `planet candidate’, `astrophysical false positive’, or `non-transiting phenomena’. Ideally the algorithm will generate a list of candidates that approximates those generated by human review, thereby allowing the humans to focus on the most interesting cases. By using a machine learning-based auto-vetting process, we have the opportunity to identify the most important metrics and diagnostics for separating signatures of transiting planets and eclipsing binaries from instrument-induced features, thereby improving the efficiency of the manual effort. We report the results of applying a random forest classifier to four years of Kepler data. We present characteristics of the likely planet candidates identified by the auto-vetter as well as those objects classified as astrophysical false positives (eclipsing binaries and background eclipsing binaries). We examine the auto-vetter's performance through receiver operating characteristic curves for each of three classes: planet candidate, astrophysical false positive, and non-transiting phenomena. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: White dwarf main-sequence binaries (Rebassa-Mansergas+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Agurto-Gangas, C.; Schreiber, M. R.; Gansicke, B. T.; Koester, D.

    2014-07-01

    The spectroscopic catalogue of white dwarf main-sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is the largest and most homogeneous sample of compact binary stars currently known. However, because of selection effects, the current sample is strongly biased against systems containing cool white dwarfs and/or early-type companions, which are predicted to dominate the intrinsic population. In this study, we present colour selection criteria that combines optical (ugriz DR8 SDSS) plus infrared (yjhk DR9 UKIRT Infrared Sky Survey, JHK Two Micron All Sky Survey and/or W1W2 Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer) magnitudes to select 3419 photometric candidates of harbouring cool white dwarfs and/or dominant (M dwarf) companions. We demonstrate that 84 percent of our selected candidates are very likely genuine WDMS binaries, and that the white dwarf effective temperatures and secondary star spectral types of 71 percent of our selected sources are expected to be below <~10000-15000K, and concentrated at ~M2-3, respectively. We also present an updated version of the spectroscopic SDSS WDMS binary catalogue, which incorporates 47 new systems from SDSS DR8. The bulk of the DR8 spectroscopy is made up of main-sequence stars and red giants that were targeted as part of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) Survey, therefore the number of new spectroscopic WDMS binaries in DR 8 is very small compared to previous SDSS data releases. Despite their low number, DR8 WDMS binaries are found to be dominated by systems containing cool white dwarfs and therefore represent an important addition to the spectroscopic sample. The updated SDSS DR8 spectroscopic catalogue of WDMS binaries consists of 2316 systems. We compare our updated catalogue with recently published lists of WDMS binaries and conclude that it currently represents the largest, most homogeneous and cleanest sample of spectroscopic WDMS binaries from SDSS. (5 data files).

  14. White dwarf main-sequence binaries from SDSS DR 8: unveiling the cool white dwarf population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Agurto-Gangas, C.; Schreiber, M. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Koester, D.

    2013-08-01

    The spectroscopic catalogue of white dwarf main-sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is the largest and most homogeneous sample of compact binary stars currently known. However, because of selection effects, the current sample is strongly biased against systems containing cool white dwarfs and/or early-type companions, which are predicted to dominate the intrinsic population. In this study, we present colour selection criteria that combines optical (ugriz DR 8 SDSS) plus infrared (yjhk DR 9 UKIRT Infrared Sky Survey, JHK Two Micron All Sky Survey and/or w1w2 Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer) magnitudes to select 3419 photometric candidates of harbouring cool white dwarfs and/or dominant (M dwarf) companions. We demonstrate that 84 per cent of our selected candidates are very likely genuine WDMS binaries, and that the white dwarf effective temperatures and secondary star spectral types of 71 per cent of our selected sources are expected to be below ≲ 10 000-15 000 K, and concentrated at ˜M2-3, respectively. We also present an updated version of the spectroscopic SDSS WDMS binary catalogue, which incorporates 47 new systems from SDSS DR 8. The bulk of the DR 8 spectroscopy is made up of main-sequence stars and red giants that were targeted as part of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) Survey, therefore the number of new spectroscopic WDMS binaries in DR 8 is very small compared to previous SDSS data releases. Despite their low number, DR 8 WDMS binaries are found to be dominated by systems containing cool white dwarfs and therefore represent an important addition to the spectroscopic sample. The updated SDSS DR 8 spectroscopic catalogue of WDMS binaries consists of 2316 systems. We compare our updated catalogue with recently published lists of WDMS binaries and conclude that it currently represents the largest, most homogeneous and cleanest sample of spectroscopic WDMS binaries from SDSS.

  15. Towards A Complete Census of the Solar-Type Binaries in the Young Open Cluster M37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Meibom, Soren; Barnes, Sydney A.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2012-08-01

    Binary stars govern the dynamical evolution of star clusters and determine the formation rates and mechanisms for exotic stars like blue stragglers and X-ray sources. Understanding the near-primordial (after removal of the natal gas) binary population of star clusters is of primary importance for dynamical models of star clusters, which have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of star cluster evolution. Yet the binary frequencies and distributions of binary orbital parameters (period, eccentricity, etc.) for young coeval stellar populations are poorly known, due to a lack of necessary observations. Time-series radial-velocity surveys are essential for identifying and characterizing binary populations. Using WIYN/Hydra data, we have already identified a nearly complete sample of 329 solar-type (1.5 <=M [M_⊙] <=1.0) candidate members in the young (~540 Myr) open cluster M37. Of these stars, 82 show significant radial-velocity variability, indicative of a binary companion. Kinematic orbital solutions are crucial to define the initial binary conditions critical for dynamical star cluster models, and to understand how binaries affects stellar rotational evolution. As we have already identified the binaries in M37, we have a unique opportunity to add significantly to our knowledge of young binaries with minimal additional telescope time. We propose to initiate a WIYN/Hydra multi-epoch radial-velocity survey of the 82 velocity variables in M37.

  16. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  17. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    events by monitoring the brightness of a very large number of stars over extended time intervals. During the past years, it has also included a search for periodic, very shallow "dips" in the brightness of stars, caused by the regular transit of small orbiting objects (small stars, brown dwarfs [2] or Jupiter-size planets). The OGLE team has since announced 177 "planetary transit candidates" from their survey of several hundred thousand stars in three southern sky fields, one in the direction of the Galactic Centre, another within the Carina constellation and the third within the Centaurus/Musca constellations. The nature of the transiting object can however only be established by subsequent radial-velocity observations of the parent star. The size of the velocity variations (the amplitude) is directly related to the mass of the companion object and therefore allows discrimination between stars and planets as the cause of the observed brightness "dip". A Bonanza of Low-Mass Stars An international team of astronomers [3] has made use of the 8.2-m VLT Kueyen telescope for this work. Profiting from the multiplex capacity of the FLAMES/UVES facility that permits to obtain high-resolution spectra of up to 8 objects simultaneously, they have looked at 60 OGLE transit candidate stars, measuring their radial velocities with an accuracy of about 50 m/s [4]. This ambitious programme has so far resulted in the discovery of five new transiting exoplanets (see, e.g., ESO PR 11/04 for the announcement of two of those). Most of the other transit candidates identified by OGLE have turned out to be eclipsing binaries, that is, in most cases common, small and low-mass stars passing in front of a solar-like star. This additional wealth of data on small and light stars is a real bonanza for the astronomers. Constraining the Relation Between Mass and Radius Low-mass stars are exceptionally interesting objects, also because the physical conditions in their interiors have much in common with

  18. BDB: The Binary Star Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O.; Kaygorodov, P.; Kovaleva, D.; Malkov, O.

    2014-05-01

    Description of the Binary star DataBase (BDB, http://bdb.inasan.ru), the world's principal database of binary and multiple systems of all observational types, is presented in the paper. BDB contains data on physical and positional parameters of 100,000 components of 40,000 systems of multiplicity 2 to 20, belonging to various observational types: visual, spectroscopic, eclipsing, etc. Information on these types of binaries is obtained from heterogeneous sources of data - astronomical and. Organization of the information is based on the careful cross-identification of the objects. BDB can be queried by star identifier, coordinates, and other parameters.

  19. Discussion of AN Advanced LIGO Low-Latency Search for Compact Binary Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messick, Cody; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Advanced ligo completed its first observing run in january, marking the beginning of a new era in gravitational wave astronomy. Low-latency pipelines searched for gravitational waves from compact binary mergers during the observing run, uploading candidate events to a database within seconds. In my presentation, we will report on the low-latency gstlal-inspiral advanced ligo search.

  20. A Systematic Search for Exoplanet Candidates in K2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Tarryn; Karnes, Katherine L.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Smith, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of 41 promising exoplanet candidates in 33 stellar systems from the K2 Campaign 3 data. The K2 Mission was developed upon the mechanical failure of the second of four reaction wheels, as the Kepler Spacecraft could not continue the original Kepler Mission. The Kepler Mission was a 4-year mission designed to determine the prevalence of exoplanets in our galaxy, and the configuration and diversity of those planetary systems discovered. The K2 Mission has a similar goal, though the spacecraft now points at fields along the ecliptic in ~75 day campaigns (Howell et al. 2014). Although the light curves in K2 data are noisier and have significant motion-induced systematics, it has been shown that there is success in finding exoplanets and exoplanet candidates (Foreman-Mackey et al. 2015; Montet et al. 2015). Utilizing the Transiting Planet Search and Data Validation from the Kepler Processing Pipeline, we systematically search K2 Campaign 3 for potential exoplanet candidates. Setting a 7.1s maximum folded statistic threshold minimum for a minimum of three transit events, we define our initial candidate list. Our list is further narrowed by the results from Data Validation, as it allows us to statistically identify false positives, such as eclipsing binaries or uncorrected roll-drift, in our sample. We further draw parallels between our results and other transit-searching pipeline results published for Campaign 3.

  1. Single transit candidates from K2: detection and period estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, H. P.; Armstrong, D. J.; Brown, D. J. A.; McCormac, J.; Doyle, A. P.; Louden, T. M.; Kirk, J.; Spake, J. J.; Lam, K. W. F.; Walker, S. R.; Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D. L.

    2016-04-01

    Photometric surveys such as Kepler have the precision to identify exoplanet and eclipsing binary candidates from only a single transit. K2, with its 75 d campaign duration, is ideally suited to detect significant numbers of single-eclipsing objects. Here we develop a Bayesian transit-fitting tool (`Namaste: An Mcmc Analysis of Single Transit Exoplanets') to extract orbital information from single transit events. We achieve favourable results testing this technique on known Kepler planets, and apply the technique to seven candidates identified from a targeted search of K2 campaigns 1, 2 and 3. We find EPIC203311200 to host an excellent exoplanet candidate with a period, assuming zero eccentricity, of 540 ^{+410}_{-230} d and a radius of 0.51 ± 0.05RJup. We also find six further transit candidates for which more follow-up is required to determine a planetary origin. Such a technique could be used in the future with TESS, PLATO and ground-based photometric surveys such as NGTS, potentially allowing the detection of planets in reach of confirmation by Gaia.

  2. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Electrophoresis has long been recognized as an effective analytic technique for the separation of proteins and other charged species, however attempts at scaling up to accommodate commercial volumes have met with limited success. In this report we describe a novel electrophoretic separation technique - Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis (BOCE). Numerical simulations indicate that the technique has the potential for preparative scale throughputs with high resolution, while simultaneously avoiding many problems common to conventional electrophoresis. The technique utilizes the interaction of an oscillatory electric field and a transverse oscillatory shear flow to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged protein species. An oscillatory electric field is applied across the narrow gap of a rectangular channel inducing a periodic motion of charged protein species. The amplitude of this motion depends on the dimensionless electrophoretic mobility, alpha = E(sub o)mu/(omega)d, where E(sub o) is the amplitude of the electric field oscillations, mu is the dimensional mobility, omega is the angular frequency of oscillation and d is the channel gap width. An oscillatory shear flow is induced along the length of the channel resulting in the separation of species with different mobilities. We present a model that predicts the oscillatory behavior of charged species and allows estimation of both the magnitude of the induced convective velocity and the effective diffusivity as a function of a in infinitely long channels. Numerical results indicate that in addition to the mobility dependence, the steady state behavior of solute species may be strongly affected by oscillating fluid into and out of the active electric field region at the ends of the cell. The effect is most pronounced using time dependent shear flows of the same frequency (cos((omega)t)) flow mode) as the electric field oscillations. Under such conditions, experiments indicate that

  3. Stability of binaries. Part II: Rubble-pile binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ishan

    2016-10-01

    We consider the stability of the binary asteroids whose members are granular aggregates held together by self-gravity alone. A binary is said to be stable whenever both its members are orbitally and structurally stable to both orbital and structural perturbations. To this end, we extend the stability analysis of Sharma (Sharma [2015] Icarus, 258, 438-453), that is applicable to binaries with rigid members, to the case of binary systems with rubble members. We employ volume averaging (Sharma et al. [2009] Icarus, 200, 304-322), which was inspired by past work on elastic/fluid, rotating and gravitating ellipsoids. This technique has shown promise when applied to rubble-pile ellipsoids, but requires further work to settle some of its underlying assumptions. The stability test is finally applied to some suspected binary systems, viz., 216 Kleopatra, 624 Hektor and 90 Antiope. We also see that equilibrated binaries that are close to mobilizing their maximum friction can sustain only a narrow range of shapes and, generally, congruent shapes are preferred.

  4. EXPLORING A 'FLOW' OF HIGHLY ECCENTRIC BINARIES WITH KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-01-20

    With 16-month of Kepler data, 15 long-period (40-265 days) eclipsing binaries on highly eccentric orbits (minimum e between 0.5 and 0.85) are identified from their closely separated primary and secondary eclipses ({Delta}t{sub I,II} = 3-10 days). These systems confirm the existence of a previously hinted binary population situated near a constant angular momentum track at P(1 - e {sup 2}){sup 3/2} {approx} 15 days, close to the tidal circularization period P{sub circ}. They may be presently migrating due to tidal dissipation and form a steady-state 'flow' ({approx}1% of stars) feeding the close-binary population (few % of stars). If so, future Kepler data releases will reveal a growing number (dozens) of systems at longer periods, following dN/dlgP {proportional_to} P {sup 1/3} with increasing eccentricities reaching e {yields} 0.98 for P {yields} 1000 days. Radial-velocity follow-up of long-period eclipsing binaries with no secondary eclipses could offer a significantly larger sample. Orders of magnitude more (hundreds) may reveal their presence from periodic 'eccentricity pulses', such as tidal ellipsoidal variations near pericenter passages. Several new few-day-long eccentricity-pulse candidates with long periods (P = 25-80 days) are reported.

  5. Exploring Dual and Binary AGN via Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke Spolaor, Sarah; Lazio, J.

    2012-05-01

    Dual and binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are thought to form as a direct result of a major galaxy merger. The discovery of late-stage SMBH pairs could critically inform upcoming gravitational wave science and cosmological formation models, and could provide fascinating studies of post-merger dynamics and merger-induced SMBH growth. However, it has been notoriously difficult to identify clear electromagnetic markers for dual and binary SMBHs in late-stage merger systems. Accordingly, few definitive discoveries of paired SMBHs have yet been made, with only a handful of known systems at projected separations below 1kpc. We will review the unique contributions that radio imaging observations can make to this field: particularly in the search for new systems, the confirmation of candidate small-orbit binary systems, and the potential for multi-messenger gravitational wave science when combined with pulsar timing methods. We will also provide an update on recent radio searches for binary AGN. We acknowledge that a portion of research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Kenyon, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the outbursts of symbiotic stars. In the thermonuclear model, outbursts begin when the hydrogen burning shell of a hot white dwarf reaches a critical mass. After a rapid increase in the luminosity and effective temperature, the white dwarf evolves at constant luminosity to lower effective temperatures, remains at optical maximum for several years, and then returns to quiescence along a white dwarf cooling curve. In disk instability models, the brightness rises when the accretion rate from the disk onto the central white dwarf abruptly increases by factors of 5-20. After a few month to several year period at maximum, both the luminosity and the effective temperature of the disk decline as the system returns to quiescence. If most symbiotic stars undergo thermonuclear eruptions, then symbiotics are probably poor candidates for type I supernovae. However, they can then provide approx. 10% of the material which stars recycle back into the interstellar medium. If disk instabilities are the dominant eruption mechanism, symbiotics are promising type Ia candidates but recycle less material into the interstellar medium.

  7. Cryptography with DNA binary strands.

    PubMed

    Leier, A; Richter, C; Banzhaf, W; Rauhe, H

    2000-06-01

    Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. Here two different cryptographic approaches based on DNA binary strands are shown. The first approach shows how DNA binary strands can be used for steganography, a technique of encryption by information hiding, to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages. The second approach shown here is based on steganography and a method of graphical subtraction of binary gel-images. It can be used to constitute a molecular checksum and can be combined with the first approach to support encryption. DNA cryptography might become of practical relevance in the context of labelling organic and inorganic materials with DNA 'barcodes'. PMID:10963862

  8. Separation in 5 Msun Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy R.; Bond, H. E.; Schaefer, G.; Mason, B. D.; Karovska, M.; Tingle, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cepheids (5 Msun stars) provide an excellent sample for determining the binary properties of fairly massive stars. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of Cepheids brighter than 8th magnitude resulted in a list of ALL companions more massive than 2.0 Msun uniformly sensitive to all separations. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has resolved three of these binaries (Eta Aql, S Nor, and V659 Cen). Combining these separations with orbital data in the literature, we derive an unbiased distribution of binary separations for a sample of 18 Cepheids, and also a distribution of mass ratios. The distribution of orbital periods shows that the 5 Msun binaries prefer shorter periods than 1 Msun stars, reflecting differences in star formation processes.

  9. CHAOTIC ZONES AROUND GRAVITATING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Ivan I.

    2015-01-20

    The extent of the continuous zone of chaotic orbits of a small-mass tertiary around a system of two gravitationally bound primaries of comparable masses (a binary star, a binary black hole, a binary asteroid, etc.) is estimated analytically, as a function of the tertiary's orbital eccentricity. The separatrix map theory is used to demonstrate that the central continuous chaos zone emerges (above a threshold in the primaries' mass ratio) due to overlapping of the orbital resonances corresponding to the integer ratios p:1 between the tertiary and the central binary periods. In this zone, the unlimited chaotic orbital diffusion of the tertiary takes place, up to its ejection from the system. The primaries' mass ratio, above which such a chaotic zone is universally present at all initial eccentricities of the tertiary, is estimated. The diversity of the observed orbital configurations of biplanetary and circumbinary exosystems is shown to be in accord with the existence of the primaries' mass parameter threshold.

  10. An adaptable binary entropy coder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiely, A.; Klimesh, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel entropy coding technique which is based on recursive interleaving of variable-to-variable length binary source codes. We discuss code design and performance estimation methods, as well as practical encoding and decoding algorithms.

  11. Simulating relativistic binaries with Whisky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, L.

    We report about our first tests and results in simulating the last phase of the coalescence and the merger of binary relativistic stars. The simulations were performed using our code Whisky and mesh refinement through the Carpet driver.

  12. From wide to close binaries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleton, Peter P.

    The mechanisms by which the periods of wide binaries (mass 8 solar mass or less and period 10-3000 d) are lengthened or shortened are discussed, synthesizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. A system of nomenclature involving seven evolutionary states, three geometrical states, and 10 types of orbital-period evolution is developed and applied; classifications of 71 binaries are presented in a table along with the basic observational parameters. Evolutionary processes in wide binaries (single-star-type winds, magnetic braking with tidal friction, and companion-reinforced attrition), late case B systems, low-mass X-ray binaries, and triple systems are examined in detail, and possible evolutionary paths are shown in diagrams.

  13. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Hartmann, L.; Raymond, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Four typical binary systems that illustrate some of the major problems in the study of binary stars are discussed. Consideration is given to (1) high-luminosity X-ray sources typified by Cyg X-1 (HDE 226868) and Vela XR-1 (HD 77581), (2) low-luminosity X-ray sources (HZ Her), (3) late-type systems of W UMa and RS CVn type, and (4) cool supergiants with a hot companion (VV Cephei).

  14. Merger of binary neutron stars in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru

    2014-09-01

    The merger of binary neutron stars is one of most promising sources of gravitational waves. It is also a promising candidate for the central engine of short-hard gamma-ray bursts and a source of the strong transient electromagnetic signal that could be the counterpart of gravitational-wave signals. Numerical relativity is probably the unique tool for theoretically exploring the merger process, and now, it is powerful enough to provide us a wide variety of aspects of the binary-neutron-star merger. In this talk, I will summarize our current understanding of the entire merger event that is obtained by a large-scale numerical-relativity simulations. In particular, I focus on the relation between the neutron-star equation of state and gravitational waves emitted during the late inspiral and merger phase, and observable electromagnetic signal that is likely to be emitted by the dynamical ejecta through r-process nucleosynthesis.

  15. Binary nanoparticle superlattices of soft-particle systems

    PubMed Central

    Travesset, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The solid-phase diagram of binary systems consisting of particles of diameter σA=σ and σB=γσ (γ≤1) interacting with an inverse p = 12 power law is investigated as a paradigm of a soft potential. In addition to the diameter ratio γ that characterizes hard-sphere models, the phase diagram is a function of an additional parameter that controls the relative interaction strength between the different particle types. Phase diagrams are determined from extremes of thermodynamic functions by considering 15 candidate lattices. In general, it is shown that the phase diagram of a soft repulsive potential leads to the morphological diversity observed in experiments with binary nanoparticles, thus providing a general framework to understand their phase diagrams. Particular emphasis is given to the two most successful crystallization strategies so far: evaporation of solvent from nanoparticles with grafted hydrocarbon ligands and DNA programmable self-assembly. PMID:26195799

  16. Eclipsing Binaries with Classical Cepheid Component in the Magellanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Skowron, D.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a census of eclipsing binary systems with classical Cepheid as a component. All such systems known were found in the OGLE collection of classical Cepheids in the Magellanic System. We extend the list of potential candidates adding four new objects found in the OGLE-IV photometric data. One of the new Cepheids in the eclipsing system, OGLE-SMC-CEP-3235, revealed only one eclipse during 15 years of the OGLE photometric monitoring. However, it additionally shows very well pronounced light-time effect indicating that the binarity is real and the system is physically bound. We also search for the light-time effect in other known eclipsing Cepheids and we clearly detect it in OGLE-LMC-CEP-1812. We discuss application of this tool for the search for Cepheids in non-eclipsing binary systems.

  17. Planets in Wide Binaries from Kepler: Ages, Stability and Evolution of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, Kolby L.; West, Andrew A.; Janes, Kenneth; Dhital, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    Using the Kepler Input Catalog and the fourth U.S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog, we have identified 1509 common proper motion (CPM) binaries in the Kepler field of view, of which a small subset host planet candidates, or Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). We have verified the fidelity of the CPM pairs using a Galactic model and follow-up astrometric observations. We present 73 KOIs distributed over 58 CPM pairs and highlight the first wide binary system (separation > 1000 AU) where both stellar components host at least one KOI. Because our binary sample was initially targeted for a gyrochronology analysis, we also present measurements of stellar rotation periods and preliminary estimates of stellar (and planetary) ages. We use these extrapolated planetary ages to investigate longterm planet stability in wide binaries and test potential formation and evolution scenarios of these dynamically complex systems.

  18. 76 FR 4896 - Call for Candidates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADVISORY BOARD Call for Candidates AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board. ACTION: Notice... Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) is currently seeking candidates (candidates must...

  19. The ELM Survey. VII. Orbital Properties of Low-Mass White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Kenyon, Scott J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We present the discovery of 15 extremely low-mass (5\\lt {log}g\\lt 7) white dwarf (WD) candidates, 9 of which are in ultra-compact double-degenerate binaries. Our targeted extremely low-mass Survey sample now includes 76 binaries. The sample has a lognormal distribution of orbital periods with a median period of 5.4 hr. The velocity amplitudes imply that the binary companions have a normal distribution of mass with 0.76 M⊙ mean and 0.25 M⊙ dispersion. Thus extremely low-mass WDs are found in binaries with a typical mass ratio of 1:4. Statistically speaking, 95% of the WD binaries have a total mass below the Chandrasekhar mass, and thus are not type Ia supernova progenitors. Yet half of the observed binaries will merge in less than 6 Gyr due to gravitational wave radiation; probable outcomes include single massive WDs and stable mass transfer AM CVn binaries. Based on observations obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  20. Quasar candidates near 1057 + 01

    SciTech Connect

    Crampton, D.; Cartledge, S.; Cowley, A.P.; Hartwick, F.D.A. Arizona State Univ., Tempe Victoria Univ. )

    1991-04-01

    Positions and magnitudes are given for 143 quasar candidates and three white dwarf candidates discovered with the CFHT blue grens in a 2.7 square degree area in the direction 1057 + 01. The goal of this survey is to provide complete samples of quasars to study the large scale distribution of matter at moderate to high (z less than 3.4) redshifts. Part of the region surveyed in this paper was previously studied by Crampton and Parmar (1983), allowing a comparison of the search and measurements accuracies. Redshifts, derived from MMT spectroscopy, for 27 of the candidates are also presented. One quasar, 1058.1 + 0052, displays strong broad absorption lines characteristic of BAL quasars. 5 refs.

  1. High Resolution Imaging of Very Low Mass Spectral Binaries: Three Resolved Systems and Detection of Orbital Motion in an L/T Transition Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Burgasser, Adam J.

    2015-11-01

    We present high resolution Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics imaging of 43 late-M, L and T dwarf systems with Keck/NIRC2. These include 17 spectral binary candidates, systems whose spectra suggest the presence of a T dwarf secondary. We resolve three systems: 2MASS J1341-3052, SDSS J1511+0607 and SDSS J2052-1609 the first two are resolved for the first time. All three have projected separations <8 AU and estimated periods of 14-80 years. We also report a preliminary orbit determination for SDSS J2052-1609 based on six epochs of resolved astrometry between 2005 and 2010. Among the 14 unresolved spectral binaries, 5 systems were confirmed binaries but remained unresolved, implying a minimum binary fraction of {47}-11+12% for this sample. Our inability to resolve most of the spectral binaries, including the confirmed binaries, supports the hypothesis that a large fraction of very low mass systems have relatively small separations and are missed with direct imaging. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  2. Coordinated observations of interacting peculiar red giant binaries, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, T.

    1995-01-01

    IUE Observations were begun for a two-year program to monitor the UV variability of three interacting peculiar red giant (PRG) binaries, HD 59643 (C6,s) HD 35155 (S3/2), and HR 1105 (S3.5/2.5). All of these systems were suspected to involve accretion of material from the PRG to a white-dwarf secondary, based mainly on previous IUE investigations. From our earlier surveys of PRG's, they were primary candidates to test the hypothesis that Tc-poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a secondary component rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch.

  3. A Speeding Binary in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of a hyper-velocity binary star system in the halo of the Milky Way poses a mystery: how was this system accelerated to its high speed?Accelerating StarsUnlike the uniform motion in the Galactic disk, stars in the Milky Ways halo exhibit a huge diversity of orbits that are usually tilted relative to the disk and have a variety of speeds. One type of halo star, so-called hyper-velocity stars, travel with speeds that can approach the escape velocity of the Galaxy.How do these hyper-velocity stars come about? Assuming they form in the Galactic disk, there are multiple proposed scenarios through which they could be accelerated and injected into the halo, such as:Ejection after a close encounter with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic centerEjection due to a nearby supernova explosionEjection as the result of a dynamical interaction in a dense stellar population.Further observations of hyper-velocity stars are necessary to identify the mechanism responsible for their acceleration.J1211s SurpriseModels of J1211s orbit show it did not originate from the Galactic center (black dot). The solar symbol shows the position of the Sun and the star shows the current position of J1211. The bottom two panels show two depictions(x-y plane and r-z plane) of estimated orbits of J1211 over the past 10 Gyr. [Nmeth et al. 2016]To this end, a team of scientists led by Pter Nmeth (Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nrnberg) recently studied the candidate halo hyper-velocity star SDSS J121150.27+143716.2. The scientists obtained spectroscopy of J1211 using spectrographs at the Keck Telescope in Hawaii and ESOs Very Large Telescope in Chile. To their surprise, they discovered the signature of a companion in the spectra: J1211 is actually a binary!Nmeth and collaborators found that J1211, located roughly 18,000 light-years away, is moving at a rapid ~570 km/s relative to the galactic rest frame. The binary system consists of a hot (30,600 K) subdwarf and a

  4. CNO Processing in Massive Algol Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    This program, used ultraviolet observations by the IUE Observatory along with other tools to search for abundance anomalies indicative of CNO processing in the secondary (mass-donating) stars of six interacting binary systems. Related IUE-based activities were also undertaken under this grant. Two Supplements to the grant were awarded. Supplement No. 1 was in connection with the NASA Grant Supplements for Education program, for a workshop for elementary school science teachers. The two sessions of the workshop were held October 24 and November 14, 1992. Eighteen school teachers from central Pennsylvania, grades 1-7, participated in the workshop, for which they received one unit of in-service training credit from their Intermediate Unit. Supplement No. 2 was awarded for additional IUE observations of the Algol stars V342 Aql and TU Mon. Observations of all six candidate stars were made with IUE, and attention was narrowed to TU Mon in particular, for which further IUE observations were made using Director's discretionary time. Observations of TU Mon were also carried out with the Voyager UV spectrometers, and optical spectroscopy was obtained on several occasions at Penn State's Black Moshannon Observatory. Photometric data on TU Mon were acquired by Dr. Paul Etzel at Mt. Laguna Observatory (MLO). McGouldrick was employed part-time during the Fall academic semester to assist in accessing the IUE Archive, and to correlate data on some cataclysmic variables and related objects that were observed with both IUE and the Voyager Far Ultraviolet Spectrometers. Approximately 21 relevant binary systems were observed with the Voyager UVS over the past decade, and a paper is being prepared for eventual publication that will serve as an index to the UVS data archive on these stars, providing observation dates, mean count rates in far and extreme UV bands, and a discussion of the relevant literature concerning the far UV behavior (including correlative IUE information from the

  5. Figures of Equilibrium among Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestroffer, D.; Tanga, P.

    2005-12-01

    The original idea of Farinella et al. [1] that rubble pile asteroids can have figures of equilibrium, is rehabilitated. Albeit asteroids generally have a broad distribution of shapes and do not follow sequences of (hydrostatic) equilibrium, we show that some asteroids are indeed Jacobi or Darwin ellipsoids. Such statement is obtained from an analysis of their ellipsoidal shape (a:b:c) together with recent measures of their mass and bulk density [2,3]. This means that both their shape and adimensional rotation frequency sbond Ω =Ω /(π ρ G) follow sequences of equilibrium [4,5]. Jacobi and Darwin figures are obtained for uniformly rotating mass of (inviscid as well as compressible) fluids and relatively large angular momentum. Interestingly these objects appear to preferably be binaries. We moreover show that the porosity of such objects is relatively large (approx. 40%) indicating that they are loose rubble piles, yet with dense packing. Last we show that, given the observed bulk-densities, these bodies must be homogeneous bodies of uniform density distribution. Thus, though solid-solid friction must occur in such aggregates, the surface of these bodies is a surface of level similar to that of inviscid fluids. Comparison to other asteroids of similar mass either possessing a moonlet or with no known satellites should shed light on their formation history and/or constrains on collisional evolution. Binaries with low eccentricities and inclination (hence prograde orbit) should preferably be the outcome of catastrophic disruption as is supposed for members of dynamical family [6,7]. Future work and analysis of the typical reaccumulation time scales, typical angular momentum, possible post-reaccumulation cosmic shaking, etc. shall help to know how the fate of collisions or catastrophic breakup of a parent body can differ yielding to binaries with equilibrium figures. In any case the existence of a figure of equilibrium appears to be highly correlated to the presence

  6. CNO Processing in Massive Algol Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Richard A.

    1998-08-01

    This program, used ultraviolet observations by the IUE Observatory along with other tools to search for abundance anomalies indicative of CNO processing in the secondary (mass-donating) stars of six interacting binary systems. Related IUE-based activities were also undertaken under this grant. Two Supplements to the grant were awarded. Supplement No. 1 was in connection with the NASA Grant Supplements for Education program, for a workshop for elementary school science teachers. The two sessions of the workshop were held October 24 and November 14, 1992. Eighteen school teachers from central Pennsylvania, grades 1-7, participated in the workshop, for which they received one unit of in-service training credit from their Intermediate Unit. Supplement No. 2 was awarded for additional IUE observations of the Algol stars V342 Aql and TU Mon. Observations of all six candidate stars were made with IUE, and attention was narrowed to TU Mon in particular, for which further IUE observations were made using Director's discretionary time. Observations of TU Mon were also carried out with the Voyager UV spectrometers, and optical spectroscopy was obtained on several occasions at Penn State's Black Moshannon Observatory. Photometric data on TU Mon were acquired by Dr. Paul Etzel at Mt. Laguna Observatory (MLO). McGouldrick was employed part-time during the Fall academic semester to assist in accessing the IUE Archive, and to correlate data on some cataclysmic variables and related objects that were observed with both IUE and the Voyager Far Ultraviolet Spectrometers. Approximately 21 relevant binary systems were observed with the Voyager UVS over the past decade, and a paper is being prepared for eventual publication that will serve as an index to the UVS data archive on these stars, providing observation dates, mean count rates in far and extreme UV bands, and a discussion of the relevant literature concerning the far UV behavior (including correlative IUE information from the

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Candidate field horizontal-branch stars catalog (Beers+, 1988)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T. C.; Preston, G. W.; Shectman, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    Coordinates and brightness estimates are presented for 4408 candidate field horizontal-branch stars selected using an objective-prism, interference-filter survey technique. The candidates lie primarily in the southern Galactic hemisphere, and are distributed in color over the range B-V from -0.2 to 0.40. Previous spectroscopic observation of a subset of these candidates indicates that roughly 85 percent of the catalog objects are bona fide members of the field blue horizontal branch. The remaining candidates include, in order of frequency, stars with main-sequence gravity which are likely to be a mix of metal-deficient turnoff stars and field blue stragglers, metallic line (Am) stars, A stars of near-solar metallicity, and high-luminosity or binary stars. (1 data file).

  8. The Michigan Binary Star Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2007-07-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, William J. Hussey and Robert G. Aitken, both at Lick Observatory, began a systematic search for unrecorded binary stars with the aid of the 12" and 36" refracting telescopes at Lick Observatory. Aitken's work (and book on binary stars) are well known, Hussey's contributions less so. In 1905 Hussey, a Michigan engineering graduate, returned to direct the Ann Arbor astronomy program, and immediately he began to design new instrumentation for the study of binary stars and to train potential observers. For a time, he spent six months a year at the La Plata Observatory, where he discovered a number of new pairs and decided upon a major southern hemisphere campaign. He spent a decade obtaining the lenses for a large refractor, through the vicissitudes of war and depression. Finally, he obtained a site in South Africa, a 26" refractor, and a small corps of observers, but he died in London en route to fulfill his dream. His right hand man, Richard Rossiter, established the observatory and spent the next thirty years discovering and measuring binary stars: his personal total is a record for the field. This talk is an account of the methods, results, and utility of the extraordinary binary star factory in the veldt.

  9. Interviewing Teacher-Librarian Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yucht, Alice

    2004-01-01

    When recently asked by an administrator for some realistic questions and "recommended" responses to expect while interviewing candidates for school library positions, the author grouped the questions into three categories: library management, information skills and teaching skills. In this article are the questions she suggested, along with topics…

  10. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    PubMed

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-01

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/. PMID:27131783

  11. Candidate cave entrances on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cushing, Glen E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents newly discovered candidate cave entrances into Martian near-surface lava tubes, volcano-tectonic fracture systems, and pit craters and describes their characteristics and exploration possibilities. These candidates are all collapse features that occur either intermittently along laterally continuous trench-like depressions or in the floors of sheer-walled atypical pit craters. As viewed from orbit, locations of most candidates are visibly consistent with known terrestrial features such as tube-fed lava flows, volcano-tectonic fractures, and pit craters, each of which forms by mechanisms that can produce caves. Although we cannot determine subsurface extents of the Martian features discussed here, some may continue unimpeded for many kilometers if terrestrial examples are indeed analogous. The features presented here were identified in images acquired by the Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System visible-wavelength camera, and by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera. Select candidates have since been targeted by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment. Martian caves are promising potential sites for future human habitation and astrobiology investigations; understanding their characteristics is critical for long-term mission planning and for developing the necessary exploration technologies.

  12. SAO RAS SN candidates classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatkhullin, T. A.; Moskvitin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    We observed SN candidates (AT 2016eow, AT 2016enu and AT 2016enf) with the BTA/Scorpio-I on August, 4. Direct images in the R band and long-slit spectra in the range of 3600-7600AA (resolution FWHM = 10A) were obtained.

  13. Candidate Exercise Technologies and Prescriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews potential exercise technologies to counter the effects of space flight. It includes a overview of the exercise countermeasures project, a review of some of the candidate exercise technologies being considered and a few of the analog exercise hardware devices, and a review of new studies that are designed to optimize the current and future exercise protocols.

  14. Empathy Development in Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    Using a grounded theory research design, the author examined 180 reflective essays of teacher candidates who participated in a "Learning Process Project," in which they were asked to synthesize and document their discoveries about the learning process over the course of a completely new learning experience as naive learners. This study explored…

  15. Experience with parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm that can be used for partitioning graphs embedded in 2- or 3-dimensional space. It partitions explicitly on the basis of nodes + (lambda)x(edges cut), where lambda is the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. The new algorithm is faster than the original binary dissection algorithm and attempts to obtain better partitions than the older algorithm, which only takes nodes into account. The performance of parametric dissection with plain binary dissection on 3 large unstructured 3-d meshes obtained from computational fluid dynamics and on 2 random graphs were compared. It was showm that the new algorithm can usually yield partitions that are substantially superior, but that its performance is heavily dependent on the input data.

  16. Liquidus of Silicon Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Kolbeinsen, Leiv; Tangstad, Merete

    2011-08-01

    Thermodynamic knowledge about liquid silicon is crucial for the production of solar-grade silicon feedstock from molten silicon. In the current study, liquidus for silicon binary alloys is formulated using a previously developed method in which the liquidus curve is calculated using two constants. The liquidus measurements for the silicon portion of the silicon alloys with Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, Zn, Cu, Ag, Au, Pt, Sn, Pb, Bi, Sb, Ga, In, Ni, Pd, Mn, and Rh are reviewed, and the consistent data were used to determine the liquidus constants. The liquidus curves for silicon binary systems are calculated and plotted. It is indicated that the calculated liquidus curves fit well with the experimental data. A correlation between the determined liquidus constants is also observed, which can be used to gain a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the silicon binary melts.

  17. An electrically powered binary star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Cropper, Mark; Ramsay, Gavin; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2002-03-01

    We propose a model for stellar binary systems consisting of a magnetic and a non-magnetic white dwarf pair which is powered principally by electrical energy. In our model the luminosity is caused by resistive heating of the stellar atmospheres arising from induced currents driven within the binary. This process is reminiscent of the Jupiter-Io system, but greatly increased in power because of the larger companion and stronger magnetic field of the primary. Electrical power is an alternative stellar luminosity source, following on from nuclear fusion and accretion. We find that this source of heating is sufficient to account for the observed X-ray luminosity of the 9.5-min binary RX J1914+24, and provides an explanation for its puzzling characteristics.

  18. Low-mass Eclipsing Binaries in the Initial Kepler Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, J. L.; López-Morales, M.; Harrison, T. E.; Ule, N.; Hoffman, D. I.

    2011-03-01

    We identify 231 objects in the newly released Cycle 0 data set from the Kepler Mission as double-eclipse, detached eclipsing binary systems with T eff < 5500 K and orbital periods shorter than ~32 days. We model each light curve using the JKTEBOP code with a genetic algorithm to obtain precise values for each system. We identify 95 new systems with both components below 1.0 M sun and eclipses of at least 0.1 mag, suitable for ground-based follow-up. Of these, 14 have periods less than 1.0 day, 52 have periods between 1.0 and 10.0 days, and 29 have periods greater than 10.0 days. This new sample of main-sequence, low-mass, double-eclipse, detached eclipsing binary candidates more than doubles the number of previously known systems and extends the sample into the completely heretofore unexplored P > 10.0 day period regime. We find preliminary evidence from these systems that the radii of low-mass stars in binary systems decrease with period. This supports the theory that binary spin-up is the primary cause of inflated radii in low-mass binary systems, although a full analysis of each system with radial-velocity and multi-color light curves is needed to fully explore this hypothesis. Also, we present seven new transiting planet candidates that do not appear among the list of 706 candidates recently released by the Kepler team, or in the Kepler False Positive Catalog, along with several other new and interesting systems. We also present novel techniques for the identification, period analysis, and modeling of eclipsing binaries.

  19. LOW-MASS ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE INITIAL KEPLER DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J. L.; Harrison, T. E.; Ule, N.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Hoffman, D. I.

    2011-03-15

    We identify 231 objects in the newly released Cycle 0 data set from the Kepler Mission as double-eclipse, detached eclipsing binary systems with T{sub eff} < 5500 K and orbital periods shorter than {approx}32 days. We model each light curve using the JKTEBOP code with a genetic algorithm to obtain precise values for each system. We identify 95 new systems with both components below 1.0 M{sub sun} and eclipses of at least 0.1 mag, suitable for ground-based follow-up. Of these, 14 have periods less than 1.0 day, 52 have periods between 1.0 and 10.0 days, and 29 have periods greater than 10.0 days. This new sample of main-sequence, low-mass, double-eclipse, detached eclipsing binary candidates more than doubles the number of previously known systems and extends the sample into the completely heretofore unexplored P > 10.0 day period regime. We find preliminary evidence from these systems that the radii of low-mass stars in binary systems decrease with period. This supports the theory that binary spin-up is the primary cause of inflated radii in low-mass binary systems, although a full analysis of each system with radial-velocity and multi-color light curves is needed to fully explore this hypothesis. Also, we present seven new transiting planet candidates that do not appear among the list of 706 candidates recently released by the Kepler team, or in the Kepler False Positive Catalog, along with several other new and interesting systems. We also present novel techniques for the identification, period analysis, and modeling of eclipsing binaries.

  20. Evidence for prolonged main sequence stellar evolution of F stars in close binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, A. A.

    2001-04-01

    Binary F stars exhibit large brightness anomaly, which is defined here as the difference between the absolute magnitude from the \\mboxuvby photometry and the actual absolute magnitude of the star. We have found that the anomaly inversely correlates with the binary components separation. There is evidence that the correlation reflects actual population differences between close and wide binary pairs, in which case it indicates that the anomaly is somehow associated with the interaction of binary's components. The anomaly has also been found to correlate with both kinematics and metallicity. The sense of the correlations implies that the anomaly increases as the star evolves, suggesting a peculiar evolution of a primary F star in a tight binary pair. This conclusion has further been supported by the study of the age-velocity relation (AVR) of F stars that are cataloged in the HIPPARCOS as single. Among these stars, those with brightness anomaly were previously shown to be most likely unidentified close binaries. We have found that the AVR of these binary candidates is different from that of the ``truly single'' F stars. The discrepancy between the two AVRs indicates that the putative binaries are, on average, older than similar normal single F stars at the same effective temperature and luminosity, which is consistent with the inferred peculiar evolution in close binaries. It appears that this peculiarity is caused by the impact of the components interaction in a tight pair on stellar evolution, which results in the prolonged main sequence lifetime of the primary F star. Based on the data from the Hipparcos astrometry satellite (European Space Agency).

  1. Orbits of 15 visual binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, W. D.

    1981-04-01

    Micrometer observations in 1979-1980 permitted the computation of substantially revised or new orbital elements for 15 visual pairs. They include the bright stars 52 Ari and 78 UMa (in the UMa cluster), four faint dK pairs, and the probable triple ADS 16185. Ephemerides for equator of data are listed in a table along with the orbital elements of the binaries. The measured positions and their residuals are listed in a second table. The considered binaries include ADS 896, 2336, 6315, 7054, 7629, 8092, 8555, 8739, 13987, 16185, Rst 1658, 3906, 3972, 4529, and Jsp 691.

  2. Mental Effort in Binary Categorization Aided by Binary Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Assaf; Meyer, Joachim; Parmet, Yisrael

    2013-01-01

    Binary cueing systems assist in many tasks, often alerting people about potential hazards (such as alarms and alerts). We investigate whether cues, besides possibly improving decision accuracy, also affect the effort users invest in tasks and whether the required effort in tasks affects the responses to cues. We developed a novel experimental tool…

  3. Consolidated RXTE Observing Grants on Observation of Neutron Stars and Black Holes in Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Thomas A.; Vaughan, Brian A.

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of neutron stars and black holes in binaries. The activities focused on observation made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The following areas were covered: long term observations of accreting binary pulsars with the All-Sky Monitor (ASM); observations of Centaurus X-3 with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) and the High-Energy X-ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE); observations of accreting pulsars with the PCA and HEXTE; studies of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO); and investigations of accreting black-hole candidates.

  4. BINARY YORP EFFECT AND EVOLUTION OF BINARY ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Elad; Sari, Re'em

    2011-02-15

    The rotation states of kilometer-sized near-Earth asteroids are known to be affected by the Yarkevsky O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. In a related effect, binary YORP (BYORP), the orbital properties of a binary asteroid evolve under a radiation effect mostly acting on a tidally locked secondary. The BYORP effect can alter the orbital elements over {approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} years for a D{sub p} = 2 km primary with a D{sub s} = 0.4 km secondary at 1 AU. It can either separate the binary components or cause them to collide. In this paper, we devise a simple approach to calculate the YORP effect on asteroids and the BYORP effect on binaries including J{sub 2} effects due to primary oblateness and the Sun. We apply this to asteroids with known shapes as well as a set of randomly generated bodies with various degrees of smoothness. We find a strong correlation between the strengths of an asteroid's YORP and BYORP effects. Therefore, statistical knowledge of one could be used to estimate the effect of the other. We show that the action of BYORP preferentially shrinks rather than expands the binary orbit and that YORP preferentially slows down asteroids. This conclusion holds for the two extremes of thermal conductivities studied in this work and the assumption that the asteroid reaches a stable point, but may break down for moderate thermal conductivity. The YORP and BYORP effects are shown to be smaller than could be naively expected due to near cancellation of the effects at small scales. Taking this near cancellation into account, a simple order-of-magnitude estimate of the YORP and BYORP effects as a function of the sizes and smoothness of the bodies is calculated. Finally, we provide a simple proof showing that there is no secular effect due to absorption of radiation in BYORP.

  5. Recent Minima of 193 Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper continues the publication of times of minima for eclipsing binary stars from observations reported to the AAVSO Eclipsing Binary section. Times of minima from CCD observations received by the author from November 2015 through January 2016 are presented.

  6. A zoo of computable binary normal sequences

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Steve; Singer, Burton H.

    2012-01-01

    Historically there has been a virtual absence of constructive methods to produce broad classes of “certifiably random” infinite sequences, despite considerable interest in this endeavor. Previously, we proved a theorem that yielded explicit algorithms to produce diverse sets of normal numbers, reasonable candidates for random sequences, given their limiting equidistribution of subblocks of all lengths. Herein, we develop this algorithmic approach much further, systematizing the normal number generation process in several ways. We construct delineated, distinct sets of normal numbers (classified by the extent to which initial segments deviate from maximal irregularity), with virtually any allowable specified rate of convergence to 0 of this deviation, encompassing arbitrarily fast and slow rates, and accommodating asymmetric behavior above or below a centered median. As a corollary, we provide an explicit construction of a normal number that satisfies the Law of the Iterated Logarithm. We also produce distinct families of “biased” normal numbers, with virtually any specified rate of convergence of the bias (to 0). This latter theory is in part motivated by the remarkable observation that the binary version of Champernowne’s number, which is also normal, is biased—any initial segment has more 1s than 0s. Finally, we construct an interesting normal sequence with arbitrarily fast convergence to equidistribution of singleton blocks, yet arbitrarily slow convergence of pairs, which has profound implications both for probability theory, and for metrics to evaluate the “near-randomness” of sequences. PMID:23125196

  7. The Kepler Mission and Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, William; Lissauer, J.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Cochran, William; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Nick

    2006-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a photometric mission with a precision of 14 ppm (at R=12) that is designed to continuously observe a single field of view (FOV) of greater 100 sq deg in the Cygnus-Lyra region for four or more years. The primary goal of the mission is to monitor greater than 100,000 stars for transits of Earth-size and smaller planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. In the process, many eclipsing binaries (EB) will also be detected and light curves produced. To enhance and optimize the mission results, the stellar characteristics for all the stars in the FOV with R less than 16 will have been determined prior to launch. As part of the verification process, stars with transit candidates will have radial velocity follow-up observations performed to determine the component masses and thereby separate eclipses caused by stellar companions from transits caused by planets. The result will be a rich database on EBs. The community will have access to the archive for further analysis, such as, for EB modeling of the high-precision light curves. A guest observer program is also planned to allow for photometric observations of objects not on the target list but within the FOV, since only the pixels of interest from those stars monitored will be transmitted to the ground.

  8. OPTOPUS observations of quasar candidates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiani, S.

    1987-06-01

    OPTOPUS is a fiber-optic instrument for multiple-object spectroscopy with the Boiler & Chivens spectrograph and a CCD detector at the 3.6-m telescope. The system has been described in detail by the Optical Instrumentation Group (1985, The Messenger 41,25). Its application for observing Halley's comet has been reported by Lund and Surdej (1986, The Messenger 43, 1). Here another "classical" use of multiple-object spectroscopy is presented: followup observations of quasar candidates.

  9. Single versus binary star progenitors of Type IIb supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sravan, Niharika

    2016-07-01

    Stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) represent a challenge to our understanding of massive star evolution. Wind mass loss and binary interactions are the leading candidates to explain observations. The latter has gained support in the recent years with growing evidence that mass-loss rates due to line-driven winds are, in reality, 2 - 3 times lower. Type IIb SNe retain a small amount of their Hydrogen envelope before undergoing core-collapse and are the only class of stripped-envelope SNe with identified progenitors. Thus they are powerful tools for testing our understanding of massive stellar evolution. To identify possible evolutionary pathways to Type IIb SNe, we use Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) to model a large population of single and binary star sequences covering a broad parameter space with a wide range of component masses and initial orbital periods and identify those that undergo core-collapse with 0.01 to 0.5 solar masses of residual Hydrogen envelope. We find no single star Type IIb progenitors in the parameter space covered. We find a few Type IIb binary progenitors. These sequences have initial mass ratios greater than 0.6, wide orbital periods and undergo non-conservative mass transfer.

  10. Δ μ binaries among stars with large proper motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovritchev, M. Yu.; Kulikova, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based on observations performed with the Pulkovo normal astrograph in 2008-2015 and data from sky surveys (DSS, 2MASS, SDSS DR12, WISE), we have investigated the motions of 1308 stars with proper motions larger than 300 mas yr-1 down to magnitude 17. The main idea of our search for binary stars based on this material is reduced to comparing the quasi-mean (POSS2-POSS1; an epoch difference of ≈50 yr) and quasi-instantaneous (2МASS, SDSS, WISE, Pulkovo; an epoch difference of ≈10 yr) proper motions. If the difference is statistically significant compared to the proper motion errors, then the object may be considered as a Δ μ-binary candidate. One hundred and twenty one stars from among those included in the observational program satisfy this requirement. Additional confirmations of binarity for a number of stars have been obtained by comparing the calculated proper motions with the data from several programs of stellar trigonometric parallax determinations and by analyzing the asymmetry of stellar images on sky-survey CCD frames. Analysis of the highly accurate SDSS photometric data for four stars (J0656+3827, J0838+3940, J1229+5332, J2330+4639) allows us to reach a conclusion about the probability that these Δ μ binaries are white dwarf +Mdwarf pairs.

  11. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  12. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  13. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  14. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF and the crew headquarters.

  15. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Contact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Frank, Juhan; Marcello, Dominic; Motl, Patrick M.; Staff, Jan E.

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for our project is the peculiar case of the 'red nova" V1309 Sco which erupted in September 2008. The progenitor was, in fact, a contact binary system. We are developing a simulation of contact binaries, so that their formation, structural, and merger properties could be studied using hydrodynamics codes. The observed transient event was the disruption of the secondary star by the primary, and their subsequent merger into one star; hence to replicate this behavior, we need a core-envelope structure for both the stars. We achieve this using a combination of Self Consistant Field (SCF) technique and composite polytropes, also known as bipolytropes. So far we have been able to generate close binaries with various mass ratios. Another consequence of using bipolytropes is that according to theoretical calculations, the radius of a star should expand when the core mass fraction exceeds a critical value, resulting in interesting consequences in a binary system. We present some initial results of these simulations.

  16. Discs in misaligned binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawiraswattana, Krisada; Hubber, David A.; Goodwin, Simon P.

    2016-08-01

    We perform SPH simulations to study precession and changes in alignment between the circumprimary disc and the binary orbit in misaligned binary systems. We find that the precession process can be described by the rigid-disc approximation, where the disc is considered as a rigid body interacting with the binary companion only gravitationally. Precession also causes change in alignment between the rotational axis of the disc and the spin axis of the primary star. This type of alignment is of great important for explaining the origin of spin-orbit misaligned planetary systems. However, we find that the rigid-disc approximation fails to describe changes in alignment between the disc and the binary orbit. This is because the alignment process is a consequence of interactions that involve the fluidity of the disc, such as the tidal interaction and the encounter interaction. Furthermore, simulation results show that there are not only alignment processes, which bring the components towards alignment, but also anti-alignment processes, which tend to misalign the components. The alignment process dominates in systems with misalignment angle near 90°, while the anti-alignment process dominates in systems with the misalignment angle near 0° or 180°. This means that highly misaligned systems will become more aligned but slightly misaligned systems will become more misaligned.

  17. Generating Constant Weight Binary Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, D.G.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of bounds for A(n, d, w), the maximum possible number of binary vectors of length n, weight w, and pairwise Hamming distance no less than d, is a classic problem in coding theory. Such sets of vectors have many applications. A description is given of how the problem can be used in a first-year undergraduate computational…

  18. Chemical Evolution of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.

    2013-02-01

    Energy generation by nuclear fusion is the fundamental process that prevents stars from collapsing under their own gravity. Fusion in the core of a star converts hydrogen to heavier elements from helium to uranium. The signature of this nucleosynthesis is often visible in a single star only for a very short time, for example while the star is a red giant or, in massive stars, when it explodes. Contrarily, in a binary system nuclear-processed matter can captured by a secondary star which remains chemically polluted long after its more massive companion star has evolved and died. By probing old, low-mass stars we gain vital insight into the complex nucleosynthesis that occurred when our Galaxy was much younger than it is today. Stellar evolution itself is also affected by the presence of a companion star. Thermonuclear novae and type Ia supernovae result from mass transfer in binary stars, but big questions still surround the nature of their progenitors. Stars may even merge and one of the challenges for the future of stellar astrophysics is to quantitatively understand what happens in such extreme systems. Binary stars offer unique insights into stellar, galactic and extragalactic astrophysics through their plethora of exciting phenomena. Understanding the chemical evolution of binary stars is thus of high priority in modern astrophysics.

  19. Orbits of Six Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olevic, D.; Cvetkovic, Z.

    2005-04-01

    Preliminary orbital elements of binary systems WDS 03494-1956 = RST 2324, WDS 03513+2621 = A 1830, WDS 04093-2025 = RST 2333, WDS 06485-1226 = A 2935, WDS 07013-0906 = A 671, and WDS 18323-1439 = CHR 73 are presented. For all systems but WDS 18323-1439 the individual masses and dynamical parallaxes are derived.

  20. A Galactic Binary Detection Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2011-01-01

    The Galaxy is suspected to contain hundreds of millions of binary white dwarf systems, a large fraction of which will have sufficiently small orbital period to emit gravitational radiation in band for space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA's main science goal is the detection of cosmological events (supermassive black hole mergers, etc.) however the gravitational signal from the galaxy will be the dominant contribution to the data - including instrumental noise over approximately two decades in frequency. The catalogue of detectable binary systems will serve as an unparalleled means of studying the Galaxy. Furthermore, to maximize the scientific return from the mission, the data must be "cleansed" of the galactic foreground. We will present an algorithm that can accurately resolve and subtract 2:: 10000 of these sources from simulated data supplied by the Mock LISA Data Challenge Task Force. Using the time evolution of the gravitational wave frequency, we will reconstruct the position of the recovered binaries and show how LISA will sample the entire compact binary population in the Galaxy.

  1. A general catalogue of close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbink, Ronald F.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive catalog of close binary stars to be used for the study of the fundamental properties of stars and for the exploration and elucidation of evolutionary processes in those systems, is presented. Spectroscopic binaries, variable stars, suspected variable stars, and interacting binaries are included in the scope of the catalog.

  2. New prospects for observing and cataloguing exoplanets in well-detached binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, R.; Funk, B.; Zechner, R.; Bazsó, Á.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is devoted to study the circumstances favourable to detect circumstellar and circumbinary planets in well detached binary-star-systems using eclipse timing variations (ETVs). We investigated the dynamics of well detached binary star systems with a star separation from 0.5 to 3~AU, to determine the probability of the detection of such variations with ground based telescopes and space telescopes (like former missions CoRoT and Kepler and future space missions Plato, Tess and Cheops). For the chosen star separations both dynamical configurations (circumstellar and circumbinary) may be observable. We performed numerical simulations by using the full three-body problem as dynamical model. The dynamical stability and the ETVs are investigated by computing ETV maps for different masses of the secondary star and the exoplanet (Earth, Neptune and Jupiter size). In addition we changed the planet's and binary's eccentricities. We conclude that many amplitudes of ETVs are large enough to detect exoplanets in binary star systems. As an application, we prepared statistics of the catalogue of exoplanets in binary star systems which we introduce in this article and compared the statistics with our parameter-space which we used for our calculations. In addition to these statistics of the catalogue we enlarged them by the investigation of well detached binary star systems from several catalogues and discussed the possibility of further candidates.

  3. New prospects for observing and cataloguing exoplanets in well-detached binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, R.; Funk, B.; Zechner, R.; Bazsó, Á.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is devoted to study the circumstances favourable to detect circumstellar and circumbinary planets in well-detached binary-star systems using eclipse timing variations (ETVs). We investigated the dynamics of well-detached binary star systems with a star separation from 0.5 to 3 au, to determine the probability of the detection of such variations with ground-based telescopes and space telescopes (like former missions CoRoT and Kepler and future space missions Plato, Tess and Cheops). For the chosen star separations both dynamical configurations (circumstellar and circumbinary) may be observable. We performed numerical simulations by using the full three-body problem as dynamical model. The dynamical stability and the ETVs are investigated by computing ETV maps for different masses of the secondary star and the exoplanet (Earth, Neptune and Jupiter size). In addition we changed the planet's and binary's eccentricities. We conclude that many amplitudes of ETVs are large enough to detect exoplanets in binary-star systems. As an application, we prepared statistics of the catalogue of exoplanets in binary star systems which we introduce in this article and compared the statistics with our parameter-space which we used for our calculations. In addition to these statistics of the catalogue we enlarged them by the investigation of well-detached binary star systems from several catalogues and discussed the possibility of further candidates.

  4. Gravity darkening in binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Lara, F.; Rieutord, M.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Interpretation of light curves of many types of binary stars requires the inclusion of the (cor)relation between surface brightness and local effective gravity. Until recently, this correlation has always been modeled by a power law relating the flux or the effective temperature and the effective gravity, namely Teff ∝ geffβ . Aims: We look for a simple model that can describe the variations of the flux at the surface of stars belonging to a binary system. Methods: This model assumes that the energy flux is a divergence-free vector anti-parallel to the effective gravity. The effective gravity is computed from the Roche model. Results: After explaining in a simple manner the old result of Lucy (1967, Z. Astrophys., 65, 89), which says that β ~ 0.08 for solar type stars, we first argue that one-dimensional models should no longer be used to evaluate gravity darkening laws. We compute the correlation between log Teff and log geff using a new approach that is valid for synchronous, weakly magnetized, weakly irradiated binaries. We show that this correlation is approximately linear, validating the use of a power law relation between effective temperature and effective gravity as a first approximation. We further show that the exponent β of this power law is a slowly varying function, which we tabulate, of the mass ratio of the binary star and the Roche lobe filling factor of the stars of the system. The exponent β remains mostly in the interval [0.20,0.25] if extreme mass ratios are eliminated. Conclusions: For binary stars that are synchronous, weakly magnetized and weakly irradiated, the gravity darkening exponent is well constrained and may be removed from the free parameters of the models.

  5. SPECTRA OF TYPE II CEPHEID CANDIDATES AND RELATED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E. G.; Rogalla, Danielle; Thacker-Lynn, Lauren E-mail: drogall1@bigred.unl.edu

    2011-02-15

    We present low-resolution spectra for variable stars in the Cepheid period range from the ROTSE-I Demonstration Project and the All Sky Automated Survey, some of which were previously identified as type II Cepheid candidates. We have derived effective temperatures, gravities, and metallicities from the spectra. Based on this, three types of variables were identified: Cepheid strip stars, cool stars that lie along the red subgiant and giant branch, and cool main-sequence stars. Many fewer type II Cepheids were found than expected and most have amplitudes less than 0.4 mag. The cool variables include many likely binaries as well as intrinsic variables. Variation among the main-sequence stars is likely to be mostly due to binarity or stellar activity.

  6. PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. III. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 16 MONTHS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; and others

    2013-02-15

    New transiting planet candidates are identified in 16 months (2009 May-2010 September) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly 5000 periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1108 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multi-quarter photo-center offsets derived from difference image analysis that identifies likely background eclipsing binaries. Twenty-two months of photometry are used for the purpose of characterizing each of the candidates. Ephemerides (transit epoch, T {sub 0}, and orbital period, P) are tabulated as well as the products of light curve modeling: reduced radius (R {sub P}/R {sub *}), reduced semimajor axis (d/R {sub *}), and impact parameter (b). The largest fractional increases are seen for the smallest planet candidates (201% for candidates smaller than 2 R {sub Circled-Plus} compared to 53% for candidates larger than 2 R {sub Circled-Plus }) and those at longer orbital periods (124% for candidates outside of 50 day orbits versus 86% for candidates inside of 50 day orbits). The gains are larger than expected from increasing the observing window from 13 months (Quarters 1-5) to 16 months (Quarters 1-6) even in regions of parameter space where one would have expected the previous catalogs to be complete. Analyses of planet frequencies based on previous catalogs will be affected by such incompleteness. The fraction of all planet candidate host stars with multiple candidates has grown from 17% to 20%, and the paucity of short-period giant planets in multiple systems is still evident. The progression toward smaller planets at longer orbital periods with each new catalog release suggests that Earth-size planets in the habitable zone are forthcoming if, indeed, such planets are abundant.

  7. The most plausible explanation of the cyclic period changes in close binaries: the case of the RS CVn-type binary WW Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.-P.; Qian, S.-B.

    2010-07-01

    Cyclic period changes are a fairly common phenomenon in close binary systems and are usually explained as being caused either by the magnetic activity of one or both components or by the light travel time effect (LTTE) of a third body. We searched the orbital period changes in 182 EA-type (including the 101 Algol systems used by Hall), 43 EB-type and 53 EW-type binaries with known mass ratio and spectral type of the secondary component. We reproduced and improved the diagram in Hall according to the new collected data. Our plots do not support the conclusion derived by Hall that cyclic period changes are restricted to binaries having a secondary component with spectral type later than F5. The presence of period changes among systems with a secondary component of early type indicates that magnetic activity is one, but not the only, cause of the period variation. It is discovered that cyclic period changes, probably resulting from the presence of a third body, are more frequent in EW-type binaries among close systems. Therefore, the most plausible explanation of the cyclic period changes is the LTTE through the presence of a third body. Using the century-long historical record of the times of light minimum, we analysed the cyclic period change in the Algol binary WW Dra. It is found that the orbital period of the binary shows a ~112.2-yr cyclic variation with an amplitude of ~0.1977d. The cyclic oscillation can be attributed to the LTTE by means of a third body with a mass no less than 6.43Msolar. However, no spectral lines of the third body were discovered, indicating that it may be a candidate black hole. The third body is orbiting the binary at a distance closer than 14.4 au and may play an important role in the evolution of this system.

  8. Environmentally friendly lubricating oil candidate.

    PubMed

    Ozgülsün, A; Karaosmanoğlu, F

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic lubricating oils based on renewable sources, excluding petroleum, have a great importance among all of the lubricating oil alternatives that are included in the research field about clean and environmentally friendly lubricating oil technologies. One of the environmentally friendly lubricating oils is a vegetable oil-based product. In this study, the esterification product of oleic acid with a fraction of molasses fusel oil as a lubricating oil candidate was determined according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard tests. The results indicate that the ester product can be used as an environmental friendly lubricating oil or lubricating oil additive. PMID:10399269

  9. Wasson's alternative candidates for soma.

    PubMed

    Riedlinger, T J

    1993-01-01

    Citing recently published challenges to R. Gordon Wasson's identification of Vedic soma as the psychoactive mushroom Amanita muscaria (fly-agaric), this article reviews unpublished letters by Wasson in which he considered and rejected other psychoactive plants as candidates, including the mint Lagochilus inebrians, Convolvulaceae (morning glory) seeds, the fungal parasite Claviceps purpurea (ergot), and especially the psilocybin mushroom Stropharia cubensis, known also as Psilocybe cubensis. Apart from their historical interest, these letters--from the Tina and Gordon Wasson Ethnomycological Collection at the Harvard Botanical Museum--demonstrate that Wasson remained open to refinements of his theory. PMID:8377083

  10. Optical BVRI photometry of common proper motion F/G/K+M wide separation binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Williams, Patrick; Chavez, Joy; Lépine, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    We present optical (BVRI) photometric measurements of a sample of 76 common proper motion wide separation main-sequence binary pairs. The pairs are composed of a F-, G-, or K-type primary star and an M-type secondary. The sample is selected from the revised NLTT catalog and the LSPM catalog. The photometry is generally precise to 0.03 mag in all bands. We separate our sample into two groups, dwarf candidates and subdwarf candidates, using the reduced proper motion diagram constructed with our improved photometry. The M subdwarf candidates in general have larger V – R colors than the M dwarf candidates at a given V – I color. This is consistent with an average metallicity difference between the two groups, as predicted by the PHOENIX/BT-Settl models. The improved photometry will be used as input into a technique to determine the metallicities of the M-type stars.

  11. Low Mass Eclipsing Binaries in Sparsely Sampled Time-Domain Surveys: SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Waqas; Richmond, M. W.; Ford, H. C.; Petro, L. D.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of a small sample of eclipsing binary systems composed exclusively of low mass stars (< 0.8 Msun, spectral type K and M) indicate that theoretical models of stellar structure and evolution (e.g. Baraffe et al. 1998) systematically under-predict the observed radii by 10%. Tidal effects and rotation-induced magnetic fields in close binaries may be responsible for this disagreement, but the small observed sample of these objects presents difficulties in testing this hypothesis. Large scale time-domain surveys are an effective method for discovery and characterization of these intrinsically faint eclipsing binaries. Here, we present results of a search for periodic variables in multi-band sparsely sampled timeseries data from SDSS Stripe 82, including the discovery of 200 eclipsing binary candidates. These include 51 K and 79 M-dwarf eclipsing binaries as classified by their SDSS colors. We discuss the general properties of this sample, including the period, spectral type, and binary type distributions. For 30 of these objects that have sufficient phase coverage and secure orbital period determinations, we model the SDSS riz-band light-curves using the Wilson-Devinney code (Wilson & Devinney 1971), and determine relative radii, temperatures, luminosities, and orbital inclinations. Finally, we identify 5 M-dwarf eclipsing binaries in this sample with median SDSS r < 18.0 mag that are particularly suitable for photometric and spectroscopic followup observations. These observations will result in precise measurements of the binary components' masses and radii, placing better constraints on the observed mass-radius relation of the lower main-sequence, and the extent of its disagreement with predictions from theoretical models. Based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (http://www.sdss.org). This research was supported in part by NASA grant NAG5-7697.

  12. Constraining Sub-parsec Binary Supermassive Black Holes in Quasars with Multi-epoch Spectroscopy. I. The General Quasar Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

    2013-09-01

    We perform a systematic search for sub-parsec binary supermassive black holes (BHs) in normal broad-line quasars at z < 0.8, using multi-epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy of the broad Hβ line. Our working model is that (1) one and only one of the two BHs in the binary is active; (2) the active BH dynamically dominates its own broad-line region (BLR) in the binary system, so that the mean velocity of the BLR reflects the mean velocity of its host BH; (3) the inactive companion BH is orbiting at a distance of a few R BLR, where R BLR ~ 0.01-0.1 pc is the BLR size. We search for the expected line-of-sight acceleration of the broad-line velocity from binary orbital motion by cross-correlating SDSS spectra from two epochs separated by up to several years in the quasar rest frame. Out of ~700 pairs of spectra for which we have good measurements of the velocity shift between two epochs (1σ error ~40 km s-1), we detect 28 systems with significant velocity shifts in broad Hβ, among which 7 are the best candidates for the hypothesized binaries, 4 are most likely due to broad-line variability in single BHs, and the rest are ambiguous. Continued spectroscopic observations of these candidates will easily strengthen or disprove these claims. We use the distribution of the observed accelerations (mostly non-detections) to place constraints on the abundance of such binary systems among the general quasar population. Excess variance in the velocity shift is inferred for observations separated by longer than 0.4 yr (quasar rest frame). Attributing all the excess to binary motion would imply that most of the quasars in this sample must be in binaries, that the inactive BH must be on average more massive than the active one, and that the binary separation is at most a few times the size of the BLR. However, if this excess variance is partly or largely due to long-term broad-line variability, the requirement of a large population of close binaries is much weakened

  13. X-ray binaries in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray and optical studies of compact binaries and globular clusters are reviewed. Topics covered include, the formation of compact binaries by three-body interactions and by tidal capture, studies of the 11 minute binary in NGC 6624 and the 8.5 hour binary in M 15 (AC211), and an evolutionary model for compact binary formation. Optical searches for X-ray binaries in globular clusters are examined including CCD surveys and studies of NGC 6712. In addition, globular clusters with central cusps in their surface brightness profiles, questions concerning the blue color of binaries, diffuse line emission from CVs, and the possibility that X-ray burst sources in the galactic bulge were formed by tidal capture in globular clusters which have since been disrupted are discussed.

  14. A Wide Angle Search for Hot Jupiters and Pre-Main Sequence Binaries in Young Stellar Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Ryan J.; Macri, Lucas M.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Depoy, Darren L.; Colazo, Carlos; Guzzo, Pablo; Lambas, Diego G.; Quiñones, Ceci; Stringer, Katelyn; Tapia, Luis; Wisdom, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a significant advancement in the detection, classification and understanding of exoplanets and binary star systems. The vast majority of these systems consist of stars on the main sequence or on the giant branch, leading to a dearth of knowledge of properties at early times (<50 Myr). Only one transiting planet candidate and a dozen eclipsing binaries are known among pre-main sequence objects, yet these are the systems that can provide the best constraints on stellar and planetary formation models. We have recently completed a photometric survey of 3 young (<50 Myr), nearby (D<150 pc) moving groups with a small-aperture instrument, nicknamed ``AggieCam''. We detected 7 candidate Hot Jupiters and over 200 likely pre-main sequence binaries, which are now being followed up photometrically and spectroscopically.

  15. Kepler Discovers Earth-size Planet Candidates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered its first Earth-size planet candidates and its first candidates in the habitable zone, a region where liquid water could exist on a planet's surface. Five of th...

  16. Four Republican Presidential Candidates Debate Educational Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equity and Excellence, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Provides the transcript of a September 1987 debate on educational issues between Republican presidential candidates Jack Kemp and Pierre du Pont. Interspersed throughout the transcript are written responses to questions submitted to additional candidates Robert Dole and George Bush. (BJV)

  17. On the Evolution, Numbers, and Characteristics of Close-Binary Supersoft Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, R.; Nelson, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to perform detailed evolutionary calculations is essential to the development of a well-defined and testable binary model. Unfortunately, traditional evolutionary calculations cannot be used to follow a significant fraction of possible close-binary supersoft sources (CBSS's). It is therefore important to examine the in-put physics carefully, to be sure that all relevant and potentially important physical processes are included. In this paper we continue a line of research begun last year, and explore the role that winds are expected to play in the evolution of CBSS's. We find that at least a subset of the systems that seemed to be candidates for common envelope evolution may survive, if radiation emitted by the white dwarf drives winds from the system. We study the effects of winds on the binary evolution of CBSS's, and compute the number and characteristics of CBSS's expected to be presently active in galaxies such as our own or M31.

  18. VLBI Observations of the Shortest Orbital Period Black Hole X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paragi, Zsolt; Belloni, Tomaso M.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Miller-Jones, James

    The X-ray transient MAXI J1659-152 was discovered by Swift/BAT and it was initially identified as a GRB. Soon its Galactic origin and binary nature were established. There exists a wealth of multi-wavelength monitoring data for this source, providing a great coverage of the full X-ray transition in this candidate black hole binary system. We obtained two epochs of EVN/e-VLBI and four epochs of VLBA data of MAXI J1659-152 which show evidence for some extended emission in the early phases but -against expectations- no major collimated ejecta during the accretion disk state transition. This might be related to the fact that, with a red dwarf donor star, MAXI J1659-152 is the shortest orbital period black hole X-ray binary system.

  19. Neutrino-driven explosions of ultra-stripped Type Ic supernovae generating binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Yoshida, Takashi; Shibata, Masaru; Umeda, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koh

    2015-12-01

    We study explosion characteristics of ultra-stripped supernovae (SNe), which are candidates of SNe generating binary neutron stars (NSs). As a first step, we perform stellar evolutionary simulations of bare carbon-oxygen cores of mass from 1.45 to 2.0 M⊙ until the iron cores become unstable and start collapsing. We then perform axisymmetric hydrodynamics simulations with spectral neutrino transport using these stellar evolution outcomes as initial conditions. All models exhibit successful explosions driven by neutrino heating. The diagnostic explosion energy, ejecta mass, Ni mass, and NS mass are typically ˜1050 erg, ˜0.1 M⊙, ˜0.01 M⊙, and ≈1.3 M⊙, which are compatible with observations of rapidly evolving and luminous transient such as SN 2005ek. We also find that the ultra-stripped SN is a candidate for producing the secondary low-mass NS in the observed compact binary NSs like PSR J0737-3039.

  20. Close supermassive binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. Martin

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that when the peaks of the broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are significantly blueshifted or redshifted from the systemic velocity of the host galaxy, this could be a consequence of orbital motion of a supermassive blackhole binary (SMB). The AGN J1536+0441 (=SDSS J153636.22+044127.0) has recently been proposed as an example of this phenomenon. It is proposed here instead that 1536+044 is an example of line emission from a disc. If this is correct, the lack of clear optical spectral evidence for close SMBs is significant and argues either that the merging of close SMBs is much faster than has generally been hitherto thought, or if the approach is slow, that when the separation of the binary is comparable to the size of the torus and broad-line region, the feeding of the black holes is disrupted.

  1. Binary nucleation at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahoransky, R. A.; Peters, F.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous condensation of binary vapors in the supersaturated state is studied in ethanol/n-propanol and water/ethanol via their unsteady expansion in a shock tube at temperatures below 273 K. Ethanol/n-propanol forms a nearly ideal solution, whereas water/ethanol is an example of a strongly nonideal mixture. Vapor mixtures of various compositions are diluted in dry air at small mole fractions and expanded in the driver section from room temperature. The onset of homogeneous condensation is detected optically and the corresponding thermodynamic state is evaluated. The experimental results are compared with the binary nucleation theory, and the particular problems of theoretical evaluation at low temperatures are discussed.

  2. Binary Stars in SBS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erastova, L. K.

    2016-06-01

    Thirty spectroscopic binary stars were found in the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS). They show composite spectra - WD(DA)+dM or dC (for example Liebert et al. 1994). They may have red color, if the radiation of the red star dominates, and blue one, if the blue star is brighter and have peculiar spectrum in our survey plate. We obtained slit spectra for most of such objects. But we often see the spectrum of one component, because our slit spectra did not cover all optical range. We examine by eye the slit spectra of all SBS stellar objects (˜700) in SDSS DR7, DR8 or DR9 independent on our observations. We confirmed or discovered the duplicity of 30 stars. Usually they are spectroscopic binaries, where one component is WD (DA) and the second one is a red star with or without emission. There also are other components combinations. Sometimes there are emission lines, probably, indicating variable ones.

  3. Orbits of six visual binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couteau, P.

    1987-12-01

    Recent interferometric and visual observations have been used to compile orbital elements for the binaries COU 79, Phi 342, ADS 5726, COU 292, ADS 15487, and COU 542. The problematic binaries COU 79 and Phi 342 are discussed in detail. The results for COU 79 indicate a dynamic parallax of 0.0182 arcsec and absolute visual magnitudes of 2.5 and 2.8, values which are not consistent with the previously-determined spectral type of F6V. A parallax of 0.01420 arcsec is found for Phi 342, and the visual magnitudes of 2.74 and 3.13 are indicative of superluminous stars outside of the main sequence.

  4. Circularization time of binary galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, S.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    1994-11-01

    We report the results of numerical experiments performed to study the orbital circularization time of binary galaxies. We find that the time scale is quite long (larger than the Hubble time), confirming earlier calculations. The results depend on the initial conditions. From our simulations we obtained a fitting formula for the circularization time as a function of the initial orbital parameters like the pericentric distance, mass ratio, and eccentricity.

  5. Cool Star Binaries with ALEXIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    We proposed to search for high-temperature, flare-produced Fe XXIII line emission from active cool star binary systems using the ALEXIS all-sky survey. Previous X-ray transient searches with ARIEL V and HEAO-1, and subsequent shorter duration monitoring with the GINGA and EXOSAT satellites demonstrated that active binaries can produce large (EM approximately equals 10(exp 55-56/cu cm) X-ray flares lasting several hours or longer. Hot plasma from these flares at temperatures of 10(exp 7)K or more should produce Fe XXIII line emission at lambda = 132.8 A, very near the peak response of ALEXIS telescopes 1A and 2A. Our primary goals were to estimate flare frequency for the largest flares in the active binary systems, and, if the data permitted, to derive a distribution of flare energy vs. frequency for the sample as a whole. After a long delay due to the initial problems with the ALEXIS attitude control, the heroic efforts on the part of the ALEXIS satellite team enabled us to carry out this survey. However, the combination of the higher than expected and variable background in the ALEXIS detectors, and the lower throughput of the ALEXIS telescopes resulted in no convincing detections of large flares from the active binary systems. In addition, vignetting-corrected effective exposure times from the ALEXIS aspect solution were not available prior to the end of this contract; therefore, we were unable to convert upper limits measured in ALEXIS counts to the equivalent L(sub EUV).

  6. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2) Broadcasters... periodical publications may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f... candidate debates in accordance with 11 CFR part 100, subparts B and C and part 100, subparts D and E....

  7. Teacher Candidate Dispositions: Perspectives of Professional Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Donna; Bunn, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a programmatic effort to examine dispositions perceptions of teacher candidates entering the profession. Study participants included 114 master's level teaching candidates in their first semester of a nontraditional teacher education program. Teacher candidates scored themselves on a department disposition rubric designed to…

  8. 11 CFR 9002.2 - Candidate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candidate. 9002.2 Section 9002.2 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: GENERAL ELECTION FINANCING DEFINITIONS § 9002.2 Candidate. (a) For the purposes of this subchapter, candidate means with respect to any presidential election, an individual who—...

  9. The end of the MACHO era, revisited: New limits on MACHO masses from halo wide binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Allen, Christine

    2014-08-01

    In order to determine an upper bound for the mass of the massive compact halo objects (MACHOs), we use the halo binaries contained in a recent catalog by Allen and Monroy-Rodríguez. To dynamically model their interactions with massive perturbers, a Monte Carlo simulation is conducted, using an impulsive approximation method and assuming a galactic halo constituted by massive particles of a characteristic mass. The results of such simulations are compared with several subsamples of our improved catalog of candidate halo wide binaries. In accordance with Quinn et al., we also find our results to be very sensitive to the widest binaries. However, our larger sample, together with the fact that we can obtain galactic orbits for 150 of our systems, allows a more reliable estimate of the maximum MACHO mass than that obtained previously. If we employ the entire sample of 211 candidate halo stars we, obtain an upper limit of 112 M{sub ☉}. However, using the 150 binaries in our catalog with computed galactic orbits, we are able to refine our fitting criteria. Thus, for the 100 most halo-like binaries we obtain a maximum MACHO mass of 21-68 M{sub ☉}. Furthermore, we can estimate the dynamical effects of the galactic disk using binary samples that spend progressively shorter times within the disk. By extrapolating the limits obtained for our most reliable—albeit smallest—sample, we find that as the time spent within the disk tends to zero, the upper bound of the MACHO mass tends to less than 5 M{sub ☉}. The non-uniform density of the halo has also been taken into account, but the limit obtained, less than 5 M{sub ☉}, does not differ much from the previous one. Together with microlensing studies that provide lower limits on the MACHO mass, our results essentially exclude the existence of such objects in the galactic halo.

  10. Dancing in the Dark: New Brown Dwarf Binaries from Kernel Phase Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin; Martinache, Frantz; Tuthill, Peter

    2013-04-01

    This paper revisits a sample of ultracool dwarfs in the solar neighborhood previously observed with the Hubble Space Telescope's NICMOS NIC1 instrument. We have applied a novel high angular resolution data analysis technique based on the extraction and fitting of kernel phases to archival data. This was found to deliver a dramatic improvement over earlier analysis methods, permitting a search for companions down to projected separations of ~1 AU on NIC1 snapshot images. We reveal five new close binary candidates and present revised astrometry on previously known binaries, all of which were recovered with the technique. The new candidate binaries have sufficiently close separation to determine dynamical masses in a short-term observing campaign. We also present four marginal detections of objects which may be very close binaries or high-contrast companions. Including only confident detections within 19 pc, we report a binary fraction of at least \\epsilon _b = 17.2^{+5.7}_{-3.7} %. The results reported here provide new insights into the population of nearby ultracool binaries, while also offering an incisive case study of the benefits conferred by the kernel phase approach in the recovery of companions within a few resolution elements of the point-spread function core. Based on observations performed with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble observations are associated with proposal ID 10143 and 10879 and were obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  11. Implications of Profile Variability in Searches for Supermassive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Alison; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Brown, Stephanie Meghan; Eracleous, Michael; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Boroson, Todd A.; Halpern, Jules P.

    2016-01-01

    Modern galaxy evolution scenarios suggest that supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) are an inevitable result of merging galaxies that host black holes in their centers. Though candidates of wide-separation dual active galactic nuclei have been detected, there is no reliable evidence for the expected close, bound binaries at separations of one parsec or less. We are searching for close SBHBs among z<0.7 SDSS quasars with offset broad emission lines. Specifically, we test the idea that, if one of the black holes is active, the orbital motion within the binary will cause its broad emission lines to exhibit periodic radial velocity shifts. Among the most significant caveats to this approach is that the variability of the broad Hβ profile may mimic radial velocity changes. Cases where the flux increases in one side of the line profile and decreases in the other are of particular concern. In order to test the extent of this problem, we introduce simulated profile variability into the observed spectra of the binary candidates and then make radial velocity measurements on the Hβ lines. We will present the results of this simulation to assess how often we will measure false radial velocity shifts as a result of changes in the shape of the broad Hβ profile.

  12. Optical spectroscopy of candidate Alpha Persei white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casewell, S. L.; Dobbie, P. D.; Geier, S.; Lodieu, N.; Hambly, N. C.

    2015-08-01

    As part of an investigation into the high-mass end of the initial mass-final mass relation we performed a search for new white dwarf members of the nearby (172.4 pc), young (80-90 Myr) α Persei open star cluster. The photometric and astrometric search using the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey and SuperCOSMOS sky surveys discovered 14 new white dwarf candidates. We have obtained medium resolution optical spectra of the brightest 11 candidates using the William Herschel Telescope and confirmed that while 7 are DA white dwarfs, 3 are DB white dwarfs and 1 is an sdOB star, only three have cooling ages within the cluster age, and from their position on the initial mass-final mass relation, it is likely none are cluster members. This result is disappointing, as recent work on the cluster mass function suggests that there should be at least one white dwarf member, even at this young age. It may be that any white dwarf members of α Per are hidden within binary systems, as is the case in the Hyades cluster, however the lack of high-mass stars within the cluster also makes this seem unlikely. One alternative is that a significant level of detection incompleteness in the legacy optical image survey data at this Galactic latitude has caused some white dwarf members to be overlooked. If this is the case, Gaia will find them.

  13. Speckle Imaging of Kepler Exo-planet Transit Candidate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott; Sherry, William

    2009-08-01

    The NASA Kepler mission was successfully launched on 6 March 2009 and will begin science operations near 1 May. At the present time, commissioning tests are being performed and all spacecraft and science instruments are nominal. Kepler's main science focus is to discover Earth-like exo-planets via photometric transit detection. ``Hot Jupiters" will be found by the hundreds (using current ground-based statistics) but Earth-sized planets (up to 2.5 Earth radii) will be more difficult, yet are the holy grail of the mission. To take the list of candidate transiting planets found by Kepler and move them to probable or certain exo-planet detections, a decision tree of false positive elimination will occur. While earth-sized exo-planets can not currently be confirmed from the ground, many of the false positive eliminations steps can be performed. This proposal aims to obtain high resolution speckle imaging to 1) finish the characterization of ~500 comparison sample stars in the Kepler field of view prior to any transit information as a sample to place planet host stars in context with and to 2) observe Kepler exo-planet transit candidates in order to eliminate the largest false positive contributor in any transit search - background eclipsing binary stars or faint companion stars.

  14. Pulsed Accretion onto Eccentric and Circular Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2016-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of circumbinary accretion onto eccentric and circular binaries using the moving-mesh code AREPO. This is the first set of simulations to tackle the problem of binary accretion using a finite-volume scheme on a freely moving mesh, which allows for accurate measurements of accretion onto individual stars for arbitrary binary eccentricity. While accretion onto a circular binary shows bursts with period of ∼ 5 times the binary period P b, accretion onto an eccentric binary is predominantly modulated at the period ∼ 1{P}{{b}}. For an equal-mass circular binary, the accretion rates onto individual stars are quite similar to each other, following the same variable pattern in time. By contrast, for eccentric binaries, one of the stars can accrete at a rate 10–20 times larger than its companion. This “symmetry breaking” between the stars, however, alternates over timescales of order 200P b and can be attributed to a slowly precessing, eccentric circumbinary disk. Over longer timescales, the net accretion rates onto individual stars are the same, reaching a quasi-steady state with the circumbinary disk. These results have important implications for the accretion behavior of binary T Tauri stars and supermassive binary black holes.

  15. Pulsed Accretion onto Eccentric and Circular Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2016-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of circumbinary accretion onto eccentric and circular binaries using the moving-mesh code AREPO. This is the first set of simulations to tackle the problem of binary accretion using a finite-volume scheme on a freely moving mesh, which allows for accurate measurements of accretion onto individual stars for arbitrary binary eccentricity. While accretion onto a circular binary shows bursts with period of ˜ 5 times the binary period P b, accretion onto an eccentric binary is predominantly modulated at the period ˜ 1{P}{{b}}. For an equal-mass circular binary, the accretion rates onto individual stars are quite similar to each other, following the same variable pattern in time. By contrast, for eccentric binaries, one of the stars can accrete at a rate 10–20 times larger than its companion. This “symmetry breaking” between the stars, however, alternates over timescales of order 200P b and can be attributed to a slowly precessing, eccentric circumbinary disk. Over longer timescales, the net accretion rates onto individual stars are the same, reaching a quasi-steady state with the circumbinary disk. These results have important implications for the accretion behavior of binary T Tauri stars and supermassive binary black holes.

  16. Galaxy Rotation and Rapid Supermassive Binary Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Khan, Fazeel Mahmood

    2015-09-01

    Galaxy mergers usher the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in each galaxy to the center of the potential, where they form an SMBH binary. The binary orbit shrinks by ejecting stars via three-body scattering, but ample work has shown that in spherical galaxy models, the binary separation stalls after ejecting all the stars in its loss cone—this is the well-known final parsec problem. However, it has been shown that SMBH binaries in non-spherical galactic nuclei harden at a nearly constant rate until reaching the gravitational wave regime. Here we use a suite of direct N-body simulations to follow SMBH binary evolution in both corotating and counterrotating flattened galaxy models. For N > 500 K, we find that the evolution of the SMBH binary is convergent and is independent of the particle number. Rotation in general increases the hardening rate of SMBH binaries even more effectively than galaxy geometry alone. SMBH binary hardening rates are similar for co- and counterrotating galaxies. In the corotating case, the center of mass of the SMBH binary settles into an orbit that is in corotation resonance with the background rotating model, and the coalescence time is roughly a few 100 Myr faster than a non-rotating flattened model. We find that counterrotation drives SMBHs to coalesce on a nearly radial orbit promptly after forming a hard binary. We discuss the implications for gravitational wave astronomy, hypervelocity star production, and the effect on the structure of the host galaxy.

  17. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler, III: Analysis of the First 16 Months of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Barclay, Thomas; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Brown, Timothy M.; Dupree, Andrea K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /UC, Santa Cruz

    2012-02-01

    New transiting planet candidates are identified in sixteen months (May 2009 - September 2010) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly five thousand periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1091 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2,300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multiquarter photo-center offsets derived from difference image analysis which identifies likely background eclipsing binaries. Twenty-two months of photometry are used for the purpose of characterizing each of the new candidates. Ephemerides (transit epoch, T{sub 0}, and orbital period, P) are tabulated as well as the products of light curve modeling: reduced radius (R{sub P}/R{sub {star}}), reduced semi-major axis (d/R{sub {star}}), and impact parameter (b). The largest fractional increases are seen for the smallest planet candidates (197% for candidates smaller than 2R{sub {circle_plus}} compared to 52% for candidates larger than 2R{sub {circle_plus}}) and those at longer orbital periods (123% for candidates outside of 50 day orbits versus 85% for candidates inside of 50 day orbits). The gains are larger than expected from increasing the observing window from thirteen months (Quarter 1 - Quarter 5) to sixteen months (Quarter 1 - Quarter 6). This demonstrates the benefit of continued development of pipeline analysis software. The fraction of all host stars with multiple candidates has grown from 17% to 20%, and the paucity of short-period giant planets in multiple systems is still evident. The progression toward smaller planets at longer orbital periods with each new catalog release suggests that Earth-size planets in the Habitable Zone are forthcoming if, indeed, such planets are abundant.

  18. Precision X-ray Timing of RX J0806.3+1527 with CHANDRA: Evidence for Gravitational Radiation from an Ultracompact Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2005-01-01

    RX J0806.3+1527 is a candidate double degenerate binary with possibly the shortest known orbital period. The source shows an $\\approx 100 \\%$ X-ray intensity modulation at the putative orbital frequency of 3.11 mHz (321.5 s). If the system is a detached, ultracompact binary gravitational radiation should drive spin-up with a magnitude of $\\dot\

  19. A FIRST COMPARISON OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES IN SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Carter, Joshua A.; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Dunham, Edward W.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Gautier, Thomas N. III

    2011-05-10

    In this Letter, we present an overview of the rich population of systems with multiple candidate transiting planets found in the first four months of Kepler data. The census of multiples includes 115 targets that show two candidate planets, 45 with three, eight with four, and one each with five and six, for a total of 170 systems with 408 candidates. When compared to the 827 systems with only one candidate, the multiples account for 17% of the total number of systems, and one-third of all the planet candidates. We compare the characteristics of candidates found in multiples with those found in singles. False positives due to eclipsing binaries are much less common for the multiples, as expected. Singles and multiples are both dominated by planets smaller than Neptune; 69{sup +2}{sub -3}% for singles and 86{sup +2}{sub -5}% for multiples. This result, that systems with multiple transiting planets are less likely to include a transiting giant planet, suggests that close-in giant planets tend to disrupt the orbital inclinations of small planets in flat systems, or maybe even prevent the formation of such systems in the first place.

  20. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    ADONIS Observes Low-mass Eclipsing System in Orion Summary A series of very detailed images of a binary system of two young stars have been combined into a movie . In merely 3 days, the stars swing around each other. As seen from the earth, they pass in front of each other twice during a full revolution, producing eclipses during which their combined brightness diminishes . A careful analysis of the orbital motions has now made it possible to deduce the masses of the two dancing stars . Both turn out to be about as heavy as our Sun. But while the Sun is about 4500 million years old, these two stars are still in their infancy. They are located some 1500 light-years away in the Orion star-forming region and they probably formed just 10 million years ago . This is the first time such an accurate determination of the stellar masses could be achieved for a young binary system of low-mass stars . The new result provides an important piece of information for our current understanding of how young stars evolve. The observations were obtained by a team of astronomers from Italy and ESO [1] using the ADaptive Optics Near Infrared System (ADONIS) on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. PR Photo 29a/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before primary eclipse PR Photo 29b/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-primary eclipse PR Photo 29c/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after primary eclipse PR Photo 29d/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before secondary eclipse PR Photo 29e/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-secondary eclipse PR Photo 29f/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after secondary eclipse PR Video Clip 06/01 : Video of the RXJ 0529.4+0041 system Binary stars and stellar masses Since some time, astronomers have noted that most stars seem to form in binary or multiple systems. This is quite fortunate, as the study of binary stars is the only way in which it is possible to measure directly one of the most fundamental quantities of a star, its mass. The mass of a

  1. Lutetium +: A better clock candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Kyle; Paez, Eduardo; Haciyev, Elnur; Arifin, Arifin; Cazan, Radu; Barrett, Murray

    2015-05-01

    With the extreme precision now reached by optical clocks it is reasonable to consider redefinition of the frequency standard. In doing so it is important to look beyond the current best-case efforts and have an eye on future possibilities. We will argue that singly ionized Lutetium is a strong candidate for the next generation of optical frequency standards. Lu + has a particularly narrow optical transition in combination with several advantageous properties for managing systematic uncertainties compared to the other atomic species. We summarize these properties and our specific strategies for managing the uncertainties due to external perturbations. Finally, we present the status of our ongoing experiments with trapped Lu +, including the results of precision measurements of its atomic structure.

  2. Photometric monitoring of polar candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdeev, M. M.

    2015-10-01

    We present photometric observations of two polar candidates, IPHAS J052832.69+283837.6 and 1RXS J073346.0+261933. Both objects reveal brightness variations related to the orbital period with an amplitude of about 1m, and about 0ṃ5 on the long-termscale. The object IPHASJ052832.69+283837.6 also exhibits variations of color indices and light curve shape. Long-term observations allowed us to determine the orbital period of the first system and refine the orbital period of the second system, which proved to be {P_{ord}} = 0_.^d055593(4) and {P_{ord}} = 0_.^d139095(2) respectively. The photometric data analysis proves that these systems are polars.

  3. WISE detection of the galactic low-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-06-20

    We report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Among 187 binaries cataloged in Liu et al., we find 13 counterparts and 2 candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, 2 (4U 0614+091 and GX 339–4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and 1 (GRS 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broadband optical and near-infrared data in the literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that 3 (A0620–00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, 4 (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and 3 (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5–0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. We discuss the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution among the known LMXBs, and suggest that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or both.

  4. WISE Detection of the Galactic Low-mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-06-01

    We report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Among 187 binaries cataloged in Liu et al., we find 13 counterparts and 2 candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, 2 (4U 0614+091 and GX 339-4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and 1 (GRS 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broadband optical and near-infrared data in the literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that 3 (A0620-00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, 4 (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and 3 (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5-0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. We discuss the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution among the known LMXBs, and suggest that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or both.

  5. Asteroid candidates for mass determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galád, A.

    2001-04-01

    The first 9511 numbered asteroids are studied in terms of their mutual closest approaches and encounter velocities during the period from November 6, 1967, to September 13, 2023. Several large asteroids (diameter 200 km and above) were (will be) encountered by smaller counterparts within a distance of 0.0200 AU. Thus, they are possible candidates for mass determination by the astrometrical method. Similarly, the search for effective perturbers is extended to even smaller asteroids for the much closer separation distance of 0.0020 AU and below. Only the simplified method for evaluation of observable effects on a perturbed body is used. Asteroid masses alone are not computed here. But a stronger criterion to reveal pairs for this purpose in comparison to some specially devoted papers should compensate for the difference and act as a reliable test. The best candidates for mass determination at present are asteroids (1), (2), (4), (10), (11), (24), (52) and (65). This list may be extended by at least (29) in the next 5 years and by many others in the next two decades. Several other strong perturbers from the last three decades are not included in the list, while there is still only a limited number of (or no) precise and reliable observations of perturbed asteroids before a close encounter. It seems that a perturbation by (10) is at least as effective as that by (2) and could be included in asteroid orbit determination in the future. Except for their bulk density determinations (knowing the size), the masses of perturbers could occasionally be used to improve the precision of the computed orbit for perturbed large-numbered and unnumbered asteroids as well.

  6. Evolution of binary stars in multiple-population globular clusters - II. Compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Sollima, Antonio; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; D'Antona, Franca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a survey of N-body simulations aimed at exploring the evolution of compact binaries in multiple-population globular clusters. We show that as a consequence of the initial differences in the structural properties of the first-generation (FG) and the second-generation (SG) populations and the effects of dynamical processes on binary stars, the SG binary fraction decreases more rapidly than that of the FG population. The difference between the FG and SG binary fraction is qualitatively similar to but quantitatively smaller than that found for wider binaries in our previous investigations. The evolution of the radial variation of the binary fraction is driven by the interplay between binary segregation, ionization and ejection. Ionization and ejection counteract in part the effects of mass segregation but for compact binaries the effects of segregation dominate and the inner binary fraction increases during the cluster evolution. We explore the variation of the difference between the FG and the SG binary fraction with the distance from the cluster centre and its dependence on the binary binding energy and cluster structural parameters. The difference between the binary fraction in the FG and the SG populations found in our simulations is consistent with the results of observational studies finding a smaller binary fraction in the SG population.

  7. Constraining RRc candidates using SDSS colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyai, E.; Plachy, E.; Molnar, L.; Dobos, L.; Szabo, R.

    2016-05-01

    The light variations of first-overtone RR Lyrae stars and contact eclipsing binaries can be difficult to distinguish. The Catalina Periodic Variable Star catalog contains several misclassified objects, despite the classification efforts by Drake et al. (2014). They used metallicity and surface gravity derived from spectroscopic data (from the SDSS database) to rule out binaries. Our aim is to further constrain the catalog using SDSS colours to estimate physical parameters for stars that did not have spectroscopic data.

  8. Massive Binaries: Dynamical and Evolutionary Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of massive binaries offer us key insight about the formation, evolution, and destinies of massive stars. Here I review some advances in observational and theoretical studies of massive binaries. Surveys for binaries using radial velocity, photometric, and high angular resolution methods show that the binary frequency is high for O stars in clusters. Evolutionary models for interacting binaries demonstrate the importance of angular momentum transfer during Roche lobe overflow. The mass gainer may reach critical rotation and stem further accretion, and there are many observed cases that show the consequences of such mass loss and transfer. New hydrodynamical models describe colliding wind physics in eccentric binaries such as η Carinae and WR 140. All these research topics are championed by Tony Moffat, and the current richness of this field is due in large measure to his energetic pursuits.

  9. Constraining the Orbits of the Supermassive Binary Blackhole Pair 0402+379

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Ben; Peck, Alison B.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Zavala, Robert T.; Romani, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are a relatively common occurrence in the Universe. Given that most large galaxies harbor supermassive black holes in their centers, it should follow that two supermassive black holes could be found in the centers of galaxies that have recently undergone a merger event. Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHB) with small separation (referred to as "tight binaries"), however, are quite rare, implying that the mergers happen less often than we think, or that the binary black hole merger happens much more quickly than expected from simulations. We present observations of one of the best candidates for a tight SMBHB, 0402+379, made in 2003, 2005, and 2009 using the VLBA at 3 frequencies, and report on their apparent relative component motions over this time frame. Additionally, these results are compared to earlier observations of 0402+379 which can help establish a long time baseline. This information, although still preliminary, can be used to provide constraints on the orbits of this binary system which in turn may yield insight as to why these binary systems are not significantly more commonly detected in, for example, ULIRGs in the late stages of merger.

  10. A Luminous High-Mass Gamma-ray Binary in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbet, Robin; Cheung, Chi C.; Chomiuk, Laura; Coe, Malcolm J.; Coley, Joel Barry; Dubus, Guillaume; Edwards, Philip; Martin, Pierrick; McBride, Vanessa; Stevens, Jamie; Strader, Jay; Townsend, Lee

    2016-04-01

    We have been undertaking a search for gamma-ray binaries from the detection of periodic modulation in light curves from all sources in the Fermi LAT 3FGL catalog. From this search we identified a 10 day modulation in the direction of the LMC. A localization of the modulation indicates that it arises from a point source identified in a recent Fermi-LAT survey of the LMC. The nature and identification of this source had been uncertain. We find that the counterpart is a previously reported candidate high-mass X-ray binary with an O6III(f) primary located in a supernova remnant. Swift XRT observations of this source show modulation on the 10 day gamma-ray period, but with a different epoch of maximum flux. ATCA radio observations (5.5 and 9 GHz) also reveal variable radio emission from this source. Optical spectroscopy (SAAO and SOAR) show that while there are no large changes in the spectrum, there is apparent radial velocity modulation. At all wavebands this new gamma-ray binary is significantly more luminous than comparable Galactic systems, even though very few of these are known. The discovery of this extragalactic gamma-ray binary may have implications for the overall population of gamma-ray binaries and their evolutionary pathways and lifetimes.

  11. WIYN open cluster study. LX. Spectroscopic binary orbits in NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect

    Milliman, Katelyn E.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Geller, Aaron M.; Meibom, Søren; Platais, Imants

    2014-08-01

    We present the current state of the WOCS radial-velocity (RV) survey for the rich open cluster NGC 6819 (2.5 Gyr) including 93 spectroscopic binary orbits with periods ranging from 1.5 to 8000 days. These results are the product of our ongoing RV survey of NGC 6819 using the Hydra Multi-Object Spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. We also include a detailed analysis of multiple prior sets of optical photometry for NGC 6819. Within a 1° field of view, our stellar sample includes the giant branch, the red clump, and blue straggler candidates, and extends to almost 2 mag below the main sequence (MS) turnoff. For each star observed in our survey we present all RV measurements, the average RV, and velocity variability information. Additionally, we discuss notable binaries from our sample, including eclipsing binaries (WOCS 23009, WOCS 24009, and WOCS 40007), stars noted in Kepler asteroseismology studies (WOCS 4008, WOCS 7009, and WOCS 8007), and potential descendants of past blue stragglers (WOCS 1006 and WOCS 6002). We find the incompleteness-corrected binary fraction for all MS binaries with periods less than 10{sup 4} days to be 22% ± 3% and a tidal circularization period of 6.2{sub −1.1}{sup +1.1} days for NGC 6819.

  12. Outflows Driven by a Potential Proto-Brown Dwarf Binary System IRAS 16253-2429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping; Belloche, Arnaud; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the molecular outflows driven by a potential proto-brown dwarf candidate IRAS 16253-2429 (hereafter IRAS 16253) with CO (2—1) using SMA and IRAM 30m telescope and CO (6—5) using APEX. Our SMA observations suggest that IRAS 16253 is hosting a binary system. The low mass of its envelope suggests that the central objects may eventually accrete only ~0.14 Msun of material (assuming the star formation efficiency is at most 0.3), which makes IRAS 16253 a potential proto brown dwarf binary system since the maximum mass of a brown dwarf is 0.08 Msun; one or two brown dwarfs may form depending on the current mass of the protostars and the future accretion process. The Position-Velocity diagrams of the outflows show sinusoidal structures which may be related to the outflow wiggling from the binary rotation. This allowed us to estimate the orbital period of the binary system. On the basis of Kepler's third law, we suggest that IRAS 16253 is very likely to contain at least one proto brown dwarf if the binary separation is less than ~0.5 arcsec. The large-scale outflows are further mapped with IRAM 30m telescope and APEX Champ+. We found that CO (6—5) traces high-excited gas around the precessing H2 jets and CO (2—1) likely probes the cold swept-up gas or entrained gas with cone-like structure.

  13. BINARY QUASARS AT HIGH REDSHIFT. I. 24 NEW QUASAR PAIRS AT z {approx} 3-4

    SciTech Connect

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Myers, Adam D.; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Glikman, Eilat; Mahabal, Ashish; Fan Xiaohui; Martin, Crystal L.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shankar, Francesco

    2010-08-20

    The clustering of quasars on small scales yields fundamental constraints on models of quasar evolution and the buildup of supermassive black holes. This paper describes the first systematic survey to discover high-redshift binary quasars. Using color-selection and photometric redshift techniques, we searched 8142 deg{sup 2} of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data for binary quasar candidates, and confirmed them with follow-up spectroscopy. Our sample of 27 high-redshift binaries (24 of them new discoveries) at redshifts 2.9 < z < 4.3 with proper transverse separations 10 kpc < R{sub perpendicular} < 650 kpc increases the number of such objects known by an order of magnitude. Eight members of this sample are very close pairs with R{sub perpendicular} < 100 kpc, and of these close systems four are at z>3.5. The completeness and efficiency of our well-defined selection algorithm are quantified using simulated photometry and we find that our sample is {approx}50% complete. Our companion paper uses this knowledge to make the first measurement of the small-scale clustering (R < 1 h {sup -1} Mpc comoving) of high-redshift quasars. High-redshift binaries constitute exponentially rare coincidences of two extreme (M {approx}> 10{sup 9} M {sub sun}) supermassive black holes. At z {approx} 4, there is about one close binary per 10 Gpc{sup 3}, thus these could be the highest sigma peaks, the analogs of superclusters, in the early universe.

  14. P/2013 P5 PANSTARRS --- a rubbing binary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainaut, O.; Snodgrass, C.

    2014-07-01

    P/2013 P5 PANSTARRS (hereafter P5) was discovered [1] on a Main Belt orbit, with a cometary appearance, thereby joining the small but growing collection of objects with such characteristics, loosely called the Main Belt Comets. The dust-lifting process at play on these bodies is not known, although several hypotheses are considered. Furthermore, it is likely that different objects are associated with different processes. For instance, 133P [2,3] and 238P [4] were active for extended periods of time on consecutive passage through perihelion; traditional cometary activity, i.e. caused by the sublimation of volatile ice, is the most likely candidate. In other cases, e.g. (596) Scheila [5,6], P/2012 F5 [7,8] or P/2010 A2 [9-11], the morphology of the dust cloud was compatible with a short, impulsive dust release; they are interpreted as the result of an impact with a smaller body. Finally, in some cases, rotational disruption was proposed as the process causing the activity: a gentle centrifugal lift (proposed by Agarwal et al. [12] for A2) or a complete disruption for P/2013 R3 [13]. Other additional processes were proposed by Jewitt [14], but they do not apply in the case of P5. P5 displayed a dust pattern [15-17] that had not been observed before in other objects. The dust cloud appeared as a series of radial fans and streaks, including some extremely narrow ones. The straight streaks matched synchrones, i.e. loci of dust particles emitted at a given time, and spread radially by the radiation pressure acting differently over a broad range of particle sizes. The narrowness of these lines, especially as observed with HST [15], indicated that the emission episodes were very short. Through a Finson-Probstein [18] analysis, it was shown that the dust release started at least 8 months before the observations, and had a series of very short episodes of dust releases. Because of the location of P5 in the inner Main Belt, sublimation-driven activity is unlikely. Rotational

  15. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Diego Jose; Lai, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 days, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov-Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. We present new results (PNAS 112, 30, p 9264) on the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this "LK+tide" mechanism. From secular and N-body calculations, we show how planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Either outcome can explain these planets' elusiveness to detection. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer specific predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like.

  16. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov–Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. Here we explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like. PMID:26159412

  17. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Diego J; Lai, Dong

    2015-07-28

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov-Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. Here we explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like. PMID:26159412

  18. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN X-RAY BINARIES AND STAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 4449

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, Blagoy; Chandar, Rupali; Prestwich, Andrea H.

    2011-11-10

    We present 23 candidate X-ray binaries with luminosities down to 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}, in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4449, from observations totaling 105 ks taken with the ACIS-S instrument on the Chandra Space Telescope. We determine count rates, luminosities, and colors for each source, and perform spectral fits for sources with sufficient counts. We also compile a new catalog of 129 compact star clusters in NGC 4449 from high-resolution, multi-band optical images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, doubling the number of clusters known in this galaxy. The UBVI, H{alpha} luminosities of each cluster are compared with predictions from stellar evolution models to estimate their ages and masses. We find strong evidence for a population of very young massive, black hole binaries, which comprise nearly 50% of the detected X-ray binaries in NGC 4449. Approximately a third of these remain within their parent star clusters, which formed {tau} {approx}< 6-8 Myr ago, while others have likely been ejected from their parent clusters. We also find evidence for a population of somewhat older X-ray binaries, including both supergiant and Be-binaries, which appear to be associated with somewhat older {tau} Almost-Equal-To 100-400 Myr star clusters, and one X-ray binary in an ancient ({tau} Almost-Equal-To 10 Gyr) globular cluster. Our results suggest that detailed information on star clusters can significantly improve constraints on X-ray binary populations in star-forming galaxies.

  19. Nonergodicity of microfine binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, L. D.; Sidorov, V. E.; Popel', P. S.; Shul'gin, D. B.

    2016-02-01

    The correction to the equation of state that is related to the nonergodicity of diffusion dynamics is discussed for a binary solid solution with a limited solubility. It is asserted that, apart from standard thermodynamic variables (temperature, volume, concentration), this correction should be taken into account in the form of the average local chemical potential fluctuations associated with microheterogeneity in order to plot a phase diagram. It is shown that a low value of this correction lowers the miscibility gap and that this gap splits when this correction increases. This situation is discussed for eutectic systems and Ga-Pb, Fe-Cu, and Cu-Zr alloys.

  20. Tomographic reconstruction of binary fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Stéphane; Leclerc, Hugo; Hild, François

    2012-09-01

    A novel algorithm is proposed for reconstructing binary images from their projection along a set of different orientations. Based on a nonlinear transformation of the projection data, classical back-projection procedures can be used iteratively to converge to the sought image. A multiscale implementation allows for a faster convergence. The algorithm is tested on images up to 1 Mb definition, and an error free reconstruction is achieved with a very limited number of projection data, saving a factor of about 100 on the number of projections required for classical reconstruction algorithms.

  1. Coronal Metallicities of Active Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V.; Drake, J. J.; Pease, D. O.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    1998-09-01

    We analyze EUV and X-ray data on a sample of X-ray active binary stars to determine coronal abundances. EUVE spectrometer data are used to obtain line fluxes, which are then used to determine Differential Emission Measures (DEMs). The continuum emission predicted for these DEMs (constrained at high temperatures by measurements in the X-ray regime where available) are then compared with EUVE/DS counts to derive coronal metallicities. These measurements indicate whether the coronae on these stars are metal deficient (the ``MAD Syndrome'') or subject to the FIP-effect (low First Ionization Potential elements have enhanced abundances relative to the photospheres).

  2. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    ADONIS Observes Low-mass Eclipsing System in Orion Summary A series of very detailed images of a binary system of two young stars have been combined into a movie . In merely 3 days, the stars swing around each other. As seen from the earth, they pass in front of each other twice during a full revolution, producing eclipses during which their combined brightness diminishes . A careful analysis of the orbital motions has now made it possible to deduce the masses of the two dancing stars . Both turn out to be about as heavy as our Sun. But while the Sun is about 4500 million years old, these two stars are still in their infancy. They are located some 1500 light-years away in the Orion star-forming region and they probably formed just 10 million years ago . This is the first time such an accurate determination of the stellar masses could be achieved for a young binary system of low-mass stars . The new result provides an important piece of information for our current understanding of how young stars evolve. The observations were obtained by a team of astronomers from Italy and ESO [1] using the ADaptive Optics Near Infrared System (ADONIS) on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. PR Photo 29a/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before primary eclipse PR Photo 29b/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-primary eclipse PR Photo 29c/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after primary eclipse PR Photo 29d/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before secondary eclipse PR Photo 29e/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-secondary eclipse PR Photo 29f/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after secondary eclipse PR Video Clip 06/01 : Video of the RXJ 0529.4+0041 system Binary stars and stellar masses Since some time, astronomers have noted that most stars seem to form in binary or multiple systems. This is quite fortunate, as the study of binary stars is the only way in which it is possible to measure directly one of the most fundamental quantities of a star, its mass. The mass of a

  3. Constraining the shape distribution and binary fractions of asteroids observed by NEOWISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnett, Sarah M.; Mainzer, Amy; Grav, Tommy; Masiero, Joseph; Bauer, James; Vernazza, Pierre; Ries, Judit Gyorgyey; Kramer, Emily

    2015-11-01

    Knowing the shape distribution of an asteroid population gives clues to its collisional and dynamical history. Constraining light curve amplitudes (brightness variations) offers a first-order approximation to the shape distribution, provided all asteroids in the distribution were subject to the same observing biases. Asteroids observed by the NEOWISE space mission at roughly the same heliocentric distances have essentially the same observing biases and can therefore be inter-compared. We used the archival NEOWISE photometry of a statistically significant sample of Jovian Trojans, Hildas, and Main belt asteroids to compare the amplitude (and by proxy, shape) distributions of L4 vs. L5 Trojans, Trojans vs. Hildas of the same size range, and several subpopulations of Main belt asteroids.For asteroids with near-fluid rubble pile structures, very large light curve amplitudes can only be explained by close or contact binary systems, offering the potential to catalog and characterize binaries within a population and gleaning more information on its dynamical evolution. Because the structure of most asteroids is not known to a high confidence level, objects with very high light curve amplitudes can only be considered candidate binaries. In Sonnett et al. (2015), we identified several binary candidates in the Jovian Trojan and Hilda populations. We have since been conducting a follow-up campaign to obtain densely sampled light curves of the binary candidates to allow detailed shape and binary modeling, helping identify true binaries. Here, we present preliminary results from the follow-up campaign, including rotation properties.This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology (CalTech) under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and was supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program at JPL. We make use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project

  4. Coordinated observations of interacting peculiar red giant binaries, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, T.

    1995-01-01

    IUE and H alpha observations continued on a two-year program to monitor the UV variability of three interacting peculiar red giant (PRG) binaries, HD 59643 (C6,s), HD 35155 (S3/2), and HR 1105 (S3.5/2.5). All of these systems were suspected to involve accretion of material from the PRG to a white-dwarf secondary, based mainly on previous IUE investigations. They were primary candidates from earlier surveys of PRG's to test the hypothesis that the Tc-poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a secondary component rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch.

  5. Gravitational and Electromagnetic Emission from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Palenzuela, C.; Lehner, L.; Ponce, M.; Liebling, S. L.; Anderson, M.; Neilsen, D.

    2013-06-01

    The inspiral of a neutron star - neutron star binary is a leading candidate for strong emission of gravitational waves. The interaction between the stellar magnetospheres may also give rise to electromagnetic emissions accompanying the gravity waves as the neutron stars inspiral and merge. We present results from a set of resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of mergers computed with full general relativity. We vary the initial magnetic field of the neutron stars including cases where the fields are initially aligned, anit-aligned and where one star’s field dominates over its companion. This presentation is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant No. NNX13AH01G through the astrophysics theory program.

  6. Mutual Orbits of Transneptunian Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Noll, K. S.; Roe, H. G.; Porter, S. B.; Trujillo, C. A.; Benecchi, S. D.; Buie, M. W.

    2012-10-01

    We report the latest results from a program of high spatial resolution imaging to resolve the individual components of binary transneptunian objects. These observations use Hubble Space Telescope and also laser guide star adaptive optics systems on Keck and Gemini telescopes on Mauna Kea. From relative astrometry over multiple epochs, we determine the mutual orbits of the components, and thus the total masses of the systems. Accurate masses anchor subsequent detailed investigations into the physical characteristics of these systems. For instance, dynamical masses enable computation of bulk densities for systems where the component sizes can be estimated from other measurements. Additionally, patterns in the ensemble characteristics of binary orbits offer clues to circumstances in the protoplanetary nebula when these systems formed, as well as carrying imprints of various subsequent dynamical evolution processes. The growing ensemble of known orbits shows intriguing patterns that can shed light on the evolution of this population of distant objects. This work has been supported by an NSF Planetary Astronomy grant and by several Hubble Space Telescope and NASA Keck data analysis grants. The research makes use of data from the Gemini Observatory obtained through NOAO survey program 11A-0017, from a large number of Hubble Space Telescope programs, and from several NASA Keck programs.

  7. Resolved Companions of Cepheids: Testing the Candidates with X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan; Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    We have made XMM-Newton observations of 14 Galactic Cepheids that have candidate resolved (≥5″) companion stars based on our earlier HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey. Main-sequence stars that are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids are expected to be strong X-ray producers in contrast to field stars. XMM-Newton exposures were set to detect essentially all companions hotter than spectral type M0 (corresponding to 0.5 M⊙). The large majority of our candidate companions were not detected in X-rays, and hence are not confirmed as young companions. One resolved candidate (S Nor #4) was unambiguously detected, but the Cepheid is a member of a populous cluster. For this reason, it is likely that S Nor #4 is a cluster member rather than a gravitationally bound companion. Two further Cepheids (S Mus and R Cru) have X-ray emission that might be produced by either the Cepheid or the candidate resolved companion. A subsequent Chandra observation of S Mus shows that the X-rays are at the location of the Cepheid/spectroscopic binary. R Cru and also V659 Cen (also X-ray bright) have possible companions closer than 5″ (the limit for this study) which are the likely sources of X-rays. One final X-ray detection (V473 Lyr) has no known optical companion, so the prime suspect is the Cepheid itself. It is a unique Cepheid with a variable amplitude. The 14 stars that we observed with XMM constitute 36% of the 39 Cepheids found to have candidate companions in our HST/WFC3 optical survey. No young probable binary companions were found with separations of ≥5″ or 4000 au. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  8. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  9. Masses of black holes in binary stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M.

    1996-08-01

    Mass determination methods and their results for ten black holes in X-ray binary systems are summarised. A unified interpretation of the radial velocity and optical light curves allows one to reliably justify the close binary system model and to prove the correctness of determination of the optical star mass function fv(m).The orbit plane inclination i can be estimated from an analysis of optical light curve of the system, which is due mainly to the ellipsoidal shape of the optical star (the so-called ellipticity effect). The component mass ratio q = mx/mv is obtained from information about the distance to the binary system as well as from data about rotational broadening of absorption lines in the spectrum of the optical star. These data allow one to obtain from the value of fv(m) a reliable value of the black hole mass mx or its low limit, as well as the optical star mass mv. An independent estimate of the optical star mass mv obtained from information about its spectral class and luminosity gives us test results. Additional test comes from information about the absence or presence of X-ray eclipses in the system. Effects of the non-zero dimension of the optical star, its pear-like shape, and X-ray heating on the absorption line profiles and the radial velocity curve are investigated. It is very significant that none of ten known massive (mx > 3M) X-ray sources considered as black hole candidates is an X-ray pulsar or an X-ray burster of the first kind.

  10. A PSF-based approach to Kepler/K2 data. II. Exoplanet candidates in Praesepe (M 44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libralato, M.; Nardiello, D.; Bedin, L. R.; Borsato, L.; Granata, V.; Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Ochner, P.; Cunial, A.; Nascimbeni, V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we keep pushing K2 data to a high photometric precision, close to that of the Kepler main mission, using a PSF-based, neighbour-subtraction technique, which also overcome the dilution effects in crowded environments. We analyse the open cluster M 44 (NGC 2632), observed during the K2 Campaign 5, and extract light curves of stars imaged on module 14, where most of the cluster lies. We present two candidate exoplanets hosted by cluster members and five by field stars. As a by-product of our investigation, we find 1680 eclipsing binaries and variable stars, 1071 of which are new discoveries. Among them, we report the presence of a heartbeat binary star. Together with this work, we release to the community a catalogue with the variable stars and the candidate exoplanets found, as well as all our raw and detrended light curves.

  11. Evidence for a binary origin of a central compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshenko, Victor; Pühlhofer, Gerd; Kavanagh, Patrick; Santangelo, Andrea; Suleimanov, Valery; Klochkov, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    Central compact objects (CCOs) are thought to be young thermally emitting isolated neutron stars that were born during the preceding core-collapse supernova explosion. Here, we present evidence that at least in one case the CCO could have been formed within a binary system. We show that the highly reddened optical source IRAS 17287-3443, located 25 arcsec away from the CCO candidate XMMUJ173203.3-344518 and classified previously as a post asymptotic giant branch star, is indeed surrounded by a dust shell. This shell is heated by the central star to temperatures of ˜90 K and observed as extended infrared emission in 8-160 μm band. The dust temperature also increases in the vicinity of the CCO which implies that it likely resides within the shell. We estimate the total dust mass to be ˜0.4-1.5 M⊙ which significantly exceeds expected dust yields by normal stars and thus likely condensed from supernova ejecta. Taking into account that both the age of the supernova remnant and the duration of active mass-loss phase by the optical star are much shorter than the total lifetime of either object, the supernova and the onset of the active mass-loss phase of the companion have likely occurred approximately simultaneously. This is most easily explained if the evolution of both objects is interconnected. We conclude, therefore, that both stars were likely members of the same binary system disrupted by a supernova.

  12. Fast large-scale object retrieval with binary quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shifu; Zeng, Dan; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Zhijiang; Tian, Qi

    2015-11-01

    The objective of large-scale object retrieval systems is to search for images that contain the target object in an image database. Where state-of-the-art approaches rely on global image representations to conduct searches, we consider many boxes per image as candidates to search locally in a picture. In this paper, a feature quantization algorithm called binary quantization is proposed. In binary quantization, a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) feature is quantized into a descriptive and discriminative bit-vector, which allows itself to adapt to the classic inverted file structure for box indexing. The inverted file, which stores the bit-vector and box ID where the SIFT feature is located inside, is compact and can be loaded into the main memory for efficient box indexing. We evaluate our approach on available object retrieval datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is fast and achieves excellent search quality. Therefore, the proposed approach is an improvement over state-of-the-art approaches for object retrieval.

  13. A Search for Close Red Dwarf-White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Mark R.; Henry, Todd J.; Subasavage, John P.

    2011-08-01

    We propose to observe 59 objects suspected to be red dwarf-white dwarf (RD-WD) binaries with separations < 3 arcsec using the CTIO 1.0m. Our goals are to use images of these objects to both resolve the systems and to obtain accurate BVRI photometry. The systems have been selected based on positions in three different color-color plots using SuperCOSMOS BRI plate photometry and 2MASS JHK photometry in accordance with the positions of known RD-WD binaries. This effort will identify candidates for detailed observations as part of the RECONS astrometric program on the CTIO 0.9m to yield accurate parallaxes and photocentric orbits. The parallaxes will then be used to determine the ages of the systems from WD cooling curves, and the orbits will eventually be used to measure dynamical masses. Ultimately, we aim to increase significantly the number of dynamical masses for white dwarfs because currently only three have been determined to 5% accuracy. The first observational step outlined here will allow us to identify appropriate systems for long-term work. This 1.0m project is likely to become the undergraduate senior thesis work of the PI.

  14. Fabricating binary optics: An overview of binary optics process technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Margaret B.

    1993-01-01

    A review of binary optics processing technology is presented. Pattern replication techniques have been optimized to generate high-quality efficient microoptics in visible and infrared materials. High resolution optical photolithography and precision alignment is used to fabricate maximally efficient fused silica diffractive microlenses at lambda = 633 nm. The degradation in optical efficiency of four-phase-level fused silica microlenses resulting from an intentional 0.35 micron translational error has been systematically measured as a function of lens speed (F/2 - F/60). Novel processes necessary for high sag refractive IR microoptics arrays, including deep anisotropic Si-etching, planarization of deep topography and multilayer resist techniques, are described. Initial results are presented for monolithic integration of photonic and microoptic systems.

  15. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  16. Spectroscopic Binary Frequency among CNO Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.; Malaroda, S.; Garcia, B.; Morell, N.

    1987-05-01

    ABSTRACT. Radial velocity variations are- analyzed through a sample of 35 OB stars with CH anomalies.Bolton and Rogers' proposal (1978) is con- firmed in the sense that the OBN stars appear preferably in short-period binary systems, in contrast to OBC stars. : STARS-BINARY - STARS-EARLY TYPE

  17. ECCENTRIC EVOLUTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasawa, Masaki; An, Sangyong; Matsubayashi, Tatsushi; Funato, Yoko; Makino, Junichiro

    2011-04-10

    In recent numerical simulations, it has been found that the eccentricity of supermassive black hole (SMBH)-intermediate black hole (IMBH) binaries grows toward unity through interactions with the stellar background. This increase of eccentricity reduces the merging timescale of the binary through the gravitational radiation to a value well below the Hubble time. It also gives a theoretical explanation of the existence of eccentric binaries such as that in OJ287. In self-consistent N-body simulations, this increase of eccentricity is always observed. On the other hand, the result of the scattering experiment between SMBH binaries and field stars indicated that the eccentricity dose not change significantly. This discrepancy leaves the high eccentricity of the SMBH binaries in N-body simulations unexplained. Here, we present a stellar-dynamical mechanism that drives the increase of the eccentricity of an SMBH binary with a large mass ratio. There are two key processes involved. The first one is the Kozai mechanism under a non-axisymmetric potential, which effectively randomizes the angular momenta of surrounding stars. The other is the selective ejection of stars with prograde orbits. Through these two mechanisms, field stars extract the orbital angular momentum of the SMBH binary. Our proposed mechanism causes the increase in the eccentricity of most of SMBH binaries, resulting in the rapid merger through gravitational wave radiation. Our result has given a definite solution to the 'last-parsec problem'.

  18. An Acidity Scale for Binary Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the classification of binary oxides as acidic, basic, or amphoteric. Demonstrates how a numerical scale for acidity/basicity of binary oxides can be constructed using thermochemical data for oxoacid salts. Presents the calculations derived from the data that provide the numeric scale values. (TW)

  19. An Extremely Fast Halo Hot Subdwarf Star in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Ziegerer, Eva; Irrgang, Andreas; Geier, Stephan; Fürst, Felix; Kupfer, Thomas; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    New spectroscopic observations of the halo hyper-velocity star candidate SDSS J121150.27+143716.2 (V = 17.92 mag) revealed a cool companion to the hot subdwarf primary. The components have a very similar radial velocity and their absolute luminosities are consistent with the same distance, confirming the physical nature of the binary, which is the first double-lined hyper-velocity candidate. Our spectral decomposition of the Keck/ESI spectrum provided an sdB+K3V pair, analogous to many long-period subdwarf binaries observed in the Galactic disk. We found the subdwarf atmospheric parameters: {T}{{eff}}=30\\600+/- 500 K, {log}g=5.57+/- 0.06 cm s-2, and He abundance {log}(n{{He}}/n{{H}})=-3.0+/- 0.2. Oxygen is the most abundant metal in the hot subdwarf atmosphere, and Mg and Na lines are the most prominent spectral features of the cool companion, consistent with a metallicity of [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]=-1.3. The non-detection of radial velocity variations suggest the orbital period to be a few hundred days, in agreement with similar binaries observed in the disk. Using the SDSS-III flux calibrated spectrum we measured the distance to the system d=5.5+/- 0.5 {{kpc}}, which is consistent with ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometric constraints derived from binary spectral energy distributions. Our kinematic study shows that the Galactic rest-frame velocity of the system is so high that an unbound orbit cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, a bound orbit requires a massive dark matter halo. We conclude that the binary either formed in the halo or was accreted from the tidal debris of a dwarf galaxy by the Milky Way.

  20. An Extremely Fast Halo Hot Subdwarf Star in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Ziegerer, Eva; Irrgang, Andreas; Geier, Stephan; Fürst, Felix; Kupfer, Thomas; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    New spectroscopic observations of the halo hyper-velocity star candidate SDSS J121150.27+143716.2 (V = 17.92 mag) revealed a cool companion to the hot subdwarf primary. The components have a very similar radial velocity and their absolute luminosities are consistent with the same distance, confirming the physical nature of the binary, which is the first double-lined hyper-velocity candidate. Our spectral decomposition of the Keck/ESI spectrum provided an sdB+K3V pair, analogous to many long-period subdwarf binaries observed in the Galactic disk. We found the subdwarf atmospheric parameters: {T}{{eff}}=30\\600+/- 500 K, {log}g=5.57+/- 0.06 cm s‑2, and He abundance {log}(n{{He}}/n{{H}})=-3.0+/- 0.2. Oxygen is the most abundant metal in the hot subdwarf atmosphere, and Mg and Na lines are the most prominent spectral features of the cool companion, consistent with a metallicity of [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]=-1.3. The non-detection of radial velocity variations suggest the orbital period to be a few hundred days, in agreement with similar binaries observed in the disk. Using the SDSS-III flux calibrated spectrum we measured the distance to the system d=5.5+/- 0.5 {{kpc}}, which is consistent with ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometric constraints derived from binary spectral energy distributions. Our kinematic study shows that the Galactic rest-frame velocity of the system is so high that an unbound orbit cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, a bound orbit requires a massive dark matter halo. We conclude that the binary either formed in the halo or was accreted from the tidal debris of a dwarf galaxy by the Milky Way.

  1. δ Scuti-type pulsation in the hot component of the Algol-type binary system BG Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyüz, T.; Soydugan, E.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, 23 Algol-type binary systems, which were selected as candidate binaries with pulsating components, were observed at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory. One of these systems was BG Peg. Its hotter component shows δ Scuti-type light variations. Physical parameters of BG Peg were derived from modelling the V light curve using the Wilson-Devinney code. The frequency analysis shows that the pulsational component of the BG Peg system pulsates in two modes with periods of 0.039 and 0.047 d. Mode identification indicates that both modes are most likely non-radial l = 2 modes.

  2. The evolution of close binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutukov, A. V.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A review of our current understanding of the physics and evolution of close binary stars with various masses under the influence of the nuclear evolution of their components and their magnetic stellar winds is presented. The role of gravitational-wave radiation by close binaries on their evolution and the loss of their orbital angular momentum is also considered. The final stages in the evolution of close binary systems are described. The review also notes the main remaining tasks related to studies of the physics and evolution of various classes of close binaries, including analyses of collisions of close binaries and supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei. Such a collision could lead to the capture of one of the components by the black hole and the acceleration of the remaining component to relativistic speeds.

  3. Eclipsing Binaries: The Primary Distance Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y.-W.; Hong, K.-S.; Lee, J.

    2007-06-01

    we have investigated how much confidence we can place in eclipsing binaries as distance indicators. The absolute visual magnitudes and the photometric distances of the selected 318 eclipsing binaries were calculated and compared with those calculated from Hipparcos parallaxes. The absolute magnitudes and distances of eclipsing binary systems deduced from analysis of light curves and radial velocity curves are confirmed to have the same accuracy as the Hipparcos parallaxes within an error of 10 percent of the parallax value. This means that photometric distances are accurate enough over a couple thousand parsecs on the basis of the eclipsing binaries used in this paper. The photometric distances of contact binaries show good agreement with those of Rucinski (1996).

  4. Neutron Star Mass Distribution in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-05-01

    Massive neutron stars with ∼ 2Mʘ have been observed in neutron star-white dwarf binaries. On the other hand, well-measured neutron star masses in double-neutron-star binaries are still consistent with the limit of 1.5Mʘ. These observations raised questions on the neutron star equations of state and the neutron star binary evolution processes. In this presentation, a hypothesis of super-Eddington accretion and its implications are discussed. We argue that a 2Mʘ neutron star is an outcome of the super-Eddington accretion during the evolution of neutron star-white dwarf binary progenitors. We also suggest the possibility of the existence of new type of neutron star binary which consists of a typical neutron star and a massive compact companion (high-mass neutron star or black hole) with M ≥ 2Mʘ.

  5. Kepler eclipsing binary stars - VI. Identification of eclipsing binaries in the K2 Campaign 0 data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCourse, Daryll M.; Jek, Kian J.; Jacobs, Thomas L.; Winarski, Troy; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Rappaport, Saul A.; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Conroy, Kyle E.; Nelson, Lorne; Barclay, Tom; Fischer, Debra A.; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Wang, Ji; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Shporer, Avi; Prša, Andrej

    2015-10-01

    The original Kepler mission observed and characterized over 2400 eclipsing binaries (EBs) in addition to its prolific exoplanet detections. Despite the mechanical malfunction and subsequent non-recovery of two reaction wheels used to stabilize the instrument, the Kepler satellite continues collecting data in its repurposed K2 mission surveying a series of fields along the ecliptic plane. Here, we present an analysis of the first full baseline K2 data release: the Campaign 0 data set. In the 7761 light curves we have identified a total of 207 EBs. Of these, 97 are new discoveries that were not previously identified. Our pixel-level analysis of these objects has also resulted in identification of several false positives (observed targets contaminated by neighbouring EBs), as well as the serendipitous discovery of two short-period exoplanet candidates. We provide catalogue cross-matched source identifications, orbital periods, morphologies and ephemerides for these eclipsing systems. We also describe the incorporation of the K2 sample into the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog,§ present spectroscopic follow-up observations for a limited selection of nine systems and discuss prospects for upcoming K2 campaigns.

  6. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Adams, F. C.; Chambers, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around one or both components of various young close binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. We have simulated the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets in both circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations ($a_B$) in the range 0.05 AU $\\le a_B \\le$ 0.4 AU and binary eccentricities in the range $0 \\le e \\le 0.8$ and circumstellar disks around individual stars with binary separations of tens of AU. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and around individual stars in the Alpha Centauri system (Quintana et al. 2002, A.J., 576, 982); giant planets analogous to Jupiter and Saturn are included if their orbits are stable. The planetary systems formed around close binaries with stellar apastron distances less than or equal to 0.2 AU with small stellar eccentricities are very similar to those formed in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn, whereas planetary systems formed around binaries with larger maximum separations tend to be sparser, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. Likewise, when the binary periastron exceeds 10 AU, terrestrial planets can form over essentially the entire range of orbits allowed for single stars with Jupiter-like planets, although fewer terrestrial planets tend to form within high eccentricity binary systems. As the binary periastron decreases, the radial extent of the terrestrial planet systems is reduced accordingly. When the periastron is 5 AU, the formation of Earth-like planets near 1 AU is compromised.

  7. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... political parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2... CFR 114.4(f), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political committee... also cover or carry candidate debates in accordance with 11 CFR part 100, subparts B and C and part...

  8. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... political parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2... CFR 114.4(f), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political committee... also cover or carry candidate debates in accordance with 11 CFR part 100, subparts B and C and part...

  9. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... political parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2... CFR 114.4(f), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political committee... also cover or carry candidate debates in accordance with 11 CFR part 100, subparts B and C and part...

  10. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candidate debates. 110.13 Section 110.13 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL CONTRIBUTION AND EXPENDITURE LIMITATIONS AND PROHIBITIONS § 110.13 Candidate debates. (a) Staging organizations. (1) Nonprofit organizations described in 26 U.S.C. 501 (c)(3) or (c)(4) and which do...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1942 - Candidate rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Candidate rates. 73.1942 Section 73.1942 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1942 Candidate rates. (a) Charges for use of...

  12. 47 CFR 76.206 - Candidate rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Candidate rates. 76.206 Section 76.206 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.206 Candidate rates. (a) Charges for use of cable...

  13. 47 CFR 76.206 - Candidate rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Candidate rates. 76.206 Section 76.206 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.206 Candidate rates. (a) Charges for use of cable...

  14. 47 CFR 76.206 - Candidate rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Candidate rates. 76.206 Section 76.206 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.206 Candidate rates. (a) Charges for use of cable...

  15. 47 CFR 76.206 - Candidate rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Candidate rates. 76.206 Section 76.206 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.206 Candidate rates. (a) Charges for use of cable...

  16. 47 CFR 76.206 - Candidate rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Candidate rates. 76.206 Section 76.206 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.206 Candidate rates. (a) Charges for use of cable...

  17. Portfolio Development for Teacher Candidates. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takona, James P.

    This Digest is intended to help teacher candidates systematically gauge their progress toward the teaching profession by developing a portfolio. Portfolios are one way to assess teacher candidates, and they are a major requirement for experienced teachers seeking board certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. The…

  18. Critical Thinking Tendencies among Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Salih Zeki

    2008-01-01

    The study aims to determine critical thinking tendencies among teacher candidates. 720 students from primary school teaching department (Primary School Teaching Programme, Science Teaching Programme and Pre-School Teaching Programme) form the sample of the study. When the gender and age distributions were investigated, 253 candidates are males and…

  19. Special Education Teacher Candidate Assessment: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Zach; McHatton, Patricia Alvarez; Shealey, Monika Williams

    2014-01-01

    Teacher preparation has been under intense scrutiny in recent years. In order for preparation of special education teacher candidates to remain viable, candidate assessment practices must apply practices identified in the extant literature base, while special education teacher education researchers must extend this base with rigorous efforts to…

  20. Planar infrared binary phase reflectarray.

    PubMed

    Ginn, James; Lail, Brian; Alda, Javier; Boreman, Glenn

    2008-04-15

    A reflective, binary phase reflectarray is demonstrated in the infrared, at a wavelength of 10.6 microm. The unique aspect of this work, at this frequency band, is that the specific desired phase shift is achieved using an array of subwavelength metallic patches on top of a ground-plane-backed dielectric stand-off layer. This is an alternative to the usual method of constructing a reflective Fresnel zone plate by means of a given thickness of dielectric. This initial demonstration of the reflectarray approach at infrared is significant in that there is inherent flexibility to create a range of phase shifts by varying the dimensions of the patches. This will allow for a multilevel phase distribution, or even a continuous variation of phase, across an optical surface with only two-dimensional lithography, avoiding the need for dielectric height variations. PMID:18414530

  1. Detecting galactic binaries with LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Porter, Edward K.

    2005-09-01

    One of the main sources of gravitational waves for the LISA space-borne interferometer is galactic binary systems. The waveforms for these sources are represented by eight parameters of which four are intrinsic and four are extrinsic to the system. Geometrically, these signals exist in an 8D parameter space. By calculating the metric tensor on this space, we calculate the number of templates needed to search for such sources. We show in this study that below a particular monochromatic frequency of f0 ~ 1.6 × 10-3 Hz we can ignore one of the intrinsic parameters and search over a 7D space. Beyond this frequency, we have a change in dimensionality of the parameter space from 7 to 8 dimensions. This sudden change in dimensionality results in a change in the scaling of template number as a function of the monochromatic frequency from ~f1.250 to ~f5.880.

  2. Normal evaporation of binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    In the study of normal evaporation, it is assumed that the evaporating alloy is homogeneous, that the vapor is instantly removed, and that the alloy follows Raoult's law. The differential equation of normal evaporation relating the evaporating time to the final solute concentration is given and solved for several important special cases. Uses of the derived equations are exemplified with a Ni-Al alloy and some binary iron alloys. The accuracy of the predicted results are checked by analyses of actual experimental data on Fe-Ni and Ni-Cr alloys evaporated at 1600 C, and also on the vacuum purification of beryllium. These analyses suggest that the normal evaporation equations presented here give satisfactory results that are accurate to within an order of magnitude of the correct values, even for some highly concentrated solutions. Limited diffusion and the resultant surface solute depletion or enrichment appear important in the extension of this normal evaporation approach.

  3. Record-Breaking Eclipsing Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    A new record holder exists for the longest-period eclipsing binary star system: TYC-2505-672-1. This intriguing system contains a primary star that is eclipsed by its companion once every 69 years with each eclipse lasting several years!120 Years of ObservationsIn a recent study, a team of scientists led by Joseph Rodriguez (Vanderbilt University) characterizes the components of TYC-2505-672-1. This binary star system consists of an M-type red giant star that undergoes a ~3.45-year-long, near-total eclipse with a period of ~69.1 years. This period is more than double that of the previous longest-period eclipsing binary!Rodriguez and collaborators combined photometric observations of TYC-2505-672-1 by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) with a variety of archival data, including observations by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) network and historical data from the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) program.In the 120 years spanned by these observations, two eclipses are detected: one in 1942-1945 and one in 2011-2015. The authors use the observations to analyze the components of the system and attempt to better understand what causes its unusual light curve.Characterizing an Unusual SystemObservations of TYC-2505-672-1 plotted from 1890 to 2015 reveal two eclipses. (The blue KELT observations during the eclipse show upper limits only.) [Rodriguez et al. 2016]By modeling the systems emission, Rodriguez and collaborators establish that TYC-2505-672-1 consists of a 3600-K primary star thats the M giant orbited by a small, hot, dim companion thats a toasty 8000 K. But if the companion is small, why does the eclipse last several years?The authors argue that the best model of TYC-2505-672-1 is one in which the small companion star is surrounded by a large, opaque circumstellar disk. Rodriguez and collaborators suggest that the companion could be a former red giant whose atmosphere was stripped from it, leaving behind

  4. New supernova remnant candidates in M 31.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnier, E. A.; Prins, S.; van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Supper, R.; Hasinger, G.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1995-12-01

    We have performed a CCD Hα, [SII], V survey of ~1.0 square degree of the disk of M 31 to search for new supernova remnant (SNR) candidates. We have identified candidates based on a combination of criteria: optical line-flux ratios, the presence or absence of ionizing blue stars, and optical morphology. We have identified a total of 178 candidate SNRs, divided into three confidence categories: 13 with the highest confidence, 54 with moderate confidence, and 111 with the lowest confidence. We have also identified 14 large structures with the characteristics of the superbubbles seen in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds. Of our 178 candidates, 15 have been identified in previous searches (Braun & Walterbos 1993; Blair et al. 1981; D'Odorico et al. 1980). We present finding charts of all candidate SNRs and the superbubbles we have noted. We also present a detailed discussion of SNR searches in the Local Group.

  5. HIRES Follow-up of Planet Candidates for the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William

    2010-08-01

    The Kepler Mission is measuring the brightnesses of 150,000 FGKM dwarfs to detect transits with a photometric precision of 20 micromags. This permits detection of transits by Earth-size and larger planets. Currently there are 163 viable planet candidates. The observations will accomplish two objectives; 1) weed out background and grazing-incidence binaries and, 2) measure planet masses, which when coupled with transit depth and stellar radii, will yield planet densities. The densities are used to distinguish rocky planets from ice giants and gas giants.

  6. Vetting Kepler planet candidates in the sub-Jovian desert with multiband photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-09-01

    We present new multiband transit photometry of three small (Rp ≲ 6 R⊕), short-period (P ≲ 6 d) Kepler planet candidates acquired with the Gran Telescopio Canarias. These observations supplement the results presented in Colón & Ford and Colón, Ford & Morehead, where we used multicolour transit photometry of five Kepler planet candidates to search for wavelength-dependent transit depths and either validate planet candidates or identify eclipsing binary false positives within our sample. In those previous studies, we provided evidence that three targets were false positives and two targets were planets. Here, we present observations that provide evidence supporting a planetary nature for Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) 439.01 and KOI 732.01, and we find that KOI 531.01, a 6 R⊕ planet candidate around an M dwarf, is likely a false positive. We also present a discussion of the purported `sub-Jovian desert' in the orbital period-planet radius plane, which cannot be easily explained by observational bias. Both KOI 439.01 and KOI 732.01 are likely planets located within the so-called desert and should be investigated with further follow-up observations. As only ˜30 of the ˜3600 currently active Kepler planet candidates are located within the sub-Jovian desert, it will be interesting to see if these candidates also survive the vetting process and fill in the gap in the period-radius plane. Confirming planets in this regime will be important for understanding planetary migration and evolution processes, and we urge additional follow-up observations of these planet candidates to confirm their nature.

  7. Validating the First Habitable-Zone Planet Candidates Identified by the NASA Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fressin, Francois; Ballard, Sarah; Borucki, William; Latham, David; Gilliland, Ronald; Seager, Sara; Knutson, Heather; Fortney, Jonathan; Brown, Timothy; Ford, Eric; Deming, Drake; Torres, Guillermo

    2011-05-01

    At the beginning of Cycle 8, the NASA Kepler Mission will have completed two years of science observations, the minimum baseline sufficient to identify candidate transiting exoplanets orbiting within the habitable-zones of Sun-like stars. The principal task that lies ahead is to reject from this sample the false positives (blends of eclipsing binaries that precisely mimic the signal of a transiting exoplanet), and to confirm the planetary nature of the remaining candidates. For planets more massive than Neptune, the direct confirmation of their planetary status can be accomplished by radial-velocity measurements. However, such planets possess primordial envelopes of hydrogen and helium that make them unsuitable to life as we know it. The most exciting candidates -- and the ones that Kepler is specifically tasked with finding -- are super-Earth and Earth-sized planets orbiting within their stellar habitable zones. Kepler has just begun to identify such planet candidates, and it will identify many more as its baseline increases throughout the coming year. While the Kepler team has developed powerful tools to weed out the impostors, Spitzer possesses the unique ability to provide the final validation of these candidates as planets, namely by measuring the depth of the transit at infrared wavelengths. By combining the infrared and optical measurements of the transit depth with models of hypothetical stellar blends, we can definitively test the stellar-blend hypothesis. We propose to observe the transits of 20 candidate habitable-zone super-Earths to be identified by the Kepler Mission. The results from this Exploration Science Program will be twofold: First, we will definitively validate the first potentially habitable planets ever identified. Second, we will determine the rate of occurrence of impostors. This rate of false positives can then be applied to the much larger sample of candidates identified by Kepler, to deduce the true rate of planetary companions.

  8. THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY ORION PROJECT: ECLIPSING BINARIES AND YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Beichman, Charles A.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Plavchan, Peter; RamIrez, Solange V.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stauffer, John R.; Hoard, D. W.; Howell, Steve B.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Nugent, Peter E.

    2011-08-15

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is one of the experiments within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide (3.{sup 0}5 x 2.{sup 0}3) field of view available using the PTF camera installed at the Palomar 48 inch telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in 2009 December to 2010 January to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10 Myr) 25 Ori association. Little is known empirically about the formation of planets at these young ages, and the primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper, we describe the survey and the data reduction pipeline, and present some initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which are good candidate 25 Ori or Orion OB1a association members. Of these, two are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include six of the candidate young systems. Forty-five of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems, and one of these shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 {+-} 0.0000071 days, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance that appears consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known

  9. DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: DEPROJECTING THE BINARY CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.-W.; Zhou, H.-Y.

    2012-10-01

    Dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as a population in a special phase during the evolution of merging galaxies have been found largely from candidates selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In this paper, we develop a simple model of dual AGNs, which are composed of two optically thin spheres emitting narrow lines and co-rotating governed by gravity between them. In order to show how profiles are sensitive to the orientation angles of the orbiting plane and phase angles, we make detailed calculations of profiles for a large space of the two angles. The dual AGNs observationally appear as ones with double-peaked profiles of emission lines, but there are still quite large ranges of orientation and phase angles where they appear only with a single-peaked profile. This implies a large fraction of dual AGN candidate missed by selecting AGNs with double-peaked profiles. We show that the highly sensitive dependence of profiles on orientation and phase angles makes them robust to deproject dual AGN systems. Deprojection by the present model has potential implications for discussion of the triggering mechanism of black hole activity in light of the deprojected distance. We apply the present model to two dual AGN, SDSS J095207.6+255257 and J171544.05+600835.7, for deprojection of the binary cores.

  10. Encounters between binaries and neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    We simulated encounters between a neutron star and primordial and tidal-capture binaries. In the case of encounters involving a tidal-capture binary, comprising a white dwarf and a main-sequence star, we find that most exchange encounters will produce a single merged object with the white dwarf and neutron star engulfed in a common envelope of gas donated by the main-sequence primary of the original binary. A small fraction of exchanges induce a merger of the white dwarf and main-sequence star, with this object being unbound to the neutron star, and the two objects having a large relative speed at infinity. For encounters involving a primordial binary, fewer encounters require the inclusion of hydrodynamical effects. Those involving collisions or close encounters tend to produce a binary comprised of the two merged stars (now forming one star) and the third star. The binaries produced typically have large enough separations to prevent the formation of a single merged object until subsequent stellar evolution of one of the components causes it to fill its Roche lobe. Clean exchanges produce binaries with large eccentricities; they are typically sufficiently wide to avoid circularization.

  11. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Chambers, John; Duncan, Martin J.; Adams, Fred

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets within binary star systems, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. We show that the late stages of terrestrial planet formation can indeed take place in a wide variety of binary systems and we have begun to delineate the range of parameter space for which this statement is true. Results of our initial simulations of planetary growth around each star in the alpha Centauri system and other 'wide' binary systems, as well as around both stars in very close binary systems, will be presented.

  12. Gamma-ray binaries and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubus, Guillaume

    2013-08-01

    After initial claims and a long hiatus, it is now established that several binary stars emit high- (0.1-100 GeV) and very high-energy (>100 GeV) gamma rays. A new class has emerged called "gamma-ray binaries", since most of their radiated power is emitted beyond 1 MeV. Accreting X-ray binaries, novae and a colliding wind binary ( η Car) have also been detected—"related systems" that confirm the ubiquity of particle acceleration in astrophysical sources. Do these systems have anything in common? What drives their high-energy emission? How do the processes involved compare to those in other sources of gamma rays: pulsars, active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants? I review the wealth of observational and theoretical work that have followed these detections, with an emphasis on gamma-ray binaries. I present the current evidence that gamma-ray binaries are driven by rotation-powered pulsars. Binaries are laboratories giving access to different vantage points or physical conditions on a regular timescale as the components revolve on their orbit. I explain the basic ingredients that models of gamma-ray binaries use, the challenges that they currently face, and how they can bring insights into the physics of pulsars. I discuss how gamma-ray emission from microquasars provides a window into the connection between accretion-ejection and acceleration, while η Car and novae raise new questions on the physics of these objects—or on the theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Indeed, explaining the gamma-ray emission from binaries strains our theories of high-energy astrophysical processes, by testing them on scales and in environments that were generally not foreseen, and this is how these detections are most valuable.

  13. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  14. Using Bayesian Networks for Candidate Generation in Consistency-based Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimhan, Sriram; Mengshoel, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Consistency-based diagnosis relies heavily on the assumption that discrepancies between model predictions and sensor observations can be detected accurately. When sources of uncertainty like sensor noise and model abstraction exist robust schemes have to be designed to make a binary decision on whether predictions are consistent with observations. This risks the occurrence of false alarms and missed alarms when an erroneous decision is made. Moreover when multiple sensors (with differing sensing properties) are available the degree of match between predictions and observations can be used to guide the search for fault candidates. In this paper we propose a novel approach to handle this problem using Bayesian networks. In the consistency- based diagnosis formulation, automatically generated Bayesian networks are used to encode a probabilistic measure of fit between predictions and observations. A Bayesian network inference algorithm is used to compute most probable fault candidates.

  15. How the Sausage is Made: Kepler's False Alarms, False Positives, and Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Kepler mission has now designated over 7,000 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs), or transit-like signatures, utilizing up to four years of data. The number of potentially habitable planet candidates (PCs) among this sample has risen significantly over time. However, starting with Kepler threshold crossing events (TCEs), there are initially about as many false alarms (FAs) detected as there are KOIs. Furthermore, due to its design, contamination from eclipsing binaries, variable stars, and other transiting planets result in a significant number of KOIs being designated as false positives (FPs). Many of these FAs and FPs occur at long orbital periods, where habitable planets are typically found. I will review the process of how an initial TCE becomes a KOI, and then is ultimately classified as a FA, FP, or PC, along with the various vetting tools employed. The understanding of this process is crucial to performing accurate statistical analyses on populations of habitable planet candidates discovered by Kepler.

  16. Solidification phenomena of binary organic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K.

    1982-01-01

    The coalescence rates and motion of liquid bubbles in binary organic mixtures were studied. Several factors such as temperature gradient, composition gradient, interfacial tension, and densities of the two phases play important roles in separation of phases of immiscible liquids. An attempt was made to study the effect of initial compositions on separation rates of well-dispersed organic mixtures at different temperatures and, ultimately, on the homogeneity of solidification of the immiscible binary organic liquids. These organic mixtures serve as models for metallic pseudo binary systems under study. Two specific systems were investigated: ethyl salicylate - diethyl glycol and succinonitrile - water.

  17. Spin-orbit coupling in binary asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Jean-Luc; Naidu, Shantanu P.

    2016-01-01

    We use radar images with decameter resolution to measure the sizes, shapes, spin states, mutual orbits, masses, and densities of components of asteroid binaries and triples. We simulate the spin-orbit dynamics of these systems and map the possible spin configurations of the satellites on surface of section plots. The presence of chaotic regions in the phase space has important consequences for the evolution of binary asteroids. It may substantially increase spin synchronization timescales, delay BYORP-type evolution, and extend the lifetime of binaries.

  18. Contact binary stars as standard candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klagyivik, P.; Csizmadia, Sz.

    2004-06-01

    Rucinski (1996) suggested to use contact binary stars as standard candles. We investigated the properties of contact binary stars in order to search for possibility of their using as standard candles. For this purpose a catalogue of their light curve solution was compiled and on the basis of the catalogue data we calculated the rate of energy transfer between the two components. This allowed us to determine the mass-luminosity relation of the primary as well as secondary components in a contact binary and using Kepler's third law and the strict geometry a very reliable distance determination method was developed.

  19. Radio Detection of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Brandon; Cardena, Brett; Dispoto, Dana; Papadopoulos, Joanna; Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John

    2011-10-01

    Neutron star binary systems lose energy through gravitational radiation, and eventually merge. The gravitational radiation from the merger can be detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). It is expected that a transient radio pulse will also be produced during the merger event. Detection of such radio transients would allow for LIGO to search for signals within constrained time periods. We calculate the LWA-1 detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers. We calculate the detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers for the Long Wavelength Array and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array.

  20. Variance in binary stellar population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.

    2016-03-01

    In the years preceding LISA, Milky Way compact binary population simulations can be used to inform the science capabilities of the mission. Galactic population simulation efforts generally focus on high fidelity models that require extensive computational power to produce a single simulated population for each model. Each simulated population represents an incomplete sample of the functions governing compact binary evolution, thus introducing variance from one simulation to another. We present a rapid Monte Carlo population simulation technique that can simulate thousands of populations in less than a week, thus allowing a full exploration of the variance associated with a binary stellar evolution model.

  1. Dynamics of binary asteroids. I - Hill's case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvineau, B.; Mignard, F.

    1990-02-01

    The present investigation of the dynamics of hypothesized binary (or multiple) asteroids attempts to evaluate the likelihood of their dynamic stability, giving attention to the trajectories of Hill's (1977) problem (including only the gravitational perturbation of the sun) to define the effects of solar perturbations on the relative motion of a binary asteroid. Only for the cases of close binary asteroids, can the Jacobian constant be unambiguously related to the semimajor axis of a weakly disturbed Keplerian ellipse. A greater likelihood is found for a stable asteroid with retrograde orbit, in both the synodic and the inertial frames, that with direct orbit.

  2. Binary Star database BDB: datasets and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Yu.; Kaygorodov, P. V.; Koravleva, D. A.; Oblak, E.; Debray, B.

    Description of the Binary star DataBase (BDB, http://bdb.inasan.ru), the world's principal database of binary and multiple systems of all observational types, is presented in the paper. BDB contains data on physical and positional parameters of 100,000 components of 40,000 systems of multiplicity 2 to 20, belonging to various observational types: visual, spectroscopic, eclipsing, etc. Information on these types of binaries is obtained from heterogeneous sources of data astronomical catalogues and surveys. Organization of the information is based on the careful cross-identification of the objects. BDB can be queried by star identifier, coordinates, and other paramete

  3. Measuring the Masses of Ophiuchus Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Gail

    2014-02-01

    Our goal is to measure dynamical masses of low-mass (<1 Msun) young (<5 Myr) binary components. We propose to continue mapping the orbits of young pairs using AO imaging. Combined with high-resolution spectroscopy, this will yield mass precisions of <5. This is important to validate and distinguish among theoretical calculations of young star evolution, which are most discrepant for low-mass stars. We target 22 binaries in Ophiuchus with unmapped orbits and 1 binary for which additional astrometry will yield precision values for its masses and distance. We request two half-nights, with LGS and NGS AO using NIRC2 on Keck II.

  4. Robust speech recognition from binary masks.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2010-11-01

    Inspired by recent evidence that a binary pattern may provide sufficient information for human speech recognition, this letter proposes a fundamentally different approach to robust automatic speech recognition. Specifically, recognition is performed by classifying binary masks corresponding to a word utterance. The proposed method is evaluated using a subset of the TIDigits corpus to perform isolated digit recognition. Despite dramatic reduction of speech information encoded in a binary mask, the proposed system performs surprisingly well. The system is compared with a traditional HMM based approach and is shown to perform well under low SNR conditions. PMID:21110529

  5. Eclipsing binaries in the ASAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoroščík, J.; Vaňko, M.; Pribulla, T.

    2014-03-01

    We present a statistical investigation of eclipsing binaries presented in the ASAS (http://www.astrouw.edu.pl/asas/?page=download) survey. Applying the Fourier analysis on the ASAS light curves, we used the relations between coefficients to infer principal properties of eclipsing binaries. The systems with eccentric orbits were found and for the same sample the minimum eccentricity was estimated. We also selected short-period detached eclipsing binaries suitable for the detection of circumbinary exoplanets. Systems with the equal minima depth were also discussed.

  6. Eclipsing binary stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud: results from the EROS-2, OGLE and VMC surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraveva, T.; Clementini, G.; Maceroni, C.; Evans, C. J.; Moretti, M. I.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Marquette, J. B.; Ripepi, V.; de Grijs, R.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Piatti, A. E.; van Loon, J. Th.

    2014-09-01

    We present a catalogue of 1768 eclipsing binary stars (EBs) detected in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the second generation of the EROS survey (hereinafter EROS-2); 493 of them are new discoveries located in outer regions (out of the central bar) of the LMC. These sources were originally included in a list of candidate classical Cepheids (CCs) extracted from the EROS-2 catalogue on the basis of the period (0.89 < PEROS < 15.85 d) versus luminosity [13.39 < < 17.82 mag] diagram. After visual inspection of the light curves we reclassified them as eclipsing binaries. They have blue colours (BEROS - REROS < 0.2 mag) hence we classed them as hot eclipsing binaries (HEBs) containing hot massive components: main sequence (MS) stars or blue giants. We present Ks-band light curves for 999 binaries from our sample that have a counterpart in the VISTA near-infrared ESO public survey of the Magellanic Clouds system (VMC). We provide spectral classifications of 13 HEBs with existing spectroscopy. We divided our sample into contact-like binaries and detached/semi-detached systems based on both visual inspection and the parameters of the Fourier decomposition of the light curves and analysed the period-luminosity (PL) relations of the contact-like systems using the REROS and Ks magnitudes at maximum light. The contact-like binaries in our sample do not follow PL relations. We analysed the sample of contact binaries from the OGLE III catalogue and confirmed that PLI and PL_{K_s} sequences are defined only by eclipsing binaries containing a red giant component.

  7. Pulsars in binary systems: probing binary stellar evolution and general relativity.

    PubMed

    Stairs, Ingrid H

    2004-04-23

    Radio pulsars in binary orbits often have short millisecond spin periods as a result of mass transfer from their companion stars. They therefore act as very precise, stable, moving clocks that allow us to investigate a large set of otherwise inaccessible astrophysical problems. The orbital parameters derived from high-precision binary pulsar timing provide constraints on binary evolution, characteristics of the binary pulsar population, and the masses of neutron stars with different mass-transfer histories. These binary systems also test gravitational theories, setting strong limits on deviations from general relativity. Surveys for new pulsars yield new binary systems that increase our understanding of all these fields and may open up whole new areas of physics, as most spectacularly evidenced by the recent discovery of an extremely relativistic double-pulsar system. PMID:15105492

  8. CALCULATING THE HABITABLE ZONE OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS. II. P-TYPE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2013-11-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology for calculating the circumbinary habitable zone (HZ) in planet-hosting P-type binary star systems. We present a general formalism for determining the contribution of each star of the binary to the total flux received at the top of the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and use the Sun's HZ to calculate the inner and outer boundaries of the HZ around a binary star system. We apply our calculations to the Kepler's currently known circumbinary planetary systems and show the combined stellar flux that determines the boundaries of their HZs. We also show that the HZ in P-type systems is dynamic and, depending on the luminosity of the binary stars, their spectral types, and the binary eccentricity, its boundaries vary as the stars of the binary undergo their orbital motion. We present the details of our calculations and discuss the implications of the results.

  9. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR MASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SPECTROSCOPIC SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Tsalmantza, P.; Decarli, R.; Hogg, David W.; Dotti, M. E-mail: decarli@mpia.de

    2011-09-01

    We present the results of a systematic search for massive black hole binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic database. We focus on bound binaries, under the assumption that one of the black holes is active. In this framework, the broad lines associated with the accreting black hole are expected to show systematic velocity shifts with respect to the narrow lines, which trace the rest frame of the galaxy. For a sample of 54,586 quasars and 3929 galaxies at redshifts 0.1 < z < 1.5, we brute-force model each spectrum as a mixture of two quasars at two different redshifts. The spectral model is a data-driven dimensionality reduction of the SDSS quasar spectra based on a matrix factorization. We identified 32 objects with peculiar spectra. Nine of them can be interpreted as black hole binaries. This doubles the number of known black hole binary candidates. We also report on the discovery of a new class of extreme double-peaked emitters with exceptionally broad and faint Balmer lines. For all the interesting sources, we present detailed analysis of the spectra and discuss possible interpretations.

  10. Improving enzymatic production of diglycerides by engineering binary ionic liquid medium system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zheng; Kahveci, Derya; Ozçelik, Beraat; Xu, Xuebing

    2009-10-01

    The tunable property of ionic liquids (ILs) offers tremendous opportunity to rethink the strategy of current efforts to resolve technical challenges that occurred in many production approaches. To establish an efficient glycerolysis approach for enzymatic production of diglycerides (DG), this work reported a novel concept to improve DG yield by applying a binary IL system that consisted of one IL with better DG production selectivity and another IL being able to achieve higher conversion of triglycerides (TG). The candidates for combination were determined by individually examining lipase-catalyzed glycerolysis in different ILs, as a result, promising ones are divided into two groups based on their reaction specificities. The effects of parametric variables were then preliminarily evaluated, following a further investigation of the reaction performance in different binary IL systems from cross-group combinations. The combination of TOMA.Tf(2)N/Ammoeng 102 was employed for optimization by Response Surface Methodology. Eighty to eighty-five percent (mol%) of oil conversion and up to 90% (mol%) of total DG yield (73%, wt%) were obtained, which are markedly higher than those previously reported. This work demonstrated the practical feasibility to couple the technical advantage (high TG conversion and high DG production selective in this work) of individual ILs into a binary system to over-perform the reaction. It is believed that binary IL system could be also applicable to other enzymatic reaction systems for establishment of more efficient reaction protocols. PMID:19426844

  11. Gemini Spectroscopy of Galactic Bulge Sources: A Population of Hidden Accreting Binaries Revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Jonker, Peter; Torres, Manuel; Britt, Christopher; Johnson, Chris; Hynes, Robert I.; Greiss, Sandra; Steeghs, Danny; Maccarone, Tom; Heinke, Craig O.; Wevers, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present Gemini spectroscopy for 21 X-ray sources detected in the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS), which aims to investigate X-ray binaries in the Galactic Bulge region. For the majority of the sources, we have obtained spectra of the objects that are likely the real optical counterparts to the X-ray sources. Line measurements, spectral classification, and radial velocity analysis were performed on the Gemini spectra. We discover a population of hidden accreting binaries whose Gemini spectra apparently show neither strong Hα emission nor Hα absorption. However, the residual spectra of some sources after subtracting the best-fit stellar spectroscopic templates contain a broad Hα emission line which likely originates in an accretion disk. These hidden accreting sources may constitute a substantial portion of the full accreting binary population. We also identify three likely candidates of eclipsing or high-inclination quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries based on their broad Hα emission line profile and/or their optical light curves. Significant Hα emission line variability was also observed for two GBS sources.

  12. Binary pulsars studies with multiwavelength sky surveys - I. Companion star identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, R. P.; Corongiu, A.; Pallanca, C.; Oates, S. R.; Yershov, V. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Page, M. J.; Ferraro, F. R.; Possenti, A.; Jackson, A. C.

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the stellar companions to binary pulsars is key to studying the evolution of the binary system and how this is influenced by the interactions between the two stars. For only a fraction of the known binary pulsars, the stellar companions have been identified. Here, we used 11 source catalogues available from multiwavelength (ultraviolet, optical, infrared) imaging sky surveys to search for the stellar companions of a sample of 144 field binary pulsars (i.e. not in globular clusters) selected from the Australia Telescope National Facility data base (version 1.48) and from the public list of γ-ray pulsars detected by Fermi. We found positional associations in at least one source catalogue for 22 pulsars, of which 10 are detected in γ-rays by Fermi, including 15 millisecond pulsars. For six pulsars in our compilation, we confirm their identifications. For another seven pulsars that had yet not been identified, we examine potential identifications. In particular, we identified a likely companion star candidate to PSR J2317+1439, whereas for both PSR B1953+29 and PSR J1935+1726 the companion star identification is more uncertain. Follow-up observations of these three pulsars are needed to settle the proposed identifications. For the remaining nine pulsars that had been already identified, we provide additional spectral information in at least one of the surveys' spectral bands, which we will use to better constrain the stars' spectral energy distributions.

  13. A massive binary black-hole system in OJ 287 and a test of general relativity.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, M J; Lehto, H J; Nilsson, K; Heidt, J; Takalo, L O; Sillanpää, A; Villforth, C; Kidger, M; Poyner, G; Pursimo, T; Zola, S; Wu, J-H; Zhou, X; Sadakane, K; Drozdz, M; Koziel, D; Marchev, D; Ogloza, W; Porowski, C; Siwak, M; Stachowski, G; Winiarski, M; Hentunen, V-P; Nissinen, M; Liakos, A; Dogru, S

    2008-04-17

    Tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity have mostly been carried out in weak gravitational fields where the space-time curvature effects are first-order deviations from Newton's theory. Binary pulsars provide a means of probing the strong gravitational field around a neutron star, but strong-field effects may be best tested in systems containing black holes. Here we report such a test in a close binary system of two candidate black holes in the quasar OJ 287. This quasar shows quasi-periodic optical outbursts at 12-year intervals, with two outburst peaks per interval. The latest outburst occurred in September 2007, within a day of the time predicted by the binary black-hole model and general relativity. The observations confirm the binary nature of the system and also provide evidence for the loss of orbital energy in agreement (within 10 per cent) with the emission of gravitational waves from the system. In the absence of gravitational wave emission the outburst would have happened 20 days later. PMID:18421348

  14. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ˜2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semimajor axes of the orbit from ˜0.6×10-3 ls to ˜6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3×10-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for circular binary orbits, the upper limits obtained remain valid for orbital eccentricities as large as 0.9. In addition, upper limits are placed on continuous gravitational wave emission from the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1 between 20 Hz and 57.25 Hz.

  15. Resolving subdwarf B stars in binaries by HST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.; Moehler, S.; Napiwotzki, R.; Thejll, P.; Green, E. M.

    2002-03-01

    The origin of subluminous B stars is still an unsolved problem in stellar evolution. Single star as well as close binary evolution scenarios have been invoked but until now have met with little success. We have carried out a small survey of spectroscopic binary candidates (19 systems consisting of an sdB star and late type companion) with the Planetary Camera of the WFPC2 onboard Hubble Space Telescope to test these scenarios. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that by imaging the programme stars in the R-band about one third of the sample (6-7 stars) should be resolved at a limiting angular resolution of 0.1 arcsec if they have linear separations like main sequence stars (``single star evolution''). None should be resolvable if all systems were produced by close binary evolution. In addition we expect three triple systems to be present in our sample. Most of these, if not all, should be resolvable. Components were resolved in 6 systems with separations between 0.2 arcsec and 4.5 arcsec. However, only in the two systems TON 139 and PG 1718+519 (separations 0.32 arcsec and 0.24 arcsec, respectively) do the magnitudes of the resolved components match the expectations from the deconvolution of the spectral energy distribution. These two stars could be physical binaries whereas in the other cases the nearby star may be a chance projection or a third component. Radial velocity measurements indicate that the resolved system TON 139 is a triple system, with the sdB having a close companion that does not contribute detectably to the integrated light of the system. Radial velocity information for the second resolved system, PG 1718+519, is insufficient. Assuming that it is not a triple system, it would be the only resolved system in our sample. Accordingly the success rate would be only 5% which is clearly below the prediction for single star evolution. We conclude that the distribution of separations of sdB binaries deviates strongly from that of normal stars. Our results

  16. Be stars with white dwarf companions: a new single degenerate binary channel to type Ia supernovae explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Luna, Gerardo; Zemko, Polina; Kotulla, Ralf; Gallagher, Jay; Harbeck, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A handful of supersoft X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds that could not be identified with transient nova outbursts turned out to be mainly massive close binaries. 6 years ago we suggested that several such sources may exist in M31, because we found that a certain fraction of supersoft sources was located in star forming regions. Following that discovery, we clearly identified a Be binary in M31, and are currently collecting data for another candidate in that galaxy. Work is in progress to assess whether the compact object companion really is a hydrogen burning white dwarf (the alternative being a massive stellar-mass black hole). If we can demonstrate that Be+white dwarf interacting close binaries are common, and that hydrogen is often ignited on the white dwarf in these systems, we have discovered a new promising channel towards the explosion of supernovae of type Ia in star forming regions, without invoking double degenerate systems.

  17. Wide Low-Mass Tertiary Companions of Binary Star Systems as a Test of Star Formation Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Allen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We will present the status of a common proper motion search for wide low-mass stellar and sub-stellar companions to known white dwarf-M dwarf binary systems. I-band observations were made using the 31" NURO telescope at Lowell Observatory. Candidate companions are selected using astrometry from our own data and 2MASS photometry. We have begun to spectroscopically confirm candidates that pass our selection criteria. The ultimate goal of the search is to test star formation theories which predict that close binary systems form by transferring angular momentum to a third companion. To this end, we will model the physical companion population and perform Bayesian statistical analysis to determine the best-fit population model to our data. Here we will present our spectroscopically confirmed companions as well as the preliminary results of our population models and statistical analysis.

  18. A systematic search for close supermassive black hole binaries in the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Stern, Daniel; Drake, Andrew J.; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Donalek, Ciro; Glikman, Eilat; Larson, Steve; Christensen, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Hierarchical assembly models predict a population of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. These are not resolvable by direct imaging but may be detectable via periodic variability (or nanohertz frequency gravitational waves). Following our detection of a 5.2-year periodic signal in the quasar PG 1302-102, we present a novel analysis of the optical variability of 243 500 known spectroscopically confirmed quasars using data from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) to look for close (<0.1 pc) SMBH systems. Looking for a strong Keplerian periodic signal with at least 1.5 cycles over a baseline of nine years, we find a sample of 111 candidate objects. This is in conservative agreement with theoretical predictions from models of binary SMBH populations. Simulated data sets, assuming stochastic variability, also produce no equivalent candidates implying a low likelihood of spurious detections. The periodicity seen is likely attributable to either jet precession, warped accretion discs or periodic accretion associated with a close SMBH binary system. We also consider how other SMBH binary candidates in the literature appear in CRTS data and show that none of these are equivalent to the identified objects. Finally, the distribution of objects found is consistent with that expected from a gravitational-wave-driven population. This implies that circumbinary gas is present at small orbital radii and is being perturbed by the black holes. None of the sources is expected to merge within at least the next century. This study opens a new unique window to study a population of close SMBH binaries that must exist according to our current understanding of galaxy and SMBH evolution.

  19. Minima Times of Selected Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimucha, S.; Dubovsky, P.; Kudak, V.; Perig, V.

    2016-05-01

    We present 221 CCD minima times of the 76 selected eclipsing binaries obtained during 2013-2016 at Observatory at Kolonica Saddle in Slovakia and Observatory of Laboratory of Space Research, Uzhhorod National University in Ukraine

  20. ROTATIONAL DOPPLER BEAMING IN ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, Paul J.

    2012-01-20

    In eclipsing binaries the stellar rotation of the two components will cause a rotational Doppler beaming during eclipse ingress and egress when only part of the eclipsed component is covered. For eclipsing binaries with fast spinning components this photometric analog of the well-known spectroscopic Rossiter-McLaughlin effect can exceed the strength of the orbital effect. Example light curves are shown for a detached double white dwarf binary, a massive O-star binary and a transiting exoplanet case, similar to WASP-33b. Inclusion of the rotational Doppler beaming in eclipsing systems is a prerequisite for deriving the correct stellar parameters from fitting high-quality photometric light curves and can be used to determine stellar obliquities as well as, e.g., an independent measure of the rotational velocity in those systems that may be expected to be fully synchronized.

  1. Binary NEAs Summary V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, P.; Scheirich, P.

    2006-03-01

    This data set includes a summary table of the characteristics of known binary near-Earth asteroids, compiled by Petr Pravec and Petr Scheirich. A list of references to the original observations is also included.

  2. Recent Minima of 171 Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper continues the publication of times of minima for 171 eclipsing binary stars from observations reported to the AAVSO EB section. Times of minima from observations received by the author from March 2015 thru October 2015 are presented.

  3. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  4. Evolution of binary black-hole spacetimes.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Frans

    2005-09-16

    We describe early success in the evolution of binary black-hole spacetimes with a numerical code based on a generalization of harmonic coordinates. Indications are that with sufficient resolution this scheme is capable of evolving binary systems for enough time to extract information about the orbit, merger, and gravitational waves emitted during the event. As an example we show results from the evolution of a binary composed of two equal mass, nonspinning black holes, through a single plunge orbit, merger, and ringdown. The resultant black hole is estimated to be a Kerr black hole with angular momentum parameter a approximately 0.70. At present, lack of resolution far from the binary prevents an accurate estimate of the energy emitted, though a rough calculation suggests on the order of 5% of the initial rest mass of the system is radiated as gravitational waves during the final orbit and ringdown. PMID:16197061

  5. Seven Democratic Presidential Candidates Debate Educational Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equity and Excellence, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Provides the transcript of a debate on educational issues among Democratic presidential candidates Paul Simon, Albert Gore, Joseph Biden, Jesse Jackson, Bruce Babbitt, Richard Gephart, and Michael Dukakis. (BJV)

  6. Triton stellar occultation candidates - 1992-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    A search for Triton stellar occultation candidates for the period 1992-1994 has been completed with CCD strip-scanning observations. The search reached an R magnitude of about 17.4 and found 129 candidates within 1.5 arcsec of Triton's ephemeris during this period. Of these events, around 30 occultations are expected to be visible from the earth, indicating that a number of Triton occultation events should be visible from major observatories. Even the faintest of the present candidate events could produce useful occultation data if observed with a large enough telescope. The present astrometric accuracy is inadequate to identify which of these appulse events will produce occultations on the earth; further astrometry is needed to refine the predictions for positive occultation identification. To aid in selecting candidates for additional astrometric and photometric studies, finder charts and earth-based visibility charts for each event are included.

  7. 29 CFR 452.28 - Unopposed candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... officers or delegates that would otherwise be required by the Act to be held by secret ballot need not be held by secret ballot when all candidates are unopposed and the following conditions are met: (a)...

  8. Updated candidate list for engineered barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes candidate materials to be evaluated over the next several years during advanced design phases for the waste package to be used for the underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes at the Yucca Mountain facility.

  9. SALT Classification of DES Supernova Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, E.; Bassett, B.; Crawford, S.; Smith, M.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Scolnic, D.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Brout, D. J.; Fischer, J. A.; Gladney, L.; March, M.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; D'Andrea, C.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.

    2015-02-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of a supernova candidates discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. The spectra (400-850 nm) were obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  10. Candidate preferences and expectations of election outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Delavande, Adeline; Manski, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of data from the American Life Panel shows that in the presidential election of 2008 and in multiple statewide elections in 2010, citizens exhibited large differences in their expectations of election outcomes. Expectations were strongly positively associated with candidate preferences, persons tending to believe that their preferred candidate is more likely to win the election. Committed supporters of opposing candidates regularly differed by 20–30% in their assessments of the likelihood that each candidate would win. These findings contribute evidence on the false consensus effect, the empirical regularity that own preferences tend to be positively associated with perceptions of social preferences. We used unique measures of preferences and perceptions that enabled respondents to express uncertainty flexibly. We studied a setting that would a priori seem inhospitable to false consensus—one where persons have little private information on social preferences but substantial common knowledge provided by media reports of election polls. PMID:22355121

  11. Candidates for GRL North American coeditor sought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), AGU's all-Union primary research journal, is seeking candidates and nominations for candidates to succeed Rob Van der Voo, whose term as North American Coeditor ends December 31, 1986. The successful candidate will be challenged to seek out interesting papers at the forefront of the geophysical sciences and to attempt to strike a balance in the publication of that science that is of interest to the entire AGU membership. While complementing the interests of Editor in Chief Alex Dessler, the successful candidate will also be challenged to maintain rapid publication time and minimize the publication of research that is routine. The North American Coeditor should be prepared to welcome controversial research papers that challenge conventional wisdom in all fields of interest to AGU. The individual selected for this prestigious position will have a vital role in making GRL an even more important and more exciting journal that readers look forward to receiving each month.

  12. Towards Treating Chemistry Teacher Candidates as Human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewthwaite, Brian Ellis

    2008-05-01

    This research inquiry investigates the factors influencing chemistry teacher candidates’ development during their extended practica in the second and final year of an After-Degree Bachelor of Education at a university in central Canada. A variety of data sources are used to identify the risk and protective factors impeding and contributing to the achievement of their chemistry pedagogical aspirations. Two theoretical frameworks, both having their origins in the pioneering work of Kurt Lewin, are used to conceptualize how a complex amalgam of personal attribute and environmental factors and the interplay among these factors influence teacher candidate developmental trajectories. The tenets of both Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological model and Learning Environment research provide insights into how the factors influencing teacher candidate development can be understood and systematically documented to provide a template for reflective consideration of the practicum experience for both teacher candidates and those involved in fostering the development of chemistry teacher candidates.

  13. Composition formulas of binary eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. P.; Dong, D. D.; Dong, C.; Luo, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1st-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism.

  14. Dixie Valley Bottoming Binary Unit

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Dale

    2014-12-21

    This binary plant is the first air cooled, high-output refrigeration based waste heat recovery cycle in the industry. Its working fluid is environmentally friendly and as such, the permits that would be required with a hydrocarbon based cycle are not necessary. The unit is largely modularized, meaning that the unit’s individual skids were assembled in another location and were shipped via truck to the plant site. The Air Cooled Condensers (ACC), equipment piping, and Balance of Plant (BOP) piping were constructed at site. This project further demonstrates the technical feasibility of using low temperature brine for geothermal power utilization. The development of the unit led to the realization of low temperature, high output, and environmentally friendly heat recovery systems through domestic research and engineering. The project generates additional renewable energy, resulting in cleaner air and reduced carbon dioxide emissions. Royalty and tax payments to governmental agencies will increase, resulting in reduced financial pressure on local entities. The major components of the unit were sourced from American companies, resulting in increased economic activity throughout the country.

  15. Binary complementary white LED illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John K.

    2001-12-01

    For widespread adoption in general-purpose illumination applications, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) must reliably produce a substantial amount of white light at a reasonable cost. While several white LED technologies appear capable of meeting the implicit technical requirements for illumination, their high purchase price (relative to traditional light sources) has heretofore impeded their market advancement. Binary complementary white (BCW) LED illuminators, first introduced commercially in late 1997, appear to offer great potential for addressing the commercial and technical demands of general-purpose illumination applications. Many properties of BCW LED systems derive from AlInGaP LED chips, the source of up to 80% of the luminous flux projected from BCW devices. This configuration yields a number of benefits, relative to other white LED approaches, including high luminous efficacy, low cost per lumen, and high luminous flux per discrete component. This document describes BCW illumination systems in detail, beginning with a review of generic LED attributes, basic illumination requirements and applied photometric and colorimetric techniques.

  16. Composition formulas of binary eutectics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y P; Dong, D D; Dong, C; Luo, L J; Wang, Q; Qiang, J B; Wang, Y M

    2015-01-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1(st)-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)(1 or 3). A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism. PMID:26658618

  17. Eclipse Binary System BB Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Leroy F.

    2008-05-01

    CCD ground-based photometry of the contact binary system BB Pegasus is presented along with analyses of the light curve. Recent radial velocity data with these obtained light curves were used to compute parameters. These results are compared with published values computed using spectroscopic values. The light curve displays total annular eclipses in the primary. The period is very short, equal to 0.3615015 days. A recent spectroscopic study indicates the existence of a third body. Three times of minimums were gathered for this poster paper and when added to those found in the literature a plotted quadratic ephemeris displays a sine-like variation of the O -- C curve indicating a tertiary component to the system. The light curve of this system shows an asymmetry in which the maximum after primary eclipse is higher than the other maximum, O'Connell effect. Two small cool stellar spots on star number 1 were used to make the parameter model fit the light curve data.

  18. Composition formulas of binary eutectics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Y. P.; Dong, D. D.; Dong, C.; Luo, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1st-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism. PMID:26658618

  19. Black hole binaries and microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2013-12-01

    This is a general review on the observations and physics of black hole X-ray binaries and microquasars, with the emphasize on recent developments in the high energy regime. The focus is put on understanding the accretion flows and measuring the parameters of black holes in them. It includes mainly two parts: i) Brief review of several recent review article on this subject; ii) Further development on several topics, including black hole spin measurements, hot accretion flows, corona formation, state transitions and thermal stability of standard think disk. This is thus not a regular bottom-up approach, which I feel not necessary at this stage. Major effort is made in making and incorporating from many sources useful plots and illustrations, in order to make this article more comprehensible to non-expert readers. In the end I attempt to make a unification scheme on the accretion-outflow (wind/jet) connections of all types of accreting BHs of all accretion rates and all BH mass scales, and finally provide a brief outlook.

  20. Spinodal decomposition in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto; Shinnar, Reuel; Triantafyllou, George

    1996-03-01

    We study the early stage of the phase separation of a binary mixture far from its critical point of demixing. Whenever the mixture of two mutually repulsive species is quenched to a temperature below its critical point of miscibility, the effect of the enthalpic repulsive force prevails upon the entropic tendency to mix, so that the system eventually separates itno two coexisting phases. We have developed a highly nonlinear model, in close analogy with the linear theory of Cahn and Hilliard, where a generalized free energy is defined in terms of two parameters ψ and a, the first describing the equilibrium composition of the two phases, ad the second denoting a characteristic length scale that is inversely proportional to the equilibrium surface tension. The linear stability analysis predicts that any perturbation of the initial mixture composition with wave number k smaller than √2ψ /a will grow exponentially in time, with a maximum growth corresponding to kmax= √ψ /a. A numerical solution of the equation shows that nonlinear effects saturate the exponential growth, and that the concentraiton distribution tends to a steady state, peroidic profile with wavelength λ=2πa/ √ψ corresponding to the fastest growing mode of the linear regime. The main result of our theoretical model is that this steady state does not depend on the form of the initial perturbation to the homogeneous composition profile.

  1. Vaccine candidates for malaria: what's new?

    PubMed

    Takashima, Eizo; Morita, Masayuki; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Although it is more than a decade since the parasite genome information was obtained, standardized novel genome-wide selection/prioritization strategies for candidacy of malaria vaccine antigens are still sought. In the quest to systematically identify candidates, it is impossible to overemphasize the usefulness of wheat germ cell-free technology in expressing quality proteins for the post-genome vaccine candidate discovery. PMID:26559316

  2. ASAS LIGHT CURVES OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS ECLIPSING BINARY STARS AND THE PARAMETERS OF HI Mon

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R.; Matson, R. A.; Caballero-Nieves, S.; Helsel, J. W. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: scaballero@chara.gsu.edu

    2011-07-15

    We present a catalog of 56 candidate intermediate-mass eclipsing binary systems extracted from the third data release of the All Sky Automated Survey. We gather pertinent observational data and derive orbital properties, including ephemerides, for these systems as a prelude to anticipated spectroscopic observations. We find that 37 of the 56, or {approx}66%, of the systems are not identified in the Simbad Astronomical Database as known binaries. As a specific example, we show spectroscopic data obtained for the system HI Mon (B0 V + B0.5 V) observed at key orbital phases based on the computed ephemeris, present a combined spectroscopic and photometric solution for the system, and give stellar parameters for each component.

  3. A test of the massive binary black hole hypothesis - Arp 102B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helpern, J. P.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    1988-01-01

    The emission-line spectra of several AGN have broad peaks which are significantly displaced in velocity with respect to the host galaxy. An interpretation of this effect in terms of orbital motion of a binary black hole predicts periods of a few centuries. It is pointed out here that recent measurements of the masses and sizes of many low-luminosity AGN imply orbital periods much shorter than this. In particular, it is found that the elliptical galaxy Arp 102B is the most likely candidate for observation of radial velocity variations; its period is expected to be about 3 yr. The H-alpha line profile of Arp 102B has been measured for 5 yr without detecting any change in velocity, and it is thus found that a rather restrictive observational test of the massive binary black hole hypothesis already exists, albeit for this one object.

  4. A BINARY ORBIT FOR THE MASSIVE, EVOLVED STAR HDE 326823, A WR+O SYSTEM PROGENITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu

    2011-12-15

    The hot star HDE 326823 is a candidate transition-phase object that is evolving into a nitrogen-enriched Wolf-Rayet star. It is also a known low-amplitude, photometric variable with a 6.123 day period. We present new, high- and moderate-resolution spectroscopy of HDE 326823, and we show that the absorption lines show coherent Doppler shifts with this period while the emission lines display little or no velocity variation. We interpret the absorption line shifts as the orbital motion of the apparently brighter star in a close, interacting binary. We argue that this star is losing mass to a mass gainer star hidden in a thick accretion torus and to a circumbinary disk that is the source of the emission lines. HDE 326823 probably belongs to a class of objects that produce short-period WR+O binaries.

  5. Parameter estimation and uncertainty for gravitational waves from binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Christopher; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Binary black holes are one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves that could be observed by Advanced LIGO. To accurately infer the parameters of an astrophysical signal, it is necessary to have a reliable model of the gravitational waveform. Uncertainty in the waveform leads to uncertainty in the measured parameters. For loud signals, this theoretical uncertainty could dominate statistical uncertainty, to be the primary source of error in gravitational-wave astronomy. However, we expect the first candidate events will be closer to the detection threshold. We look at how parameter estimation would be influenced by the use of different waveform models for a binary black-hole signal near detection threshold, and how this can be folded in to a Bayesian analysis.

  6. Search for gravitational waves from galactic and extra-galactic binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; Barr, B.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Beausoleil, R.; Belczynski, K.; Bennett, R.; Berukoff, S. J.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Bland, B.; Bochner, B.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgess, R.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cantley, C. A.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castiglione, J.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chickarmane, V.; Chin, D.; Christensen, N.; Churches, D.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C.; Coldwell, R.; Coles, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Csatorday, P.; Cusack, B. J.; Cutler, C.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Daw, E.; Debra, D.; Delker, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Credico, A. Di; Díaz, M.; Ding, H.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dupuis, R. J.; Edlund, J. A.; Ehrens, P.; Elliffe, E. J.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fallnich, C.; Farnham, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Findley, T.; Fine, M.; Finn, L. S.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Giaime, J. A.; Gillespie, A.; Goda, K.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Grandclément, P.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimmett, D.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E.; Gustafson, R.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammond, M.; Hanson, J.; Hardham, C.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Hartunian, A.; Heefner, J.; Hefetz, Y.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Hepler, N.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hindman, N.; Hoang, P.; Hough, J.; Hrynevych, M.; Hua, W.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jennrich, O.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnston, W. R.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, L.; Jungwirth, D.; Kalogera, V.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kells, W.; Kern, J.; Khan, A.; Killbourn, S.; Killow, C. J.; Kim, C.; King, C.; King, P.; Klimenko, S.; Koranda, S.; Kötter, K.; Kovalik, J.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Landry, M.; Langdale, J.; Lantz, B.; Lawrence, R.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lindquist, P.; Liu, S.; Logan, J.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Lyons, T. T.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majid, W.; Malec, M.; Mann, F.; Marin, A.; Márka, S.; Maros, E.; Mason, J.; Mason, K.; Matherny, O.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McHugh, M.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyoki, S.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Murray, P.; Myers, J.; Nagano, S.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R.; Newton, G.; Nocera, F.; Noel, J. S.; Nutzman, P.; Olson, T.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottewill, A.; Ouimette, D.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswaran, A.; Parameswariah, C.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pitkin, M.; Plissi, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rao, S. R.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Redding, D.; Regehr, M. W.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reilly, K. T.; Reithmaier, K.; Reitze, D. H.; Richman, S.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Rizzi, A.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Robison, L.; Roddy, S.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Rong, H.; Rose, D.; Rotthoff, E.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Salzman, I.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Sathyaprakash, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sazonov, A.; Schilling, R.; Schlaufman, K.; Schmidt, V.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Seader, S. E.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seel, S.; Seifert, F.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shapiro, C. A.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shu, Q. Z.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sievers, L.; Sigg, D.; Sintes, A. M.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, M. R.; Sneddon, P. H.; Spero, R.; Stapfer, G.; Steussy, D.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T.; Sumner, M. C.; Sutton, P. J.; Sylvestre, J.; Takamori, A.; Tanner, D. B.; Tariq, H.; Taylor, I.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Tibbits, M.; Tilav, S.; Tinto, M.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Vallisneri, M.; van Putten, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.

    2005-10-01

    We use 373 hours (≈15 days) of data from the second science run of the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors to search for signals from binary neutron star coalescences within a maximum distance of about 1.5 Mpc, a volume of space which includes the Andromeda Galaxy and other galaxies of the Local Group of galaxies. This analysis requires a signal to be found in data from detectors at the two LIGO sites, according to a set of coincidence criteria. The background (accidental coincidence rate) is determined from the data and is used to judge the significance of event candidates. No inspiral gravitational-wave events were identified in our search. Using a population model which includes the Local Group, we establish an upper limit of less than 47 inspiral events per year per Milky Way equivalent galaxy with 90% confidence for nonspinning binary neutron star systems with component masses between 1 and 3M⊙.

  7. Spectroscopic Subsystems in Nearby Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity (RV) monitoring of solar-type visual binaries has been conducted at the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5 m telescope to study short-period systems. The data reduction is described, and mean and individual RVs of 163 observed objects are given. New spectroscopic binaries are discovered or suspected in 17 objects, and for some of them the orbital periods could be determined. Subsystems are efficiently detected even in a single observation by double lines and/or by the RV difference between the components of visual binaries. The potential of this detection technique is quantified by simulation and used for statistical assessment of 96 wide binaries within 67 pc. It is found that 43 binaries contain at least one subsystem, and the occurrence of subsystems is equally probable in either primary or secondary components. The frequency of subsystems and their periods matches the simple prescription proposed by the author. The remaining 53 simple wide binaries with a median projected separation of 1300 AU have an RV difference distribution between their components that is not compatible with the thermal eccentricity distribution f (e) = 2e but rather matches the uniform eccentricity distribution.

  8. Eclipsing Binary B-Star Mass Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Amanda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    B-stars in binary pairs provide a laboratory for key astrophysical measurements of massive stars, including key insights for the formation of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes). In their paper, Martayan et al (2004) find 23 Be binary star pairs in NGC2004 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, five of which are both eclipsing and spectroscopic binaries with archival data from VLT-Giraffe and photometric data from MACHO. By using the Wilson eclipsing binary code (e.g., Wilson, 1971), we can determine preliminary stellar masses of the binary components. We present the first results from this analysis. This study also serves as proof-of-concept for future observations with the Photonic Synthesis Telescope Array (Eikenberry et al., in prep) that we are currently building for low-cost, precision spectroscopic observations. With higher resolution and dedicated time for observations, we can follow-up observations of these Be stars as well as Be/X-ray binaries, for improved mass measurements of neutron stars and black holes and better constraints on their origin/formation.

  9. Spectroscopic Orbits for Kepler FOV Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Rachel A.; Gies, Douglas R.; Williams, Stephen J.; Guo, Zhao

    2013-02-01

    We are currently involved in a four year program of precise eclipsing binary photometry with the NASA Kepler Observatory. Our goal is to search for variations in minimum light timing for intermediate mass eclipsing binaries. Such periodic variations will reveal the reflex motion caused by any distant, low mass object that orbits the close binary. it Kepler's unprecedented accuracy and continuous observations provide a unique opportunity to detect the low mass companions that are predicted to result from the angular momentum of the natal cloud. The goal of this proposal is to obtain blue spectra of short period (0.9-6d) eclipsing binaries, derive radial velocities, and produce a double-lined spectroscopic orbit (as well as estimates of the stellar effective temperatures, gravities, and metallicities). Combined with the it Kepler light curve, we will determine very accurate masses and radii for the members of the close binary, which will yield the mass-inclination product M_3 sin i for any companions detected by light travel time or other effects. An extended sample of eclipsing binaries with longer periods (up to 50d) is now being investigated to test whether the presence of a tertiary companion declines with increasing period. We propose to obtain a single spectrum at quadrature for the brightest 48 stars in this expanded sample to characterize the effective temperatures and total mass contained in these systems.

  10. Protoplanetary Disk Evolution: Singles vs. Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daemgen, Sebastian; Jayawardhana, Ray; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; Meyer, Elliot

    2016-01-01

    Based on a large number of observations carried out in the last decade it appears that the fraction of stars with protoplanetary disks declines steadily between ~1 Myr and ~10 Myr. We do, however, know that the multiplicity fraction of star-forming regions can be as high as >50% and that multiples have reduced disk lifetimes on average. As a consequence, the observed roughly exponential disk decay can be fully attributed neither to single nor binary stars and its functional form may need revision. Observational evidence for a non-exponential decay has been provided by Kraus et al. (2012), who statistically correct previous disk frequency measurements for the presence of binaries and find agreement with models that feature a constantly high disk fraction up to ~3 Myr, followed by a rapid (<~2 Myr) decline. We present results from our high angular resolution observational program to study the fraction of protoplanetary disks of single and binary stars separately. We find that disk evolution timescales of stars bound in close binaries (<100 AU) are significantly reduced compared to wider binaries. The frequencies of accretors among single stars and wide binaries appear indistinguishable, and are found to be lower than predicted from planet forming disk models governed by viscous evolution and photoevaporation.

  11. Terrestrial Planet Formation Around Close Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets around close binary stars, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. The sum of the masses of the two stars is one solar mass, and the initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and in the Alpha Centauri wide binary star system. Giant planets &are included in the simulations, as they are in most simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet accumulation in our Solar System. When the stars travel on a circular orbit with semimajor axis of up to 0.1 AU about their mutual center of mass, the planetary embryos grow into a system of terrestrial planets that is statistically identical to those formed about single stars, but a larger semimajor axis and/or a significantly eccentric binary orbit can lead to significantly more dynamically hot terrestrial planet systems.

  12. Texture classification by texton: statistical versus binary.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenhua; Zhang, Zhongcheng; Li, Xiu; Li, Qin; You, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Using statistical textons for texture classification has shown great success recently. The maximal response 8 (Statistical_MR8), image patch (Statistical_Joint) and locally invariant fractal (Statistical_Fractal) are typical statistical texton algorithms and state-of-the-art texture classification methods. However, there are two limitations when using these methods. First, it needs a training stage to build a texton library, thus the recognition accuracy will be highly depended on the training samples; second, during feature extraction, local feature is assigned to a texton by searching for the nearest texton in the whole library, which is time consuming when the library size is big and the dimension of feature is high. To address the above two issues, in this paper, three binary texton counterpart methods were proposed, Binary_MR8, Binary_Joint, and Binary_Fractal. These methods do not require any training step but encode local feature into binary representation directly. The experimental results on the CUReT, UIUC and KTH-TIPS databases show that binary texton could get sound results with fast feature extraction, especially when the image size is not big and the quality of image is not poor. PMID:24520346

  13. Texture Classification by Texton: Statistical versus Binary

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhenhua; Zhang, Zhongcheng; Li, Xiu; Li, Qin; You, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Using statistical textons for texture classification has shown great success recently. The maximal response 8 (Statistical_MR8), image patch (Statistical_Joint) and locally invariant fractal (Statistical_Fractal) are typical statistical texton algorithms and state-of-the-art texture classification methods. However, there are two limitations when using these methods. First, it needs a training stage to build a texton library, thus the recognition accuracy will be highly depended on the training samples; second, during feature extraction, local feature is assigned to a texton by searching for the nearest texton in the whole library, which is time consuming when the library size is big and the dimension of feature is high. To address the above two issues, in this paper, three binary texton counterpart methods were proposed, Binary_MR8, Binary_Joint, and Binary_Fractal. These methods do not require any training step but encode local feature into binary representation directly. The experimental results on the CUReT, UIUC and KTH-TIPS databases show that binary texton could get sound results with fast feature extraction, especially when the image size is not big and the quality of image is not poor. PMID:24520346

  14. An Initial Census of Eclipsing Binaries in the Pleiades and Hyades in Field 4 of the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Stassun, Keivan; Aigrain, Suzanne; Hillenbrand, Lynne; David, Trevor J.; Rebull, Luisa M.; K2 Young Clusters Team

    2016-01-01

    We have identified four new eclipsing binary members of the Pleiades and Hyades in the K2 Field 4 data.For one of those stars, where radial velocities are available, we report a complete SB1/EB orbital fit to the data.For the other EB candidates, we describe the information we have derived from the K2 light curve and what is known about the stars from the published literature.

  15. Halo Wide Binaries and Moving Clusters as Probes of the Dynamical and Merger History of our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine; Poveda, Arcadio; Hernández-Alcántara, A.

    2007-08-01

    Wide or fragile pairs are sensitive probes of the galactic potential, and they have been used to provide information about the galactic tidal field, the density of GMC and the amount of dark matter present in both the disk and the halo. Halo wide binaries and moving clusters, since they are likely to be the remains of past mergers or of dissolved clusters, can provide information on the dynamical and merger history of our Galaxy. Such remnants should continue to show similar motions over times of the order of their ages. We have looked for phase space groupings among the low metallicity stars of Beers et al. (2000) and of Schuster et al. (2004) and have identified a number of candidate moving clusters. In several of the moving clusters from the data of Schuster et al. we found a wide CPM binary already identified in the catalogue of wide binaries among high-velocity and metal-poor stars of Allen et al. (2000). Spectroscopic follow-up studies of these stars would confirm the physical reality of the group, as well as allow us to distinguish whether their progenitors are dissolved clusters or accreted systems. The proper motions of the Beers et al. stars are too small to appear in the CPM binary searches so far conducted, but the members of the moving groups we have identified are prime candidates for such searches.

  16. A Wide-field Survey for Transiting Hot Jupiters and Eclipsing Pre-main-sequence Binaries in Young Stellar Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Ryan J.; Macri, Lucas M.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Lambas, Diego G.; Colazo, Carlos; Stringer, Katelyn

    2016-09-01

    The past two decades have seen a significant advancement in the detection, classification, and understanding of exoplanets and binaries. This is due, in large part, to the increase in use of small-aperture telescopes (<20 cm) to survey large areas of the sky to milli-mag precision with rapid cadence. The vast majority of the planetary and binary systems studied to date consists of main-sequence or evolved objects, leading to a dearth of knowledge of properties at early times (<50 Myr). Only a dozen binaries and one candidate transiting Hot Jupiter are known among pre-main-sequence objects, yet these are the systems that can provide the best constraints on stellar formation and planetary migration models. The deficiency in the number of well characterized systems is driven by the inherent and aperiodic variability found in pre-main-sequence objects, which can mask and mimic eclipse signals. Hence, a dramatic increase in the number of young systems with high-quality observations is highly desirable to guide further theoretical developments. We have recently completed a photometric survey of three nearby (<150 pc) and young (<50 Myr) moving groups with a small-aperture telescope. While our survey reached the requisite photometric precision, the temporal coverage was insufficient to detect Hot Jupiters. Nevertheless, we discovered 346 pre-main-sequence binary candidates, including 74 high-priority objects for further study. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  17. A New Way to Confirm Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    What was the big deal behind the Kepler news conference yesterday? Its not just that the number of confirmed planets found by Kepler has more than doubled (though thats certainly exciting news!). Whats especially interesting is the way in which these new planets were confirmed.Number of planet discoveries by year since 1995, including previous non-Kepler discoveries (blue), previous Kepler discoveries (light blue) and the newly validated Kepler planets (orange). [NASA Ames/W. Stenzel; Princeton University/T. Morton]No Need for Follow-UpBefore Kepler, the way we confirmed planet candidates was with follow-up observations. The candidate could be validated either by directly imaging (which is rare) or obtaining a large number radial-velocity measurements of the wobble of the planets host star due to the planets orbit. But once Kepler started producing planet candidates, these approaches to validation became less feasible. A lot of Kepler candidates are small and orbit faint stars, making follow-up observations difficult or impossible.This problem is what inspired the development of whats known as probabilistic validation, an analysis technique that involves assessing the likelihood that the candidates signal is caused by various false-positive scenarios. Using this technique allows astronomers to estimate the likelihood of a candidate signal being a true planet detection; if that likelihood is high enough, the planet candidate can be confirmed without the need for follow-up observations.A breakdown of the catalog of Kepler Objects of Interest. Just over half had previously been identified as false positives or confirmed as candidates. 1284 are newly validated, and another 455 have FPP of1090%. [Morton et al. 2016]Probabilistic validation has been used in the past to confirm individual planet candidates in Kepler data, but now Timothy Morton (Princeton University) and collaborators have taken this to a new level: they developed the first code thats designed to do fully

  18. New observations and new models of spin-orbit coupling in binary asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Jean-Luc; Naidu, Shantanu

    2015-08-01

    The YORP-induced rotational fission hypothesis is the leading candidate for explaining the formation of binaries, triples, and pairs among small (<20 km) asteroids (e.g., Margot et al, Asteroids IV, subm., 2015). Various evolutionary paths following rotational fission have been suggested, but many important questions remain about the evolutionary mechanisms and timescales. We test hypotheses about the evolution of binary asteroids by obtaining precise descriptions of the orbits and components of binary systems with radar and by examining the system dynamics with detailed numerical simulations. Predictions for component spin states and orbital precession rates can then be compared to observables in our data sets or in other data sets to elucidate the states of various systems and their likely evolutionary paths.Accurate simulations require knowledge of the masses, shapes, and spin states of individual binary components. Because radar observations can provide exquisite data sets spanning days with spatial resolutions at the decameter level, we can invert for the component shapes and measure spin states. We can also solve for the mutual orbit by fitting the observed separations between components. In addition, the superb (10e-7--10e-8) fractional uncertainties in range allow us to measure the reflex motions directly, allowing masses of individual components to be determined.We use recently published observations of the binary 2000 DP107 (Naidu et al. AJ, subm., 2015) and that of other systems to simulate the dynamics of components in well-characterized binary systems (Naidu and Margot, AJ 149, 80, 2015). We model the coupled spin and orbital motions of two rigid, ellipsoidal bodies under the influence of their mutual gravitational potential. We use surface of section plots to map the possible spin configurations of the satellites. For asynchronous satellites, the analysis reveals large regions of phase space where the spin state of the satellite is chaotic. The

  19. Stability and Coalescence of Massive Twin Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Lombardi, J. C., Jr.; Rasio, F. A.; Kalogera, V.

    2015-06-01

    Massive stars are usually found in binaries, and binaries with periods less than 10 days may have a preference for near equal component masses (“twins”). In this paper we investigate the evolution of massive twin binaries all the way to contact and the possibility that these systems can be progenitors of double neutron star binaries. The small orbital separations of observed double neutron star binaries suggest that the progenitor systems underwent a common envelope phase at least once during their evolution. Bethe & Brown proposed that massive binary twins will undergo a common envelope evolution while both components are ascending the red giant branch (RGB) or asymptotic giant branch (AGB) simultaneously, also known as double-core evolution. Using models generated from the stellar evolution code EZ (evolve zero-age main sequence), we determine the range of mass ratios resulting in a contact binary with both components simultaneously ascending the RGB or AGB as a function of the difference in birth times, Δτ. We find that, even for a generous Δτ = 5 Myr, the minimum mass ratio {{q}min }=0.933 for an 8 {{M}⊙ } primary and increases for larger mass primaries. We use a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, StarSmasher, to study specifically the evolution of q = 1 common envelope systems as a function of initial component mass, age, and orbital separation. We also consider a q = 0.997 system to test the effect of relaxing the constraint of strictly identical components. We find the dynamical stability limit, the largest orbital separation where the binary becomes dynamically unstable, as a function of the component mass and age. Finally, we calculate the efficiency of ejecting matter during the inspiral phase to extrapolate the properties of the remnant binary from our numerical results, assuming the common envelope is completely ejected. We find that for the nominal core masses, there is a minimum orbital separation for a given component mass such that the

  20. Microlensing Towards M31: Candidates and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results of the SLOTT-AGAPE and POINT-AGAPE collaborations on a search for microlensing events in direction of the Andromeda galaxy, by using the pixel method, are reported. The detection of 4 microlensing events, some likely to be due to self--lensing, is discussed. One microlensing light curve is shown to be compatible with a binary lens. The present analysis still does not allow us to draw conclusions on the MACHO content of the M31 galaxy.

  1. Microlensing Towards M31:. Candidates and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novati, S. Calchi

    Recent results of the SLOTT-AGAPB and POINT-AGAPE collaborations on a search for microlensing events in direction of the Andromeda galaxy, by using the pixel method, are reported. The detection of 4 microlensing events, some likely to be due to self-lensing, is discussed. One microlensing light curve is shown to be compatible with a binary lens. The present analysis still does not allow us to draw conclusions on the MACHO content of the M31 galaxy.

  2. Spectroscopy of Kepler Candidate Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Mark E.; Howell, Steve B.; Silva, David R.; Szkody, Paula

    2014-02-01

    Currently the NASA Kepler Mission has identified 3449 exoplanet candidates, one third with estimated radii R_p<2.5R_oplus and orbiting faint (m_Kep>14.5) host stars. The NASA sponsored Kepler Follow-up Program is focusing on small exoplanet candidates (R_p<2.5R_oplus) and those in habitable zone orbits. Planet radii estimates depend on estimates of host star radii. Based on spectra previously obtained at the KPNO Mayall 4-m for 220 stars with candidate exoplanets, Everett et al. (2013) have shown that many host stars are larger than originally assumed (up to factor of 2). Therefore, the exoplanet candidates they host must be larger than originally assumed, which conversely reduces the number of known Earth- sized exoplanet candidates. Determination of the frequency of such Earth-sized planets is a cornerstone Kepler mission objective and of keen general interest. These Mayall spectra were also used to confirm the Buchhave et al. (2012) result that exoplanet candidates larger than 4R_oplus in short-period orbits are preferentially associated with host stars with solar or higher metallicity, using a fainter and larger sample of stars than Buchhave et al. In short, followup Mayall optical spectroscopy is critical to confirming the detection of Earth-sized exoplanets, a Kepler cornerstone goal, as well as characterizing the relationship between host star properties and planetary system properties. Here, we propose to continue our reconnaissance survey with a focus on the smallest (most rare) exoplanet candidates orbiting the faintest Kepler host stars.

  3. Jellyfish Galaxy Candidates at Low Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.; Omizzolo, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bettoni, D.; Moretti, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Jaffé, Y. L.; Vulcani, B.; Fritz, J.; Couch, W.; D'Onofrio, M.

    2016-03-01

    Galaxies that are being stripped of their gas can sometimes be recognized from their optical appearance. Extreme examples of stripped galaxies are the so-called “jellyfish galaxies” that exhibit tentacles of debris material with a characteristic jellyfish morphology. We have conducted the first systematic search for galaxies that are being stripped of their gas at low-z (z = 0.04-0.07) in different environments, selecting galaxies with varying degrees of morphological evidence for stripping. We have visually inspected B- and V-band images and identified 344 candidates in 71 galaxy clusters of the OMEGAWINGS+WINGS sample and 75 candidates in groups and lower mass structures in the PM2GC sample. We present the atlas of stripping candidates and a first analysis of their environment and their basic properties, such as morphologies, star formation rates and galaxy stellar masses. Candidates are found in all clusters and at all clustercentric radii, and their number does not correlate with the cluster velocity dispersion σ or X-ray luminosity LX. Interestingly, convincing cases of candidates are also found in groups and lower mass halos (1011-1014M⊙), although the physical mechanism at work needs to be securely identified. All the candidates are disky, have stellar masses ranging from log M/M⊙ < 9 to > 11.5 and the majority of them form stars at a rate that is on average a factor of 2 higher (2.5σ) compared to non-stripped galaxies of similar mass. The few post-starburst and passive candidates have weak stripping evidence. We conclude that disturbed morphologies suggestive of stripping phenomena are ubiquitous in clusters and could be present even in groups and low mass halos. Further studies will reveal the physics of the gas stripping and clarify the mechanisms at work.

  4. Exploring the Birth of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    More than half of all stars are thought to be in binary or multiple star systems. But how do these systems form? The misaligned spins of some binary protostars might provide a clue.Two Formation ModelsIts hard to tell how multiple-star systems form, since these systems are difficult to observe in their early stages. But based on numerical simulations, there are two proposed models for the formation of stellar binaries:Turbulent fragmentationTurbulence within a single core leads to multiple dense clumps. These clumps independently collapse to form stars that orbit each other.Disk fragmentationGravitational instabilities in a massive accretion disk cause the formation of a smaller, secondary disk within the first, resulting in two stars that orbit each other.Log column density for one of the authors simulated binary systems, just after the formation of two protostars. Diamonds indicate the protostar positions. [Adapted from Offner et al. 2016]Outflows as CluesHow can we differentiate between these formation mechanisms? Led by Stella Offner (University of Massachusetts), a team of scientists has suggested that the key isto examine the alignment of the stars protostellar outflows jets that are often emitted from the poles of young, newly forming stars.Naively, wed expect that disk fragmentation would produce binary stars with common angular momentum. As the stars spins would be aligned, they would therefore also launch protostellar jets that were aligned with each other. Turbulent fragmentation, on the other hand, would cause the stars to have independent angular momentum. This would lead to randomly oriented spins, so the protostellar jets would be misaligned.Snapshots from the authors simulations. Left panel of each pair: column density; green arrows giveprotostellar spin directions. Right panel: synthetic observations produced from the simulations; cyan arrows giveprotostellar outflow directions. [Offner et al. 2016]Simulations of FragmentationIn order to better

  5. CANDID: A flexible method for prioritizing candidate genes for complex human traits

    PubMed Central

    Hutz, Janna E.; Kraja, Aldi T.; McLeod, Howard L.; Province, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Genomewide studies and localized candidate gene approaches have become everyday study designs for identifying polymorphisms in genes that influence complex human traits. Yet, in general, the number of significant findings and the need to focus in smaller regions require a prioritization of genes for further study. Some candidate gene identification algorithms have been proposed in recent years to attempt to streamline this prioritization, but many suffer from limitations imposed by the source data or are difficult to use and understand. CANDID is a prioritization algorithm designed to produce impartial, accurate rankings of candidate genes that influence complex human traits. CANDID can use information from publications, protein domain descriptions, cross-species conservation measures, gene expression profiles, and protein-protein interactions in its analysis. Additionally, users may supplement these data sources with results from linkage, association and other studies. CANDID was tested on well-known complex trait genes using data from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. Additionally, CANDID was evaluated in a modeled gene discovery environment, where it ranked genes whose trait associations were published after CANDID’s databases were compiled. In all settings, CANDID exhibited high sensitivity and specificity, indicating an improvement upon previously published algorithms. Its accuracy and ease of use make CANDID a highly useful tool in study design and analysis for complex human traits. PMID:18613097

  6. Modelling of binary stars from observations. (Italian Title: Creare modelli di stelle binarie dalle osservazioni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, G.

    2011-08-01

    A review on basic physical parameters of closed binary stars introduces to modelling observational data. PHOEBE and other modelling software are described. As example of application, for the first time photometric elements of the eclipsing binary V400 Lyr are obtained.

  7. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF X-RAY BINARIES IN CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Evans, Daniel A.; Jordan, Andres; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Croston, Judith H.; Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Goodger, Joanna L.; Kainulainen, Jouni; Woodley, Kristin A.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarazin, Craig L.; Voss, Rasmus [Department of Astrophysics and others

    2013-04-01

    We present a spectral investigation of X-ray binaries (XBs) in NGC 5128 (Cen A), using six 100 ks Chandra observations taken over two months in 2007. We divide our sample into thermally and non-thermally dominated states based on the behavior of the fitted absorption column N{sub H}, and present the spectral parameters of sources with L{sub x} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. The majority of sources are consistent with being neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS LMXBs) and we identify three transient black hole (BH) LMXB candidates coincident with the dust lane, which is the remnant of a small late-type galaxy. Our results also provide tentative support for the apparent 'gap' in the mass distribution of compact objects between {approx}2-5 M{sub Sun }. We propose that BH LMXBs are preferentially found in the dust lane, and suggest this is because of the younger stellar population. The majority ({approx}70%-80%) of potential Roche lobe filling donors in the Cen A halo are {approx}> 12 Gyr old, while BH LMXBs require donors {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun} to produce the observed peak luminosities. This requirement for more massive donors may also explain recent results that claim a steepening of the X-ray luminosity function with age at L{sub x} {>=} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for the XB population of early-type galaxies; for older stellar populations, there are fewer stars {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun }, which are required to form the more luminous sources.

  8. Effects of lubricants on binary direct compression mixtures.

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, T; Halaçoğlu, M D; Türkoğlu, M

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of conventional lubricants including a new candidate lubricant on binary direct compression mixtures. Magnesium stearate (MGST), stearic acid (STAC), glyceryl behenate (COMP) and hexagonal boron nitride (HBN) were tested. The binary mixtures were 1:1 combinations of spray dried lactose (FlowLac 100), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (Emcompress), and modified starch (Starch 1500) with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH 102). Tablets were manufactured on a single-station instrumented tablet press with and without lubricants. In the case of unlubricated granules, the modified starch-microcrystalline cellulose mixture provided the highest percent compressibility value at 8.25%, spray dried lactose-microcrystalline cellulose mixture was 7.33%, and the dialcium phosphate dihydrate-microcrystalline cellulose mixture was 5.79%. Their corresponding tablet crushing strength values were: 104 N, 117 N, and 61 N, respectively. The lubricant concentrations studied were 0.5, 1, 2, and 4%. Effects of lubricant type and lubricant concentration on crushing strength were analyzed using a factorial ANOVA model. It was found that the Avicel PH 102-Starch 1500 mixture showed the highest lubricant sensitivity (110 N vs. 9 N), the least affected formulation was FlowLac-Avicel PH 102 mixture (118 N vs. 62 N). The crushing strength vs. concentration curve for MGST showed a typical biphasic profile, a fast drop up to 1% and a slower decline between 1 and 4%. The STAC, COMP, and HBN for all formulations showed a shallow linear decline of tablet crushing strength with increasing lubricant concentration. The HBN was as effective as MGST as a lubricant, and did not show a significant negative effect on the crushing strength of the tablets. The COMP and STAC also did not interfere with the crushing strength, however, they were not as effective lubricants as MGST or HBN. PMID:22491169

  9. Birth of Massive Black Hole Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Colpi, M.; Dotti, M.; Mayer, L.; Kazantzidis, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-19

    If massive black holes (BHs) are ubiquitous in galaxies and galaxies experience multiple mergers during their cosmic assembly, then BH binaries should be common albeit temporary features of most galactic bulges. Observationally, the paucity of active BH pairs points toward binary lifetimes far shorter than the Hubble time, indicating rapid inspiral of the BHs down to the domain where gravitational waves lead to their coalescence. Here, we review a series of studies on the dynamics of massive BHs in gas-rich galaxy mergers that underscore the vital role played by a cool, gaseous component in promoting the rapid formation of the BH binary. The BH binary is found to reside at the center of a massive self-gravitating nuclear disc resulting from the collision of the two gaseous discs present in the mother galaxies. Hardening by gravitational torques against gas in this grand disc is found to continue down to sub-parsec scales. The eccentricity decreases with time to zero and when the binary is circular, accretion sets in around the two BHs. When this occurs, each BH is endowed with it own small-size ({approx}< 0.01 pc) accretion disc comprising a few percent of the BH mass. Double AGN activity is expected to occur on an estimated timescale of {approx}< 1 Myr. The double nuclear point-like sources that may appear have typical separation of {approx}< 10 pc, and are likely to be embedded in the still ongoing starburst. We note that a potential threat of binary stalling, in a gaseous environment, may come from radiation and/or mechanical energy injections by the BHs. Only short-lived or sub-Eddington accretion episodes can guarantee the persistence of a dense cool gas structure around the binary necessary for continuing BH inspiral.

  10. The mass ratio in spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducati, J. R.; Penteado, E. M.; Turcati, R.

    2003-08-01

    The process of formation of binary and multiple stars is not yet fully understood. Possibilities range from simultaneous processes of condensation from the primeval nebula, to isolated star formation and eventual capture to form a double system. Models exist that predict success probabilities for each theoretical process, and comparison with observational data is crucial. Spectroscopic binaries are specially suited to be used as observational data, since several biases that can arise from general catalogues of binary stars can be avoided, including dominance of systems with large separations between components. A very important parameter in these studies is the mass ratio, the quocient of the masses of primary and secundary members. The histogram of mass ratios provides crucial information to models of binary formation, linked to condensation processes and evolutionaty rates.In this case, spectroscopic binaries can be chosen as the observational sample, provided that the spectrum of the primary is from a non-evolved, main-sequence star,whose mass can be derived reliably from its spectral type. Defining an adequate limiting magnitude (6.5), one avoids bias from eclipsing systems with high inclinations, since nearly all systems up to 6.5 mag were detected. In this paper, a critical review is presented of the existing methods for deriving the distribution of the mass ratios from spectroscopic binary orbital data. After showing the incorrectness of some results published in the litterature, the available data (Batten's 8th Catalogue, 1989) is discussed. Simulations for several distributions of mass ratios (constant, quadratic, etc) are performed. It is shown that the existing data permits only to assert that the spectroscopic binaries with small mass ratios (q < 0.4) are more frequent that those with large mass ratios (q = 0.9 to 1.0).

  11. Gravitational wave background from binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2011-10-15

    Basic aspects of the background of gravitational waves and its mathematical characterization are reviewed. The spectral energy density parameter {Omega}(f), commonly used as a quantifier of the background, is derived for an ensemble of many identical sources emitting at different times and locations. For such an ensemble, {Omega}(f) is generalized to account for the duration of the signals and of the observation, so that one can distinguish the resolvable and unresolvable parts of the background. The unresolvable part, often called confusion noise or stochastic background, is made by signals that cannot be either individually identified or subtracted out of the data. To account for the resolvability of the background, the overlap function is introduced. This function is a generalization of the duty cycle, which has been commonly used in the literature, in some cases leading to incorrect results. The spectra produced by binary systems (stellar binaries and massive black hole binaries) are presented over the frequencies of all existing and planned detectors. A semi-analytical formula for {Omega}(f) is derived in the case of stellar binaries (containing white dwarfs, neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes). Besides a realistic expectation of the level of background, upper and lower limits are given, to account for the uncertainties in some astrophysical parameters such as binary coalescence rates. One interesting result concerns all current and planned ground-based detectors (including the Einstein Telescope). In their frequency range, the background of binaries is resolvable and only sporadically present. In other words, there is no stochastic background of binaries for ground-based detectors.

  12. Direct Exoplanet Detection with Binary Differential Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Mamajek, Eric E.; Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Morzinski, Katie; Hinz, Philip M.; Kaib, Nathan

    2015-10-01

    Binaries are typically excluded from direct imaging exoplanet surveys. However, the recent findings of Kepler and radial velocity programs show that planets can and do form in binary systems. Here, we suggest that visual binaries offer unique advantages for direct imaging. We show that Binary Differential Imaging (BDI), whereby two stars are imaged simultaneously at the same wavelength within the isoplanatic patch at a high Strehl ratio, offers improved point spread function (PSF) subtraction that can result in increased sensitivity to planets close to each star. We demonstrate this by observing a young visual binary separated by 4″ with MagAO/Clio-2 at 3.9 μm, where the Strehl ratio is high, the isoplanatic patch is large, and giant planets are bright. Comparing BDI to angular differential imaging (ADI), we find that BDI’s 5σ contrast is ˜0.5 mag better than ADI’s within ˜1″ for the particular binary we observed. Because planets typically reside close to their host stars, BDI is a promising technique for discovering exoplanets in stellar systems that are often ignored. BDI is also 2-4× more efficient than ADI and classical reference PSF subtraction, since planets can be detected around both the target and PSF reference simultaneously. We are currently exploiting this technique in a new MagAO survey for giant planets in 140 young nearby visual binaries. BDI on a space-based telescope would not be limited by isoplanatism effects and would therefore be an even more powerful tool for imaging and discovering planets. This paper includes data obtained at the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. Phenoscape: Identifying Candidate Genes for Evolutionary Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Richard C; Su, Baofeng; Balhoff, James P; Eames, B Frank; Dahdul, Wasila M; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G; Vision, Todd J; Dunham, Rex A; Mabee, Paula M; Westerfield, Monte

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes resulting from mutations in genetic model organisms can help reveal candidate genes for evolutionarily important phenotypic changes in related taxa. Although testing candidate gene hypotheses experimentally in nonmodel organisms is typically difficult, ontology-driven information systems can help generate testable hypotheses about developmental processes in experimentally tractable organisms. Here, we tested candidate gene hypotheses suggested by expert use of the Phenoscape Knowledgebase, specifically looking for genes that are candidates responsible for evolutionarily interesting phenotypes in the ostariophysan fishes that bear resemblance to mutant phenotypes in zebrafish. For this, we searched ZFIN for genetic perturbations that result in either loss of basihyal element or loss of scales phenotypes, because these are the ancestral phenotypes observed in catfishes (Siluriformes). We tested the identified candidate genes by examining their endogenous expression patterns in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The experimental results were consistent with the hypotheses that these features evolved through disruption in developmental pathways at, or upstream of, brpf1 and eda/edar for the ancestral losses of basihyal element and scales, respectively. These results demonstrate that ontological annotations of the phenotypic effects of genetic alterations in model organisms, when aggregated within a knowledgebase, can be used effectively to generate testable, and useful, hypotheses about evolutionary changes in morphology. PMID:26500251

  14. Phenoscape: Identifying Candidate Genes for Evolutionary Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Richard C.; Su, Baofeng; Balhoff, James P.; Eames, B. Frank; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G.; Vision, Todd J.; Dunham, Rex A.; Mabee, Paula M.; Westerfield, Monte

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes resulting from mutations in genetic model organisms can help reveal candidate genes for evolutionarily important phenotypic changes in related taxa. Although testing candidate gene hypotheses experimentally in nonmodel organisms is typically difficult, ontology-driven information systems can help generate testable hypotheses about developmental processes in experimentally tractable organisms. Here, we tested candidate gene hypotheses suggested by expert use of the Phenoscape Knowledgebase, specifically looking for genes that are candidates responsible for evolutionarily interesting phenotypes in the ostariophysan fishes that bear resemblance to mutant phenotypes in zebrafish. For this, we searched ZFIN for genetic perturbations that result in either loss of basihyal element or loss of scales phenotypes, because these are the ancestral phenotypes observed in catfishes (Siluriformes). We tested the identified candidate genes by examining their endogenous expression patterns in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The experimental results were consistent with the hypotheses that these features evolved through disruption in developmental pathways at, or upstream of, brpf1 and eda/edar for the ancestral losses of basihyal element and scales, respectively. These results demonstrate that ontological annotations of the phenotypic effects of genetic alterations in model organisms, when aggregated within a knowledgebase, can be used effectively to generate testable, and useful, hypotheses about evolutionary changes in morphology. PMID:26500251

  15. Evaluating Historical Candidate Genes for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Martilias; Werge, Thomas; Sklar, Pamela; Owen, Michael J.; Ophoff, Roel; O’Donovan, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Cichon, Sven; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (e.g., COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1, and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia. PMID:25754081

  16. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P; Owen, M J; Ophoff, R A; O'Donovan, M C; Corvin, A; Cichon, S; Sullivan, P F

    2015-05-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia. PMID:25754081

  17. A Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Search for Brown Dwarf Binaries in the Pleiades Open Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouy, H.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Brandner, W.; Martín, E. L.; Allard, F.; Baraffe, I.; Fernández, M.

    2006-02-01

    We present the results of a high-resolution imaging survey for brown dwarf binaries in the Pleiades open cluster. The observations were carried out with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (Pavlovsky and coworkers) on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our sample consists of 15 bona fide brown dwarfs. We confirm two binaries and detect their orbital motion, but we did not resolve any new binary candidates in the separation range between 5.4 and 1700 AU and masses in the range 0.035-0.065 Msolar. Together with the results of our previous study (Martín and coworkers), we can derive a visual binary frequency of 13.3+13.7-4.3% for separations greater than 7 AU, masses in the range 0.055-0.065 Msolar, and mass ratios in the range 0.45-0.9binaries (distributions of separation and mass ratio) appear to be similar to their older counterparts in the field.

  18. High-energy signatures of binary systems of supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. E.; Vila, G. S.; Pérez, D.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Binary systems of supermassive black holes are expected to be strong sources of long gravitational waves prior to merging. These systems are good candidates to be observed with forthcoming space-borne detectors. Only a few of these systems, however, have been firmly identified to date. Aims: We aim at providing a criterion for the identification of some supermassive black hole binaries based on the characteristics of the high-energy emission of a putative relativistic jet launched from the most massive of the two black holes. Methods: We study supermassive black hole binaries where the less massive black hole has carved an annular gap in the circumbinary disk, but nevertheless there is a steady mass flow across its orbit. Such a perturbed disk is hotter and more luminous than a standard thin disk in some regions. Assuming that the jet contains relativistic electrons, we calculate its broadband spectral energy distribution focusing on the inverse Compton up-scattering of the disk photons. We also compute the opacity to the gamma rays produced in the jet by photon annihilation with the disk radiation and take into account the effects of the anisotropy of the target photon field as seen from the jet. Results: We find that the excess of low-energy photons radiated by the perturbed disk causes an increment in the external Compton emission from the jet in the X-ray band, and a deep absorption feature at energies of tens of TeVs for some sets of parameters. According to our results, observations with Cherenkov telescopes might help in the identification of supermassive black hole binaries, especially those black hole binaries that host primaries from tens to hundreds of million of solar masses.

  19. CHANDRA IDENTIFICATION OF 26 NEW BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES IN THE CENTRAL REGION OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.; Garcia, M. R.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-06-20

    We have previously identified 10 M31 black hole candidates (BHCs) in M31 from their X-ray properties alone. They exhibit ''hard state'' emission spectra that are seen at luminosities {approx}<10% Eddington in X-ray binaries (XBs) containing a neutron star (NS) or black hole, at luminosities that significantly exceed the NS threshold. Nine of these are associated with globular clusters (GCs); hence, these are most likely low mass X-ray binaries; eight are included in this survey. We have recently discovered that analysis of the long term 0.5-4.5 keV variability of XBs via structure functions allows us to separate XBs from active galactic nuclei, even though the emission spectra are often similar; this has enabled us to search for BHCs outside of GCs. We have identified 26 new BHCs (12 strong, 14 plausible) within 20' of the M31 nucleus (M31*), using 152 Chandra observations spaced over {approx}13 yr; some of our classifications were enhanced with XMM-Newton observations. Of these, seven appear within 100'' of M31*; this supports the theory suggesting that this region experiences enhanced XB production via dynamical processes similar to those seen in GCs. We have found a parameter space where our BHCs are separated from Galactic NS binaries: we show that modeling a simulated hard state spectrum with a disk blackbody + blackbody model yields parameters that lie outside the space occupied by NS binaries that are modeled this way. The probability that our BHCs all lie within the NS parameter space is {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -29}.

  20. EVOLUTION OF THE BINARY FRACTION IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Fregeau, John M.; Ivanova, Natalia; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2009-12-20

    Using our recently improved Monte Carlo evolution code, we study the evolution of the binary fraction in globular clusters. In agreement with previous N-body simulations, we find generally that the hard binary fraction in the core tends to increase with time over a range of initial cluster central densities for initial binary fractions approx<90%. The dominant processes driving the evolution of the core binary fraction are mass segregation of binaries into the cluster core and preferential destruction of binaries there. On a global scale, these effects and the preferential tidal stripping of single stars tend to roughly balance, leading to overall cluster binary fractions that are roughly constant with time. Our findings suggest that the current hard binary fraction near the half-mass radius is a good indicator of the hard primordial binary fraction. However, the relationship between the true binary fraction and the fraction of main-sequence stars in binaries (which is typically what observers measure) is nonlinear and rather complicated. We also consider the importance of soft binaries, which not only modify the evolution of the binary fraction, but can also drastically change the evolution of the cluster as a whole. Finally, we briefly describe the recent addition of single and binary stellar evolution to our cluster evolution code.

  1. A SEARCH FOR BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: DOUBLE-PEAKED [O III] AGNs IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. L.; Shields, G. A.; McMullen, C. C.; Salviander, S.; Bonning, E. W.; Rosario, D. J. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.ed E-mail: erin.bonning@yale.ed

    2010-06-10

    We present active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) having double-peaked profiles of [O III]{lambda}{lambda}5007, 4959 and other narrow emission lines, motivated by the prospect of finding candidate binary AGNs. These objects were identified by means of a visual examination of 21,592 quasars at z < 0.7 in SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7). Of the spectra with adequate signal-to-noise, 148 spectra exhibit a double-peaked [O III] profile. Of these, 86 are Type 1 AGNs and 62 are Type 2 AGNs. Only two give the appearance of possibly being optically resolved double AGNs in the SDSS images, but many show close companions or signs of recent interaction. Radio-detected quasars are three times more likely to exhibit a double-peaked [O III] profile than quasars with no detected radio flux, suggesting a role for jet interactions in producing the double-peaked profiles. Of the 66 broad-line (Type 1) AGNs that are undetected in the FIRST survey, 0.9% show double-peaked [O III] profiles. We discuss statistical tests of the nature of the double-peaked objects. Further study is needed to determine which of them are binary AGNs rather than disturbed narrow line regions, and how many additional binaries may remain undetected because of insufficient line-of-sight velocity splitting. Previous studies indicate that 0.1% of SDSS quasars are spatially resolved binaries, with typical spacings of {approx}10-100 kpc. If a substantial fraction of the double-peaked objects are indeed binaries, then our results imply that binaries occur more frequently at smaller separations (<10 kpc). This suggests that simultaneous fueling of both black holes is more common as the binary orbit decays through these spacings.

  2. Angular momentum evolution of Algol binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanoǧlu, C.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Dervişoǧlu, A.

    2006-11-01

    We have compiled the well-determined absolute parameters of Algol-type binaries. The lists contain the parameters of 74 detached and 61 semidetached close binaries. The double-lined eclipsing binaries provide not only the most accurate determinations of stellar mass, radius and temperatures but also distance-independent luminosity for each of their individual components. The distributions of the primary and secondary masses of detached binaries (DBs) are similar, whilst the secondary masses of the semidetached binaries (SDBs) are mostly smaller than 2 Msolar with a peak in the M2-bin (0.21-1.0). The components of the DBs are almost all located in the main-sequence band. On the contrary, the secondary components of the SDBs have larger radii and luminosity with respect to the same mass and the same effective temperature of main-sequence counterparts. They occupy a region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram between terminal-age main sequence and giants. Moreover, the total angular momenta and specific angular momenta are larger for the SDBs of orbital periods with P > 5 d than those of the shorter period ones. The specific angular momenta of SDBs with periods longer than 5 d are 65 per cent greater than that of the short period group with the same mass. The DBs and the SDBs with orbital periods longer and shorter than 5 d are separated into three groups in the J/M5/3 - q diagram. The SDBs with mass ratios greater than 0.3 and P > 5 d have almost the same angular momentum to those of DBs. However, the SDBs with short periods have the smallest angular momentum even though they have the same mass ratios. This result reveals that angular momentum loss (AML) considerably affects the evolution of close binary systems. Recently, Chen, Li & Qian suggested that, in addition to magnetic braking, a circumbinary disc may play an important role in AML from Algol-type binaries. Their calculations indicated that the evolution of Algol-type binaries can be significantly affected by

  3. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Deleuil, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonomo, A. S.; Almenara, J.-M.

    2011-10-01

    As CoRoT, the Kepler space mission found a large amount of planetary transit candidates for which radial velocity follow-up is necessary in order to establish the planetary nature and then, to characterize the mass of the transiting companion. We are following up some interesting Kepler candidates with the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted at the 1.93-m telescope in Observatoire de Haute Provence (France). More than one year after the first Kepler release, we will present the strategy used to select the most promising Kepler candidates, within reach of a detection with SOPHIE, using the experience of more than 4 years of CoRoT, SWASP and HAT radial velocity follow-up. We will also highlight the results of the first year of observations that led to the discovery of several new transiting exoplanets and help the understanding of the false positive rate of the Kepler mission.

  4. Developing Potential Candidates of Preclinical Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Founds, Sandra; Zeng, Xuemei; Lykins, David; Roberts, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for developing molecules of interest in preclinical preeclampsia from candidate genes that were discovered on gene expression microarray analysis has been challenged by limited access to additional first trimester trophoblast and decidual tissues. The question of whether these candidates encode secreted proteins that may be detected in maternal circulation early in pregnancy has been investigated using various proteomic methods. Pilot studies utilizing mass spectrometry based proteomic assays, along with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and Western immunoblotting in first trimester samples are reported. The novel targeted mass spectrometry methods led to robust multiple reaction monitoring assays. Despite detection of several candidates in early gestation, challenges persist. Future antibody-based studies may lead to a novel multiplex protein panel for screening or detection to prevent or mitigate preeclampsia. PMID:26580600

  5. Spherical hashing: binary code embedding with hyperspheres.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jae-Pil; Lee, Youngwoon; He, Junfeng; Chang, Shih-Fu; Yoon, Sung-Eui

    2015-11-01

    Many binary code embedding schemes have been actively studied recently, since they can provide efficient similarity search, and compact data representations suitable for handling large scale image databases. Existing binary code embedding techniques encode high-dimensional data by using hyperplane-based hashing functions. In this paper we propose a novel hypersphere-based hashing function, spherical hashing, to map more spatially coherent data points into a binary code compared to hyperplane-based hashing functions. We also propose a new binary code distance function, spherical Hamming distance, tailored for our hypersphere-based binary coding scheme, and design an efficient iterative optimization process to achieve both balanced partitioning for each hash function and independence between hashing functions. Furthermore, we generalize spherical hashing to support various similarity measures defined by kernel functions. Our extensive experiments show that our spherical hashing technique significantly outperforms state-of-the-art techniques based on hyperplanes across various benchmarks with sizes ranging from one to 75 million of GIST, BoW and VLAD descriptors. The performance gains are consistent and large, up to 100 percent improvements over the second best method among tested methods. These results confirm the unique merits of using hyperspheres to encode proximity regions in high-dimensional spaces. Finally, our method is intuitive and easy to implement. PMID:26440269

  6. Planet Scattering Around Binaries: Ejections, Not Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Shannon, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Transiting circumbinary planets discovered by Kepler provide unique insight into binary star and planet formation. Several features of this new found population, for example the apparent pile-up of planets near the innermost stable orbit, may distinguish between formation theories. In this work, we determine how planet-planet scattering shapes planetary systems around binaries as compared to single stars. In particular, we look for signatures that arise due to differences in dynamical evolution in binary systems. We carry out a parameter study of N-body scattering simulations for four distinct planet populations around both binary and single stars. While binarity has little influence on the final system multiplicity or orbital distribution, the presence of a binary dramatically effects the means by which planets are lost from the system. Most circumbinary planets are lost due to ejections rather than planet-planet or planet-star collisions. The most massive planet in the system tends to control the evolution. Systems similar to the only observed multi-planet circumbinary system, Kepler-47, can arise from much more tightly packed, unstable systems. Only extreme initial conditions introduce differences in the final planet populations. Thus, we suggest that any intrinsic differences in the populations are imprinted by formation.

  7. Eclipsing binaries in the MOST satellite fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribulla, T.; Rucinski, S. M.; Latham, D. W.; Quinn, S. N.; Siwak, M.; Matthews, J. M.; Kuschnig, R.; Rowe, J. F.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Weiss, W. W.

    2010-04-01

    Sixteen new eclipsing binaries have been discovered by the MOST satellite among guide stars used to point its telescope in various fields. Several previously known eclipsing binaries were also observed by MOST with unprecedented quality. Among the objects we discuss in more detail are short-period eclipsing binaries with eccentric orbits in young open clusters: V578 Mon in NGC 2244 and HD 47934 in NGC 2264. Long nearly-continuous photometric runs made it possible to discover three long-period eclipsing binaries with orbits seen almost edge-on: HD 45972 with P = 28.1 days and two systems (GSC 154 1247 and GSC 2141 526) with P > 25 days. The high precision of the satellite data led to discoveries of binaries with very shallow eclipses (e.g., HD 46180 with A = 0.016 mag, and HD 47934 with A = 0.025 mag). Ground-based spectroscopy to support the space-based photometry was used to refine the models of several of the systems. Based on photometric data from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission (jointly operated by Microsat Systems Canada Inc. (formerly the Space Division of Dynacon Inc.), the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - SpaceFlight Lab and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna), and on spectroscopic data from the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto, and Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institute Washington.

  8. Urey Prize Lecture: Binary Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J. L.

    2004-11-01

    The discovery of binary systems in the near-Earth, main belt, and Kuiper belt populations provides an abundance of new data that expand our knowledge of the physics and chemistry of the solar system. Binary minor planets form as a result of collisional, tidal, and capture processes that are important to study as they play major roles in the formation and evolution of planetary systems. The frequency of occurrence of such processes directly reflects the dynamical environment in the various populations. Observations of binaries provide a powerful way to measure the bulk properties of small bodies, which in turn lead to inferences about their composition and internal structure. These data may offer a rare glimpse of what physical and chemical conditions prevailed when protoplanets formed, and what subsequent evolution took place. In the case of the Kuiper Belt, the study of a handful of binaries forces us to rethink how dense and how bright these bodies are, and to significantly revise our current mass estimates for the entire population. The number of known binary minor planets has increased dramatically over the past few years, with roughly ten new discoveries each year. I will attempt to summarize recent developments, with examples drawn from my observations with the Hubble, Palomar, Keck, Arecibo and Goldstone telescopes.

  9. Planet scattering around binaries: ejections, not collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Shannon, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Transiting circumbinary planets discovered by Kepler provide unique insight into binary star and planet formation. Several features of this new found population, for example the apparent pile-up of planets near the innermost stable orbit, may distinguish between formation theories. In this work, we determine how planet-planet scattering shapes planetary systems around binaries as compared to single stars. In particular, we look for signatures that arise due to differences in dynamical evolution in binary systems. We carry out a parameter study of N-body scattering simulations for four distinct planet populations around both binary and single stars. While binarity has little influence on the final system multiplicity or orbital distribution, the presence of a binary dramatically affects the means by which planets are lost from the system. Most circumbinary planets are lost due to ejections rather than planet-planet or planet-star collisions. The most massive planet in the system tends to control the evolution. Systems similar to the only observed multiplanet circumbinary system, Kepler-47, can arise from much more tightly packed, unstable systems. Only extreme initial conditions introduce differences in the final planet populations. Thus, we suggest that any intrinsic differences in the populations are imprinted by formation.

  10. The binary white dwarf LHS 3236

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Hugh C.; Dahn, Conard C.; Canzian, Blaise; Guetter, Harry H.; Levine, Stephen E.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice K. B.; Stone, Ronald C.; Subasavage, John P.; Tilleman, Trudy; Walker, Richard L.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C.; Hartkopf, William I.; Ireland, Michael J.; Leggett, S. K.

    2013-12-10

    The white dwarf LHS 3236 (WD1639+153) is shown to be a double-degenerate binary, with each component having a high mass. Astrometry at the U.S. Naval Observatory gives a parallax and distance of 30.86 ± 0.25 pc and a tangential velocity of 98 km s{sup –1}, and reveals binary orbital motion. The orbital parameters are determined from astrometry of the photocenter over more than three orbits of the 4.0 yr period. High-resolution imaging at the Keck Observatory resolves the pair with a separation of 31 and 124 mas at two epochs. Optical and near-IR photometry give a set of possible binary components. Consistency of all data indicates that the binary is a pair of DA stars with temperatures near 8000 and 7400 K and with masses of 0.93 and 0.91 M {sub ☉}; also possible is a DA primary and a helium DC secondary with temperatures near 8800 and 6000 K and with masses of 0.98 and 0.69 M {sub ☉}. In either case, the cooling ages of the stars are ∼3 Gyr and the total ages are <4 Gyr. The combined mass of the binary (1.66-1.84 M {sub ☉}) is well above the Chandrasekhar limit; however, the timescale for coalescence is long.

  11. Planetary nebula progenitors that swallow binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I propose that some irregular messy planetary nebulae (PNe) owe their morphologies to triple-stellar evolution where tight binary systems evolve inside and/or on the outskirts of the envelope of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In some cases, the tight binary system can survive, in others, it is destroyed. The tight binary system might break up with one star leaving the system. In an alternative evolution, one of the stars of the broken-up tight binary system falls towards the AGB envelope with low specific angular momentum, and drowns in the envelope. In a different type of destruction process, the drag inside the AGB envelope causes the tight binary system to merge. This releases gravitational energy within the AGB envelope, leading to a very asymmetrical envelope ejection, with an irregular and messy PN as a descendant. The evolution of the triple-stellar system can be in a full common envelope evolution or in a grazing envelope evolution. Both before and after destruction (if destruction takes place), the system might launch pairs of opposite jets. One pronounced signature of triple-stellar evolution might be a large departure from axisymmetrical morphology of the descendant PN. I estimate that about one in eight non-spherical PNe is shaped by one of these triple-stellar evolutionary routes.

  12. Keck Imaging of Binary L Dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Koerner; Kirkpatrick; McElwain; Bonaventura

    1999-11-20

    We present Keck near-infrared imaging of three binary L dwarf systems, all of which are likely to be substellar. Two are lithium dwarfs, and a third exhibits an L7 spectral type, making it the coolest binary known to date. All have component flux ratios near 1 and projected physical separations between 5 and 10 AU, assuming distances of 18-26 pc from recent measurements of trigonometric parallax. These surprisingly similar binaries represent the sole detections of companions in 10 L dwarf systems that were analyzed in the preliminary phase of a much larger dual-epoch imaging survey. The detection rate prompts us to speculate that binary companions to L dwarfs are common, that similar-mass systems predominate, and that their distribution peaks at radial distances in accord both with M dwarf binaries and with the radial location of Jovian planets in our own solar system. To fully establish these conjectures against doubts raised by biases inherent in this small preliminary survey, however, will require quantitative analysis of a larger volume-limited sample that has been observed with high resolution and dynamic range. PMID:10534453

  13. FU Orionis: A Binary Star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchi; Apai, Dániel; Henning, Thomas; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2004-01-01

    By using the Adaptive Optics with a Laser for Astronomy system at the 3.6 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory, we detected a faint red star in the apparent vicinity of FU Ori, the prototype of the FUor outburst stars. Independent confirmation of the detection is obtained from archival Probing the Universe with Enhanced Optics/Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope images. The separation between the companion candidate and FU Ori is 0.50", and their brightness contrast is around 4 mag. We discuss the possible nature of the newly detected star based on near-infrared photometry and its proper motion relative to FU Ori. The photometric data are consistent with a nearby late-type main-sequence star, a background giant star, and a pre-main-sequence star. On the basis of the proper motion and the stellar surface density in the direction toward FU Ori, we argue that the probabilities of the first two options are very low.

  14. Binary drop coalescence in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungyong

    Experiments on binary drop collisions within an index-matched liquid were conducted for Weber numbers (We) of 1-50 and collision angles of 15-80° below the horizontal. Drop pairs of water/glycerin mixture were injected into silicone oil and, due to gravitational effects, traveled on downward trajectories before colliding. A dual-field high-speed PIV measurement system was employed to quantify drop trajectories and overall collision conditions while simultaneously examining detailed velocity fields near the collision interface. In the We range examined, for equal size drops, both rebounding and coalescing behavior occurred. The drops coalesced for We > 10 and rebounded for We < 10, and this boundary was found to be insensitive to collision angle. Coalescence was found to result from a combination of vortical flow within drops and strong drop deformation characteristic of higher We. Flow through the centers of opposing ring vortices, strengthened by drop deformation, enhanced drainage of the thin film in the impact region, leading to film rupture and coalescence. The collision angle affected the eventual location of film rupture, with the rupture location moving higher in the thin film region as the collision angle increased. The film rupture location correlated closely with the location of maximum downward velocity in the thin film. The time between collision and rupture increases with We until We = 30. For We > 30, the time decreases as We increases. Unequal size drop collisions with drop size ratios (Ds/D L) of 0.7 and 0.5 were also examined. Coalescence occurs above We* = 11 similar to equal size drops. As drop size ratio decreases, the intervening film deforms more. If the velocity ratio uL/u s < 1, the deformed interface becomes flat before coalescence. The rupture location varies due to the asymmetry of the drops. As collision offset increases (B > 0), the film rupture time is shortened and mixing of the fluid from both drops is enhanced after coalescence

  15. Binaries discovered by the SPY project . V. GD 687 - a massive double degenerate binary progenitor that will merge within a Hubble time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Kupfer, T.; Napiwotzki, R.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: The ESO SN Ia Progenitor Survey (SPY) aims at finding merging double degenerate binaries as candidates for supernova type Ia (SN Ia) explosions. A white dwarf merger has also been suggested to explain the formation of rare types of stars like R CrB, extreme helium or He sdO stars. Here we present the hot subdwarf B binary GD 687, which will merge in less than a Hubble time. Methods: The orbital parameters of the close binary have been determined from time resolved spectroscopy. Since GD 687 is a single-lined binary, the spectra contain only information about the subdwarf primary and its orbit. From high resolution spectra the projected rotational velocity was derived. Assuming orbital synchronisation, the inclination of the system and the mass of the unseen companion were constrained. Results: The derived inclination is i = 39.3+6.2-5.6 °. The mass M2 = 0.71-0.21+0.22 M_⊙ indicates that the companion must be a white dwarf, most likely of C/O composition. This is only the fourth case that an sdB companion has been proven to be a white dwarf unambiguously. Its mass is somewhat larger than the average white dwarf mass, but may be as high as 0.93 M_⊙ in which case the total mass of the system comes close to the Chandrasekhar limit. Conclusions: GD 687 will evolve into a double degenerate system and merge to form a rare supermassive white dwarf with a mass in excess of solar. A death in a sub-Chandrasekhar supernova is also conceivable. Based on observations at the Paranal Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programme No. 165.H-0588(A). Based on observations at the La Silla Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programmes No. 072.D-0510(B), 079.D-0288(A), 080.D-0685(A) and 084.D-0348(A).

  16. Potential Optical Counterparts to High Mass X-Ray and γ-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; McSwain, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    We seek to identify optical counterparts to several previously discovered high mass X-ray binaries and γ-ray sources from the Liu et al. and Fermi first year catalogues. Observations were taken with the CTIO 0.9-meter telescope, operated by the SMARTS Consortium. Photometric data were taken in the Strömgren b and y filters, as well as a narrow-band Hα filter. We present color-color diagrams of y-Hα vs. b-y for each field, and candidates for optical counterparts were selected based on their excesses of Hα emission. We also present spectral energy distributions for select candidates. This work is supported by the NSF REU site grant PHY-0849416, NASA DPR No. NNX09AT67G, and Lehigh University. We also thank the SMARTS Consortium, Rachael Roettenbacher, Tina Aragona, and Amber Marsh.

  17. Compact symmetric objects and supermassive binary black holes in the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, S. E.; Taylor, G. B.; Ortiz, A. A.; Tremblay, C. D.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Romani, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    We present multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) follow-up observations of VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey sources identified as likely compact symmetric objects (CSOs) or supermassive binary black holes (SBBHs). We also present new spectroscopic redshifts for 11 sources observed with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. While no new SBBHs can be confirmed from these observations, we have identified 24 CSOs in the sample, 15 of which are newly designated, and refuted 52 candidates leaving 33 unconfirmed candidates. This is the first large uniform sample of CSOs which can be used to elicit some of the general properties of these sources, including morphological evolution and environmental interaction. We have detected polarized emission from two of these CSOs the properties of which are consistent with active galactic nuclei unification schemes.

  18. SETI implications of gravitational assist via chaotic trajectories of binary objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeden, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Extrapolating from the technique of gravitational assist via chaotic trajectories of binary objects, this paper considers how such techniques might be used in other systems. We examine which types of systems are the best candidates for harvesting gravitational energy for payload ejection. We also consider what signatures might be present in either the asteroid orbits or radiation of the central body if extraterrestrial intelligences were to use such techniques about these candidate systems. The simulation studies show that current technology cannot approach the sensitivity needed to detect either of these signals. Instead, we provide these results as guidance to studies in coming decades on patterns that may indicate the use of an asteroid ejection system.

  19. The Angstrom Project: a new microlensing candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Darnley, M. J.; Newsam, A. M.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Street, C. Han B.-G. Park R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new microlensing candidate in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The candidate was discovered using difference imaging techniques by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  20. Wavefront sensing applications of binary optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Warren, M.E.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1994-02-01

    The advent of micro- or binary optics technology has made possible the fabrication of a variety of new optical devices. Optical fabrication is no longer limited by surfaces that can be made by grinding and polishing, or even diamond turning. In fact, optics with no symmetry, no smooth surfaces, and that perform multiple functions can be readily fabricated. While these optics have a large number of applications, they are extremely useful for systems that require arrays of small optics or aperture multiplexing, since these are fabricated using computer controlled photo-lithography and etching processes. We have applied binary optics technology to construct various wavefront sensing using four mask processes to create 16 level optics. They are binary in the sense that they use discrete phase levels, not in the sense of using only two levels (they might more properly be called digital optics). We have found that 16 levels is adequate for most systems, giving greater than 99% of efficiency.

  1. TIDAL NOVAE IN COMPACT BINARY WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jim; Lai Dong

    2012-09-01

    Compact binary white dwarfs (WDs) undergoing orbital decay due to gravitational radiation can experience significant tidal heating prior to merger. In these WDs, the dominant tidal effect involves the excitation of outgoing gravity waves in the inner stellar envelope and the dissipation of these waves in the outer envelope. As the binary orbit decays, the WDs are synchronized from outside in (with the envelope synchronized first, followed by the core). We examine the deposition of tidal heat in the envelope of a carbon-oxygen WD and study how such tidal heating affects the structure and evolution of the WD. We show that significant tidal heating can occur in the star's degenerate hydrogen layer. This layer heats up faster than it cools, triggering runaway nuclear fusion. Such 'tidal novae' may occur in all WD binaries containing a CO WD, at orbital periods between 5 minutes and 20 minutes, and precede the final merger by 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years.

  2. Galactic Binaries with eLISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelemans, G.

    2013-01-01

    I review what eLISA will see from Galactic binaries — double stars with orbital periods less than a few hours and white dwarf (or neutron star/black hole) components. I discuss the currently known binaries that are guaranteed (or verification) sources and explain why the expected total number of eLISA Galactic binaries is several thousand, even though there are large uncertainties in our knowledge of this population, in particular that of the interacting AM CVn systems. I very briefly sketch the astrophysical questions that can be addressed once these thousands of systems are detected. I close with a short outline of the electro-magnetic facilities that will come on line before eLISA will fly and the importance of developing analysis plans using both electro-magnetic and gravitational wave data.

  3. Improved study of metallic-line binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, H. A.; Levy, S. G.

    1985-10-01

    For the sake of completeness, a new study has been made of the frequency of binaries among classical metallic-line (Am) stars and of the characteristics of these systems. For an initial sample of 60 Am stars, about 20 coude spectra and radial velocities were obtained each. When combined with excellent published orbital elements for some systems, the new material yields 16 SB2s, 20 SB1s, and 20 visual and occultation companions not already counted as spectroscopic companions. Extensive details are given about the observations, radial velocities, and binary orbits. Evolutionary expansion during their main sequence lifetime is seen as an additional mechanism (besides tidal braking) acting in close binaries to lower rotational velocities below 100 km/s.

  4. The Circulation Pattern in Simulated Contact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Frank, J.; Tohline, J. E.

    2006-06-01

    We present a three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation of an initially symmetric (equal mass) binary where both components are marginally in contact. The simulation evolves the binary through approximately 150 orbital periods and within the first 20 orbits, a global velocity field is established that carries material between both components. In the equatorial plane, the flow is along a figure eight pattern with streams of material sliding past one another in the neighborhood of the inner Lagrange point. For our chosen equation of state, mass transfer is ultimately unstable in this binary though the growth time is long compared to the orbital period. We are therefore able to observe that the circulation pattern, once established, is quite close to steady state. We explore the role that similar steady state flows may play in real contact systems.

  5. Gravitational Wave Physics with Binary Love Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves from the late inspiral of neutron star binaries encode rich information about their internal structure at supranuclear densities through their tidal deformabilities. However, extracting the individual tidal deformabilities of the components of a binary is challenging with future ground-based gravitational wave interferometers due to degeneracies between them. We overcome this difficulty by finding new, approximate universal relations between the individual tidal deformabilities that depend on the mass ratio of the two stars and are insensitive to their internal structure. Such relations have applications not only to gravitational wave astrophysics, but also to nuclear physics as they improve the measurement accuracy of tidal parameters. Moreover, the relations improve our ability to test extreme gravity and perform cosmology with gravitational waves emitted from neutron star binaries.

  6. Compact binary hashing for music retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin S.

    2014-03-01

    With the huge volume of music clips available for protection, browsing, and indexing, there is an increased attention to retrieve the information contents of the music archives. Music-similarity computation is an essential building block for browsing, retrieval, and indexing of digital music archives. In practice, as the number of songs available for searching and indexing is increased, so the storage cost in retrieval systems is becoming a serious problem. This paper deals with the storage problem by extending the supervector concept with the binary hashing. We utilize the similarity-preserving binary embedding in generating a hash code from the supervector of each music clip. Especially we compare the performance of the various binary hashing methods for music retrieval tasks on the widely-used genre dataset and the in-house singer dataset. Through the evaluation, we find an effective way of generating hash codes for music similarity estimation which improves the retrieval performance.

  7. A binary spelling interface with random errors.

    PubMed

    Perelmouter, J; Birbaumer, N

    2000-06-01

    An algorithm for design of a spelling interface based on a modified Huffman's algorithm is presented. This algorithm builds a full binary tree that allows to maximize an average probability to reach a leaf where a required character is located when a choice at each node is made with possible errors. A means to correct errors (a delete-function) and an optimization method to build this delete-function into the binary tree are also discussed. Such a spelling interface could be successfully applied to any menu-orientated alternative communication system when a user (typically, a patient with devastating neuromuscular handicap) is not able to express an intended single binary response, either through motor responses or by using of brain-computer interfaces, with an absolute reliability. PMID:10896195

  8. Jets in black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    I will review selected aspects of observations and theory of jets in black-hole binaries. The radio and gamma-ray emission of jets differs significantly between the low and high-mass X-ray binaries, which appears to be due jet-wind interaction (in particular, formation of recollimation shocks) in the latter. Also, both radio and X-ray emission of the jets can be significantly absorbed in the stellar wind of the donors in high-mass binaries. I will also review the theory of radiative processes in jets, their contributions to broad-band spectra, estimates of the jet power, the role of black-hole spin in powering jets, and the possibility that the base of the jet is the main source of X-ray emission (the lamppost model).

  9. Tidal evolution in close binary systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopal, Z.

    1972-01-01

    Mathematical outline of the theory of tidal evolution in close binary systems of secularly constant total momentum. Following a general outline of the problem the basic expressions for the energy and momenta of close binaries consisting of components of arbitrary internal structure are established, and the maximum and minimum values of the energy (kinetic and potential) which such systems can attain for a given amount of total momentum are investigated. These results are compared with the actual facts encountered in binaries with components whose internal structure (and, therefore, rotational momenta) are known from evidence furnished by the observed rates of apsidal advance. The results show that all such systems whether of detached or semidetached type - disclose that more than 99% of their total momenta are stored in the orbital momentum. The sum of the rotational momenta of the constituent components amounts to less than 1% of the total -a situation characteristic of a state close to the minimum energy for given total momentum.

  10. Semiparametric binary model for clustered survival data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlin, Rifina; Ibrahim, Noor Akma; Arasan, Jayanthi; Bakar, Rizam Abu

    2015-10-01

    This paper considers a method to analyze semiparametric binary models for clustered survival data when the responses are correlated. We extend parametric generalized estimating equation (GEE) to semiparametric GEE by introducing smoothing spline into the model. A backfitting algorithm is used in the derivation of the estimating equation for the parametric and nonparametric components of a semiparametric binary covariate model. The properties of the estimates for both are evaluated using simulation studies. We investigated the effects of the strength of cluster correlation and censoring rates on properties of the parameters estimate. The effect of the number of clusters and cluster size are also discussed. Results show that the GEE-SS are consistent and efficient for parametric component and nonparametric component of semiparametric binary covariates.

  11. Hybrid Black-Hole Binary Initial Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundim, Bruno C.; Kelly, Bernard J.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Zlochower, Yosef; Campanelli, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    "Traditional black-hole binary puncture initial data is conformally flat. This unphysical assumption is coupled with a lack of radiation signature from the binary's past life. As a result, waveforms extracted from evolutions of this data display an abrupt jump. In Kelly et al. [Class. Quantum Grav. 27:114005 (2010)], a new binary black-hole initial data with radiation contents derived in the post-Newtonian (PN) calculations was adapted to puncture evolutions in numerical relativity. This data satisfies the constraint equations to the 2.5PN order, and contains a transverse-traceless "wavy" metric contribution, violating the standard assumption of conformal flatness. Although the evolution contained less spurious radiation, there were undesired features; the unphysical horizon mass loss and the large initial orbital eccentricity. Introducing a hybrid approach to the initial data evaluation, we significantly reduce these undesired features."

  12. Using Spitzer to Estimate the Kepler False Positive Rate and to Validate Kepler Candidates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.

    2012-01-01

    I present the results from an ongoing large campaign with the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Our goals are (1) to validate the planetary status of these Kepler candidates, (2) to estimate observationally the false positive rate, and (3) to study the atmospheres of confirmed planets through measurements of their secondary eclipses. Our target list spans of wide range of candidate sizes and periods orbiting various spectral type stars. The Spitzer observations provide constraints on the possibility of astrophysical false positives resulting from stellar blends, including eclipsing binaries and hierarchical triples. The number of possible blends per star is estimated using stellar population synthesis models and observational probes of the KOI close environments from direct imaging (e.g. Adaptive Optics, Speckle images, Kepler centroids). Combining all the above information with the shape of the transit lightcurves from the Kepler photometry, we compute odd ratios for the 34 candidates we observed in order to determine their false positive probability. Our results suggest that the Kepler false positive rate in this subset of candidates is low. I finally present a new list of Kepler candidates that we were able to validate using this method. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer, which is operated by JPL/Caltech, under a contract with NASA. Support was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  13. Spitzer Photometry of WISE-Selected Brown Dwarf and Hyper-Lumninous Infrared Galaxy Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Roger L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Cushing, Michael C.; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Bridge, Carrie R.; Cohen, Martin; Cutri, Roc M.; Donoso, Emilio; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Lonsdale, Carol; Mace, Gregory; Mainzer, A.; Marsh, Ken; Padgett, Deborah; Petty, Sara; Ressler, Michael E.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Stanford, Spencer A.; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Wright, Edward L.; Wu, Jingwen

    2012-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micrometer photometry and positions for a sample of 1510 brown dwarf candidates identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. Of these, 166 have been spectroscopically classified as objects with spectral types M(1), L(7), T(146), and Y(12). Sixteen other objects are non-(sub)stellar in nature. The remainder are most likely distant L and T dwarfs lacking spectroscopic verification, other Y dwarf candidates still awaiting follow-up, and assorted other objects whose Spitzer photometry reveals them to be background sources. We present a catalog of Spitzer photometry for all astrophysical sources identified in these fields and use this catalog to identify seven fainter (4.5 m to approximately 17.0 mag) brown dwarf candidates, which are possibly wide-field companions to the original WISE sources. To test this hypothesis, we use a sample of 919 Spitzer observations around WISE-selected high-redshift hyper-luminous infrared galaxy candidates. For this control sample, we find another six brown dwarf candidates, suggesting that the seven companion candidates are not physically associated. In fact, only one of these seven Spitzer brown dwarf candidates has a photometric distance estimate consistent with being a companion to the WISE brown dwarf candidate. Other than this, there is no evidence for any widely separated (greater than 20 AU) ultra-cool binaries. As an adjunct to this paper, we make available a source catalog of 7.33 x 10(exp 5) objects detected in all of these Spitzer follow-up fields for use by the astronomical community. The complete catalog includes the Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 m photometry, along with positionally matched B and R photometry from USNO-B; J, H, and Ks photometry from Two Micron All-Sky Survey; and W1, W2, W3, and W4 photometry from the WISE all-sky catalog.

  14. CONSTRAINING SUB-PARSEC BINARY SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN QUASARS WITH MULTI-EPOCH SPECTROSCOPY. I. THE GENERAL QUASAR POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

    2013-09-20

    We perform a systematic search for sub-parsec binary supermassive black holes (BHs) in normal broad-line quasars at z < 0.8, using multi-epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy of the broad Hβ line. Our working model is that (1) one and only one of the two BHs in the binary is active; (2) the active BH dynamically dominates its own broad-line region (BLR) in the binary system, so that the mean velocity of the BLR reflects the mean velocity of its host BH; (3) the inactive companion BH is orbiting at a distance of a few R{sub BLR}, where R{sub BLR} ∼ 0.01-0.1 pc is the BLR size. We search for the expected line-of-sight acceleration of the broad-line velocity from binary orbital motion by cross-correlating SDSS spectra from two epochs separated by up to several years in the quasar rest frame. Out of ∼700 pairs of spectra for which we have good measurements of the velocity shift between two epochs (1σ error ∼40 km s{sup –1}), we detect 28 systems with significant velocity shifts in broad Hβ, among which 7 are the best candidates for the hypothesized binaries, 4 are most likely due to broad-line variability in single BHs, and the rest are ambiguous. Continued spectroscopic observations of these candidates will easily strengthen or disprove these claims. We use the distribution of the observed accelerations (mostly non-detections) to place constraints on the abundance of such binary systems among the general quasar population. Excess variance in the velocity shift is inferred for observations separated by longer than 0.4 yr (quasar rest frame). Attributing all the excess to binary motion would imply that most of the quasars in this sample must be in binaries, that the inactive BH must be on average more massive than the active one, and that the binary separation is at most a few times the size of the BLR. However, if this excess variance is partly or largely due to long-term broad-line variability, the requirement of a large population of close

  15. Doppler follow-up of OGLE planetary transit candidates in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pont, F.; Bouchy, F.; Melo, C.; Santos, N. C.; Mayor, M.; Queloz, D.; Udry, S.

    2005-08-01

    We present the results of our high-resolution spectroscopic follow-up of 42 planetary transit candidates in Carina from the OGLE survey. This follow-up has already allowed the discovery of three new transiting exoplanets, OGLE-TR-111, 113 and 132. Here we analyse the data for the remaining 39 candidates. The radial velocity data show that most of them are eclipsing binaries, in very varied configurations. Precise radial velocity orbits were derived for 15 binaries, revealing 9 transits of small stars (generally M-dwarfs) in front of F-G dwarfs, 1 grazing equal-mass eclipsing binary, 4 triple and 1 quadruple systems. A further 14 systems appear binary, but the exact orbit is uncertain or was not determined. 2 objects do not show any radial velocity variations in phase with the transit signal, and 6 do not possess spectral lines strong enough for a reliable cross-correlation function to be measured. Among these last two categories, up to 6 objects are suspected false positives of the photometric transit detection. 2 objects are unsolved cases that deserve further observations. Our study illustrates the wide variety of cases that can mimic photometric planetary transits, and the importance of spectroscopic follow-up. Multi-fiber capacities and an optimized follow-up strategy, which we present here, can help deal with the high number of candidates that are likely to be found in the near future. An important by-product of this study is the determination of exact masses and radii for five very low-mass stars, including two at the very edge of the stellar domain, OGLE-TR-106 (M=0.116± 0.021 {M}_⊙) and OGLE-TR-122 (M=0.092 ± 0.009 {M}_⊙). The radius of these objects is consistent with theoretical expectations. Two further objects, OGLE-TR-123 and OGLE-TR-129, may harbour transiting companions near the brown-dwarf/stellar limit (M≃ 0.07 {M}_⊙), whose confirmation requires further high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring. No transiting massive planets (M=2{-}10 {M

  16. Reconciliation with Non-Binary Species Trees

    PubMed Central

    Vernot, Benjamin; Stolzer, Maureen; Goldman, Aiton

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reconciliation extracts information from the topological incongruence between gene and species trees to infer duplications and losses in the history of a gene family. The inferred duplication-loss histories provide valuable information for a broad range of biological applications, including ortholog identification, estimating gene duplication times, and rooting and correcting gene trees. While reconciliation for binary trees is a tractable and well studied problem, there are no algorithms for reconciliation with non-binary species trees. Yet a striking proportion of species trees are non-binary. For example, 64% of branch points in the NCBI taxonomy have three or more children. When applied to non-binary species trees, current algorithms overestimate the number of duplications because they cannot distinguish between duplication and incomplete lineage sorting. We present the first algorithms for reconciling binary gene trees with non-binary species trees under a duplication-loss parsimony model. Our algorithms utilize an efficient mapping from gene to species trees to infer the minimum number of duplications in O(|VG| · (kS + hS)) time, where |VG| is the number of nodes in the gene tree, hS is the height of the species tree and kS is the size of its largest polytomy. We present a dynamic programming algorithm which also minimizes the total number of losses. Although this algorithm is exponential in the size of the largest polytomy, it performs well in practice for polytomies with outdegree of 12 or less. We also present a heuristic which estimates the minimal number of losses in polynomial time. In empirical tests, this algorithm finds an optimal loss history 99% of the time. Our algorithms have been implemented in Notung, a robust, production quality, tree-fitting program, which provides a graphical user interface for exploratory analysis and also supports automated, high-throughput analysis of large data sets. PMID:18808330

  17. Binary stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, R.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Bouvier, J.; Duchêne, G.; Quirrenbach, A.; Zinnecker, H.

    2006-11-01

    We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5-15 arcmin (0.65-2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13 arcsec-1.12 arcsec (60-500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 M⊙ is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from θ^1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.

  18. Binary Stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Rainer; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; McCaughrean, Mark J.; Bouvier, Jerome; Duchêne, Gaspard; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Zinnecker, Hans

    2007-08-01

    We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5 - 15 arcmin (0.65 - 2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13 - 1.12 arcsec (60 - 500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 Msun is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from θ1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.

  19. Signatures of rotating binaries in microlensing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; Giordano, M.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.

    2014-03-01

    Gravitational microlensing offers a powerful method with which to probe a variety of binary-lens systems, as the binarity of the lens introduces deviations from the typical (single-lens) Paczyński behaviour in the event light curves. Generally, a static binary lens is considered to fit the observed light curve and, when the orbital motion is taken into account, an oversimplified model is usually employed. In this paper, we treat the binary-lens motion in a realistic way and focus on simulated events that are fitted well by a Paczyński curve. We show that an accurate timing analysis of the residuals (calculated with respect to the best-fitting Paczyński model) is usually sufficient to infer the orbital period of the binary lens. It goes without saying that the independently estimated period may be used to further constrain the orbital parameters obtained by the best-fitting procedure, which often gives degenerate solutions. We also present a preliminary analysis of the event OGLE-2011-BLG-1127 / MOA-2011-BLG-322, which has been recognized to be the result of a binary lens. The period analysis results in a periodicity of ≃12 d, which confirms the oscillation of the observed data around the best-fitting model. The estimated periodicity is probably associated with an intrinsic variability of the source star, and therefore there is an opportunity to use this technique to investigate either the intrinsic variability of the source or the effects induced by the binary-lens orbital motion.

  20. Distinguishing Compact Binary Population Synthesis Models Using Gravitational Wave Observations of Coalescing Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Simon; Ohme, Frank; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The coalescence of compact binaries containing neutron stars or black holes is one of the most promising signals for advanced ground-based laser interferometer gravitational-wave (GW) detectors, with the first direct detections expected over the next few years. The rate of binary coalescences and the distribution of component masses is highly uncertain, and population synthesis models predict a wide range of plausible values. Poorly constrained parameters in population synthesis models correspond to poorly understood astrophysics at various stages in the evolution of massive binary stars, the progenitors of binary neutron star and binary black hole systems. These include effects such as supernova kick velocities, parameters governing the energetics of common envelope evolution and the strength of stellar winds. Observing multiple binary black hole systems through GWs will allow us to infer details of the astrophysical mechanisms that lead to their formation. Here we simulate GW observations from a series of population synthesis models including the effects of known selection biases, measurement errors and cosmology. We compare the predictions arising from different models and show that we will be able to distinguish between them with observations (or the lack of them) from the early runs of the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. This will allow us to narrow down the large parameter space for binary evolution models.