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Sample records for binaural signal detection

  1. Leak detection utilizing analog binaural (VLSI) techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A detection method and system utilizing silicon models of the traveling wave structure of the human cochlea to spatially and temporally locate a specific sound source in the presence of high noise pandemonium. The detection system combines two-dimensional stereausis representations, which are output by at least three VLSI binaural hearing chips, to generate a three-dimensional stereausis representation including both binaural and spectral information which is then used to locate the sound source.

  2. Binaural signal analysis of diffuse sound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novo, Pedro A.

    2004-10-01

    The simulation and the binaural recording of sounds produced by large crowds and rain impact sounds has produced an unexpected result. The listeners have reported that the auditory events were mainly concentrated to the left and to right, although the sound sources were equally distributed around the listeners. A similar result was reported with binaural recordings of applause. The results of a binaural signal analysis suggest that the key aspect regarding the lateral position dominance of the auditory events is connected to the sections where the cross-correlation coefficient assumes negative values. A comparison between normalized and non-normalized cross-correlation function predictions indicates that the latter is a better predictor for the cases studied. An adaptation period of several seconds was reported by several listeners. It is suggested that this adaptation period is related to the variations of the cross-correlation, which only average out after, approximately 2 s. The binaural impulse responses of a concert hall at two different listener positions have been analyzed in the light of the previous findings. In particular the diffuse sound field buildup will be analyzed in detail. Implications for the auditory source width and listener envelopment will be discussed.

  3. Analog Binaural Circuits for Detecting and Locating Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2003-01-01

    Very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) analog binaural signal-processing circuits have been proposed for use in detecting and locating leaks that emit noise in the ultrasonic frequency range. These circuits would be designed to function even in the presence of intense lower-frequency background noise that could include sounds associated with flow and pumping. Each of the proposed circuits would include the approximate electronic equivalent of a right and a left cochlea plus correlator circuits. A pair of transducers (microphones or accelerometers), corresponding to right and left ears, would provide the inputs to their respective cochleas from different locations (e.g., from different positions along a pipe). The correlation circuits plus some additional external circuits would determine the difference between the times of arrival of a common leak sound at the two transducers. Then the distance along the pipe from either transducer to the leak could be estimated from the time difference and the speed of sound along the pipe. If three or more pairs of transducers and cochlear/correlator circuits were available and could suitably be positioned, it should be possible to locate a leak in three dimensions by use of sound propagating through air.

  4. The Effect of Asymmetrical Signal Degradation on Binaural Speech Recognition in Children and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothpletz, Ann M.; Tharpe, Anne Marie; Grantham, D. Wesley

    2004-01-01

    To determine the effect of asymmetrical signal degradation on binaural speech recognition, 28 children and 14 adults were administered a sentence recognition task amidst multitalker babble. There were 3 listening conditions: (a) monaural, with mild degradation in 1 ear; (b) binaural, with mild degradation in both ears (symmetric degradation); and…

  5. Subjective diffuseness of music signals convolved with binaural impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Tronchin, Lamberto; Cocchi, Alessandro; Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2011-07-01

    The spatial impression of sound in a hall can be quantified using sound field factors such as the interaural cross-correlation coefficient (IACC) calculated from binaural impulse response (BIR), henceforth denoted by IACC IR. The subjective diffuseness for the listener is a spatial attribute which depends on factors associated both with the source signal and with the actual sound field, and is quantified using the IACC of the signal received by the listener, henceforth denoted by IACC SR. Therefore, the subjective diffuseness in a given hall may change with the music. The aims of this study are to estimate the IACC SR from the IACC IR and the factors, which is obtained from autocorrelation function (ACF) of music signal, and to evaluate the subjective diffuseness by these factors. First, the relationship between the IACC IR and IACC SR was investigated. Second, subjective diffuseness was measured by a psycho-acoustical experiment. As a result, the IACC SR could be estimated from the IACC IR of the BIR and the effective duration ( τe) from the ACF of music signal. It was found that the effects of BIRs on subjective diffuseness could be evaluated by IACC IR for almost all subjects, while the effects of music signals could be evaluated by the τe and the width of the peak at τ=0 ( Wϕ(0) ) of the ACF.

  6. 4D time-frequency representation for binaural speech signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhael, Raed; Szu, Harold H.

    2006-04-01

    Hearing is the ability to detect and process auditory information produced by the vibrating hair cilia residing in the corti of the ears to the auditory cortex of the brain via the auditory nerve. The primary and secondary corti of the brain interact with one another to distinguish and correlate the received information by distinguishing the varying spectrum of arriving frequencies. Binaural hearing is nature's way of employing the power inherent in working in pairs to process information, enhance sound perception, and reduce undesired noise. One ear might play a prominent role in sound recognition, while the other reinforces their perceived mutual information. Developing binaural hearing aid devices can be crucial in emulating the working powers of two ears and may be a step closer to significantly alleviating hearing loss of the inner ear. This can be accomplished by combining current speech research to already existing technologies such as RF communication between PDAs and Bluetooth. Ear Level Instrument (ELI) developed by Micro-tech Hearing Instruments and Starkey Laboratories is a good example of a digital bi-directional signal communicating between a PDA/mobile phone and Bluetooth. The agreement and disagreement of arriving auditory information to the Bluetooth device can be classified as sound and noise, respectively. Finding common features of arriving sound using a four coordinate system for sound analysis (four dimensional time-frequency representation), noise can be greatly reduced and hearing aids would become more efficient. Techniques developed by Szu within an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Blind Source Separation (BSS), Adaptive Wavelets Transform (AWT), and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) hold many possibilities to the improvement of acoustic segmentation of phoneme, all of which will be discussed in this paper. Transmitted and perceived acoustic speech signal will improve, as the binaural hearing aid will emulate two ears in sound

  7. Binaural Sound Localizer for Azimuthal Movement Detection Based on Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keonwook; Choi, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Sound localization can be realized by utilizing the physics of acoustics in various methods. This paper investigates a novel detection architecture for the azimuthal movement of sound source based on the interaural level difference (ILD) between two receivers. One of the microphones in the system is surrounded by barriers of various heights in order to cast the direction dependent diffraction of the incoming signal. The gradient analysis of the ILD between the structured and unstructured microphone demonstrates the rotation directions as clockwise, counter clockwise, and no rotation of the sound source. Acoustic experiments with different types of sound source over a wide range of target movements show that the average true positive and false positive rates are 67% and 16%, respectively. Spectral analysis demonstrates that the low frequency delivers decreased true and false positive rates and the high frequency presents increases of both rates, overall. PMID:23112617

  8. The Binaural Masking-Level Difference of Mandarin Tone Detection and the Binaural Intelligibility-Level Difference of Mandarin Tone Recognition in the Presence of Speech-Spectrum Noise

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cheng-Yu; Li, Pei-Chun; Chiang, Yuan-Chuan; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2015-01-01

    Binaural hearing involves using information relating to the differences between the signals that arrive at the two ears, and it can make it easier to detect and recognize signals in a noisy environment. This phenomenon of binaural hearing is quantified in laboratory studies as the binaural masking-level difference (BMLD). Mandarin is one of the most commonly used languages, but there are no publication values of BMLD or BILD based on Mandarin tones. Therefore, this study investigated the BMLD and BILD of Mandarin tones. The BMLDs of Mandarin tone detection were measured based on the detection threshold differences for the four tones of the voiced vowels /i/ (i.e., /i1/, /i2/, /i3/, and /i4/) and /u/ (i.e., /u1/, /u2/, /u3/, and /u4/) in the presence of speech-spectrum noise when presented interaurally in phase (S0N0) and interaurally in antiphase (SπN0). The BILDs of Mandarin tone recognition in speech-spectrum noise were determined as the differences in the target-to-masker ratio (TMR) required for 50% correct tone recognitions between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions. The detection thresholds for the four tones of /i/ and /u/ differed significantly (p<0.001) between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions. The average detection thresholds of Mandarin tones were all lower in the SπN0 condition than in the S0N0 condition, and the BMLDs ranged from 7.3 to 11.5 dB. The TMR for 50% correct Mandarin tone recognitions differed significantly (p<0.001) between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions, at –13.4 and –18.0 dB, respectively, with a mean BILD of 4.6 dB. The study showed that the thresholds of Mandarin tone detection and recognition in the presence of speech-spectrum noise are improved when phase inversion is applied to the target speech. The average BILDs of Mandarin tones are smaller than the average BMLDs of Mandarin tones. PMID:25835987

  9. Binaural Interaction in Specific Language Impairment: An Auditory Evoked Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Elaine M; Adams, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether auditory binaural interaction, defined as any difference between binaurally evoked responses and the sum of monaurally evoked responses, which is thought to index functions involved in the localization and detection of signals in background noise, is atypical in a group of children with specific language…

  10. Benefits to Speech Perception in Noise From the Binaural Integration of Electric and Acoustic Signals in Simulated Unilateral Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Morris, Saffron; Kitterick, Pádraig Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study used vocoder simulations with normal-hearing (NH) listeners to (1) measure their ability to integrate speech information from an NH ear and a simulated cochlear implant (CI), and (2) investigate whether binaural integration is disrupted by a mismatch in the delivery of spectral information between the ears arising from a misalignment in the mapping of frequency to place. Design: Eight NH volunteers participated in the study and listened to sentences embedded in background noise via headphones. Stimuli presented to the left ear were unprocessed. Stimuli presented to the right ear (referred to as the CI-simulation ear) were processed using an eight-channel noise vocoder with one of the three processing strategies. An Ideal strategy simulated a frequency-to-place map across all channels that matched the delivery of spectral information between the ears. A Realistic strategy created a misalignment in the mapping of frequency to place in the CI-simulation ear where the size of the mismatch between the ears varied across channels. Finally, a Shifted strategy imposed a similar degree of misalignment in all channels, resulting in consistent mismatch between the ears across frequency. The ability to report key words in sentences was assessed under monaural and binaural listening conditions and at signal to noise ratios (SNRs) established by estimating speech-reception thresholds in each ear alone. The SNRs ensured that the monaural performance of the left ear never exceeded that of the CI-simulation ear. The advantages of binaural integration were calculated by comparing binaural performance with monaural performance using the CI-simulation ear alone. Thus, these advantages reflected the additional use of the experimentally constrained left ear and were not attributable to better-ear listening. Results: Binaural performance was as accurate as, or more accurate than, monaural performance with the CI-simulation ear alone. When both ears supported a

  11. Responses of neurons in the auditory pathway of the barn owl to partially correlated binaural signals.

    PubMed

    Albeck, Y; Konishi, M

    1995-10-01

    1. Extracellular single-unit recording in anesthetized barn owls was used to study neuronal response to dichotic stimuli of variable binaural correlation (BC). Recordings were made in the output fibers of nucleus laminaris (NL), the anterior division of the ventral lateral lemniscal nucleus (VLVa), the core of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICcC), the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICcLS), and the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx). 2. The response of all neurons sensitive to interaural time difference (ITD) varied with BC. The relationship between BC and impulse number fits a linear, a parabolic, or a ramp model. A linear or parabolic model fits most neurons in low-level nuclei. Higher order neurons in ICx did not respond to noise bursts with strong negative binaural correlation, creating a ramp-like response to BC. 3. A neuron's ability to detect ITD varied as a function of BC. Conversely, a neuron's response to BC changed with ITD. Neurons in NL, VLVa, and ICcC show almost periodic ITD response curves. In these neurons peaks and troughs of ITD response curves diminished as BC decreased, creating a flat ITD response when BC = 0. When BC was set to -1, the most favorable ITD became the least favorable one and vice versa. The ITD response curve of ICx neurons usually has a single dominant peak. The response of those neurons to a negatively correlated noise pair (BC = -1) showed two ITD peaks, flanking the position of the primary peak. 4. The parabolic BC response of NL neurons fits the prediction of the cross-correlation model, assuming half-wave rectification of the sound by the cochlea. Linear response is not predicted by the model. However, the parabolic and the linear neurons probably do not belong to two distinct groups as the difference between them is not statistically significant. Thus, the cross-correlation model provides a good description of the binaural response not only in NL but also in

  12. Binaural beat salience

    PubMed Central

    Grose, John H.; Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of binaural beats have noted individual variability and response lability, but little attention has been paid to the salience of the binaural beat percept. The purpose of this study was to gauge the strength of the binaural beat percept by matching its salience to that of sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM), and to then compare rate discrimination for the two types of fluctuation. Rate discrimination was measured for standard rates of 4, 8, 16, and 32 Hz – all in the 500-Hz carrier region. Twelve normal-hearing adults participated in this study. The results indicated that discrimination acuity for binaural beats is similar to that for SAM tones whose depths of modulation have been adjusted to provide equivalent modulation salience. The matched-salience SAM tones had relatively shallow depths of modulation, suggesting that the perceptual strength of binaural beats is relatively weak, although all listeners perceived them. The Weber fraction for detection of an increase in binaural beat rate is roughly constant across beat rates, at least for rates above 4 Hz, as is rate discrimination for SAM tones. PMID:22326292

  13. Binaural room simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehnert, H.; Blauert, Jens; Pompetzki, W.

    1991-01-01

    In every-day listening the auditory event perceived by a listener is determined not only by the sound signal that a sound emits but also by a variety of environmental parameters. These parameters are the position, orientation and directional characteristics of the sound source, the listener's position and orientation, the geometrical and acoustical properties of surfaces which affect the sound field and the sound propagation properties of the surrounding fluid. A complete set of these parameters can be called an Acoustic Environment. If the auditory event perceived by a listener is manipulated in such a way that the listener is shifted acoustically into a different acoustic environment without moving himself physically, a Virtual Acoustic Environment has been created. Here, we deal with a special technique to set up nearly arbitrary Virtual Acoustic Environments, the Binaural Room Simulation. The purpose of the Binaural Room Simulation is to compute the binaural impulse response related to a virtual acoustic environment taking into account all parameters mentioned above. One possible way to describe a Virtual Acoustic Environment is the concept of the virtual sound sources. Each of the virtual sources emits a certain signal which is correlated but not necessarily identical with the signal emitted by the direct sound source. If source and receiver are non moving, the acoustic environment becomes a linear time-invariant system. Then, the Binaural Impulse Response from the source to a listener' s eardrums contains all relevant auditory information related to the Virtual Acoustic Environment. Listening into the simulated environment can easily be achieved by convolving the Binaural Impulse Response with dry signals and representing the results via headphones.

  14. Predicting binaural speech intelligibility using the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope power spectrum domain.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Leclerc, Alexandre; MacDonald, Ewen N; Dau, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a binaural extension to the multi-resolution speech-based envelope power spectrum model (mr-sEPSM) [Jørgensen, Ewert, and Dau (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 436-446]. It consists of a combination of better-ear (BE) and binaural unmasking processes, implemented as two monaural realizations of the mr-sEPSM combined with a short-term equalization-cancellation process, and uses the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv) as the decision metric. The model requires only two parameters to be fitted per speech material and does not require an explicit frequency weighting. The model was validated against three data sets from the literature, which covered the following effects: the number of maskers, the masker types [speech-shaped noise (SSN), speech-modulated SSN, babble, and reversed speech], the masker(s) azimuths, reverberation on the target and masker, and the interaural time difference of the target and masker. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the simulated speech reception thresholds and the data across all experiments was 0.91. A model version that considered only BE processing performed similarly (correlation coefficient of 0.86) to the complete model, suggesting that BE processing could be considered sufficient to predict intelligibility in most realistic conditions. PMID:27475146

  15. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Carrier bandwidth effects and binaural versus monaural comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Collecchia, Regina; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 12, 050005 (2011)] has reported that for a broadband noise carrier signal in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the broadband acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. Interpretation of this result was complicated by the fact that acoustical MTFs of rooms are often quite different for different carrier frequency regions, and listeners may have selectively responded to advantageous carrier frequency regions where the effective acoustic modulation loss due to the room was less than indicated by a broadband acoustic MTF analysis. Here, AM sensitivity testing and acoustic MTF analyses were expanded to include narrowband noise carriers (1-octave and 1/3-octave bands centered at 4 kHz), as well as monaural and binaural listening conditions. Narrowband results were found to be consistent with broadband results: In a reverberant sound field, human AM sensitivity is higher than indicated by the acoustical MTFs. The effect was greatest for modulation frequencies above 32 Hz and was present whether the stimulation was monaural or binaural. These results are suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening. PMID:23437416

  16. Binaural release from masking with single- and multi-electrode stimulation in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Todd, Ann E; Goupell, Matthew J; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2016-07-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) provide children with access to speech information from a young age. Despite bilateral cochlear implantation becoming common, use of spatial cues in free field is smaller than in normal-hearing children. Clinically fit CIs are not synchronized across the ears; thus binaural experiments must utilize research processors that can control binaural cues with precision. Research to date has used single pairs of electrodes, which is insufficient for representing speech. Little is known about how children with bilateral CIs process binaural information with multi-electrode stimulation. Toward the goal of improving binaural unmasking of speech, this study evaluated binaural unmasking with multi- and single-electrode stimulation. Results showed that performance with multi-electrode stimulation was similar to the best performance with single-electrode stimulation. This was similar to the pattern of performance shown by normal-hearing adults when presented an acoustic CI simulation. Diotic and dichotic signal detection thresholds of the children with CIs were similar to those of normal-hearing children listening to a CI simulation. The magnitude of binaural unmasking was not related to whether the children with CIs had good interaural time difference sensitivity. Results support the potential for benefits from binaural hearing and speech unmasking in children with bilateral CIs. PMID:27475132

  17. Comparing Binaural Pre-processing Strategies II

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongmei; Krawczyk-Becker, Martin; Marquardt, Daniel; Herzke, Tobias; Coleman, Graham; Adiloğlu, Kamil; Bomke, Katrin; Plotz, Karsten; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Kollmeier, Birger; Hohmann, Volker; Dietz, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Several binaural audio signal enhancement algorithms were evaluated with respect to their potential to improve speech intelligibility in noise for users of bilateral cochlear implants (CIs). 50% speech reception thresholds (SRT50) were assessed using an adaptive procedure in three distinct, realistic noise scenarios. All scenarios were highly nonstationary, complex, and included a significant amount of reverberation. Other aspects, such as the perfectly frontal target position, were idealized laboratory settings, allowing the algorithms to perform better than in corresponding real-world conditions. Eight bilaterally implanted CI users, wearing devices from three manufacturers, participated in the study. In all noise conditions, a substantial improvement in SRT50 compared to the unprocessed signal was observed for most of the algorithms tested, with the largest improvements generally provided by binaural minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming algorithms. The largest overall improvement in speech intelligibility was achieved by an adaptive binaural MVDR in a spatially separated, single competing talker noise scenario. A no-pre-processing condition and adaptive differential microphones without a binaural link served as the two baseline conditions. SRT50 improvements provided by the binaural MVDR beamformers surpassed the performance of the adaptive differential microphones in most cases. Speech intelligibility improvements predicted by instrumental measures were shown to account for some but not all aspects of the perceptually obtained SRT50 improvements measured in bilaterally implanted CI users. PMID:26721921

  18. A new perspective on binaural integration using response time methodology: super capacity revealed in conditions of binaural masking release

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Jennifer J.; He, Yuan; Townsend, James T.

    2014-01-01

    This study applied reaction-time based methods to assess the workload capacity of binaural integration by comparing reaction time (RT) distributions for monaural and binaural tone-in-noise detection tasks. In the diotic contexts, an identical tone + noise stimulus was presented to each ear. In the dichotic contexts, an identical noise was presented to each ear, but the tone was presented to one of the ears 180° out of phase with respect to the other ear. Accuracy-based measurements have demonstrated a much lower signal detection threshold for the dichotic vs. the diotic conditions, but accuracy-based techniques do not allow for assessment of system dynamics or resource allocation across time. Further, RTs allow comparisons between these conditions at the same signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we apply a reaction-time based capacity coefficient, which provides an index of workload efficiency and quantifies the resource allocations for single ear vs. two ear presentations. We demonstrate that the release from masking generated by the addition of an identical stimulus to one ear is limited-to-unlimited capacity (efficiency typically less than 1), consistent with less gain than would be expected by probability summation. However, the dichotic presentation leads to a significant increase in workload capacity (increased efficiency)—most specifically at lower signal-to-noise ratios. These experimental results provide further evidence that configural processing plays a critical role in binaural masking release, and that these mechanisms may operate more strongly when the signal stimulus is difficult to detect, albeit still with nearly 100% accuracy. PMID:25202254

  19. A new perspective on binaural integration using response time methodology: super capacity revealed in conditions of binaural masking release.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer J; He, Yuan; Townsend, James T

    2014-01-01

    This study applied reaction-time based methods to assess the workload capacity of binaural integration by comparing reaction time (RT) distributions for monaural and binaural tone-in-noise detection tasks. In the diotic contexts, an identical tone + noise stimulus was presented to each ear. In the dichotic contexts, an identical noise was presented to each ear, but the tone was presented to one of the ears 180° out of phase with respect to the other ear. Accuracy-based measurements have demonstrated a much lower signal detection threshold for the dichotic vs. the diotic conditions, but accuracy-based techniques do not allow for assessment of system dynamics or resource allocation across time. Further, RTs allow comparisons between these conditions at the same signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we apply a reaction-time based capacity coefficient, which provides an index of workload efficiency and quantifies the resource allocations for single ear vs. two ear presentations. We demonstrate that the release from masking generated by the addition of an identical stimulus to one ear is limited-to-unlimited capacity (efficiency typically less than 1), consistent with less gain than would be expected by probability summation. However, the dichotic presentation leads to a significant increase in workload capacity (increased efficiency)-most specifically at lower signal-to-noise ratios. These experimental results provide further evidence that configural processing plays a critical role in binaural masking release, and that these mechanisms may operate more strongly when the signal stimulus is difficult to detect, albeit still with nearly 100% accuracy. PMID:25202254

  20. Comparison between bilateral cochlear implants and Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural cochlear implant: speech perception, sound localization and patient self-assessment.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Damien; Lautissier, Sylvie; Bosset-Audoit, Amélie; Coriat, Géraldine; Beraha, Max; Maunoury, Antoine; Martel, Jacques; Darrouzet, Vincent; Bébéar, Jean-Pierre; Dauman, René

    2013-01-01

    An alternative to bilateral cochlear implantation is offered by the Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural cochlear implant, which allows stimulation of both cochleae within a single device. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare a group of Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural implant users (denoted BINAURAL group, n = 7) with a group of bilateral adult cochlear implant users (denoted BILATERAL group, n = 6) in terms of speech perception, sound localization, and self-assessment of health status and hearing disability. Speech perception was assessed using word recognition at 60 dB SPL in quiet and in a 'cocktail party' noise delivered through five loudspeakers in the hemi-sound field facing the patient (signal-to-noise ratio = +10 dB). The sound localization task was to determine the source of a sound stimulus among five speakers positioned between -90° and +90° from midline. Change in health status was assessed using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory and hearing disability was evaluated with the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit. Speech perception was not statistically different between the two groups, even though there was a trend in favor of the BINAURAL group (mean percent word recognition in the BINAURAL and BILATERAL groups: 70 vs. 56.7% in quiet, 55.7 vs. 43.3% in noise). There was also no significant difference with regard to performance in sound localization and self-assessment of health status and hearing disability. On the basis of the BINAURAL group's performance in hearing tasks involving the detection of interaural differences, implantation with the Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural implant may be considered to restore effective binaural hearing. Based on these first comparative results, this device seems to provide benefits similar to those of traditional bilateral cochlear implantation, with a new approach to stimulate both auditory nerves. PMID:23548561

  1. Binaural Loudness Constancy.

    PubMed

    Culling, John F; Dare, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In binaural loudness summation, diotic presentation of a sound usually produces greater loudness than monaural presentation. However, experiments using loudspeaker presentation with and without earplugs find that magnitude estimates of loudness are little altered by the earplug, suggesting a form of loudness constancy. We explored the significance of controlling stimulation of the second ear using meatal occlusion as opposed to the deactivation of one earphone. We measured the point of subjective loudness equality (PSLE) for monaural vs. binaural presentation using an adaptive technique for both speech and noise. These stimuli were presented in a reverberant room over a loudspeaker to the right of the listener, or over lightweight headphones. Using the headphones, stimuli were either presented dry, or matched to those of the loudspeaker by convolution with impulse responses measured from the loudspeaker to the listener position, using an acoustic manikin. The headphone response was also compensated. Using the loudspeaker, monaural presentation was achieved by instructing the listener to block the left ear with a finger. Near perfect binaural loudness constancy was observed using loudspeaker presentation, while there was a summation effect of 3-6 dB for both headphone conditions. However, only partial constancy was observed when meatal occlusion was simulated. These results suggest that there may be contributions to binaural loudness constancy from residual low frequencies at the occluded ear as well as a cognitive element, which is activated by the knowledge that one ear is occluded. PMID:27080647

  2. Spectral and binaural loudness summation for hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Oetting, Dirk; Hohmann, Volker; Appell, Jens-E; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-05-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss typically results in a steepened loudness function and a reduced dynamic range from elevated thresholds to uncomfortably loud levels for narrowband and broadband signals. Restoring narrowband loudness perception for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners can lead to overly loud perception of broadband signals and it is unclear how binaural presentation affects loudness perception in this case. Here, loudness perception quantified by categorical loudness scaling for nine normal-hearing (NH) and ten HI listeners was compared for signals with different bandwidth and different spectral shape in monaural and in binaural conditions. For the HI listeners, frequency- and level-dependent amplification was used to match the narrowband monaural loudness functions of the NH listeners. The average loudness functions for NH and HI listeners showed good agreement for monaural broadband signals. However, HI listeners showed substantially greater loudness for binaural broadband signals than NH listeners: on average a 14.1 dB lower level was required to reach "very loud" (range 30.8 to -3.7 dB). Overall, with narrowband loudness compensation, a given binaural loudness for broadband signals above "medium loud" was reached at systematically lower levels for HI than for NH listeners. Such increased binaural loudness summation was not found for loudness categories below "medium loud" or for narrowband signals. Large individual variations in the increased loudness summation were observed and could not be explained by the audiogram or the narrowband loudness functions. PMID:27006003

  3. Binaural unmasking of frequency-following responses in rat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi; Huang, Qiang; Wu, Xihong; Galbraith, Gary C; Li, Liang

    2009-03-01

    Survival in natural environments for small animals such as rats often depends on precise neural coding of life-threatening acoustic signals, and binaural unmasking of species-specific pain calls is especially critical. This study investigated how species-specific tail-pain chatter is represented in the rat amygdala, which receives afferents from both auditory thalamus and auditory association cortex, and whether the amygdaloid representation of the chatter can be binaurally unmasked. The results show that chatter with a fundamental frequency (F0) of 2.1 kHz was able to elicit salient phase-locked frequency-following responses (FFRs) in the lateral amygdala nucleus in anesthetized rats. FFRs to the F0 of binaurally presented chatter were sensitive to the interaural time difference (ITD), with the preference of ipsilateral-ear leading, as well as showing features of binaural inhibition. When interaurally correlated masking noises were added and ipsilateral chatter led contralateral chatter, introducing an ITD disparity between the chatter and masker significantly enhanced (unmasked) the FFRs. This binaural unmasking was further enhanced by chemically blocking excitatory glutamate receptors in the auditory association cortex. When the chatter was replaced by a harmonic tone complex with an F0 of 0.7 kHz, both the binaural-inhibition feature and the binaural unmasking were preserved only for the harmonic of 2.1 kHz but not the tone F0. These results suggest that both frequency-dependent ascending binaural modulations and cortical descending modulations of the precise auditory coding of the chatter in the amygdala are critical for processing life-threatening acoustic signals in noisy and even reverberant environments. PMID:19036862

  4. The neural substrate for binaural masking level differences in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Heather J; Shackleton, Trevor M; Krumbholz, Katrin; Palmer, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    The binaural masking level difference (BMLD) is a phenomenon whereby a signal that is identical at each ear (S0), masked by a noise that is identical at each ear (N0), can be made 12-15 dB more detectable by inverting the waveform of either the tone or noise at one ear (Sπ, Nπ). Single-cell responses to BMLD stimuli were measured in the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized guinea pigs. Firing rate was measured as a function of signal level of a 500 Hz pure tone masked by low-passed white noise. Responses were similar to those reported in the inferior colliculus. At low signal levels, the response was dominated by the masker. At higher signal levels, firing rate either increased or decreased. Detection thresholds for each neuron were determined using signal detection theory. Few neurons yielded measurable detection thresholds for all stimulus conditions, with a wide range in thresholds. However, across the entire population, the lowest thresholds were consistent with human psychophysical BMLDs. As in the inferior colliculus, the shape of the firing-rate versus signal-level functions depended on the neurons' selectivity for interaural time difference. Our results suggest that, in cortex, BMLD signals are detected from increases or decreases in the firing rate, consistent with predictions of cross-correlation models of binaural processing and that the psychophysical detection threshold is based on the lowest neural thresholds across the population. PMID:25568115

  5. The Neural Substrate for Binaural Masking Level Differences in the Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Heather J.; Krumbholz, Katrin; Palmer, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    The binaural masking level difference (BMLD) is a phenomenon whereby a signal that is identical at each ear (S0), masked by a noise that is identical at each ear (N0), can be made 12–15 dB more detectable by inverting the waveform of either the tone or noise at one ear (Sπ, Nπ). Single-cell responses to BMLD stimuli were measured in the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized guinea pigs. Firing rate was measured as a function of signal level of a 500 Hz pure tone masked by low-passed white noise. Responses were similar to those reported in the inferior colliculus. At low signal levels, the response was dominated by the masker. At higher signal levels, firing rate either increased or decreased. Detection thresholds for each neuron were determined using signal detection theory. Few neurons yielded measurable detection thresholds for all stimulus conditions, with a wide range in thresholds. However, across the entire population, the lowest thresholds were consistent with human psychophysical BMLDs. As in the inferior colliculus, the shape of the firing-rate versus signal-level functions depended on the neurons' selectivity for interaural time difference. Our results suggest that, in cortex, BMLD signals are detected from increases or decreases in the firing rate, consistent with predictions of cross-correlation models of binaural processing and that the psychophysical detection threshold is based on the lowest neural thresholds across the population. PMID:25568115

  6. Loudness enhancement - Monaural, binaural, and dichotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmasian, R.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    When one tone burst (T) precedes another (S) by 100 msec, variations in the intensity of T systematically influence the loudness of S. When T is more intense than S, S is increased; and when T is less intense, S loudness is decreased. This occurs in monaural, binaural, and dichotic paradigms of signal presentation. When T and S are presented to the same ear (monaural or binaural), there is more enhancement with less intersubject variability than when they are presented to different ears (dichotic paradigm). Monaural enhancements as large as 30 dB can readily be demonstrated, but decrements rarely exceed 5 dB. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed for this loudness enhancement, which apparently shares certain characteristics with time-order error, assimilation, and temporal partial masking experiments.

  7. A probabilistic model for binaural sound localization.

    PubMed

    Willert, Volker; Eggert, Julian; Adamy, Jürgen; Stahl, Raphael; Körner, Edgar

    2006-10-01

    This paper proposes a biologically inspired and technically implemented sound localization system to robustly estimate the position of a sound source in the frontal azimuthal half-plane. For localization, binaural cues are extracted using cochleagrams generated by a cochlear model that serve as input to the system. The basic idea of the model is to separately measure interaural time differences and interaural level differences for a number of frequencies and process these measurements as a whole. This leads to two-dimensional frequency versus time-delay representations of binaural cues, so-called activity maps. A probabilistic evaluation is presented to estimate the position of a sound source over time based on these activity maps. Learned reference maps for different azimuthal positions are integrated into the computation to gain time-dependent discrete conditional probabilities. At every timestep these probabilities are combined over frequencies and binaural cues to estimate the sound source position. In addition, they are propagated over time to improve position estimation. This leads to a system that is able to localize audible signals, for example human speech signals, even in reverberating environments. PMID:17036807

  8. Effects of binaural decorrelation on neural and behavioral processing of interaural level differences in the barn owl (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Egnor, S E

    2001-10-01

    The effect of binaural decorrelation on the processing of interaural level difference cues in the barn owl (Tyto alba) was examined behaviorally and electrophysiologically. The electrophysiology experiment measured the effect of variations in binaural correlation on the first stage of interaural level difference encoding in the central nervous system. The responses of single neurons in the posterior part of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus were recorded to stimulation with binaurally correlated and binaurally uncorrelated noise. No significant differences in interaural level difference sensitivity were found between conditions. Neurons in the posterior part of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus encode the interaural level difference of binaurally correlated and binaurally uncorrelated noise with equal accuracy and precision. This nucleus therefore supplies higher auditory centers with an undegraded interaural level difference signal for sound stimuli that lack a coherent interaural time difference. The behavioral experiment measured auditory saccades in response to interaural level differences presented in binaurally correlated and binaurally uncorrelated noise. The precision and accuracy of sound localization based on interaural level difference was reduced but not eliminated for binaurally uncorrelated signals. The observation that barn owls continue to vary auditory saccades with the interaural level difference of binaurally uncorrelated stimuli suggests that neurons that drive head saccades can be activated by incomplete auditory spatial information. PMID:11763957

  9. Statistics of Natural Binaural Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Młynarski, Wiktor; Jost, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Binaural sound localization is usually considered a discrimination task, where interaural phase (IPD) and level (ILD) disparities at narrowly tuned frequency channels are utilized to identify a position of a sound source. In natural conditions however, binaural circuits are exposed to a stimulation by sound waves originating from multiple, often moving and overlapping sources. Therefore statistics of binaural cues depend on acoustic properties and the spatial configuration of the environment. Distribution of cues encountered naturally and their dependence on physical properties of an auditory scene have not been studied before. In the present work we analyzed statistics of naturally encountered binaural sounds. We performed binaural recordings of three auditory scenes with varying spatial configuration and analyzed empirical cue distributions from each scene. We have found that certain properties such as the spread of IPD distributions as well as an overall shape of ILD distributions do not vary strongly between different auditory scenes. Moreover, we found that ILD distributions vary much weaker across frequency channels and IPDs often attain much higher values, than can be predicted from head filtering properties. In order to understand the complexity of the binaural hearing task in the natural environment, sound waveforms were analyzed by performing Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Properties of learned basis functions indicate that in natural conditions soundwaves in each ear are predominantly generated by independent sources. This implies that the real-world sound localization must rely on mechanisms more complex than a mere cue extraction. PMID:25285658

  10. Unilateral spectral and temporal compression reduces binaural fusion for normal hearing listeners with cochlear implant simulations

    PubMed Central

    Aronoff, Justin M.; Shayman, Corey; Prasad, Akila; Suneel, Deepa; Stelmach, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Patients with single sided deafness have recently begun receiving cochlear implants in their deaf ear. These patients gain a significant benefit from having a cochlear implant. However, despite this benefit, they are considerably slower to develop binaural abilities such as summation compared to bilateral cochlear implant patients. This suggests that these patients have difficulty fusing electric and acoustic signals. Although this may reflect inherent differences between electric and acoustic stimulation, it may also reflect properties of the processor and fitting system, which result in spectral and temporal compression. To examine the possibility that unilateral spectral and temporal compression can adversely affect binaural fusion, this study tested normal hearing listeners’ binaural fusion through the use of vocoded speech with unilateral spectral and temporal compression. The results indicate that unilateral spectral and temporal compression can hinder binaural fusion and thus may adversely affect binaural abilities in patients with single sided deafness who use a cochlear implant in their deaf ear. PMID:25549574

  11. Cortical representation of the combination of monaural and binaural unmasking.

    PubMed

    Uppenkamp, Stefan; Uhlig, Christian H; Verhey, Jesko L

    2013-01-01

    The audibility of a target tone is improved by introducing either -amplitude modulations that are coherent across different frequency channels of the masker (comodulation masking release, CMR) or interaural phase differences that are -different for target and masker (binaural masking-level difference, BMLD). Although the two effects are likely to be based on different processing strategies, they both result in improved figure-background decomposition for a target-in-noise situation. In this study, we analyzed the combination of CMR and BMLD for a -target tone in a masker with six 48-Hz-wide noise bands, distributed over a wide frequency range from 216 Hz to 2.78 kHz. Psychoacoustical detection thresholds for the tones in noise were determined for two masker conditions (comodulated or unmodulated bands) and two interaural phase differences of the target tone (0 or 180°). The mean results indicate that the effects of unmasking add independently. The lowest thresholds are found for the dichotic signal embedded in a -modulated masker with an overall threshold difference of about 16 dB compared to the -unmodulated condition with no binaural cues. Based on the psychoacoustic results, a set of 12 signal-masker configurations was selected individually to explore the representation of the audibility of the test tone in brain activation maps by means of auditory functional MR imaging. The comparison of the results for the combination of CMR and BMLD with the results for the separate effects indicates a large overlap of the activated brain regions, where a largely extended area is activated, covering primary auditory cortex and adjacent regions. The result is in agreement with previous fMRI studies on auditory masking, identifying specific regions in the auditory cortex representing a change of the audibility of a target tone in a noise masker, irrespective of the overall sound pressure level of the stimulus. PMID:23716250

  12. Comparing Binaural Pre-processing Strategies III

    PubMed Central

    Warzybok, Anna; Ernst, Stephan M. A.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of eight signal pre-processing strategies, including directional microphones, coherence filters, single-channel noise reduction, binaural beamformers, and their combinations, was undertaken with normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured in three noise scenarios (multitalker babble, cafeteria noise, and single competing talker). Predictions of three common instrumental measures were compared with the general perceptual benefit caused by the algorithms. The individual SRTs measured without pre-processing and individual benefits were objectively estimated using the binaural speech intelligibility model. Ten listeners with NH and 12 HI listeners participated. The participants varied in age and pure-tone threshold levels. Although HI listeners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to obtain 50% intelligibility than listeners with NH, no differences in SRT benefit from the different algorithms were found between the two groups. With the exception of single-channel noise reduction, all algorithms showed an improvement in SRT of between 2.1 dB (in cafeteria noise) and 4.8 dB (in single competing talker condition). Model predictions with binaural speech intelligibility model explained 83% of the measured variance of the individual SRTs in the no pre-processing condition. Regarding the benefit from the algorithms, the instrumental measures were not able to predict the perceptual data in all tested noise conditions. The comparable benefit observed for both groups suggests a possible application of noise reduction schemes for listeners with different hearing status. Although the model can predict the individual SRTs without pre-processing, further development is necessary to predict the benefits obtained from the algorithms at an individual level. PMID:26721922

  13. Comparing Binaural Pre-processing Strategies I

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk-Becker, Martin; Marquardt, Daniel; Völker, Christoph; Hu, Hongmei; Herzke, Tobias; Coleman, Graham; Adiloğlu, Kamil; Ernst, Stephan M. A.; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Kollmeier, Birger; Hohmann, Volker; Dietz, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    In a collaborative research project, several monaural and binaural noise reduction algorithms have been comprehensively evaluated. In this article, eight selected noise reduction algorithms were assessed using instrumental measures, with a focus on the instrumental evaluation of speech intelligibility. Four distinct, reverberant scenarios were created to reflect everyday listening situations: a stationary speech-shaped noise, a multitalker babble noise, a single interfering talker, and a realistic cafeteria noise. Three instrumental measures were employed to assess predicted speech intelligibility and predicted sound quality: the intelligibility-weighted signal-to-noise ratio, the short-time objective intelligibility measure, and the perceptual evaluation of speech quality. The results show substantial improvements in predicted speech intelligibility as well as sound quality for the proposed algorithms. The evaluated coherence-based noise reduction algorithm was able to provide improvements in predicted audio signal quality. For the tested single-channel noise reduction algorithm, improvements in intelligibility-weighted signal-to-noise ratio were observed in all but the nonstationary cafeteria ambient noise scenario. Binaural minimum variance distortionless response beamforming algorithms performed particularly well in all noise scenarios. PMID:26721920

  14. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology—ABCIT—as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies. PMID:26721929

  15. Accuracy of pointing a binaural listening array.

    PubMed

    Letowski, T R; Ricard, G L; Kalb, J T; Mermagen, T J; Amrein, K M

    1997-12-01

    We measured the accuracy with which sounds heard over a binaural, end-fire array could be located when the angular separation of the array's two arms was varied. Each individual arm contained nine cardioid electret microphones, the responses of which were combined to produce a unidirectional, band-limited pattern of sensitivity. We assessed the desirable angular separation of these arms by measuring the accuracy with which listeners could point to the source of a target sound presented against high-level background noise. We employed array separations of 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees, and signal-to-noise ratios of +5, -5, and -15 dB. Pointing accuracy was best for a separation of 60 degrees; this performance was indistinguishable from pointing during unaided listening conditions. In addition, the processing of the array was modeled to depict the information that was available for localization. The model indicates that highly directional binaural arrays can be expected to support accurate localization of sources of sound only near the axis of the array. Wider enhanced listening angles may be possible if the forward coverage of the sensor system is made less directional and more similar to that of human listeners. PMID:9473975

  16. Rate-Constrained Beamforming in Binaural Hearing Aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Sriram; den Brinker, Albertus C.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, hearing aid systems where the left and right ear devices collaborate with one another have received much attention. Apart from supporting natural binaural hearing, such systems hold great potential for improving the intelligibility of speech in the presence of noise through beamforming algorithms. Binaural beamforming for hearing aids requires an exchange of microphone signals between the two devices over a wireless link. This paper studies two problems: which signal to transmit from one ear to the other, and at what bit-rate. The first problem is relevant as modern hearing aids usually contain multiple microphones, and the optimal choice for the signal to be transmitted is not obvious. The second problem is relevant as the capacity of the wireless link is limited by stringent power consumption constraints imposed by the limited battery life of hearing aids.

  17. Loudness enhancement: Monaural, binaural and dichotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmasian, R. O.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that when one tone burst precedes another by 100 msec variations in the intensity of the first systematically influences the loudness of second. When the first burst is more intense than the second, the second is increased and when the first burst is less intense, the loudness of the second is decreased. This occurs in monaural, binaural and dichotic paradigms of signal presentation. Where both bursts are presented to the same ear there is more enhancement with less intersubject variability than when they are presented to different ears. Monaural enhancements as large as 30 db can readily be demonstrated, but decrements rarely exceed 5 db. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed for this loudness enhancement, which apparently shares certain characteristics with time-order-error, assimilation, and temporal partial masking experiments.

  18. Dynamic binaural sound localization based on variations of interaural time delays and system rotations.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claude; Rogers, Chris; Massen, Francis

    2015-08-01

    This work develops the mathematical model for a steerable binaural system that determines the instantaneous direction of a sound source in space. The model combines system angular speed and interaural time delays (ITDs) in a differential equation, which allows monitoring the change of source position in the binaural reference frame and therefore resolves the confusion about azimuth and elevation. The work includes the analysis of error propagation and presents results from a real-time application that was performed on a digital signal processing device. Theory and experiments demonstrate that the azimuthal angle to the sound source is accurately yielded in the case of horizontal rotations, whereas the elevation angle is estimated with large uncertainty. This paper also proves the equivalence of the ITD derivative and the Doppler shift appearing between the binaurally captured audio signals. The equation of this Doppler shift is applicable for any kind of motion. It shows that weak binaural pitch differences may represent an additional cue in localization of sound. Finally, the paper develops practical applications from this relationship, such as the synthesizing of binaural images of pure and complex tones emitted by a moving source, and the generation of multiple frequency images for binaural beat experiments. PMID:26328682

  19. Noncoherent detection of periodic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliardi, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The optimal Bayes detector for a general periodic waveform having uniform delay and additive white Gaussian noise is examined. It is shown that the detector is much more complex than that for the well known cases of pure sine waves (i.e. classical noncoherent detection) and narrowband signals. An interpretation of the optimal processing is presented, and several implementations are discussed. The results have application to the noncoherent detection of optical square waves.

  20. Wind profiler signal detection improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, G. F.; Divis, Dale H.

    1992-01-01

    Research is described on potential improvements to the software used with the NASA 49.25 MHz wind profiler located at Kennedy Space Center. In particular, the analysis and results are provided of a study to (1) identify preferred mathematical techniques for the detection of atmospheric signals that provide wind velocities which are obscured by natural and man-made sources, and (2) to analyze one or more preferred techniques to demonstrate proof of the capability to improve the detection of wind velocities.

  1. Sound localization in the presence of multiple reflections using a binaurally integrated cross-correlation/auto-correlation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    A precedence effect model is described that can use a binaural signal to robustly localize a sound source in the presence of multiple reflections for the frontal horizontal plane. The model also estimates a room impulse response from a running binaural signal and determines the spatial locations and delays of early reflections, without any prior or additional knowledge of the source. A dual-layer cross-correlation/auto-correlation algorithm is used to determine the interaural time difference of the direct sound source component and to estimate a binaural activity pattern. PMID:27475205

  2. Binaural Loudness Summation in the Hearing Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, David B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Binaural loudness summation was measured using three different paradigms with 10 normally hearing and 20 bilaterally symmetrical high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss subjects. Binaural summation increased with presentation level using the loudness matching procedure, with values in the 6-10 dB range. Summation decreased with level using the…

  3. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carey, Anne-Marie; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others. PMID:22496862

  4. A High-Density EEG Investigation into Steady State Binaural Beat Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others. PMID:22496862

  5. Binaural Benefit with and without a Bilateral Spectral Mismatch in Acoustic Simulations of Cochlear Implant Processing

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yang-soo; Shin, You-Ree; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated whether a spectral mismatch across ears influences the benefit of redundancy, squelch, and head shadow differently in speech perception using acoustic simulation of bilateral cochlear implant (CI) processing. Design Ten normal hearing subjects participated in the study, and acoustic simulations of CIs were used to test these subjects. Sentence recognition, presented unilaterally and bilaterally, was measured at +5 dB and +10 dB signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) with bilaterally matched and mismatched conditions. Unilateral and bilateral CIs were simulated using 8-channel sine-wave vocoders. Binaural spectral mismatch was introduced by changing the relative simulated insertion depths across ears. Subjects were tested while listening with headphones; head-related transfer functions were applied before the vocoder processing to preserve natural interaural level and time differences. Results For both SNRs, greater and more consistent binaural benefit of squelch and redundancy occurred for the matched condition while binaural interference of squelch and redundancy occurred for the mismatched condition. However, significant binaural benefit of head shadow existed irrespective of spectral mismatches and SNRs. Conclusions The results suggest that bilateral spectral mismatch may have a negative impact on the binaural benefit of squelch and redundancy for bilateral CI users. The results also suggest that clinical mapping should be carefully administrated for bilateral CI users to minimize the difference in spectral patterns between the two CIs. PMID:22968427

  6. The impact of binaural beats on creativity

    PubMed Central

    Reedijk, Susan A.; Bolders, Anne; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Human creativity relies on a multitude of cognitive processes, some of which are influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine. This suggests that creativity could be enhanced by interventions that either modulate the production or transmission of dopamine directly, or affect dopamine-driven processes. In the current study we hypothesized that creativity can be influenced by means of binaural beats, an auditory illusion that is considered a form of cognitive entrainment that operates through stimulating neuronal phase locking. We aimed to investigate whether binaural beats affect creative performance at all, whether they affect divergent thinking, convergent thinking, or both, and whether possible effects may be mediated by the individual striatal dopamine level. Binaural beats were presented at alpha and gamma frequency. Participants completed a divergent and a convergent thinking task to assess two important functions of creativity, and filled out the Positive And Negative Affect Scale—mood State questionnaire (PANAS-S) and an affect grid to measure current mood. Dopamine levels in the striatum were estimated using spontaneous eye blink rates (EBRs). Results showed that binaural beats, regardless of the presented frequency, can affect divergent but not convergent thinking. Individuals with low EBRs mostly benefitted from alpha binaural beat stimulation, while individuals with high EBRs were unaffected or even impaired by both alpha and gamma binaural beats. This suggests that binaural beats, and possibly other forms of cognitive entrainment, are not suited for a one-size-fits-all approach, and that individual cognitive-control systems need to be taken into account when studying cognitive enhancement methods. PMID:24294202

  7. Rate-constrained source separation for speech enhancement in wireless-communicated binaural hearing aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayllón, David; Gil-Pita, Roberto; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    A recent trend in hearing aids is the connection of the left and right devices to collaborate between them. Binaural systems can provide natural binaural hearing and support the improvement of speech intelligibility in noise, but they require data transmission between both devices, which increases the power consumption. This paper presents a novel sound source separation algorithm for binaural speech enhancement based on supervised machine learning and time-frequency masking. The system is designed considering the power restrictions in hearing aids, constraining both the computational cost of the algorithm and the transmission bit rate. The transmission schema is optimized using a tailored evolutionary algorithm that assigns a different number of bits to each frequency band. The proposed algorithm requires less than 10% of the available computational resources for signal processing and obtains good separation performance using bit rates lower than 64 kbps.

  8. Extracting binaural information from simultaneous targets and distractors: Effects of amplitude modulation and asynchronous envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Stellmack, Mark A.; Byrne, Andrew J.; Viemeister, Neal F.

    2010-01-01

    When different components of a stimulus carry different binaural information, processing of binaural information in a target component is often affected. The present experiments examine whether such interference is affected by amplitude modulation and the relative phase of modulation of the target and distractors. In all experiments, listeners attempted to discriminate interaural time differences of a target stimulus in the presence of distractor stimuli with ITD=0. In Experiment 1, modulation of the distractors but not the target reduced interference between components. In Experiment 2, synthesized musical notes exhibited little binaural interference when there were slight asynchronies between different streams of notes (31 or 62 ms). The remaining experiments suggested that the reduction in binaural interference in the previous experiments was due neither to the complex spectra of the synthesized notes nor to greater detectability of the target in the presence of modulated distractors. These data suggest that this interference is reduced when components are modulated in ways that result in the target appearing briefly in isolation, not because of segregation cues. These data also suggest that modulation and asynchronies between modulators that might be encountered in real-world listening situations are adequate to reduce binaural interference to inconsequential levels. PMID:20815459

  9. The binaural masking level difference: cortical correlates persist despite severe brain stem atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, James B.; Ghosh, Boyd C. P.; Carlyon, Robert P.; Plack, Christopher J.; Gockel, Hedwig E.

    2014-01-01

    Under binaural listening conditions, the detection of target signals within background masking noise is substantially improved when the interaural phase of the target differs from that of the masker. Neural correlates of this binaural masking level difference (BMLD) have been observed in the inferior colliculus and temporal cortex, but it is not known whether degeneration of the inferior colliculus would result in a reduction of the BMLD in humans. We used magnetoencephalography to examine the BMLD in 13 healthy adults and 13 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). PSP is associated with severe atrophy of the upper brain stem, including the inferior colliculus, confirmed by voxel-based morphometry of structural MRI. Stimuli comprised in-phase sinusoidal tones presented to both ears at three levels (high, medium, and low) masked by in-phase noise, which rendered the low-level tone inaudible. Critically, the BMLD was measured using a low-level tone presented in opposite phase across ears, making it audible against the noise. The cortical waveforms from bilateral auditory sources revealed significantly larger N1m peaks for the out-of-phase low-level tone compared with the in-phase low-level tone, for both groups, indicating preservation of early cortical correlates of the BMLD in PSP. In PSP a significant delay was observed in the onset of the N1m deflection and the amplitude of the P2m was reduced, but these differences were not restricted to the BMLD condition. The results demonstrate that although PSP causes subtle auditory deficits, binaural processing can survive the presence of significant damage to the upper brain stem. PMID:25231610

  10. Transionospheric signal detection with chirped wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Doser, A.B.; Dunham, M.E.

    1997-11-01

    Chirped wavelets are utilized to detect dispersed signals in the joint time scale domain. Specifically, pulses that become dispersed by transmission through the ionosphere and are received by satellites as nonlinear chirps are investigated. Since the dispersion greatly lowers the signal to noise ratios, it is difficult to isolate the signals in the time domain. Satellite data are examined with discrete wavelet expansions. Detection is accomplished via a template matching threshold scheme. Quantitative experimental results demonstrate that the chirped wavelet detection scheme is successful in detecting the transionospheric pulses at very low signal to noise ratios.

  11. Binaural Fusion and Listening Effort in Children Who Use Bilateral Cochlear Implants: A Psychoacoustic and Pupillometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Morrison M.; Papsin, Blake C.; Gordon, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants aim to provide hearing to both ears for children who are deaf and promote binaural/spatial hearing. Benefits are limited by mismatched devices and unilaterally-driven development which could compromise the normal integration of left and right ear input. We thus asked whether children hear a fused image (ie. 1 vs 2 sounds) from their bilateral implants and if this “binaural fusion” reduces listening effort. Binaural fusion was assessed by asking 25 deaf children with cochlear implants and 24 peers with normal hearing whether they heard one or two sounds when listening to bilaterally presented acoustic click-trains/electric pulses (250 Hz trains of 36 ms presented at 1 Hz). Reaction times and pupillary changes were recorded simultaneously to measure listening effort. Bilaterally implanted children heard one image of bilateral input less frequently than normal hearing peers, particularly when intensity levels on each side were balanced. Binaural fusion declined as brainstem asymmetries increased and age at implantation decreased. Children implanted later had access to acoustic input prior to implantation due to progressive deterioration of hearing. Increases in both pupil diameter and reaction time occurred as perception of binaural fusion decreased. Results indicate that, without binaural level cues, children have difficulty fusing input from their bilateral implants to perceive one sound which costs them increased listening effort. Brainstem asymmetries exacerbate this issue. By contrast, later implantation, reflecting longer access to bilateral acoustic hearing, may have supported development of auditory pathways underlying binaural fusion. Improved integration of bilateral cochlear implant signals for children is required to improve their binaural hearing. PMID:25668423

  12. Electrophysiological and psychophysical asymmetries in sensitivity to interaural correlation gaps and implications for binaural integration time.

    PubMed

    Lüddemann, Helge; Kollmeier, Birger; Riedel, Helmut

    2016-02-01

    Brief deviations of interaural correlation (IAC) can provide valuable cues for detection, segregation and localization of acoustic signals. This study investigated the processing of such "binaural gaps" in continuously running noise (100-2000 Hz), in comparison to silent "monaural gaps", by measuring late auditory evoked potentials (LAEPs) and perceptual thresholds with novel, iteratively optimized stimuli. Mean perceptual binaural gap duration thresholds exhibited a major asymmetry: they were substantially shorter for uncorrelated gaps in correlated and anticorrelated reference noise (1.75 ms and 4.1 ms) than for correlated and anticorrelated gaps in uncorrelated reference noise (26.5 ms and 39.0 ms). The thresholds also showed a minor asymmetry: they were shorter in the positive than in the negative IAC range. The mean behavioral threshold for monaural gaps was 5.5 ms. For all five gap types, the amplitude of LAEP components N1 and P2 increased linearly with the logarithm of gap duration. While perceptual and electrophysiological thresholds matched for monaural gaps, LAEP thresholds were about twice as long as perceptual thresholds for uncorrelated gaps, but half as long for correlated and anticorrelated gaps. Nevertheless, LAEP thresholds showed the same asymmetries as perceptual thresholds. For gap durations below 30 ms, LAEPs were dominated by the processing of the leading edge of a gap. For longer gap durations, in contrast, both the leading and the lagging edge of a gap contributed to the evoked response. Formulae for the equivalent rectangular duration (ERD) of the binaural system's temporal window were derived for three common window shapes. The psychophysical ERD was 68 ms for diotic and about 40 ms for anti- and uncorrelated noise. After a nonlinear Z-transform of the stimulus IAC prior to temporal integration, ERDs were about 10 ms for reference correlations of ±1 and 80 ms for uncorrelated reference. Hence, a physiologically motivated

  13. A Comparison of Two Objective Measures of Binaural Processing

    PubMed Central

    Undurraga, Jaime A.; Marquardt, Torsten; McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    There has been continued interest in clinical objective measures of binaural processing. One commonly proposed measure is the binaural interaction component (BIC), which is obtained typically by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs)—the BIC reflects the difference between the binaural ABR and the sum of the monaural ABRs (i.e., binaural − (left + right)). We have recently developed an alternative, direct measure of sensitivity to interaural time differences, namely, a following response to modulations in interaural phase difference (the interaural phase modulation following response; IPM-FR). To obtain this measure, an ongoing diotically amplitude-modulated signal is presented, and the interaural phase difference of the carrier is switched periodically at minima in the modulation cycle. Such periodic modulations to interaural phase difference can evoke a steady state following response. BIC and IPM-FR measurements were compared from 10 normal-hearing subjects using a 16-channel electroencephalographic system. Both ABRs and IPM-FRs were observed most clearly from similar electrode locations—differential recordings taken from electrodes near the ear (e.g., mastoid) in reference to a vertex electrode (Cz). Although all subjects displayed clear ABRs, the BIC was not reliably observed. In contrast, the IPM-FR typically elicited a robust and significant response. In addition, the IPM-FR measure required a considerably shorter recording session. As the IPM-FR magnitude varied with interaural phase difference modulation depth, it could potentially serve as a correlate of perceptual salience. Overall, the IPM-FR appears a more suitable clinical measure than the BIC. PMID:26721925

  14. Optimal source distribution for binaural synthesis over loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Takashi; Nelson, Philip A.

    2002-12-01

    When binaural sound signals are presented with loudspeakers, the system inversion involved gives rise to a number of problems such as a loss of dynamic range and a lack of robustness to small errors and room reflections. The amplification required by the system inversion results in loss of dynamic range. The control performance of such a system deteriorates severely due to small errors resulting from, e.g., misalignment of the system and individual differences in the head related transfer functions at certain frequencies. The required large sound radiation results in severe reflection which also reduces the control performance. A method of overcoming these fundamental problems is proposed in this paper. A conceptual monopole transducer is introduced whose position varies continuously as frequency varies. This gives a minimum processing requirement of the binaural signals for the control to be achieved and all the above problems either disappear or are minimized. The inverse filters have flat amplitude response and the reproduced sound is not colored even outside the relatively large ``sweet area.'' A number of practical solutions are suggested for the realization of such optimally distributed transducers. One of them is a discretization that enables the use of conventional transducer units.

  15. A Comparison of Two Objective Measures of Binaural Processing: The Interaural Phase Modulation Following Response and the Binaural Interaction Component.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Nicholas R; Undurraga, Jaime A; Marquardt, Torsten; McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    There has been continued interest in clinical objective measures of binaural processing. One commonly proposed measure is the binaural interaction component (BIC), which is obtained typically by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs)-the BIC reflects the difference between the binaural ABR and the sum of the monaural ABRs (i.e., binaural - (left + right)). We have recently developed an alternative, direct measure of sensitivity to interaural time differences, namely, a following response to modulations in interaural phase difference (the interaural phase modulation following response; IPM-FR). To obtain this measure, an ongoing diotically amplitude-modulated signal is presented, and the interaural phase difference of the carrier is switched periodically at minima in the modulation cycle. Such periodic modulations to interaural phase difference can evoke a steady state following response. BIC and IPM-FR measurements were compared from 10 normal-hearing subjects using a 16-channel electroencephalographic system. Both ABRs and IPM-FRs were observed most clearly from similar electrode locations-differential recordings taken from electrodes near the ear (e.g., mastoid) in reference to a vertex electrode (Cz). Although all subjects displayed clear ABRs, the BIC was not reliably observed. In contrast, the IPM-FR typically elicited a robust and significant response. In addition, the IPM-FR measure required a considerably shorter recording session. As the IPM-FR magnitude varied with interaural phase difference modulation depth, it could potentially serve as a correlate of perceptual salience. Overall, the IPM-FR appears a more suitable clinical measure than the BIC. PMID:26721925

  16. Sensitive Infrared Signal Detection by Upconversion Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Teh-Hwa; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Johnson, William; Chen, Songsheng; Petros, Mulugeta; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated upconversion assisted detection of a 2.05-micron signal by sum frequency generation to generate a 700-nm light using a bulk periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. The achieved 94% intrinsic upconversion efficiency and 22.58% overall detection efficiency at a pW level of 2.05 micron pave the path to detect extremely weak infrared (IR) signals for remote sensing applications.

  17. Binaural cues provide for a release from informational masking.

    PubMed

    Tolnai, Sandra; Dolležal, Lena-Vanessa; Klump, Georg M

    2015-10-01

    Informational masking (IM) describes the insensitivity of detecting a change in sound features in a complex acoustical environment when such a change could easily be detected in the absence of distracting sounds. IM occurs because of the similarity between deviant sound and distracting sounds (so-called similarity-based IM) and/or stimulus uncertainty stemming from trial-to-trial variability (so-called uncertainty-based IM). IM can be abolished if similarity-based or uncertainty-based IM are minimized. Here, we modulated similarity-based IM using binaural cues. Standard/deviant tones and distracting tones were presented sequentially, and level-increment thresholds were measured. Deviant tones differed from standard tones by a higher sound level. Distracting tones covered a wide range of levels. Standard/deviant tones and distracting tones were characterized by their interaural time difference (ITD), interaural level difference (ILD), or both ITD and ILD. The larger the ITD or ILD was, the better similarity-based IM was overcome. If both interaural differences were applied to standard/deviant tones, the release from IM was larger than when either interaural difference was used. The results show that binaural cues are potent cues to abolish similarity-based IM and that the auditory system makes use of multiple available cues. PMID:26413722

  18. Perception of Binaural Cues Develops in Children Who Are Deaf through Bilateral Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Karen A.; Deighton, Michael R.; Abbasalipour, Parvaneh; Papsin, Blake C.

    2014-01-01

    There are significant challenges to restoring binaural hearing to children who have been deaf from an early age. The uncoordinated and poor temporal information available from cochlear implants distorts perception of interaural timing differences normally important for sound localization and listening in noise. Moreover, binaural development can be compromised by bilateral and unilateral auditory deprivation. Here, we studied perception of both interaural level and timing differences in 79 children/adolescents using bilateral cochlear implants and 16 peers with normal hearing. They were asked on which side of their head they heard unilaterally or bilaterally presented click- or electrical pulse- trains. Interaural level cues were identified by most participants including adolescents with long periods of unilateral cochlear implant use and little bilateral implant experience. Interaural timing cues were not detected by new bilateral adolescent users, consistent with previous evidence. Evidence of binaural timing detection was, for the first time, found in children who had much longer implant experience but it was marked by poorer than normal sensitivity and abnormally strong dependence on current level differences between implants. In addition, children with prior unilateral implant use showed a higher proportion of responses to their first implanted sides than children implanted simultaneously. These data indicate that there are functional repercussions of developing binaural hearing through bilateral cochlear implants, particularly when provided sequentially; nonetheless, children have an opportunity to use these devices to hear better in noise and gain spatial hearing. PMID:25531107

  19. Density dependence of signal detection in radiographs.

    PubMed

    Burgess, A E; Humphrey, K

    1981-01-01

    We report results of the variation of signal detectability with radiographic film density for Lanex screens and four different x-ray films. We found that maximum signal detectability occurs near (but not precisely at) the maximum slope of the characteristic curve. We interpret our results using a model that includes film gamma quantum noise, film granularity, and an intrinsic observer contrast threshold. PMID:7290017

  20. Human cortical responses to slow and fast binaural beats reveal multiple mechanisms of binaural hearing.

    PubMed

    Ross, Bernhard; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Thompson, Jessica; Jamali, Shahab; Fujioka, Takako

    2014-10-15

    When two tones with slightly different frequencies are presented to both ears, they interact in the central auditory system and induce the sensation of a beating sound. At low difference frequencies, we perceive a single sound, which is moving across the head between the left and right ears. The percept changes to loudness fluctuation, roughness, and pitch with increasing beat rate. To examine the neural representations underlying these different perceptions, we recorded neuromagnetic cortical responses while participants listened to binaural beats at a continuously varying rate between 3 Hz and 60 Hz. Binaural beat responses were analyzed as neuromagnetic oscillations following the trajectory of the stimulus rate. Responses were largest in the 40-Hz gamma range and at low frequencies. Binaural beat responses at 3 Hz showed opposite polarity in the left and right auditory cortices. We suggest that this difference in polarity reflects the opponent neural population code for representing sound location. Binaural beats at any rate induced gamma oscillations. However, the responses were largest at 40-Hz stimulation. We propose that the neuromagnetic gamma oscillations reflect postsynaptic modulation that allows for precise timing of cortical neural firing. Systematic phase differences between bilateral responses suggest that separate sound representations of a sound object exist in the left and right auditory cortices. We conclude that binaural processing at the cortical level occurs with the same temporal acuity as monaural processing whereas the identification of sound location requires further interpretation and is limited by the rate of object representations. PMID:25008412

  1. Infrared Signal Detection by Upconversion Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Teh-Hwa; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Johnson, William E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated up-conversion assisted detection of a 2.05-micron signal by using a bulk periodically poled Lithium niobate crystal. The 94% intrinsic up-conversion efficiency and 22.58% overall detection efficiency at pW level of 2.05-micron was achieved.

  2. New cognitive detection techniques for multimedia signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yixuan; Chakravarty, Sumit

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we are address two issues regarding cognitive radio spectrum sensing. Spectrum sensing for cognitive radio has been extensively studied in recent past and multiple techniques have been proposed. One such technique is entropy based detection. In entropy based detection we measure the entropy of the received signal after converting it to frequency domain. The logic is that in frequency domain, the entropy of noise (assuming its AWGN) is higher than the signal, thereby enabling us to segment noise from signal by using entropy based threshold. This approach however makes some assumptions which may not be valid. It assumes at a time only one of the two( signal / noise) is present. It further assumes that a given test segment is either a signal or a noise segment. The length of the segment in such a scenario would be fixed /known. These assumptions may be too constraining and we propose alternate method to address the above issues. We use a filtering technique in form of Independent Component Analysis to segment the signal and further use additional techniques like energy weight-age to weigh the components to estimate the signal strength. We test our proposed method for a variety of signals include image, audio and sinusoidal signals. Results show the improvement in performance as well as the availability of new measures as generated from our proposed technique.

  3. Intelligent Signal Processing for Detection System Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C Y; Petrich, L I; Daley, P F; Burnham, A K

    2004-12-05

    A wavelet-neural network signal processing method has demonstrated approximately tenfold improvement over traditional signal-processing methods for the detection limit of various nitrogen and phosphorus compounds from the output of a thermionic detector attached to a gas chromatograph. A blind test was conducted to validate the lower detection limit. All fourteen of the compound spikes were detected when above the estimated threshold, including all three within a factor of two above the threshold. In addition, two of six spikes were detected at levels of 1/2 the concentration of the nominal threshold. Another two of the six would have been detected correctly if we had allowed human intervention to examine the processed data. One apparent false positive in five nulls was traced to a solvent impurity, whose presence was subsequently identified by analyzing a solvent aliquot evaporated to 1% residual volume, while the other four nulls were properly classified. We view this signal processing method as broadly applicable in analytical chemistry, and we advocate that advanced signal processing methods should be applied as directly as possible to the raw detector output so that less discriminating preprocessing and post-processing does not throw away valuable signal.

  4. VLSI processors for signal detection in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duluk, J. F.; Linscott, I. R.; Peterson, A. M.; Burr, J.; Ekroot, B.; Twicken, J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is to locate an artificially created signal coming from a distant star. This is done in two steps: (1) spectral analysis of an incoming radio frequency band, and (2) pattern detection for narrow-band signals. Both steps are computationally expensive and require the development of specially designed computer architectures. To reduce the size and cost of the SETI signal detection machine, two custom VLSI chips are under development. The first chip, the SETI DSP Engine, is used in the spectrum analyzer and is specially designed to compute Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs). It is a high-speed arithmetic processor that has two adders, one multiplier-accumulator, and three four-port memories. The second chip is a new type of Content-Addressable Memory. It is the heart of an associative processor that is used for pattern detection. Both chips incorporate many innovative circuits and architectural features.

  5. Tornado Detection Based on Seismic Signal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatom, Frank B.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Vitton, Stanley J.

    1995-02-01

    At the present time the only generally accepted method for detecting when a tornado is on the ground is human observation. Based on theoretical considerations combined with eyewitness testimony, there is strong reason to believe that a tornado in contact with the ground transfers a significant amount of energy into the ground. The amount of energy transferred depends upon the intensity of the tornado and the characteristics of the surface. Some portion of this energy takes the form of seismic waves, both body and surface waves. Surface waves (Rayleigh and possibly Love) represent the most likely type of seismic signal to be detected. Based on the existence of such a signal, a seismic tornado detector appears conceptually possible. The major concerns for designing such a detector are range of detection and discrimination between the tornadic signal and other types of surface waves generated by ground transportation equipment, high winds, or other nontornadic sources.

  6. VLSI processors for signal detection in SETI.

    PubMed

    Duluk, J F; Linscott, I R; Peterson, A M; Burr, J; Ekroot, B; Twicken, J

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is to locate an artificially created signal coming from a distant star. This is done in two steps: (1) spectral analysis of an incoming radio frequency band, and (2) pattern detection for narrow-band signals. Both steps are computationally expensive and require the development of specially designed computer architectures. To reduce the size and cost of the SETI signal detection machine, two custom VLSI chips are under development. The first chip, the SETI DSP Engine, is used in the spectrum analyzer and is specially designed to compute Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs). It is a high-speed arithmetic processor that has two adders, one multiplier-accumulator, and three four-port memories. The second chip is a new type of Content-Addressable Memory. It is the heart of an associative processor that is used for pattern detection. Both chips incorporate many innovative circuits and architectural features. PMID:11537749

  7. VLSI processors for signal detection in SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duluk, J. F.; Linscott, I. R.; Peterson, A. M.; Burr, J.; Ekroot, B.; Twicken, J.

    The objective of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is to locate an artifically created signal coming from a distant star. This is done in two steps: (1) spectral analysis of an incoming radio frequency band, and (2) pattern detection for narrow-band signals. Both steps are computationally expensive and require the development of specially designed computer architectures. To reduce the size and cost of the SETI signal detection machine, two custom VLSI chips are under development. The first chip, the SETI DSP Engine, is used in the spectrum analyzer and is specially designed to compute Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs). It is a high-speed arithmetic processor that has two adders, one multiplier-accumulator, and three four-port memories. The second chip is a new type of Content-Addressable Memory. It is the heart of an associative processor that is used for pattern detection. Both chips incoporate many innovative circuits and architectural features.

  8. Analysis of EEG activity in response to binaural beats with different frequencies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Cao, Hongbao; Ming, Dong; Qi, Hongzhi; Wang, Xuemin; Wang, Xiaolu; Chen, Runge; Zhou, Peng

    2014-12-01

    When two coherent sounds with nearly similar frequencies are presented to each ear respectively with stereo headphones, the brain integrates the two signals and produces a sensation of a third sound called binaural beat (BB). Although earlier studies showed that BB could influence behavior and cognition, common agreement on the mechanism of BB has not been reached yet. In this work, we employed Relative Power (RP), Phase Locking Value (PLV) and Cross-Mutual Information (CMI) to track EEG changes during BB stimulations. EEG signals were acquired from 13 healthy subjects. Five-minute BBs with four different frequencies were tested: delta band (1 Hz), theta band (5 Hz), alpha band (10 Hz) and beta band (20 Hz). We observed RP increase in theta and alpha bands and decrease in beta band during delta and alpha BB stimulations. RP decreased in beta band during theta BB, while RP decreased in theta band during beta BB. However, no clear brainwave entrainment effect was identified. Connectivity changes were detected following the variation of RP during BB stimulations. Our observation supports the hypothesis that BBs could affect functional brain connectivity, suggesting that the mechanism of BB-brain interaction is worth further study. PMID:25448376

  9. Intelligent Signal Processing for Detection System Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C Y; Petrich, L I; Daley, P F; Burnham, A K

    2004-06-18

    A wavelet-neural network signal processing method has demonstrated approximately tenfold improvement in the detection limit of various nitrogen and phosphorus compounds over traditional signal-processing methods in analyzing the output of a thermionic detector attached to the output of a gas chromatograph. A blind test was conducted to validate the lower detection limit. All fourteen of the compound spikes were detected when above the estimated threshold, including all three within a factor of two above. In addition, two of six were detected at levels 1/2 the concentration of the nominal threshold. We would have had another two correct hits if we had allowed human intervention to examine the processed data. One apparent false positive in five nulls was traced to a solvent impurity, whose presence was identified by running a solvent aliquot evaporated to 1% residual volume, while the other four nulls were properly classified. We view this signal processing method as broadly applicable in analytical chemistry, and we advocate that advanced signal processing methods be applied as directly as possible to the raw detector output so that less discriminating preprocessing and post-processing does not throw away valuable signal.

  10. Binaural Advantage for Younger and Older Adults with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubno, Judy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Horwitz, Amy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Three experiments measured benefit of spatial separation, benefit of binaural listening, and masking-level differences (MLDs) to assess age-related differences in binaural advantage. Method: Participants were younger and older adults with normal hearing through 4.0 kHz. Experiment 1 compared spatial benefit with and without head shadow.…

  11. Monaural Congenital Deafness Affects Aural Dominance and Degrades Binaural Processing

    PubMed Central

    Tillein, Jochen; Hubka, Peter; Kral, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Cortical development extensively depends on sensory experience. Effects of congenital monaural and binaural deafness on cortical aural dominance and representation of binaural cues were investigated in the present study. We used an animal model that precisely mimics the clinical scenario of unilateral cochlear implantation in an individual with single-sided congenital deafness. Multiunit responses in cortical field A1 to cochlear implant stimulation were studied in normal-hearing cats, bilaterally congenitally deaf cats (CDCs), and unilaterally deaf cats (uCDCs). Binaural deafness reduced cortical responsiveness and decreased response thresholds and dynamic range. In contrast to CDCs, in uCDCs, cortical responsiveness was not reduced, but hemispheric-specific reorganization of aural dominance and binaural interactions were observed. Deafness led to a substantial drop in binaural facilitation in CDCs and uCDCs, demonstrating the inevitable role of experience for a binaural benefit. Sensitivity to interaural time differences was more reduced in uCDCs than in CDCs, particularly at the hemisphere ipsilateral to the hearing ear. Compared with binaural deafness, unilateral hearing prevented nonspecific reduction in cortical responsiveness, but extensively reorganized aural dominance and binaural responses. The deaf ear remained coupled with the cortex in uCDCs, demonstrating a significant difference to deprivation amblyopia in the visual system. PMID:26803166

  12. Monaural Congenital Deafness Affects Aural Dominance and Degrades Binaural Processing.

    PubMed

    Tillein, Jochen; Hubka, Peter; Kral, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    Cortical development extensively depends on sensory experience. Effects of congenital monaural and binaural deafness on cortical aural dominance and representation of binaural cues were investigated in the present study. We used an animal model that precisely mimics the clinical scenario of unilateral cochlear implantation in an individual with single-sided congenital deafness. Multiunit responses in cortical field A1 to cochlear implant stimulation were studied in normal-hearing cats, bilaterally congenitally deaf cats (CDCs), and unilaterally deaf cats (uCDCs). Binaural deafness reduced cortical responsiveness and decreased response thresholds and dynamic range. In contrast to CDCs, in uCDCs, cortical responsiveness was not reduced, but hemispheric-specific reorganization of aural dominance and binaural interactions were observed. Deafness led to a substantial drop in binaural facilitation in CDCs and uCDCs, demonstrating the inevitable role of experience for a binaural benefit. Sensitivity to interaural time differences was more reduced in uCDCs than in CDCs, particularly at the hemisphere ipsilateral to the hearing ear. Compared with binaural deafness, unilateral hearing prevented nonspecific reduction in cortical responsiveness, but extensively reorganized aural dominance and binaural responses. The deaf ear remained coupled with the cortex in uCDCs, demonstrating a significant difference to deprivation amblyopia in the visual system. PMID:26803166

  13. Signal processing aspects of windshear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aalfs, David D.; Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1993-01-01

    Low-altitude windshear (LAWS) has been identified as a major hazard to aircraft, particularly during takeoff and landing. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been involved with developing technology to detect LAWS. A key element in this technology is high resolution pulse Doppler weather radar equipped with signal and data processing to provide timely information about possible hazardous conditions.

  14. Detection and frequency tracking of chirping signals

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, G.R.; Stearns, S.D.

    1990-08-01

    This paper discusses several methods to detect the presence of and track the frequency of a chirping signal in broadband noise. The dynamic behavior of each of the methods is described and tracking error bounds are investigated in terms of the chirp rate. Frequency tracking and behavior in the presence of varying levels of noise are illustrated in examples. 11 refs., 29 figs.

  15. “UTILIZING” SIGNAL DETECTION THEORY

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Spencer K.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-01-01

    What do inferring what a person is thinking or feeling, deciding to report a symptom to your doctor, judging a defendant’s guilt, and navigating a dimly lit room have in common? They involve perceptual uncertainty (e.g., a scowling face might indicate anger or concentration, which engender different appropriate responses), and behavioral risk (e.g., a cost to making the wrong response). Signal detection theory describes these types of decisions. In this tutorial we show how, by incorporating the economic concept of utility, signal detection theory serves as a model of optimal decision making, beyond its common use as an analytic method. This utility approach to signal detection theory highlights potentially enigmatic influences of perceptual uncertainty on measures of decision-making performance (accuracy and optimality) and on behavior (a functional relationship between bias and sensitivity). A “utilized” signal detection theory offers the possibility of expanding the phenomena that can be understood within a decision-making framework. PMID:25097061

  16. Carrier synchronization and detection of polyphase signals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Simon, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    Digital communication networks used for the distribution of high-speed digital information are currently the subject of design studies for many civil and military applications. This paper presents results that are useful in such studies as well as in network planning. In particular, the paper is concerned with the problems of carrier synchronization and noisy reference detection of polyphase signals. Reconstruction of coherent references for the detection of polyphase signals is considered and analyzed for three carrier reconstruction loops, namely, Nth power (multiply-and-divide) loops, generalized Costas (I-Q) loops, and extensions of data-aided (modulation wipeoff) loops. General expressions for the error probability are developed when the reconstructed reference signals are noisy.

  17. Chaotic system detection of weak seismic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Yang, B. J.; Badal, J.; Zhao, X. P.; Lin, H. B.; Li, R. L.

    2009-09-01

    When the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio is less than -3 dB or even 0 dB, seismic events are generally difficult to identify from a common shot record. To overcome this type of problem we present a method to detect weak seismic signals based on the oscillations described by a chaotic dynamic system in phase space. The basic idea is that a non-linear chaotic oscillator is strongly immune to noise. Such a dynamic system is less influenced by noise, but it is more sensitive to periodic signals, changing from a chaotic state to a large-scale periodic phase state when excited by a weak signal. With the purpose of checking the possible contamination of the signal by noise, we have performed a numerical experiment with an oscillator controlled by the Duffing-Holmes equation, taking a distorted Ricker wavelet sequence as input signal. In doing so, we prove that the oscillator system is able to reach a large-scale periodic phase state in a strong noise environment. In the case of a common shot record with low S/N ratio, the onsets reflected from a same interface are similar to one other and can be put on a single trace with a common reference time and the periodicity of the so-generated signal follows as a consequence of moveout at a particular scanning velocity. This operation, which is called `horizontal dynamic correction' and leads to a nearly periodic signal, is implemented on synthetic wavelet sequences taking various sampling arrival times and scanning velocities. Thereafter, two tests, both in a noisy ambient of -3.7 dB, are done using a chaotic oscillator: the first demonstrates the capability of the method to really detect a weak seismic signal; the second takes care of the fundamental weakness of the dynamic correction coming from the use of a particular scanning velocity, which is investigated from the effect caused by near-surface lateral velocity variation on the periodicity of the reconstructed seismic signal. Finally, we have developed an application of the

  18. [Sound localization cues of binaural hearing].

    PubMed

    Paulus, E

    2003-04-01

    The ability to localize sound sources in space is of considerable importance to the human safety- and survival-system. Consequently the current scientific interest in improving the safety-standard i. e. in air-traffic control has provided a new momentum for investigating spatial hearing. This review deals with the nature and the relative salience of the localization cues. Localization refers to judgements of the direction and distance of a sound source but here we will deal with direction only. We begin with a short introduction into the so-called Duplex theory which dates back to John William Strutt (later Lord Rayleigh). The idea is that sound localization is based on interaural time differences (ITD) at low frequencies and interaural level differences (ILD) at high frequencies. If the head remains stationary neither a given ITD nor an ILD can sufficiently define the position of a sound source in space. On such a theoretical basis cones of confusion which open outward from each ear can be predicted ambiguously projecting any source on the surface of such a cone onto an interaural axis. Our restricted ability at localizing sound sources in the vertical median plane is another example of possible ambiguity. At the end of the 19th century scientists already realized that occlusion of the pinnae cavities decreases localization competence. As a result of later achievements in physics and signal-theory it became more obvious that the pinnae may provide an additional cue for spatial hearing and that the outer ear together with the head and the upper torso form a sophisticated direction-dependent filter. The action of such a filter is mathematically described by the so-called Anatomical Transfer Function (ATF). The spectral patterning of the sound produced by the pinnae and the head is most effective when the source has spectral energy over a wide range and contains frequencies above 6 kHz, that is it contains wavelengths short enough to interact with the anatomical

  19. Acoustic signal detection of manatee calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Phillips, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2003-04-01

    The West Indian manatee (trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of a growing number of collisions with boats. A system to warn boaters of the presence of manatees, that can signal to boaters that manatees are present in the immediate vicinity, could potentially reduce these boat collisions. In order to identify the presence of manatees, acoustic methods are employed. Within this paper, three different detection algorithms are used to detect the calls of the West Indian manatee. The detection systems are tested in the laboratory using simulated manatee vocalizations from an audio compact disc. The detection method that provides the best overall performance is able to correctly identify ~=96% of the manatee vocalizations. However the system also results in a false positive rate of ~=16%. The results of this work may ultimately lead to the development of a manatee warning system that can warn boaters of the presence of manatees.

  20. Optimal signal recovery for pulsed balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Icaza Astiz, Yannick A.; Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; León-Montiel, R. de J.; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a tool for filtering technical and electronic noises from pulses of light, especially relevant for signal processing methods in quantum optics experiments as a means to achieve the shot-noise level and reduce strong technical noise by means of a pattern function. We provide the theory of this pattern-function filtering based on balance detection. Moreover, we implement an experimental demonstration where 10 dB of technical noise is filtered after balance detection. Such filter can readily be used for probing magnetic atomic ensembles in environments with strong technical noise.

  1. Detection of Smad Signaling in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingfeng; Wang, Qiang; Meng, Anming

    2016-01-01

    Nodal and BMPs play critical roles in germ layer induction and patterning in early zebrafish embryos. Smad2/3 and Smad1/5/8 are intracellular effectors of Nodal and BMPs, respectively. These Smads regulate, in cooperation with other factors, transcription of hundreds of target genes in the nucleus. The activity and stability of Smads are regulated by phosphorylation modifications. To better understand the regulatory network of Smads-mediated signaling and its biological implications, it is necessary to monitor the signaling activity in an in vivo model system. In this chapter, we describe the methods used in zebrafish embryos for dissecting Smads signaling, including TGF-β/Nodal- and BMP-responsive luciferase reporter assays, Western blotting for Smads, co-immunoprecipitation for Smads and their interacting proteins, chromatin-immunoprecipitation for identification of Smad2-binding sites, and immunostaining for detection of active Smad1/5/8. PMID:26520131

  2. Automated detection and location of indications in eddy current signals

    DOEpatents

    Brudnoy, David M.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Levy, Arthur J.

    2000-01-01

    A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

  3. Automated Detection and Location of Indications in Eddy Current Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Brudnoy, David M.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Levy, Arthur J.

    1998-06-30

    A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, said signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

  4. A Binaural CI Research Platform for Oticon Medical SP/XP Implants Enabling ITD/ILD and Variable Rate Processing.

    PubMed

    Backus, B; Adiloğlu, K; Herzke, T

    2015-01-01

    We present the first portable, binaural, real-time research platform compatible with Oticon Medical SP and XP generation cochlear implants. The platform consists of (a) a pair of behind-the-ear devices, each containing front and rear calibrated microphones, (b) a four-channel USB analog-to-digital converter, (c) real-time PC-based sound processing software called the Master Hearing Aid, and (d) USB-connected hardware and output coils capable of driving two implants simultaneously. The platform is capable of processing signals from the four microphones simultaneously and producing synchronized binaural cochlear implant outputs that drive two (bilaterally implanted) SP or XP implants. Both audio signal preprocessing algorithms (such as binaural beamforming) and novel binaural stimulation strategies (within the implant limitations) can be programmed by researchers. When the whole research platform is combined with Oticon Medical SP implants, interaural electrode timing can be controlled on individual electrodes to within ±1 µs and interaural electrode energy differences can be controlled to within ±2%. Hence, this new platform is particularly well suited to performing experiments related to interaural time differences in combination with interaural level differences in real-time. The platform also supports instantaneously variable stimulation rates and thereby enables investigations such as the effect of changing the stimulation rate on pitch perception. Because the processing can be changed on the fly, researchers can use this platform to study perceptual changes resulting from different processing strategies acutely. PMID:26721923

  5. A Binaural CI Research Platform for Oticon Medical SP/XP Implants Enabling ITD/ILD and Variable Rate Processing

    PubMed Central

    Adiloğlu, K.; Herzke, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first portable, binaural, real-time research platform compatible with Oticon Medical SP and XP generation cochlear implants. The platform consists of (a) a pair of behind-the-ear devices, each containing front and rear calibrated microphones, (b) a four-channel USB analog-to-digital converter, (c) real-time PC-based sound processing software called the Master Hearing Aid, and (d) USB-connected hardware and output coils capable of driving two implants simultaneously. The platform is capable of processing signals from the four microphones simultaneously and producing synchronized binaural cochlear implant outputs that drive two (bilaterally implanted) SP or XP implants. Both audio signal preprocessing algorithms (such as binaural beamforming) and novel binaural stimulation strategies (within the implant limitations) can be programmed by researchers. When the whole research platform is combined with Oticon Medical SP implants, interaural electrode timing can be controlled on individual electrodes to within ±1 µs and interaural electrode energy differences can be controlled to within ±2%. Hence, this new platform is particularly well suited to performing experiments related to interaural time differences in combination with interaural level differences in real-time. The platform also supports instantaneously variable stimulation rates and thereby enables investigations such as the effect of changing the stimulation rate on pitch perception. Because the processing can be changed on the fly, researchers can use this platform to study perceptual changes resulting from different processing strategies acutely. PMID:26721923

  6. The across frequency independence of equalization of interaural time delay in the equalization-cancellation model of binaural unmasking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeroyd, Michael A.

    2004-08-01

    The equalization stage in the equalization-cancellation model of binaural unmasking compensates for the interaural time delay (ITD) of a masking noise by introducing an opposite, internal delay [N. I. Durlach, in Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory, Vol. II., edited by J. V. Tobias (Academic, New York, 1972)]. Culling and Summerfield [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 785-797 (1995)] developed a multi-channel version of this model in which equalization was ``free'' to use the optimal delay in each channel. Two experiments were conducted to test if equalization was indeed free or if it was ``restricted'' to the same delay in all channels. One experiment measured binaural detection thresholds, using an adaptive procedure, for 1-, 5-, or 17-component tones against a broadband masking noise, in three binaural configurations (N0S180, N180S0, and N90S270). The thresholds for the 1-component stimuli were used to normalize the levels of each of the 5- and 17-component stimuli so that they were equally detectable. If equalization was restricted, then, for the 5- and 17-component stimuli, the N90S270 and N180S0 configurations would yield a greater threshold than the N0S180 configurations. No such difference was found. A subsequent experiment measured binaural detection thresholds, via psychometric functions, for a 2-component complex tone in the same three binaural configurations. Again, no differential effect of configuration was observed. An analytic model of the detection of a complex tone showed that the results were more consistent with free equalization than restricted equalization, although the size of the differences was found to depend on the shape of the psychometric function for detection.

  7. Development of an Efficient Binaural Simulation for the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marty E.; Lalime, Aimee L.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    Applying binaural simulation techniques to structural acoustic data can be very computationally intensive as the number of discrete noise sources can be very large. Typically, Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) are used to individually filter the signals from each of the sources in the acoustic field. Therefore, creating a binaural simulation implies the use of potentially hundreds of real time filters. This paper details two methods of reducing the number of real-time computations required by: (i) using the singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the complexity of the HRTFs by breaking them into dominant singular values and vectors and (ii) by using equivalent source reduction (ESR) to reduce the number of sources to be analyzed in real-time by replacing sources on the scale of a structural wavelength with sources on the scale of an acoustic wavelength. The ESR and SVD reduction methods can be combined to provide an estimated computation time reduction of 99.4% for the structural acoustic data tested. In addition, preliminary tests have shown that there is a 97% correlation between the results of the combined reduction methods and the results found with the current binaural simulation techniques

  8. Detection and Classification of Whale Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yin

    This dissertation focuses on two vital challenges in relation to whale acoustic signals: detection and classification. In detection, we evaluated the influence of the uncertain ocean environment on the spectrogram-based detector, and derived the likelihood ratio of the proposed Short Time Fourier Transform detector. Experimental results showed that the proposed detector outperforms detectors based on the spectrogram. The proposed detector is more sensitive to environmental changes because it includes phase information. In classification, our focus is on finding a robust and sparse representation of whale vocalizations. Because whale vocalizations can be modeled as polynomial phase signals, we can represent the whale calls by their polynomial phase coefficients. In this dissertation, we used the Weyl transform to capture chirp rate information, and used a two dimensional feature set to represent whale vocalizations globally. Experimental results showed that our Weyl feature set outperforms chirplet coefficients and MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients) when applied to our collected data. Since whale vocalizations can be represented by polynomial phase coefficients, it is plausible that the signals lie on a manifold parameterized by these coefficients. We also studied the intrinsic structure of high dimensional whale data by exploiting its geometry. Experimental results showed that nonlinear mappings such as Laplacian Eigenmap and ISOMAP outperform linear mappings such as PCA and MDS, suggesting that the whale acoustic data is nonlinear. We also explored deep learning algorithms on whale acoustic data. We built each layer as convolutions with either a PCA filter bank (PCANet) or a DCT filter bank (DCTNet). With the DCT filter bank, each layer has different a time-frequency scale representation, and from this, one can extract different physical information. Experimental results showed that our PCANet and DCTNet achieve high classification rate on the whale

  9. Signal Injection as a Fault Detection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Cusidó, Jordi; Romeral, Luis; Ortega, Juan Antonio; Garcia, Antoni; Riba, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Double frequency tests are used for evaluating stator windings and analyzing the temperature. Likewise, signal injection on induction machines is used on sensorless motor control fields to find out the rotor position. Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA), which focuses on the spectral analysis of stator current, is the most widely used method for identifying faults in induction motors. Motor faults such as broken rotor bars, bearing damage and eccentricity of the rotor axis can be detected. However, the method presents some problems at low speed and low torque, mainly due to the proximity between the frequencies to be detected and the small amplitude of the resulting harmonics. This paper proposes the injection of an additional voltage into the machine being tested at a frequency different from the fundamental one, and then studying the resulting harmonics around the new frequencies appearing due to the composition between injected and main frequencies. PMID:22163801

  10. Detecting double compression of audio signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Shi, Yun Q.; Huang, Jiwu

    2010-01-01

    MP3 is the most popular audio format nowadays in our daily life, for example music downloaded from the Internet and file saved in the digital recorder are often in MP3 format. However, low bitrate MP3s are often transcoded to high bitrate since high bitrate ones are of high commercial value. Also audio recording in digital recorder can be doctored easily by pervasive audio editing software. This paper presents two methods for the detection of double MP3 compression. The methods are essential for finding out fake-quality MP3 and audio forensics. The proposed methods use support vector machine classifiers with feature vectors formed by the distributions of the first digits of the quantized MDCT (modified discrete cosine transform) coefficients. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. To the best of our knowledge, this piece of work is the first one to detect double compression of audio signal.

  11. Signal injection as a fault detection technique.

    PubMed

    Cusidó, Jordi; Romeral, Luis; Ortega, Juan Antonio; Garcia, Antoni; Riba, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Double frequency tests are used for evaluating stator windings and analyzing the temperature. Likewise, signal injection on induction machines is used on sensorless motor control fields to find out the rotor position. Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA), which focuses on the spectral analysis of stator current, is the most widely used method for identifying faults in induction motors. Motor faults such as broken rotor bars, bearing damage and eccentricity of the rotor axis can be detected. However, the method presents some problems at low speed and low torque, mainly due to the proximity between the frequencies to be detected and the small amplitude of the resulting harmonics. This paper proposes the injection of an additional voltage into the machine being tested at a frequency different from the fundamental one, and then studying the resulting harmonics around the new frequencies appearing due to the composition between injected and main frequencies. PMID:22163801

  12. Detecting the cosmological recombination signal from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjacques, Vincent; Chluba, Jens; Silk, Joseph; de Bernardis, Francesco; Doré, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have recently experienced an increased interest. One of the inevitable distortion signals of our cosmological concordance model is created by the cosmological recombination process, just a little before photons last scatter at redshift z ≃ 1100. These cosmological recombination lines, emitted by the hydrogen and helium plasma, should still be observable as tiny deviation from the CMB blackbody spectrum in the cm-dm spectral bands. In this paper, we present a forecast for the detectability of the recombination signal with future satellite experiments. We argue that serious consideration for future CMB experiments in space should be given to probing spectral distortions and, in particular, the recombination line signals. The cosmological recombination radiation not only allows determination of standard cosmological parameters, but also provides a direct observational confirmation for one of the key ingredients of our cosmological model: the cosmological recombination history. We show that, with present technology, such experiments are futuristic but feasible. The potential rewards won by opening this new window to the very early universe could be considerable.

  13. The pattern of Fos expression in the rat auditory brainstem changes with the temporal structure of binaural electrical intracochlear stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Till F; Döring, Ulrike; Illing, Robert-Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The immediate-early-gene c-fos with its protein product Fos has been used as a powerful tool to investigate neuronal activity and plasticity following sensory stimulation. Fos combines with Jun, another IEG product, to form the dimeric transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) which has been implied in a variety of cellular functions like neuronal plasticity, apoptosis, and regeneration. The intracellular emergence of Fos indicates a functional state of nerve cells directed towards molecular and morphological changes. The central auditory system is construed to detect stimulus intensity, spectral composition, and binaural balance through neurons organized in a complex network of ascending, descending and commissural pathways. Here we compare monaural and binaural electrical intracochlear stimulation (EIS) in normal hearing and early postnatally deafened rats. Binaural stimulation was done either synchronously or asynchronously. The auditory brainstem of hearing and deaf rats responds differently, with a dramatically increasing Fos expression in the deaf group so as if the network had no pre-orientation for how to organize sensory activity. Binaural EIS does not result in a trivial sum of 2 independent monaural EIS, as asynchronous stimulation invokes stronger Fos activation compared to synchronous stimulation almost everywhere in the auditory brainstem. The differential response to synchronicity of the stimulation puts emphasis on the importance of the temporal structure of EIS with respect to its potential for changing brain structure and brain function in stimulus-specific ways. PMID:25708983

  14. Tone-in-noise detection using envelope cues: comparison of signal-processing-based and physiological models.

    PubMed

    Mao, Junwen; Carney, Laurel H

    2015-02-01

    Tone-in-noise detection tasks with reproducible noise maskers have been used to identify cues that listeners use to detect signals in noisy environments. Previous studies have shown that energy, envelope, and fine-structure cues are significantly correlated to listeners' performance for detection of a 500-Hz tone in noise. In this study, envelope cues were examined for both diotic and dichotic tone-in-noise detection using both stimulus-based signal processing and physiological models. For stimulus-based envelope cues, a modified envelope slope model was used for the diotic condition and the binaural slope of the interaural envelope difference model for the dichotic condition. Stimulus-based models do not include key nonlinear transformations in the auditory periphery such as compression, rate and dynamic range adaptation, and rate saturation, all of which affect the encoding of the stimulus envelope. For physiological envelope cues, stimuli were passed through models for the auditory nerve (AN), cochlear nucleus, and inferior colliculus (IC). The AN and cochlear nucleus models included appropriate modulation gain, another transformation of the stimulus envelope that is not typically included in stimulus-based models. A model IC cell was simulated with a linear band-pass modulation filter. The average discharge rate and response fluctuations of the model IC cell were compared to human performance. Previous studies have predicted a significant amount of the variance across reproducible noise maskers in listeners' detection using stimulus-based envelope cues. In this study, a physiological model that includes neural mechanisms that affect encoding of the stimulus envelope predicts a similar amount of the variance in listeners' performance across noise maskers. PMID:25266265

  15. Aging effects on the binaural interaction component of the auditory brainstem response in the Mongolian gerbil: Effects of interaural time and level differences.

    PubMed

    Laumen, Geneviève; Tollin, Daniel J; Beutelmann, Rainer; Klump, Georg M

    2016-07-01

    The effect of interaural time difference (ITD) and interaural level difference (ILD) on wave 4 of the binaural and summed monaural auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) as well as on the DN1 component of the binaural interaction component (BIC) of the ABR in young and old Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) was investigated. Measurements were made at a fixed sound pressure level (SPL) and a fixed level above visually detected ABR threshold to compensate for individual hearing threshold differences. In both stimulation modes (fixed SPL and fixed level above visually detected ABR threshold) an effect of ITD on the latency and the amplitude of wave 4 as well as of the BIC was observed. With increasing absolute ITD values BIC latencies were increased and amplitudes were decreased. ILD had a much smaller effect on these measures. Old animals showed a reduced amplitude of the DN1 component. This difference was due to a smaller wave 4 in the summed monaural ABRs of old animals compared to young animals whereas wave 4 in the binaural-evoked ABR showed no age-related difference. In old animals the small amplitude of the DN1 component was correlated with small binaural-evoked wave 1 and wave 3 amplitudes. This suggests that the reduced peripheral input affects central binaural processing which is reflected in the BIC. PMID:27173973

  16. Availability of binaural cues for bilateral implant recipients and bimodal listeners with and without preserved hearing in the implanted ear

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, Michael F.; Sheffield, Sterling W.; Teece, Kate; Olund, Amy P.; Gifford, René H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the availability of binaural cues for adult, bilateral cochlear implant (CI) patients, bimodal patients and hearing preservation patients using a multiple baseline, observational study design. Speech recognition was assessed using the Bamford-Kowal-Bench Speech-In-Noise (BKB-SIN) test as well as the AzBio sentences [Spahr et al., 2012] presented in a multi-talker babble at +5 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Test conditions included speech at 0° with noise presented at 0° (S0N0), 90° (S0N90), and 270° (S0N270). Estimates of summation, head shadow (HS), squelch, and spatial release from masking (SRM) were calculated. Though none of the subject groups consistently showed access to binaural cues, the hearing preservation patients exhibited a significant correlation between summation and squelch whereas the bilateral and bimodal participants did not. That is, the two effects associated with binaural hearing—summation and squelch—were positively correlated for only the listeners with bilateral acoustic hearing. This finding provides evidence for the supposition that implant recipients with bilateral acoustic hearing have access to binaural cues which should, in theory, provide greater benefit in noisy listening environments. It is likely, however, that the chosen test environment negatively affected the outcomes. Specifically, the spatially separated noise conditions directed noise toward the mic port of the behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid and implant processor. Thus it is possible that in more realistic listening environments for which the diffuse noise is not directed toward the processor/hearing aid mic, hearing preservation patients have binaural hearing cues for improved speech understanding. PMID:24356514

  17. Dose response signal detection under model uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Dette, Holger; Titoff, Stefanie; Volgushev, Stanislav; Bretz, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We investigate likelihood ratio contrast tests for dose response signal detection under model uncertainty, when several competing regression models are available to describe the dose response relationship. The proposed approach uses the complete structure of the regression models, but does not require knowledge of the parameters of the competing models. Standard likelihood ratio test theory is applicable in linear models as well as in nonlinear regression models with identifiable parameters. However, for many commonly used nonlinear dose response models the regression parameters are not identifiable under the null hypothesis of no dose response and standard arguments cannot be used to obtain critical values. We thus derive the asymptotic distribution of likelihood ratio contrast tests in regression models with a lack of identifiability and use this result to simulate the quantiles based on Gaussian processes. The new method is illustrated with a real data example and compared to existing procedures using theoretical investigations as well as simulations. PMID:26228796

  18. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  19. Binaural interaction in human auditory brainstem response compared for tone-pips and rectangular clicks under conditions of auditory and visual attention.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazunari

    2015-07-01

    Binaural interaction in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) represents the discrepancy between the binaural waveform and the sum of monaural ones. A typical ABR binaural interaction in humans is a reduction of the binaural amplitude compared to the monaural sum at the wave-V latency, i.e., the DN1 component. It has been considered that the DN1 is mainly elicited by high frequency components of stimuli whereas some studies have shown the contribution of low-to-middle frequency components to the DN1. To examine this issue, the present study compared the ABR binaural interaction elicited by tone pips (1 kHz, 10-ms duration) with the one by clicks (a rectangular wave, 0.1-ms duration) presented at 80 dB peak equivalent SPL and a fixed stimulus onset interval (180 ms). The DN1 due to tone pips was vulnerable compared to the click-evoked DN1. The pip-evoked DN1 was significantly detected under auditory attention whereas it failed to reach significance under visual attention. The click-evoked DN1 was robustly present for the two attention conditions. The current results might confirm the high frequency sound contribution to the DN1 elicitation. PMID:25776741

  20. On the detection of differentially encoded polyphase signals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Simon, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of the transmission and detection of differentially encoded multiple phase-shift-keyed (MPSK) signals, paying particular attention to the ambiguity resolution problem resulting from suppression of the transmitted carrier. A study is made of the coherent detection of differentially encoded MPSK signals, and the performance of a differentially encoded MPSK system is compared with that of a system which transmits absolutely encoded polyphase signals and performs perfect ambiguity resolution. Both the perfect and noisy reference signal cases are treated. Also, the performance of coherent detection of differentially encoded MPSK signals is compared with that of differentially coherent reception of the same signal set.

  1. Detection of antipodal signalling and its application to wideband SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Ian S.

    2012-09-01

    The SETI community is becoming increasingly interested in extending its searches to include wideband signals, such as information-bearing beacons. However, prior to discovery of a target signal, a SETI receiver has no knowledge of the signal parameters (bandwidth, carrier frequency, modulation type, etc.) and so detection can be very challenging, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. However, this paper shows by example that there exist signal classes and corresponding detection methods that permit straightforward discovery of wideband signals of unknown structure. The example given is a form of binary antipodal signalling that utilises spread-spectrum modulation, which offers benefits to the receiver in terms of immunity to noise/interference and ease of detection. The proposed detection method is a 'symbol-wise' autocorrelation process that takes advantage of the cyclostationarity property of modulated signals. Detection sensitivity is suboptimal in comparison with what is possible if the target signal structure is known. However, this deficit can be overcome by processing longer timespans of signal, providing scope for detection at extremely low signal-to-noise ratios. It is postulated that antipodal signalling represents an attractive option for interstellar beacons because it is both power efficient and there exists a simple complementary detection method not requiring explicit coordination between the transmitter and receiver. This in turn suggests there is a case for extending future SETI searches to include this class of signal.

  2. Binaural hearing in children using Gaussian enveloped and transposed tones.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Erica; Kan, Alan; Winn, Matthew B; Stoelb, Corey; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2016-04-01

    Children who use bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs) show significantly poorer sound localization skills than their normal hearing (NH) peers. This difference has been attributed, in part, to the fact that cochlear implants (CIs) do not faithfully transmit interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs), which are known to be important cues for sound localization. Interestingly, little is known about binaural sensitivity in NH children, in particular, with stimuli that constrain acoustic cues in a manner representative of CI processing. In order to better understand and evaluate binaural hearing in children with BiCIs, the authors first undertook a study on binaural sensitivity in NH children ages 8-10, and in adults. Experiments evaluated sound discrimination and lateralization using ITD and ILD cues, for stimuli with robust envelope cues, but poor representation of temporal fine structure. Stimuli were spondaic words, Gaussian-enveloped tone pulse trains (100 pulse-per-second), and transposed tones. Results showed that discrimination thresholds in children were adult-like (15-389 μs for ITDs and 0.5-6.0 dB for ILDs). However, lateralization based on the same binaural cues showed higher variability than seen in adults. Results are discussed in the context of factors that may be responsible for poor representation of binaural cues in bilaterally implanted children. PMID:27106319

  3. Using a binaural biomimetic array to identify bottom objects ensonified by echolocating dolphins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heiweg, D.A.; Moore, P.W.; Martin, S.W.; Dankiewicz, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a unique dolphin biomimetic sonar produced data that were used to study signal processing methods for object identification. Echoes from four metallic objects proud on the bottom, and a substrate-only condition, were generated by bottlenose dolphins trained to ensonify the targets in very shallow water. Using the two-element ('binaural') receive array, object echo spectra were collected and submitted for identification to four neural network architectures. Identification accuracy was evaluated over two receive array configurations, and five signal processing schemes. The four neural networks included backpropagation, learning vector quantization, genetic learning and probabilistic network architectures. The processing schemes included four methods that capitalized on the binaural data, plus a monaural benchmark process. All the schemes resulted in above-chance identification accuracy when applied to learning vector quantization and backpropagation. Beam-forming or concatenation of spectra from both receive elements outperformed the monaural benchmark, with higher sensitivity and lower bias. Ultimately, best object identification performance was achieved by the learning vector quantization network supplied with beam-formed data. The advantages of multi-element signal processing for object identification are clearly demonstrated in this development of a first-ever dolphin biomimetic sonar. ?? 2006 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Subaperture clutter filter with CFAR signal detection

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Naething, Richard M.

    2016-08-30

    The various technologies presented herein relate to the determination of whether a received signal comprising radar clutter further comprises a communication signal. The communication signal can comprise of a preamble, a data symbol, communication data, etc. A first portion of the radar clutter is analyzed to determine a radar signature of the first portion of the radar clutter. A second portion of the radar clutter can be extracted based on the radar signature of the first portion. Following extraction, any residual signal can be analyzed to retrieve preamble data, etc. The received signal can be based upon a linear frequency modulation (e.g., a chirp modulation) whereby the chirp frequency can be determined and the frequency of transmission of the communication signal can be based accordingly thereon. The duration and/or bandwidth of the communication signal can be a portion of the duration and/or the bandwidth of the radar clutter.

  5. Compressive detection of frequency-hopping spread spectrum signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Marcellin, Michael W.; Goodman, Nathan A.; Bilgin, Ali

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, compressive detection strategies for FHSS signals are introduced. Rapid switching of the carrier frequency among many channels using a pseudorandom sequence makes detection of FHSS signals challenging. The conventional approach to detect these signals is to rapidly scan small segments of the spectrum sequentially. However, such a scanner has the inherent risk of never overlapping with the transmitted signal depending on factors such as rate of hopping and scanning. In this paper, we propose compressive detection strategies that sample the full spectrum in a compressive manner. Theory and simulations are presented to illustrate the benefits of the proposed framework.

  6. Structural Changes and Lack of HCN1 Channels in the Binaural Auditory Brainstem of the Naked Mole-Rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    PubMed Central

    Gessele, Nikodemus; Garcia-Pino, Elisabet; Omerbašić, Damir; Park, Thomas J.; Koch, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber) live in large eu-social, underground colonies in narrow burrows and are exposed to a large repertoire of communication signals but negligible binaural sound localization cues, such as interaural time and intensity differences. We therefore asked whether monaural and binaural auditory brainstem nuclei in the naked mole-rat are differentially adjusted to this acoustic environment. Using antibody stainings against excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic structures, namely the vesicular glutamate transporter VGluT1 and the glycine transporter GlyT2 we identified all major auditory brainstem nuclei except the superior paraolivary nucleus in these animals. Naked mole-rats possess a well structured medial superior olive, with a similar synaptic arrangement to interaural-time-difference encoding animals. The neighboring lateral superior olive, which analyzes interaural intensity differences, is large and elongated, whereas the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, which provides the contralateral inhibitory input to these binaural nuclei, is reduced in size. In contrast, the cochlear nucleus, the nuclei of the lateral lemniscus and the inferior colliculus are not considerably different when compared to other rodent species. Most interestingly, binaural auditory brainstem nuclei lack the membrane-bound hyperpolarization-activated channel HCN1, a voltage-gated ion channel that greatly contributes to the fast integration times in binaural nuclei of the superior olivary complex in other species. This suggests substantially lengthened membrane time constants and thus prolonged temporal integration of inputs in binaural auditory brainstem neurons and might be linked to the severely degenerated sound localization abilities in these animals. PMID:26760498

  7. Prediction of the influence of reverberation on binaural speech intelligibility in noise and in quiet.

    PubMed

    Rennies, Jan; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger

    2011-11-01

    Reverberation usually degrades speech intelligibility for spatially separated speech and noise sources since spatial unmasking is reduced and late reflections decrease the fidelity of the received speech signal. The latter effect could not satisfactorily be predicted by a recently presented binaural speech intelligibility model [Beutelmann et al. (2010). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 2479-2497]. This study therefore evaluated three extensions of the model to improve its predictions: (1) an extension of the speech intelligibility index based on modulation transfer functions, (2) a correction factor based on the room acoustical quantity "definition," and (3) a separation of the speech signal into useful and detrimental parts. The predictions were compared to results of two experiments in which speech reception thresholds were measured in a reverberant room in quiet and in the presence of a noise source for listeners with normal hearing. All extensions yielded better predictions than the original model when the influence of reverberation was strong, while predictions were similar for conditions with less reverberation. Although model (3) differed substantially in the assumed interaction of binaural processing and early reflections, its predictions were very similar to model (2) that achieved the best fit to the data. PMID:22087928

  8. Perceptually aligning apical frequency regions leads to more binaural fusion of speech in a cochlear implant simulation.

    PubMed

    Staisloff, Hannah E; Lee, Daniel H; Aronoff, Justin M

    2016-07-01

    For bilateral cochlear implant users, the left and right arrays are typically not physically aligned, resulting in a degradation of binaural fusion, which can be detrimental to binaural abilities. Perceptually aligning the two arrays can be accomplished by disabling electrodes in one ear that do not have a perceptually corresponding electrode in the other side. However, disabling electrodes at the edges of the array will cause compression of the input frequency range into a smaller cochlear extent, which may result in reduced spectral resolution. An alternative approach to overcome this mismatch would be to only align one edge of the array. By aligning either only the apical or basal end of the arrays, fewer electrodes would be disabled, potentially causing less reduction in spectral resolution. The goal of this study was to determine the relative effect of aligning either the basal or apical end of the electrode with regards to binaural fusion. A vocoder was used to simulate cochlear implant listening conditions in normal hearing listeners. Speech signals were vocoded such that the two ears were either predominantly aligned at only the basal or apical end of the simulated arrays. The experiment was then repeated with a spectrally inverted vocoder to determine whether the detrimental effects on fusion were related to the spectral-temporal characteristics of the stimuli or the location in the cochlea where the misalignment occurred. In Experiment 1, aligning the basal portion of the simulated arrays led to significantly less binaural fusion than aligning the apical portions of the simulated array. However, when the input was spectrally inverted, aligning the apical portion of the simulated array led to significantly less binaural fusion than aligning the basal portions of the simulated arrays. These results suggest that, for speech, with its predominantly low frequency spectral-temporal modulations, it is more important to perceptually align the apical portion of

  9. Auditory target detection in reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Freyman, Richard L.; Balakrishnan, Uma

    2004-04-01

    Measurements and theoretical predictions of auditory target detection in simulated reverberant conditions are reported. The target signals were pulsed 13-octave bands of noise and the masker signal was a continuous wideband noise. Target and masker signals were passed through a software simulation of a reverberant room with a rigid sphere modeling a listener's head. The location of the target was fixed while the location of the masker was varied in the simulated room. Degree of reverberation was controlled by varying the uniform acoustic absorption of the simulated room's surfaces. The resulting target and masker signals were presented to the listeners over headphones in monaural-left, monaural-right, or binaural listening modes. Changes in detection performance in the monaural listening modes were largely predictable from the changes in target-to-masker ratio in the target band, but with a few dB of extra masking in reverberation. Binaural detection performance was generally well predicted by applying Durlach's [in Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory (Academic, New York, 1972)] equalization-cancellation theory to the direct-plus-reverberant ear signals. Predictions in all cases were based on a statistical description of room acoustics and on acoustic diffraction by a sphere. The success of these detection models in the present well-controlled reverberant conditions suggests that they can be used to incorporate listening mode and source location as factors in speech-intelligibility predictions.

  10. Signal Detection with Criterion Noise: Applications to Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Diaz, Michael; Wee, Serena

    2009-01-01

    A tacit but fundamental assumption of the theory of signal detection is that criterion placement is a noise-free process. This article challenges that assumption on theoretical and empirical grounds and presents the noisy decision theory of signal detection (ND-TSD). Generalized equations for the isosensitivity function and for measures of…

  11. Signal Detection Models with Random Participant and Item Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Lu, Jun; Sun, Dongchu; Speckman, Paul; Morey, Richard; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe

    2007-01-01

    The theory of signal detection is convenient for measuring mnemonic ability in recognition memory paradigms. In these paradigms, randomly selected participants are asked to study randomly selected items. In practice, researchers aggregate data across items or participants or both. The signal detection model is nonlinear; consequently, analysis…

  12. A Dynamic Stimulus-Driven Model of Signal Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brandon M.; Van Zandt, Trisha; Brown, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Signal detection theory forms the core of many current models of cognition, including memory, choice, and categorization. However, the classic signal detection model presumes the a priori existence of fixed stimulus representations--usually Gaussian distributions--even when the observer has no experience with the task. Furthermore, the classic…

  13. Transient signal detection using the empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael L.; Ridgway, Jeffrey; Waldman, Cye H.; Gabbay, Michael; Buntzen, Rodney R.; Battista, Brad

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we report on efforts to develop signal processing methods appropriate for the detection of man-made electromagnetic signals in the nonlinear and nonstationary underwater electromagnetic noise environment of the littoral. Using recent advances in time series analysis methods [Huang et al., 1998], we present new techniques for detection and compare their effectiveness with conventional signal processing methods, using experimental data from recent field experiments. These techniques are based on an empirical mode decomposition which is used to isolate signals to be detected from noise without a priori assumptions. The decomposition generates a physically motivated basis for the data.

  14. On the detection of differentially encoded polyphase signals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the transmission and detection of differentially encoded polyphase signals and of the ambiguity resolution problem which results from suppression of the transmitted carrier. In particular, an analysis is made of the performance of differentially encoded coherent multiple phase-shift keyed (MPSK) systems which reconstruct coherent reference signals by means of generalized Costas or nth-power loops. The performance of such systems is then compared with that of ideal reception of MPSK signals and differentially coherent detection of differentially encoded MPSK signals. Emphasis is placed upon the special cases of quadriphase and octaphase signaling.

  15. Signal processing in cryogenic particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryev, Y. N.; Jang, Y. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. J.; Yoon, W. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    2011-04-01

    We describe a signal-processing program for a data acquisition system for cryogenic particle detectors. The program is based on an optimal-filtering method for high-resolution measurement of calorimetric signals with a significant amount of noise of unknown origin and non-stationary behavior. The program was applied to improve the energy resolution of the alpha particle spectrum of an 241Am source.

  16. Binaural speech unmasking and localization in noise with bilateral cochlear implants using envelope and fine-timing based strategies.

    PubMed

    van Hoesel, Richard; Böhm, Melanie; Pesch, Jörg; Vandali, Andrew; Battmer, Rolf D; Lenarz, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Four adult bilateral cochlear implant users, with good open-set sentence recognition, were tested with three different sound coding strategies for binaural speech unmasking and their ability to localize 100 and 500 Hz click trains in noise. Two of the strategies tested were envelope-based strategies that are clinically widely used. The third was a research strategy that additionally preserved fine-timing cues at low frequencies. Speech reception thresholds were determined in diotic noise for diotic and interaurally time-delayed speech using direct audio input to a bilateral research processor. Localization in noise was assessed in the free field. Overall results, for both speech and localization tests, were similar with all three strategies. None provided a binaural speech unmasking advantage due to the application of 700 micros interaural time delay to the speech signal, and localization results showed similar response patterns across strategies that were well accounted for by the use of broadband interaural level cues. The data from both experiments combined indicate that, in contrast to normal hearing, timing cues available from natural head-width delays do not offer binaural advantages with present methods of electrical stimulation, even when fine-timing cues are explicitly coded. PMID:18397030

  17. A function for binaural integration in auditory grouping and segregation in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kyle T; Shackleton, Trevor M; Magezi, David A; Palmer, Alan R

    2015-03-15

    Responses of neurons to binaural, harmonic complex stimuli in urethane-anesthetized guinea pig inferior colliculus (IC) are reported. To assess the binaural integration of harmonicity cues for sound segregation and grouping, responses were measured to harmonic complexes with different fundamental frequencies presented to each ear. Simultaneously gated harmonic stimuli with fundamental frequencies of 125 Hz and 145 Hz were presented to the left and right ears, respectively, and recordings made from 96 neurons with characteristic frequencies >2 kHz in the central nucleus of the IC. Of these units, 70 responded continuously throughout the stimulus and were excited by the stimulus at the contralateral ear. The stimulus at the ipsilateral ear excited (EE: 14%; 10/70), inhibited (EI: 33%; 23/70), or had no significant effect (EO: 53%; 37/70), defined by the effect on firing rate. The neurons phase locked to the temporal envelope at each ear to varying degrees depending on signal level. Many of the cells (predominantly EO) were dominated by the response to the contralateral stimulus. Another group (predominantly EI) synchronized to the contralateral stimulus and were suppressed by the ipsilateral stimulus in a phasic manner. A third group synchronized to the stimuli at both ears (predominantly EE). Finally, a group only responded when the waveform peaks from each ear coincided. We conclude that these groups of neurons represent different "streams" of information but exhibit modifications of the response rather than encoding a feature of the stimulus, like pitch. PMID:25540219

  18. A function for binaural integration in auditory grouping and segregation in the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Shackleton, Trevor M.; Magezi, David A.; Palmer, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Responses of neurons to binaural, harmonic complex stimuli in urethane-anesthetized guinea pig inferior colliculus (IC) are reported. To assess the binaural integration of harmonicity cues for sound segregation and grouping, responses were measured to harmonic complexes with different fundamental frequencies presented to each ear. Simultaneously gated harmonic stimuli with fundamental frequencies of 125 Hz and 145 Hz were presented to the left and right ears, respectively, and recordings made from 96 neurons with characteristic frequencies >2 kHz in the central nucleus of the IC. Of these units, 70 responded continuously throughout the stimulus and were excited by the stimulus at the contralateral ear. The stimulus at the ipsilateral ear excited (EE: 14%; 10/70), inhibited (EI: 33%; 23/70), or had no significant effect (EO: 53%; 37/70), defined by the effect on firing rate. The neurons phase locked to the temporal envelope at each ear to varying degrees depending on signal level. Many of the cells (predominantly EO) were dominated by the response to the contralateral stimulus. Another group (predominantly EI) synchronized to the contralateral stimulus and were suppressed by the ipsilateral stimulus in a phasic manner. A third group synchronized to the stimuli at both ears (predominantly EE). Finally, a group only responded when the waveform peaks from each ear coincided. We conclude that these groups of neurons represent different “streams” of information but exhibit modifications of the response rather than encoding a feature of the stimulus, like pitch. PMID:25540219

  19. The effect of overlap-masking on binaural reverberant word intelligibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libbey, Brad; Rogers, Peter H.

    2004-11-01

    Reverberation interferes with the ability to understand speech in rooms. Overlap-masking explains this degradation by assuming reverberant phonemes endure in time and mask subsequent reverberant phonemes. Most listeners benefit from binaural listening when reverberation exists, indicating that the listener's binaural system processes the two channels to reduce the reverberation. This paper investigates the hypothesis that the binaural word intelligibility advantage found in reverberation is a result of binaural overlap-masking release with the reverberation acting as masking noise. The tests utilize phonetically balanced word lists (ANSI-S3.2 1989), that are presented diotically and binaurally with recorded reverberation and reverberation-like noise. A small room, 62 m3, reverberates the words. These are recorded using two microphones without additional noise sources. The reverberation-like noise is a modified form of these recordings and has a similar spectral content. It does not contain binaural localization cues due to a phase randomization procedure. Listening to the reverberant words binaurally improves the intelligibility by 6.0% over diotic listening. The binaural intelligibility advantage for reverberation-like noise is only 2.6%. This indicates that binaural overlap-masking release is insufficient to explain the entire binaural word intelligibility advantage in reverberation. .

  20. Collaborative Wideband Compressed Signal Detection in Interplanetary Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulin; Zhang, Gengxin; Bian, Dongming; Gou, Liang; Zhang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    As the development of autonomous radio in deep space network, it is possible to actualize communication between explorers, aircrafts, rovers and satellites, e.g. from different countries, adopting different signal modes. The first mission to enforce the autonomous radio is to detect signals of the explorer autonomously without disturbing the original communication. This paper develops a collaborative wideband compressed signal detection approach for InterPlaNetary (IPN) Internet where there exist sparse active signals in the deep space environment. Compressed sensing (CS) can be utilized by exploiting the sparsity of IPN Internet communication signal, whose useful frequency support occupies only a small portion of an entirely wide spectrum. An estimate of the signal spectrum can be obtained by using reconstruction algorithms. Against deep space shadowing and channel fading, multiple satellites collaboratively sense and make a final decision according to certain fusion rule to gain spatial diversity. A couple of novel discrete cosine transform (DCT) and walsh-hadamard transform (WHT) based compressed spectrum detection methods are proposed which significantly improve the performance of spectrum recovery and signal detection. Finally, extensive simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of our proposed collaborative scheme for signal detection in IPN Internet. Compared with the conventional discrete fourier transform (DFT) based method, our DCT and WHT based methods reduce computational complexity, decrease processing time, save energy and enhance probability of detection.

  1. Stimulus configuration determines the detectability of motion signals in noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, P.; McKee, S. P.; Grzywacz, N. M.

    2000-01-01

    We measured the detectability of moving signal dots in dynamic noise to determine whether local motion signals are preferentially combined along an axis parallel to the direction of motion. Observers were asked to detect a signal composed of three dots moving in a linear trajectory among dynamic noise dots. The signal dots were collinear and equally spaced in a configuration that was either parallel to or perpendicular to their trajectory. The probability of detecting the signal was measured as a function of noise density, over a range of signal dot spacings from 0.5 degrees to 5.0 degrees. At any given noise density, the signal in the parallel configuration was more detectable than that in the perpendicular configuration. Our four observers could tolerate 1.5-2.5 times more noise in the parallel configuration. This improvement is not due merely to temporal summation between consecutive dots in the parallel trajectory. Temporal summation functions measured on our observers indicate that the benefit from spatial coincidence of the dots lasts for no more than 50 ms, whereas the increased detectability of the parallel configuration is observed up to the largest temporal separations tested (210 ms). These results demonstrate that dots arranged parallel to the signal trajectory are more easily detected than those arranged perpendicularly. Moreover, this enhancement points to the existence of visual mechanisms that preferentially organize motion information parallel to the direction of motion.

  2. Signal analysis techniques for incipient failure detection in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, T.

    1985-01-01

    Signal analysis techniques for the detection and classification of incipient mechanical failures in turbomachinery were developed, implemented and evaluated. Signal analysis techniques available to describe dynamic measurement characteristics are reviewed. Time domain and spectral methods are described, and statistical classification in terms of moments is discussed. Several of these waveform analysis techniques were implemented on a computer and applied to dynamic signals. A laboratory evaluation of the methods with respect to signal detection capability is described. Plans for further technique evaluation and data base development to characterize turbopump incipient failure modes from Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hot firing measurements are outlined.

  3. Detectability of auditory signals presented without defined observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, C. S.; Nichols, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Ability to detect tones in noise was measured without defined observation intervals. Latency density functions were estimated for the first response following a signal and, separately, for the first response following randomly distributed instances of background noise. Detection performance was measured by the maximum separation between the cumulative latency density functions for signal-plus-noise and for noise alone. Values of the index of detectability, estimated by this procedure, were approximately those obtained with a 2-dB weaker signal and defined observation intervals. Simulation of defined- and non-defined-interval tasks with an energy detector showed that this device performs very similarly to the human listener in both cases.

  4. Phase coherence adaptive processor for automatic signal detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Ronald A.

    2006-05-01

    A continuously adapting acoustic signal processor with an automatic detection/decision aid is presented. Its purpose is to preserve the signals of tactical interest, and filter out other signals and noise. It utilizes single sensor or beamformed spectral data and transforms the signal and noise phase angles into "aligned phase angles" (APA). The APA increase the phase temporal coherence of signals and leave the noise incoherent. Coherence thresholds are set, which are representative of the type of source "threat vehicle" and the geographic area or volume in which it is operating. These thresholds separate signals, based on the "quality" of their APA coherence. An example is presented in which signals from a submerged source in the ocean are preserved, while clutter signals from ships and noise are entirely eliminated. Furthermore, the "signals of interest" were identified by the processor's automatic detection aid. Similar performance is expected for air and ground vehicles. The processor's equations are formulated in such a manner that they can be tuned to eliminate noise and exploit signal, based on the "quality" of their APA temporal coherence. The mathematical formulation for this processor is presented, including the method by which the processor continuously self-adapts. Results show nearly complete elimination of noise, with only the selected category of signals remaining, and accompanying enhancements in spectral and spatial resolution. In most cases, the concept of signal-to-noise ratio looses significance, and "adaptive automated /decision aid" is more relevant.

  5. Wavelet-based detection of transients in biological signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mzaik, Tahsin; Jagadeesh, Jogikal M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents two multiresolution algorithms for detection and separation of mixed signals using the wavelet transform. The first algorithm allows one to design a mother wavelet and its associated wavelet grid that guarantees the separation of signal components if information about the expected minimum signal time and frequency separation of the individual components is known. The second algorithm expands this idea to design two mother wavelets which are then combined to achieve the required separation otherwise impossible with a single wavelet. Potential applications include many biological signals such as ECG, EKG, and retinal signals.

  6. Enzymatic signal amplification of molecular beacons for sensitive DNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianwei Jeffery; Chu, Yizhuo; Lee, Benjamin Yi-Hung; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2008-01-01

    Molecular beacons represent a new family of fluorescent probes for nucleic acids, and have found broad applications in recent years due to their unique advantages over traditional probes. Detection of nucleic acids using molecular beacons has been based on hybridization between target molecules and molecular beacons in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio. The stoichiometric hybridization, however, puts an intrinsic limitation on detection sensitivity, because one target molecule converts only one beacon molecule to its fluorescent form. To increase the detection sensitivity, a conventional strategy has been target amplification through polymerase chain reaction. Instead of target amplification, here we introduce a scheme of signal amplification, nicking enzyme signal amplification, to increase the detection sensitivity of molecular beacons. The mechanism of the signal amplification lies in target-dependent cleavage of molecular beacons by a DNA nicking enzyme, through which one target DNA can open many beacon molecules, giving rise to amplification of fluorescent signal. Our results indicate that one target DNA leads to cleavage of hundreds of beacon molecules, increasing detection sensitivity by nearly three orders of magnitude. We designed two versions of signal amplification. The basic version, though simple, requires that nicking enzyme recognition sequence be present in the target DNA. The extended version allows detection of target of any sequence by incorporating rolling circle amplification. Moreover, the extended version provides one additional level of signal amplification, bringing the detection limit down to tens of femtomolar, nearly five orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional hybridization assay. PMID:18304948

  7. ECG Signal Analysis and Arrhythmia Detection using Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Inderbir; Rajni, Rajni; Marwaha, Anupma

    2016-06-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is used to record the electrical activity of the heart. The ECG signal being non-stationary in nature, makes the analysis and interpretation of the signal very difficult. Hence accurate analysis of ECG signal with a powerful tool like discrete wavelet transform (DWT) becomes imperative. In this paper, ECG signal is denoised to remove the artifacts and analyzed using Wavelet Transform to detect the QRS complex and arrhythmia. This work is implemented in MATLAB software for MIT/BIH Arrhythmia database and yields the sensitivity of 99.85 %, positive predictivity of 99.92 % and detection error rate of 0.221 % with wavelet transform. It is also inferred that DWT outperforms principle component analysis technique in detection of ECG signal.

  8. Windshear detection radar signal processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This final report briefly summarizes research work at Clemson in the Radar Systems Laboratory under the NASA Langley Research Grant NAG-1-928 in support of the Antenna and Microwave Branch, Guidance and Control Division, program to develop airborne sensor technology for the detection of low altitude windshear. A bibliography of all publications generated by Clemson personnel is included. An appendix provides abstracts of all publications.

  9. Binaural sonar electronic travel aid provides vibrotactile cues for landmark, reflector motion and surface texture classification.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Roman

    2002-10-01

    Electronic travel aids (ETAs) for the blind commonly employ conventional time-of-flight sonars to provide range measurements, but their wide beams prevent accurate determination of object bearing. We describe a binaural sonar that detects objects over a wider bearing interval compared with a single transducer and also determines if the object lies to the left or right of the sonar axis in a robust manner. The sonar employs a pair of Polaroid 6500 ranging modules connected to Polaroid 7000 transducers operating simultaneously in a binaural array configuration. The sonar determines which transducer detects the echo first. An outward vergence angle between the transducers improves the first-echo detection reliability by increasing the delay between the two detected echoes, a consequence of threshold detection. We exploit this left/right detection capability in an ETA that provides vibrotactile feedback. Pager motors mount on both sides of the sonar, possibly worn on the user's wrists. The motor on the same side as the reflecting object vibrates with speed inversely related to range. As the sonar or object moves, vibration patterns provide landmark, motion and texture cues. Orienting the sonar at 45 degrees relative to the travel direction and passing a right-angle corner produces a characteristic vibrational pattern. When pointing the sonar at a moving object, such as a fluttering flag, the motors alternate in a manner to give the user a perception of the object motion. When the sonar translates or rotates to scan a foliage surface, the vibrational patterns are related to the surface scatterer distribution, allowing the user to identify the foliage. PMID:12374342

  10. Calculating the probability of detecting radio signals from alien civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, Marko

    2006-09-01

    Although it might not be self-evident, it is in fact entirely possible to calculate the probability of detecting alien radio signals by understanding what types of extraterrestrial radio emissions can be expected and what properties these emissions can have. Using the Drake equation as the obvious starting point, and logically identifying and enumerating constraints of interstellar radio communications, may yield the possibility of detecting a genuine alien radio signal.

  11. The Sensitive Infrared Signal Detection by Sum Frequency Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Teh-Hwa; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin

    2013-01-01

    An up-conversion device that converts 2.05-micron light to 700 nm signal by sum frequency generation using a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal is demonstrated. The achieved 92% up-conversion efficiency paves the path to detect extremely weak 2.05-micron signal with well established silicon avalanche photodiode detector for sensitive lidar applications.

  12. Signal Detection Framework Using Semantic Text Mining Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudarsan, Sithu D.

    2009-01-01

    Signal detection is a challenging task for regulatory and intelligence agencies. Subject matter experts in those agencies analyze documents, generally containing narrative text in a time bound manner for signals by identification, evaluation and confirmation, leading to follow-up action e.g., recalling a defective product or public advisory for…

  13. Optimum Detection Of Slow-Frequency-Hopping Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, Barry K.; Cheng, Unjeng

    1994-01-01

    Two papers present theoretical analyses of various schemes for coherent and noncoherent detection of M-ary-frequency-shift-keyed (MFSK) signals with slow frequency hopping. Special attention focused on continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) subset of SFH/MFSK signals, for which frequency modulation such carrier phase remains continuous (albeit unknown) during each hop.

  14. Multimodal heart beat detection using signal quality indices.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alistair E W; Behar, Joachim; Andreotti, Fernando; Clifford, Gari D; Oster, Julien

    2015-08-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a well studied signal from which many clinically relevant parameters can be derived, such as heart rate. A key component in the estimation of these parameters is the accurate detection of the R peak in the QRS complex. While corruption of the ECG by movement artefact or sensor failure can result in poor delineation of the R peak, use of synchronously measured signals could allow for resolution of the R peak even scenarios with poor quality ECG recordings. Robust estimation of R peak locations from multimodal signals facilitates real time monitoring and is likely to reduce false alarms due to inaccurate derived parameters.We propose a method which fuses R peaks detected on the ECG using an energy detector with those detected on the arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform using the length transform. A signal quality index (SQI) for the two signals is then derived. The ECG SQI is based upon the agreement between two distinct peak detectors. The ABP SQI estimates the blood pressure at various phases in the cardiac cycle and only accepts the signal as good quality if the values are physiologically plausible. Detections from these two signals were merged by selecting the R peak detections from the signal with a higher SQI. The approach presented in this paper was evaluated on datasets provided for the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014. The algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 95.1% and positive predictive value of 89.3% on an external evaluation set, and achieved a score of 91.5%.The method here demonstrated excellent performance across a variety of signal morphologies collected during clinical practice. Fusion of R peaks from other signals has the potential to provide informed estimates of the R peak location in situations where the ECG is noisy or completely absent. Source code for the algorithm is made available freely online. PMID:26218060

  15. The effect of stimulus bandwidth on binaural loudness summation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyue; Mo, Fangshuo; Mao, Dongxing

    2015-09-01

    Binaural loudness summation is an important property of the human auditory system. This paper presents an experimental investigation of how binaural loudness summation varies with stimulus bandwidth. Loudness matches were obtained between dichotic stimuli, with interaural level differences (ILDs) of 2-12 dB, and diotic stimuli. The stimuli were noise bands with seven center frequencies and four bandwidths. Results showed that the loudness of dichotic stimuli increased nonlinearly with ILD, the increase being slightly less with broader bandwidths. There was a bandwidth-dependent difference between the listening tests results and the predictions of Moore and Glasberg's [(2007) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 1604-1612] loudness model. The size of the difference was, however, small. A characteristic function was derived describing how overall loudness depends on stimulus bandwidth and ILD. PMID:26428788

  16. Intelligibility for Binaural Speech with Discarded Low-SNR Speech Components.

    PubMed

    Schoenmaker, Esther; van de Par, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Speech intelligibility in multitalker settings improves when the target speaker is spatially separated from the interfering speakers. A factor that may contribute to this improvement is the improved detectability of target-speech components due to binaural interaction in analogy to the Binaural Masking Level Difference (BMLD). This would allow listeners to hear target speech components within specific time-frequency intervals that have a negative SNR, similar to the improvement in the detectability of a tone in noise when these contain disparate interaural difference cues. To investigate whether these negative-SNR target-speech components indeed contribute to speech intelligibility, a stimulus manipulation was performed where all target components were removed when local SNRs were smaller than a certain criterion value. It can be expected that for sufficiently high criterion values target speech components will be removed that do contribute to speech intelligibility. For spatially separated speakers, assuming that a BMLD-like detection advantage contributes to intelligibility, degradation in intelligibility is expected already at criterion values below 0 dB SNR. However, for collocated speakers it is expected that higher criterion values can be applied without impairing speech intelligibility. Results show that degradation of intelligibility for separated speakers is only seen for criterion values of 0 dB and above, indicating a negligible contribution of a BMLD-like detection advantage in multitalker settings. These results show that the spatial benefit is related to a spatial separation of speech components at positive local SNRs rather than to a BMLD-like detection improvement for speech components at negative local SNRs. PMID:27080648

  17. Smartphone application for emergency signal detection.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Isabel N; Leal, Carlos; Pinto, Luís; Bolito, Jason; Lemos, André

    2016-09-01

    Currently, a number of studies focus on the study and design of new healthcare technologies to improve elderly health and quality of life. Taking advantage of the popularity, portability, and inherent technology of smartphones, we present an emergency application for smartphones, designated as knock-to-panic (KTP). This innovative and novel system enables users to simply hit their devices in order to send an alarm signal to an emergency service. This application is a complete and autonomous emergency system, and can provide an economic, reliable, and unobtrusive method for elderly monitoring or safety protection. Moreover, the simple and fast activation of KTP makes it a viable and potentially superior alternative to traditional ambient assisted living emergency calls. Furthermore, KTP can be further extended to the general population as well and not just be limited for elderly persons. The proposed method is a threshold-based algorithm and is designed to require a low battery power consumption. The evaluation of the performance of the algorithm in collected data indicates that both sensitivity and specificity are above 90%. PMID:27264240

  18. Subsurface event detection and classification using Wireless Signal Networks.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Suk-Un; Ghazanfari, Ehsan; Cheng, Liang; Pamukcu, Sibel; Suleiman, Muhannad T

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs). The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events. PMID:23202191

  19. Subsurface Event Detection and Classification Using Wireless Signal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Suk-Un; Ghazanfari, Ehsan; Cheng, Liang; Pamukcu, Sibel; Suleiman, Muhannad T.

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs). The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events. PMID:23202191

  20. Detection of buried objects using reflected GNSS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notarpietro, Riccardo; De Mattia, Salvatore; Campanella, Maurizio; Pei, Yuekun; Savi, Patrizia

    2014-12-01

    The use of reflected Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals for sensing the Earth has been growing rapidly in recent years. This technique is founded on the basic principle of detecting GNSS signals after they have been reflected off the Earth's surface and using them to determine the properties of the reflecting surface remotely. This is the so-called GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) technique. In this paper, a new application regarding the detection of metallic buried objects is analyzed and it is validated through several experimental campaigns. Although the penetration depth of GNSS signals into the ground is not optimal and depends on the soil moisture, GNSS signals can likely interact approximately with the first 10 cm of the ground and therefore can be reflected back by any metallic object buried on the first terrain layer. A very light and low-cost GNSS receiver prototype based on a software-defined radio approach was developed. This receiver can be used as a payload on board small drones or unmanned aerial systems to detect metallic objects (mines or other explosive devices). A signal processing tool based on an open-loop GNSS signal acquisition strategy was developed. The results of two experiments which show the possibility of using GNSS-R signals to detect buried metallic objects and to provide an estimate of their dimensions are discussed.

  1. A Multiagent System for Integrated Detection of Pharmacovigilance Signals.

    PubMed

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the scientific discipline that copes with the continuous assessment of the safety profile of marketed drugs. This assessment relies on diverse data sources, which are routinely analysed to identify the so-called "signals", i.e. potential associations between drugs and adverse effects, that are unknown or incompletely documented. Various computational methods have been proposed to support domain experts in signal detection. However, recent comparative studies illustrated that current methods exhibit high false-positive rates, significantly variable performance across different datasets used for analysis and events of interest, but also complementarity in their outcomes. In this regard, in order to reinforce accurate and timely signal detection, we elaborated through an agent-based approach towards systematic, joint exploitation of multiple heterogeneous signal detection methods, data sources and other drug-related resources under a common, integrated framework. The approach relies on a multiagent system operating based on a collaborative agent interaction protocol, aiming to implement a comprehensive workflow that comprises of method selection and execution, as well as outcomes' aggregation, filtering, ranking and annotation. This paper presents the design of the proposed multiagent system, discusses implementation issues and demonstrates the applicability of the proposed solution in an example signal detection scenario. This work constitutes a step towards large-scale, integrated and knowledge-intensive computational signal detection. PMID:26590975

  2. Phase-synchronous detection of coherent and incoherent nonlinear signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Khadga Jung; Kringle, Loni; Marcus, Andrew H.; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear optical response of a material system contains detailed information about its electronic structure. Standard approaches to nonlinear spectroscopy often use multiple beams crossed in a sample, and detect the wave vector matched polarization in transmission. Here, we apply a phase-synchronous digital detection scheme using an excitation geometry with two phase-modulated collinear ultrafast pulses. This scheme can be used to efficiently detect nonlinear coherent signals and incoherent signals, such as higher harmonics and multiphoton fluorescence and photocurrent, from various systems including a photocell device. We present theory and experiment to demonstrate that when the phase of each laser pulse is modulated at the frequency {φ }1 and {φ }2, respectively, nonlinear signals can be isolated at the frequencies n({φ }2-{φ }1), where n=0,1,2,\\ldots . This approach holds promise for performing nonlinear spectroscopic measurements under low-signal conditions.

  3. Detection of continuous-time quaternion signals in additive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Moreno, Jesús; Ruiz-Molina, Juan Carlos; Oya, Antonia; Quesada-Rubio, José M.

    2012-12-01

    Different kinds of quaternion signal detection problems in continuous-time by using a widely linear processing are dealt with. The suggested solutions are based on an extension of the Karhunen-Loève expansion to the quaternion domain which provides uncorrelated scalar real-valued random coefficients. This expansion presents the notable advantage of transforming the original four-dimensional eigen problem to a one-dimensional problem. Firstly, we address the problem of detecting a quaternion deterministic signal in quaternion Gaussian noise and a version of Pitcher's Theorem is given. Also the particular case of a general quaternion Wiener noise is studied and an extension of the Cameron-Martin formula is presented. Finally, the problem of detecting a quaternion random signal in quaternion white Gaussian noise is tackled. In such a case, it is shown that the detector depends on the quaternion widely linear estimator of the signal.

  4. [The design of circuit for detecting multi-physiological signals].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Bo; Liu, Wen

    2009-12-01

    In this paper is presented the design of detection circuit and single chip acquisition circuit for heart sound, blood pressure and pulse wave. The multi-physiological signals from single chip are synthesized and processed by master computer. The master computer acquires, analyzes and displays the multi-signals by Software LabVIEW. The three physiological signals are fused to calculate the artery stiffness index by time relation of multi-physiological signals. The experiment shows that the circuit is reliable and effective so that it can be used for human vessel function evaluation. PMID:20095475

  5. Embolic Doppler ultrasound signal detection using discrete wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nizamettin; Marvasti, Farokh; Markus, Hugh S

    2004-06-01

    Asymptomatic circulating emboli can be detected by Doppler ultrasound. Embolic Doppler ultrasound signals are short duration transient like signals. The wavelet transform is an ideal method for analysis and detection of such signals by optimizing time-frequency resolution. We propose a detection system based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and study some parameters, which might be useful for describing embolic signals (ES). We used a fast DWT algorithm based on the Daubechies eighth-order wavelet filters with eight scales. In order to evaluate feasibility of the DWT of ES, two independent data sets, each comprising of short segments containing an ES (N = 100), artifact (N = 100) or Doppler speckle (DS) (N = 100), were used. After applying the DWT to the data, several parameters were evaluated. The threshold values used for both data sets were optimized using the first data set. While the DWT coefficients resulting from artifacts dominantly appear at the higher scales (five, six, seven, and eight), the DWT coefficients at the lower scales (one, two, three, and four) are mainly dominated by ES and DS. The DWT is able to filter out most of the artifacts inherently during the transform process. For the first data set, 98 out of 100 ES were detected as ES. For the second data set, 95 out of 100 ES were detected as ES when the same threshold values were used. The algorithm was also tested with a third data set comprising 202 normal ES; 198 signals were detected as ES. PMID:15217263

  6. Detection of noise-corrupted sinusoidal signals with Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatrella, Giovanni; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of exploiting the speed and low noise features of Josephson junctions for detecting sinusoidal signals masked by Gaussian noise. We show that the escape time from the static locked state of a Josephson junction is very sensitive to a small periodic signal embedded in the noise, and therefore the analysis of the escape times can be employed to reveal the presence of the sinusoidal component. We propose and characterize two detection strategies: in the first, the initial phase is supposedly unknown (incoherent strategy), while in the second, the signal phase remains unknown but is fixed (coherent strategy). Our proposals are both suboptimal, with the linear filter being the optimal detection strategy, but they present some remarkable features, such as resonant activation, that make detection through Josephson junctions appealing in some special cases.

  7. Narrowband signal detection in the SETI field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, D. Kent; Deans, Stanley R.

    1986-01-01

    Various methods for detecting narrow-band signals are evaluated. The characteristics of synchronized and unsynchronized pulses are examined. Synchronous, square law, regular pulse, and the general form detections are discussed. The CW, single pulse, synchronous, and four pulse detections are analyzed in terms of false alarm rate and threshold relative to average noise power. Techniques for saving memory and retaining sensitivity are described. Consideration is given to nondrifting CW detection, asynchronous pulse detection, interpolative and extrapolative pulse detectors, and finite and infinite pulses.

  8. Lateral reflections are favorable in concert halls due to binaural loudness.

    PubMed

    Lokki, Tapio; Pätynen, Jukka

    2011-11-01

    A recent study on perceptual difference in simulated concert halls showed that a concert hall renders stronger sound with more bass when the temporal envelope of a signal is preserved in the reflections [Lokki et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, EL223-EL228 (2011)]. In the same study the lateral reflections were shown to contribute to the perceived envelopment and openness. Moreover, the listening test results suggest that lateral reflections contribute to perception of sound source distance. Here, it is shown that lateral reflections are beneficial due to their increasing effect on binaural loudness-the phenomenon known well in psychoacoustics, but not in architectural acoustics. The reflections from the side are amplified more than median plane reflections, in particular at high frequencies, due to the shape of the human head. PMID:22088039

  9. Techniques of EMG signal analysis: detection, processing, classification and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M.S.; Mohd-Yasin, F.

    2006-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) signals can be used for clinical/biomedical applications, Evolvable Hardware Chip (EHW) development, and modern human computer interaction. EMG signals acquired from muscles require advanced methods for detection, decomposition, processing, and classification. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and algorithms for EMG signal analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the signal and its nature. We further point up some of the hardware implementations using EMG focusing on applications related to prosthetic hand control, grasp recognition, and human computer interaction. A comparison study is also given to show performance of various EMG signal analysis methods. This paper provides researchers a good understanding of EMG signal and its analysis procedures. This knowledge will help them develop more powerful, flexible, and efficient applications. PMID:16799694

  10. Application of LSI to signal detection: The deltic DFPCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gassaway, J. D.; Whelchel, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the DELTIC DFPCC serial mode signal processor is discussed. The processor is designed to detect in the presence of background noise a signal coded into the zero crossings of the waveform. The unique features of the DELTIC DFPCC include versatility in handling a variety of signals and relative simplicity in implementation. A theoretical performance model is presented which predicts the expected value of the output signal as a function of the input signal to noise ratio. Experimental results obtained with the prototype system, which was breadboarded with LSI, MSI and SSI components, are given. The device was compared with other LSI schemes for signal processing and it was concluded that the DELTIC DFPCC is simpler and in some cases more versatile than other systems. With established LSI technology, low frequency systems applicable to sonar and similar problems are feasible.

  11. Statistically robust detection of spontaneous, non-stereotypical neural signals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Merwine, David K; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2006-06-15

    Neural signals of interest are often temporally spontaneous and non-stereotypical in waveform. Detecting such signals is difficult, since one cannot use time-locking or simple template-matching techniques. We have sought a statistical method for automatically estimating the baseline in these conditions, and subsequently detecting the occurrence of neural signals. One could consider the signals as outliers in the distribution of neural activity and thus separate them from the baseline with median-based techniques. However, we found that baseline estimators that rely on the median are problematic. They introduce progressively greater estimation errors as the neural signal's duration, amplitude or frequency increases. Therefore, we tested several mode-based algorithms, taking advantage of the most probable state of the neural activity being the baseline. We found that certain mode-based algorithms perform baseline estimation well, with low susceptibility to changes in event duration, amplitude or frequency. Once the baseline is properly established, its median absolute deviation (MAD) can be determined. One can then use it to detect spontaneous signals robustly as outliers from the noise distribution. We also demonstrate how the choice of detection threshold in terms of MADs can be used to bias against false positives, without creating too many false negatives or vice versa. PMID:16430965

  12. Signal detection in post-marketing surveillance for controlled substances.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Nabarun; Schnoll, Sidney H

    2009-12-01

    Signal detection for pharmaceutical controlled substances presents unique challenges compared to other pharmacovigilance programs because risks are present in the patient and non-patient populations. Defining signals for controlled substances has been difficult because no specific empirical criteria have been established through regulatory actions or guidances. We start with a review of data sources available for decision making to regulators and industry. In this paper we present a framework for processing signals received during post-marketing surveillance: signal identification, verification and assessment, followed by intervention and evaluation. Signal identification involves processing qualitative and quantitative information in order to generate hypotheses describing concerns with controlled substances. Integration of heterogeneous data sources makes this process difficult and we describe multiple approaches utilized in practice today. Signal verification currently relies heavily on telephone interviews with stakeholders in local communities. Once information on a potential signal has been gathered signal assessment is a higher order process conducted with an eye towards broader societal expectations and the ability to intervene or further study the problem. Intervention and evaluation complete the cycle of signal assessment and triage. This paper is intended as a primer of the current practice of signal assessment in the post-marketing surveillance for controlled substances. PMID:19616902

  13. Coherent Detection of High-Rate Optical PPM Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor; Fernandez, Michela Munoz

    2006-01-01

    A method of coherent detection of high-rate pulse-position modulation (PPM) on a received laser beam has been conceived as a means of reducing the deleterious effects of noise and atmospheric turbulence in free-space optical communication using focal-plane detector array technologies. In comparison with a receiver based on direct detection of the intensity modulation of a PPM signal, a receiver based on the present method of coherent detection performs well at much higher background levels. In principle, the coherent-detection receiver can exhibit quantum-limited performance despite atmospheric turbulence. The key components of such a receiver include standard receiver optics, a laser that serves as a local oscillator, a focal-plane array of photodetectors, and a signal-processing and data-acquisition assembly needed to sample the focal-plane fields and reconstruct the pulsed signal prior to detection. The received PPM-modulated laser beam and the local-oscillator beam are focused onto the photodetector array, where they are mixed in the detection process. The two lasers are of the same or nearly the same frequency. If the two lasers are of different frequencies, then the coherent detection process is characterized as heterodyne and, using traditional heterodyne-detection terminology, the difference between the two laser frequencies is denoted the intermediate frequency (IF). If the two laser beams are of the same frequency and remain aligned in phase, then the coherent detection process is characterized as homodyne (essentially, heterodyne detection at zero IF). As a result of the inherent squaring operation of each photodetector, the output current includes an IF component that contains the signal modulation. The amplitude of the IF component is proportional to the product of the local-oscillator signal amplitude and the PPM signal amplitude. Hence, by using a sufficiently strong local-oscillator signal, one can make the PPM-modulated IF signal strong enough to

  14. Respiratory rate detection algorithms by photoplethysmography signal processing.

    PubMed

    Lee, E M; Kim, N H; Trang, N T; Hong, J H; Cha, E J; Lee, T S

    2008-01-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) offers the clinically meaningful parameters, such as, heart rate, and respiratory rate. In this study, we presented three respiratory signal detection algorithms using photoplethysmography raw data generated from commercial PPG sensor: (1)Min-Max (2)Peak-to-Peak (3)Pulse Shape. As reference signal, nasal sensor signal was acquired simultaneously and compared and analyzed. We used two types of moving average filtering technique to process three PPG parameters. In laboratory experiment, 6 subjects' PPG signals were measured when they respire ten and fifteen, and arbitrary times per minute. From the results, following conclusions were drawn. Min-Max and Peak-to-Peak algorithms perform better than Pulse shape algorithm. They can be used to detect respiratory rate. But, Pulse Shape algorithm was accurate for subject 4 only. More experimental data is necessary to improve the accuracy and reliability. PMID:19162865

  15. Local Earthquake Detection in Marine Environments Using Seismic Signal Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. C.; Trehu, A. M.; Braunmiller, J.

    2010-12-01

    The amphibious Central Oregon Locked Zone Array (COLZA) of seismic stations was deployed from 2007-2009 to record earthquakes occurring in the seismogenic zone offshore central Oregon. This array included two year-long deployments of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS's) from the NSF OBSIP. In addition to local and distant earthquakes, the OBS array recorded thousands of impulsive local signals, which are not easily filtered out by a standard STA/LTA detection algorithm. Many of these signals are likely of biological origin (informally referred to as “fish bumps”). These signals have a wide range of amplitudes, can mask local earthquake phase arrivals, and make automatic detection difficult. We show that signal characteristics derived from 3-component seismic data at each station can be used to filter out event detections that are unlikely to be earthquake-generated. A decision-making algorithm, such as an artificial neural network, will be applied to the joint set of signal characteristics to identify possible local events and classify detections that are likely to be "bumps". Detecting low-magnitude local earthquake phases in the high-noise marine environment requires that a standard STA/LTA detector must have a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) threshold. Using an SNR threshold of 3 in the 1-5 Hz frequency band detects P-arrivals of local earthquakes of magnitude M = ~1.5, but flags hundreds of impulsive local “bumps” per day for each single OBS. Due to the random nature of the impulsive events, it is impractical to filter them out by comparing to neighboring stations. However, additional a priori information from detected waveforms may provide an effective means for distinguishing earthquakes from other events. For each detection, we determine 3 additional signal characteristics from the 3-component waveform data: the variance of the power cepstrum calculated from a portion of the signal spectrum, the rectilinearity of particle motion, and the

  16. Photoacoustic imaging with rotational compounding for improved signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, A.; Heinmiller, A.; Jose, J.; Needles, A.; Hirson, D.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy with linear array transducers enables fast two-dimensional, cross-sectional photoacoustic imaging. Unfortunately, most ultrasound transducers are only sensitive to a very narrow angular acceptance range and preferentially detect signals along the main axis of the transducer. This often limits photoacoustic microscopy from detecting blood vessels which can extend in any direction. Rotational compounded photoacoustic imaging is introduced to overcome the angular-dependency of detecting acoustic signals with linear array transducers. An integrate system is designed to control the image acquisition using a linear array transducer, a motorized rotational stage, and a motorized lateral stage. Images acquired at multiple angular positions are combined to form a rotational compounded image. We found that the signal-to-noise ratio improved, while the sidelobe and reverberation artifacts were substantially reduced. Furthermore, the rotational compounded images of excised kidneys and hindlimb tumors of mice showed more structural information compared with any single image collected.

  17. Good Signal Detection Practices: Evidence from IMI PROTECT.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Antoni F Z; Bate, Andrew; Bousquet, Cedric; Brueckner, Andreas; Candore, Gianmario; Juhlin, Kristina; Macia-Martinez, Miguel A; Manlik, Katrin; Quarcoo, Naashika; Seabroke, Suzie; Slattery, Jim; Southworth, Harry; Thakrar, Bharat; Tregunno, Phil; Van Holle, Lionel; Kayser, Michael; Norén, G Niklas

    2016-06-01

    Over a period of 5 years, the Innovative Medicines Initiative PROTECT (Pharmacoepidemiological Research on Outcomes of Therapeutics by a European ConsorTium) project has addressed key research questions relevant to the science of safety signal detection. The results of studies conducted into quantitative signal detection in spontaneous reporting, clinical trial and electronic health records databases are summarised and 39 recommendations have been formulated, many based on comparative analyses across a range of databases (e.g. regulatory, pharmaceutical company). The recommendations point to pragmatic steps that those working in the pharmacovigilance community can take to improve signal detection practices, whether in a national or international agency or in a pharmaceutical company setting. PROTECT has also pointed to areas of potentially fruitful future research and some areas where further effort is likely to yield less. PMID:26951233

  18. Study of the fluorescence signal for gastrointestinal dysplasia detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, S.; Castanheira, E. M. S.; Minas, G.

    2014-08-01

    The detection of cancer at the dysplasia stage is one of the most important goals in biomedical research. Optical techniques, specifically diffuse reflectance and intrinsic fluorescence, may improve the ability to detect gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, since they have exquisite sensitivity to some intrinsic biomarkers present on the tissues. This work follows the research that has been done towards the implementation of a spectroscopy microsystem for the early detection of GI cancers. For that purpose, the behavior of the fluorescence signal, at different temperatures and considering the most important biomarkers in GI malignancy detection, was studied and presented.

  19. Comparing Binaural Pre-processing Strategies III: Speech Intelligibility of Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    PubMed

    Völker, Christoph; Warzybok, Anna; Ernst, Stephan M A

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of eight signal pre-processing strategies, including directional microphones, coherence filters, single-channel noise reduction, binaural beamformers, and their combinations, was undertaken with normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured in three noise scenarios (multitalker babble, cafeteria noise, and single competing talker). Predictions of three common instrumental measures were compared with the general perceptual benefit caused by the algorithms. The individual SRTs measured without pre-processing and individual benefits were objectively estimated using the binaural speech intelligibility model. Ten listeners with NH and 12 HI listeners participated. The participants varied in age and pure-tone threshold levels. Although HI listeners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to obtain 50% intelligibility than listeners with NH, no differences in SRT benefit from the different algorithms were found between the two groups. With the exception of single-channel noise reduction, all algorithms showed an improvement in SRT of between 2.1 dB (in cafeteria noise) and 4.8 dB (in single competing talker condition). Model predictions with binaural speech intelligibility model explained 83% of the measured variance of the individual SRTs in the no pre-processing condition. Regarding the benefit from the algorithms, the instrumental measures were not able to predict the perceptual data in all tested noise conditions. The comparable benefit observed for both groups suggests a possible application of noise reduction schemes for listeners with different hearing status. Although the model can predict the individual SRTs without pre-processing, further development is necessary to predict the benefits obtained from the algorithms at an individual level. PMID:26721922

  20. Rotational signal detecting apparatus for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, R.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes a rotational signal detecting apparatus comprising: a housing; a rotor shaft attached to the housing so as to be freely rotatable, the rotor shaft rotating in synchronism with a crankshaft or a cam shaft of an engine; a photoelectric pickup comprising a first rotating portion fixed to the rotor shaft so as to rotate with the rotor shaft as one body, a first fixed portion attached to the housing, the fixed portion having photoelectronic conversion means for outputting a signal varying according to the quantity of incident light varied in synchronism with the rotation of the rotating portion, the first rotating portion and the photoelectric conversion means comprising a first reference signal detecting means for generating a first reference signal each time the crankshaft rotates by a first predetermined angle and a position signal detecting means for generating q position signal each time the crankshaft rotates by a second predetermined angle which is smaller than the first predetermined angle; and an electromagnetic pickup comprising a second rotating portion fixed to the rotor shaft so as to rotate with the rotor shaft as one body and a second fixed portion integrally attached to the housing.

  1. Detection algorithm of big bandwidth chirp signals based on STFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinzhen; Wu, Juhong; Su, Shaoying; Chen, Zengping

    2014-10-01

    Aiming at solving the problem of detecting the wideband chirp signals under low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) condition, an effective signal detection algorithm based on Short-Time-Fourier-Transform (STFT) is proposed. Considering the characteristic of dispersion of noise spectrum and concentration of chirp spectrum, STFT is performed on chirp signals with Gauss window by fixed step, and these frequencies of peak spectrum obtained from every STFT are in correspondence to the time of every stepped window. Then, the frequencies are binarized and the approach similar to mnk method in time domain is used to detect the chirp pulse signal and determine the coarse starting time and ending time. Finally, the data segments, where the former starting time and ending time locate, are subdivided into many segments evenly, on which the STFT is implemented respectively. By that, the precise starting and ending time are attained. Simulations shows that when the SNR is higher than -28dB, the detection probability is not less than 99% and false alarm probability is zero, and also good estimation accuracy of starting and ending time is acquired. The algorithm is easy to realize and surpasses FFT in computation when the width of STFT window and step length are selected properly, so the presented algorithm has good engineering value.

  2. Application of signal detection theory to assess optoacoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yang; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    The hybrid nature of optoacoustic tomography (OAT) brings together the advantages of both optical imaging and ultrasound imaging, making it a promising tool for breast cancer imaging. It is advocated in the modern imaging science literature to utilize objective, or task-based, measures of system performance to guide the optimization of hardware design and image reconstruction algorithms. In this work, we investigate this approach to assess the performance of OAT breast imaging systems. In particular, we apply principles from signal detection theory to compute the detectability of a simulated tumor at different depths within a breast, for two different system designs. The signal-to-noise ratio of the test statistic computed by a numerical observer is employed as the task-specific summary measure of system performance. A numerical breast model is employed that contains both slowly varying background and vessel structures as the background model, and superimpose a deterministic signal to emulate a tumor. This study demonstrates how signal detection performance of a numerical observer will vary as a function of signal depth and imaging system characteristics. The described methodology can be employed readily to systematically optimize other OAT imaging systems for tumor detection tasks.

  3. Singularity detection by wavelet approach: application to electrocardiogram signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil, Bushra; Beya, Ouadi; Fauvet, Eric; Laligant, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In signal processing, the region of abrupt changes contains the most of the useful information about the nature of the signal. The region or the points where these changes occurred are often termed as singular point or singular region. The singularity is considered to be an important character of the signal, as it refers to the discontinuity and interruption present in the signal and the main purpose of the detection of such singular point is to identify the existence, location and size of those singularities. Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is used to analyze the cardiovascular activity in the human body. However the presence of noise due to several reasons limits the doctor's decision and prevents accurate identification of different pathologies. In this work we attempt to analyze the ECG signal with energy based approach and some heuristic methods to segment and identify different signatures inside the signal. ECG signal has been initially denoised by empirical wavelet shrinkage approach based on Steins Unbiased Risk Estimate (SURE). At the second stage, the ECG signal has been analyzed by Mallat approach based on modulus maximas and Lipschitz exponent computation. The results from both approaches has been discussed and important aspects has been highlighted. In order to evaluate the algorithm, the analysis has been done on MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database; a set of ECG data records sampled at a rate of 360 Hz with 11 bit resolution over a 10mv range. The results have been examined and approved by medical doctors.

  4. Role of binaural hearing in speech intelligibility and spatial release from masking using vocoded speech.

    PubMed

    Garadat, Soha N; Litovsky, Ruth Y; Yu, Gongqiang; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2009-11-01

    A cochlear implant vocoder was used to evaluate relative contributions of spectral and binaural temporal fine-structure cues to speech intelligibility. In Study I, stimuli were vocoded, and then convolved through head related transfer functions (HRTFs) to remove speech temporal fine structure but preserve the binaural temporal fine-structure cues. In Study II, the order of processing was reversed to remove both speech and binaural temporal fine-structure cues. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured adaptively in quiet, and with interfering speech, for unprocessed and vocoded speech (16, 8, and 4 frequency bands), under binaural or monaural (right-ear) conditions. Under binaural conditions, as the number of bands decreased, SRTs increased. With decreasing number of frequency bands, greater benefit from spatial separation of target and interferer was observed, especially in the 8-band condition. The present results demonstrate a strong role of the binaural cues in spectrally degraded speech, when the target and interfering speech are more likely to be confused. The nearly normal binaural benefits under present simulation conditions and the lack of order of processing effect further suggest that preservation of binaural cues is likely to improve performance in bilaterally implanted recipients. PMID:19894832

  5. Falling Person Detection Using Multi-Sensor Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toreyin, B. Ugur; Soyer, A. Birey; Onaran, Ibrahim; Cetin, E. Enis

    2007-12-01

    Falls are one of the most important problems for frail and elderly people living independently. Early detection of falls is vital to provide a safe and active lifestyle for elderly. Sound, passive infrared (PIR) and vibration sensors can be placed in a supportive home environment to provide information about daily activities of an elderly person. In this paper, signals produced by sound, PIR and vibration sensors are simultaneously analyzed to detect falls. Hidden Markov Models are trained for regular and unusual activities of an elderly person and a pet for each sensor signal. Decisions of HMMs are fused together to reach a final decision.

  6. Application of signal detection theory to perceptual-motor skills.

    PubMed

    Jagacinski, R J; Isaac, P D; Burke, M W

    1977-09-01

    A signal-detection paradigm was utilized to examine subjects' sensitivity to situational and sensory-motor stimuli in predicting motor skill performance. College-level and professional basketball players attempted uncontested shots from assigned positions on the basketball court. Before each shot was released, both the shooter and a passive observer were required to predict whether it would be successful. Signal-detection analysis revealed no evidence for greater sensitivity of the shooter over the passive observer or an idealized statistical predictor using only floor position as a prediction cue. Both shooters and passive observers were too optimistic when strong penalties were imposed for incorrect predictions of success. PMID:23952878

  7. Time-Frequency Approach for Stochastic Signal Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ripul; Akula, Aparna; Kumar, Satish; Sardana, H. K.

    2011-10-20

    The detection of events in a stochastic signal has been a subject of great interest. One of the oldest signal processing technique, Fourier Transform of a signal contains information regarding frequency content, but it cannot resolve the exact onset of changes in the frequency, all temporal information is contained in the phase of the transform. On the other hand, Spectrogram is better able to resolve temporal evolution of frequency content, but has a trade-off in time resolution versus frequency resolution in accordance with the uncertainty principle. Therefore, time-frequency representations are considered for energetic characterisation of the non-stationary signals. Wigner Ville Distribution (WVD) is the most prominent quadratic time-frequency signal representation and used for analysing frequency variations in signals.WVD allows for instantaneous frequency estimation at each data point, for a typical temporal resolution of fractions of a second. This paper through simulations describes the way time frequency models are applied for the detection of event in a stochastic signal.

  8. Prompt Earthquake Detection based on Transient Gravity Signals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhel, K.; Montagner, J. P.; Barsuglia, M.; Ampuero, J. P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Harms, J.; Whiting, B. F.; Bernard, P.; Clevede, E.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    The deformation caused by an earthquake induces changes in the Earth's gravitational field known as coseismic gravity changes, especially during mega-earthquakes. So far, only static gravity changes have been detected, considerably after the end of the rupture. Since gravity changes propagate at the speed of light, a dynamic gravity signal is produced everywhere on Earth during the rupture, even before the arrival of seismic waves. Here we confirm the evidence of this prompt gravity signal. We have analyzed, with a statistical blind method, the data recorded during the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake by a superconducting gravimeter in the underground Kamioka observatory, about 500 km away from the earthquake centroid. We find that a gravity signal is present before the P wave arrival, with a statistical significance of more than 99%. The signal amplitude is a fraction of μGal, consistent in sign and order-of-magnitude with theoretical predictions. A similar analysis is being conducted on data recorded by the broadband seismometers of the japanese network Fnet. Numerical simulations based on normal-mode method and an analytical model of dynamic gravity signals are used to compute synthetic seismograms, and thus characterize the prompt gravity signal. The robust detection of this prompt gravity signal with instruments more immune to the background seismic noise could, in principle, open new directions in earthquake seismology and overcome limitations of current earthquake early-warning systems imposed by the propagation speed of seismic waves.

  9. System and method for detection of dispersed broadband signals

    DOEpatents

    Qian, S.; Dunham, M.E.

    1999-06-08

    A system and method for detecting the presence of dispersed broadband signals in real time are disclosed. The present invention utilizes a bank of matched filters for detecting the received dispersed broadband signals. Each matched filter uses a respective robust time template that has been designed to approximate the dispersed broadband signals of interest, and each time template varies across a spectrum of possible dispersed broadband signal time templates. The received dispersed broadband signal x(t) is received by each of the matched filters, and if one or more matches occurs, then the received data is determined to have signal data of interest. This signal data can then be analyzed and/or transmitted to Earth for analysis, as desired. The system and method of the present invention will prove extremely useful in many fields, including satellite communications, plasma physics, and interstellar research. The varying time templates used in the bank of matched filters are determined as follows. The robust time domain template is assumed to take the form w(t)=A(t)cos[l brace]2[phi](t)[r brace]. Since the instantaneous frequency f(t) is known to be equal to the derivative of the phase [phi](t), the trajectory of a joint time-frequency representation of x(t) is used as an approximation of [phi][prime](t). 10 figs.

  10. System and method for detection of dispersed broadband signals

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Shie; Dunham, Mark E.

    1999-06-08

    A system and method for detecting the presence of dispersed broadband signals in real time. The present invention utilizes a bank of matched filters for detecting the received dispersed broadband signals. Each matched filter uses a respective robust time template that has been designed to approximate the dispersed broadband signals of interest, and each time template varies across a spectrum of possible dispersed broadband signal time templates. The received dispersed broadband signal x(t) is received by each of the matched filters, and if one or more matches occurs, then the received data is determined to have signal data of interest. This signal data can then be analyzed and/or transmitted to Earth for analysis, as desired. The system and method of the present invention will prove extremely useful in many fields, including satellite communications, plasma physics, and interstellar research. The varying time templates used in the bank of matched filters are determined as follows. The robust time domain template is assumed to take the form w(t)=A(t)cos{2.phi.(t)}. Since the instantaneous frequency f(t) is known to be equal to the derivative of the phase .phi.(t), the trajectory of a joint time-frequency representation of x(t) is used as an approximation of .phi.'(t).

  11. Signal detection techniques applied to the Chandler wobble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    A sudden excitation event of the Chandler wobble should induce the earth's rotation pole to undergo damped harmonic motion. This type of motion has been searched for in the observations of the Chandler wobble using techniques based upon the concept of a matched filter. Although the signal detection techniques used here were not sensitive enough to detect any such isolated sudden excitation events, the result that was obtained is consistent with a randomly excited model of the Chandler wobble.

  12. A signal detection strategy for the SETI All Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, W.; Olsen, E. T.; Solomon, J.; Quirk, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    A source detection strategy for the SETI All Sky Survey is described. The method is designed to detect continuous wave (or very narrowband) sources transitting an antenna beam. The short-time spectra of the received signal are accumulated, and candidate extraterrestrial sources are recognized by the recognized by the presence of narrowband power exceeding a threshold function. The threshold function is derived using a Neyman-pearson hypothesis test.

  13. Detection of essential hypertension with physiological signals from wearable devices.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Torres, Juan Manuel Mayor; Danieli, Morena; Riccardi, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    Early detection of essential hypertension can support the prevention of cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of death. The traditional method of identification of hypertension involves periodic blood pressure measurement using brachial cuff-based measurement devices. While these devices are non-invasive, they require manual setup for each measurement and they are not suitable for continuous monitoring. Research has shown that physiological signals such as Heart Rate Variability, which is a measure of the cardiac autonomic activity, is correlated with blood pressure. Wearable devices capable of measuring physiological signals such as Heart Rate, Galvanic Skin Response, Skin Temperature have recently become ubiquitous. However, these signals are not accurate and are prone to noise due to different artifacts. In this paper a) we present a data collection protocol for continuous non-invasive monitoring of physiological signals from wearable devices; b) we implement signal processing techniques for signal estimation; c) we explore how the continuous monitoring of these physiological signals can be used to identify hypertensive patients; d) We conduct a pilot study with a group of normotensive and hypertensive patients to test our techniques. We show that physiological signals extracted from wearable devices can distinguish between these two groups with high accuracy. PMID:26738172

  14. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinki; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod. PMID:23874612

  15. Fault Detection of Gearbox from Inverter Signals Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pislaru, C.; Lane, M.; Ball, A. D.; Gu, F.

    2012-05-01

    The gear faults are time-localized transient events so time-frequency analysis techniques (such as the Short-Time Fourier Transform, Wavelet Transform, motor current signature analysis) are widely used to deal with non-stationary and nonlinear signals. Newly developed signal processing techniques (such as empirical mode decomposition and Teager Kaiser Energy Operator) enabled the recognition of the vibration modes that coexist in the system, and to have a better understanding of the nature of the fault information contained in the vibration signal. However these methods require a lot of computational power so this paper presents a novel approach of gearbox fault detection using the inverter signals to monitor the load, rather than the motor current. The proposed technique could be used for continuous monitoring as well as on-line damage detection systems for gearbox maintenance.

  16. Signal detection in conditions of everyday life traffic dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Tova; Wolf, Yuval

    2002-11-01

    This paper shows how the paradigm of signal detection could serve as a viable means for the analysis of drivers' choices in conditions of everyday life traffic dilemmas. The participants were 28 drivers, most of them professional, who spend at least 6 h a day on the road. All agreed to have a note-taking silent passenger for the entire journey, every day during a period of 3-4 weeks. All completed the sensation-seeking questionnaire. Their 'to do or not to do' choices in conditions of four (out of a total of six) traffic dilemmas (amber light, distance keeping, stopping in road-crossing and merging in routes) were analyzable in terms of a modification of the paradigm of signal detection. In accord with the basics of the paradigm of signal detection, the rate of success of the drivers to detect signals of danger on the road (perceptual sensitivity) fell into the range of partial uncertainty (more than 50% and not too much above this level)! The choices made by thrill-and-adventure-seeking drivers were more lenient than the choices of the drivers who scored lower on this dimension. PMID:12371781

  17. Safety signal detection: the relevance of literature review.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Helena; Clément, Mallorie; Rollason, Victoria

    2014-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent an important risk for patients and have a significant economic impact on health systems. ADRs are the fifth most common cause of hospital death, with a burden estimated at 197,000 deaths per year in the EU. This has a societal cost of 79 billion per year. Because of this strong impact in public health, regulatory authorities (RAs) worldwide are implementing new pharmacovigilance legislation to promote and protect public health by reducing the burden of ADRs through the detection of safety signals. Although, traditionally, signal detection activities have mainly been performed based on spontaneous reporting from healthcare professionals and national health RAs, the new pharmacovigilance legislation underlines the relevance of other sources of information (such as scientific literature) for the evaluation of the benefit-risk balance of a certain product. This review aims to highlight the relevance of periodic scientific literature screening in the safety signal detection process. The authors present four practical examples where a safety signal that was detected from a literature report had an impact on the lifecycle of a drug. In addition, based on practical experience of the screening of medical and scientific literature for safety purposes, this article analyses the requirements of the new pharmacovigilance guidelines on literature screening and highlights the need for the implementation of a literature review procedure and the main challenges encountered when performing literature screening for safety aspects. PMID:24895178

  18. The Mirror Effect and Mixture Signal Detection Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T.

    2007-01-01

    The mirror effect for word frequency refers to the finding that low-frequency words have higher hit rates and lower false alarm rates than high-frequency words. This result is typically interpreted in terms of conventional signal detection theory (SDT), in which case it indicates that the order of the underlying old item distributions mirrors…

  19. Detection of visual signals by rats: A computational model

    EPA Science Inventory

    We applied a neural network model of classical conditioning proposed by Schmajuk, Lam, and Gray (1996) to visual signal detection and discrimination tasks designed to assess sustained attention in rats (Bushnell, 1999). The model describes the animals’ expectation of receiving fo...

  20. Signal processing techniques for clutter filtering and wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Deshpande, Manohar D

    1991-01-01

    An extended Prony algorithm applicable to signal processing techniques for clutter filtering and windshear detection is discussed. The algorithm is based upon modelling the radar return as a time series, and appears to offer potential for improving hazard factor estimates in the presence of strong clutter returns.

  1. Coherent stochastic oscillations enhance signal detection in spiking neurons

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Tatiana A.; Helbig, Brian; Russell, David F.; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Neiman, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of noisy oscillatory input on the signal discrimination by spontaneously firing neurons. Using analytically tractable model, we contrast signal detection in two situations (i) when the neuron is driven by coherent oscillations and (ii) when the coherence of oscillations is destroyed. Analytical calculations revealed a region in the parameter space of the model, where oscillations act to reduce the variability of neuronal firing and to enhance the discriminability of weak signals. These analytical results are employed to unveil a possible role of coherent oscillations in peripheral electrosensory system of paddlefish in improvement of detection of weak stimuli. The proposed mechanism may be relevant to a wide range of phenomena involving coherently driven oscillators. PMID:19792163

  2. Signal enhancement in electronic detection of DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, C.; Philippin, G.; Bockelmann, U.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic detection of the specific recognition between complementary DNA sequences is investigated. DNA probes are immobilized at different lateral positions on a Poly( L -lysine)-coated surface of an integrated silicon transistor array. Hybridization and field effect detection are done with the solid surface immersed in electrolyte solutions. Differential measurements are performed, where DNA hybridization leads to surface potential shifts between the transistors of the array. We experimentally show that these differential signals of hybridization can be enhanced significantly by changing the salt concentration between hybridization and detection.

  3. Automatic detection of service initiation signals used in bars.

    PubMed

    Loth, Sebastian; Huth, Kerstin; De Ruiter, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the intention of others is important in all social interactions, especially in the service domain. Enabling a bartending robot to serve customers is particularly challenging as the system has to recognize the social signals produced by customers and respond appropriately. Detecting whether a customer would like to order is essential for the service encounter to succeed. This detection is particularly challenging in a noisy environment with multiple customers. Thus, a bartending robot has to be able to distinguish between customers intending to order, chatting with friends or just passing by. In order to study which signals customers use to initiate a service interaction in a bar, we recorded real-life customer-staff interactions in several German bars. These recordings were used to generate initial hypotheses about the signals customers produce when bidding for the attention of bar staff. Two experiments using snapshots and short video sequences then tested the validity of these hypothesized candidate signals. The results revealed that bar staff responded to a set of two non-verbal signals: first, customers position themselves directly at the bar counter and, secondly, they look at a member of staff. Both signals were necessary and, when occurring together, sufficient. The participants also showed a strong agreement about when these cues occurred in the videos. Finally, a signal detection analysis revealed that ignoring a potential order is deemed worse than erroneously inviting customers to order. We conclude that (a) these two easily recognizable actions are sufficient for recognizing the intention of customers to initiate a service interaction, but other actions such as gestures and speech were not necessary, and (b) the use of reaction time experiments using natural materials is feasible and provides ecologically valid results. PMID:24009594

  4. Automatic detection of service initiation signals used in bars

    PubMed Central

    Loth, Sebastian; Huth, Kerstin; De Ruiter, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the intention of others is important in all social interactions, especially in the service domain. Enabling a bartending robot to serve customers is particularly challenging as the system has to recognize the social signals produced by customers and respond appropriately. Detecting whether a customer would like to order is essential for the service encounter to succeed. This detection is particularly challenging in a noisy environment with multiple customers. Thus, a bartending robot has to be able to distinguish between customers intending to order, chatting with friends or just passing by. In order to study which signals customers use to initiate a service interaction in a bar, we recorded real-life customer-staff interactions in several German bars. These recordings were used to generate initial hypotheses about the signals customers produce when bidding for the attention of bar staff. Two experiments using snapshots and short video sequences then tested the validity of these hypothesized candidate signals. The results revealed that bar staff responded to a set of two non-verbal signals: first, customers position themselves directly at the bar counter and, secondly, they look at a member of staff. Both signals were necessary and, when occurring together, sufficient. The participants also showed a strong agreement about when these cues occurred in the videos. Finally, a signal detection analysis revealed that ignoring a potential order is deemed worse than erroneously inviting customers to order. We conclude that (a) these two easily recognizable actions are sufficient for recognizing the intention of customers to initiate a service interaction, but other actions such as gestures and speech were not necessary, and (b) the use of reaction time experiments using natural materials is feasible and provides ecologically valid results. PMID:24009594

  5. Signal processing techniques for atrial fibrillation source detection.

    PubMed

    Ambadkar, Minal; Leonelli, Fabio M; Sankar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    In clinical practice, Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most common and critical cardiac arrhythmia encountered. The treatment that can ensure permanent AF removal is catheter ablation, where cardiologists destroy the affected cardiac muscle cells with RF or Laser. In this procedure it is necessary to know exactly from which part of the heart AF triggers are originated. Various signal processing algorithms provide a strong tool to track AF sources. This study proposes, signal processing techniques that can be exploited for characterization, analysis and source detection of AF signals. These algorithms are implemented on Electrocardiogram (ECG) and intracardiac signals which contain important information that allows the analysis of anatomic and physiologic aspects of the whole cardiac muscle. PMID:25570578

  6. Single photon radioluminescence. II. Signal detection and biological applications.

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokh, Z.; Bicknese, S.; Shohet, S. B.; Verkman, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative theory for excitation of fluorescent molecules by beta decay electrons is reported in the accompanying manuscript; experimental detection methods and biological applications are reported here. The single photon signals produced by an excited fluorophore (single photon radioluminescence, SPR) provide quantitative information about the distance between radioisotope and fluorophore. Instrumentation was constructed for SPR signal detection. Photons produced in a 0.5-ml sample volume were detected by a cooled photomultiplier and photon counting electronics. To minimize electronic noise and drift for detection of very small SPR signals, a mechanical light chopper was used for gated-signal detection, and a pulse height analyzer for noise rejection. SPR signals of approximately 1 cps were reproducibly measurable. The influence of inner filter effect, sample turbidity, and fluorophore environment (lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) on SPR signals were evaluated experimentally. SPR was then applied to measure lipid exchange kinetics, ligand binding, and membrane transport, and to determine an intermolecular distance in an intact membrane. (a. Lipid exchange kinetics.) Transfer of 12-anthroyloxystearic acid (12-AS) from sonicated lipid vesicles and micelles to vesicles containing 3H-cholesterol was measured from the time course of increasing SPR signal. At 22 degrees C, the half-times for 12-AS transfer from vesicles and micelles were 3.3 and 1.1 min, respectively. (b. Ligand binding.) Binding of 3H-oleic acid to albumin in solution, and 3H-2,2'-dihydro-4,4'-diisothiocyanodisulfonic stilbene (3H-H2DIDS) to band 3 on the erythrocyte membranes were detected by the radioluminescence of the intrinsic tryptophans. The SPR signal from 5 microCi 3H-oleic acid bound to 0.3 mM albumin decreased from 13 +/- 2 cps to 3 +/- 2 cps upon addition of nonradioactive oleic acid, giving 2.7 high affinity oleic acid binding sites per albumin. The SPR signal from 1 microCi 3H-H2DIDS

  7. Single photon radioluminescence. II. Signal detection and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Shahrokh, Z; Bicknese, S; Shohet, S B; Verkman, A S

    1992-11-01

    A quantitative theory for excitation of fluorescent molecules by beta decay electrons is reported in the accompanying manuscript; experimental detection methods and biological applications are reported here. The single photon signals produced by an excited fluorophore (single photon radioluminescence, SPR) provide quantitative information about the distance between radioisotope and fluorophore. Instrumentation was constructed for SPR signal detection. Photons produced in a 0.5-ml sample volume were detected by a cooled photomultiplier and photon counting electronics. To minimize electronic noise and drift for detection of very small SPR signals, a mechanical light chopper was used for gated-signal detection, and a pulse height analyzer for noise rejection. SPR signals of approximately 1 cps were reproducibly measurable. The influence of inner filter effect, sample turbidity, and fluorophore environment (lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) on SPR signals were evaluated experimentally. SPR was then applied to measure lipid exchange kinetics, ligand binding, and membrane transport, and to determine an intermolecular distance in an intact membrane. (a. Lipid exchange kinetics.) Transfer of 12-anthroyloxystearic acid (12-AS) from sonicated lipid vesicles and micelles to vesicles containing 3H-cholesterol was measured from the time course of increasing SPR signal. At 22 degrees C, the half-times for 12-AS transfer from vesicles and micelles were 3.3 and 1.1 min, respectively. (b. Ligand binding.) Binding of 3H-oleic acid to albumin in solution, and 3H-2,2'-dihydro-4,4'-diisothiocyanodisulfonic stilbene (3H-H2DIDS) to band 3 on the erythrocyte membranes were detected by the radioluminescence of the intrinsic tryptophans. The SPR signal from 5 microCi 3H-oleic acid bound to 0.3 mM albumin decreased from 13 +/- 2 cps to 3 +/- 2 cps upon addition of nonradioactive oleic acid, giving 2.7 high affinity oleic acid binding sites per albumin. The SPR signal from 1 microCi 3H-H2DIDS

  8. Threshold detection in generalized non-additive signals and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, D., LLNL

    1997-12-22

    The classical theory of optimum (binary-on-off) threshold detection for additive signals and generalized (i.e. nongaussian) noise is extended to the canonical nonadditive threshold situation. In the important (and usual) applications where the noise is sampled independently, a canonical threshold optimum theory is outlined here, which is found formally to parallel the earlier additive theory, including the critical properties of locally optimum Bayes detection algorithms, which are asymptotically normal and optimum as well. The important Class A clutter model provides an explicit example of optimal threshold envelope detection, for the non-additive cases of signal and noise. Various extensions are noted in the concluding section, as are selected references.

  9. Separating Decision and Encoding Noise in Signal Detection Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Carlos Alexander; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Dosher, Barbara Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop an extension to the Signal Detection Theory (SDT) framework to separately estimate internal noise arising from representational and decision processes. Our approach constrains SDT models with decision noise by combining a multi-pass external noise paradigm with confidence rating responses. In a simulation study we present evidence that representation and decision noise can be separately estimated over a range of representative underlying representational and decision noise level configurations. These results also hold across a number of decision rules and show resilience to rule miss-specification. The new theoretical framework is applied to a visual detection confidence-rating task with three and five response categories. This study compliments and extends the recent efforts of researchers (Benjamin, Diaz, & Wee, 2009; Mueller & Weidemann, 2008; Rosner & Kochanski, 2009, Kellen, Klauer, & Singmann, 2012) to separate and quantify underlying sources of response variability in signal detection tasks. PMID:26120907

  10. Signal Improvement Strategies for Fluorescence Detection of Biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Luan, Chengxin; Yang, Zixue; Chen, Baoan

    2016-05-01

    For analysis of biomacromolecules, a sensitive, specified and reliable method is indispensable. Fluorescent dyes or fluorophores have been widely used as mediums to obtain readout signals in various assays or bioimaging because of their versatilities such as biocompatibility. Those fluorescent dyes based techniques manipulate many molecular interactions for analysis of biomacromolecules including antibody-protein interaction, base complementation, glycan-lectin interaction, etc. The strategies to manipulate those molecular interactions are various and always updating due to the development of biotechnological tools and instruments. In this minireview, we summarize the state of the art of signal improvement techniques for fluorescence detection of biomacromolecules especially proteins and nucleic acids. We focus on the principle and mechanism of those techniques for fluorescence detection of biomacromolecules. We also discuss the future trend of the techniques for fluorescence detection of biomacromolecules. PMID:27063869

  11. An Improved Network Strain Filter for Detecting Transient Deformation Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, R.; McGuire, J.; Segall, P.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a tool to detect transient signals such as aseismic fault slip and magmatic intrusion automatically from large-scale (principally GPS) geodetic arrays, referred to as a Network Strain Filter (NSF). The NSF is capable of detecting transient signals in large data sets which may be difficult to identify by visual inspection of individual time series. The underlying principle is to exploit the spatially coherent nature of tectonic signals. The NSF models GPS displacement time series as a sum of contributions from tectonic transients, steady motion due to secular deformation, site-specific local benchmark motion, reference frame errors, and white noise. Transient deformation is represented by a spatial wavelet basis with time varying coefficients estimated using Kalman filtering techniques. A "hyperparameter" is also estimated to constrain the amount of temporal smoothness of the tectonic deformation. As station distribution is irregular and wavelets have local support (non-zero only over a localized domain), the design matrix is generally ill-conditioned. We investigate two strategies for regularizing the problem. The first is explicit spatial smoothing of the transient deformation. The second is to simply exclude wavelet bases that don't span some minimum number of stations. In this case, the smallest wavelet scale is determined such that the residual variance is consistent with the a priori errors of the data. Similarly the degree of spatial smoothing is determined by a priori knowledge of the data errors. To test the performance of the NSF, we carried out numerical tests using the southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) station distribution with synthetic transients of variable signal to noise ratio. We tested a six-year-long time series with a slow slip event with a duration of three years. Due to the long duration of the transient event, the contributions from secular motion and benchmark wobble make it difficult to identify the

  12. Binaural speech discrimination under noise in hearing-impaired listeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Rao, A. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an assessment of speech discrimination by hearing-impaired listeners (sensori-neural, conductive, and mixed groups) under binaural free-field listening in the presence of background noise. Subjects with pure-tone thresholds greater than 20 dB in 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 kHz were presented with a version of the W-22 list of phonetically balanced words under three conditions: (1) 'quiet', with the chamber noise below 28 dB and speech at 60 dB; (2) at a constant S/N ratio of +10 dB, and with a background white noise at 70 dB; and (3) same as condition (2), but with the background noise at 80 dB. The mean speech discrimination scores decreased significantly with noise in all groups. However, the decrease in binaural speech discrimination scores with an increase in hearing impairment was less for material presented under the noise conditions than for the material presented in quiet.

  13. Modeling the utility of binaural cues for underwater sound localization.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jennifer N; Lloyd, David R; Banks, Patchouly N; Mercado, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The binaural cues used by terrestrial animals for sound localization in azimuth may not always suffice for accurate sound localization underwater. The purpose of this research was to examine the theoretical limits of interaural timing and level differences available underwater using computational and physical models. A paired-hydrophone system was used to record sounds transmitted underwater and recordings were analyzed using neural networks calibrated to reflect the auditory capabilities of terrestrial mammals. Estimates of source direction based on temporal differences were most accurate for frequencies between 0.5 and 1.75 kHz, with greater resolution toward the midline (2°), and lower resolution toward the periphery (9°). Level cues also changed systematically with source azimuth, even at lower frequencies than expected from theoretical calculations, suggesting that binaural mechanical coupling (e.g., through bone conduction) might, in principle, facilitate underwater sound localization. Overall, the relatively limited ability of the model to estimate source position using temporal and level difference cues underwater suggests that animals such as whales may use additional cues to accurately localize conspecifics and predators at long distances. PMID:24727491

  14. Binaural loudness summation for speech presented via earphones and loudspeaker with and without visual cuesa)

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Michael; Florentine, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary data [M. Epstein and M. Florentine, Ear. Hear. 30, 234–237 (2009)] obtained using speech stimuli from a visually present talker heard via loudspeakers in a sound-attenuating chamber indicate little difference in loudness when listening with one or two ears (i.e., significantly reduced binaural loudness summation, BLS), which is known as “binaural loudness constancy.” These data challenge current understanding drawn from laboratory measurements that indicate a tone presented binaurally is louder than the same tone presented monaurally. Twelve normal listeners were presented recorded spondees, monaurally and binaurally across a wide range of levels via earphones and a loudspeaker with and without visual cues. Statistical analyses of binaural-to-monaural ratios of magnitude estimates indicate that the amount of BLS is significantly less for speech presented via a loudspeaker with visual cues than for stimuli with any other combination of test parameters (i.e., speech presented via earphones or a loudspeaker without visual cues, and speech presented via earphones with visual cues). These results indicate that the loudness of a visually present talker in daily environments is little affected by switching between binaural and monaural listening. This supports the phenomenon of binaural loudness constancy and underscores the importance of ecological validity in loudness research. PMID:22559371

  15. Heart beat detection in multimodal data using automatic relevant signal detection.

    PubMed

    De Cooman, Thomas; Goovaerts, Griet; Varon, Carolina; Widjaja, Devy; Willemen, Tim; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Accurate R peak detection in the electrocardiogram (ECG) is a well-known and highly explored problem in biomedical signal processing. Although a lot of progress has been made in this area, current methods are still insufficient in the presence of extreme noise and/or artifacts such as loose electrodes. Often, however, not only the ECG is recorded, but multiple signals are simultaneously acquired from the patient. Several of these signals, such as blood pressure, can help to improve the heart beat detection. These signals of interest can be detected automatically by analyzing their power spectral density or by using the available signal type identifiers. Individual peaks from the signals of interest are combined using majority voting, heart beat location estimation and Hjorth's mobility of the resulting RR intervals. Both multimodal algorithms showed significant increases in performance of up to 8.65% for noisy multimodal datasets compared to when only the ECG signal is used. A maximal performance of 90.02% was obtained on the hidden test set of the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data. PMID:26218307

  16. Signal processing for passive detection and classification of underwater acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kil Woo

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation examines signal processing for passive detection, classification and tracking of underwater acoustic signals for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. First, we consider the problem of passive acoustic detection of a diver in a shallow water environment. A frequency-domain multi-band matched-filter approach to swimmer detection is presented. The idea is to break the frequency contents of the hydrophone signals into multiple narrow frequency bands, followed by time averaged (about half of a second) energy calculation over each band. Then, spectra composed of such energy samples over the chosen frequency bands are correlated to form a decision variable. The frequency bands with highest Signal/Noise ratio are used for detection. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated for experimental data collected for a diver in the Hudson River. We also propose a new referenceless frequency-domain multi-band detector which, unlike other reference-based detectors, does not require a diver specific signature. Instead, our detector matches to a general feature of the diver spectrum in the high frequency range: the spectrum is roughly periodic in time and approximately flat when the diver exhales. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using experimental data collected from the Hudson River. Moreover, we present detection, classification and tracking of small vessel signals. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification and tracking. This dissertation presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise) acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship

  17. Magnetic resonance microwave absorption imaging: Feasibility of signal detection

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bin; Weaver, John B.; Meaney, Paul M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) technique was used to detect small displacements induced by localized absorption of pulsed 434 MHz microwave power as a potential method for tumor detection. Methods: Phase contrast subtraction was used to separate the phase change due to motion from thermoelastic expansion from other contributions to phase variation such as the bulk temperature rise of the medium and phase offsets from the MR scanner itself. A simple set of experiments was performed where the motion was constrained to be one dimensional which provided controls on the data acquisition and motion extraction procedures. Specifically, the MR-detected motion signal was isolated by altering the direction of the microwave-induced motion and sampling the response with motion encoding gradients in all three directions when the microwave power was turned on and turned off. Results: Successful signal detection, as evidenced by the recording of a systematic alternating (zigzag) phase pattern, occurred only when the motion encoding was in parallel with either the vertical or horizontal direction of the microwave-induced motion on both 10 and 4 mm spatial scales. Conclusions: These results demonstrate, for the first time, that motion associated with thermoelastic expansion from the absorption of pulsed microwave power can be detected with MR. PMID:19994529

  18. Detection of weak signals in memory thermal baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Aquino, J. I.; Velasco, R. M.; Romero-Bastida, M.

    2014-11-01

    The nonlinear relaxation time and the statistics of the first passage time distribution in connection with the quasideterministic approach are used to detect weak signals in the decay process of the unstable state of a Brownian particle embedded in memory thermal baths. The study is performed in the overdamped approximation of a generalized Langevin equation characterized by an exponential decay in the friction memory kernel. A detection criterion for each time scale is studied: The first one is referred to as the receiver output, which is given as a function of the nonlinear relaxation time, and the second one is related to the statistics of the first passage time distribution.

  19. Estimation and detection of signals in multiplicative noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    We define a class of detection-estimation problems on matrix Lie groups in which the observation noise is multiplicative in nature. By examining the differential versions of the hypotheses, which are bilinear, we are able to derive the relevant likelihood ratio formula and the associated optimal estimation equations for the signal given the observations and the assumption that the signal is present. These estimation equations are of interest in their own right, in that they represent a finite-dimensional optimal solution to a nonlinear estimation problem and consist of a Kalman-Bucy filter along with the on-line computation of the solution of the associated Riccati equation, which is driven by the observations. The usefulness of these results is illustrated via an example concerning the detection of an actuator failure in a rigid-body rotational control system.

  20. Estimation and detection of signals in multiplicative noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.

    1973-01-01

    A class of detection-estimation problems on matrix Lie groups is defined in which the observation noise is multiplicative in nature. By examining the differential versions of the hypotheses, which are bilinear in nature, it is possible to derive the relevant likelihood ratio formula and the associated optimal estimation equations for the signal given the observations and the assumption that the signal is present. These estimation equations are of interest in their own right, in that they represent a finite dimensional optimal solution to a nonlinear estimation problem and can be viewed as consisting of a Kalman-Bucy filter along with the on-line computation of the solution of the associated Riccati equation, which is driven by the observations. The usefulness of these results is illustrated via an example concerning the detection of an actuator failure in a rigid body rotational control system.

  1. Fault detection and bypass in a sequence information signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C. (Inventor); Chow, Edward T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises a plurality of scan registers, each such register respectively associated with a processor element; an on-chip comparator, encoder and fault bypass register. Each scan register generates a unitary signal the logic state of which depends on the correctness of the input from the previous processor in the systolic array. These unitary signals are input to a common comparator which generates an output indicating whether or not an error has occurred. These unitary signals are also input to an encoder which identifies the location of any fault detected so that an appropriate multiplexer can be switched to bypass the faulty processor element. Input scan data can be readily programmed to fully exercise all of the processor elements so that no fault can remain undetected.

  2. Improving the performance of cardiac abnormality detection from PCG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujit, N. R.; Kumar, C. Santhosh; Rajesh, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    The Phonocardiogram (PCG) signal contains important information about the condition of heart. Using PCG signal analysis prior recognition of coronary illness can be done. In this work, we developed a biomedical system for the detection of abnormality in heart and methods to enhance the performance of the system using SMOTE and AdaBoost technique have been presented. Time and frequency domain features extracted from the PCG signal is input to the system. The back-end classifier to the system developed is Decision Tree using CART (Classification and Regression Tree), with an overall classification accuracy of 78.33% and sensitivity (alarm accuracy) of 40%. Here sensitivity implies the precision obtained from classifying the abnormal heart sound, which is an essential parameter for a system. We further improve the performance of baseline system using SMOTE and AdaBoost algorithm. The proposed approach outperforms the baseline system by an absolute improvement in overall accuracy of 5% and sensitivity of 44.92%.

  3. A Binaural Steering Beamformer System for Enhancing a Moving Speech Source.

    PubMed

    Adiloğlu, Kamil; Kayser, Hendrik; Baumgärtel, Regina M; Rennebeck, Sanja; Dietz, Mathias; Hohmann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    In many daily life communication situations, several sound sources are simultaneously active. While normal-hearing listeners can easily distinguish the target sound source from interfering sound sources-as long as target and interferers are spatially or spectrally separated-and concentrate on the target, hearing-impaired listeners and cochlear implant users have difficulties in making such a distinction. In this article, we propose a binaural approach composed of a spatial filter controlled by a direction-of-arrival estimator to track and enhance a moving target sound. This approach was implemented on a real-time signal processing platform enabling experiments with test subjects in situ. To evaluate the proposed method, a data set of sound signals with a single moving sound source in an anechoic diffuse noise environment was generated using virtual acoustics. The proposed steering method was compared with a fixed (nonsteering) method that enhances sound from the frontal direction in an objective evaluation and subjective experiments using this database. In both cases, the obtained results indicated a significant improvement in speech intelligibility and quality compared with the unprocessed signal. Furthermore, the proposed method outperformed the nonsteering method. PMID:26721924

  4. A Binaural Steering Beamformer System for Enhancing a Moving Speech Source

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Hendrik; Baumgärtel, Regina M.; Rennebeck, Sanja; Dietz, Mathias; Hohmann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    In many daily life communication situations, several sound sources are simultaneously active. While normal-hearing listeners can easily distinguish the target sound source from interfering sound sources—as long as target and interferers are spatially or spectrally separated—and concentrate on the target, hearing-impaired listeners and cochlear implant users have difficulties in making such a distinction. In this article, we propose a binaural approach composed of a spatial filter controlled by a direction-of-arrival estimator to track and enhance a moving target sound. This approach was implemented on a real-time signal processing platform enabling experiments with test subjects in situ. To evaluate the proposed method, a data set of sound signals with a single moving sound source in an anechoic diffuse noise environment was generated using virtual acoustics. The proposed steering method was compared with a fixed (nonsteering) method that enhances sound from the frontal direction in an objective evaluation and subjective experiments using this database. In both cases, the obtained results indicated a significant improvement in speech intelligibility and quality compared with the unprocessed signal. Furthermore, the proposed method outperformed the nonsteering method. PMID:26721924

  5. Evaluation of Speech Intelligibility and Sound Localization Abilities with Hearing Aids Using Binaural Wireless Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Iman; Parsa, Vijay; Macpherson, Ewan; Cheesman, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Wireless synchronization of the digital signal processing (DSP) features between two hearing aids in a bilateral hearing aid fitting is a fairly new technology. This technology is expected to preserve the differences in time and intensity between the two ears by co-ordinating the bilateral DSP features such as multichannel compression, noise reduction, and adaptive directionality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of wireless communication as implemented in two commercially available hearing aids. More specifically, this study measured speech intelligibility and sound localization abilities of normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners using bilateral hearing aids with wireless synchronization of multichannel Wide Dynamic Range Compression (WDRC). Twenty subjects participated; 8 had normal hearing and 12 had bilaterally symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. Each individual completed the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) and a sound localization test with two types of stimuli. No specific benefit from wireless WDRC synchronization was observed for the HINT; however, hearing impaired listeners had better localization with the wireless synchronization. Binaural wireless technology in hearing aids may improve localization abilities although the possible effect appears to be small at the initial fitting. With adaptation, the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing may lead to an improvement in localization and speech intelligibility. Further research is required to demonstrate the effect of adaptation to the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing on different aspects of auditory performance. PMID:26557339

  6. Optimal BLS: Optimizing transit-signal detection for Keplerian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2015-08-01

    Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. We optimize the search for transit signals for both detection and computational efficiencies by assuming that the searched systems can be described by Keplerian, and propagating the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Importnantly, we mainly consider the information content of the transit signal and not any specific algorithm - and use BLS (Kovács, Zucker, & Mazeh 2002) just as a specific example.We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually.By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the transit signal parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available.

  7. Exploring Sampling in the Detection of Multicategory EEG Signals

    PubMed Central

    Siuly, Siuly; Kabir, Enamul; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Yanchun

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a structure based on samplings and machine leaning techniques for the detection of multicategory EEG signals where random sampling (RS) and optimal allocation sampling (OS) are explored. In the proposed framework, before using the RS and OS scheme, the entire EEG signals of each class are partitioned into several groups based on a particular time period. The RS and OS schemes are used in order to have representative observations from each group of each category of EEG data. Then all of the selected samples by the RS from the groups of each category are combined in a one set named RS set. In the similar way, for the OS scheme, an OS set is obtained. Then eleven statistical features are extracted from the RS and OS set, separately. Finally this study employs three well-known classifiers: k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), multinomial logistic regression with a ridge estimator (MLR), and support vector machine (SVM) to evaluate the performance for the RS and OS feature set. The experimental outcomes demonstrate that the RS scheme well represents the EEG signals and the k-NN with the RS is the optimum choice for detection of multicategory EEG signals. PMID:25977705

  8. Exploring sampling in the detection of multicategory EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Siuly, Siuly; Kabir, Enamul; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Yanchun

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a structure based on samplings and machine leaning techniques for the detection of multicategory EEG signals where random sampling (RS) and optimal allocation sampling (OS) are explored. In the proposed framework, before using the RS and OS scheme, the entire EEG signals of each class are partitioned into several groups based on a particular time period. The RS and OS schemes are used in order to have representative observations from each group of each category of EEG data. Then all of the selected samples by the RS from the groups of each category are combined in a one set named RS set. In the similar way, for the OS scheme, an OS set is obtained. Then eleven statistical features are extracted from the RS and OS set, separately. Finally this study employs three well-known classifiers: k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), multinomial logistic regression with a ridge estimator (MLR), and support vector machine (SVM) to evaluate the performance for the RS and OS feature set. The experimental outcomes demonstrate that the RS scheme well represents the EEG signals and the k-NN with the RS is the optimum choice for detection of multicategory EEG signals. PMID:25977705

  9. Plant neighbor detection through touching leaf tips precedes phytochrome signals.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Kegge, Wouter; Evers, Jochem B; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen H; Gankema, Paulien; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Pierik, Ronald

    2012-09-01

    Plants in dense vegetation compete for resources, including light, and optimize their growth based on neighbor detection cues. The best studied of such behaviors is the shade-avoidance syndrome that positions leaves in optimally lit zones of a vegetation. Although proximate vegetation is known to be sensed through a reduced ratio between red and far-red light, we show here through computational modeling and manipulative experiments that leaves of the rosette species Arabidopsis thaliana first need to move upward to generate sufficient light reflection potential for subsequent occurrence and perception of a reduced red to far-red ratio. This early hyponastic leaf growth response is not induced by known neighbor detection cues under both climate chamber and natural sunlight conditions, and we identify a unique way for plants to detect future competitors through touching of leaf tips. This signal occurs before light signals and appears to be the earliest means of above-ground plant-plant signaling in horizontally growing rosette plants. PMID:22908260

  10. Effect of monaural and binaural stimulation on cytoplasmic RNA content in cells of the central nucleus of the cat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Shmigidina, G N

    1981-01-01

    A cytophotometric study of sections stained with gallocyanin and chrome alum showed that monaural stimulation for 2 h and binaural stimulation for 1.5 h with rhythmic noise signals led to a marked increase in the cytoplasmic RNA content per cell in the principal and large multipolar neurons of the dorsal and ventral parts of the ventrolateral region of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The increase in cytoplasmic RNA content in the principal cells of the ipsi- and contralateral parts of this nucleus relative to the stimulated ear in the case of monaural stimulation and the increase in RNA content in response to binaural stimulation suggests a uniform distribution of bilaterally converging connections from the lower nuclei of the auditory system on the principal cells. The increase in cytoplasmic RNA in the large multipolar cells of the contralateral central nucleus in response to monaural stimulation is evidence of the predominantly contralateral projection to these cells. The results are evidence of convergence of binaural influences on the principal and large multipolar cells of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. PMID:6173796

  11. SIDRA: a blind algorithm for signal detection in photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mislis, D.; Bachelet, E.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Parley, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Signal Detection using Random-Forest Algorithm (SIDRA). SIDRA is a detection and classification algorithm based on the Machine Learning technique (Random Forest). The goal of this paper is to show the power of SIDRA for quick and accurate signal detection and classification. We first diagnose the power of the method with simulated light curves and try it on a subset of the Kepler space mission catalogue. We use five classes of simulated light curves (CONSTANT, TRANSIT, VARIABLE, MLENS and EB for constant light curves, transiting exoplanet, variable, microlensing events and eclipsing binaries, respectively) to analyse the power of the method. The algorithm uses four features in order to classify the light curves. The training sample contains 5000 light curves (1000 from each class) and 50 000 random light curves for testing. The total SIDRA success ratio is ≥90 per cent. Furthermore, the success ratio reaches 95-100 per cent for the CONSTANT, VARIABLE, EB and MLENS classes and 92 per cent for the TRANSIT class with a decision probability of 60 per cent. Because the TRANSIT class is the one which fails the most, we run a simultaneous fit using SIDRA and a Box Least Square (BLS)-based algorithm for searching for transiting exoplanets. As a result, our algorithm detects 7.5 per cent more planets than a classic BLS algorithm, with better results for lower signal-to-noise light curves. SIDRA succeeds to catch 98 per cent of the planet candidates in the Kepler sample and fails for 7 per cent of the false alarms subset. SIDRA promises to be useful for developing a detection algorithm and/or classifier for large photometric surveys such as TESS and PLATO exoplanet future space missions.

  12. In Vivo Detection of Intracellular Signaling Pathways in Developing Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2000-01-01

    Information regarding the intracellular signaling processes that occur during the development of T cells has largely been obtained with the use of transgenic mouse models, which although providing invaluable information are time consuming and costly. To this end, we have developed a novel system that facilitates the In Vivo analysis of signal transduction pathways during T-lymphocyte development. This approach uses reporter-plasmids for the detection of intracellular signals mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase or cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Reporter-plasmids are transfected into thymocytes in fetal thymic organ culture by accelerated DNA/particle bombardment (gene gun), and the activation of a signaling pathway is determined in the form of a standard luciferase assay. Importantly, this powerful technique preserves the structural integrity of the thymus, and will provide an invaluable tool to study how thymocytes respond to normal environmental stimuli encountered during differentiation within the thymic milieu. Thus, this method allows for the monitoring of signals that occur in a biological time frame, such as during differentiation, and within the natural environment of differentiating cells. PMID:11293810

  13. Nasal chemosensory cells use bitter taste signaling to detect irritants and bacterial signals

    PubMed Central

    Tizzano, Marco; Gulbransen, Brian D.; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Clapp, Tod R.; Herman, Jake P.; Sibhatu, Hiruy M.; Churchill, Mair E. A.; Silver, Wayne L.; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract is continually assaulted with harmful dusts and xenobiotics carried on the incoming airstream. Detection of such irritants by the trigeminal nerve evokes protective reflexes, including sneezing, apnea, and local neurogenic inflammation of the mucosa. Although free intra-epithelial nerve endings can detect certain lipophilic irritants (e.g., mints, ammonia), the epithelium also houses a population of trigeminally innervated solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) that express T2R bitter taste receptors along with their downstream signaling components. These SCCs have been postulated to enhance the chemoresponsive capabilities of the trigeminal irritant-detection system. Here we show that transduction by the intranasal solitary chemosensory cells is necessary to evoke trigeminally mediated reflex reactions to some irritants including acyl–homoserine lactone bacterial quorum-sensing molecules, which activate the downstream signaling effectors associated with bitter taste transduction. Isolated nasal chemosensory cells respond to the classic bitter ligand denatonium as well as to the bacterial signals by increasing intracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, these same substances evoke changes in respiration indicative of trigeminal activation. Genetic ablation of either Gα-gustducin or TrpM5, essential elements of the T2R transduction cascade, eliminates the trigeminal response. Because acyl–homoserine lactones serve as quorum-sensing molecules for Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, detection of these substances by airway chemoreceptors offers a means by which the airway epithelium may trigger an epithelial inflammatory response before the bacteria reach population densities capable of forming destructive biofilms. PMID:20133764

  14. Detectability of the Reflection Signal from Inner Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Jenkins, J. M.; Scargle, J.; Koch, D.; Doyle, L. R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Mayor and Queloz (1996) and Marcy and Butler (1996) have found massive planets with orbital periods Tp=approx.4 days around two solar-like stars (51 Pegasi and v Andromeda). These planets are most likely similar in size and composition to the gas giants in our solar system (Burrows et al 1996). Based on this expectation and assuming the same albedo as Jupiter, we examined the feasibility of searching for similar planets with a dedicated space-based 1-m telescope. The Kepler mission will survey approximately 70,000 main-sequence dwarf stars from 9 to 14 mag continuously for four years to detect transiting Earthlike planets. Based on the detection statistics of Marcy and Butler, we expect to detect 1400 inner-orbit giant planets. Such planets in a much wider range of orbital inclinations (i) will produce nearly sinusoidal modulations of the star light flux due to the varying planetary phases. The relative signal amplitudes are of order 2x10(exp -5) and decrease as Tp(exp 4/3) for i >> 0deg. We estimated the expected signal to noise ratio (SNR) using the solar irradiance measurements from the ACRIM 1 experiment along with expected shot and detector noises. The figure shows SNR as a function of Tp for a 12 mag star, and indicates the planet radius required for detection. The survey will be sensitive to planets with periods from 12 hr to approx.8 days at the 6 sigma level.

  15. Intelligent signal analysis methodologies for nuclear detection, identification and attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis

    Detection and identification of special nuclear materials can be fully performed with a radiation detector-spectrometer. Due to several physical and computational limitations, development of fast and accurate radioisotope identifier (RIID) algorithms is essential for automated radioactive source detection and characterization. The challenge is to identify individual isotope signatures embedded in spectral signature aggregation. In addition, background and isotope spectra overlap to further complicate the signal analysis. These concerns are addressed, in this thesis, through a set of intelligent methodologies recognizing signature spectra, background spectrum and, subsequently, identifying radionuclides. Initially, a method for detection and extraction of signature patterns is accomplished by means of fuzzy logic. The fuzzy logic methodology is applied on three types of radiation signal processing applications, where it exhibits high positive detection, low false alarm rate and very short execution time, while outperforming the maximum likelihood fitting approach. In addition, an innovative Pareto optimal multiobjective fitting of gamma ray spectra using evolutionary computing is presented. The methodology exhibits perfect identification while performs better than single objective fitting. Lastly, an innovative kernel based machine learning methodology was developed for estimating natural background spectrum in gamma ray spectra. The novelty of the methodology lies in the fact that it implements a data based approach and does not require any explicit physics modeling. Results show that kernel based method adequately estimates the gamma background, but algorithm's performance exhibits a strong dependence on the selected kernel.

  16. Integrated Heterodyne MOEMS for detection of low intensity signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elman, Noel M.; Krylov, Slava; Sternheim, Marek; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2006-01-01

    A novel MEMS-based modulation scheme is presented as a method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of silicon photodiodes adapted for the detection of light-emitting bio-reporter signals. Photodiodes are an attractive photodetector choice because they are VLSI compatible, easily miniaturized, highly scalable, and inexpensive. Silicon photodiodes exhibit a wide response range extending from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared (IR) part of the spectrum, which in principle is appropriate for sensing low intensity optical signals. Silicon photodiodes, however, exhibit limited sensitivity to optical dc signals, as the magnitude of the low frequency noise is comparable to signal magnitude. Optical modulation prior to photodetection overcomes the inherent low frequency noise of photodetectors and system detection circuits. The enhancement scheme is based on a design of high frequency optical modulators that operate in the 1-2 kHz range in order to overcome the low frequency spectral noise. We have denominated this MEMS-based scheme Integrated Heterodyne Optical System (IHOS). The modulation efficiency of the proposed architecture can reach up to 50 percent. In order to implement the MOEMS optical modulators, a new two-mask fabrication process was developed that combines high-aspect ratio and low aspect ratio structures at the same device layer (aspect ratio is defined as a ratio between the structure height to its width). Long stroke electrostatic combdrive actuators integrated with folded flexures (high aspect-ratio) were fabricated together to drive large aperture shutters (low aspect ratio). We have denominated this process MASIS (Multiple Aspect Ratio Structural Integration). Under resonant excitation at approximately 1 kHz, MOEMS modulators demonstrated maximum displacement of about 40 microns at an actuation voltage of 15 V peak in air, and 3.5 V peak in vacuum (8 mTorr). Results of analytical solutions and finite element analysis (FEA) simulations are

  17. Automatic fall detection using wearable biomedical signal measurement terminal.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy-Trang; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Lee, Tae-Soo

    2009-01-01

    In our study, we developed a mobile waist-mounted device which can monitor the subject's acceleration signal and detect the fall events in real-time with high accuracy and automatically send an emergency message to a remote server via CDMA module. When fall event happens, the system also generates an alarm sound at 50Hz to alarm other people until a subject can sit up or stand up. A Kionix KXM52-1050 tri-axial accelerometer and a Bellwave BSM856 CDMA standalone modem were used to detect and manage fall events. We used not only a simple threshold algorithm but also some supporting methods to increase an accuracy of our system (nearly 100% in laboratory environment). Timely fall detection can prevent regrettable death due to long-lie effect; therefore increase the independence of elderly people in an unsupervised living environment. PMID:19964661

  18. Coherent detection and digital signal processing for fiber optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ezra

    The drive towards higher spectral efficiency in optical fiber systems has generated renewed interest in coherent detection. We review different detection methods, including noncoherent, differentially coherent, and coherent detection, as well as hybrid detection methods. We compare the modulation methods that are enabled and their respective performances in a linear regime. An important system parameter is the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) utilized in transmission. Polarization-multiplexed quadrature-amplitude modulation maximizes spectral efficiency and power efficiency as it uses all four available DOF contained in the two field quadratures in the two polarizations. Dual-polarization homodyne or heterodyne downconversion are linear processes that can fully recover the received signal field in these four DOF. When downconverted signals are sampled at the Nyquist rate, compensation of transmission impairments can be performed using digital signal processing (DSP). Software based receivers benefit from the robustness of DSP, flexibility in design, and ease of adaptation to time-varying channels. Linear impairments, including chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD), can be compensated quasi-exactly using finite impulse response filters. In practical systems, sampling the received signal at 3/2 times the symbol rate is sufficient to enable an arbitrary amount of CD and PMD to be compensated for a sufficiently long equalizer whose tap length scales linearly with transmission distance. Depending on the transmitted constellation and the target bit error rate, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) should have around 5 to 6 bits of resolution. Digital coherent receivers are naturally suited for the implementation of feedforward carrier recovery, which has superior linewidth tolerance than phase-locked loops, and does not suffer from feedback delay constraints. Differential bit encoding can be used to prevent catastrophic receiver failure due

  19. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-01

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP “smoking gun.” If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of ˜2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  20. Stochastic model for detection of signals in noise.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2009-11-01

    Fifty years ago Birdsall, Tanner, and colleagues made rapid progress in developing signal detection theory into a powerful psychophysical tool. One of their major insights was the utility of adding external noise to the signals of interest. These methods have been enhanced in recent years by the addition of multipass and classification-image methods for opening up the black box. There remain a number of as yet unresolved issues. In particular, Birdsall developed a theorem that large amounts of external input noise can linearize nonlinear systems, and Tanner conjectured, with mathematical backup, that what had been previously thought of as a nonlinear system could actually be a linear system with uncertainty. Recent findings, both experimental and theoretical, have validated Birdsall's theorem and Tanner's conjecture. However, there have also been experimental and theoretical findings with the opposite outcome. In this paper we present new data and simulations in an attempt to sort out these issues. Our simulations and experiments plus data from others show that Birdsall's theorem is quite robust. We argue that uncertainty can serve as an explanation for violations of Birdsall's linearization by noise and also for reports of stochastic resonance. In addition, we modify present models to better handle detection of signals with both noise and pedestal backgrounds. PMID:19884912

  1. Photoacoustic Signal Formation in Heterogeneous Multilayer Systems with Piezoelectric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaiev, Mykola; Andrusenko, Dmytro; Tytarenko, Alona; Kuzmich, Andrey; Lysenko, Vladimir; Burbelo, Roman

    2014-12-01

    A new efficient model describing photoacoustic (PA) signal formation with piezoelectric detection is reported. Multilayer sandwich-like systems: heterogeneous studied structure—buffer layer—piezoelectric transducers are considered. In these systems, the buffer layer is used for spatial redistribution of thermoelastic force moments generated in the investigated structure. Thus, mechanical properties of this layer play a crucial role to ensure perfect control of the detected voltage formed on a piezoelectric transducer by contribution of different regions of the studied structure. In particular, formation of the voltage signal strongly depends on the point at which the thermoelastic source is applied. Therefore, use of relatively simple linear Green's functions introduced in frames of the Kirchhoff-Love theory is chosen as an efficient approach for the PA signal description. Moreover, excellent agreement between the theoretical model and measured results obtained on a heterogeneous "porous silicon-bulk Si substrate" structure is stated. Furthermore, resolving of the inverse problem with fitting of the experimental curves by the developed model allows reliable evaluation of the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured porous silicon layer.

  2. Signal detection in FDA AERS database using Dirichlet process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Na; Huang, Lan; Tiwari, Ram C

    2015-08-30

    In the recent two decades, data mining methods for signal detection have been developed for drug safety surveillance, using large post-market safety data. Several of these methods assume that the number of reports for each drug-adverse event combination is a Poisson random variable with mean proportional to the unknown reporting rate of the drug-adverse event pair. Here, a Bayesian method based on the Poisson-Dirichlet process (DP) model is proposed for signal detection from large databases, such as the Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) database. Instead of using a parametric distribution as a common prior for the reporting rates, as is the case with existing Bayesian or empirical Bayesian methods, a nonparametric prior, namely, the DP, is used. The precision parameter and the baseline distribution of the DP, which characterize the process, are modeled hierarchically. The performance of the Poisson-DP model is compared with some other models, through an intensive simulation study using a Bayesian model selection and frequentist performance characteristics such as type-I error, false discovery rate, sensitivity, and power. For illustration, the proposed model and its extension to address a large amount of zero counts are used to analyze statin drugs for signals using the 2006-2011 AERS data. PMID:25924820

  3. A dual-detector optical receiver for PDM signals detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanyu; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-05-01

    We propose and fabricate a silicon based dual-detector optical receiver, which consists of a two dimensional (2D) grating coupler (GC) and two separate germanium photodetectors (Ge PDs). The 2D GC performs polarization diversity, and thus demultiplexing and detection for polarization division multiplexed (PDM) signals can be achieved. Through a specific design with double-sides illumination, the space charge density can be reduced and the responsivity and saturation power can be improved significantly. The measured dark current, responsivity and bandwidth are 0.86 μA, 1.06 A/W and 36 GHz under 3 V reverse biased voltage, respectively. Both DC currents and eye diagrams are measured for the proposed device and the results validate its performance successfully. The power penalty between the single and dual polarized signals is about 1.9 dB under 10 and 20 Gb/s cases for both the two Ge PDs. The proposed direct detection (DD) for PDM signals with high speed, high responsivity and large saturation power is cost-effective and promising for short reach optical communication.

  4. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  5. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP 'smoking gun'. If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of {approx}2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  6. A dual-detector optical receiver for PDM signals detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyu; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    We propose and fabricate a silicon based dual-detector optical receiver, which consists of a two dimensional (2D) grating coupler (GC) and two separate germanium photodetectors (Ge PDs). The 2D GC performs polarization diversity, and thus demultiplexing and detection for polarization division multiplexed (PDM) signals can be achieved. Through a specific design with double-sides illumination, the space charge density can be reduced and the responsivity and saturation power can be improved significantly. The measured dark current, responsivity and bandwidth are 0.86 μA, 1.06 A/W and 36 GHz under 3 V reverse biased voltage, respectively. Both DC currents and eye diagrams are measured for the proposed device and the results validate its performance successfully. The power penalty between the single and dual polarized signals is about 1.9 dB under 10 and 20 Gb/s cases for both the two Ge PDs. The proposed direct detection (DD) for PDM signals with high speed, high responsivity and large saturation power is cost-effective and promising for short reach optical communication. PMID:27198501

  7. A dual-detector optical receiver for PDM signals detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanyu; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    We propose and fabricate a silicon based dual-detector optical receiver, which consists of a two dimensional (2D) grating coupler (GC) and two separate germanium photodetectors (Ge PDs). The 2D GC performs polarization diversity, and thus demultiplexing and detection for polarization division multiplexed (PDM) signals can be achieved. Through a specific design with double-sides illumination, the space charge density can be reduced and the responsivity and saturation power can be improved significantly. The measured dark current, responsivity and bandwidth are 0.86 μA, 1.06 A/W and 36 GHz under 3 V reverse biased voltage, respectively. Both DC currents and eye diagrams are measured for the proposed device and the results validate its performance successfully. The power penalty between the single and dual polarized signals is about 1.9 dB under 10 and 20 Gb/s cases for both the two Ge PDs. The proposed direct detection (DD) for PDM signals with high speed, high responsivity and large saturation power is cost-effective and promising for short reach optical communication. PMID:27198501

  8. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model.

    PubMed

    van Dorp Schuitman, Jasper; de Vries, Diemer; Lindau, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various studies show that these physical measures are not able to predict the related perceptual attributes sufficiently well under all circumstances. In particular, it has been shown that physical measures are dependent on the state of occupation, are prone to exaggerated spatial fluctuation, and suffer from lacking discrimination regarding the kind of acoustic stimulus being presented. Accordingly, this paper proposes a method for the derivation of signal-based measures aiming at predicting aspects of room acoustic perception from content specific signal representations produced by a binaural, nonlinear model of the human auditory system. Listening tests were performed to test the proposed auditory parameters for both speech and music. The results look promising; the parameters correlate with their corresponding perceptual attributes in most cases. PMID:23464027

  9. A Signal Detection Theory Approach to Evaluating Oculometer Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara; Lynn, William, III; Barry, John S.; Kelly, Lon; Shih, Ming-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Currently, data quality is described in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy and precision [Holmqvist et al. in press]. While this approach provides precise errors in pixels, or visual angle, often experiments are more concerned with whether subjects'points of gaze can be said to be reliable with respect to experimentally-relevant areas of interest. This paper proposes a method to characterize oculometer data quality using Signal Detection Theory (SDT) [Marcum 1947]. SDT classification results in four cases: Hit (correct report of a signal), Miss (failure to report a ), False Alarm (a signal falsely reported), Correct Reject (absence of a signal correctly reported). A technique is proposed where subjects' are directed to look at points in and outside of an AOI, and the resulting Points of Gaze (POG) are classified as Hits (points known to be internal to an AOI are classified as such), Misses (AOI points are not indicated as such), False Alarms (points external to AOIs are indicated as in the AOI), or Correct Rejects (points external to the AOI are indicated as such). SDT metrics describe performance in terms of discriminability, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper presentation will provide the procedure for conducting this assessment and an example of data collected for AOIs in a simulated flightdeck environment.

  10. An automated approach to detecting signals in electroantennogram data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slone, D.H.; Sullivan, B.T.

    2007-01-01

    Coupled gas chromatography/electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) is a widely used method for identifying insect olfactory stimulants present in mixtures of volatiles, and it can greatly accelerate the identification of insect semiochemicals. In GC-EAD, voltage changes across an insect's antenna are measured while the antenna is exposed to compounds eluting from a gas chromatograph. The antenna thus serves as a selective GC detector whose output can be compared to that of a "general" GC detector, commonly a flame ionization detector. Appropriate interpretation of GC-EAD results requires that olfaction-related voltage changes in the antenna be distinguishable from background noise that arises inevitably from antennal preparations and the GC-EAD-associated hardware. In this paper, we describe and compare mathematical algorithms for discriminating olfaction-generated signals in an EAD trace from background noise. The algorithms amplify signals by recognizing their characteristic shape and wavelength while suppressing unstructured noise. We have found these algorithms to be both powerful and highly discriminatory even when applied to noisy traces where the signals would be difficult to discriminate by eye. This new methodology removes operator bias as a factor in signal identification, can improve realized sensitivity of the EAD system, and reduces the number of runs required to confirm the identity of an olfactory stimulant. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  11. Detection of Gaussian signals in Poisson-modulated interference.

    PubMed

    Streit, R L

    2000-10-01

    Passive broadband detection of target signals by an array of hydrophones in the presence of multiple discrete interferers is analyzed under Gaussian statistics and low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. A nonhomogeneous Poisson-modulated interference process is used to model the ensemble of possible arrival directions of the discrete interferers. Closed-form expressions are derived for the recognition differential of the passive-sonar equation in the presence of Poisson-modulated interference. The interference-compensated recognition differential differs from the classical recognition differential by an additive positive term that depend on the interference-to-noise ratio, the directionality of the Poisson-modulated interference, and the array beam pattern. PMID:11051502

  12. Acoustic Aspects of Photoacoustic Signal Generation and Detection in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper photoacoustic signal generation and detection in gases is investigated and discussed from the standpoint of acoustics. Four topics are considered: the effect of the absorption-desorption process of modulated and pulsed light on the heat power density released in the gas; the generation of the primary sound by the released heat in an unbounded medium; the excitation of an acoustic resonator by the primary sound; and finally, the generation of the measurable PA signal by a microphone. When light is absorbed by a molecule and the excess energy is relaxed by collisions with the surrounding molecules, the average kinetic energy, thus also the temperature of an ensemble of molecules (called "particle" in acoustics) will increase. In other words heat energy is added to the energy of the particle. The rate of the energy transfer is characterized by the heat power density. A simple two-level model of absorption-desorption is applied for describing the heat power generation process for modulated and pulsed illumination. Sound generation by a laser beam in an unbounded medium is discussed by means of the Green's function technique. It is shown that the duration of the generated sound pulse depends mostly on beam geometry. A photoacoustic signal is mostly detected in a photoacoustic cell composed of acoustic resonators, buffers, filters, etc. It is not easy to interpret the measured PA signal in such a complicated acoustic system. The acoustic response of a PA detector to different kinds of excitations (modulated cw, pulsed, periodic pulse train) is discussed. It is shown that acoustic resonators respond very differently to modulated cw excitation and to excitation by a pulse train. The microphone for detecting the PA signal is also a part of the acoustic system; its properties have to be taken into account by the design of a PA detector. The moving membrane of the microphone absorbs acoustic energy; thus, it may influence the resonance frequency and

  13. Transduction of nanovolt signals: Limits of electric-field detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmijn, J.

    1989-11-01

    Life scientists discussed the extreme electrical sensitivity of marine sharks, skates, and rays. After reviewing the results of earlier studies on the electric sense at the animal and system levels, the participants discussed the basic process of signal transduction in terms of voltage-sensitive ionic channels. Struck by the small charge displacements needed for excitation, they strongly recommended that sensory biologists, physiologists, and biophysicists join in a concerted effort to initiate new research on the ionic mechanisms of electric field detection. To obtain detailed information on the electroreceptive membrane and its ionic channels, high resolution recording techniques will be mandatory.

  14. Model-Based Signal Processing: Correlation Detection With Synthetic Seismograms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Harris, D; Pasyanos, M; Blair, S; Matt, R

    2006-08-30

    Recent applications of correlation methods to seismological problems illustrate the power of coherent signal processing applied to seismic waveforms. Examples of these applications include detection of low amplitude signals buried in ambient noise and cross-correlation of sets of waveforms to form event clusters and accurately measure delay times for event relocation and/or earth structure. These methods rely on the exploitation of the similarity of individual waveforms and have been successfully applied to large sets of empirical observations. However, in cases with little or no empirical event data, such as aseismic regions or exotic event types, correlation methods with observed seismograms will not be possible due to the lack of previously observed similar waveforms. This study uses model-based signals computed for three-dimensional (3D) Earth models to form the basis for correlation detection. Synthetic seismograms are computed for fully 3D models estimated from the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) method. MCMC uses stochastic sampling to fit multiple seismological data sets. Rather than estimate a single ''optimal'' model, MCMC results in a suite of models that sample the model space and incorporates uncertainty through variability of the models. The variability reflects our ignorance of Earth structure, due to limited resolution, data and modeling errors, and produces variability in the seismic waveform response. Model-based signals are combined using a subspace method where the synthetic signals are decomposed into an orthogonal basis by singular-value decomposition (SVD) and the observed waveforms are represented with a linear combination of a sub-set of eigenvectors (signals) associated with the most significant eigenvalues. We have demonstrated the method by modeling long-period (80-10 seconds) regional seismograms for a moderate (M{approx}5) earthquake near the China-North Korea border. Synthetic seismograms are computed with the Spectral Element Method

  15. Signal detection methods for measurement of utility in animals1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Anthony A.; Nevin, John A.

    1974-01-01

    Analytic methods of signal detection theory were employed to assess the utility of reinforcers. Four pigeons were trained to detect the presence or absence of a stimulus by pecking one of two side keys in a trial-by-trial choice paradigm. The relative rate of positive reinforcement for correct choices was varied to offset the biasing effects of electric shock for incorrect right side-key choices. The effects of relative rate of reinforcement on bias were similar at all shock intensities even though the subjects' sensitivity changed during the course of the experiment. The relative rate of reinforcement required to produce equal bias was calculated and plotted against shock intensity to generate utility functions. The relative rate of reinforcement necessary to offset the bias induced by shock was an increasing function of shock intensity. PMID:16811750

  16. Entropy in DNA Double-Strand Break, Detection and Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Schindler, Christina; Heermann, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    In biology, the term entropy is often understood as a measure of disorder - a restrictive interpretation that can even be misleading. Recently it has become clearer and clearer that entropy, contrary to conventional wisdom, can help to order and guide biological processes in living cells. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most dangerous lesions and efficient damage detection and repair is essential for organism viability. However, what remains unknown is the precise mechanism of targeting the site of damage within billions of intact nucleotides and a crowded nuclear environment, a process which is often referred to as recruitment or signaling. Here we show that the change in entropy associated with inflicting a DSB facilitates the recruitment of damage sensor proteins. By means of computational modeling we found that higher mobility and local chromatin structure accelerate protein association at DSB ends. We compared the effect of different chromatin architectures on protein dynamics and concentrations in the vicinity of DSBs, and related these results to experiments on repair in heterochromatin. Our results demonstrate how entropy contributes to a more efficient damage detection. We identify entropy as the physical basis for DNA double-strand break signaling.

  17. Signal detection with criterion noise: Applications to recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Diaz, Michael; Wee, Serena

    2010-01-01

    A tacit but fundamental assumption of the Theory of Signal Detection (TSD) is that criterion placement is a noise-free process. This paper challenges that assumption on theoretical and empirical grounds and presents the Noisy Decision Theory of Signal Detection (ND-TSD). Generalized equations for the isosensitivity function and for measures of discrimination that incorporate criterion variability are derived, and the model's relationship with extant models of decision-making in discrimination tasks is examined. An experiment that evaluates recognition memory for ensembles of word stimuli reveals that criterion noise is not trivial in magnitude and contributes substantially to variance in the slope of the isosensitivity function. We discuss how ND-TSD can help explain a number of current and historical puzzles in recognition memory, including the inconsistent relationship between manipulations of learning and the slope of the isosensitivity function, the lack of invariance of the slope with manipulations of bias or payoffs, the effects of aging on the decision-making process in recognition, and the nature of responding in Remember/Know decision tasks. ND-TSD poses novel and theoretically meaningful constraints on theories of recognition and decision-making more generally, and provides a mechanism for rapprochement between theories of decision-making that employ deterministic response rules and those that postulate probabilistic response rules. PMID:19159149

  18. Wavelet neural network for detection of signals in communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Sanchez, Raquel; Andina, Diego

    1998-03-01

    Our objective is the design and simulation of an efficient system for detection of signals in communications in terms of speed and computational complexity. The proposed scheme takes advantage of two powerful frameworks in signal processing: wavelets and neural networks. The decision system will take a decision based on the computation of the a prior probabilities of the input signal. For the estimation of such probability density functions, a wavelet neural network has been chosen. The election has risen under the following considerations: (a) neural networks have been established as a general approximation tool for fitting nonlinear models from input/output data and (b) the increasing popularity of the wavelet decomposition as a powerful tool for approximation. The integration of the above factors leads to the wavelet neural network concept. This network preserves the universal approximation property of wavelet series, with the advantage of the speed and efficient computation of a neural network architecture. The topology and learning algorithm of the network will provide an efficient approximation to the required probability density functions.

  19. Correntropy measures to detect daytime sleepiness from EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Melia, Umberto; Guaita, Marc; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Montserrat, Josep M; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Gaig, Carles; Caminal, Pere; Santamaria, Joan

    2014-10-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders and has a great impact on patients' lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on correntropy function analysis of EEG signals was proposed in order to detect patients suffering from EDS. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five Maintenance of Wakefulness Tests (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) alternated throughout the day for patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing (SDB). A group of 20 patients with EDS was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60 s EEG windows in a waking state. Measures obtained from the cross-correntropy function (CCORR) and auto-correntropy function (ACORR) were calculated in the EEG frequency bands: δ, 0.1-4 Hz; θ, 4-8 Hz; α, 8-12 Hz; β, 12-30 Hz; total band TB, 0.1-45 Hz. These functions permitted the quantification of complex signal properties and the non-linear couplings between different areas of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were mainly found in the β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). The WDS group presented more complexity in the occipital zone than the EDS group, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between the occipital and frontal regions was detected in EDS patients than in the WDS group. At best, ACORR and CCORR measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and the area under ROC curve (AUC) was above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients. These performances represent an improvement with respect to classical EEG indices applied in the same database (sensitivity and specificity were never above 80% and AUC was under 0.75). PMID:25237837

  20. Infrasonic detection performance in presence of nuisance signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbit, Maurice; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Che, Il-young; Le Pichon, Alexis; Nouvellet, Adrien; Park, Junghyun; Roueff, Francois

    2014-05-01

    The infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) consists of sixty stations deployed all over the World by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The IMS has been designed to reliably detect, at least by two stations, an explosion greater than 1 kiloton located anywhere on the Earth [1]. Each station is an array of at least four microbarometers with an aperture of 1 to 3 km. The first important issue is to detect the presence of the signal of interest (SOI) embedded in noise. The detector is commonly based on the property that the SOI provides coherent observations on the sensors but not the noise. The statistic of test, called F-stat [2], [5], [6] , calculated in a time cell a few seconds, is commonly used for this purpose. In this paper, we assume that a coherent source is permanently present arriving from an unknown direction of arrivals (DOA). The typical case is the presence of microbaroms or the presence of wind. This source is seen as a nuisance signal (NS). In [4], [3] authors assume that a time cell without the SOI (CH0) is available, whereas a following time cell is considered as the cell under test (CUT). Therefore the DOA and the SNR of the NS can be estimated. If the signal-to-noise ration SNR of the NS is large enough, the distribution of the F-stat under the absence of SOI is known to be a non central Fisher. It follows that the threshold can be performed from a given value of the FAR. The major drawback to keep the NS is that the NS could hide the SOI, this phenomena is similar to the leakage which is a well-known phenomena in the Fourier analysis. An other approach consists to use the DOA estimate of the NS to mitigate the NS by spatial notch filter in the frequency domain. On this approach a new algorithm is provided. To illustrate, numerical results on synthetical and real data are presented, in term of Receiver Operating Characteristic ROC curves. REFERENCES [1] Christie D.R. and Campus P., The IMS

  1. Diffraction tomographic signal processing algorithms for tunnel detection

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.

    1993-08-01

    Signal processing algorithms have been developed for wave based imaging using diffraction tomography. The basis for this image reconstruction procedure is the generalized projection slice theorem (GPST) which, for homogeneous waves, is an analytic relationship between the spatial Fourier transform of the acquired data and the spatial Fourier transform of the spatial profile (object function) of the object being imaged. Imaging within geophysical diffraction tomography when only homogeneous waves are considered can then be accomplished by inversion of the GPST using standard numerical techniques. In an attenuating background medium or when eddy currents or static fields are considered, a generalized GPST can be derived that involves both real and complex spatial frequencies. In this case, direct Fourier inversion is not possible because of the presence of the complex frequencies. Although direct inversion and, hence, complete imaging is not possible for such cases, the generalized CPST`S can be used to analytically shift the location of data templates matched to specified targets and these templates can, in turn, be correlated with acquired data to detect and estimate the location of the specified targets. Since GPST`s are used directly in the detection problem, there is no need to numerically invert the intergal transform of the object function. For this reason, target detection can be accomplished in a computationally efficient manner independent of the type of measurement or background geologic conditions. A number of GPST`s are derived and the use of GPST`s for both imaging and detection of subsurface voids is demonstrated in several recent applications.

  2. Marginalized Particle Filter for Blind Signal Detection with Analog Imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yuki; Hayashi, Kazunori; Sakai, Hideaki; Bocquet, Wladimir

    Recently, the marginalized particle filter (MPF) has been applied to blind symbol detection problems over selective fading channels. The MPF can ease the computational burden of the standard particle filter (PF) while offering better estimates compared with the standard PF. In this paper, we investigate the application of the blind MPF detector to more realistic situations where the systems suffer from analog imperfections which are non-linear signal distortion due to the inaccurate analog circuits in wireless devices. By reformulating the system model using the widely linear representation and employing the auxiliary variable resampling (AVR) technique for estimation of the imperfections, the blind MPF detector is successfully modified to cope with the analog imperfections. The effectiveness of the proposed MPF detector is demonstrated via computer simulations.

  3. Reinforcer control and human signal-detection performance.

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, V; Alsop, B

    2000-01-01

    Eight humans participated in a two-choice signal-detection task in which stimulus disparity was varied over four levels. Two procedures arranged asymmetrical numbers of reinforcers received for correct left- and right-key responses (the reinforcer ratio). The controlled procedure ensured that the obtained reinforcer ratio remained constant over changes in stimulus disparity, irrespective of subjects' performances. In the uncontrolled procedure, the asymmetrical reinforcer ratio could covary with subjects' performances. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) patterns obtained from the controlled procedure approximated isobias functions predicted by criterion location measures of bias. The uncontrolled procedure produced variable ROC patterns that were somewhat like the isobias predictions made by likelihood ratio measures of bias; however, the obtained reinforcer ratio became more extreme as discriminability decreased. The obtained pattern of bias was directly related to the obtained reinforcer ratio. This research indicates that criterion location measures seem to be preferable indices of response bias. PMID:10866352

  4. Origin of electrical signals for plasma etching endpoint detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolewski, Mark A.

    2011-11-14

    Electrical signals are used for endpoint detection in plasma etching, but the origin of the electrical changes observed at endpoint is not known. They may be caused by changes in the gas-phase densities of etch products and reactants or by changes in substrate surface properties such as photoemitted or ion-induced electron yield. To investigate these effects, experiments were performed in an inductively coupled, rf-biased reactor, during CF{sub 4}/Ar etches of SiO{sub 2} films on Si wafers. The rf bias impedance was measured vs. time during etching, simultaneous with Langmuir probe measurements. At endpoint, a decrease in impedance coincided with increases in ion current and electron energy. The data, analyzed by a numerical model of the discharge, indicate that changes in electron emission yield were relatively insignificant or entirely absent. Thus the impedance change is not a surface effect but is, instead, predominantly or entirely a gas-phase phenomenon.

  5. Decision Processes in Discrimination: Fundamental Misrepresentations of Signal Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    In the first part of this article, I describe a new approach to studying decision making in discrimination tasks that does not depend on the technical assumptions of signal detection theory (e.g., normality of the encoding distributions). Applying these new distribution-free tests to data from three experiments, I show that base rate and payoff manipulations had substantial effects on the participants' encoding distributions but no effect on their decision rules, which were uniformly unbiased in equal and unequal base rate conditions and in symmetric and asymmetric payoff conditions. In the second part of the article, I show that this seemingly paradoxical result is readily explained by the sequential sampling models of discrimination. I then propose a new, "model-free" test for response bias that seems to more properly identify both the nature and direction of the biases induced by the classical bias manipulations.

  6. Signal-detection properties of verbal self-reports.

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, T S

    1993-01-01

    The bias (B'H) and discriminability (A') of college students' self-reports about choices made in a delayed identity matching-to-sample task were studied as a function of characteristics of the response about which they reported. Each matching-to-sample trial consisted of two, three, or four simultaneously presented sample stimuli, a 1-s retention interval, and two, three, or four comparison stimuli. One sample stimulus was always reproduced among the comparisons, and choice of the matching comparison in less than 800 ms produced points worth chances in a drawing for money. After each choice, subjects pressed either a "yes" or a "no" button to answer a computer-generated query about whether the choice met the point contingency. The number of sample and comparison stimuli was manipulated across experimental conditions. Rates of successful matching-to-sample choices were negatively correlated with the number of matching-to-sample stimuli, regardless of whether samples or comparisons were manipulated. As in previous studies, subjects exhibited a pronounced bias for reporting successful responses. Self-report bias tended to become less pronounced as matching-to-sample success became less frequent, an outcome consistent with signal-frequency effects in psychophysical research. The bias was also resistant to change, suggesting influences other than signal frequency that remain to be identified. Self-report discriminability tended to decrease with the number of sample stimuli and increase with the number of comparison stimuli, an effect not attributable to differential effects of the two manipulations on matching-to-sample performance. Overall, bias and discriminability indices revealed effects that were not evident in self-report accuracy scores. The results indicate that analyses based on signal-detection theory can improve the description of correspondence between self-reports and their referents and thus contribute to the identification of environmental sources of

  7. Detection of signals by weighted integrate-and-dump filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, R.

    1987-01-01

    A Weighted Integrate and Dump Filter (WIDF) is presented that results in reducing those losses in telemetry symbol signal to noise ratio (SNR) which occur in digital Integrate and Dump Filters (IDFs) when the samples are not phase locked to the input data symbol clock. The Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE) criterion is used to derive a set of weights for approximating the analog integrate and dump filter, which is the matched filter for detection of signals in additive white Gaussian noise. This new digital matched filter results in considerable performance improvement compared to unweighted digital matched filters. An example is presented for a sampling rate of four times the symbol rate. As the sampling offset (or phase) varies with respect to the data symbol boundaries, the output SNR varies 1 dB for an unweighted IDF, but only 0.3 dB for the optimum WIDF, averaged over random data patterns. This improvement in performance relative to unweighted IDF means that significantly lower sampling and processing rates can be used for given telemetry symbol rates, resulting in reduced system cost.

  8. Technique for detecting a direct signal pulse from an underwater explosive source in a waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenko, K. V.; Kryukov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    A technique for detecting direct signal pulses based on steep rising edges of acoustic pressure is developed. The technique consists in calculating the mirror derivative of the received signal and normalizing it in a specific manner. This makes it possible to amplify weak direct signals and suppress strong reflected ones. A key feature of this technique is that it ensures a high probability of detection of direct signal pulses while keeping the number of false detections at a minimum.

  9. PDM-16QAM vector signal generation and detection based on intensity modulation and direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel and simple method to generate and detect high speed polarization-division-multiplexing 16-ary quadrature-amplitude-modulation (PDM-16QAM) vector signal enabled by Mach-Zehnder modulator-based (MZM-based) optical-carrier-suppression (OCS) intensity modulation and direct detection. Due to the adoption of OCS intensity modulation, carrier beating can be avoided at the receiver, and thus polarization de-multiplexing can be implemented by digital-signal-processing-based (DSP-based) cascaded multi-modulus algorithm (CMMA) equalization instead of a polarization tracking system. The change of both amplitude and phase information due to the adoption of OCS modulation can be equalized by DSP-based amplitude and phase precoding at the transmitter. Up to 64-Gb/s PDM-16QAM vector signal is generated and detected after 2-km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28) or 20-km large-effective-area fiber (LEAF) transmission with a bit-error-ratio (BER) less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  10. Low-Frequency Envelope Sensitivity Produces Asymmetric Binaural Tuning Curves

    PubMed Central

    Agapiou, John P.; McAlpine, David

    2008-01-01

    Neurons in the auditory midbrain are sensitive to differences in the timing of sounds at the two ears—an important sound localization cue. We used broadband noise stimuli to investigate the interaural-delay sensitivity of low-frequency neurons in two midbrain nuclei: the inferior colliculus (IC) and the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. Noise-delay functions showed asymmetries not predicted from a linear dependence on interaural correlation: a stretching along the firing-rate dimension (rate asymmetry), and a skewing along the interaural-delay dimension (delay asymmetry). These asymmetries were produced by an envelope-sensitive component to the response that could not entirely be accounted for by monaural or binaural nonlinearities, instead indicating an enhancement of envelope sensitivity at or after the level of the superior olivary complex. In IC, the skew-like asymmetry was consistent with intermediate-type responses produced by the convergence of ipsilateral peak-type inputs and contralateral trough-type inputs. This suggests a stereotyped pattern of input to the IC. In the course of this analysis, we were also able to determine the contribution of time and phase components to neurons' internal delays. These findings have important consequences for the neural representation of interaural timing differences and interaural correlation—cues critical to the perception of acoustic space. PMID:18753329

  11. Binaural masking level differences in actual and simulated bilateral cochlear implant listeners

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Litovsky, Ruth; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2010-01-01

    At present commercially available bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) improve their users’ speech understanding in noise but they employ two independent speech processors that cannot provide accurate and appropriate interaural level and time differences as seen binaurally in normal hearing (NH) listeners. Previous work suggests that binaural cues are accessible to bilateral CI users when presented to single pairs of pitch-matched electrodes, but the scope was limited and the mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, binaural masking level differences (BMLDs) were measured in five bilateral Nucleus-24 CI users over multiple pairs of pitch-matched electrodes. Average BMLD was 4.6±4.9 dB, but large individual variability prevented significance (p=0.09). Considering just the 125 Hz condition, as in previous work, phase (N0S0 vs N0Sπ) and electrode effects were significant. Compared with simulated bilateral CI users, actual bilateral CI users had proportionally higher thresholds for N0Sπ than N0S0. Together the present results suggest that the performance gap in BMLDs between CI and NH listeners is not due to a lack of sufficient acoustic cues in the temporal envelope domain but to a true binaural deficit related to a central mechanism in deprived binaural processing. PMID:20329848

  12. An evaluation of the performance of two binaural beamformers in complex and dynamic multitalker environments

    PubMed Central

    Best, Virginia; Mejia, Jorge; Freeston, Katrina; van Hoesel, Richard J.; Dillon, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Objective Binaural beamformers are super-directional hearing aids created by combining microphone outputs from each side of the head. While they offer substantial improvements in SNR over conventional directional hearing aids, the benefits (and possible limitations) of these devices in realistic, complex listening situations have not yet been fully explored. In this study we evaluated the performance of two experimental binaural beamformers. Design Testing was carried out using a horizontal loudspeaker array. Background noise was created using recorded conversations. Performance measures included speech intelligibility, localisation in noise, acceptable noise level, subjective ratings, and a novel dynamic speech intelligibility measure. Study sample Participants were 27 listeners with bilateral hearing loss, fitted with BTE prototypes that could be switched between conventional directional or binaural beamformer microphone modes. Results Relative to the conventional directional microphones, both binaural beamformer modes were generally superior for tasks involving fixed frontal targets, but not always for situations involving dynamic target locations. Conclusions Binaural beamformers show promise for enhancing listening in complex situations when the location of the source of interest is predictable. PMID:26140298

  13. Modeling the effects of a single reflection on binaural speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Rennies, Jan; Warzybok, Anna; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger

    2014-03-01

    Recently the influence of delay and azimuth of a single speech reflection on speech reception thresholds (SRTs) was systematically investigated using frontal, diffuse, and lateral noise [Warzybok et al. (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 269-282]. The experiments showed that the benefit of an early reflection was independent of its azimuth and mostly independent of noise type, but that the detrimental effect of a late reflection depended on its direction relative to the noise. This study tests if different extensions of a binaural speech intelligibility model can predict these data. The extensions differ in the order in which binaural processing and temporal integration of early reflections take place. Models employing a correction for the detrimental effects of reverberation on speech intelligibility after performing the binaural processing predict SRTs in symmetric masking conditions (frontal, diffuse), but cannot predict the measured interaction of temporal and spatial integration. In contrast, a model extension accounting for the distinction between useful and detrimental reflections before the binaural processing stage predicts the data with an overall R(2) of 0.95. This indicates that any model framework predicting speech intelligibility in rooms should incorporate an interaction between binaural and temporal integration of reflections at a comparatively early stage. PMID:24606290

  14. Simple signal-to-signal beat interference cancellation receiver based on balanced detection for a single-sideband optical OFDM signal with a reduced guard band.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianxin

    2013-11-01

    A simple signal-to-signal beat interference cancellation receiver based on balanced detection (ICRBD) with an interleaver, a 2×2 three-decibel optical coupler, and a balanced photodiode pair is proposed for a single-sideband optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (SSB-OOFDM) signal with a reduced guard band (GB). Simulation demonstration of the ICRBD for a 40 Gbit/s 16-QAM SSB-OOFDM signal with a reduced GB was achieved successfully. PMID:24177087

  15. An image sensor capable of detecting nano-ampere transient signals with strong background illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.D.; Dixon, D.A.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    A readout detector integrated circuit (IC) has been developed which is capable of detecting nano-ampere photo-current signals of interest in a high (micro-ampere) background illumination or DC noise level (SNR=92dB). The readout detector sensor IC processes transient signals of interest from a separate photodiode array chip. Low noise signal conditioning, filtering, and signal thresholding implement smart sensor detection of only ``active pixels.`` This detector circuit can also be used to perform signal conditioning for other sensor applications that require detection of very small signals in a high background noise environment.

  16. Acoustic emission signal classification for gearbox failure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishino, Jun

    The purpose of this research is to develop a methodology and technique to determine the optimal number of clusters in acoustic emission (AE) data obtained from a ground test stand of a rotating H-60 helicopter tail gearbox by using mathematical algorithms and visual inspection. Signs of fatigue crack growth were observed from the AE signals acquired from the result of the optimal number of clusters in a data set. Previous researches have determined the number of clusters by visually inspecting the AE plots from number of iterations. This research is focused on finding the optimal number of clusters in the data set by using mathematical algorithms then using visual verification to confirm it. The AE data were acquired from the ground test stand that simulates the tail end of an H-60 Seahawk at Naval Air Station in Patuxant River, Maryland. The data acquired were filtered to eliminate durations that were greater than 100,000 is and 0 energy hit data to investigate the failure mechanisms occurring on the output bevel gear. From the filtered data, different AE signal parameters were chosen to perform iterations to see which clustering algorithms and number of outputs is the best. The clustering algorithms utilized are the Kohonen Self-organizing Map (SOM), k-mean and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). From the clustering iterations, the three cluster criterion algorithms were performed to observe the suggested optimal number of cluster by the criterions. The three criterion algorithms utilized are the Davies-Bouldin, Silhouette and Tou Criterions. After the criterions had suggested the optimal number of cluster for each data set, visual verification by observing the AE plots and statistical analysis of each cluster were performed. By observing the AE plots and the statistical analysis, the optimal number of cluster in the data set and effective clustering algorithms were determined. Along with the optimal number of clusters and effective clustering algorithm, the mechanisms

  17. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOEpatents

    Synovec, Robert E.; Yueng, Edward S.

    1989-10-17

    A method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal.

  18. Eliminating the Attentional Blink through Binaural Beats: A Case for Tailored Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Reedijk, Susan A.; Bolders, Anne; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing human cognitive performance is a topic that continues to spark scientific interest. Studies into cognitive-enhancement techniques often fail to take inter-individual differences into account, however, which leads to underestimation of the effectiveness of these techniques. The current study investigated the effect of binaural beats, a cognitive-enhancement technique, on attentional control in an attentional blink (AB) task. As predicted from a neurocognitive approach to cognitive control, high-frequency binaural beats eliminated the AB, but only in individuals with low spontaneous eye-blink rates (indicating low striatal dopamine levels). This suggests that the way in which cognitive-enhancement techniques, such as binaural beats, affect cognitive performance depends on inter-individual differences. PMID:26089802

  19. Detection of Gravity Waves and Infrasound Signals at the USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hedlin, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The USArray Transportable Array (TA) is a 400-station network that has been deployed in the continental United States since 2004. The network, which at its height spanned 2,000,000 km2, has gradually moved east across the country via station re-deployments. Although originally conceived as a seismic-only network, a suite of atmospheric pressure sensors added to each station starting in early 2010 allows for enhanced observations of pressure variations at the Earth's surface associated with infrasound and other atmospheric phenomena. We present novel techniques that make use of the close spacing of stations within the TA to detect and track the progress of pressure disturbances across the network. The method has been applied to the detection of both atmospheric gravity waves having periods from 40 minutes to 8 hours, and 1-3 Hz infrasound energy generated by meteoroids. The TA is sufficiently dense that gravity waves with wavelengths from tens to hundreds of kilometers are coherent between neighboring stations, but is too large for coherence across the entire network. To examine the characteristics of gravity waves propagating across the network, the TA is divided into a large number of elemental, triangular, sub-arrays consisting of three neighboring stations. Coherent analysis of the data at each triad provides a robust estimate of the signal's direction and speed. The results from all triads are combined to follow the progress of a gravity wave as it propagates across the TA. This method allows for observation of fine-scale variations in the speed, direction and amplitude of long period signals across the TA, as well as the statistics of these waves. The method has been applied to TA data collected over the eastern half of the continental United States over a 5-year timespan beginning on January 1, 2010. The network has detected particularly large and long-lived gravity waves such as from a tornadic storm system in the American south in April, 2011. In addition

  20. Rapid shape detection signals in area V4

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Katherine F.; Ghose, Geoffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Vision in foveate animals is an active process that requires rapid and constant decision-making. For example, when a new object appears in the visual field, we can quickly decide to inspect it by directing our eyes to the object's location. We studied the contribution of primate area V4 to these types of rapid foveation decisions. Animals performed a reaction time task that required them to report when any shape appeared within a peripherally-located noisy stimulus by making a saccade to the stimulus location. We found that about half of the randomly sampled V4 neurons not only rapidly and precisely represented the appearance of this shape, but they were also predictive of the animal's saccades. A neuron's ability to predict the animal's saccades was not related to the specificity with which the cell represented a single type of shape but rather to its ability to signal whether any shape was present. This relationship between sensory sensitivity and behavioral predictiveness was not due to global effects such as alertness, as it was equally likely to be observed for cells with increases and decreases in firing rate. Careful analysis of the timescales of reliability in these neurons implies that they reflect both feedforward and feedback shape detecting processes. In approximately 7% of our recorded sample, individual neurons were able to predict both the delay and precision of the animal's shape detection performance. This suggests that a subset of V4 neurons may have been directly and causally contributing to task performance and that area V4 likely plays a critical role in guiding rapid, form-based foveation decisions. PMID:25278828

  1. Evaluating Classifiers to Detect Arm Movement Intention from EEG Signals

    PubMed Central

    Planelles, Daniel; Hortal, Enrique; Costa, Álvaro; Úbeda, Andrés; Iáñez, Eduardo; Azorín, José M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to detect the intention to make a reaching movement with the arm in healthy subjects before the movement actually starts. This is done by measuring brain activity through electroencephalographic (EEG) signals that are registered by electrodes placed over the scalp. The preparation and performance of an arm movement generate a phenomenon called event-related desynchronization (ERD) in the mu and beta frequency bands. A novel methodology to characterize this cognitive process based on three sums of power spectral frequencies involved in ERD is presented. The main objective of this paper is to set the benchmark for classifiers and to choose the most convenient. The best results are obtained using an SVM classifier with around 72% accuracy. This classifier will be used in further research to generate the control commands to move a robotic exoskeleton that helps people suffering from motor disabilities to perform the movement. The final aim is that this brain-controlled robotic exoskeleton improves the current rehabilitation processes of disabled people. PMID:25268915

  2. Automatic detection of atrial fibrillation in cardiac vibration signals.

    PubMed

    Brueser, C; Diesel, J; Zink, M D H; Winter, S; Schauerte, P; Leonhardt, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a study on the feasibility of the automatic detection of atrial fibrillation (AF) from cardiac vibration signals (ballistocardiograms/BCGs) recorded by unobtrusive bedmounted sensors. The proposed system is intended as a screening and monitoring tool in home-healthcare applications and not as a replacement for ECG-based methods used in clinical environments. Based on BCG data recorded in a study with 10 AF patients, we evaluate and rank seven popular machine learning algorithms (naive Bayes, linear and quadratic discriminant analysis, support vector machines, random forests as well as bagged and boosted trees) for their performance in separating 30 s long BCG epochs into one of three classes: sinus rhythm, atrial fibrillation, and artifact. For each algorithm, feature subsets of a set of statistical time-frequency-domain and time-domain features were selected based on the mutual information between features and class labels as well as first- and second-order interactions among features. The classifiers were evaluated on a set of 856 epochs by means of 10-fold cross-validation. The best algorithm (random forests) achieved a Matthews correlation coefficient, mean sensitivity, and mean specificity of 0.921, 0.938, and 0.982, respectively. PMID:23086532

  3. Binaural advantages in users of bimodal and bilateral cochlear implant devices

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Pak, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates to what extent users of bilateral and bimodal fittings should expect to benefit from all three different binaural advantages found to be present in normal-hearing listeners. Head-shadow and binaural squelch are advantages occurring under spatially separated speech and noise, while summation emerges when speech and noise coincide in space. For 14 bilateral or bimodal listeners, speech reception thresholds in the presence of four-talker babble were measured in sound-field under various speech and noise configurations. Statistical analysis revealed significant advantages of head-shadow and summation for both bilateral and bimodal listeners. Squelch was significant only for bimodal listeners. PMID:24437856

  4. Binaural Diplacusis and Its Relationship with Hearing-Threshold Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Colin, David; Micheyl, Christophe; Girod, Anneline; Truy, Eric; Gallégo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Binaural pitch diplacusis refers to a perceptual anomaly whereby the same sound is perceived as having a different pitch depending on whether it is presented in the left or the right ear. Results in the literature suggest that this phenomenon is more prevalent, and larger, in individuals with asymmetric hearing loss than in individuals with symmetric hearing. However, because studies devoted to this effect have thus far involved small samples, the prevalence of the effect, and its relationship with interaural asymmetries in hearing thresholds, remain unclear. In this study, psychometric functions for interaural pitch comparisons were measured in 55 subjects, including 12 normal-hearing and 43 hearing-impaired participants. Statistically significant pitch differences between the left and right ears were observed in normal-hearing participants, but the effect was usually small (less than 1.5/16 octave, or about 7%). For the hearing-impaired participants, statistically significant interaural pitch differences were found in about three-quarters of the cases. Moreover, for about half of these participants, the difference exceeded 1.5/16 octaves and, in some participants, was as large as or larger than 1/4 octave. This was the case even for the lowest frequency tested, 500 Hz. The pitch differences were weakly, but significantly, correlated with the difference in hearing thresholds between the two ears, such that larger threshold asymmetries were statistically associated with larger pitch differences. For the vast majority of the hearing-impaired participants, the direction of the pitch differences was such that pitch was perceived as higher on the side with the higher (i.e., ‘worse’) hearing thresholds than on the opposite side. These findings are difficult to reconcile with purely temporal models of pitch perception, but may be accounted for by place-based or spectrotemporal models. PMID:27536884

  5. Binaural Diplacusis and Its Relationship with Hearing-Threshold Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Colin, David; Micheyl, Christophe; Girod, Anneline; Truy, Eric; Gallégo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Binaural pitch diplacusis refers to a perceptual anomaly whereby the same sound is perceived as having a different pitch depending on whether it is presented in the left or the right ear. Results in the literature suggest that this phenomenon is more prevalent, and larger, in individuals with asymmetric hearing loss than in individuals with symmetric hearing. However, because studies devoted to this effect have thus far involved small samples, the prevalence of the effect, and its relationship with interaural asymmetries in hearing thresholds, remain unclear. In this study, psychometric functions for interaural pitch comparisons were measured in 55 subjects, including 12 normal-hearing and 43 hearing-impaired participants. Statistically significant pitch differences between the left and right ears were observed in normal-hearing participants, but the effect was usually small (less than 1.5/16 octave, or about 7%). For the hearing-impaired participants, statistically significant interaural pitch differences were found in about three-quarters of the cases. Moreover, for about half of these participants, the difference exceeded 1.5/16 octaves and, in some participants, was as large as or larger than 1/4 octave. This was the case even for the lowest frequency tested, 500 Hz. The pitch differences were weakly, but significantly, correlated with the difference in hearing thresholds between the two ears, such that larger threshold asymmetries were statistically associated with larger pitch differences. For the vast majority of the hearing-impaired participants, the direction of the pitch differences was such that pitch was perceived as higher on the side with the higher (i.e., 'worse') hearing thresholds than on the opposite side. These findings are difficult to reconcile with purely temporal models of pitch perception, but may be accounted for by place-based or spectrotemporal models. PMID:27536884

  6. Method and apparatus for automatically detecting patterns in digital point-ordered signals

    SciTech Connect

    Brudnoy, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The present invention is a method and system for detecting a physical feature of a test piece by detecting a pattern in a signal representing data from inspection of the test piece. The pattern is detected by automated additive decomposition of a digital point-ordered signal which represents the data. The present invention can properly handle a non-periodic signal. A physical parameter of the test piece is measured. A digital point-ordered signal representative of the measured physical parameter is generated. The digital point-ordered signal is decomposed into a baseline signal, a background noise signal, and a peaks/troughs signal. The peaks/troughs from the peaks/troughs signal are located and peaks/troughs information indicating the physical feature of the test piece is output.

  7. Twin signal signature sensing: Application to shorted winding monitoring, detection and localization

    SciTech Connect

    Streifel, R.J.; Marks, R.J.; El-Sharkawi, A.E.; Kerszenbaum, I.

    1995-12-31

    Using twin signal sensing we propose a method to monitor, detect and localize shorts in power system devices with windings: including rotors, transformers and motors. There has, to date, been no effective way to do so. The most obvious approach, time domain reflectometry, fails due to the reactive coupling of the windings. Twin signal signature sensing of shorts results from identical signals being simultaneously injected in both sides of the windings. The reflected signals are measured and the difference amplified to produce the signature signal. The signature signal characterizes the current state of the windings. When winding shorts are present, the electrical characteristics of the device will be different and thus the signature signal will also change. The changes in the signature signal can be monitored to detect shorted windings. While a device is in operation, the signature signals can be monitored and the development of winding shorts can be diagnosed through the process of novelty detection. After a device is cleaned or otherwise known to be functioning correctly (no winding shorts), signature signals can be collected which represent the healthy device. If a sufficient number of signals can be collected, the signal space representing healthy windings can be characterized. A detection surface can be placed around the healthy signature signals to provide a partition of the signal space into two regions: healthy and faulty. Any signature signal which is not within the healthy signature partition will indicate a faulted device.

  8. Relating hearing loss and executive functions to hearing aid users' preference for, and speech recognition with, different combinations of binaural noise reduction and microphone directionality.

    PubMed

    Neher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how executive functions relate to preferred hearing aid (HA) processing is sparse and seemingly inconsistent with related knowledge for speech recognition outcomes. This study thus aimed to find out if (1) performance on a measure of reading span (RS) is related to preferred binaural noise reduction (NR) strength, (2) similar relations exist for two different, non-verbal measures of executive function, (3) pure-tone average hearing loss (PTA), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and microphone directionality (DIR) also influence preferred NR strength, and (4) preference and speech recognition outcomes are similar. Sixty elderly HA users took part. Six HA conditions consisting of omnidirectional or cardioid microphones followed by inactive, moderate, or strong binaural NR as well as linear amplification were tested. Outcome was assessed at fixed SNRs using headphone simulations of a frontal target talker in a busy cafeteria. Analyses showed positive effects of active NR and DIR on preference, and negative and positive effects of, respectively, strong NR and DIR on speech recognition. Also, while moderate NR was the most preferred NR setting overall, preference for strong NR increased with SNR. No relation between RS and preference was found. However, larger PTA was related to weaker preference for inactive NR and stronger preference for strong NR for both microphone modes. Equivalent (but weaker) relations between worse performance on one non-verbal measure of executive function and the HA conditions without DIR were found. For speech recognition, there were relations between HA condition, PTA, and RS, but their pattern differed from that for preference. Altogether, these results indicate that, while moderate NR works well in general, a notable proportion of HA users prefer stronger NR. Furthermore, PTA and executive functions can account for some of the variability in preference for, and speech recognition with, different binaural NR and DIR settings. PMID

  9. Relating hearing loss and executive functions to hearing aid users' preference for, and speech recognition with, different combinations of binaural noise reduction and microphone directionality

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how executive functions relate to preferred hearing aid (HA) processing is sparse and seemingly inconsistent with related knowledge for speech recognition outcomes. This study thus aimed to find out if (1) performance on a measure of reading span (RS) is related to preferred binaural noise reduction (NR) strength, (2) similar relations exist for two different, non-verbal measures of executive function, (3) pure-tone average hearing loss (PTA), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and microphone directionality (DIR) also influence preferred NR strength, and (4) preference and speech recognition outcomes are similar. Sixty elderly HA users took part. Six HA conditions consisting of omnidirectional or cardioid microphones followed by inactive, moderate, or strong binaural NR as well as linear amplification were tested. Outcome was assessed at fixed SNRs using headphone simulations of a frontal target talker in a busy cafeteria. Analyses showed positive effects of active NR and DIR on preference, and negative and positive effects of, respectively, strong NR and DIR on speech recognition. Also, while moderate NR was the most preferred NR setting overall, preference for strong NR increased with SNR. No relation between RS and preference was found. However, larger PTA was related to weaker preference for inactive NR and stronger preference for strong NR for both microphone modes. Equivalent (but weaker) relations between worse performance on one non-verbal measure of executive function and the HA conditions without DIR were found. For speech recognition, there were relations between HA condition, PTA, and RS, but their pattern differed from that for preference. Altogether, these results indicate that, while moderate NR works well in general, a notable proportion of HA users prefer stronger NR. Furthermore, PTA and executive functions can account for some of the variability in preference for, and speech recognition with, different binaural NR and DIR settings. PMID

  10. Inferential statistics for transient signal detection in radio astronomy phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Natalia A.; Prestage, Richard M.; Alkhweldi, Marwan

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we develop two statistical rules for the purpose of detecting pulsars and transients using signals from phased array feeds installed on a radio telescope in place of a traditional horn receiver. We assume a known response of the antenna arrays and known coupling among array elements. We briefly summarize a set of pre-processing steps applied to raw array data prior to signal detection and then derive two detection statistics assuming two models for the unknown radio source astronomical signal: (1) the signal is deterministic and (2) the signal is a random process. The performance of both detectors is analyzed using both real and simulated data.

  11. Electrically detected magnetic resonance signal from iron contaminated Czochralski silicon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlidze, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    1998-04-01

    The electrical detection of magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurement, a detection method for the spin-dependent recombination, was applied to characterize iron contaminated silicon samples grown by the Czochralski method. The observed signal was different than previously reported electron paramagnetic resonance signals from defects in silicon. In addition, as the signal was not detected from similarly contaminated samples prepared from floating zone grown silicon crystal, we propose that the signal originates from defects containing iron and oxygen, namely, from iron decorated oxide precipitates. The dependency of EDMR signal on different experimental conditions (microwave power, illumination intensity, and temperature) were studied.

  12. Note: On-line weak signal detection via adaptive stochastic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo Kong, Fanrang

    2014-06-15

    We design an instrument with a novel embedded adaptive stochastic resonance (SR) algorithm that consists of a SR module and a digital zero crossing detection module for on-line weak signal detection in digital signal processing applications. The two modules are responsible for noise filtering and adaptive parameter configuration, respectively. The on-line weak signal detection can be stably achieved in seconds. The prototype instrument exhibits an advance of 20 dB averaged signal-to-noise ratio and 5 times averaged adjust R-square as compared to the input noisy signal, in considering different driving frequencies and noise levels.

  13. Dual-microphone and binaural noise reduction techniques for improved speech intelligibility by hearing aid users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefian Jazi, Nima

    Spatial filtering and directional discrimination has been shown to be an effective pre-processing approach for noise reduction in microphone array systems. In dual-microphone hearing aids, fixed and adaptive beamforming techniques are the most common solutions for enhancing the desired speech and rejecting unwanted signals captured by the microphones. In fact, beamformers are widely utilized in systems where spatial properties of target source (usually in front of the listener) is assumed to be known. In this dissertation, some dual-microphone coherence-based speech enhancement techniques applicable to hearing aids are proposed. All proposed algorithms operate in the frequency domain and (like traditional beamforming techniques) are purely based on the spatial properties of the desired speech source and does not require any knowledge of noise statistics for calculating the noise reduction filter. This benefit gives our algorithms the ability to address adverse noise conditions, such as situations where interfering talker(s) speaks simultaneously with the target speaker. In such cases, the (adaptive) beamformers lose their effectiveness in suppressing interference, since the noise channel (reference) cannot be built and updated accordingly. This difference is the main advantage of the proposed techniques in the dissertation over traditional adaptive beamformers. Furthermore, since the suggested algorithms are independent of noise estimation, they offer significant improvement in scenarios that the power level of interfering sources are much more than that of target speech. The dissertation also shows the premise behind the proposed algorithms can be extended and employed to binaural hearing aids. The main purpose of the investigated techniques is to enhance the intelligibility level of speech, measured through subjective listening tests with normal hearing and cochlear implant listeners. However, the improvement in quality of the output speech achieved by the

  14. Linking the sender to the receiver: vocal adjustments by bats to maintain signal detection in noise

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jinhong; Goerlitz, Holger R.; Brumm, Henrik; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Short-term adjustments of signal characteristics allow animals to maintain reliable communication in noise. Noise-dependent vocal plasticity often involves simultaneous changes in multiple parameters. Here, we quantified for the first time the relative contributions of signal amplitude, duration, and redundancy for improving signal detectability in noise. To this end, we used a combination of behavioural experiments on pale spear-nosed bats (Phyllostomus discolor) and signal detection models. In response to increasing noise levels, all bats raised the amplitude of their echolocation calls by 1.8–7.9 dB (the Lombard effect). Bats also increased signal duration by 13%–85%, corresponding to an increase in detectability of 1.0–5.3 dB. Finally, in some noise conditions, bats increased signal redundancy by producing more call groups. Assuming optimal cognitive integration, this could result in a further detectability improvement by up to 4 dB. Our data show that while the main improvement in signal detectability was due to the Lombard effect, increasing signal duration and redundancy can also contribute markedly to improving signal detectability. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the observed adjustments of signal parameters in noise are matched to how these parameters are processed in the receiver’s sensory system, thereby facilitating signal transmission in fluctuating environments. PMID:26692325

  15. Baseline Signal Reconstruction for Temperature Compensation in Lamb Wave-Based Damage Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Xiao, Yingchun; Zhang, Hua; Ren, Gexue

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations have significant effects on propagation of Lamb wave and therefore can severely limit the damage detection for Lamb wave. In order to mitigate the temperature effect, a temperature compensation method based on baseline signal reconstruction is developed for Lamb wave-based damage detection. The method is a reconstruction of a baseline signal at the temperature of current signal. In other words, it compensates the baseline signal to the temperature of current signal. The Hilbert transform is used to compensate the phase of baseline signal. The Orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) is used to compensate the amplitude of baseline signal. Experiments were conducted on two composite panels to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method could effectively work for temperature intervals of at least 18 °C with the baseline signal temperature as the center, and can be applied to the actual damage detection. PMID:27529245

  16. Detection of Ocean Reflected GPS Signals: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L.; Katzberg, Stephen J.; Howell, Charles T., III

    1997-01-01

    A number of advanced applications of the Global Positioning System (GPS) have been proposed which use the signal reflected from a smooth ocean surface. The viability of these concepts hinges upon the ability to acquire and code track the reflected signal for an extended period of time over a variety of sea states. The analytical theory of specularly and diffusely reflected radio frequency radiation from a rough surface is reviewed. Experiments to demonstrate tracking of a reflected signal were performed on three aircraft flights over the Chesapeake Bay and the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The experimental hardware consisted of two of-the-shelf receivers configured so that one received the GPS signal in the conventional manner using a right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) antenna on top of the fuselage and the other could receive the reflected signal using a left hand circularly polarized (LHCP) antenna on the bottom of the fuselage. Three tests were performed on the data to verify that the signals received in the bottom antenna were viewed as sea surface reflections; Pseudorange double differences were compared against predicted geometric range double differences; Characteristics of a signal reflected from a random surface were observed in the carrier to noise ratio; Predicted specular points were plotted which demonstrate reflection only from wet areas. These tests indicated tracking of reflected signals for extended periods of time at altitudes of up to 5500 m and sporadic signal acquisition at higher altitudes. The duration of the continuous signal tracking was limited by the receiver's need to maintain carrier tracking.

  17. Frequency-Shift Detectors Bind Binaural as Well as Monaural Frequency Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carcagno, Samuele; Semal, Catherine; Demany, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Previous psychophysical work provided evidence for the existence of automatic frequency-shift detectors (FSDs) that establish perceptual links between successive sounds. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of the FSDs with respect to the binaural system. Listeners were presented with sound sequences consisting of a chord of pure…

  18. The benefit of binaural hearing in a cocktail party: Effect of location and type of interferer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Monica L.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.; Culling, John F.

    2004-02-01

    The ``cocktail party problem'' was studied using virtual stimuli whose spatial locations were generated using anechoic head-related impulse responses from the AUDIS database [Blauert et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 3082 (1998)]. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured for Harvard IEEE sentences presented from the front in the presence of one, two, or three interfering sources. Four types of interferer were used: (1) other sentences spoken by the same talker, (2) time-reversed sentences of the same talker, (3) speech-spectrum shaped noise, and (4) speech-spectrum shaped noise, modulated by the temporal envelope of the sentences. Each interferer was matched to the spectrum of the target talker. Interferers were placed in several spatial configurations, either coincident with or separated from the target. Binaural advantage was derived by subtracting SRTs from listening with the ``better monaural ear'' from those for binaural listening. For a single interferer, there was a binaural advantage of 2-4 dB for all interferer types. For two or three interferers, the advantage was 2-4 dB for noise and speech-modulated noise, and 6-7 dB for speech and time-reversed speech. These data suggest that the benefit of binaural hearing for speech intelligibility is especially pronounced when there are multiple voiced interferers at different locations from the target, regardless of spatial configuration; measurements with fewer or with other types of interferers can underestimate this benefit.

  19. High-Frequency Binaural Beats Increase Cognitive Flexibility: Evidence from Dual-Task Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Bernhard; Sellaro, Roberta; Fischer, Rico; Borg, Saskia; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive-control processes can be configured to optimize either persistence of information processing (by amplifying competition between decision-making alternatives and top-down biasing of this competition) or flexibility (by dampening competition and biasing). We investigated whether high-frequency binaural beats, an auditory illusion suspected to act as a cognitive enhancer, have an impact on cognitive-control configuration. We hypothesized that binaural beats in the gamma range bias the cognitive-control style toward flexibility, which in turn should increase the crosstalk between tasks in a dual-task paradigm. We replicated earlier findings that the reaction time in the first-performed task is sensitive to the compatibility between the responses in the first and the second task—an indication of crosstalk. As predicted, exposing participants to binaural beats in the gamma range increased this effect as compared to a control condition in which participants were exposed to a continuous tone of 340 Hz. These findings provide converging evidence that the cognitive-control style can be systematically biased by inducing particular internal states; that high-frequency binaural beats bias the control style toward more flexibility; and that different styles are implemented by changing the strength of local competition and top-down bias. PMID:27605922

  20. High-Frequency Binaural Beats Increase Cognitive Flexibility: Evidence from Dual-Task Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Bernhard; Sellaro, Roberta; Fischer, Rico; Borg, Saskia; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive-control processes can be configured to optimize either persistence of information processing (by amplifying competition between decision-making alternatives and top-down biasing of this competition) or flexibility (by dampening competition and biasing). We investigated whether high-frequency binaural beats, an auditory illusion suspected to act as a cognitive enhancer, have an impact on cognitive-control configuration. We hypothesized that binaural beats in the gamma range bias the cognitive-control style toward flexibility, which in turn should increase the crosstalk between tasks in a dual-task paradigm. We replicated earlier findings that the reaction time in the first-performed task is sensitive to the compatibility between the responses in the first and the second task-an indication of crosstalk. As predicted, exposing participants to binaural beats in the gamma range increased this effect as compared to a control condition in which participants were exposed to a continuous tone of 340 Hz. These findings provide converging evidence that the cognitive-control style can be systematically biased by inducing particular internal states; that high-frequency binaural beats bias the control style toward more flexibility; and that different styles are implemented by changing the strength of local competition and top-down bias. PMID:27605922

  1. The Physiological Basis and Clinical Use of the Binaural Interaction Component of the Auditory Brainstem Response.

    PubMed

    Laumen, Geneviève; Ferber, Alexander T; Klump, Georg M; Tollin, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR) is a sound-evoked noninvasively measured electrical potential representing the sum of neuronal activity in the auditory brainstem and midbrain. ABR peak amplitudes and latencies are widely used in human and animal auditory research and for clinical screening. The binaural interaction component (BIC) of the ABR stands for the difference between the sum of the monaural ABRs and the ABR obtained with binaural stimulation. The BIC comprises a series of distinct waves, the largest of which (DN1) has been used for evaluating binaural hearing in both normal hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. Based on data from animal and human studies, the authors discuss the possible anatomical and physiological bases of the BIC (DN1 in particular). The effects of electrode placement and stimulus characteristics on the binaurally evoked ABR are evaluated. The authors review how interaural time and intensity differences affect the BIC and, analyzing these dependencies, draw conclusion about the mechanism underlying the generation of the BIC. Finally, the utility of the BIC for clinical diagnoses are summarized. PMID:27232077

  2. Detecting PTEN and PI3K signaling in brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guo; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The central nervous system is comprised of multiple cell types including neurons, glia and other supporting cells that may differ dramatically in levels of signaling pathway activation. Immunohistochemistry in conjunction with drug interference are powerful tools that allow evaluation of signaling pathways in different cell types of the mouse central nervous system in vivo. Here we provide detailed protocols for immunohistochemistry to evaluate three essential components in the PI3K pathway in mouse brain: Pten, p-Akt and p-4ebp1, and for rapamycin treatment to modulate mTOR signaling in vivo. PMID:27033070

  3. Moving beyond Pure Signal-Detection Models: Comment on Wixted (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Colleen M.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    The dual-process signal-detection (DPSD) model assumes that recognition memory is based on recollection of qualitative information or on a signal-detection-based familiarity process. The model has proven useful for understanding results from a wide range of memory research, including behavioral, neuropsychological, electrophysiological, and…

  4. Apparatus and method for stabilized phase detection for binary signal tracking loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus and method is presented for phase detection in binary signal tracking loops wherein two bandpass detectors are alternately interchanged between electrical connection with two local code reference tracking signals in order to cancel any adverse effect of gain imbalance in the bandpass detectors and direct current offset or drift. The detectors are time shared in multiplex fashion between the two local reference signals.

  5. Detecting Climate Signals Using Space-Time EOFs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Gerald R.; Wu, Qigang

    2001-04-01

    Estimates of the amplitudes of the forced responses of the surface temperature field over the last century are provided by a signal processing scheme utilizing space-time empirical orthogonal functions for several combinations of station sites and record intervals taken from the last century. These century-long signal fingerprints come mainly from energy balance model calculations, which are shown to be very close to smoothed ensemble average runs from a coupled ocean-atmosphere model (Hadley Centre Model). The space-time lagged covariance matrices of natural variability come from 100-yr control runs from several well-known coupled ocean-atmosphere models as well as a 10000-yr run from the stochastic energy balance climate model (EBCM). Evidence is found for robust, but weaker than expected signals from the greenhouse [amplitude 65% of that expected for a rather insensitive model (EBCM: T2×CO2 2.3°C)], volcanic (also about 65% expected amplitude), and even the 11-yr component of the solar signal (a most probable value of about 2.0 times that expected). In the analysis the anthropogenic aerosol signal is weak and the null hypothesis for this signal can only be rejected in a few sampling configurations involving the last 50 yr of the record. During the last 50 yr the full strength value (1.0) also lies within the 90% confidence interval. Some amplitude estimation results based upon the (temporally smoothed) Hadley fingerprints are included and the results are indistinguishable from those based on the EBCM. In addition, a geometrical derivation of the multiple regression formula from the filter point of view is provided, which shows how the signals `not of interest' are removed from the data stream in the estimation process. The criteria for truncating the EOF sequence are somewhat different from earlier analyses in that the amount of the signal variance accounted for at a given level of truncation is explicitly taken into account.

  6. Automated feature detection and identification in digital point-ordered signals

    DOEpatents

    Oppenlander, Jane E.; Loomis, Kent C.; Brudnoy, David M.; Levy, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    A computer-based automated method to detect and identify features in digital point-ordered signals. The method is used for processing of non-destructive test signals, such as eddy current signals obtained from calibration standards. The signals are first automatically processed to remove noise and to determine a baseline. Next, features are detected in the signals using mathematical morphology filters. Finally, verification of the features is made using an expert system of pattern recognition methods and geometric criteria. The method has the advantage that standard features can be, located without prior knowledge of the number or sequence of the features. Further advantages are that standard features can be differentiated from irrelevant signal features such as noise, and detected features are automatically verified by parameters extracted from the signals. The method proceeds fully automatically without initial operator set-up and without subjective operator feature judgement.

  7. Detecting and characterizing infrasound signals with optical fiber infrasound sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristoffer; Zumberge, Mark; Berger, Jonathan; Hedlin, Michael; Arrowsmith, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensors (OFIS) are long compliant tubes wrapped with two optical fibers that interferometrically measure the differential pressure variation along the length of the tube. Because each sensor averages spatially along the length of the tube, the frequency response of the recorded pressure variation is a function of the orientation of the OFIS sensor relative to the back azimuth and incidence angle of the incoming wave. We have exploited this property to investigate the ability of various OFIS geometries to determine the back azimuth of infrasound signals. We have found that an OFIS comprised of two orthogonal 89-m-long arms having their centers separated by 63 m can resolve the back azimuth of most infrasound signals with a good signal-to-noise ratio. We find a good match between the back azimuths determined with our technique and those determined for the same signals recorded on the co-located pipe array I57US with the Progressive Multichannel Cross-Correlation technique. Based on these results and additional synthetic tests, we have built and are testing a larger OFIS with several arms that will be able to resolve signals from all directions and with small signal-to-noise ratios.

  8. Vestibular receptor cells and signal detection: bioaccelerometers and the hexagonal sampling of two-dimensional signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mugler, D. H.; Ross, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The inner ear contains sensory organs which signal changes in head movement. The vestibular sacs, in particular, are sensitive to linear accelerations. Electron microscopic images have revealed the structure of tiny sensory hair bundles, whose mechanical deformation results in the initiation of neuronal activity and the transmission of electrical signals to the brain. The structure of the hair bundles is shown in this paper to be that of the most efficient two-dimensional phased-array signal processors.

  9. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN THE FIRST 12 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Girouard, Forrest R. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three years of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 112,321 targets that were observed over the full interval and an additional 79,992 targets that were observed for a subset of the full interval. From this set of targets we find a total of 11,087 targets that contain at least one signal that meets the Kepler detection criteria: periodicity of the signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and three tests that reject false positives. Each target containing at least one detected signal is then searched repeatedly for additional signals, which represent multi-planet systems of transiting planets. When targets with multiple detections are considered, a total of 18,406 potential transiting planet signals are found in the Kepler mission data set. The detected signals are dominated by events with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios and by events with relatively short periods. The distribution of estimated transit depths appears to peak in the range between 20 and 30 parts per million, with a few detections down to fewer than 10 parts per million. The detections exhibit signal-to-noise ratios from 7.1{sigma}, which is the lower cutoff for detections, to over 10,000{sigma}, and periods ranging from 0.5 days, which is the shortest period searched, to 525 days, which is the upper limit of achievable periods given the length of the data set and the requirement that all detections include at least three transits. The detected signals are compared to a set of known transit events in the Kepler field of view, many of which were identified by alternative methods; the comparison shows that the current search recovery rate for targets with known transit events is 98.3%.

  10. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN 16 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Girouard, Forrest R. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in 4 yr of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 111,800 stars which were observed for the entire interval and 85,522 stars which were observed for a subset of the interval. We found that 9743 targets contained at least one signal consistent with the signature of a transiting or eclipsing object where the criteria for detection are periodicity of the detected transits, adequate signal-to-noise ratio, and acceptance by a number of tests which reject false positive detections. When targets that had produced a signal were searched repeatedly, an additional 6542 signals were detected on 3223 target stars, for a total of 16,285 potential detections. Comparison of the set of detected signals with a set of known and vetted transit events in the Kepler field of view shows that the recovery rate for these signals is 96.9%. The ensemble properties of the detected signals are reviewed.

  11. Vigilance Deficit in Learning Disabled Children: A Signal Detection Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Lee

    1981-01-01

    Tested whether learning disabled children start a vigilance task (1) with the same capacity or detectability as nondisabled children but decline as time on task increases; (2) at a lower level of stimulus detectability due to a reduced capacity for information processing but do not decline in attention faster than nondisabled children. (Author/DB)

  12. Detectability of CO2 Flux Signals by a Space-Based Lidar Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammerling, Dorit M.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Schaefer, Kevin; Doney, Scott; Michalak, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) offer novel and distinctive opportunities for improving our quantitative understanding of the carbon cycle. Prospective observations include those from space-based lidar such as the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Here we explore the ability of such a mission to detect regional changes in CO2 fluxes. We investigate these using three prototypical case studies, namely the thawing of permafrost in the Northern High Latitudes, the shifting of fossil fuel emissions from Europe to China, and changes in the source-sink characteristics of the Southern Ocean. These three scenarios were used to design signal detection studies to investigate the ability to detect the unfolding of these scenarios compared to a baseline scenario. Results indicate that the ASCENDS mission could detect the types of signals investigated in this study, with the caveat that the study is based on some simplifying assumptions. The permafrost thawing flux perturbation is readily detectable at a high level of significance. The fossil fuel emission detectability is directly related to the strength of the signal and the level of measurement noise. For a nominal (lower) fossil fuel emission signal, only the idealized noise-free instrument test case produces a clearly detectable signal, while experiments with more realistic noise levels capture the signal only in the higher (exaggerated) signal case. For the Southern Ocean scenario, differences due to the natural variability in the ENSO climatic mode are primarily detectable as a zonal increase.

  13. Digital encoding and detection of voiceband data signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneru, R. R.

    1980-12-01

    The codecs considered for investigation are Pulse Code Modulation (PCM), Differential PCM, and Delta Modulation operating at bit rates from 16 to 64 kb/sec. A central result of this study was the identification and evaluation of sampling phase differential effect present in a digital encoding system when sampling clock is not synchronous with an integral multiple of the data modern bit clock. PSK voiceband data signals are allowed to pass through these codecs that are designed for speech or data input signals. Digital encoders considered for investigation are ranked using the above performance metrics. Performance results of these coders are fully discussed and analyzed. Recognition algorithm for voiceband data, speech, and silence signals is developed for complete automation in digital channel efficiency models to achieve the optimum system performance. Pattern recognition approaches are sought to formulate and solve this problem. Maximum likelihood estimation procedure with recursive implementation of algorithm is developed.

  14. Robust detection of peak signals for lateral flow immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwon; Kim, Jong Dae; Nahm, Kie Bong; Choi, Eui Yul; Lee, Geumyoung

    2011-02-01

    Template matching method is presented to identify the peaks from the scanned signals of lateral flow immunoassay strips. The template is composed of two pulses separated by the distance of the control and the target ligand line in the assay, and is convolved with the scanned signal to deliver the maximum at the center of the two peaks. The peak regions were identified with the predefined distances from the center. Glycosylated haemoglobin immunoassay strips and fluorescent strip readers from Boditechmed Inc. were tested to estimate the lot and reader variations of the concentration measurands. The results showed the robustness of the propose method.

  15. Detecting Fleeting MRI Signals with Frequency-Modulated Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curtis; Moeller, Steen; Chamberlain, Ryan; O'Connell, Robert; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Garwood, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We describe a fundamentally different approach to MRI referred to as SWIFT (sweep imaging with Fourier transformation). SWIFT exploits time-shared RF excitation and signal acquisition, allowing capture of signal from spins with extremely short transverse relaxation time, T2*. The MR signal is acquired in gaps inserted into a broadband frequency-swept excitation pulse, which results in acquisition delays of only 1 – 2 microseconds. In SWIFT, 3D k-space is sampled in a radial manner, whereby one projection of the object is acquired in the gaps of each frequency-swept pulse, allowing a repetition time (TR) on the order of the pulse length (typically 1 – 3 milliseconds). Since the orientation of consecutive projections varies in a smooth manner (i.e., only small increments in the values of the x, y, z gradients occur from view to view), SWIFT scanning is close to inaudible and is insensitive to gradient timing errors and eddy currents. SWIFT images can be acquired in scan times similar to and sometimes faster than conventional 3D gradient echo techniques. With its ability to capture signals from ultrashort T2* spins, SWIFT promises to expand the role of MRI in areas of research where MRI previously played no or negligible role. In this article, we show wood and tooth images obtained with SWIFT as examples of materials with ultrashort T2*. Early experience suggests SWIFT can play a role in materials science and porous media research. PMID:22661791

  16. Laboratory Studies of Nonlinear Optical Signals for Caries Detection.

    PubMed

    Terrer, E; Panayotov, I V; Slimani, A; Tardivo, D; Gillet, D; Levallois, B; Fejerskov, O; Gergely, C; Cuisinier, F J G; Tassery, H; Cloitre, T

    2016-05-01

    Multiphoton confocal microscopy and nonlinear spectroscopy are used to investigate the caries process in dentin. Although dentin is a major calcified tissue of the teeth, its organic phase comprises type I collagen fibers. Caries drive dentin demineralization and collagen denaturation. Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful imaging technique: the biological materials are transparent to infrared frequencies and can be excited to penetration depths inaccessible to 1-photon confocal microscopy. The laser excitation greatly reduces photodamage to the sole focal region, and the signal-to-noise ratio is improved significantly. The method has been used to follow pathologic processes involving collagen fibrosis or collagen destruction based on their 2-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) emission and second harmonic generation (SHG). Combining multiphoton imaging with nonlinear spectroscopy, we demonstrate that both 2PEF and SHG intensity of human dentin are strongly modified during the tooth caries process, and we show that the ratio between SHG and 2PEF signals is a reliable parameter to follow dental caries. The ratio of the SHG/2PEF signals measured by nonlinear optical spectroscopy provides valuable information on the caries process, specifically on the degradation of the organic matrix of dentin. The goal is to bring these nonlinear optical signals to clinical application for caries diagnosis. PMID:26826107

  17. A novel algorithm for real-time adaptive signal detection and identification

    SciTech Connect

    Sleefe, G.E.; Ladd, M.D.; Gallegos, D.E.; Sicking, C.W.; Erteza, I.A.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a novel digital signal processing algorithm for adaptively detecting and identifying signals buried in noise. The algorithm continually computes and updates the long-term statistics and spectral characteristics of the background noise. Using this noise model, a set of adaptive thresholds and matched digital filters are implemented to enhance and detect signals that are buried in the noise. The algorithm furthermore automatically suppresses coherent noise sources and adapts to time-varying signal conditions. Signal detection is performed in both the time-domain and the frequency-domain, thereby permitting the detection of both broad-band transients and narrow-band signals. The detection algorithm also provides for the computation of important signal features such as amplitude, timing, and phase information. Signal identification is achieved through a combination of frequency-domain template matching and spectral peak picking. The algorithm described herein is well suited for real-time implementation on digital signal processing hardware. This paper presents the theory of the adaptive algorithm, provides an algorithmic block diagram, and demonstrate its implementation and performance with real-world data. The computational efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated through benchmarks on specific DSP hardware. The applications for this algorithm, which range from vibration analysis to real-time image processing, are also discussed.

  18. Robust stochastic resonance: Signal detection and adaptation in impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosko, Bart; Mitaim, Sanya

    2001-11-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) occurs when noise improves a system performance measure such as a spectral signal-to-noise ratio or a cross-correlation measure. All SR studies have assumed that the forcing noise has finite variance. Most have further assumed that the noise is Gaussian. We show that SR still occurs for the more general case of impulsive or infinite-variance noise. The SR effect fades as the noise grows more impulsive. We study this fading effect on the family of symmetric α-stable bell curves that includes the Gaussian bell curve as a special case. These bell curves have thicker tails as the parameter α falls from 2 (the Gaussian case) to 1 (the Cauchy case) to even lower values. Thicker tails create more frequent and more violent noise impulses. The main feedback and feedforward models in the SR literature show this fading SR effect for periodic forcing signals when we plot either the signal-to-noise ratio or a signal correlation measure against the dispersion of the α-stable noise. Linear regression shows that an exponential law γopt(α)=cAα describes this relation between the impulsive index α and the SR-optimal noise dispersion γopt. The results show that SR is robust against noise ``outliers.'' So SR may be more widespread in nature than previously believed. Such robustness also favors the use of SR in engineering systems. We further show that an adaptive system can learn the optimal noise dispersion for two standard SR models (the quartic bistable model and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model) for the signal-to-noise ratio performance measure. This also favors practical applications of SR and suggests that evolution may have tuned the noise-sensitive parameters of biological systems.

  19. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN THE FIRST THREE QUARTERS OF Kepler MISSION DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Seader, Shawn; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Stumpe, Martin C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Girouard, Forrest R.; Klaus, Todd C. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three quarters of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 151,722 stars which were observed over the full interval and an additional 19,132 stars which were observed for only one or two quarters. From this set of targets we find a total of 5392 detections which meet the Kepler detection criteria: those criteria are periodicity of signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and a composition test which rejects spurious detections which contain non-physical combinations of events. The detected signals are dominated by events with relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and by events with relatively short periods. The distribution of estimated transit depths appears to peak in the range between 40 and 100 parts per million, with a few detections down to fewer than 10 parts per million. The detections exhibit signal-to-noise ratios from 7.1{sigma}, which is the lower cutoff for detections, to over 10,000{sigma}, and periods ranging from 0.5 days, which is the lower cutoff used in the procedure, to 109 days, which is the upper limit of achievable periods given the length of the data set and the criteria used for detections. The detected signals are compared to a set of known transit events in the Kepler field of view which were derived by a different method using a longer data interval; the comparison shows that the current search correctly identified 88.1% of the known events. A tabulation of the detected transit signals, examples which illustrate the analysis and detection process, a discussion of future plans and open, potentially fruitful, areas of further research are included.

  20. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOEpatents

    Synovec, R.E.; Yueng, E.S.

    1989-10-17

    Disclosed is a method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal. 8 figs.

  1. Detection and Parameter Estimation of Multicomponent LFM Signal Based on the Cubic Phase Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Jiang, Yi-Cheng

    2008-12-01

    A new algorithm for the detection and parameters estimation of LFM signal is presented in this paper. By the computation of the cubic phase function (CPF) of the signal, it is shown that the CPF is concentrated along the frequency rate law of the signal, and the peak of the CPF yields the estimate of the frequency rate. The initial frequency and amplitude can be obtained by the dechirp technique and fast Fourier transform. And for multicomponent signal, the CLEAN technique combined with the CPF is proposed to detect the weak components submerged by the stronger components. The statistical performance is analyzed and the simulation results are shown simultaneously.

  2. Recursive ideal observer detection of known M-ary signals in multiplicative and additive Gaussian noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. H.; Gupta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the derivation of the recursive algorithms necessary for real-time digital detection of M-ary known signals that are subject to independent multiplicative and additive Gaussian noises. The motivating application is minimum probability of error detection of digital data-link messages aboard civil aircraft in the earth reflection multipath environment. For each known signal, the detector contains one Kalman filter and one probability computer. The filters estimate the multipath disturbance. The estimates and the received signal drive the probability computers. Outputs of all the computers are compared in amplitude to give the signal decision. The practicality and usefulness of the detector are extensively discussed.

  3. System for Automatic Detection and Analysis of Targets in FMICW Radar Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejfek, Luboš; Mošna, Zbyšek; Urbář, Jaroslav; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the automatic system for the processing of the signals from the frequency modulated interrupted continuous wave (FMICW) radar and describes methods for the primary signal processing. Further, we present methods for the detection of the targets in strong noise. These methods are tested both on the real and simulated signals. The real signals were measured using the developed at the IAP CAS experimental prototype of FMICW radar with operational frequency 35.4 GHz. The measurement campaign took place at the TU Delft, the Netherlands. The obtained results were used for development of the system for the automatic detection and analysis of the targets measured by the FMICW radar.

  4. Ocean variablity and its influence on the detectability of greenhouse warming signals

    SciTech Connect

    Santer, B.D.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    1995-06-15

    Recent investigations have considered whether it is possible to achieve early detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climate change by observing changes in ocean variables. In this study the authors use model data to assess some of the uncertainties involved in estimating when one could expect to detect ocean greenhouse warming signals. They distinguish between detection periods and detection times. As defined here, detection period is the length of a climate time series required in order to detect, at some prescribed significance level, a given linear trend in the presence of the natural climate variability. Detection period is defined in model years and is independent of reference time and the real time evolution of the signal. Detection time is computed for an actual time-evolving signal from a greenhouse warming experiment and depends on the experiment`s start date. Two sources of uncertainty are considered: those associated with the level of natural variability or noise, and those associated with the time-evolving signals. The authors analyze the ocean signal and noise for spatially averaged ocean circulation indices such as heat and fresh water fluxes, rate of deep water formation, salinity, temperature, transport of mass, and ice volume. The signals for these quantities are taken from recent time-dependent greenhouse warming experiments performed by the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg with a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. 75 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Lateralization and Binaural Interaction of Middle-Latency and Late-Brainstem Components of the Auditory Evoked Response.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Andrew R; Burchard, Daniel; Starzynski, Christian; Riedel, Helmut; Rupp, Andre; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    We used magnetoencephalography to examine lateralization and binaural interaction of the middle-latency and late-brainstem components of the auditory evoked response (the MLR and SN10, respectively). Click stimuli were presented either monaurally, or binaurally with left- or right-leading interaural time differences (ITDs). While early MLR components, including the N19 and P30, were larger for monaural stimuli presented contralaterally (by approximately 30 and 36 % in the left and right hemispheres, respectively), later components, including the N40 and P50, were larger ipsilaterally. In contrast, MLRs elicited by binaural clicks with left- or right-leading ITDs did not differ. Depending on filter settings, weak binaural interaction could be observed as early as the P13 but was clearly much larger for later components, beginning at the P30, indicating some degree of binaural linearity up to early stages of cortical processing. The SN10, an obscure late-brainstem component, was observed consistently in individuals and showed linear binaural additivity. The results indicate that while the MLR is lateralized in response to monaural stimuli-and not ITDs-this lateralization reverses from primarily contralateral to primarily ipsilateral as early as 40 ms post stimulus and is never as large as that seen with fMRI. PMID:27197812

  6. A matched filter algorithm for acoustic signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, D. W.

    1985-06-01

    This thesis is a presentation of several alternative acoustic filter designs which allow Space Shuttle payload experiment initiation prior to launch. This initiation is accomplished independently of any spacecraft services by means of a matched band-pass filter tuned to the acoustic signal characteristic of the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) which is brought up to operating RPM's approximately five minutes prior to launch. These alternative designs include an analog filter built around operational amplifiers, a digital IIR design implemented with an INTEL 2920 Signal Processor, and an Adaptive FIR Weiner design. Working prototypes of the first two filters are developed and a discussion of the advantage of the 2920 digital design is presented.

  7. High speed microscopy techniques for signaling detection in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mauro, C.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Alfieri, D.; Borile, Giulia; Urbani, A.; Mongillo, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-05-01

    Alterations in intracellular cardiomyocyte calcium handling have a key role in initiating and sustaining arrhythmias. Arrhythmogenic calcium leak from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) can be attributed to all means by which calcium exits the SR store in an abnormal fashion. Abnormal SR calcium exit maymanifest as intracellular Ca2+ sparks and/or Ca2+ waves. Ca2+ signaling in arrhythmogenesis has been mainly studied in isolated cardiomyocytes and given that the extracellular matrix influences both Ca2+ and membrane potential dynamics in the intact heart and underlies environmentally mediated changes, understanding how Ca2+ and voltage are regulated in the intact heart will represent a tremendous advancement in the understanding of arrhythmogenic mechanisms. Using novel high-speed multiphoton microscopy techinques, such as multispot and random access, we investigated animal models with inherited and acquired arrhythmias to assess the role of Ca2+ and voltage signals as arrhythmia triggers in cell and subcellular components of the intact heart and correlate these with electrophysiology.

  8. Composition for detection of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS), which is secreted by fibroblastic cells in culture, preferably tendon cells, and which provides a means by which the cells self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  9. Coherence specific signal detection via chiral pump-probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holdaway, David I H; Collini, Elisabetta; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2016-05-21

    We examine transient circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy as a technique to investigate signatures of exciton coherence dynamics under the influence of structured vibrational environments. We consider a pump-probe configuration with a linearly polarized pump and a circularly polarized probe, with a variable angle θ between the two directions of propagation. In our theoretical formalism the signal is decomposed in chiral and achiral doorway and window functions. Using this formalism, we show that the chiral doorway component, which beats during the population time, can be isolated by comparing signals with different values of θ. As in the majority of time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, the overall TRCD response shows signatures of both excited and ground state dynamics. However, we demonstrate that the chiral doorway function has only a weak ground state contribution, which can generally be neglected if an impulsive pump pulse is used. These findings suggest that the pump-probe configuration of optical TRCD in the impulsive limit has the potential to unambiguously probe quantum coherence beating in the excited state. We present numerical results for theoretical signals in an example dimer system. PMID:27208941

  10. Spontaneous Alpha Power Lateralization Predicts Detection Performance in an Un-Cued Signal Detection Task.

    PubMed

    Boncompte, Gonzalo; Villena-González, Mario; Cosmelli, Diego; López, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Focusing one's attention by external guiding stimuli towards a specific area of the visual field produces systematical neural signatures. One of the most robust is the change in topological distribution of oscillatory alpha band activity across parieto-occipital cortices. In particular, decreases in alpha activity over contralateral and/or increases over ipsilateral scalp sites, respect to the side of the visual field where attention was focused. This evidence comes mainly from experiments where an explicit cue informs subjects where to focus their attention, thus facilitating detection of an upcoming target stimulus. However, recent theoretical models of attention have highlighted a stochastic or non-deterministic component related to visuospatial attentional allocation. In an attempt to evidence this component, here we analyzed alpha activity in a signal detection paradigm in the lack of informative cues; in the absence of preceding information about the location (and time) of appearance of target stimuli. We believe that the unpredictability of this situation could be beneficial for unveiling this component. Interestingly, although total alpha power did not differ between Seen and Unseen conditions, we found a significant lateralization of alpha activity over parieto-occipital electrodes, which predicted behavioral performance. This effect had a smaller magnitude compared to paradigms in which attention is externally guided (cued). However we believe that further characterization of this spontaneous component of attention is of great importance in the study of visuospatial attentional dynamics. These results support the presence of a spontaneous component of visuospatial attentional allocation and they advance pre-stimulus alpha-band lateralization as one of its neural signatures. PMID:27504824

  11. Spontaneous Alpha Power Lateralization Predicts Detection Performance in an Un-Cued Signal Detection Task

    PubMed Central

    Villena-González, Mario; Cosmelli, Diego; López, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Focusing one’s attention by external guiding stimuli towards a specific area of the visual field produces systematical neural signatures. One of the most robust is the change in topological distribution of oscillatory alpha band activity across parieto-occipital cortices. In particular, decreases in alpha activity over contralateral and/or increases over ipsilateral scalp sites, respect to the side of the visual field where attention was focused. This evidence comes mainly from experiments where an explicit cue informs subjects where to focus their attention, thus facilitating detection of an upcoming target stimulus. However, recent theoretical models of attention have highlighted a stochastic or non-deterministic component related to visuospatial attentional allocation. In an attempt to evidence this component, here we analyzed alpha activity in a signal detection paradigm in the lack of informative cues; in the absence of preceding information about the location (and time) of appearance of target stimuli. We believe that the unpredictability of this situation could be beneficial for unveiling this component. Interestingly, although total alpha power did not differ between Seen and Unseen conditions, we found a significant lateralization of alpha activity over parieto-occipital electrodes, which predicted behavioral performance. This effect had a smaller magnitude compared to paradigms in which attention is externally guided (cued). However we believe that further characterization of this spontaneous component of attention is of great importance in the study of visuospatial attentional dynamics. These results support the presence of a spontaneous component of visuospatial attentional allocation and they advance pre-stimulus alpha-band lateralization as one of its neural signatures. PMID:27504824

  12. The application of signal detection theory to optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1971-01-01

    The restoration of images focused on a photosensitive surface is treated from the standpoint of maximum likelihood estimation, taking into account the Poisson distributions of the observed data, which are the numbers of photoelectrons from various elements of the surface. A detector of an image focused on such a surface utilizes a certain linear combination of those numbers as the optimum detection statistic. Methods for calculating the false alarm and detection probabilities are proposed. It is shown that measuring noncommuting observables in an ideal quantum receiver cannot yield a lower Bayes cost than that attainable by a system measuring only commuting observables.

  13. Psychophysical Models for Signal Detection with Time Varying Uncertainty. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gai, E.

    1975-01-01

    Psychophysical models for the behavior of the human operator in detection tasks which include change in detectability, correlation between observations and deferred decisions are developed. Classical Signal Detection Theory (SDT) is discussed and its emphasis on the sensory processes is contrasted to decision strategies. The analysis of decision strategies utilizes detection tasks with time varying signal strength. The classical theory is modified to include such tasks and several optimal decision strategies are explored. Two methods of classifying strategies are suggested. The first method is similar to the analysis of ROC curves, while the second is based on the relation between the criterion level (CL) and the detectability. Experiments to verify the analysis of tasks with changes of signal strength are designed. The results show that subjects are aware of changes in detectability and tend to use strategies that involve changes in the CL's.

  14. Signal-detection outcomes on heartbeat and respiratory resistance detection tasks in male and female subjects.

    PubMed

    Harver, A; Katkin, E S; Bloch, E

    1993-05-01

    Male and female subjects were compared on heartbeat, respiratory resistance, and light-tone signal-detection tasks. Subjects judged whether a series of 10 tones was coincident with their heartbeats; whether an external load added to the airway was either present or absent during targeted inspiratory cycles; and whether a series of 10 light flashes was matched with auditory tones presented following a fixed delay of either 50 or 100 ms. Nonparametric indices of perceptual sensitivity and response bias indicated that men were more sensitive than women on the resistive load task (p < .05) and on the heartbeat task (p = .07). Performance on the light-tone task was virtually identical. All subjects used a stricter criterion on the respiratory resistance task than on either the heartbeat or the light-tone task; women employed a stricter criterion than men on the heartbeat task. The gender differences may be understood in terms of lateralization of central processing of somesthetic sensory information. PMID:8497550

  15. Asynchronous Detection of Trials Onset from Raw EEG Signals.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gordo, M A; Grima Murcia, M D; Padilla, Pablo; Pelayo, F; Fernandez, E

    2016-11-01

    Clinical processing of event-related potentials (ERPs) requires a precise synchrony between the stimulation and the acquisition units that are guaranteed by means of a physical link between them. This precise synchrony is needed since temporal misalignments during trial averaging can lead to high deviations of peak times, thus causing error in diagnosis or inefficiency in classification in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Out of the laboratory, mobile EEG systems and BCI headsets are not provided with the physical link, thus being inadequate for acquisition of ERPs. In this study, we propose a method for the asynchronous detection of trials onset from raw EEG without physical links. We validate it with a BCI application based on the dichotic listening task. The user goal was to attend the cued auditory message and to report three keywords contained in it while ignoring the other message. The BCI goal was to detect the attended message from the analysis of auditory ERPs. The rate of successful onset detection in both synchronous (using the real onset) and asynchronous (blind detection of trial onset from raw EEG) was 73% with a synchronization error of less than 1[Formula: see text]ms. The level of synchronization provided by this proposal would allow home-based acquisition of ERPs with low cost BCI headsets and any media player unit without physical links between them. PMID:27377663

  16. A threshold-based approach for muscle contraction detection from surface EMG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morantes, Gaudi; Fernández, Gerardo; Altuve, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    Surface electromyographic (SEMG) signals are commonly used as control signals in prosthetic and orthotic devices. Super cial electrodes are placed on the skin of the subject to acquire its muscular activity through this signal. The muscle contraction episode is then in charge of activating and deactivating these devices. Nevertheless, there is no gold standard" to detect muscle contraction, leading to delayed responses and false and missed detections. This fact motivated us to propose a new approach that compares a smoothed version of the SEMG signal with a xed threshold, in order to detect muscle contraction episodes. After preprocessing the SEMG signal, the smoothed version is obtained using a moving average lter, where three di erent window lengths has been evaluated. The detector was tuned by maximizing sensitivity and speci city and evaluated using SEMG signals obtained from the anterior tibial and gastrocnemius muscles, taken during the walking of ve subjects. Compared with traditional detection methods, we obtain a reduction of 3 ms in the detection delay, an increase of 8% in sensitivity but a decrease of 15% in speci city. Future work is directed to the inclusion of a temporal threshold (a double-threshold approach) to minimize false detections and reduce detection delays.

  17. Research on power-law acoustic transient signal detection based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian-hui; Yang, Ri-jie; Wang, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Aiming at the characteristics of acoustic transient signal emitted from antisubmarine weapon which is being dropped into water (torpedo, aerial sonobuoy and rocket assisted depth charge etc.), such as short duration, low SNR, abruptness and instability, based on traditional power-law detector, a new method to detect acoustic transient signal is proposed. Firstly wavelet transform is used to de-noise signal, removes random spectrum components and improves SNR. Then Power- Law detector is adopted to detect transient signal. The simulation results show the method can effectively extract envelop characteristic of transient signal on the condition of low SNR. The performance of WT-Power-Law markedly outgoes that of traditional Power-Law detection method.

  18. Static corrections for enhanced signal detection at IMS seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Neil; Wookey, James; Selby, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Seismic monitoring forms an important part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verifying the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Analysis of seismic data can be used to discriminate between nuclear explosions and the tens of thousands of natural earthquakes of similar magnitude that occur every year. This is known as "forensic seismology", and techniques include measuring the P-to-S wave amplitude ratio, the body-to-surface wave magnitude ratio (mb/Ms), and source depth. Measurement of these seismic discriminants requires very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data, and this has led to the development and deployment of seismic arrays as part of the IMS. Array processing methodologies such as stacking can be used, but optimum SNR improvement needs an accurate estimate of the arrival time of the particular seismic phase. To enhance the imaging capability of IMS arrays, we aim to develop site-specific static corrections to the arrival time as a function of frequency, slowness and backazimuth. Here, we present initial results for the IMS TORD array in Niger. Vespagrams are calculated for various events using the F-statistic to clearly identify seismic phases and measure their arrival times. Observed arrival times are compared with those predicted by 1D and 3D velocity models, and residuals are calculated for a range of backazimuths and slownesses. Finally, we demonstrate the improvement in signal fidelity provided by these corrections.

  19. Binaural simulation of virtual stage environments for evaluation by the solo violinist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, William

    2004-10-01

    A unique computational and testing model for assessing solo violinists' response to various acoustical conditions on-stage was developed and shown to be an effective study tool. Realtime binaural auralizations of CATT-Acoustic models of several different virtual stage-acoustic designs were examined with a small group of professional violinists. Perceived differences as expressed by the subjects were discussed and explored in light of the specific measured acoustical descriptors available through the model. Unlike acoustical descriptors developed for audience receivers, ease of playing, support, and other soloist concerns do not necessarily show strong correlation between different subjects. It was found that this binaural simulation technique could provide a basis for developing a personal contextual vocabulary, to better understand the desired acoustical response of individual musicians.

  20. SIGNAL DETECTION BEHAVIOR IN HUMANS AND RATS: A COMPARISON WITH MATCHED TASKS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal models of human cognitive processes are essential for studying the neurobiological mechanisms of these processes and for developing therapies for intoxication and neurodegenerative diseases. A discrete-trial signal detection task was developed for assessing sustained atten...

  1. Signal to Noise Ratios of Pulsed and Sinewave Modulated Direct Detection Lidar for IPDA Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratios have been derived for IPDA lidar using a direct detection receiver for both pulsed and sinewave laser modulation techniques, and the results and laboratory measurements are presented

  2. Vertex evoked potentials in a rating-scale detection task: Relation to signal probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Vertex evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing in an auditory detection task with rating scale responses. Three values of a priori probability of signal presentation were tested. The amplitudes of the N1 and P3 components of the vertex potential associated with correct detections of the signal were found to be systematically related to the strictness of the response criterion and independent of variations in a priori signal probability. No similar evoked potential components were found associated with signal absent judgements (misses and correct rejections) regardless of the confidence level of the judgement or signal probability. These results strongly support the contention that the form of the vertex evoked response is closely correlated with the subject's psychophysical decision regarding the presence or absence of a threshold level signal.

  3. Signal Detection Techniques for Diagnostic Monitoring of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, Thomas; Jong, Jen-Yi

    1986-01-01

    An investigation to develop, implement, and evaluate signal analysis techniques for the detection and classification of incipient mechanical failures in turbomachinery is reviewed. A brief description of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) test/measurement program is presented. Signal analysis techniques available to describe dynamic measurement characteristics are reviewed. Time domain and spectral methods are described, and statistical classification in terms of moments is discussed. Several of these waveform analysis techniques have been implemented on a computer and applied to dynamc signals. A laboratory evaluation of the methods with respect to signal detection capability is described. A unique coherence function (the hyper-coherence) was developed through the course of this investigation, which appears promising as a diagnostic tool. This technique and several other non-linear methods of signal analysis are presented and illustrated by application. Software for application of these techniques has been installed on the signal processing system at the NASA/MSFC Systems Dynamics Laboratory.

  4. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-09-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neural networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  5. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-04-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neutral networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  6. Wavelet Transform for Real-Time Detection of Action Potentials in Neural Signals

    PubMed Central

    Quotb, Adam; Bornat, Yannick; Renaud, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We present a study on wavelet detection methods of neuronal action potentials (APs). Our final goal is to implement the selected algorithms on custom integrated electronics for on-line processing of neural signals; therefore we take real-time computing as a hard specification and silicon area as a price to pay. Using simulated neural signals including APs, we characterize an efficient wavelet method for AP extraction by evaluating its detection rate and its implementation cost. We compare software implementation for three methods: adaptive threshold, discrete wavelet transform (DWT), and stationary wavelet transform (SWT). We evaluate detection rate and implementation cost for detection functions dynamically comparing a signal with an adaptive threshold proportional to its SD, where the signal is the raw neural signal, respectively: (i) non-processed; (ii) processed by a DWT; (iii) processed by a SWT. We also use different mother wavelets and test different data formats to set an optimal compromise between accuracy and silicon cost. Detection accuracy is evaluated together with false negative and false positive detections. Simulation results show that for on-line AP detection implemented on a configurable digital integrated circuit, APs underneath the noise level can be detected using SWT with a well-selected mother wavelet, combined to an adaptive threshold. PMID:21811455

  7. Wall lizards display conspicuous signals to conspecifics and reduce detection by avian predators

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Visual signals are often under conflicting selection to be hidden from predators while being conspicuous to mates and rivals. Here, we investigated whether 3 different island populations of Aegean wall lizards (Podarcis erhardii) with variable coloration among diverse island habitats exhibit simultaneous camouflage and sexual signals. We examined whether signals appear better tuned to conspecific vision as opposed to that of avian predators, and whether background-matching camouflage and sexual signals are partitioned to specific body regions. This could facilitate both covert sexual signaling and camouflage according to the viewing perspectives of predators and conspecifics. We found that lizards typically appeared twice as conspicuous to conspecifics than to avian predators against the same visual background, largely due to lizards’ enhanced sensitivity to ultraviolet, suggesting that P. erhardii signals are tuned to conspecific vision to reduce detection by predators. Males were more conspicuous than females to both predators and conspecifics. In 2 populations, male backs were relatively more camouflaged to predators compared to signaling flanks, whereas in females, exposed and concealed surfaces were camouflaged to predators and generally did not differ in background matching. These findings indicate that lizard coloration evolves under the competing demands of natural and sexual selection to promote signals that are visible to conspecifics while being less perceptible to avian predators. They also elucidate how interactions between natural and sexual selection influence signal detectability and partitioning to different body regions, highlighting the importance of considering receiver vision, viewing perspectives, and signaling environments in studies of signal evolution. PMID:25419083

  8. Techniques and applications for binaural sound manipulation in human-machine interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1990-01-01

    The implementation of binaural sound to speech and auditory sound cues (auditory icons) is addressed from both an applications and technical standpoint. Techniques overviewed include processing by means of filtering with head-related transfer functions. Application to advanced cockpit human interface systems is discussed, although the techniques are extendable to any human-machine interface. Research issues pertaining to three-dimensional sound displays under investigation at the Aerospace Human Factors Division at NASA Ames Research Center are described.

  9. Quantum detection of coherent-state signals in the presence of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Lau, C. W.

    2003-01-01

    A general method for solving an important class of quantum detection problems will be presented and evaluated. The quantum theory for detecting pure states for communications purposes has been developed over two decades ago, however the mixed state problem representing signal plus noise states has received little attention due to its great complexity. Here we develop a practical model for solving the mixed-state problem using a discrete approximation to the coherent-state representation of signal plus noise density operators.

  10. Technical feasibility evaluation of fluorescence signal detection by compact photonic explorer for better health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Wang, LeMing; Wang, Q. Z.; Luo, J.-C.; Zeng, Fanan; Zevallos, Manuel; Budansky, Yury; Alfano, Scott; Katz, Alvin; Alfano, R. R.

    2004-10-01

    The lowest detectable fluorescence signal level from biomedical specimens have been determined using a spectrometer, cooled CCD detector, and PIN photodiode with 365 nm UV LED light excitation. The data indicates the PIN photodiodes have adequate sensitivity for detection of tissue fluorescence with a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. This data is being used to design a "pill-sized" Compact Photonics Explorer (CPE) for in vivo cancer optical diagnostics.

  11. Refined detection of cracks in weep holes using spatial signal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, J. C.; Achenbach, J. D.

    2001-04-01

    In earlier work, an automated protocol was considered to detect bottom cracks in weep holes. During experimentation, this protocol was found to produce some false calls and miss certain small cracks. In this paper, a technique is presented which examines the variation in the A-scan signals as the transducer is incrementally moved along the wing surface. The advantage of this B-scan classification technique is its ability to detect superimposed signals independently from the shape of the pulse.

  12. Electronic post-compensation of WDM transmission impairments using coherent detection and digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Chen, Xin; Goldfarb, Gilad; Mateo, Eduardo; Kim, Inwoong; Yaman, Fatih; Li, Guifang

    2008-01-21

    A universal post-compensation scheme for fiber impairments in wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) systems is proposed based on coherent detection and digital signal processing (DSP). Transmission of 10 x 10 Gbit/s binary-phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signals at a channel spacing of 20 GHz over 800 km dispersion shifted fiber (DSF) has been demonstrated numerically. PMID:18542162

  13. Objectively measuring signal detectability, contrast, blur and noise in medical images using channelized joint observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Platiša, Ljiljana; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    To improve imaging systems and image processing techniques, objective image quality assessment is essential. Model observers adopting a task-based quality assessment strategy by estimating signal detectability measures, have shown to be quite successful to this end. At the same time, costly and time-consuming human observer experiments can be avoided. However, optimizing images in terms of signal detectability alone, still allows a lot of freedom in terms of the imaging parameters. More specifically, fixing the signal detectability defines a manifold in the imaging parameter space on which different "possible" solutions reside. In this article, we present measures that can be used to distinguish these possible solutions from each other, in terms of image quality factors such as signal blur, noise and signal contrast. Our approach is based on an extended channelized joint observer (CJO) that simultaneously estimates the signal amplitude, scale and detectability. As an application, we use this technique to design k-space trajectories for MRI acquisition. Our technique allows to compare the different spiral trajectories in terms of blur, noise and contrast, even when the signal detectability is estimated to be equal.

  14. A Bayesian group sequential approach to safety signal detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenfeng; Zhao, Naiqing; Qin, Guoyou; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Clinical safety data, usually reported as clinically manifested adverse events (AEs) according to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), are routinely collected during the course of a clinical trial involving comparative groups, and periodical monitoring of the safety events is often required to determine whether excessive occurrence of a set of AEs is associated with treatment. To accommodate the structure of reported AEs with the MedDRA system, a Bayesian hierarchical model has been proposed for the analysis of clinical safety data. However, the characteristics of sequential use of the Bayesian method has not been studied. In this paper the Bayesian hierarchical model is applied in a group sequential manner for multiple interim analyses of safety events. A decision-theoretic approach is employed to determine threshold values in the safety signaling process. The proposed approach is illustrated through simulations and a real example. PMID:23331232

  15. Signal detection in l/f noise of SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Anderson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the variance on the SQUID power spectrum in the l/f low frequency region is well behaved, i.e., any small frequency band may be treated as white noise in standard power spectrum estimation theory. Specifically a calibration signal is examined at 0.017 Hz with an equivalent energy referred to the SQUID input coil of 1 times 10 to the -30th J and a digitally recorded and analyzed record of 140 hr duration obtained an optimum S/N better than 400. The results are in good agreement with theory. In addition no deviation from the l/f dependence of the noise energy spectrum is seen down to frequencies below 10 to the -5th Hz. A commercially available SQUID and electronics system were used.

  16. Development of an Efficient Binaural Simulation for the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalime, Aimee L.; Johnson, Marty E.; Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Binaural or "virtual acoustic" representation has been proposed as a method of analyzing acoustic and vibroacoustic data. Unfortunately, this binaural representation can require extensive computer power to apply the Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) to a large number of sources, as with a vibrating structure. This work focuses on reducing the number of real-time computations required in this binaural analysis through the use of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Equivalent Source Reduction (ESR). The SVD method reduces the complexity of the HRTF computations by breaking the HRTFs into dominant singular values (and vectors). The ESR method reduces the number of sources to be analyzed in real-time computation by replacing sources on the scale of a structural wavelength with sources on the scale of an acoustic wavelength. It is shown that the effectiveness of the SVD and ESR methods improves as the complexity of the source increases. In addition, preliminary auralization tests have shown that the results from both the SVD and ESR methods are indistinguishable from the results found with the exhaustive method.

  17. Monaural and binaural hearing directivity in the bottlenose dolphin: evoked-potential study.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya; Klishin, Vladimir O; Bulgakova, Tatyana N

    2006-01-01

    Hearing thresholds as a function of sound-source azimuth were measured in bottlenose dolphins using an auditory evoked potential (AEP) technique. AEP recording from a region next to the ear allowed recording monaural responses. Thus, a monaural directivity diagram (a threshold-vs-azimuth function) was obtained. For comparison, binaural AEP components were recorded from the vertex to get standard binaural directivity diagrams. Both monaural and binaural diagrams were obtained at frequencies ranging from 8 to 128 kHz in quarter-octave steps. At all frequencies, the monaural diagram demonstrated asymmetry manifesting itself as: (1) lower thresholds at the ipsilateral azimuth as compared to the symmetrical contralateral azimuth and (2) ipsilateral shift of the lowest-threshold point. The directivity index increased with frequency: at the ipsilateral side it rose from 4.7 to 17.8 dB from 11.2 to 128 kHz, and from 10.5 to 15.6 dB at the contralateral side. The lowest-threshold azimuth shifted from 0 degrees at 90-128 kHz to 22.5 degrees at 8-11.2 kHz. The frequency-dependent variation of the lowest-threshold azimuth indicates the presence of two sound-receiving apertures at each head side: a high-frequency aperture with the axis directed frontally, and a low-frequency aperture with the axis directed laterally. PMID:16454317

  18. Binaural beats increase interhemispheric alpha-band coherence between auditory cortices.

    PubMed

    Solcà, Marco; Mottaz, Anaïs; Guggisberg, Adrian G

    2016-02-01

    Binaural beats (BBs) are an auditory illusion occurring when two tones of slightly different frequency are presented separately to each ear. BBs have been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes through synchronization of the brain hemispheres. To test this, we recorded electroencephalograms (EEG) at rest and while participants listened to BBs or a monaural control condition during which both tones were presented to both ears. We calculated for each condition the interhemispheric coherence, which expressed the synchrony between neural oscillations of both hemispheres. Compared to monaural beats and resting state, BBs enhanced interhemispheric coherence between the auditory cortices. Beat frequencies in the alpha (10 Hz) and theta (4 Hz) frequency range both increased interhemispheric coherence selectively at alpha frequencies. In a second experiment, we evaluated whether this coherence increase has a behavioral aftereffect on binaural listening. No effects were observed in a dichotic digit task performed immediately after BBs presentation. Our results suggest that BBs enhance alpha-band oscillation synchrony between the auditory cortices during auditory stimulation. This effect seems to reflect binaural integration rather than entrainment. PMID:26541421

  19. Advanced Geospatial Hydrodynamic Signals Analysis for Tsunami Event Detection and Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab-Zavar, Banafshe; Sabeur, Zoheir

    2013-04-01

    Current early tsunami warning can be issued upon the detection of a seismic event which may occur at a given location offshore. This also provides an opportunity to predict the tsunami wave propagation and run-ups at potentially affected coastal zones by selecting the best matching seismic event from a database of pre-computed tsunami scenarios. Nevertheless, it remains difficult and challenging to obtain the rupture parameters of the tsunamigenic earthquakes in real time and simulate the tsunami propagation with high accuracy. In this study, we propose a supporting approach, in which the hydrodynamic signal is systematically analysed for traces of a tsunamigenic signal. The combination of relatively low amplitudes of a tsunami signal at deep waters and the frequent occurrence of background signals and noise contributes to a generally low signal to noise ratio for the tsunami signal; which in turn makes the detection of this signal difficult. In order to improve the accuracy and confidence of detection, a re-identification framework in which a tsunamigenic signal is detected via the scan of a network of hydrodynamic stations with water level sensing is performed. The aim is to attempt the re-identification of the same signatures as the tsunami wave spatially propagates through the hydrodynamic stations sensing network. The re-identification of the tsunamigenic signal is technically possible since the tsunami signal at the open ocean itself conserves its birthmarks relating it to the source event. As well as supporting the initial detection and improving the confidence of detection, a re-identified signal is indicative of the spatial range of the signal, and thereby it can be used to facilitate the identification of certain background signals such as wind waves which do not have as large a spatial reach as tsunamis. In this paper, the proposed methodology for the automatic detection of tsunamigenic signals has been achieved using open data from NOAA with a recorded

  20. Automatic detecting method of LED signal lamps on fascia based on color image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaoling; Hou, Wenguang; Ding, Mingyue

    2009-10-01

    Instrument display panel is one of the most important parts of automobiles. Automatic detection of LED signal lamps is critical to ensure the reliability of automobile systems. In this paper, an automatic detection method was developed which is composed of three parts in the automatic detection: the shape of LED lamps, the color of LED lamps, and defect spots inside the lamps. More than hundreds of fascias were detected with the automatic detection algorithm. The speed of the algorithm is quite fast and satisfied with the real-time request of the system. Further, the detection result was demonstrated to be stable and accurate.

  1. The observation of theta wave modulation on brain training by 5 Hz-binaural beat stimulation in seven days.

    PubMed

    Yamsa-Ard, Traisak; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2015-08-01

    Traditional buddhist meditation method maybe easy for someone with high experience. However, for the beginner, it is very difficult to keep mental concentration with the tradition way for more than 5 minutes. This research aims to observe effect of the new method for meditation in various analysis methods. A piano music mixed with a 5 Hz (theta band enhancement) binaural beat frequency was used to modulate the brain signals continuously for 7 days. Male of the average age of 33.5±3.84 and female of the average age of 28.6±2.49 were participated. All participants were acquired EEGs twice, before the experiment and seven days after the experiment. We also proposed the observations on the changes of absolute powers, relative powers and brain connectivity (coherence) of the participants. After seven days of training, the absolute power, relative power, and coherence were clearly closer to the normative database. We can initially say that the recommended meditation method can efficiently mimic the effect of having the traditional buddhist meditation on enhancing the delta and theta powers in the brain. PMID:26737822

  2. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  3. Detection of adverse drug reactions by medication antidote signals and comparison of their sensitivity with common methods of ADR detection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Lateef M.; Al-Harthi, Sameer E.; Alkreathy, Huda M.; Osman, Abdel-Moneim M.; Ali, Ahmed S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the PPVs of selected ten medication antidote signals in recognizing potential ADRs and comparison of their sensitivity with manual chart analysis, and voluntary reporting recognizing the same ADRs. Method The inpatient EMR database of internal medicine department was utilized for a period of one year, adult patients prescribed at least one of the ten signals, were included in the study, recipient patients of antidote signals were assessed for the occurrence of an ADR by Naranjo’s tool of ADR evaluation. PPVs of each antidote signal were verified. Result PPV of Methylprednisolone and Phytonadione was 0.28, Metoclopramide and Potassium Chloride – 0.29, Dextrose 50%, Promethazine, Sodium Polystyrene and Loperamide – 0.30, Protamine and Acetylcysteine – 0.33. In comparison of confirmed ADRs of antidote signals with other methods, Dextrose 50%, Metoclopramide, Sodium Polystyrene, Potassium Chloride, Methylprednisolone and Promethazine seem to be extremely significant (P value > 0.0001), while ADRs of Phytonadione, Protamine, Acetylcysteine and Loperamide were insignificant. Conclusion Antidote medication signals have definitive discerning evaluation value of ADRs over routine methods of ADR detection with a high detection rate with a minimum cost; Their integration with hospital EMR database and routine patient safety surveillance enhances transparency, time-saving and facilitates ADR detection. PMID:26594117

  4. Sensitive Method for Biomolecule Detection Utilizing Signal Amplification with Porphyrin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Lauren E; Wright, David W

    2016-06-01

    Disease diagnosis requires identification of biomarkers that occur in small quantities, making detection a difficult task. Effective diagnosis is an even greater challenge in low-resource areas of the world. Methods must be simple, stable, and sensitive so that tests can be easily administered and withstand uncontrolled environmental conditions. One approach to this issue is development of stable signal amplification strategies. In this work, we applied the nanocrystal-based signal amplification method to tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin nanoparticles (TCPP NPs). The dissolution of the nanoparticle into thousands of porphyrin molecules results in amplified detection of the biomarker. By using nanoparticles as the signal-generating moiety, stability of the detection method is increased relative to commonly used enzyme-based assays. Additionally, the inherent fluorescent signal of TCPP molecules can be measured after nanoparticle dissolution. The ability to directly read the TCPP fluorescent signal increases assay simplicity by reducing the steps required for the test. This detection method was optimized by detecting rabbit IgG and then was applied to the detection of the malarial biomarker Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein II (pfHRPII) from a complex matrix. The results for both biomarkers were assays with low picomolar limits of detection. PMID:27160976

  5. Detection of low-amplitude in vivo intrinsic signals from an optical imager of retinal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; T'so, Dan; Pattichis, Marios; Kwon, Young; Kardon, Randy; Abramoff, Michael; Soliz, Peter

    2006-02-01

    In the early stages of some retinal diseases, such as glaucoma, loss of retinal activity may be difficult to detect with today's clinical instruments. Many of today's instruments focus on detecting changes in anatomical structures, such as the nerve fiber layer. Our device, which is based on a modified fundus camera, seeks to detect changes in optical signals that reflect functional changes in the retina. The functional imager uses a patterned stimulus at wavelength of 535nm. An intrinsic functional signal is collected at a near infrared wavelength. Measured changes in reflectance in response to the visual stimulus are on the order of 0.1% to 1% of the total reflected intensity level, which makes the functional signal difficult to detect by standard methods because it is masked by other physiological signals and by imaging system noise. In this paper, we analyze the video sequences from a set of 60 experiments with different patterned stimuli from cats. Using a set of statistical techniques known as Independent Component Analysis (ICA), we estimate the signals present in the videos. Through controlled simulation experiments, we quantify the limits of signal strength in order to detect the physiological signal of interest. The results of the analysis show that, in principle, signal levels of 0.1% (-30dB) can be detected. The study found that in 86% of the animal experiments the patterned stimuli effects on the retina can be detected and extracted. The analysis of the different responses extracted from the videos can give an insight of the functional processes present during the stimulation of the retina.

  6. The effect of white non-stationary data on drifting signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Mauricio; Stroeer, Alexander; Benacquista, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    We analyze the effect of non-stationary noise in the detection of drifting signals on unevenly sampled data. Initial frequency estimation is obtained from a Lomb-Scargle periodogram; which is followed by a global multi-start optimization, as working on a dense local Nelder-Mead iterator for parameter estimates. It has been found that a varying white noise level has no effect on the required relative signal-to-noise ratio for detection in the proposed algorithm, though affecting the absolute amplitude strength of the signal recording. Future work includes the addition of colored noise to this analysis.

  7. Design and experiment of a neural signal detection using a FES driving system.

    PubMed

    Zonghao, Huang; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaoying, Lu; Wenyuan, Li; Xiaoyan, Shen; Xintai, Zhao; Shushan, Xie; Haixian, Pan; Cunliang, Zhu

    2010-01-01

    The channel bridging, signal regenerating, and functional rebuilding of injured nerves is one of the most important issues in life science research. In recent years, some progresses in the research area have been made in repairing injured nerves with microelectronic neural bridge. Based on the previous work, this paper presents a neural signal detection and functional electrical stimulation (FES) driving system with using high performance operational amplifiers, which has been realized. The experimental results show that the designed system meets requirements. In animal experiments, sciatic nerve signal detection, regeneration and function rebuilding between two toads have been accomplished successfully by using the designed system. PMID:21096372

  8. Coherent (photon) vs incoherent (current) detection of multidimensional optical signals from single molecules in open junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Hua, Weijie; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-06-07

    The nonlinear optical response of a current-carrying single molecule coupled to two metal leads and driven by a sequence of impulsive optical pulses with controllable phases and time delays is calculated. Coherent (stimulated, heterodyne) detection of photons and incoherent detection of the optically induced current are compared. Using a diagrammatic Liouville space superoperator formalism, the signals are recast in terms of molecular correlation functions which are then expanded in the many-body molecular states. Two dimensional signals in benzene-1,4-dithiol molecule show cross peaks involving charged states. The correlation between optical and charge current signal is also observed.

  9. Data mining for signal detection of adverse event safety data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Chia; Tsong, Yi; Chen, James J

    2013-01-01

    The Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) is the primary database designed to support the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) postmarketing safety surveillance program for all approved drugs and therapeutic biologic products. Most current disproportionality analysis focuses on the detection of potential adverse events (AE) involving a single drug and a single AE only. In this paper, we present a data mining biclustering technique based on the singular value decomposition to extract local regions of association for a safety study. The analysis consists of collection of biclusters, each representing an association between a set of drugs with the corresponding set of adverse events. Significance of each bicluster can be tested using disproportionality analysis. Individual drug-event combination can be further tested. A safety data set consisting of 193 drugs with 8453 adverse events is analyzed as an illustration. PMID:23331228

  10. Signal Detection Theory Applied to Helicopter Transmission Diagnostic Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Keller, Jonathan A.; Wade, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) have potential for providing data to support increasing the service life of a dynamic mechanical component in the transmission of a helicopter. Data collected can demonstrate the HUMS condition indicator responds to a specific component fault with appropriate alert limits and minimal false alarms. Defining thresholds for specific faults requires a tradeoff between the sensitivity of the condition indicator (CI) limit to indicate damage and the number of false alarms. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to assess CI performance was demonstrated using CI data collected from accelerometers installed on several UH60 Black Hawk and AH64 Apache helicopters and an AH64 helicopter component test stand. Results of the analysis indicate ROC curves can be used to reliably assess the performance of commercial HUMS condition indicators to detect damaged gears and bearings in a helicopter transmission.

  11. Signal Detection Theory Applied to Helicopter Transmission Diagnostic Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Keller, Jonathan A.; Wade, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) have potential for providing data to support increasing the service life of a dynamic mechanical component in the transmission of a helicopter. Data collected can demonstrate the HUMS condition indicator responds to a specific component fault with appropriate alert limits and minimal false alarms. Defining thresholds for specific faults requires a tradeoff between the sensitivity of the condition indicator (CI) limit to indicate damage and the number of false alarms. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to assess CI performance was demonstrated using CI data collected from accelerometers installed on several UH60 Black Hawk and AH64 Apache helicopters and an AH64 helicopter component test stand. Results of the analysis indicate ROC curves can be used to reliably assess the performance of commercial HUMS condition indicators to detect damaged gears and bearings in a helicopter transmission.

  12. Dual-Process Theory and Signal-Detection Theory of Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixted, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Two influential models of recognition memory, the unequal-variance signal-detection model and a dual-process threshold/detection model, accurately describe the receiver operating characteristic, but only the latter model can provide estimates of recollection and familiarity. Such estimates often accord with those provided by the remember-know…

  13. Sensitive SERS detection of miRNA via enzyme-free DNA machine signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Ye, Sujuan; Luo, Xiliang

    2016-08-11

    In this work, an enzyme-free signal amplified detection platform is described for miRNA detection with a DNA fueled molecular machine. Coupling SERS technology with multiple amplification modes, this flexible biosensing system exhibits high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27469084

  14. Compressive Sensing of Roller Bearing Faults via Harmonic Detection from Under-Sampled Vibration Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Gang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Huaqing; Luo, Ganggang; Ma, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    The Shannon sampling principle requires substantial amounts of data to ensure the accuracy of on-line monitoring of roller bearing fault signals. Challenges are often encountered as a result of the cumbersome data monitoring, thus a novel method focused on compressed vibration signals for detecting roller bearing faults is developed in this study. Considering that harmonics often represent the fault characteristic frequencies in vibration signals, a compressive sensing frame of characteristic harmonics is proposed to detect bearing faults. A compressed vibration signal is first acquired from a sensing matrix with information preserved through a well-designed sampling strategy. A reconstruction process of the under-sampled vibration signal is then pursued as attempts are conducted to detect the characteristic harmonics from sparse measurements through a compressive matching pursuit strategy. In the proposed method bearing fault features depend on the existence of characteristic harmonics, as typically detected directly from compressed data far before reconstruction completion. The process of sampling and detection may then be performed simultaneously without complete recovery of the under-sampled signals. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulations and experiments. PMID:26473858

  15. Method of detection, classification, and identification of objects employing acoustic signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzanowski, Tomasz; Madura, Henryk; Sosnowski, Tomasz; Chmielewski, Krzysztof

    2008-10-01

    The methods of detection and identification of objects based on acoustic signal analysis are used in many applications, e.g., alarm systems, military battlefield reconnaissance systems, intelligent ammunition, and others. The construction of technical objects such as vehicle or helicopter gives some possibilities to identify them on the basis of acoustic signals generated by those objects. In this paper a method of automatic detection, classification and identification of military vehicles and helicopters using a digital analysis of acoustic signals is presented. The method offers a relatively high probability of object detection in attendance of other disturbing acoustic signals. Moreover, it provides low probability of false classification and identification of object. The application of this method to acoustic sensor for the anti-helicopter mine is also presented.

  16. Auditory-visual speech perception and synchrony detection for speech and nonspeech signals

    PubMed Central

    Conrey, Brianna; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has identified a “synchrony window” of several hundred milliseconds over which auditory-visual (AV) asynchronies are not reliably perceived. Individual variability in the size of this AV synchrony window has been linked with variability in AV speech perception measures, but it was not clear whether AV speech perception measures are related to synchrony detection for speech only or for both speech and nonspeech signals. An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship between measures of AV speech perception and AV synchrony detection for speech and nonspeech signals. Variability in AV synchrony detection for both speech and nonspeech signals was found to be related to variability in measures of auditory-only (A-only) and AV speech perception, suggesting that temporal processing for both speech and nonspeech signals must be taken into account in explaining variability in A-only and multisensory speech perception. PMID:16838548

  17. SETI: The transmission rate of radio communication and the signal's detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, P. A.

    2011-11-01

    The transmission rate of communication between radio telescopes on Earth and extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) is here calculated up to distances of 1000 light years. Both phase-shift keying (PSK) and frequency-shift keying (FSK) modulation schemes are considered. It is shown that M-ary FSK is advantageous in terms of energy. Narrow-band pulses scattered over the spectrum sharing a common drift rate can be the probable signals of ETI. Modern SETI spectrum analyzers are well suited to searching for these types of signals. Such signals can be detected using the Hough transform which is a dedicated tool for detecting patterns in an image. The time-frequency plane representing the power output of the spectrum analyzer during the search for ETI gives an image from which the Hough transform (HT) can detect signal patterns with frequency drift.

  18. A feasibility assessment of automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cervical cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Zheng, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology provides a promising molecular imaging tool to detect cervical cancer. Since manual FISH analysis is difficult, time-consuming, and inconsistent, the automated FISH image scanning systems have been developed. Due to limited focal depth of scanned microscopic image, a FISH-probed specimen needs to be scanned in multiple layers that generate huge image data. To improve diagnostic efficiency of using automated FISH image analysis, we developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme. In this experiment, four pap-smear specimen slides were scanned by a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system that acquired two spectrum images simultaneously, which represent images of interphase cells and FISH-probed chromosome X. During image scanning, once detecting a cell signal, system captured nine image slides by automatically adjusting optical focus. Based on the sharpness index and maximum intensity measurement, cells and FISH signals distributed in 3-D space were projected into a 2-D con-focal image. CAD scheme was applied to each con-focal image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm and detect FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform. The ratio of abnormal cells was calculated to detect positive cases. In four scanned specimen slides, CAD generated 1676 con-focal images that depicted analyzable cells. FISH-probed signals were independently detected by our CAD algorithm and an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cyto-geneticists in detecting cervical cancers.

  19. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  20. Efficient signal processing for time-resolved fluorescence detection of nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Hacquebard, L.; Childress, L.

    2016-03-01

    Room-temperature fluorescence detection of the nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin typically has low signal to noise, requiring long experiments to reveal an averaged signal. Here, we present a simple approach to analysis of time-resolved fluorescence data that permits an improvement in measurement precision through signal processing alone. Applying our technique to experimental data reveals an improvement in signal to noise equivalent to a 14% increase in photon collection efficiency. We further explore the dependence of the signal to noise ratio on excitation power, and analyze our results using a rate equation model. Our results provide a rubric for optimizing fluorescence spin detection, which has direct implications for improving precision of nitrogen-vacancy-based sensors.

  1. Robust off-line heartbeat detection using ECG and pressure-signals.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Bart; Teo, Soo Kng; Yang, Bo; Su, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Artefacts in pressure- and ECG-signals generally arise due to different causes. Therefore, the combined analysis of both signals can increase the effectiveness of heartbeat detection compared to analysis using solely ECG-signals. In this paper, we present an algorithm for heartbeat annotation by combining the analysis of both the pressure- and ECG-signals. The novelties of our algorithm are as follows: (1) development of a new approach for annotating heartbeats using pressure-signals, (2) development of a mechanism that identifies and corrects paced rhythms, and (3) development of a noise detection approach. Our algorithm is tested on the datasets from the extended phase of the Physionet CINC-2014 challenge and produces an overall score of 87.31%. Finally, we put forth several recommendations that could further improve our algorithm. PMID:26641478

  2. [An algorithm based on ECG signal for sleep apnea syndrome detection].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaomin; Tu, Yuewen; Huang, Chao; Ye, Shuming; Chen, Hang

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) has a significant importance in clinic for preventing diseases of hypertention, coronary heart disease, arrhythmia and cerebrovascular disorder, etc. This study presents a novel method for SAS detection based on single-channel electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. The method preprocessed ECG and detected QRS waves to get RR signal and ECG-derived respiratory (EDR) signal. Then 40 time- and spectral-domain features were extracted to normalize the signals. After that support vector machine (SVM) was used to classify the signals as "apnea" or "normal". Finally, the performance of the method was evaluated by the MIT-BIH Apnea-ECG database, and an accuracy of 95% in train sets and an accuracy of 88% in test sets were achieved. PMID:24459959

  3. Parameters estimation and detection of MIMO-LFM signals using MWHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunhao; Tang, Bin

    2016-03-01

    This article proposed an improved Wigner-Hough Transform (WHT) for multicarrier LFM signals of MIMO radars (MIMO-LFM). First, the signal model of the intercepted MIMO-LFM signals and the localisation of conventional WHT for this signal model are analysed. Therefore, we present the new WHT with multiple matching components, which is called as multicomponent WHT (MWHT). Then the detection and parameters estimation performance of MWHT are deduced, and analytical results indicate that MWHT is superior to conventional WHT for MIMO-LFM. In order to reduce the computation cost, a coarse estimation method is introduced. Finally, the numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of MWHT, as well as analytical results.

  4. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release. PMID:26641634

  5. The real-time realization of detecting weak multi-pulse laser echo signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tinghua; Fan, Guihua; Sun, Huayan

    2014-12-01

    The multi-pulsed laser ranging technology is prominent on improving the maximum measuring range of laser active detection,laser range finder and other long-distance measurement. For all laser echo detection techniques, the weak signal detection is an important step, which aims to increase the detection range. Most algorithms are based on the priori knowledge of laser echo or the improvement of laser power. However, we cannot know or estimate the waveform accurately in many applications. Moreover, these means are difficult to satisfy the real-time needs. The present paper proposes an improved algorithm which extended the signal accumulation algorithm for the high power burst laser. This method is mainly based on signal accumulation and tri-cumulant algorithm which can improve the signal to noise SNR of the weak laser echo; moreover it does not need more prior knowledge of echo. In order to reduce the detection time, the algorithm is realized based on FPGA using signal retiming and parallel pipeline structure. The simulations and experiments results demonstrate that the minimum detecting SNR is -5dB and the maximum detecting time is only less than 1us.

  6. Application of chaos-based signal processing in the laser underwater target detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Z.; Lu, Y.; Chen, W.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the authors first demonstrate that the signal received from the laser underwater target detection system may be chaotic through phase space reconstruction, correlation dimension analysis and Lyapunov exponent calculation. Then the result of the correlation dimension analysis is used to construct a neural network predictor which is considered as an approximation of the basic dynamics of the received signal. Finally they introduce a chaos-based detection method and apply it to detect the underwater target. The performance of this new method is superior to that of the conventional method.

  7. Tables of square-law signal detection statistics for Hann spectra with 50 percent overlap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Stanley R.; Cullers, D. Kent

    1991-01-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, currently being planned by NASA, will require that an enormous amount of data be analyzed in real time by special purpose hardware. It is expected that overlapped Hann data windows will play an important role in this analysis. In order to understand the statistical implication of this approach, it has been necessary to compute detection statistics for overlapped Hann spectra. Tables of signal detection statistics are given for false alarm rates from 10(exp -14) to 10(exp -1) and signal detection probabilities from 0.50 to 0.99; the number of computed spectra ranges from 4 to 2000.

  8. Signal processing techniques for damage detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and embedded ultrasonic structural radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2004-07-01

    Embedded ultrasonic structural radar (EUSR) algorithm is developed for using piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) array to detect defects within a large area of a thin-plate specimen. Signal processing techniques are used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages, and thereby to determine the location of the defects with the EUSR algorithm. In our research, the transient tone-burst wave propagation signals are generated and collected by the embedded PWAS. Then, with signal processing, the frequency contents of the signals and the time of flight of individual frequencies are determined. This paper starts with an introduction of embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm. Then we will describe the signal processing methods used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages. The signal processing methods being used include the wavelet denoising, the cross correlation, and Hilbert transform. Though hardware device can provide averaging function to eliminate the noise coming from the signal collection process, wavelet denoising is included to ensure better signal quality for the application in real severe environment. For better recognition of time of flight, cross correlation method is used. Hilbert transform is applied to the signals after cross correlation in order to extract the envelope of the signals. Signal processing and EUSR are both implemented by developing a graphical user-friendly interface program in LabView. We conclude with a description of our vision for applying EUSR signal analysis to structural health monitoring and embedded nondestructive evaluation. To this end, we envisage an automatic damage detection application utilizing embedded PWAS, EUSR, and advanced signal processing.

  9. The detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Odermatt, P.; Etterlin, M.; Lerch, T.; Frei, M.; Farhat, M.

    2014-03-01

    This presentation describes an experimental approach for the detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis. Instead of using the high frequency pulses (typically 1MHz) only for transit time measurement different other signal characteristics are extracted from the individual signals and its correlation function with reference signals in order to gain knowledge of the water conditions. As the pulse repetition rate is high (typically 100Hz), statistical parameters can be extracted of the signals. The idea is to find patterns in the parameters by a classifier that can distinguish between the different water states. This classification scheme has been applied to different cavitation sections: a sphere in a water flow in circular tube at the HSLU in Lucerne, a NACA profile in a cavitation tunnel and a Francis model test turbine both at LMH in Lausanne. From the signal raw data several statistical parameters in the time and frequency domain as well as from the correlation function with reference signals have been determined. As classifiers two methods were used: neural feed forward networks and decision trees. For both classification methods realizations with lowest complexity as possible are of special interest. It is shown that three signal characteristics, two from the signal itself and one from the correlation function are in many cases sufficient for the detection capability. The final goal is to combine these results with operating point, vibration, acoustic emission and dynamic pressure information such that a distinction between dangerous and not dangerous cavitation is possible.

  10. Reducing false arrhythmia alarms in the ICU using multimodal signals and robust QRS detection.

    PubMed

    Sadr, Nadi; Huvanandana, Jacqueline; Nguyen, Doan Trang; Kalra, Chandan; McEwan, Alistair; de Chazal, Philip

    2016-08-01

    This study developed algorithms to decrease the arrhythmia false alarms in the ICU by processing multimodal signals of photoplethysmography (PPG), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and two ECG signals. The goal was to detect the five critical arrhythmias comprising asystole (ASY), extreme bradycardia (EBR), extreme tachycardia (ETC), ventricular tachycardia (VTA), and ventricular flutter or fibrillation (VFB). The different characteristics of the arrhythmias suggested the application of individual signal processing for each alarm and the combination of the algorithms to enhance false alarm detection. Thus, different features and signal processing techniques were used for each arrhythmia type. The ECG signals were first processed to reduce the signal interference. Then, a Hilbert-transform based QRS detector algorithm was utilized to identify the QRS complexes, which were then processed to determine the instantaneous heart rate. The pulsatile signals (PPG and ABP) were processed to discover the pulse onset of beats which were then employed to measure the heart rate. The signal quality index (SQI) of the signals was implemented to verify the integrity of the heart rate information. The overall score obtained by our algorithms in the 2015 Computing in Cardiology Challenge was a score of 74.03% for retrospective and 69.92% for real-time analysis. PMID:27455121

  11. Climate signal detected in sub-fossil and living oak trees data. An analysis of signal frequency components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Nechita; Francisca, Chiriloaei; Maria, Radoane; Ionel, Popa; Nicoae, Radoane

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on analysis the frequency components of the signal detected in living and sub-fossil tree ring series from different time periods. The investigation is oriented to analyze signal frequency components (low and high) of the two categories of trees. The interpretation technique of tree ring width is the instrument most often used to elaborate past climatic reconstructions. The annual resolution, but also, the high capacity of trees to accumulate climatic information are attributes which confer to palaeo-environmental reconstructions the biggest credibility. The main objective of the study refers to the evaluation of climatic signal characteristics, both present day climate and palaeo-climate (last 7000 years BP). Modern dendrochronological methods were applied on 350 samples of sub-fossil trees and 400 living trees. The subfossil trunks were sampled from different fluvial environments (Siret, Suceava, Moldova). Their age was determined using radiocarbon, varying from under 100 years to almost 7000 years BP. The subfossil tree species investigated were Quercus, Alnus, Ulmus. Considering living trees, these were identified on eastern part of Romania, in different actual physico-geographical conditions. The studied living tree species consisted in Quercus species (robur and petraea). Each site was investigated regarding stress factors of the sampled tree. The working methods were applied to the total wood series, both late and early, to detect intra-annual level climate information. Each series has been tested to separate individual trees with climatic signal of other trees with different signals (noises determined by competition between individuals or site stress, or anthropic impact). Comparing dendrochronological series (sub-fossil and living trees) we want to identify what significant causes determined the difference in the signal frequencies. Especially, the human interventions registered in the last 2 centuries will be evaluated by these

  12. The correct estimate of the probability of false detection of the matched filter in weak-signal detection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vio, R.; Andreani, P.

    2016-05-01

    The reliable detection of weak signals is a critical issue in many astronomical contexts and may have severe consequences for determining number counts and luminosity functions, but also for optimizing the use of telescope time in follow-up observations. Because of its optimal properties, one of the most popular and widely-used detection technique is the matched filter (MF). This is a linear filter designed to maximise the detectability of a signal of known structure that is buried in additive Gaussian random noise. In this work we show that in the very common situation where the number and position of the searched signals within a data sequence (e.g. an emission line in a spectrum) or an image (e.g. a point-source in an interferometric map) are unknown, this technique, when applied in its standard form, may severely underestimate the probability of false detection. This is because the correct use of the MF relies upon a priori knowledge of the position of the signal of interest. In the absence of this information, the statistical significance of features that are actually noise is overestimated and detections claimed that are actually spurious. For this reason, we present an alternative method of computing the probability of false detection that is based on the probability density function (PDF) of the peaks of a random field. It is able to provide a correct estimate of the probability of false detection for the one-, two- and three-dimensional case. We apply this technique to a real two-dimensional interferometric map obtained with ALMA.

  13. Nonlinear photoacoustic response of opaque media in gas microphone signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madvaliev, U.; Salikhov, T. Kh.; Sharifov, D. M.; Khan, N. A.

    2006-03-01

    We have theoretically studied the effect of thermal nonlinearity, due to the temperature dependence of the thermophysical and optical parameters for thermally thick opaque media, on the characteristics of the fundamental photoacoustic signal when the signal is detected by a gas microphone. We have shown that the dependence of the amplitude of the nonlinear component of the signal on the intensity of the incident radiation I0 is expressed by means of the dependence of the temperature rise for the irradiated sample surface Θ0 on I0, and the thermal nonlinearity does not affect the phase of the photoacoustic signal. We propose a theory for generation of the second harmonic of the photoacoustic signal. We have established that the phase shift of the photoacoustic signal is equal to 3π/4, while its amplitude depends on the frequency (˜ω-3/2) and the intensity (˜ I{0/2}).

  14. Two crossed axonal projections contribute to binaural unmasking of frequency-following responses in rat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi; Ma, Tianfang; Wang, Qian; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2009-11-01

    Frequency-following responses (FFRs) are sustained potentials based on phase-locked neural activities elicited by low- to medium-frequency periodical sound waveforms. Human brainstem FFRs, which are able to encode some critical acoustic features of speech, can be unmasked by binaural processing. However, the underlying unmasking mechanisms have not previously been reported. In rats, most neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) exhibit binaural responses which are affected by axonal projections from both the contralateral dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL) and the contralateral IC. The present study investigated whether the contralateral DNLL and the contralateral IC modulate binaural unmasking of FFRs recorded in the rat IC. The results show that IC FFRs to the rat pain call (chatter) were enhanced by local injection of the excitatory glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA) into the contralateral DNLL but were reduced by KYNA injection into the contralateral IC. Introducing a disparity between the interaural time difference (ITD) of the FFR-eliciting chatter and the ITD of the masking noise enhanced IC FFRs. Moreover, the ITD-disparity-induced FFR enhancement was weakened by injection of KYNA into either the contralateral DNLL or the contralateral IC when the ipsilateral chatter preceded the contralateral chatter. Thus, binaural hearing can improve IC FFRs against noise masking. More importantly, both inhibitory projections from the contralateral DNLL and excitatory projections from the contralateral IC modulate IC FFRs and play a role in forming binaural unmasking of IC FFRs. PMID:19840111

  15. High Speed All Optical Nyquist Signal Generation and Full-band Coherent Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Fang, Yuan; Chi, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Spectrum efficient data transmission is of key interest for high capacity optical communication systems considering the limited available bandwidth. Transmission of the high speed signal with higher-order modulation formats within the Nyquist bandwidth using coherent detection brings attractive performance advantages. However, high speed Nyquist signal generation with high order modulation formats is challenging. Electrical Nyquist pulse generation is restricted by the limited sampling rate and processor capacities of digital-to-analog convertor devices, while the optical Nyquist signals can provide a much higher symbol rate using time domain multiplexing method. However, most optical Nyquist signals are based on direct detection with simple modulation formats. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of high speed all optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped pulse generation and time-division multiplexing with high level modulation format and full-band coherent detection. Our experiments demonstrate a highly flexible and compatible all optical high speed Nyquist signal generation and detection scheme for future fiber communication systems. PMID:25142269

  16. Efficient detection and signal parameter estimation with applications to high dynamic GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1988-01-01

    A novel technique for simultaneously detecting data and estimating the parameters of a received carrier signal phase modulated by unknown data and experiencing very high Doppler, Doppler rate, etc. is discussed. Such a situation arises, for example, in the case of Global Positioning Systems (DPS) where the signal parameters are directly related to the position, velocity and acceleration of the GPS receiver. The proposed scheme is based upon first estimating the received signal local (data dependent) parameters over two consecutive bit periods, followed by the detection of a possible jump in these parameters. The presence of a detected jump signifies a data transition which is then removed from the received signal. This effectively demodulated signal is then processed to provide the estimates of global (data independent) parameters of the signal related to the position, velocity, etc. of the receiver. One of the key features of the proposed algorithm is the introduction of two different schemes which can provide an improvement of up to 3 dB over the conventional implementation of Kalman filter as applied to phase and frequency estimation, under low to medium signal-to-noise ratio conditions.

  17. Statistical properties of radio-frequency and envelope-detected signals with applications to medical ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.F.; Insana, M.F.; Brown, D.G.

    1987-05-01

    Both radio-frequency (rf) and envelope-detected signal anlayses have lead to successful tissue discrimination in medical ultrasound. The extrapolation from tissue discrimination to a description of the tissue structure requires an analysis of the statistics of complex signals. To that end, first- and second-order statistics of complex random signals are reviewed, and an example is taken from rf signal analysis of the backscattered echoes from diffuse scatterers. In this case the scattering form factor of small scatterers can be easily separated from long-range structure and corrected for the transducer characteristics, thereby yielding an instrument-independent tissue signature. The statistics of the more economical envelope- and square-law-detected signals are derived next and found to be almost identical when normalized autocorrelation functions are used. Of the two nonlinear methods of detection, the square-law or intensity scheme gives rise to statistics that are more transparent to physical insight. Moreover, an analysis of the intensity-correlation structure indicates that the contributions to the total echo signal from the diffuse scatter and from the steady and variable components of coherent scatter can still be separated and used for tissue characterization. However, this anlaysis is not system independent. Finally, the statistical methods of this paper may be applied directly to envelope signals in nuclear-magnetic-resonance imaging because of the approximate equivalence of second-order statistics for magnitude and intensity.

  18. Detecting transient signals in geodetic time series using sparse estimation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, Bryan; Simons, Mark; Agram, Piyush; Zhan, Zhongwhen

    2014-06-01

    We present a new method for automatically detecting transient deformation signals from geodetic time series. We cast the detection problem as a least squares procedure where the design matrix corresponds to a highly overcomplete, nonorthogonal dictionary of displacement functions in time that resemble transient signals of various timescales. The addition of a sparsity-inducing regularization term to the cost function limits the total number of dictionary elements needed to reconstruct the signal. Sparsity-inducing regularization enhances interpretability of the resultant time-dependent model by localizing the dominant timescales and onset times of the transient signals. Transient detection can then be performed using convex optimization software where detection sensitivity is dependent on the strength of the applied sparsity-inducing regularization. To assess uncertainties associated with estimation of the dictionary coefficients, we compare solutions with those found through a Bayesian inference approach to sample the full model space for each dictionary element. In addition to providing uncertainty bounds on the coefficients and confirming the optimization results, Bayesian sampling reveals trade-offs between dictionary elements that have nearly equal probability in modeling a transient signal. Thus, we can rigorously assess the probabilities of the occurrence of transient signals and their characteristic temporal evolution. The detection algorithm is applied on several synthetic time series and real observed GPS time series for the Cascadia region. For the latter data set, we incorporate a spatial weighting scheme that self-adjusts to the local network density and filters for spatially coherent signals. The weighting allows for the automatic detection of repeating slow slip events.

  19. An ideal-observer framework to investigate signal detectability in diffuse optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    With the emergence of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) as a non-invasive imaging modality, there is a requirement to evaluate the performance of the developed DOT systems on clinically relevant tasks. One such important task is the detection of high-absorption signals in the tissue. To investigate signal detectability in DOT systems for system optimization, an appropriate approach is to use the Bayesian ideal observer, but this observer is computationally very intensive. It has been shown that the Fisher information can be used as a surrogate figure of merit (SFoM) that approximates the ideal observer performance. In this paper, we present a theoretical framework to use the Fisher information for investigating signal detectability in DOT systems. The usage of Fisher information requires evaluating the gradient of the photon distribution function with respect to the absorption coefficients. We derive the expressions to compute the gradient of the photon distribution function with respect to the scattering and absorption coefficients. We find that computing these gradients simply requires executing the radiative transport equation with a different source term. We then demonstrate the application of the SFoM to investigate signal detectability in DOT by performing various simulation studies, which help to validate the proposed framework and also present some insights on signal detectability in DOT. PMID:24156068

  20. An Obstructive Sleep Apnea Detection Approach Using a Discriminative Hidden Markov Model From ECG Signals.

    PubMed

    Song, Changyue; Liu, Kaibo; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Lili; Xian, Xiaochen

    2016-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a common sleep disorder suffered by an increasing number of people worldwide. As an alternative to polysomnography (PSG) for OSA diagnosis, the automatic OSA detection methods used in the current practice mainly concentrate on feature extraction and classifier selection based on collected physiological signals. However, one common limitation in these methods is that the temporal dependence of signals are usually ignored, which may result in critical information loss for OSA diagnosis. In this study, we propose a novel OSA detection approach based on ECG signals by considering temporal dependence within segmented signals. A discriminative hidden Markov model (HMM) and corresponding parameter estimation algorithms are provided. In addition, subject-specific transition probabilities within the model are employed to characterize the subject-to-subject differences of potential OSA patients. To validate our approach, 70 recordings obtained from the Physionet Apnea-ECG database were used. Accuracies of 97.1% for per-recording classification and 86.2% for per-segment OSA detection with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity were achieved. Compared with other existing methods that simply ignore the temporal dependence of signals, the proposed HMM-based detection approach delivers more satisfactory detection performance and could be extended to other disease diagnosis applications. PMID:26560867

  1. Seismo-electric exploration; Expected signal amplitudes. [Conversion of seismic to electromagnetic signal in geological media and detection of electric or magnetic signals

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, R.D. . Dept. of Geophysics and Astronomy); Barker, A.S. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    For more than 20 years, Soviet scientists have published papers and registered patents describing the conversion of seismic to electromagnetic energy in geological environments and the detection of the electric or magnetic signals as a method of geophysical exploration. Because of the potential importance of a reliable geophysical technique for locating quartz veins, the authors have been conducting extensive laboratory and field tests of the phenomena. For the purposes of designing appropriate field tests the approximate signal magnitudes must be known, but little has been published on them. The paper describes a simplified model from which order-of-magnitude estimates of expected electric and magnetic signal strengths can be made with sufficient accuracy for such purposes. For mathematical convenience the target is modeled as a homogeneous sphere in which the seismic input induces uniform, time-varying electric polarization. More realistic configurations can be described by linear superposition of the potentials of appropriate sub-elements.

  2. Unsupervised Event Characterization and Detection in Multichannel Signals: An EEG application.

    PubMed

    Mur, Angel; Dormido, Raquel; Vega, Jesús; Duro, Natividad; Dormido-Canto, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new unsupervised method to automatically characterize and detect events in multichannel signals. This method is used to identify artifacts in electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings of brain activity. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated and compared with a supervised method. To this end an example of the performance of the algorithm to detect artifacts is shown. The results show that although both methods obtain similar classification, the proposed method allows detecting events without training data and can also be applied in signals whose events are unknown a priori. Furthermore, the proposed method provides an optimal window whereby an optimal detection and characterization of events is found. The detection of events can be applied in real-time. PMID:27120605

  3. Unsupervised Event Characterization and Detection in Multichannel Signals: An EEG application

    PubMed Central

    Mur, Angel; Dormido, Raquel; Vega, Jesús; Duro, Natividad; Dormido-Canto, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new unsupervised method to automatically characterize and detect events in multichannel signals. This method is used to identify artifacts in electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings of brain activity. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated and compared with a supervised method. To this end an example of the performance of the algorithm to detect artifacts is shown. The results show that although both methods obtain similar classification, the proposed method allows detecting events without training data and can also be applied in signals whose events are unknown a priori. Furthermore, the proposed method provides an optimal window whereby an optimal detection and characterization of events is found. The detection of events can be applied in real-time. PMID:27120605

  4. Fractal dimension analysis for spike detection in low SNR extracellular signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmasi, Mehrdad; Büttner, Ulrich; Glasauer, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Many algorithms have been suggested for detection and sorting of spikes in extracellular recording. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to detect spikes in low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). We propose a spike detection algorithm that is based on the fractal properties of extracellular signals and can detect spikes in low SNR regimes. Semi-intact spikes are low-amplitude spikes whose shapes are almost preserved. The detection of these spikes can significantly enhance the performance of multi-electrode recording systems. Approach. Semi-intact spikes are simulated by adding three noise components to a spike train: thermal noise, inter-spike noise, and spike-level noise. We show that simulated signals have fractal properties which make them proper candidates for fractal analysis. Then we use fractal dimension as the main core of our spike detection algorithm and call it fractal detector. The performance of the fractal detector is compared with three frequently used spike detectors. Main results. We demonstrate that in low SNR, the fractal detector has the best performance and results in the highest detection probability. It is shown that, in contrast to the other three detectors, the performance of the fractal detector is independent of inter-spike noise power and that variations in spike shape do not alter its performance. Finally, we use the fractal detector for spike detection in experimental data and similar to simulations, it is shown that the fractal detector has the best performance in low SNR regimes. Significance. The detection of low-amplitude spikes provides more information about the neural activity in the vicinity of the recording electrodes. Our results suggest using the fractal detector as a reliable and robust method for detecting semi-intact spikes in low SNR extracellular signals.

  5. Use of Multiscale Entropy to Facilitate Artifact Detection in Electroencephalographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Sara; Borges, Ana F. T.; Henriques, Teresa; Goldberger, Ary L.; Costa, Madalena D.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals present a myriad of challenges to analysis, beginning with the detection of artifacts. Prior approaches to noise detection have utilized multiple techniques, including visual methods, independent component analysis and wavelets. However, no single method is broadly accepted, inviting alternative ways to address this problem. Here, we introduce a novel approach based on a statistical physics method, multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, which quantifies the complexity of a signal. We postulate that noise corrupted EEG signals have lower information content, and, therefore, reduced complexity compared with their noise free counterparts. We test the new method on an open-access database of EEG signals with and without added artifacts due to electrode motion. PMID:26738116

  6. A new algorithm for epilepsy seizure onset detection and spread estimation from EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero-Rincón, Antonio; Pereyra, Marcelo; D’Giano, Carlos; Batatia, Hadj; Risk, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is a main public health issue. Patients suffering from this disease often exhibit different physical characterizations, which result from the synchronous and excessive discharge of a group of neurons in the cerebral cortex. Extracting this information using EEG signals is an important problem in biomedical signal processing. In this work we propose a new algorithm for seizure onset detection and spread estimation in epilepsy patients. The algorithm is based on a multilevel 1-D wavelet decomposition that captures the physiological brain frequency signals coupled with a generalized gaussian model. Preliminary experiments with signals from 30 epilepsy crisis and 11 subjects, suggest that the proposed methodology is a powerful tool for detecting the onset of epilepsy seizures with his spread across the brain.

  7. Detection of the greenhouse gas signal from space - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, T. P.; Haskins, R.; Chahine, M.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the expected changes in the atmospheric water vapor content and cloud cover, as predicted by the transient greenhouse gas (GHG) simulation of Hansen et al. (1988), are examined to determine whether the signals would be large enough and unique enough to be useful in a GHG detection study. The nature of the predicted GHG signal was first examined using the transient CO2 run from the GISS ocean/atmosphere general circulation model. Next, the remotely sensed irradiance characteristics data (as the measure of water vapor content) supplied by the HIRS/MSU sensors for the area of the equatorial cold tongue region (the region in which there are no measurement stations). It is shown that HIRS/MSU signals can provide data necessary for detecting GHS signals in atmospheric moisture for regions where ground observations are not possible.

  8. Use of multiscale entropy to facilitate artifact detection in electroencephalographic signals.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Sara; Borges, Ana F T; Henriques, Teresa; Goldberger, Ary L; Costa, Madalena D

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals present a myriad of challenges to analysis, beginning with the detection of artifacts. Prior approaches to noise detection have utilized multiple techniques, including visual methods, independent component analysis and wavelets. However, no single method is broadly accepted, inviting alternative ways to address this problem. Here, we introduce a novel approach based on a statistical physics method, multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, which quantifies the complexity of a signal. We postulate that noise corrupted EEG signals have lower information content, and, therefore, reduced complexity compared with their noise free counterparts. We test the new method on an open-access database of EEG signals with and without added artifacts due to electrode motion. PMID:26738116

  9. Signal processing for the detection of multiple imperfection echoes drowned in the structural noise.

    PubMed

    Drai, R; Benammar, A; Benchaala, A

    2004-04-01

    In this work, we propose to develop algorithms based on the split spectrum processing method associated with the multi-steps method based on "Group delay moving entropy" (GDME) allowing detecting and locating multiple imperfection echoes drowned in the structural noise of materials. In fact, GDME is based on the fact that defect echoes have a constant group delay while the noise has a random group delay. The investigation is performed with 4 known defect echoes with different characteristics (position, center frequency and bandwidth). The defect echo frequency is varied around the frequency of the input signal in order to evaluate, by signal to noise ratio calculation, the robustness of the detection method. The grain noise signal is generated first, by a simple clutter model which consider the noise, in the time domain, as the superimposed of signal coming from backscaterers in the medium and second, experimentally by a material with coarse grains. PMID:15047392

  10. Signal Detection of Multi-Channel Capillary Electrophoresis Chip Based on CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hongfeng; Yan, Weiping; Yang, Xiaobo; Li, Jiechao; Zhu, Jieying

    2012-12-01

    A kind of multi-channel capillary electrophoresis (CE) chip signal detection system based on CCD was developed. The output signal of the CCD sensor was processed by a series of pre-processing circuits and ADC, and then it was collected by the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip which communicated with a host computer. The core in FPGA was designed to control the signal flow of the CCD and transfer the data to PC based on a Nios II embedded soft-processor. The application of PC was used to store the data and demonstrate the curve. The measurement of the fluorescent signals for different concentration Rhodamine B dyes is presented and the comparison with other detection systems is also discussed.

  11. A novel time-domain signal processing algorithm for real time ventricular fibrillation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, G. E.; Scarone, N. C.; Liscovsky, P. O.; Rotter S/N, P.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents an application of a novel algorithm for real time detection of ECG pathologies, especially ventricular fibrillation. It is based on segmentation and labeling process of an oversampled signal. After this treatment, analyzing sequence of segments, global signal behaviours are obtained in the same way like a human being does. The entire process can be seen as a morphological filtering after a smart data sampling. The algorithm does not require any ECG digital signal pre-processing, and the computational cost is low, so it can be embedded into the sensors for wearable and permanent applications. The proposed algorithms could be the input signal description to expert systems or to artificial intelligence software in order to detect other pathologies.

  12. Matched signal detection on graphs: Theory and application to brain imaging data classification.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenhui; Sepulcre, Jorge; Johnson, Keith A; Fakhri, Georges E; Lu, Yue M; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-01-15

    Motivated by recent progress in signal processing on graphs, we have developed a matched signal detection (MSD) theory for signals with intrinsic structures described by weighted graphs. First, we regard graph Laplacian eigenvalues as frequencies of graph-signals and assume that the signal is in a subspace spanned by the first few graph Laplacian eigenvectors associated with lower eigenvalues. The conventional matched subspace detector can be applied to this case. Furthermore, we study signals that may not merely live in a subspace. Concretely, we consider signals with bounded variation on graphs and more general signals that are randomly drawn from a prior distribution. For bounded variation signals, the test is a weighted energy detector. For the random signals, the test statistic is the difference of signal variations on associated graphs, if a degenerate Gaussian distribution specified by the graph Laplacian is adopted. We evaluate the effectiveness of the MSD on graphs both with simulated and real data sets. Specifically, we apply MSD to the brain imaging data classification problem of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on two independent data sets: 1) positron emission tomography data with Pittsburgh compound-B tracer of 30 AD and 40 normal control (NC) subjects, and 2) resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) data of 30 early mild cognitive impairment and 20 NC subjects. Our results demonstrate that the MSD approach is able to outperform the traditional methods and help detect AD at an early stage, probably due to the success of exploiting the manifold structure of the data. PMID:26481679

  13. Detection and tracking of humans and vehicle targets using high definition television signals in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greneker, Gene

    2007-04-01

    The detection and tracking of humans and vehicles on the battlefield using radar systems operating at microwave frequencies was first achieved almost 40 years ago. The subsequent generation of radars designed to detect personnel and vehicles on the battlefield has seen improvements due to increased signal processing capability. To date, most of the self-contained human detection radars have incorporated a co-located (monostatic) transmitter and receiver operated by humans. Approximately, three decades ago the bistatic radar was introduced and used for security at high value target sites. These bistatic "fence" radars employ a transmitter located at one end of a bistatic baseline and a receiver at the other end of the baseline. The receiver is tuned to the transmitter. Operation is simple; an intruder crosses the bistatic baseline and is detected after simple signal processing is performed on the bistatic signature produced by the intruder. The experiments demonstrate that passive bistatic radar can be used to detect humans and vehicles. This paper describes "quick-look" experiments that have been conducted in the Atlanta, Georgia area to detect humans and vehicles using a passive radar configuration requiring no coordination between the receiver and transmitter. The illumination source (transmitter) is a High Definition Television (HDTV) broadcast transmitter located approximately 13.5 miles from the test area. The transmitter is broadcasting a 6 MHz wide digital signal with a pilot carrier on a frequency of 548.310 MHz. The continuous wave (CW) pilot carrier HDTV signal component is processed to extract the signature of the walking human or the signature of a vehicle. The experimental receiving system utilizes a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) communications receiver. A set of multi-element back to back Yagi antennas are used to provide a reference signal and the signal from the area where the human subject is located. The walking human generates micro

  14. The Effect of White Nonstationary and Colored Nonstationary Noise on Signal Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Mauricio; Benacquista, Matthew; Stroeer, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the effect of non-stationary noise on the detection of signals on unevenly sampled data. Initial frequency estimation is obtained from a Lomb-Scargle periodogram; which is followed by a global multi-start optimization, as working on a dense local Nelder-Mead iterator for parameter estimates. It has been found that a varying white noise level has no effect on the required relative signal-to-noise ratio for detection in the proposed algorithm, though affecting the absolute amplitude strength of the signal recording. Further analysis has been done on realistic colored noise. Different whitening routines have been incorporated to the proposed algorithm. Detection efficiency is compared for these different routines.

  15. Pulsed laser noise analysis and pump-probe signal detection with a data acquisition card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werley, Christopher A.; Teo, Stephanie M.; Nelson, Keith A.

    2011-12-01

    A photodiode and data acquisition card whose sampling clock is synchronized to the repetition rate of a laser are used to measure the energy of each laser pulse. Simple analysis of the data yields the noise spectrum from very low frequencies up to half the repetition rate and quantifies the pulse energy distribution. When two photodiodes for balanced detection are used in combination with an optical modulator, the technique is capable of detecting very weak pump-probe signals (ΔI/I0 ˜ 10-5 at 1 kHz), with a sensitivity that is competitive with a lock-in amplifier. Detection with the data acquisition card is versatile and offers many advantages including full quantification of noise during each stage of signal processing, arbitrary digital filtering in silico after data collection is complete, direct readout of percent signal modulation, and easy adaptation for fast scanning of delay between pump and probe.

  16. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect.

    PubMed

    Kostarakos, Konstantinos; Römer, Heiner

    2015-07-22

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of -21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and "novelty detection" to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. Significance statement: Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same "cocktail party problem," when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one species

  17. Intense and specialized dendritic localization of the fragile X mental retardation protein in binaural brainstem neurons: a comparative study in the alligator, chicken, gerbil, and human.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Sakano, Hitomi; Beebe, Karisa; Brown, Maile R; de Laat, Rian; Bothwell, Mark; Kulesza, Randy J; Rubel, Edwin W

    2014-06-15

    Neuronal dendrites are structurally and functionally dynamic in response to changes in afferent activity. The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an mRNA binding protein that regulates activity-dependent protein synthesis and morphological dynamics of dendrites. Loss and abnormal expression of FMRP occur in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and some forms of autism spectrum disorders. To provide further understanding of how FMRP signaling regulates dendritic dynamics, we examined dendritic expression and localization of FMRP in the reptilian and avian nucleus laminaris (NL) and its mammalian analogue, the medial superior olive (MSO), in rodents and humans. NL/MSO neurons are specialized for temporal processing of low-frequency sounds for binaural hearing, which is impaired in FXS. Protein BLAST analyses first demonstrate that the FMRP amino acid sequences in the alligator and chicken are highly similar to human FMRP with identical mRNA-binding and phosphorylation sites, suggesting that FMRP functions similarly across vertebrates. Immunocytochemistry further reveals that NL/MSO neurons have very high levels of dendritic FMRP in low-frequency hearing vertebrates including alligator, chicken, gerbil, and human. Remarkably, dendritic FMRP in NL/MSO neurons often accumulates at branch points and enlarged distal tips, loci known to be critical for branch-specific dendritic arbor dynamics. These observations support an important role for FMRP in regulating dendritic properties of binaural neurons that are essential for low-frequency sound localization and auditory scene segregation, and support the relevance of studying this regulation in nonhuman vertebrates that use low frequencies in order to further understand human auditory processing disorders. PMID:24318628

  18. Adaptive instant record signals applied to detection with time reversal operator decomposition.

    PubMed

    Folegot, Thomas; de Rosny, Julien; Prada, Claire; Fink, Mathias

    2005-06-01

    Time reversal arrays are becoming common tools whether for detection or tomography. These applications require the measurement of the response from the array to one or several receivers. The most natural way to record the impulse responses for several sources is to generate pulses successively from each emitting point and record simultaneously the signals from the receivers. However, this method is very time consuming or inefficient in terms of signal-to-noise ratio. To overcome this limitation quasi-orthogonal pseudonoise signals like Kasami sequences can be used. For guided wave propagation, a very high degree of orthogonality between the signal is necessary to allow an accurate measure of the whole multipath structure of the transfer function. Hence, in this work, we propose a new family of pseudo-orthogonal signals that is adapted to the environment and more specifically, to highly dispersive media. These adaptive instant records signals are used experimentally to detect targets using the time reversal operator decomposition method. The accuracy of the 15 x 15 transfer functions acquired simultaneously, and therefore the detection capability, are demonstrated in an experimental ultrasonic waveguide as a small-scale model of shallow water propagation including bottom absorption and reverberation. PMID:16018479

  19. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system. PMID:26343662

  20. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system. PMID:26343662

  1. Chiroptical signal enhancement in quasi-null-polarization-detection geometry: Intrinsic limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Hanju; Eom, Intae; Ahn, Sung-Hyun; Song, Ki-Hee; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-01

    Despite its unique capability of distinguishing molecular handedness, chiroptical spectroscopy suffers from the weak-signal problem, which has restricted more extensive applications. The quasi-null-polarization-detection (QNPD) method has been shown to be useful for enhancing the chiroptical signal. Here, the underlying enhancement mechanism in the QNPD method combined with a heterodyne detection scheme is elucidated. It is experimentally demonstrated that the optical rotatory dispersion signal can be amplified by a factor of ˜400, which is the maximum enhancement effect achievable with our femtosecond laser setup. The upper limit of the QNPD enhancement effect of chiroptical measurements could, in practice, be limited by imperfection of the polarizer and finite detection sensitivity. However, we show that there exists an intrinsic limit in the enhancement with the QNPD method due to the weak but finite contribution from the homodyne chiroptical signal. This is experimentally verified by measuring the optical rotation of linearly polarized light with the QNPD scheme. We further provide discussions on the connection between this intrinsic limitation in the QNPD scheme for enhanced detection of weak chiroptical signals and those in optical enantioselectivity and Raman optical activity with a structured chiral field. We anticipate that the present work could be useful in further developing time-resolved nonlinear chiroptical spectroscopy.

  2. Detection of driving fatigue by using noncontact EMG and ECG signals measurement system.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rongrong; Wang, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Driver fatigue can be detected by constructing a discriminant mode using some features obtained from physiological signals. There exist two major challenges of this kind of methods. One is how to collect physiological signals from subjects while they are driving without any interruption. The other is to find features of physiological signals that are of corresponding change with the loss of attention caused by driver fatigue. Driving fatigue is detected based on the study of surface electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiograph (ECG) during the driving period. The noncontact data acquisition system was used to collect physiological signals from the biceps femoris of each subject to tackle the first challenge. Fast independent component analysis (FastICA) and digital filter were utilized to process the original signals. Based on the statistical analysis results given by Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z test, the peak factor of EMG (p < 0.001) and the maximum of the cross-relation curve of EMG and ECG (p < 0.001) were selected as the combined characteristic to detect fatigue of drivers. The discriminant criterion of fatigue was obtained from the training samples by using Mahalanobis distance, and then the average classification accuracy was given by 10-fold cross-validation. The results showed that the method proposed in this paper can give well performance in distinguishing the normal state and fatigue state. The noncontact, onboard vehicle drivers' fatigue detection system was developed to reduce fatigue-related risks. PMID:24552510

  3. Wideband signal detection using a Nyquist folding analog-to-information receiver in multipath fading environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odejide, Olusegun; Annamalai, Annamalai; Akujuobi, Cajetan

    2010-04-01

    The need to efficiently and effectively monitor the frequency spectrum for identification of unoccupied bands is essential in communication systems such as Cognitive Radio (CR), battlefield communications, etc. The Nyquist Folding Analog-to-Information Receiver (NYFR) which is based on the theory of Compressed Sensing has been proposed recently to address this problem in a sparse environment. Although, typical CS techniques, involve random projections followed by a computationally intensive signal reconstruction process, the methods used in NYFR does not requires the laborious l1 minimization algorithm. The NYFR performs analog compression via a non-uniform sampling process that induces a chirp-like modulation on each received signal. Signal parameters can simply be determined by using timefrequency analysis techniques without full signal reconstruction. This paper revisits the detection problem of using NYFR for information recovery for appropriate frequency detection when the original signal in the presence of both the additive white Gaussian noise and Rice multipath fading. An automatic detection algorithm was also developed to determine the detected frequency parameters without looking at the FFT spectrogram plot.

  4. Analog CMOS design for optical coherence tomography signal detection and processing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Mathine, David L; Barton, Jennifer K

    2008-02-01

    A CMOS circuit was designed and fabricated for optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detection and processing. The circuit includes a photoreceiver, differential gain stage and lock-in amplifier based demodulator. The photoreceiver consists of a CMOS photodetector and low noise differential transimpedance amplifier which converts the optical interference signal into a voltage. The differential gain stage further amplifies the signal. The in-phase and quadrature channels of the lock-in amplifier each include an analog mixer and switched-capacitor low-pass filter with an external mixer reference signal. The interferogram envelope and phase can be extracted with this configuration, enabling Doppler OCT measurements. A sensitivity of -80 dB is achieved with faithful reproduction of the interferometric signal envelope. A sample image of finger tip is presented. PMID:18269983

  5. Error detection and correction for a multiple frequency quaternary phase shift keyed signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Kevin S.

    1989-06-01

    A multiple frequency quaternary phased shift (MFQPSK) signaling system was developed and experimentally tested in a controlled environment. In order to insure that the quality of the received signal is such that information recovery is possible, error detection/correction (EDC) must be used. Various EDC coding schemes available are reviewed and their application to the MFQPSK signal system is analyzed. Hamming, Golay, Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH), Reed-Solomon (R-S) block codes as well as convolutional codes are presented and analyzed in the context of specific MFQPSK system parameters. A computer program was developed in order to compute bit error probabilities as a function of signal to noise ratio. Results demonstrate that various EDC schemes are suitable for the MFQPSK signal structure, and that significant performance improvements are possible with the use of certain error correction codes.

  6. Speech Perception in Noise in Normally Hearing Children: Does Binaural Frequency Modulated Fitting Provide More Benefit than Monaural Frequency Modulated Fitting?

    PubMed

    Mukari, Siti Zamratol-Mai Sarah; Umat, Cila; Razak, Ummu Athiyah Abdul

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the benefit of monaural versus binaural ear-level frequency modulated (FM) fitting on speech perception in noise in children with normal hearing. Reception threshold for sentences (RTS) was measured in no-FM, monaural FM, and binaural FM conditions in 22 normally developing children with bilateral normal hearing, aged 8 to 9 years old. Data were gathered using the Pediatric Malay Hearing in Noise Test (P-MyHINT) with speech presented from front and multi-talker babble presented from 90°, 180°, 270° azimuths in a sound treated booth. The results revealed that the use of either monaural or binaural ear level FM receivers provided significantly better mean RTSs than the no-FM condition (P<0.001). However, binaural FM did not produce a significantly greater benefit in mean RTS than monaural fitting. The benefit of binaural over monaural FM varies across individuals; while binaural fitting provided better RTSs in about 50% of study subjects, there were those in whom binaural fitting resulted in either deterioration or no additional improvement compared to monaural FM fitting. The present study suggests that the use of monaural ear-level FM receivers in children with normal hearing might provide similar benefit as binaural use. Individual subjects' variations of binaural FM benefit over monaural FM suggests that the decision to employ monaural or binaural fitting should be individualized. It should be noted however, that the current study recruits typically developing normal hearing children. Future studies involving normal hearing children with high risk of having difficulty listening in noise is indicated to see if similar findings are obtained. PMID:26557323

  7. Auditory driving of the autonomic nervous system: Listening to theta-frequency binaural beats post-exercise increases parasympathetic activation and sympathetic withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Patrick A.; Froeliger, Brett; Garland, Eric L.; Ives, Jeffrey C.; Sforzo, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory illusion perceived when two or more pure tones of similar frequencies are presented dichotically through stereo headphones. Although this phenomenon is thought to facilitate state changes (e.g., relaxation), few empirical studies have reported on whether binaural beats produce changes in autonomic arousal. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of binaural beating on autonomic dynamics [heart rate variability (HRV)] during post-exercise relaxation. Subjects (n = 21; 18–29 years old) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study during which binaural beats and placebo were administered over two randomized and counterbalanced sessions (within-subjects repeated-measures design). At the onset of each visit, subjects exercised for 20-min; post-exercise, subjects listened to either binaural beats (‘wide-band’ theta-frequency binaural beats) or placebo (carrier tones) for 20-min while relaxing alone in a quiet, low-light environment. Dependent variables consisted of high-frequency (HF, reflecting parasympathetic activity), low-frequency (LF, reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF normalized powers, as well as self-reported relaxation. As compared to the placebo visit, the binaural-beat visit resulted in greater self-reported relaxation, increased parasympathetic activation and increased sympathetic withdrawal. By the end of the 20-min relaxation period there were no observable differences in HRV between binaural-beat and placebo visits, although binaural-beat associated HRV significantly predicted subsequent reported relaxation. Findings suggest that listening to binaural beats may exert an acute influence on both LF and HF components of HRV and may increase subjective feelings of relaxation. PMID:25452734

  8. Method and means for detecting optically transmitted signals and establishing optical interference pattern between electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Kostenbauder, A.G.

    1988-06-28

    A photodetector for detecting signal pulses transmitted in an optical carrier signal relies on the generation of electron-hole pairs and the diffusion of the generated electrons and holes to the electrodes on the surface of the semiconductor detector body for generating photovoltaic pulses. The detector utilizes the interference of optical waves for generating an electron-hole grating within the semiconductor body, and, by establishing an electron-hole pair maximum at one electrode and a minimum at the other electrode, a detectable voltaic pulse is generated across the electrode. 4 figs.

  9. Method and means for detecting optically transmitted signals and establishing optical interference pattern between electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Kostenbauder, Adnah G.

    1988-01-01

    A photodetector for detecting signal pulses transmitted in an optical carrier signal relies on the generation of electron-hole pairs and the diffusion of the generated electrons and holes to the electrodes on the surface of the semiconductor detector body for generating photovoltaic pulses. The detector utilizes the interference of optical waves for generating an electron-hole grating within the semiconductor body, and, by establishing an electron-hole pair maximum at one electrode and a minimum at the other electrode, a detectable voltaic pulse is generated across the electrode.

  10. Correlation Detection Based on the Reconstructed Excitation Signal of Electromagnetic Seismic Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Jiang, T.; Xu, X.; Jia, H.

    2014-12-01

    Correlation detection method is generally used to detect seismic data of electromagnetic seismic vibrator, which is widely applicated for shallow mineral prospecting. By analyzing field seismic data from electromagnetic and hydraulic seismic vibrators in mining area, we find when media underground is complex or the base-plate of vibrator is coupled poorly with ground, there is a 9.30 m positioning precision error and false multiple waves in the electromagnetic vibrator data reference to hydraulic vibrator data. The paper analyzes the theoretical reason of above problems by studying how the signal of electromagnetic vibrator is excited, then proposes a new method of correlation detection based on the reconstructed excitation signal (CDBRES). CDBRES includes following steps. First, it extracts the direct wave signal from seismometer near base-plate of electromagnetic vibrator. Next, it reconstructs the excitation signal according to the extracted direct wave. Then, it detects the seismic data using cross-correlation with the reconstructed excitation signal as a reference. Finally, it uses spectrum whitening to improve detection quality. We simulate with ray-tracing method, and simulation results show that the reconstructed excitation signal is extremely consistence with the ideal excitation signal, the correlation coefficient between them is up to 0.9869. And the signal of electromagnetic vibrator is detected correctly with CDBRES method. Then a field comparison experiment between hydraulic vibrator MiniVib T15000 and electromagnetic vibrator PHVS 500 was carried out near a copper and nickel deposit area. Their output force are 30000N and 300N, respectively. Though there is a great output force difference, the detection result of PHVS 500 using CDBRES method is still consistent with MiniVib T15000. Reference to the MiniVib T15000, the positioning error of PHVS 500 is only 0.93m in relatively stronger noise level. In addition, false multiple waves are invisible. In

  11. Signal and image processing for early detection of coronary artery diseases: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobssite, Youness; Samir, B. Belhaouari; Mohamad Hani, Ahmed Fadzil B.

    2012-09-01

    Today biomedical signals and image based detection are a basic step to diagnose heart diseases, in particular, coronary artery diseases. The goal of this work is to provide non-invasive early detection of Coronary Artery Diseases relying on analyzing images and ECG signals as a combined approach to extract features, further classify and quantify the severity of DCAD by using B-splines method. In an aim of creating a prototype of screening biomedical imaging for coronary arteries to help cardiologists to decide the kind of treatment needed to reduce or control the risk of heart attack.

  12. Signal Waveform Detection with Statistical Automaton for Internet and Web Service Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiming; Huang, Nai-Lun; Zeng, Fufu; Lin, Fang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, many approaches have been suggested for Internet and web streaming detection. In this paper, we propose an approach to signal waveform detection for Internet and web streaming, with novel statistical automatons. The system records network connections over a period of time to form a signal waveform and compute suspicious characteristics of the waveform. Network streaming according to these selected waveform features by our newly designed Aho-Corasick (AC) automatons can be classified. We developed two versions, that is, basic AC and advanced AC-histogram waveform automata, and conducted comprehensive experimentation. The results confirm that our approach is feasible and suitable for deployment. PMID:25032231

  13. Evaluation of a nonlinear method for the enhancement of tonal signal detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, Donald P.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for biasing spectral estimates to enhance detection of tonal signals against a background of broadband noise. In this method, a nonlinear average of an ensemble of individual spectral estimates is made where broadband noise energy is biased downward, pure tone energy is unbiased, and a mixture of the two is biased by an amount that depends on the ratio of tonal energy to broadband energy. The method is analyzed to provide estimates of the extent of tonal signal detection enhancement.

  14. Automated infrasound signal detection algorithms implemented in MatSeis - Infra Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Darren

    2004-07-01

    MatSeis's infrasound analysis tool, Infra Tool, uses frequency slowness processing to deconstruct the array data into three outputs per processing step: correlation, azimuth and slowness. Until now, an experienced analyst trained to recognize a pattern observed in outputs from signal processing manually accomplished infrasound signal detection. Our goal was to automate the process of infrasound signal detection. The critical aspect of infrasound signal detection is to identify consecutive processing steps where the azimuth is constant (flat) while the time-lag correlation of the windowed waveform is above background value. These two statements describe the arrival of a correlated set of wavefronts at an array. The Hough Transform and Inverse Slope methods are used to determine the representative slope for a specified number of azimuth data points. The representative slope is then used in conjunction with associated correlation value and azimuth data variance to determine if and when an infrasound signal was detected. A format for an infrasound signal detection output file is also proposed. The detection output file will list the processed array element names, followed by detection characteristics for each method. Each detection is supplied with a listing of frequency slowness processing characteristics: human time (YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS.SSS), epochal time, correlation, fstat, azimuth (deg) and trace velocity (km/s). As an example, a ground truth event was processed using the four-element DLIAR infrasound array located in New Mexico. The event is known as the Watusi chemical explosion, which occurred on 2002/09/28 at 21:25:17 with an explosive yield of 38,000 lb TNT equivalent. Knowing the source and array location, the array-to-event distance was computed to be approximately 890 km. This test determined the station-to-event azimuth (281.8 and 282.1 degrees) to within 1.6 and 1.4 degrees for the Inverse Slope and Hough Transform detection algorithms, respectively, and

  15. Development of an apnea detection algorithm based on temporal analysis of thoracic respiratory effort signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell’Aquila, C. R.; Cañadas, G. E.; Correa, L. S.; Laciar, E.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the design of an algorithm for detecting apnea episodes, based on analysis of thorax respiratory effort signal. Inspiration and expiration time, and range amplitude of respiratory cycle were evaluated. For range analysis the standard deviation statistical tool was used over respiratory signal temporal windows. The validity of its performance was carried out in 8 records of Apnea-ECG database that has annotations of apnea episodes. The results are: sensitivity (Se) 73%, specificity (Sp) 83%. These values can be improving eliminating artifact of signal records.

  16. Efficient detection and signal parameter estimation with application to high dynamic GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system for deriving position, velocity, and acceleration information from a received signal emitted from an object to be tracked wherein the signal comprises a carrier signal phase modulated by unknown binary data and experiencing very high Doppler and Doppler rate, this invention provides combined estimation/detection apparatus for simultaneously detecting data bits and obtaining estimates of signal parameters such as carrier phase and frequency related to receiver dynamics in a sequential manner. There is a first stage for obtaining estimates of the signal parameters related to phase and frequency in the vicinity of possible data transitions on the basis of measurements obtained within a current data bit. A second stage uses the estimates from the first stage to decide whether or not a data transition has actually occurred. There is a third stage for removing data modulation from the received signal when a data transition has occurred and a fourth stage for using the received signal with data modulation removed therefrom to update global parameters which are dependent only upon receiver dynamics and independent of data modulation. Finally, there is a fifth stage for using the global parameters to determine the position, velocity, and acceleration of the object.

  17. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J. M. Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A.; Murer, D.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  18. Sound-by-sound thalamic stimulation modulates midbrain auditory excitability and relative binaural sensitivity in frogs

    PubMed Central

    Ponnath, Abhilash; Farris, Hamilton E.

    2014-01-01

    Descending circuitry can modulate auditory processing, biasing sensitivity to particular stimulus parameters and locations. Using awake in vivo single unit recordings, this study tested whether electrical stimulation of the thalamus modulates auditory excitability and relative binaural sensitivity in neurons of the amphibian midbrain. In addition, by using electrical stimuli that were either longer than the acoustic stimuli (i.e., seconds) or presented on a sound-by-sound basis (ms), experiments addressed whether the form of modulation depended on the temporal structure of the electrical stimulus. Following long duration electrical stimulation (3–10 s of 20 Hz square pulses), excitability (spikes/acoustic stimulus) to free-field noise stimuli decreased by 32%, but returned over 600 s. In contrast, sound-by-sound electrical stimulation using a single 2 ms duration electrical pulse 25 ms before each noise stimulus caused faster and varied forms of modulation: modulation lasted <2 s and, in different cells, excitability either decreased, increased or shifted in latency. Within cells, the modulatory effect of sound-by-sound electrical stimulation varied between different acoustic stimuli, including for different male calls, suggesting modulation is specific to certain stimulus attributes. For binaural units, modulation depended on the ear of input, as sound-by-sound electrical stimulation preceding dichotic acoustic stimulation caused asymmetric modulatory effects: sensitivity shifted for sounds at only one ear, or by different relative amounts for both ears. This caused a change in the relative difference in binaural sensitivity. Thus, sound-by-sound electrical stimulation revealed fast and ear-specific (i.e., lateralized) auditory modulation that is potentially suited to shifts in auditory attention during sound segregation in the auditory scene. PMID:25120437

  19. Ultrasensitive Detection of Low-Abundance Protein Biomarkers by Mass Spectrometry Signal Amplification Assay.

    PubMed

    Du, Ruijun; Zhu, Lina; Gan, Jinrui; Wang, Yuning; Qiao, Liang; Liu, Baohong

    2016-07-01

    A mass spectrometry signal amplification method is developed for the ultrasensitive and selective detection of low-abundance protein biomarkers by utilizing tag molecules on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). EpCAM and thrombin as model targets are captured by specific aptamers immobilized on the AuNPs. With laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS), the mass tag molecules are detected to represent the protein biomarkers. Benefiting from the MS signal amplification, the assay can achieve a limit of detection of 100 aM. The method is further applied to detect thrombin in fetal bovine serum and EpCAM in cell lysates to demonstrate its selectivity and feasibility in complex biological samples. With the high sensitivity and specificity, the protocol shows great promise for providing a new route to single-cell analysis and early disease diagnosis. PMID:27253396

  20. Signal averaging limitations in heterodyne- and direct-detection laser remote sensing measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menyuk, N.; Killinger, D. K.; Menyuk, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The improvement in measurement uncertainty brought about by the averaging of increasing numbers of pulse return signals in both heterodyne- and direct-detection lidar systems is investigated. A theoretical analysis is presented which shows the standard deviation of the mean measurement to decrease as the inverse square root of the number of measurements, except in the presence of temporal correlation. Experimental measurements based on a dual-hybrid-TEA CO2 laser differential absorption lidar system are reported which demonstrate that the actual reduction in the standard deviation of the mean in both heterodyne- and direct-detection systems is much slower than the inverse square-root dependence predicted for uncorrelated signals, but is in agreement with predictions in the event of temporal correlation. Results thus favor the use of direct detection at relatively short range where the lower limit of the standard deviation of the mean is about 2 percent, but advantages of heterodyne detection at longer ranges are noted.

  1. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect

    PubMed Central

    Römer, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of −21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and “novelty detection” to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same “cocktail party problem,” when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one

  2. Improved Detection and Location of Ocean Microseism Signals using Array Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, A. M.; Gal, M.; Koper, K. D.; Tkalcic, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present and evaluate a range of approaches that may be used to investigate ocean microseisms using seismic array data. At amplitudes below the dominant incoming signal, the ambient seismic energy (background noise) associated with microseisms arrives from multiple directions at any one time. Thus we address the challenge of detecting weaker signals from unpredictable directions in the presence of other strong signals. Our aim is to extract the most accurate information possible from such weaker signals in order to expand the capability of ocean storm studies, using seismology, including the ability to extract storm patterns from archive seismic array records. Detection of weaker microseism signals may be improved using algorithms widely used in astronomy. One example is the CLEAN algorithm which has wide usage in radio astronomy. This algorithm operates by finding the position and strength of point sources and iteratively deconvolving their contribution to the image. It may be combined to optimum effect with the previously published (Incoherently Averaged Signal) IAS Capon implementation for an accurate detection of weaker sources. Having detected weaker sources, they may be backprojected using a suitable Earth model, taking into account a correction for the mislocation due to slowness-azimuth station corrections. The microseism generation locations inferred in this manner are strongly frequency dependent, even within relatively restricted frequency ranges (0.325-0.725 Hz) for some arrays. Our advances in seismic array processing, with a focus on methods appropriate to weaker ambient noise signals, have led to insights, for example, regarding the generation of seismic noise. We find that secondary microseisms in the lower frequency band are generated mainly by ocean swell whereas higher frequency bands are generated by local wind conditions. These arrivals are investigated over a two-decade time frame for the Southern Ocean and west Pacific Ocean.

  3. The effects of pulse rate, power, width and coding on signal detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects on the signal detectability of varying the pulse repetition rate (PRF), peak pulse power (p(pk)) and pulse width (tau(p)) (tp) are examined. Both coded and uncoded pulses are considered. The following quantities are assumed to be constant; (1) antenna area, (z)echo reflectivity, (3) Doppler shift, (4) spectral width, (5) spectral resolution, (6) effective sampling rate, and (7) total incoherent spectral averagaing time. The detectability is computed for two types of targets.

  4. The sensing of bacteria: emerging principles for the detection of signal sequences by formyl peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Bufe, Bernd; Zufall, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The ability to detect specific chemical signatures released by bacteria and other microorganisms is a fundamental feature of immune defense against pathogens. There is increasing evidence that chemodetection of such microorganism-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) occurs at many places in the body including specific sets of chemosensory neurons in the mammalian nose. Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a unique family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can detect the presence of bacteria and function as chemotactic receptors. Here, we highlight the recent discovery of a vast family of natural FPR agonists, the bacterial signal peptides (or signal sequences), thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms of bacterial sensing by human and mouse FPRs. Signal peptides in bacteria are formylated, N-terminal protein signatures required for directing the transfer of proteins through the plasma membrane. After their cleavage and release, signal peptides are available for FPR detection and thus provide a previously unrecognized MAMP. With over 170 000 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent one of the largest families of GPCR ligands and one of the most complex classes of natural activators of the innate immune system. By recognizing a conserved three-dimensional peptide motif, FPRs employ an unusual detection mechanism that combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and sensitivity, thus solving the problem of detecting thousands of distinct sequences yet maintaining selectivity. How signal peptides are released by bacteria and sensed by GPCRs and how these processes shape the responses of other cells and whole organisms represents an important topic for future research. PMID:27305707

  5. Origin of electrical signals for plasma etching end point detection: Comparison of end point signals and electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolewski, Mark A.; Lahr, David L.

    2012-09-15

    Electrical signals are used for end point detection in plasma etching, but the origin of the electrical changes observed at end point is not well understood. As an etch breaks through one layer and exposes an underlayer, the fluxes and densities of etch products and reactants in the gas phase will change. The resulting perturbation in gas composition may alter the plasma electron density, which in turn may affect the electrical signals. Alternatively, changes in substrate electrical properties or surface properties, such as work function or emitted electron yield, may be involved. To investigate these effects, experiments were performed in a radio-frequency (rf)-biased, inductively coupled reactor, during CF{sub 4}/Ar plasma etching of silicon dioxide films on silicon substrates. A complete set of electrical parameters, for the bias as well as the inductive source, was measured and compared. The most useful end point signal was found to be the fundamental rf bias impedance, which decreases when the oxide is removed. A simultaneous increase in plasma electron density was measured by a wave cutoff probe. Analytical sheath models indicate that the measured change in electron density accounts for nearly all of the impedance decrease. The change in electron density can in turn be explained by the effects of etch products or reactants on gas composition. In contrast, electrons emitted from the wafer surface play at most a minor role in the changes in electron density and impedance observed at end point.

  6. Multi-Phenomenology Explosion Monitoring (Multi-PEM). Signal Detection. Research to target smaller sources for tomorrow’s missions

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua Daniel

    2015-12-12

    This a guide on how to detect and identify explosions from various sources. For example, nuclear explosions produce acoustic, optical, and EMP outputs. Each signal can be buried in noise, but fusing detection statistics from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic signals results in clear detection otherwise unobtainable.

  7. Basic elements of an international terrestrial reply following the detection of a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijnen, G. C. M.

    One of the most tantalizing questions human intelligence has posed itself since the beginnings of time is whether we are alone in the Universe. And if not, where are "the others," and is it possible that these "others" may contact us, with or without our knowledge? Scientific literature abounds with theories pro and con, and if any subject ever lent itself to make-believe it is this one. Connected with the scientific theories on the subject, which are so often misunderstood, popular belief has led to a steady stream of publications which have done nothing if they have not greatly hampered the real issue. In legal circles the subject of possible contacts with extraterrestrial intelligence was first discussed in the literature in the early 1960's when, among others, Andrew Haley wrote, in 1965, about "Space Law and Government." This publication appeared in the midst of the United Nations preparations for what was to become, in 1967, the Outer Space Treaty. Though the idea of an international protocol governing actions after the detection of a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence has never been on the agenda of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, space lawyers continue to think and to write about that subject. Recent advances in spaceflight, in particular the Voyager missions to the outer planets of our solar system, give the subject a new impetus. The present paper is intended to dwell upon present scientific thoughts about the likelihood that a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence will be detected in the near future. Although this likelihood appears to be remote, it seems, nevertheless, worthwhile that discussion continues in space legal circles regarding the formulation of an international protocol for activities following the detection of a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence. Since the confirmed detection of a signal from extraterrestrial intelligence could well be of crucial importance for the continuing existence of

  8. Expected properties of the first gravitational wave signal detected with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.; Sesana, Alberto; Gair, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we attempt to investigate the nature of the first gravitational wave (GW) signal to be detected by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs): will it be an individual, resolved supermassive black hole binary (SBHB), or a stochastic background made by the superposition of GWs produced by an ensemble of SBHBs? To address this issue, we analyse a broad set of simulations of the cosmological population of SBHBs that cover the entire parameter space allowed by current electromagnetic observations in an unbiased way. For each simulation, we construct the expected GW signal and identify the loudest individual sources. We then employ appropriate detection statistics to evaluate the relative probability of detecting each type of source as a function of time for a variety of PTAs; we consider the current International PTA, and speculate into the era of the Square Kilometre Array. The main properties of the first detectable individual SBHBs are also investigated. Contrary to previous work, we cast our results in terms of the detection probability (DP), since the commonly adopted criterion based on a signal-to-noise ratio threshold is statistic-dependent and may result in misleading conclusions for the statistics adopted here. Our results confirm quantitatively that a stochastic signal is more likely to be detected first (with between 75 and 93 per cent probability, depending on the array), but the DP of single-sources is not negligible. Our framework is very flexible and can be easily extended to more realistic arrays and to signal models including environmental coupling and SBHB eccentricity.

  9. Classification of change detection and change blindness from near-infrared spectroscopy signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Katura, Takusige

    2011-08-01

    Using a machine-learning classification algorithm applied to near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals, we classify a success (change detection) or a failure (change blindness) in detecting visual changes for a change-detection task. Five subjects perform a change-detection task, and their brain activities are continuously monitored. A support-vector-machine algorithm is applied to classify the change-detection and change-blindness trials, and correct classification probability of 70-90% is obtained for four subjects. Two types of temporal shapes in classification probabilities are found: one exhibiting a maximum value after the task is completed (postdictive type), and another exhibiting a maximum value during the task (predictive type). As for the postdictive type, the classification probability begins to increase immediately after the task completion and reaches its maximum in about the time scale of neuronal hemodynamic response, reflecting a subjective report of change detection. As for the predictive type, the classification probability shows an increase at the task initiation and is maximal while subjects are performing the task, predicting the task performance in detecting a change. We conclude that decoding change detection and change blindness from NIRS signal is possible and argue some future applications toward brain-machine interfaces.

  10. Automated wavelet denoising of photoacoustic signals for circulating melanoma cell detection and burn image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Holan, Scott H; Viator, John A

    2008-06-21

    Photoacoustic image reconstruction may involve hundreds of point measurements, each of which contributes unique information about the subsurface absorbing structures under study. For backprojection imaging, two or more point measurements of photoacoustic waves induced by irradiating a biological sample with laser light are used to produce an image of the acoustic source. Each of these measurements must undergo some signal processing, such as denoising or system deconvolution. In order to process the numerous signals, we have developed an automated wavelet algorithm for denoising signals. We appeal to the discrete wavelet transform for denoising photoacoustic signals generated in a dilute melanoma cell suspension and in thermally coagulated blood. We used 5, 9, 45 and 270 melanoma cells in the laser beam path as test concentrations. For the burn phantom, we used coagulated blood in 1.6 mm silicon tube submerged in Intralipid. Although these two targets were chosen as typical applications for photoacoustic detection and imaging, they are of independent interest. The denoising employs level-independent universal thresholding. In order to accommodate nonradix-2 signals, we considered a maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform (MODWT). For the lower melanoma cell concentrations, as the signal-to-noise ratio approached 1, denoising allowed better peak finding. For coagulated blood, the signals were denoised to yield a clean photoacoustic resulting in an improvement of 22% in the reconstructed image. The entire signal processing technique was automated so that minimal user intervention was needed to reconstruct the images. Such an algorithm may be used for image reconstruction and signal extraction for applications such as burn depth imaging, depth profiling of vascular lesions in skin and the detection of single cancer cells in blood samples. PMID:18495977

  11. Signals consistent with microbubbles detected in legs of normal human subjects after exercise.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, J C; Phillips, S D; Donoghue, T G; Alvarenga, D L; Knaus, D A; Magari, P J; Buckey, J C

    2010-02-01

    Exercise may produce micronuclei (presumably gas-filled bubbles) in tissue, which could serve as nucleation sites for bubbles during subsequent decompression stress. These micronuclei have never been directly detected in humans. Dual-frequency ultrasound (DFU) is a resonance-based, ultrasound technique capable of detecting and sizing small stationary bubbles. We surveyed for bubbles in the legs of six normal human subjects (ages 28-52 yr) after exercise using DFU. Eleven marked sites on the left thigh and calf were imaged using standard imaging ultrasound. Subjects then rested in a reclining chair for 2 h before exercise. For the hour before exercise, a series of baseline measurements was taken at each site using DFU. At least six baseline measurements were taken at each site. Subjects exercised at 80% of their age-adjusted maximal heart rate for 30 min on an upright bicycle ergometer. After exercise, the subjects returned to the chair, and multiple postexercise measurements were taken at the marked sites. Measurements continued until no further signals consistent with bubbles were returned or 1 h had elapsed. All subjects showed signals consistent with bubbles after exercise at at least one site. The percentage of sites in a given subject showing signals significantly greater than baseline (P < 0.01) at first measurement ranged from 9.1 to 100%. Overall, 58% of sites showed signals consistent with bubbles at the first postexercise measurement. Signals decreased over time after exercise. These data strongly suggest that exercise produces bubbles detectable using DFU. PMID:19875715

  12. Efficiency of the human observer detecting random signals in random backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Subok; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2005-01-01

    The efficiencies of the human observer and the channelized-Hotelling observer relative to the ideal observer for signal-detection tasks are discussed. Both signal-known-exactly (SKE) tasks and signal-known-statistically (SKS) tasks are considered. Signal location is uncertain for the SKS tasks, and lumpy backgrounds are used for background uncertainty in both cases. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are employed to determine ideal-observer performance on the detection tasks. Psychophysical studies are conducted to compute human-observer performance on the same tasks. Efficiency is computed as the squared ratio of the detectabilities of the observer of interest to the ideal observer. Human efficiencies are approximately 2.1% and 24%, respectively, for the SKE and SKS tasks. The results imply that human observers are not affected as much as the ideal observer by signal-location uncertainty even though the ideal observer outperforms the human observer for both tasks. Three different simplified pinhole imaging systems are simulated, and the humans and the model observers rank the systems in the same order for both the SKE and the SKS tasks.

  13. Analysis of two-pass Modified Hough Transform (MHT) technique for the detection of wake like signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmut, M. J.; MacKinnon, R. F.

    1989-03-01

    In this paper a procedure is developed using the Modified Hough Transform (MHT) for the detection of signals of low signal-to-noise ratio. The signal can be considered as being composed of a sum of narrow lines. The expected number of signal and false lines to be found in an image can be determined as a function of the false alarm probability per decision. The MHT performance is compared to that of the matched filter. The method is applied to noisy images containing a wake-like signal. The MHT is able to detect the signal pattern at signal-to-noise ratios for which the signal is just visible on a good image display system. A two pass system, employing prior knowledge about the signal, gives improved detection performance.

  14. The Role of Cognitive Style in Processing Color Information: A Signal Detection Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Louis H.

    The interaction between field dependence/independence and pictorial recognition memory was investigated using pictures in three different color modes: realistic color, non-realistic color, and black and white. The study was designed to further confirm the efficacy of applying signal detection analyses to color recognition memory data as a means of…

  15. Using Signal Detection Theory to Model Changes in Serial Learning of Radiological Image Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutis, Kathy; Pecaric, Martin; Seeto, Brian; Pusic, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Signal detection theory (SDT) parameters can describe a learner's ability to discriminate (d[prime symbol]) normal from abnormal and the learner's criterion ([lambda]) to under or overcall abnormalities. To examine the serial changes in SDT parameters with serial exposure to radiological cases. 46 participants were recruited for this study: 20…

  16. Investigating Strength and Frequency Effects in Recognition Memory Using Type-2 Signal Detection Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higham, Philip A.; Perfect, Timothy J.; Bruno, Davide

    2009-01-01

    Criterion- versus distribution-shift accounts of frequency and strength effects in recognition memory were investigated with Type-2 signal detection receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, which provides a measure of metacognitive monitoring. Experiment 1 demonstrated a frequency-based mirror effect, with a higher hit rate and lower…

  17. Rapid Acquisition of Bias in Signal Detection: Dynamics of Effective Reinforcement Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutsell, Blake; Jacobs, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated changes in bias (preference for one response alternative) in signal detection when relative reinforcer frequency for correct responses varied across sessions. In Experiment 1, 4 rats responded in a two-stimulus, two-response identification procedure employing temporal stimuli (short vs. long houselight presentations). Relative…

  18. A common signal detection model accounts for both perception and discrimination of the watercolor effect.

    PubMed

    Devinck, Frédéric; Knoblauch, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Establishing the relation between perception and discrimination is a fundamental objective in psychophysics, with the goal of characterizing the neural mechanisms mediating perception. Here, we show that a procedure for estimating a perceptual scale based on a signal detection model also predicts discrimination performance. We use a recently developed procedure, Maximum Likelihood Difference Scaling (MLDS), to measure the perceptual strength of a long-range, color, filling-in phenomenon, the Watercolor Effect (WCE), as a function of the luminance ratio between the two components of its generating contour. MLDS is based on an equal-variance, gaussian, signal detection model and yields a perceptual scale with interval properties. The strength of the fill-in percept increased 10-15 times the estimate of the internal noise level for a 3-fold increase in the luminance ratio. Each observer's estimated scale predicted discrimination performance in a subsequent paired-comparison task. A common signal detection model accounts for both the appearance and discrimination data. Since signal detection theory provides a common metric for relating discrimination performance and neural response, the results have implications for comparing perceptual and neural response functions. PMID:22438468

  19. Sensitive detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 based on cascade signal amplification in ELISA.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shan; Liu, Daofeng; Guo, Qi; Wu, Songsong; Chen, Rui; Luo, Kai; Hu, Liming; Xiong, Yonghua; Lai, Weihua

    2016-09-01

    In this study, cascade signal amplification in ELISA involving double-antibody sandwich ELISA and indirectly competitive ELISA was established to sensitively detect Escherichia coli O157:H7. In the double-antibody sandwich ELISA, a complex was formed comprising anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibody, E. coli O157:H7, biotinylated anti-E. coli O157:H7 monoclonal antibody, streptavidin, and biotinylated β-lactamase. Penicillin solution was then added into the ELISA well and hydrolyzed by β-lactamase. Afterward, the penicillin solution was transferred to indirectly competitive ELISA. The concentration of penicillin can be sensitively detected in indirectly competitive ELISA. In the cascade signal amplification system, increasing the amount of added E. coli O157:H7 resulted in more β-lactamase and less penicillin. The detection sensitivity of E. coli O157:H7, which was 20cfu/mL with the cascade signal amplification in ELISA, was 1,000-fold higher than that of traditional ELISA. Furthermore, the novel method can be used to detect E. coli O157:H7 in milk (2cfu/g). Therefore, this new signaling strategy will facilitate analyses of highly sensitive foodborne pathogens. PMID:27394946

  20. Conceptualization of the Complex Outcomes of Sexual Abuse: A Signal Detection Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pechtel, Pia; Evans, Ian M.; Podd, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Eighty-five New Zealand based practitioners experienced in treating adults with a history of child sexual abuse participated in an online judgment study of child sexual abuse outcomes using signal detection theory methodology. Participants' level of sensitivity was assessed independent of their degree of response bias when discriminating (a) known…

  1. Signal Detection Analysis of Factors Associated with Diabetes among Semirural Mexican American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanni, K. D.; Ahn, D. A.; Winkleby, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Signal detection analysis was used to evaluate a combination of sociodemographic, acculturation, mental health, health care, and chronic disease risk factors potentially associated with diabetes in a sample of 4,505 semirural Mexican American adults. Overall, 8.9% of adults had been diagnosed with diabetes. The analysis resulted in 12 mutually…

  2. A Signal-Detection Analysis of Sex Differences in the Perception of Emotional Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimshaw, Gina M.; Bulman-Fleming, M. Barbara; Ngo, Cam

    2004-01-01

    A signal-detection task was used to assess sex differences in emotional face recognition under conditions of uncertainty. Computer images of Ekman faces showing sad, angry, happy, and fearful emotional states were presented for 50ms to thirty-six men and thirty-seven women. All participants monitored for presentation of either happy, angry, or sad…

  3. On the Measurement of Criterion Noise in Signal Detection Theory: The Case of Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellen, David; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Singmann, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Traditional approaches within the framework of signal detection theory (SDT; Green & Swets, 1966), especially in the field of recognition memory, assume that the positioning of response criteria is not a noisy process. Recent work (Benjamin, Diaz, & Wee, 2009; Mueller & Weidemann, 2008) has challenged this assumption, arguing not only…

  4. ROUTE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON SIGNAL DETECTION BEHAVIOR IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute effects of toluene and other solvents on behavior are thought to depend upon their concentration in the brain. We have shown previously that inhaled toluene and trichloroethylene disrupt sustained attention in rats as assessed with a visual signal detection task (SDT). ...

  5. Applying Signal-Detection Theory to the Study of Observer Accuracy and Bias in Behavioral Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Tetreault, Allison; Hovanetz, Alyson; Bellaci, Emily; Miller, Jonathan; Karp, Hilary; Mahmood, Angela; Strobel, Maggie; Mullen, Shelley; Keyl, Alice; Toupard, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and utility of a laboratory model for examining observer accuracy within the framework of signal-detection theory (SDT). Sixty-one individuals collected data on aggression while viewing videotaped segments of simulated teacher-child interactions. The purpose of Experiment 1 was to determine if brief feedback and…

  6. Effects of Point-Loss Punishers on Human Signal-Detection Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lie, Celia; Alsop, Brent

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments using human participants varied the distribution of point-gain reinforcers or point-loss punishers in two-alternative signal-detection procedures. Experiment 1 varied the distribution of point-gain reinforcers for correct responses (Group A) and point-loss punishers for errors (Group B) across conditions. Response bias varied…

  7. Stimulus Disparity and Punisher Control of Human Signal-Detection Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lie, Celia; Alsop, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment examined the effects of varying stimulus disparity and relative punisher frequencies on signal detection by humans. Participants were placed into one of two groups. Group 3 participants were presented with 1:3 and 3:1 punisher frequency ratios, while Group 11 participants were presented with 1:11 and 11:1 punisher frequency…

  8. Two-Stage Dynamic Signal Detection: A Theory of Choice, Decision Time, and Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleskac, Timothy J.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2010-01-01

    The 3 most often-used performance measures in the cognitive and decision sciences are choice, response or decision time, and confidence. We develop a random walk/diffusion theory--2-stage dynamic signal detection (2DSD) theory--that accounts for all 3 measures using a common underlying process. The model uses a drift diffusion process to account…

  9. Right Hemisphere Sensitivity to Novel Metaphoric Relations: Application of the Signal Detection Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashal, N.; Faust, M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study used the signal detection theory to test the hypothesis that the right hemisphere (RH) is more sensitive than the left hemisphere (LH) to the distant semantic relations in novel metaphoric expressions. In two divided visual field experiments, sensitivity (d') and criterion ([beta]) were calculated for responses to different types…

  10. Residual Sensory Capacities of the Deaf: A Signal Detection Analysis of a Visual Discrimination Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bross, Michael

    1979-01-01

    The experiment compared the visual sensory sensitivity of six deaf and six hearing Ss (mean age 11.2 years) in a signal detection paradigm. Ss were required to give forced-choice responses to a brightness discrimination task under three stimulus probability conditions. (Author/PHR)

  11. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene.

  12. Ultrasensitive electrochemical strategy for trace detection of APE-1 via triple signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Xiang, Yu; Yuan, Ruo; Yuan, Yali; Liao, Ni

    2013-03-15

    A novel ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay for the determination of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) using a three-step signal amplification process was reported in this work. The first-step signal amplification process was based on the labeled biotinylated alkaline phosphatase (bio-AP) on the nickel hexacyanoferrates nanoparticle-decorated Au nanochains (Ni-AuNCs) toward the biocatalysis of ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA-P) to in-situ produce ascorbic acid (AA). Then the signal was further amplified by electrochemical oxidation of the in-situ-produced AA because of the catalysis of Ni-AuNCs. Finally, with the nanochain-modified streptavidin (SA), the stoichiometry of bio-AP could be increased through the specific and high affinity interaction of streptavidin-biotin. On the other hand, a kind of organic material (PTC-NH(2)), owing the amino-functionalized interface and unique electrochemical properties, as matrix for primary antibodies (Ab(1)) immobilization could lower the background current signal and enhance the amount of immobilized Ab(1). With a sandwich-type immunoreaction, the triple signal amplification greatly enhanced the sensitivity for the detection of APE-1. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor exhibited a linear range of 0.01-100 pg/mL with an extremely low detection limit of 3.9 fg/mL (signal/noise=3). PMID:22981009

  13. Analysis of VLF signals associated to AGILE Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes detected over Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Lyu, Fanchao; Cummer, Steven; Ursi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of radio signals detected on ground and associated to Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) have proven to be a successful tool to extract information on the TGF itself and the possible associated lightning process. Triangulation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals by means of the Time Of Arrival technique provides TGF location with few km accuracy. The AGILE satellite is routinely observing TGFs on a narrow band across the Equator, limited by the small satellite orbital inclination (2.5°). However, until recently it was not possible to provide firm associations between AGILE TGFs and radio signals, because of two main limiting factors. First, dead-time effects led to a bias towards long duration events in AGILE TGF sample, which are less likely associated to strong radio pulses. In addition, most VLF detection networks are less sensitive along the equatorial region. Since the end of March 2015 a major change in the AGILE MiniCalorimeter instrument configuration resulted in a ten fold increase in TGF detection rate, and in the detection of events as short as 20 microseconds. 14% of the events in the new sample resulted simultaneous (within 200 microseconds) to sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), therefore a source localisation is available for these events. We present here the first analysis of VLF waveforms associated to AGILE TGFs observed above Central America, detected by magnetic field sensors deployed in Puerto Rico. Among the seven TGFs with a WWLLN location at a distance lower than 10000 km from the sensors, four of them have detectable signals. These events are the closest to the sensors, with distance less than 7500 km. We present here the properties of these TGFs and the characteristics of the associated radio waveforms.

  14. [ECG QRS signal detection and control system design of ventricular assist device].

    PubMed

    Liao, Huogen; Yang, Ming; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Huang, Huan

    2013-06-01

    In order to achieve auxiliary timing of ventricular assisting device to automatically track the ECG signals, we designed a set of ECG acquisition circuit in our study for the first time. Then we carried out ECG acquisition, smoothing filter and QRS detection on the LabVIEW. With the QRS signal as a benchmark, the control system immediately triggered ventricular assisting device to trigger the heart to contract for ejection for about 300 ms, and then to assist to make it relax. The practical effects of the experiment proved that ECG acquisition circuit had the feature of strong anti-interference, and control system had no false QRS detection and no false triggering of assist device. This achieves the auxiliary timing which could automatically track the ECG signal. PMID:23865330

  15. The Effect of Non-stationary Noise on Drifting Signal Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Mauricio; Benacquista, M.; Stroeer, A.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effect of non-stationary noise in the detection of drifting signals on unevenly sampled data. Initial frequency estimation is obtained from a Lomb-Scargle periodogram; which is followed by a global multi-start optimization, as working on a dense local Nelder-Mead iterator for parameter estimates. It has been found that a varying white noise level has no effect on the required relative signal-to-noise ratio for detection in the proposed algorithm, though affecting the absolute amplitude strength of the signal recording. Future work includes the addition of colored noise to this analysis. We plan to investigate how this work can be applied to gravitational wave data analysis, for example LISA or LIGO. This work is funded by NASA URC Grant NASA NNX09AV06A, ARCC grant NSF AST0750913 and CREST grant NSF HRD0734800.

  16. An intelligent procedure for watermelon ripeness detection based on vibration signals.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadeh, Rouzbeh; Moosavian, Ashkan; Rajabipour, Ali; Najafi, Gholamhassan

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, an efficient procedure for ripeness detection of watermelon was presented. A nondestructive method was used based on vibration response to determine the internal quality of watermelon. The responses of samples to vibration excitation were optically recorded by a Laser Doppler (LD) vibrometer. Vibration data was collected from watermelons of two qualities, namely, ripe and unripe. Vibration signals were transformed from time-domain to frequency-domain by fast Fourier transform (FFT). Twenty nine features were extracted from the FFT amplitude and phase angle of the vibration signals. K-nearest neighbor (KNN) analysis was applied as a classifier in decision-making stage. The experimental results showed that the usage of the FFT amplitude of the vibration signals gave the maximum classification accuracy. This method allowed identification at a 95.0 % level of efficiency. Hence, the proposed method can reliably detect watermelon ripeness. PMID:25694721

  17. Extending lock-in methods: term isolation detection of nonlinear signals.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Thomas W

    2016-08-01

    We show that components of a nonlinear signal can be measured using phase-sensitive detection at unconventional demodulation frequencies, allowing us to isolate individual terms from the signal. To demonstrate this technique, autocorrelation measurements of an ultrafast pulsed laser were performed using two-photon absorption. In this example, the isolation of individual autocorrelation terms may provide internal consistency checks to improve the precision and accuracy of pulse characterization. More generally, this scheme can be extended to a range of nonlinear measurements. As a demonstration, we analyze a three-photon autocorrelation model, showing that many nonlinear signals can be studied with this method. We anticipate that term isolation detection will find application in a broad range of experiments, such as multidimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy or coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27505362

  18. Predicting the capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal independently of the astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Garcia, Juan

    2016-05-01

    The goal of the works on which this talk is based is to relate a direct detection signal with neutrino limits from the Sun independently of the astrophysics. In order to achieve this we derive a halo-independent lower bound on the dark matter capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal, with which one can set upper limits on the branching ratios into different channels from the absence of a high-energy neutrino flux in neutrino observatories. We also extend this bound to the case of inelastic scattering, both endothermic and exothermic. From two inelastic signals we show how the dark matter mass, the mass difference of the states and the couplings to neutrons and protons can be obtained. Furthermore, one can also pin down the exothermic/endothermic nature of the scattering, and therefore a precise lower bound on the solar capture rate is predicted. We also discuss isospin violation and uncertainties due to form factors.

  19. Implication of Two-Coupled Differential Van der Pol Duffing Oscillator in Weak Signal Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hang-hang; Xu, Xue-mei; Yang, Bing-chu; Yin, Lin-zi

    2016-04-01

    The principle of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator for state transition and for determining critical value is described, which has been studied to indicate that the application of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator in weak signal detection is feasible. On the basis of this principle, an improved two-coupled differential Van der Pol Duffing oscillator is proposed which can identify signals under any frequency and ameliorate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The analytical methods of the proposed model and the construction of the proposed oscillator are introduced in detail. Numerical experiments on the properties of the proposed oscillator compared with those of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator are carried out. Our numerical simulations have confirmed the analytical treatment. The results demonstrate that this novel oscillator has better detection performance than the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator.

  20. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer for signal detection in 2D tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRoque, Samuel J.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Edwards, Darrin C.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2007-03-01

    Signal detection by the channelized Hotelling (ch-Hotelling) observer is studied for tomographic application by employing a small, tractable 2D model of a computed tomography (CT) system. The primary goal of this manuscript is to develop a practical method for evaluating the ch-Hotelling observer that can generalize to larger 3D cone-beam CT systems. The use of the ch-Hotelling observer for evaluating tomographic image reconstruction algorithms is also demonstrated. For a realistic model for CT, the ch-Hotelling observer can be a good approximation to the ideal observer. The ch-Hotelling observer is applied to both the projection data and the reconstructed images. The difference in signal-to-noise ratio for signal detection in both of these domains provides a metric for evaluating the image reconstruction algorithm.

  1. Simulated performance of an order statistic threshold strategy for detection of narrowband signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, E.; Brady, R.; Deich, W.; Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E.

    1988-01-01

    The application of order statistics to signal detection is becoming an increasingly active area of research. This is due to the inherent robustness of rank estimators in the presence of large outliers that would significantly degrade more conventional mean-level-based detection systems. A detection strategy is presented in which the threshold estimate is obtained using order statistics. The performance of this algorithm in the presence of simulated interference and broadband noise is evaluated. In this way, the robustness of the proposed strategy in the presence of the interference can be fully assessed as a function of the interference, noise, and detector parameters.

  2. Progress in testing exo-planet signal extraction on the TPF-I Planet Detection Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan R.; Szwaykowski, Piotr; Loya, Frank M.; Liewer, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The TPF Interferometer (TPF-I) concept is being studied at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the TPF-I Planet Detection Testbed has been developed to simulate the detection process for an earthlike planet orbiting a star within about 15 pc. The testbed combines four beams of infrared light simulating the operation of a dual chopped Bracewell interferometer observing a star and a faint planet. This paper describes the results obtained this year including nulling of the starlight on four input beams at contrast ratios up to 250,000 to 1, and detection of faint planet signals at contrast ratios with the star of 2 million to 1.

  3. Detecting of ELF/VLF Signals Generated by GEMINIDS 2011 Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Amir Kayone; Zeinali, M. M.; Taraz, M.

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, the generation mechanism of simultaneous sound with passing of large meteors was a research edge until a reasonable mechanism was proposed for that. This mechanism is based on the existence of ELF/VLF radio signals. This research that aims for detection of these signals archives an improvement over previous works. The signal was found on the extremely low frequency (ELF) band which could not be generated by other sources like lightning, has a frequency range between several Hertz to 500 Hz, and so could be missed with noises produce by electrical machines. The new signal is presented at this work has a good correlation with synchronized visual data that were collected on the peak of Geminids 2011 meteor shower.

  4. Factors influencing the detectability of early warning signals of population collapse.

    PubMed

    Clements, Christopher F; Drake, John M; Griffiths, Jason I; Ozgul, Arpat

    2015-07-01

    The recent description of potentially generic early warning signals is a promising development that may help conservationists to anticipate a population's collapse prior to its occurrence. So far, the majority of such warning signals documented have been in highly controlled laboratory systems or in theoretical models. Data from wild populations, however, are typically restricted both temporally and spatially due to limited monitoring resources and intrinsic ecological heterogeneity-limitations that may affect the detectability of generic early warning signals, as they add additional stochasticity to population abundance estimates. Consequently, spatial and temporal subsampling may serve to either muffle or magnify early warning signals. Using a combination of theoretical models and analysis of experimental data, we evaluate the extent to which statistical warning signs are robust to data corruption. PMID:26098338

  5. Combining eigenvector methods and support vector machines for detecting variability of Doppler ultrasound signals.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, the multiclass support vector machines (SVMs) with the error correcting output codes (ECOC) were presented for detecting variabilities of the multiclass Doppler ultrasound signals. The ophthalmic arterial (OA) Doppler signals were recorded from healthy subjects, subjects suffering from OA stenosis, subjects suffering from ocular Behcet disease. The internal carotid arterial (ICA) Doppler signals were recorded from healthy subjects, subjects suffering from ICA stenosis, subjects suffering from ICA occlusion. Methods of combining multiple classifiers with diverse features are viewed as a general problem in various application areas of pattern recognition. Because of the importance of making the right decision, better classification procedures for Doppler ultrasound signals are searched. Decision making was performed in two stages: feature extraction by eigenvector methods and classification using the SVMs trained on the extracted features. The research demonstrated that the multiclass SVMs trained on extracted features achieved high accuracy rates. PMID:17289211

  6. Detection of beam induced dipole-mode signals in the SLC S-band structures

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, M.; Adolphsen, C.; Assmann, R.; Whittum, D.H.

    1997-06-01

    Beam emittance dilution caused by wakefield effects is one of the important issues in the SLC linac. The detection of beam induced dipole mode signals in the C-band range could provide a direct measure of the strength of transverse wakefield kicks the beam experiences in the accelerating structures. The authors investigate the applicability of these microwave signals for the beam steering purposes. The RF distribution system in the linac sectors 2, 6 and 29 has been equipped with a simple experimental setup to observe the beam induced dipole mode signals. The paper discusses the setup, the mode-structure of the observed signals as well as experimental results from beam steering scans, obtained during the 95/96 SLC runs.

  7. Multi-frequency phase-coded microwave signal generation based on polarization modulation and balanced detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Xu, Weiyuan; Wei, Zhengwu; Pan, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Photonic multi-frequency phase-coded microwave signal generation is proposed and demonstrated based on polarization modulation and balanced detection. Consisting of only a polarization modulator (PolM) driven by an electrical coding data, a polarization beam splitter (PBS) and a balanced photodetector (BPD), the proposed microwave phase coder has no requirement on the wavelength, intensity modulation format, or modulation index of the input optical microwave signal, and allows phase coding of arbitrary-format RF signals, which enables multi-frequency phase coding with compact structure, simple operation, and high flexibility. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed, achieving simultaneous phase coding of 15 and 30 GHz, or 10 and 20 GHz RF signals with a coding rate of 5  Gb/s. PMID:26696170

  8. Low-cost detection of RC-IED activation signals in VHF band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo Suarez, Victor Hugo; Marulanda B., Jose Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    The proliferation of Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Devices (RC-IED) is a growing threat around the world. The ease of construction and low cost of these devices are transforming common things in lethal tramps. The fight against this threats normally involves the use of sophisticated and expensive equipment of Electronic Warfare based on high speed DSP systems, just to detect the presence of detonation signals. In this work is showed how to find activation signals based on the characteristic of the power in a specific band and the previous knowledge about the detonation signals. As proof of concept we have taken the information about the RC-IEDs used in the Colombian conflict and develop an algorithm to find detonation signals based on the measured power in frequencies between 136 MHz and 174 MHz (2 meter civil band)

  9. From social-signal detection to higher social cognition: an fMRI approach.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Motoaki; Yomogida, Yukihito; Mano, Yoko; Sassa, Yuko; Kambara, Toshimune; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-09-01

    Implicit or automatic detection of social signals, which discriminate animate, intentional objects in the environment, is essential for higher social cognition and its development. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we identified the neural substrate of detecting simple visual social signals and examined its functional link with the mechanism of inferring another's mental state. Healthy participants were presented with the eye-gaze shift (EG) and self-propelling motion (SP) under both implicit and explicit task conditions. They also performed a social role-playing game in which mental inference (MI) was implicitly prompted during the presentation of faces (implicit MI). Implicit detection of EG and SP activated the posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) bilaterally, whereas the right posterior superior temporal sulcus was activated during the explicit conditions. We revealed that the individual variation in neural response in the right pMTG during implicit eye-gaze detection explains the individual tendency to recruit the regions implicated in mental-state inference (medial prefrontal cortex, temporal pole and striatum) during the implicit MI task. Our results suggest that the implicit detection of visual social signals involves the pMTG and underlies the development of higher social cognition. PMID:23887806

  10. Developmental hearing loss impairs signal detection in noise: putative central mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Jennifer D.; Voytenko, Sergiy V.; Galazyuk, Alexander V.; Rosen, Merri J.

    2014-01-01

    Listeners with hearing loss have difficulty processing sounds in noisy environments. This is most noticeable for speech perception, but is reflected in a basic auditory processing task: detecting a tonal signal in a noise background, i.e., simultaneous masking. It is unresolved whether the mechanisms underlying simultaneous masking arise from the auditory periphery or from the central auditory system. Poor detection in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is attributed to cochlear hair cell damage. However, hearing loss alters neural processing in the central auditory system. Additionally, both psychophysical and neurophysiological data from normally hearing and impaired listeners suggest that there are additional contributions to simultaneous masking that arise centrally. With SNHL, it is difficult to separate peripheral from central contributions to signal detection deficits. We have thus excluded peripheral contributions by using an animal model of early conductive hearing loss (CHL) that provides auditory deprivation but does not induce cochlear damage. When tested as adults, animals raised with CHL had increased thresholds for detecting tones in simultaneous noise. Furthermore, intracellular in vivo recordings in control animals revealed a cortical correlate of simultaneous masking: local cortical processing reduced tone-evoked responses in the presence of noise. This raises the possibility that altered cortical responses which occur with early CHL can influence even simple signal detection in noise. PMID:25249949

  11. Detection of Delamination in Concrete Bridge Decks Using Mfcc of Acoustic Impact Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Harichandran, R. S.; Ramuhalli, P.

    2010-02-01

    Delamination of the concrete cover is a commonly observed damage in concrete bridge decks. The delamination is typically initiated by corrosion of the upper reinforcing bars and promoted by freeze-thaw cycling and traffic loading. The detection of delamination is important for bridge maintenance and acoustic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) is widely used due to its low cost, speed, and easy implementation. In traditional acoustic approaches, the inspector sounds the surface of the deck by impacting it with a hammer or bar, or by dragging a chain, and assesses delamination by the "hollowness" of the sound. The detection of the delamination is subjective and requires extensive training. To improve performance, this paper proposes an objective method for delamination detection. In this method, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) of the signal are extracted. Some MFCC are then selected as features for detection purposes using a mutual information criterion. Finally, the selected features are used to train a classifier which is subsequently used for detection. In this work, a simple quadratic Bayesian classifier is used. Different numbers of features are used to compare the performance of the detection method. The results show that the performance first increases with the number of features, but then decreases after an optimal value. The optimal number of features based on the recorded signals is four, and the mean error rate is only 3.3% when four features are used. Therefore, the proposed algorithm has sufficient accuracy to be used in field detection.

  12. Asymmetric signal amplification for simultaneous SERS detection of multiple cancer markers with significantly different levels.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sujuan; Wu, Yanying; Zhai, Xiaomo; Tang, Bo

    2015-08-18

    Simultaneous detection of cancer biomarkers holds great promise for the early diagnosis of different cancers. However, in the presence of high-concentration biomarkers, the signals of lower-expression biomarkers are overlapped. Existing techniques are not suitable for simultaneously detecting multiple biomarkers at concentrations with significantly different orders of magnitude. Here, we propose an asymmetric signal amplification method for simultaneously detecting multiple biomarkers with significantly different levels. Using the bifunctional probe, a linear amplification mode responds to high-concentration markers, and quadratic amplification mode responds to low-concentration markers. With the combined biobarcode probe and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification method, the detection limits of microRNA (miRNA) and ATP via surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection are 0.15 fM and 20 nM, respectively, with a breakthrough of detection concentration difference over 11 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, successful determination of miRNA and ATP in cancer cells supports the practicability of the assay. This methodology promises to open an exciting new avenue for the detection of various types of biomolecules. PMID:26218034

  13. High efficiency processing for reduced amplitude zones detection in the HRECG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugarte, N.; Álvarez, A.; Balacco, J.; Mercado, G.; Gonzalez, A.; Dugarte, E.; Olivares, A.

    2016-04-01

    Summary – This article presents part of a more detailed research proposed in the medium to long term, with the intention of establishing a new philosophy of electrocardiogram surface analysis. This research aims to find indicators of cardiovascular disease in its early stage that may go unnoticed with conventional electrocardiography. This paper reports the development of a software processing which collect some existing techniques and incorporates novel methods for detection of reduced amplitude zones (RAZ) in high resolution electrocardiographic signal (HRECG).The algorithm consists of three stages, an efficient processing for QRS detection, averaging filter using correlation techniques and a step for RAZ detecting. Preliminary results show the efficiency of system and point to incorporation of techniques new using signal analysis with involving 12 leads.

  14. Improved Detection of Magnetic Signals by a MEMS Sensor Using Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Tapia, Jesus A.; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M.; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Gutierrez-D, Edmundo A.; Flores, Amira; Figueras, Eduard; Manjarrez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the behavior of the electrical output response of a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology under different levels of controlled magnetic noise. We explored whether a particular level of magnetic noise applied on the vicinity of the MEMS sensor can improve the detection of subthreshold magnetic fields. We examined the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such detected magnetic fields as a function of the magnetic noise intensity. The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the SNR and the applied magnetic noise. This finding shows that the application of an intermediate level of noise in the environment of a MEMS magnetic field sensor improves its detection capability of subthreshold signals via the stochastic resonance phenomenon. PMID:25329563

  15. Representation of binaural spatial cues in field L of the barn owl forebrain.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Y E; Knudsen, E I

    1998-02-01

    This study examined the representation of spatial information in the barn owl Field L, the first telencephalic processing stage of the classical auditory pathway. Field L units were recorded extracellularly, and their responses to dichotically presented interaural time differences (ITD) and interaural level differences (ILD) were tested. We observed a variety of tuning profiles in Field L. Some sites were not sensitive to ITD or ILD. Other sites, especially those in the high-frequency region, were highly selective for values of ITD and ILD. These sites had multipeaked (commonly called "phase ambiguous") ITD tuning profiles and were tuned for a single value of ILD. The tuning properties of these sites are similar to those seen in the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Although the tuning properties of Field L sites were similar to those observed in the inferior colliculus, the functional organization of this spatial information was fundamentally different. Whereas in the inferior colliculus spatial information is organized into global topographics maps, in Field L spatial information is organized into local clusters, with sites having similar binaural tuning properties grouped together. The representation of binaural cues in Field L suggests that it is involved in auditory space processing but at a lower level of information processing than the auditory archistriatum, a forebrain area that is specialized for processing spatial information, and that the levels of information processing in the forebrain space processing pathway are remarkably similar to those in the well-known midbrain space processing pathway. PMID:9463449

  16. Structure-based modeling of head-related transfer functions towards interactive customization of binaural sound systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Navarun

    2003-10-01

    One of the most popular techniques for creating spatialized virtual sounds is based on the use of Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs). HRTFs are signal processing models that represent the modifications undergone by the acoustic signal as it travels from a sound source to each of the listener's eardrums. These modifications are due to the interaction of the acoustic waves with the listener's torso, shoulders, head and pinnae, or outer ears. As such, HRTFs are somewhat different for each listener. For a listener to perceive synthesized 3-D sound cues correctly, the synthesized cues must be similar to the listener's own HRTFs. One can measure individual HRTFs using specialized recording systems, however, these systems are prohibitively expensive and restrict the portability of the 3-D sound system. HRTF-based systems also face several computational challenges. This dissertation presents an alternative method for the synthesis of binaural spatialized sounds. The sound entering the pinna undergoes several reflective, diffractive and resonant phenomena, which determine the HRTF. Using signal processing tools, such as Prony's signal modeling method, an appropriate set of time delays and a resonant frequency were used to approximate the measured Head-Related Impulse Responses (HRIRs). Statistical analysis was used to find out empirical equations describing how the reflections and resonances are determined by the shape and size of the pinna features obtained from 3D images of 15 experimental subjects modeled in the project. These equations were used to yield "Model HRTFs" that can create elevation effects. Listening tests conducted on 10 subjects show that these model HRTFs are 5% more effective than generic HRTFs when it comes to localizing sounds in the frontal plane. The number of reversals (perception of sound source above the horizontal plane when actually it is below the plane and vice versa) was also reduced by 5.7%, showing the perceptual effectiveness of this

  17. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Park, Kyounghoon; Yang, Bo Ram; Lee, Joongyub; Jin, Xue Mei; Park, Byung Joo

    2016-09-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  18. Orthogonal sensor suite and the signal-processing algorithm for human detection and discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekimov, Alexander; Sabatier, James M.

    2009-05-01

    The focus of this paper is a review of methods and algorithms for human motion detection in the presence of nonstationary environmental background noise. Human footstep forces on the ground/floor generate periodic broadband seismic and sound signals envelopes with two characteristic times, T1 (the footstep repetition time, which is equal to the time of the whole body periodic vibrations) and T2 (the footstep duration time, which is equal to the time interval for a single footstep from "heel strike" to "toe slap and weight transfer"). Human body motions due to walking are periodic movements of a multiple-degrees-of-freedom mechanical system with a specific cadence frequency equal to 1/T1. For a walking human, the cadence frequencies for the appendages are the same and lie below 3 Hz. Simultaneously collecting footstep seismic, ultrasonic, and Doppler signals of human motion enhance the capability to detect humans in quiet and noisy environments. The common denominator of in the use of these orthogonal sensors (seismic, ultrasonic, Doppler) is a signal-processing algorithm package that allows detection of human-specific time-frequency signatures and discriminates them using a distinct cadence frequency from signals produced by other moving and stationary objects (e.g. vehicular and animal signatures). It has been experimentally shown that human cadence frequencies for seismic, passive ultrasonic, and Doppler motion signatures are equivalent and temporally stable.

  19. Generalized average of signals (GAS) - a new method for denoising and phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, J.; Kolinsky, P.; Strunc, J.; Valenta, J.

    2007-12-01

    A novel method called Generalized Average of Signals (GAS) was developed and tested during the last two years (Málek et al., in press). This method is designed for processing of seismograms from dense seismic arrays and is convenient mainly for denoising and weak phase detection. The main idea of the GAS method is based on non-linear stacking of seismograms in frequency domain, which considerably improves signal-to-noise ratio of coherent seismograms. Several synthetic tests of the GAS method are presented and the results are compared with the PWS method of Schimell and Paulssen (1997). Moreover, examples of application on real data are presented. These examples were chosen to show a broad applicability of the method in experiments of different scales. The first one shows identification of S-waves on seismograms from shallow seismic. The second one concerns identification of converted waves from local earthquakes registered at the WEBNET local network in western Bohemia. Finally, the third one depicts identification of PKIKP onsets on seismograms of teleseismic earthquakes. Schimmel, M., Paulssen H. (1997): Noise reduction and detection of weak, coherent signals through phase- weighted stacks. Geophys. J. Int. 130, 497-505. Málek J., Kolínský P., Strunc J. and Valenta J. (2007): Generalized average of signals (GAS) - a new method for detection of very weak waves in seismograms. Acta Geodyn. et Geomater., in press.

  20. A capillary-based probe for in situ detection of enhanced fluorescence signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, F.; Xiao, R.; Zhu, A. N.; Shi, H. C.; Wang, S. Q.

    2013-07-01

    A simple, compact, and high sensitivity capillary-based probe for the in situ detection of fluorescence signals with high sensitivity is demonstrated. A home-made single-multi-mode fiber coupler that is coaxially aligned with the capillary-based probe provides for the transmission of excitation light and the collection and transmission of fluorescence. We propose a conceptually straightforward theoretical model to optimize the factors affecting the fluorescence-capture capability of the capillary-based probe. The fluorescence signal detected by fiber-optic spectroscopy non-linearly increases with the length of the capillary-based probe. In addition, the thicker the capillary tube wall is, the less the fluorescence signals determined are. The performance of the proposed probe is evaluated experimentally by measuring the fluorescence spectra of Cy5.5 dye and blue-green algae. The experimental results show that the proposed probe provides more than a ten-fold increase in fluorescence signal compared with direct measurements by a flat-tipped multi-mode fiber probe. The advantages of the capillary-based probe, which include its simple and compact structure, excellent light collection efficiency, requirement of small sample volume, and recoverability of samples, allow its wide application to in situ detection in the medical, forensic, biological, geological, and environmental fields with high sensitivity.

  1. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  2. Increasing signal amplitude in fiber Bragg grating detection of Lamb waves using remote bonding.

    PubMed

    Wee, Junghyun; Wells, Brian; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2016-07-20

    Networks of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can serve as structural health monitoring systems for large-scale structures based on the collection of ultrasonic waves. The demodulation of structural Lamb waves using FBG sensors requires a high signal-to-noise ratio because the Lamb waves are of low amplitudes. This paper compares the signal transfer amplitudes between two adhesive mounting configurations for an FBG to detect Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate: a directly bonded FBG and a remotely bonded FBG. In the directly bonded FBG case, the Lamb waves create in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, which are transferred through the adhesive bond and detected by the FBG sensor. In the remotely bonded FBG case, the Lamb waves are converted into longitudinal and flexural traveling waves in the optical fiber at the adhesive bond, which propagate through the optical fiber and are detected by the FBG sensor. A theoretical prediction of overall signal attenuation also is performed, which is the combination of material attenuation in the plate and optical fiber and attenuation due to wave spreading in the plate. The experimental results demonstrate that remote bonding of the FBG significantly increases the signal amplitude measured by the FBG. PMID:27463905

  3. Electrochemical detection of protein kinase activity based on carboxypeptidase Y digestion triggered signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huanshun; Wang, Xinxu; Guo, Yunlong; Zhou, Yunlei; Ai, Shiyun

    2015-04-15

    An effective assay method for monitoring protein kinase activity and screening inhibitors is greatly beneficial to kinase-related drug discovery, early diagnosis of diseases, and therapeutic effect evaluation. Herein, we develop a simple electrochemical method for detecting the activity of casein kinase II (CK2) based on phosphorylation against carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) digestion triggered signal amplification, where CK2 catalyzed phosphorylation event protects the substrate peptide from the digestion of CPY, maintains the repulsive force of the substrate peptide towards the redox probe, and results in a weak electrochemical signal. Whereas, without phosphorylation, the substrate peptide is digested by CPY and a strong electrochemical signal is obtained. The detection feasibility is demonstrated for the assay of CK2 activity with low detection limit of 0.047unit/mL. Moreover, the biosensor was used for the analysis of kinase inhibition. Based on the electrochemical signal dependent inhibitor concentration, the IC50 value of ellagic acid was estimated to be 39.77nM. The proposed method is also successfully applied to analyze CK2 activity in cell lysates, proving the applicability in complex biological samples. PMID:25460885

  4. A wavelet decomposition analysis of vibration signal for bearing fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizwan, C. K. E.; Ong, S. A.; Yusof, M. F. M.; Baharom, M. Z.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a study of vibrational signal analysis for bearing fault detection using Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). In this study, the vibration data was acquired from three different types of bearing defect i.e. corroded, outer race defect and point defect. The experiments were carried out at three different speeds which are 10%, 50% and 90% of the maximum motor speed. The time domain vibration data measured from accelerometer was then transformed into frequency domain using a frequency analyzer in order to study the frequency characteristics of the signal. The DWT was utilized to decomposed signal at different frequency scale. Then, root mean square (RMS) for every decomposition level was calculated to detect the defect features in vibration signals by referring to the trend of vibrational energy retention at every decomposition. Based on the result, the defective bearings show significant deviation in retaining RMS value after a few levels of decomposition. The findings indicate that Wavelet decomposition analysis can be used to develop an effective bearing condition monitoring tool. This signal processing analysis is recommended in on-line monitoring while the machine is on operation.

  5. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca; Kleinjung, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Allostery offers a highly specific way to modulate protein function. Therefore, understanding this mechanism is of increasing interest for protein science and drug discovery. However, allosteric signal transmission is difficult to detect experimentally and to model because it is often mediated by local structural changes propagating along multiple pathways. To address this, we developed a method to identify communication pathways by an information-theoretical analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. Signal propagation was described as information exchange through a network of correlated local motions, modeled as transitions between canonical states of protein fragments. The method was used to describe allostery in two-component regulatory systems. In particular, the transmission from the allosteric site to the signaling surface of the receiver domain NtrC was shown to be mediated by a layer of hub residues. The location of hubs preferentially connected to the allosteric site was found in close agreement with key residues experimentally identified as involved in the signal transmission. The comparison with the networks of the homologues CheY and FixJ highlighted similarities in their dynamics. In particular, we showed that a preorganized network of fragment connections between the allosteric and functional sites exists already in the inactive state of all three proteins.—Pandini, A., Fornili, A., Fraternali, F., Kleinjung, J. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics. PMID:22071506

  6. Development of a Photon Counting System for Differential Lidar Signal Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1997-01-01

    Photon counting has been chosen as a means to extend the detection range of current airborne DIAL ozone measurements. Lidar backscattered return signals from the on and off-line lasers experience a significant exponential decay. To extract further data from the decaying ozone return signals, photon counting will be used to measure the low light levels, thus extending the detection range. In this application, photon counting will extend signal measurement where the analog return signal is too weak. The current analog measurement range is limited to approximately 25 kilometers from an aircraft flying at 12 kilometers. Photon counting will be able to exceed the current measurement range so as to follow the mid-latitude model of ozone density as a function of height. This report describes the development of a photon counting system. The initial development phase begins with detailed evaluation of individual photomultiplier tubes. The PMT qualities investigated are noise count rates, single electron response peaks, voltage versus gain values, saturation effects, and output signal linearity. These evaluations are followed by analysis of two distinctive tube base gating schemes. The next phase is to construct and operate a photon counting system in a laboratory environment. The laboratory counting simulations are used to determine optimum discriminator setpoints and to continue further evaluations of PMT properties. The final step in the photon counting system evaluation process is the compiling of photon counting measurements on the existing ozone DIAL laser system.

  7. Detection and identification of seismic signals recorded at Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibs-von Seht, M.

    2008-10-01

    The Anak Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) has been monitored by a multi-parametric system since 2005. A variety of signal types can be observed in the records of the seismic stations installed on the island volcano. These include volcano-induced signals such as LP, VT, and tremor-type events as well as signals not originating from the volcano such as regional tectonic earthquakes and transient noise signals. The work presented here aims at the realization of a system that automatically detects and identifies the signals in order to estimate and monitor current activity states of the volcano. An artificial neural network approach was chosen for the identification task. A set of parameters was defined, describing waveform and spectrogram properties of events detected by an amplitude-ratio-based (STA/LTA) algorithm. The parameters are fed into a neural network which is, after a training phase, able to generalize input data and identify corresponding event types. The success of the identification depends on the network architecture and training strategy. Several tests have been performed in order to determine appropriate network layout and training for the given problem. The performance of the final system is found to be well suited to get an overview of the seismic activity recorded at the volcano. The reliability of the network classifier, as well as general drawbacks of the methods used, are discussed.

  8. Computer-aided detection of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): a multichannel signal detection approach on projection views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

    2012-03-01

    DBT is one of the promising imaging modalities that may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications (MC) in DBT. A data set of two-view DBTs from 42 breasts was collected with a GE prototype system. We investigated a 2D approach to MC detection using projection view (PV) images rather than reconstructed 3D DBT volume. Our 2D approach consisted of two major stages: 1) detecting individual MC candidates on each PV, and 2) correlating the MC candidates from the different PVs and detecting clusters in the breast volume. With the MC candidates detected by prescreening on PVs, a trained multi-channel (MCH) filter bank was used to extract signal response from each MC candidate. A ray-tracing process was performed to fuse the MCH responses and localize the MC candidates in 3D using the geometrical information of the DBT system. Potential MC clusters were then identified by dynamic clustering of the MCs in 3D. A two-fold cross-validation method was used to train and test the CADe system. The detection performance of clustered MCs was assessed by free receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. It was found that the CADe system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 90% at an average false positive rate of 2.1 clusters per DBT volume. Our study demonstrated that the CADe system using 2D MCH filter bank is promising for detection of clustered MCs in DBT.

  9. Weak signal amplification and detection by higher-order sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sarah N; Longtin, Andre; Maler, Leonard

    2016-04-01

    Sensory systems must extract behaviorally relevant information and therefore often exhibit a very high sensitivity. How the nervous system reaches such high sensitivity levels is an outstanding question in neuroscience. Weakly electric fish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus/albifrons) are an excellent model system to address this question because detailed background knowledge is available regarding their behavioral performance and its underlying neuronal substrate. Apteronotus use their electrosense to detect prey objects. Therefore, they must be able to detect electrical signals as low as 1 μV while using a sensory integration time of <200 ms. How these very weak signals are extracted and amplified by the nervous system is not yet understood. We studied the responses of cells in the early sensory processing areas, namely, the electroreceptor afferents (EAs) and pyramidal cells (PCs) of the electrosensory lobe (ELL), the first-order electrosensory processing area. In agreement with previous work we found that EAs cannot encode very weak signals with a spike count code. However, PCs can encode prey mimic signals by their firing rate, revealing a huge signal amplification between EAs and PCs and also suggesting differences in their stimulus encoding properties. Using a simple leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model we predict that the target neurons of PCs in the midbrain torus semicircularis (TS) are able to detect very weak signals. In particular, TS neurons could do so by assuming biologically plausible convergence rates as well as very simple decoding strategies such as temporal integration, threshold crossing, and combining the inputs of PCs. PMID:26843601

  10. Detection of emetic activity in the cat by monitoring venous pressure and audio signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, A.; Fox, Robert A.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Elfar, S.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the use of audio signals as a simple, noninvasive measure of emetic activity, the relationship between the somatic events and sounds associated with retching and vomiting was studied. Thoracic venous pressure obtained from an implanted external jugular catheter was shown to provide a precise measure of the somatic events associated with retching and vomiting. Changes in thoracic venous pressure monitored through an indwelling external jugular catheter with audio signals, obtained from a microphone located above the animal in a test chamber, were compared. In addition, two independent observers visually monitored emetic episodes. Retching and vomiting were induced by injection of xylazine (0.66mg/kg s.c.), or by motion. A unique audio signal at a frequency of approximately 250 Hz is produced at the time of the negative thoracic venous pressure change associated with retching. Sounds with higher frequencies (around 2500 Hz) occur in conjunction with the positive pressure changes associated with vomiting. These specific signals could be discriminated reliably by individuals reviewing the audio recordings of the sessions. Retching and those emetic episodes associated with positive venous pressure changes were detected accurately by audio monitoring, with 90 percent of retches and 100 percent of emetic episodes correctly identified. Retching was detected more accurately (p is less than .05) by audio monitoring than by direct visual observation. However, with visual observation a few incidents in which stomach contents were expelled in the absence of positive pressure changes or detectable sounds were identified. These data suggest that in emetic situations, the expulsion of stomach contents may be accomplished by more than one neuromuscular system and that audio signals can be used to detect emetic episodes associated with thoracic venous pressure changes.

  11. A Visual or Tactile Signal Makes Auditory Speech Detection More Efficient by Reducing Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Tjan, Bosco S.; Chao, Ewen; Bernstein, Lynne E.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic speech is easier to detect in noise when the talker can be seen. This finding could be explained by integration of multisensory inputs or refinement of auditory processing from visual guidance. In two experiments, we studied two-interval forced choice detection of an auditory “ba” in acoustic noise, paired with various visual and tactile stimuli that were identically presented in both observation intervals. Detection thresholds were reduced under the multisensory conditions versus the auditory-only condition, even though the visual and/or tactile stimuli alone could not inform the correct response. Results were analyzed relative to an ideal observer for which intrinsic (internal) noise and efficiency were independent contributors to detection sensitivity. Across experiments, intrinsic noise was unaffected by the multisensory stimuli, arguing against the merging (integrating) of multisensory inputs into a unitary speech signal; but sampling efficiency was increased to varying degrees, supporting refinement of knowledge about the auditory stimulus. The steepness of the psychometric functions decreased with increasing sampling efficiency, suggesting that the “task-irrelevant” visual and tactile stimuli reduced uncertainty about the acoustic signal. Visible speech was not superior for enhancing auditory speech detection. Our results reject multisensory neuronal integration and speech-specific neural processing as explanations for enhanced auditory speech detection under noisy conditions. Instead, our results support a more rudimentary form of multisensory interaction – the otherwise task-irrelevant sensory systems inform the auditory system about when to listen. PMID:24400652

  12. Stream computing for biomedical signal processing: A QRS complex detection case-study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; O'Driscoll, C; Boylan, G B; Lightbody, G; Marnane, W P

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in "Big Data" have brought significant gains in the ability to process large amounts of data on commodity server hardware. Stream computing is a relatively new paradigm in this area, addressing the need to process data in real time with very low latency. While this approach has been developed for dealing with large scale data from the world of business, security and finance, there is a natural overlap with clinical needs for physiological signal processing. In this work we present a case study of streams processing applied to a typical physiological signal processing problem: QRS detection from ECG data. PMID:26737641

  13. Fast detection and automatic parameter estimation of a gravitational wave signal with a novel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    The detection of gravitational wave usually requires to match the measurement data with a large number of templates, which is computationally very expensive. Compressed sensing methods allow one to match the data with a small number of templates and interpolate the rest. However, the interpolation process is still computationally expensive. In this article, we designed a novel method that only requires to match the data with a few templates, yet without needing any interpolation process. The algorithm worked well for signals with relatively high SNRs. It also showed promise for low SNRs signals.

  14. Detection and Quantification of Intracellular Signaling Using FRET-Based Biosensors and High Content Imaging.

    PubMed

    Halls, Michelle L; Poole, Daniel P; Ellisdon, Andrew M; Nowell, Cameron J; Canals, Meritxell

    2015-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors represent invaluable tools to detect the spatiotemporal context of second messenger production and intracellular signaling that cannot be attained using traditional methods. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for the use of high content imaging in combination with FRET biosensors to assess second messenger production and intracellular signaling in a time-effective manner. We use four different FRET biosensors to measure cAMP levels, kinase (ERK and PKC), and GTPase activity. Importantly, we provide the protocols to express and measure these sensors in a variety of model cell lines and primary dorsal root ganglia neurons. PMID:26260599

  15. Fast wavelength-scanning interferometry technique with derivative detection of quadrature signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Číp, O.; Mikel, B.; Lazar, J.

    2006-04-01

    We present a laser interferometer where a narrow-line width tuneable VCSEL laser (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser) working at 760 nm is used. For the detection of an absolute distance, we have used a fast wavelength-scanning interferometry technique. In the first part of the work we introduce the absolute laser interferometer as a demonstrator for research of a digital detection of quadrature signals (X-cos and Y-sin). This interferometer uses polarized beams and magnitude division of interference fringes. The wavelength of VCSEL laser is swept with the mode-hop free tuning range more than 1.2 nm, by means of the amplitude modulation of the injection current. At the same time, the operating temperature of the VCSEL is stabilized with a fast digital temperature controller. We control the wavelength value and whole tuning process of the laser with the frequency lock to selected modes of an external Fabry-Perot etalon. Except the frequency lock, the Fabry-Perot mode spectrum identifies wavelength-tuning interval of VCSEL during each sweep. A digital signal processor (DSP) is heart of the control and detection system. It samples intensity signal from Fabry- Perot etalon and X-Y quadrature signals from the detection unit of the interferometer. After 1 nm sweep of the VCSEL wavelength, we obtain a number of passed interference fringes and the number of passed Fabry-Perot resonance modes, at the same time. On basis of these measured quantities we are able to calculate the instantaneous value of the optical path length difference between the measuring and reference arm of the demonstrational interferometer. The other part of the work is oriented to research and experimental testing of the digital detection of quadrature signals (X-cos and Y-sin) processed only on basis of one intensity signal (X-axis) that is produced by a simple photo-detector. On basis of traditional inversion function arctan(Y/X) we are able to determine instantaneous phase between interference

  16. Atrial electrical activity detection using linear combination of 12-lead ECG signals.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Or; Katz, Amos; Weissman, Noam; Amit, Guy; Zigel, Yaniv

    2014-04-01

    ECG analysis is the method for cardiac arrhythmia diagnosis. During the diagnostic process many features should be taken into consideration, such as regularity and atrial activity. Since in some arrhythmias, the atrial electrical activity (AEA) waves are hidden in other waves, and a precise classification from surface ECG is inapplicable, a confirmation diagnosis is usually performed during an invasive procedure. In this paper, we study a "semiautomatic" method for AEA-waves detection using a linear combination of 12-lead ECG signals. This method's objective is to be applicable to a variety of arrhythmias with emphasis given to detect concealed AEA waves. It includes two variations--using maximum energy ratio and a synthetic AEA signal. In the former variation, an energy ratio-based cost function is created and maximized using the gradient ascent method. The latter variation adapted the linear combiner method, when applied on a synthetic signal, combined with surface ECG leads. A study was performed evaluating the AEA-waves detection from 63 patients (nine training, 54 validation) presenting eight arrhythmia types. Averaged sensitivity of 92.21% and averaged precision of 92.08% were achieved compared to the definite diagnosis. In conclusion, the presented method may lead to early and accurate detection of arrhythmias, which will result in a better oriented treatment. PMID:24658228

  17. Polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chemiluminescence immunodevice with the signal amplification strategy for sensitive detection of human immunoglobin G.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifang; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Wei; Chu, Weiru; Guo, Yumei

    2016-01-15

    A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chemiluminescence (CL) immunodevice for sensitive detection of human immunoglobin G (IgG) with the signal amplification strategy was developed in this work. The immunodevice was prepared by covalently immobilizing capture antibodies (Abs) on the silanized microchannel of microfluidic chip. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with a high molar ratio of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were used as an Ab label for signal amplification. Using a sandwich immunoassay, the multi-HRP conjugated AuNPs can catalyze the luminol-H2O2 CL system to achieve the high sensitivity. In addition, the double spiral flow-channel was adopted here, which can still contribute to the high sensitivity. Based on signal amplification strategy, the performance of human IgG tests revealed a lower detection limit (DL) of 0.03ng/mL and showed an increase of 7.4-fold in detection sensitivity compared to a commercial Ab-HRP conjugation. This microfluidic immunodevice can provide an alternative approach for sensitive detection of human IgG in the field of clinic diagnostic and therapeutic. PMID:26592629

  18. Defect Detection of Fiberglass Composite Laminates (FGCL) with Ultrasonic A-Scan Signal Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, M. F.; Abu Bakar, Elmi; Othman, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    Fiberglass composite laminates are widely used in many industries, due to its advantages of high specific strength and high specific modulus. Invisible defect such as delamination and inclusion may cause composite structural failure. Therefore, several research on ultrasonic testing for composite material defect detection have been done for the past few years. However, improper parameter setup may lead to significant error to determine the behavior of defects. In this paper, the intensive study on defect detection with ultrasonic single crystal immersion transducer has been conducted. In general, the defects detection thru acquired signal is determine the behavior of defects through the certain ultrasonic parameter setup such as sound velocity, pulse width, gain, sampling rate and transducer distance with specimen surface. Furthermore, an A-scan signal interpretation for FGCL defect detection is demonstrated and illustrated. This research is focusing on for FGCL with maximum thickness up to 10 mm in ambient temperature. The result shows an appropriate ultrasonic parameter will result better signal interpretation analysis.

  19. Info-gap robustness of an input signal optimization algorithm for damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquali, M.; Stull, C. J.; Farrar, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Info-Gap Decision Theory is adopted to assess the robustness of a technique aimed at identifying the optimal excitation signal to be used for active sensing approaches to damage detection. Here the term "active sensing" refers to procedures where a known input is applied to the structure to enhance the damage detection process. Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, the ultimate goal of the mentioned technique is to improve the detectability of damage by increasing the difference between measured outputs of the undamaged and damaged systems. In particular, a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring-damper system characterized by the presence of a nonlinear stiffness is considered. Uncertainty is introduced to the system in the form of deviations of its parameters (mass, stiffness, damping ratio) from their nominal values. Variations in the performance of the mentioned technique are then evaluated both in terms of changes in the estimated difference between the responses of the damaged and undamaged systems and in terms of deviations of the identified optimal input signal from its nominal estimation. Finally, plots of the performances of the analyzed algorithm for different levels of uncertainty are obtained, enabling a clear evaluation of the risks connected with designing excitation signals for damage detection, when the parameters that dictate system behavior (e.g. stiffness, mass) are poorly characterized or improperly modeled.

  20. Real-time bicycle detection at signalized intersections using thermal imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaert, Robin

    2013-02-01

    More and more governments and authorities around the world are promoting the use of bicycles in cities, as this is healthy for the bicyclist and improves the quality of life in general. Safety and efficiency of bicyclists has become a major focus. To achieve this, there is a need for a smarter approach towards the control of signalized intersections. Various traditional detection technologies, such as video, microwave radar and electromagnetic loops, can be used to detect vehicles at signalized intersections, but none of these can consistently separate bikes from other traffic, day and night and in various weather conditions. As bikes should get a higher priority and also require longer green time to safely cross the signalized intersection, traffic managers are looking for alternative detection systems that can make the distinction between bicycles and other vehicles near the stop bar. In this paper, the drawbacks of a video-based approach are presented, next to the benefits of a thermal-video-based approach for vehicle presence detection with separation of bicycles. Also, the specific technical challenges are highlighted in developing a system that combines thermal image capturing, image processing and output triggering to the traffic light controller in near real-time and in a single housing.